Group Title: Biennial report of the Florida Forest and Park Service
Title: Report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075934/00004
 Material Information
Title: Report
Alternate Title: Work of the Florida Forest Service
Florida forestry
Florida forestry and park progress
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 18-28 cm.
Creator: Florida Board of Forestry
Florida Board of Forestry
Florida Forest Service
Florida -- Forest and Park Service
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Forests and forestry -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1st- 1928/30-
Numbering Peculiarities: Period covered by reports ends June 30.
Issuing Body: Reports for 1928/30, 1934/36, 1940/42-1946/48 issued by the board under an interim name: Board of Forestry and Parks.
General Note: Some vols. have also distinctive titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075934
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001746447
notis - AJF9242
lccn - a 59002387 //r

Full Text








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CONTENTS

Page
.ET.OSPEC ...... ........................ .........*. 8
PERSZONNEL ...........................
Boaud of Forestry and Parks................................
Florida Foret and Par Service.. ........................... 4
In to Win ................................................. 5
THE FOREST FIGHTS.........................................
FIE CONTOL................................................
Fire Proetin ............................................. 7
The Fire R deod. ......................................... .
Fire CasFg ........- .......... ..........................

Fire CoItUn Lga -e-. t ................................... 8
Fire CnLaw Eoreml ..aM at................................. 8

The CCC in Fire Contio........... ...................... 9
Fire Conrol in the War................... ..................
APPLIED FONSTR ... ............... ......................... i
Rememrcd .................................................. 10
Planting ....................... ........ ................
Plpwrood Co ti ..................................................... 10

Farm Foremtry ........... .... ....................... 11
State Forests .... ................... ................. 11
STATE PAIMKS...................... ..................... 12
In General............. ...................... ..
Acquisiaon ................... ..................... ...... 12
Perso.anel .......... ........ .. ....... ....... U
e of ......................................... 1
Par E aron al ........................ ....................... 13
State o Parksy... .................. ............. ........ 13
Parkl in th War P tod............. ........... .. ...... 14
PUBLIC RELATIONS ................ ................... 14

Boy Seout ForeAity.................. ................. I
The F=esT Tri g C.amp......... ~. .................... 15
Shl elimmry Shadmbag Camp........, k.........................
Visual Education ............................................ 'Is
Signs and Pos .................. .................... 25
Exhbia ............... ......... .. .... ... ....
Publiity ............................ ..............
P iti .....................................................
APPEND I............................... 1I
Thabe I............................. .......................
Table H...... ...............-.... &0
Tabe ...... ............. .................: ... .2
Table IV.......................... .................... ..


iI









SEVENTH
BIENNIAL REPORT

of the


FLORIDA FOREST AND PARK SERVICE


JULY 1, 1940-JUNE 30, 1942





A state organization directed by the
Florida Board of Forestry and Parks, co-
operating with the Federal Government
in rendering assistance to the landowners
and forest industries in applied forestry
and forest protection, and in the preserva-
tion and use of Florida's outstanding
scenic, historical and recreational areas.


Tallahassee, Florida




















PREFACE


The law requires that the Florida Board of
Forestry and Parks report biennially on the
operation and activities of the Florida Forest
and Park Service. These reports-in the past
-have been regarded as an important educa-
tional medium through which to enlighten the
public with respect to the forest resource, its
importance, protection and management, and
the value and services of State parks. Accord-
ingly, previous reports have run to 60 pages
or more. In recognition of war-time economies,
the Seventh Biennial Report has been limited
to a minimum account of departmental changes,
activities and progress.

A. G. McARTHUR, President,
Florida Board of Forestry and Parks







'N')
A^eLc








SEVENTH
BIENNIAL REPORT

of the

FLORIDA FOREST AND PARK SERVICE



RETROSPECT
The biennium covered by this report began on July 1, 1940.
Germany had already liquidated Poland and was at that time
overrunning France. By the end of the first year of the bien-
nium, Germany had turned on Russia-and the whole world
was tense. Within a few weeks of the opening of the second
year, the Selective Service Act went into effect and the youth
of America was registering for military duty. On December
7, 1941, the attack on Pearl Harbor and our other Pacific in-
stallations catapulted the United States fully into the war.
Before the end of the first year of the biennium, lease-lend
and war preparations in this country had created a shortage
of certain materials and supplies. Members of the Service
personnel who had reserve officer commissions were being
called to active duty. With the inauguration of the draft, the
flow of Service personnel to the armed forces was stepped up
and by June 30, 1942, 7 were in the Navy and 22 were in the
Army, a total of 29 men. In the meantime, the need of men
in defense industries and construction-and the attractive
wages offered-had precipitated an even greater flow of man-
power from the Service personnel into those fields.
Consequently, the operations of the Service have been colored
throughout the biennium by war demands and have been in-
creasingly directed toward war efforts.

PERSONNEL

Board of During the course of the biennium, there were three
Forestry changes in the Board of Forestry and Parks. Joe
and Parks Foley of Foley resigned in March, 1941, to accept an-
other State appointment and was succeeded by
Basil E. Kenney of Port St. Joe. The term of Stanley S. Sheip
of Apalachicola terminated September 16, 1939, but he con-
tinued to serve until September 23, 1940, when A. B. Edwards
of Sarasota was appointed to succeed him. W. C. Ray of Ocala
resigned February 2, 1942, and was succeeded by Alex Collins of
the same place on February 24. At the end of the biennium, the
Board was comprised of:


147694







4 FLORIDA FOREST AND PARK SERVICE

President: A. G. McArthur, Fernandina
Vice President: Basil E. Kenney, Port St. Joe
Secretary: Mrs. Linwood Jeffreys, Jacksonville
Member: A. B. Edwards, Sarasota
Member: Alex Collins, Ocala
Florida Due to reorganization changes and to war demands,
Forest there was an unusual turn-over of personnel during
and Park the two-year period. Harry Lee Baker resigned as
State Forester and Park Executive within a month
Service after the beginning of the biennium and was suc-
ceeded by Henry J. Malsberger who has been a member of the
personnel of the Service since July 15, 1928, and has seen service
as a district forester, Chief of the Public Relations Branch, and
Chief of the Branch of State Parks.
At the end of the biennium, June 30, 1942, the administrative
personnel consisted of the following: *
Main Office, Tallahassee
State Forester and Park Executive............H. J. Malsberger
Branch of Fire Control.... Joe R. Gramling, Asst. State Forester
Branch of Applied Forestry.. C. H. Coulter, Asst. State Forester
Branch of Public Relations.. Wm. F. Jacobs, Asst. State Forester
Branch of State Parks............L. G. Scoggin, Park Director
Fiscal Branch.................... ....H. D'Anna, Fiscal Agent
District Offices
District 1, comprised of': Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Wal-
ton, Holmes, Washington, Jackson, Calhoun, Bay, and Gulf;
headquarters, Panama City;
James N. Wilson, Jr., District Forester.
District 2, comprised of: Franklin, Liberty, Gadsden, Leon,
Wakulla, Jefferson, Madison, Taylor, Lafayette and Dixie;
headquarters, Tallahassee;
B. C. Leynes, District Forester.
District 3, comprised of: Hamilton, Suwannee, Columbia, Baker,
Nassau, Duval, St. Johns, Clay, Bradford, Union, Gilchrist,
Alachua and Putnam; headquarters, Lake City;
B. F. Harris, District Forester.
District 4, comprised of: Flagler, Marion, Citrus, Hernando,
Sumter, Lake, Orange, Seminole, Volusia and the northern
portion of Brevard; headquarters, Ocala;
E. L. Molpus, District Forester.
Distirct 5, comprised of: southern portion of Brevard, all of
Osceola, Polk, Pasco, Pinellas, Hillsborough, Manatee, Hardee,
Highlands, Okeechobee, Indian River, St. Lucie, Martin,
Glades, DeSoto, Sarasota, Charlotte, Lee, Collier, Hendry,
Palm Beach, Broward, Dade and Monroe; headquarters,
Lakeland;
Claude L. DeVane, District Forester.







SEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT 5


IN TO WIN


Bethea, John M., Extension Forester, D-1.............. Army
Blocker, Nelson B., District Forester, D-5.............. Army
Brown, Travis, Assistant Ranger, D-5................ Navy
Dennard, Kermit A., Mechanic, State Garage........... Navy
Denison, Arthur, Assistant Ranger, D-5............... Army
Douglass, O. R., Assistant State Forester.............. Army
Foster, Floyd, Towerman, D-5....................... Army
Frier, Woodrow, Truck Helper, D-5 ................ Army
Govreau, C. J., Mechanic, State Garage................ Navy
Hardcastle, John, Ranger, PR ...................... Army
Henderson, Chas. D., Dispatcher, D-1 ................. Army
Howell, Wilbur K., Assistant Ranger, D-3.............. Navy
Johnson, Johnnie, Ass. Ranger, Blackwater River SF... Army
Jones, A. J., Ranger, D-3 ............................. Army
Lee, J. Frank, Extension Forester, D-4............... Army
Lewis, Tom, Ass. Park Ranger, Hillsborough River SP.. Army
McCain, J. Clarence, Assistant Ranger, D-5............ Army
Moody, A. B., Mechanic, State Garage ................. Navy
Perreault, Clayton L., Naturalist, Goldhead Branch SP.. Navy
Pitts, Edward C., Towerman, D-1 .................... Army
Ray, Leonard L., Assistant Ranger, D-5............... Army
Rhodes, Hugh E., Extension Forester, D-1 ............ Army
Rich, Arthur A., Jr., Extension Forester, D-2.......... Army
Selph, Elco, Towerman, D-5......................... Army
Sorensen, John, Assistant Ranger, D-1 ................ Army
Struthers, Orville R., Extension Forester, D-1........... Navy
Swinford, Kenneth B., Extension Forester, D-3......... Army
Taylor, Russell, Park Guard, Fort Clinch State Park.... Army
Thomas, Ralph E., Extension Forester, PR............ Army







FLORIDA FOREST AND PARK SERVICE


THE FOREST FIGHTS
Space will not permit a complete report of the part that forest
products are playing in the war effort. Wood, as such, is being
used for ship patterns and interiors, decking, transports, tor-
pedo boats, mine sweepers, coast guard cutters, docks, planes,
plane hangars, propellers, pontoons, bridges, truck beds, anti-
tank barriers, shipping crates, barracks and similar camp build-
ings, fuel for mobile kitchens, defense plants, defense housing,
air-raid shelters and blackout shutters. Wood pulp and paper
are being used for boxes, cartridge wrappers, building paper,
gas mask filters and surgical dressings. Wood fibre in the form
of artificial wool and cotton and rayon is going into uniforms,
parachutes, tents, and tarpaulins. Rosin is being used in shrapnel
and varnish; turpentine is used in paint and in flame throwers.
Wood bark is being used for insulation, tannin, and dyestuffs.
Cellulose acetate from wood is used in photographic film, shat-
terproof glass, airplane dopes, lacquers, cements, and molded
articles. Wood flour and wood cellulose are used for explosives.
In addition, wood is being called upon in the farm and sub-
sistence program to replace more critical material needs in
the war effort.
Roughly, war has increased the demand for forest products
from a third to a half and has stimulated research into wood
chemistry and wood engineering that are opening amazing new
fields for industry when the war is won.
Unfortunately, this increased demand comes at a time when
every effort was being made to reduce the rate of cut and im-
prove forest management with the future in mind. The needs
of the future are no less important than before-in fact, they
become more critical-but the war must be won and over-cutting
cannot be avoided.
The interests of the future can at least partially be met by
more complete utilization of the trees harvested now, by proper
regard in logging operations for the undersized trees that rep-
resent tomorrow's crop, and by increased efforts toward fire pre-
vention and control to assure a fuller stocking on the State's
forest acreage.
The Florida Forest and Park Service, in this emergency, is
dedicated to:
1. Assisting landowners in the harvesting and marketing of
matured timber crops needed now for the war effort;
2. Intensifying fire control measures to safeguard immature
timber crops that may be needed before the war is over and
certainly in the period of post-war reconstruction;
3. Aiding every effort and research toward the elimination and
use of waste in the processing of forest products;
4. Furthering study and research into new uses for wood prod-
ucts-to meet current needs, stimulate new industries for







SEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT 7

the post-war period, and assure a greater income in the future
from every forest acre;
5. Increased efforts in conservation education to the end that
man-caused fires are reduced to a minimum and forest land
given a chance to produce at its full capacity.

FIRE CONTROL
Fire The acreage listed for fire control on June 30, 1940,
Protection the closing date of the preceding biennium, was
4,339,829 acres and was comprised of 5 county
units, 7 group units, and 428 individual units. During the first
year of the biennium, this acreage underwent a normal increase
to 4,982,836. County units increased to 8, individual agreements
to 435, and the number of group units fell to 6. During the sec-
ond year of the biennium, individual agreements increased to
461, group units numbered 6, and county units were reduced
to 7 by the deferment of fire control in Suwannee County. This
decreased the protected acreage total to 4,950,091 in spite of
increases in the group and individual total. Counties currently
under fire control agreements are: Bay, Dade, Duval, Hills-
borough, Orange, Pinellas, and Volusia.
The Fire During the biennium, a total of 10,507 fires were
Record fought, 5,827 in the first year and 4,680 in the
second. Losses were consistent with previous years.
For comparison, fire losses for the two years of the previous
biennium were 3.4% and 3.17% of the acreage under protection.
During the first year of this biennium, the acreage burned was
4.3% and during the second year 2.36%.
Fire Incendiary, or set, fires continued to overshadow all
Causes other causes. Such fires totaled 79.6% by number in
the first year and in the second year 84%. Second in
importance were fires escaping from brush burning. These
amounted to 5.4% and 5.2% in the two years of the period.
Lightning, the only natural cause of fires, was responsible for
1.8% of the fires in each year. A complete analysis of fire
causes on the lands under protection will be found in Tables II
and III of the Appendix.
Fire Fighting Fire control equipment showed a disposition to
Equipment get bigger and better. Early in the biennium,
there was a definite trend away from the /2-ton
pickup tank trucks to 1- and 11/2-ton jobs equipped to carry more
men, more water, and more tools. An attempt was made to add
a tractor, suppression plow, and transport unit to the equipment
of every county or large group unit. The St. Joe Unit and Bay,
Duval and Volusia Counties had been so equipped when the
pinch of war priorities set in. Since that time, very little new
equipment has been purchased and the Service is making every







8 FLORIDA FOREST AND PARK SERVICE

effort to depend upon re-conditioning their second-hand equip-
ment for the duration.
At the end of the biennium, the Service had in operation 44
l/-ton fire trucks, 15 1-ton fire trucks, and 4 11/-ton jobs. In
addition, it was operating 23 1-ton stake-bodied trucks for
hauling fire crews and maintaining improvements on the fire
control areas. The fire control garage had, in addition, 3 large
transport trucks for moving tractors and equipment and a 1-ton
panel job for the use of the tractor service man. The radio and
communications supervisor was also provided with a passenger
car. This makes a total of 91 vehicles in use in the fire control
program. Plowing equipment was comprised of 7 crawler-type
tractors assigned to definite units and 18 more working State-
wide, a total of 25. Available for use with this power equip-
ment were 13 fire-line harrows, 10 4-disc Settlemire plows, and
7 2-disc Settlemire suppression plows.
Fire Control Independent of CCC activities, the regular
Improvements fire control organization accounted for the
following improvements during the biennium:
9 new lookout towers, 6 towermen's dwellings, 3 garages, 1 barn,
8 miscellaneous buildings at towersites, 5 wells, 225 rods of fenc-
ing, 1 cattle guard, 1 stile, 708 miles of new fire lines were
plowed, 250 miles of new line burned, and approximately 33,000
miles of old plow line maintained. Seven hundred and fifty-two
miles of new truck trails were constructed and 815 miles main-
tained.
Fire Control The expansion of our fire control radio sys-
Communications tem continued until slowed down toward the
end of the period when it became increasing-
ly difficult to get needed parts and equipment. However, on
June 30, 1942, the Service had installed and in use 11 base sta-
tions, one portable station, 31 portable mobile units attached
to base stations, and 2 more operating State-wide.
The telephone communication system was expanded by ap-
Sproximately 600 miles. Of this, 237 miles were built by CCC
camp labor and 363 miles out of the regular funds of the Service.
All construction was of a higher type than in the past, less than
25 miles being grounded circuit and metallic circuit being con-
structed of a new type improved high tensile wire.
Fire Law At the beginning of the biennium, there were 3
Enforcement fire law cases bound over for court and 5 pend-
ing, a total of 8 cases. During the biennium, 38
new cases developed, making a total of 46 to be handled during
the report period.
In 7 of the cases, costs or damages were paid without any
arrest made. Of the remaining 39 cases, 9 were nol pressed, 4
pled guilty, 11 were convicted, 7 acquitted, 5 bound over for
court, and 3 more are still pending.







SEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT 9

All cases were supported by good evidence, in almost every
case by eye-witnesses. The law enforcement record continues
to reflect the general apathy .of the public toward proper en-
forcement of the forest fire laws.
The CCC in The biennium saw the end of the CCC which
Fire Control had played an important part in fire control
improvements since 1933. There were eight
forestry camps in the State at the beginning of the biennium.
The first of these was closed on April 5, 1941. By January 1,
1942, only 5 camps were left and the last one closed officially on
the last day of the biennium. A tabulation of camps follows:
Date of Date of
Camp No. County Occupancy Evacuation
P-80 Bay 11-30-37 4- 5-41
P-81 Gulf 8- 1-39 6-30-42
P-82 Volusia 6- 5-39 4-30-42
P-83 Levy 10- 9-39 12-31-41
P-84 Dixie 10-11-39 11-15-41
P-86 Taylor 6-30-41 5-28-42
P-86A Dixie 8-10-39 1-20-42
P-86B Taylor 1- 2-42 3-31-42
During the first year of the biennium, the camps reported a
total of 157,670 man-days' work and during the second year
58,648, a total of 216,318 man-days. Principal accomplishments
were the construction of 4 lookout towers, 11 dwellings, 9 barns,
4 equipment storage sheds, 29 other buildings, 758 rods of fence,
4 cattle guards, 237 miles of telephone line, 259 miles of truck
trails, 59 vehicle bridges, and 251 miles of plowed firebreaks.
They maintained an additional 179 miles of truck trails, timber-
type mapped 489,120 acres, estimated the timber stands on
61,540 acres, collected 1,641 bushels of pine cones for the nursery,
and spent 3,673 man-days fighting fires.
Fire Control The normal, peace-time development of a sys-
in the War tem of fire lookout towers, connected by tele-
phone and coordinated with a Service-owned
radio network has provided Florida with a remarkable setup for
observing and reporting the movements of hostile troops in the
event of invasion. Practically all towers are now being used as
aircraft warning stations with the lookouts serving voluntarily
as aircraft spotters. The Service-owned telephone and radio com-
munications system is being used in this connection also and, in
an emergency, the entire system can be put under Army super-
vision immediately.
Further, the existence of fires and smoke along the coast and
in the vicinity of defense centers represent a hazard to public
safety, defense installations, coastwise shipping, and the war
training program. Toward the end of the biennium, plans were







FLORIDA FOREST AND PARK SERVICE


shaping for the recruiting and training of special emergency
fire crews under the direction of the Service to combat this
menace in critical areas.

APPLIED FORESTRY
Research Management research has continued throughout the
biennium about as outlined in the last report. Two
new experimental plantings were made on dry sites on the Hos-
ford Fire Control Unit in Liberty County, a loblolly thinning
plot was established near Blountstown in Calhoun County, and
a cutting study initiated on a 12-year old stand of planted slash
pine near Chipley in Washington County.
The 10-year forestry and grazing study at Penney Farms in
Clay County matured in the second year in the biennium. Field
data on seedlings, saplings and pole plots has been taken but
not yet compiled. Supplemental to this data, a 10% cruise and
growth study has been made.
Research on desirable species for south Florida has continued
on six experimental plots scattered from Hillsborough to Dade
County. The semi-tropical forest tree species that have been
planted were secured from several foreign countries and in-
clude Kauri, hoop and cypress pines, cajeput, balsa, Spanish
cedar, cork oak, and several species of eucalyptus and mahogany.
Planting During the first year of the biennium, the nurseries
at Olustee and Munson produced and distributed a
total of 8,310,000 seedling trees and during the second year
5,371,098, a total of 13,681,098 for .the biennium. During the
1941-42 planting season, the Container Corporation of America,
with a pulp mill at Fernandina, purchased 1,065,450 trees for
free distribution to landowners.
The sharp reduction in seedling production the second year
was due to late planting and a dry, hot spring. However, the
reduction in the seedling crop did not result in any shortage of
supply because of a general lack of planting labor. Recognizing
that this labor shortage has become even more acute, the Mun-
son nursery has been closed for the duration and the crop pro-
gram at Olustee has been geared accordingly.
Pulpwood New pulpwood cutting demonstration plots
Cooperation were established at Point Millikin in Gadsden
County, on the Williamson tract near Gainesville,
on the Mansell tract near Starke, and on the Beck tract near
Bonifay.
Naval Stores Cooperative work in naval stores carried on
Cooperation jointly with the Bureau of Agricultural Chem-
istry and Engineering has continued. Six new
improved-type stills were constructed, 4 were repaired, and 5 de-
hydrators, 3 turpentine separators, and 9 thermometers in-







SEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT 11

stalled. However, emphasis was put on woods operations and
there was increasing activity along these lines.
In keeping with the stepped-up demand for naval stores for
war needs, gum farming received emphasis in all farm forestry
activities.

Farm Farm forestry work, initiated during the preceding
Forestry biennium, was expanded during the year. Coopera-
tors in the Chipley project in west Florida now num-
ber 50 and in the Lake City project 40. Probably outstanding
in the west Florida area was the cooperative operation of a port-
able sawmill that made 72 setups on cooperative farms. In the
Lake City area, outstanding work has been done in assisting
farmers with the utilization and marketing of their woods crops.
A farm forestry handbook has been prepared in cooperation
with the Agricultural Extension Service, tl e Soil Conservation
Service, the U. S. Forest Service, and the School of Forestry
of the University of Florida. This will bE issued shortly in
printed form.

State Early in the biennium, the administration of State
Forests forests was transferred from the Branch of State
Parks to the Branch of Applied Forestry. The State
forest program has undergone only minor changes during the
biennium. The O'Leno State Forest, near High Springs, was
given the status of a recreational area and transferred to the
Branch of State Parks for administration. Myakka River State
Forest, near Sarasota, continues to produce a grazing revenue.
Pasture improvements work was carried on on 856.6 acres and
approximately 3 miles of new fence constructed. The Cary State
Forest, in Duval and Nassau Counties, has responded abundant-
ly to fire protection and supports a full stand of young timber.
A grazing lease and a turpentine lease on portions of the area
are contributing to carrying charges. Pine Log State Forest, in
Bay County and Washington County, is also showing the results
of protection and reforestation. Blackwater River State Forest,
acquired in the previous biennium, continues to be the major land
management project. A well-rounded program of land-use has
been prepared by the Soil Conservation Service and this depart-
ment. It includes farming, grazing, game management, and
forestry. The administration of the game program is in the
hands of the Commission of Game and Fresh Water Fish. Graz-
ing has proven limited and only a minor source of operating
funds. The harvesting of naval stores, mature timber, and of
worked-out turpentine trees, stumps and similar materials, has
been the principal source of revenue. The 24 farm units have
not been generally effective due to limited crops, distance to
markets, changing tenancy, and the drain of man-power to the
armed forces and defense industries.







12 FLORIDA FOREST AND PARK SERVICE

A tabulation of State Forests as of June 30, 1942, follows:

Name Acquired Acreage Location

Myakka 1934 14,588 Manatee and Sarasota Counties
Pine Log 1936 6,900 Bay and Washington Counties
Cary 1937 3,143 Nassau and Duval Counties
Blackwater
River 1939 181,822 Okaloosa and Santa Rosa Counties


STATE PARKS
In General The State park program has been affected more
by wartime conditions than other activities of the
Florida Board of Forestry and Parks. The park construction
program was always largely dependent on CCC labor and funds
made available through the National Park Service. This began
to dwindle shortly after the opening of the biennium and was
definitely suspended in June of 1942.
The completion of the many improvements left in process of
construction by the CCC drained the department's limited park
funds and thereby weakened other plans for strengthening the
park system.
Acquisition Planned acquisition of needed land areas within or
adjoining the existing park units had to be largely
postponed. A total of 218 acres was purchased at Hillsborough,
Caverns and Tomoka.
Nevertheless, the park system and its acreage was consider-
ably augmented by transfers and donations. The O'Leno State
Forest, comprised of 1,320 acres situated on the Santa Fe River
near High Springs and containing an outstanding group camp
developed for forestry training purposes, was transferred to the
custody of the Park Branch and designated as the O'Leno Rec-
reational Area.
At Highlands Hammock, 160 acres adjoining the park were
acquired by donation. A road right-of-way amounting to 98
acres was donated by landowners in the vicinity of Torreya
State Park.
Through the personal efforts of Governor Holland, a 250-acre
estate situated between the Atlantic Beach and the Inland Water-
way at Fort Lauderdale was deeded by Hugh Taylor Birch for
State park purposes.
The Governor and his cabinet also reserved a total of 3,074
acres of tax delinquent lands for State park purposes pending
the enactment of legislation necessary to make its actual trans-
fer possible.






SEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Personnel The proper development of park areas and the
rendering of efficient park services to the public
require a carefully selected staff of landscape architects, natural-
ists, geologists, recreational specialists and similar technicians.
It has not been an easy task to find men suited to park demands
but during the biennium a sound nucleus was employed on all
park units opened to the public. By the end of the biennium,
war demands were making their inroads of the personnel and
by June 30, 1942, almost a third of the park employees had gone
to some branch of the armed services or to defense activities.
Use of The park units formally opened to public use showed
Parks an increase in civilian attendance of 25 percent over
the preceding year until war-time rationing of trans-
portation went into effect. The decrease after that time was
not as great as was anticipated and in a few instances continued
to increase due to the patronage of nearby residents who were
accustomed to seeking their recreation farther from home.
Actually, there has been a considerable increase in park use
due to the attendance of service men for whom no charge is
made. Groups from military camps are visiting the various
parks as a part of their organized recreational activity. Other
service men, individually and with their families, are finding
the parks ideal for restful outings.
Park Park income is comprised of gate admissions, cot-
Earnings tage and boat rentals, concession profits, and the
like. This has increased steadily from year to year.
It is anticipated and written into the park budgets for improve-
ments and operations. Due to the leveling off and even the de-
crease of civilian use of the parks because of travel limitations,
it is anticipated that park earnings will not increase to their
normal extent during the coming biennium.
Status of Park System The status of the park system, as of
June 30, 1942, is as follows:
Date Acreage Acreage
Park Acquired Counties 1940 1942
Highlands Hammock* 1935 Highlands ......... 3,640 3,800
Hugh Taylor Birch.. 1942 Broward ......... 250
Hillsborough River*. 1935 Hillsborough ...... 720 800
Gold Head Branch*.. 1935 Clay .............. 1,180 1,180
Fort Clinch*........ 1935 Nassau ........... 1,085 1,086
Myakka River*...... 1934 Manatee & Sarasota 12,153 12,233
Torreya* .......... 1935 Liberty ........... 520 618
Florida Caverns*.... 1935 Jackson ........... 963 1,090
Suwannee .......... 1936 Hamilton &Suwannee 1,636 1,636
Tomoka ........... 1938 Volusia ........... 525 527
Pan American...... 1938 Broward .......... 270 270
O'Leno Rec. Area*.. 1934 Columbia & Alachua. 1,320 1,320
*Opened to public use.







14 FLORIDA FOREST AND PARK SERVICE

Parks in the While the strain of the all-out war effort makes
War Period the need for healthful outdoor recreation even
more imperative for national health and morale,
Florida's park system is not expected to flourish for the duration.
Generally speaking, it is anticipated that the development and
activities programs of all State parks will be arrested except for:
(1) those located in the vicinity of large communities having
a high percentage of their population engaged in war plants; or
(2) those parks that have sufficient existing hotels or housing
facilities to serve as convalescing centers for war casualties.
Unfortunately, Florida's parks can claim little under either
classification due to the lack of industrial cities and to the lack
of finances to make the construction of park hotels and similar
housing possible.
However, because of the fact that so many military training
centers have been located in the State and that thousands of the
nation's youth are taking their training here, an unprecedented
tourist business is anticipated in the post-war period and Flor-
ida's park system needs to be as fully developed as possible to
meet the demands that will be made on it.

PUBLIC RELATIONS
Major trends in the program of the Branch of Publicity, In-
formation and Education were: (1) the intensification of the
exhibit activity, (2) the revival of the visual education activity,
and (3) the initiation of a systematic schedule of county-wide
educational campaigns.
Public In October, 1941, the Service was host to a Conserva-
Schools tion Educational Conference sponsored by the State
Department of Education, held at the forestry train-
ing camp and attended by 50 outstanding educators representing
elementary and high schools as well as colleges providing courses
in teacher training. The report of an outstanding forestry
project in the Cross City school was issued as Circular No. 4. A
display of forestry and conservation teaching aids was installed
at the 1942 meeting of the Florida Education Association. All
schools in Orange and Volusia Counties were reached with
movies and literature distribution in the Spring of 1942 in con-
nection with county-wide educational campaigns. Four pages
of conservation teaching material were presented in 8 of the
monthly issues of the Journal of the Florida Education Associa-
tion during the school term of 1941-42. Twenty-two thousand
rulers, carrying a fire prevention message, were distributed in
the schools.
While it was not possible to keep a full-time forester assigned
to the supervision of the forestry curriculum in the more than
100 agricultural high schools, the program has continued with
the aid of 13 activity teaching units made available by the







SEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Service. During the first year of the biennium, the agricultural
schools planted 129,700 trees and used 156 pounds of tree seed
in their program. In the second year, they planted 399,740 trees
and used 130 pounds of seed.

Boy Scout The last year of the biennium saw the Scout For-
Forestry ests Project complete its tenth year. A critical
analysis of its costs and accomplishments has led
to the decision to reduce the emphasis on it in favor of other
educational undertakings which may be more fruitful.

The Forestry The annual forestry training camps were con-
Training Camp ducted as usual although war-time sugar ra-
tioning and travel restrictions were making
themselves felt by the second year. The 1941 camp was attended
by 98 Future Farmers and Boy Scouts and the 1942 camp by
104. The camp training program and curriculum was little
changed from previous years.
Visual At the beginning of the biennium, the Service
Education owned one 16mm sound motion picture projector;
by the end of the biennium it owned three. In ad-
dition, it had acquired 9 lantern slide projectors, 8 of them 35mm
combination film strip and slide type. Five of these are in the
hands of park superintendents and being used locally. More
than 500 lantern slides, made by color photography and mostly
of park scenes, have been prepared and are in use. All available
forestry motion pictures suitable for use in Florida have been
secured and were shown in Orange and Volusia Counties in con-
nection with county-wide educational campaigns before the end
of the biennium. The Service acquired also a good 16mm motion
picture camera with its accessories about the beginning of the
biennium and this is being used as time and opportunity permit
to secure sequences that will be assembled into strictly Florida
park and forestry movies.
Signs and The intensive sign campaign conducted by the PR
Posters Branch during the previous biennium was discon-
tinued and the material on hand distributed to the
districts for erection by them. A new billboard law passed by
the Legislature during the biennium exempts Service signs from
its provisions; this was supplemented by a written agreement
with the State Road Department which stipulates the location
of Service signboards.
Exhibits The exhibit items loaned to the Wood Parade
Museum of St. Petersburg in the previous biennium
continued on display throughout this two-year period. At the
invitation of the State Department of Agriculture, a diorama
of the caves at Florida Caverns State Park was installed in that
department's exhibit building in the Jacksonville Terminal.







FLORIDA FOREST AND PARK SERVICE


A special forestry educational train was operated over the
Seaboard Air Line Railway during the Fall of 1941. It made ten
stands in Florida and showed to a total attendance of .12,375
people. Two members of the Service personnel escorted the train
while in the State to serve as hosts and to distribute literature
to those in attendance.
During the first year, 15 displays were installed at fairs and
similar occasions where they were viewed by an estimated 900,-
000 people. These were assembled from old exhibits or locally
collected native materials. In the second year, the Service
launched on a more pretentious display comprised of 20 col-
lapsible units. War-time priorities and restrictions delayed de-
livery of some of the materials and the exhibit was not avail-
able until the last six months of the biennium. The exhibit
proper was displayed at only 4 points but units from the display
or localized exhibits similar to those used the previous year were
also used with the result that the Service was represented at
19 fairs, expositions or similar gatherings and viewed by ap-
proximately 635,000 people.
Publicity Florida newspapers carried forestry and park copy
to the extent of 26,372 column inches during the
first year and 18,499 column inches during the second year.
The reduction during the second year resulted from: (1) war
news preempting much of the news space; (2) the decline of the
CCC as important news; and (3) the sacrificing of park activity
and interest.
There was no reduction in the news space given to releases
issued by the Service or growing directly from its activities.
While war, as a news priority, reduced the space given to edi-
torials and similar voluntary publicity on Service activities,
increased numbers of both State-wide and local releases by
members of the Service personnel made up the difference and
approximately 8,400 column inches of publicity were tallied each
year.
Publications During the biennium, Planted Pines Pay, Cir-
cular No. 2, was revised and reprinted. The new
management bulletin, No. 13, entitled Cutting Timber for In-
creased Profits, was reprinted.
Early in the biennium, the Sixth Biennial Report was pre-
pared and released. The report of an elementary school forestry
educational project conducted by a Cross City teacher was is-
sued as Circular No. 4.
During the first year an 8-page publication entitled, Florida's
State Parks Invite You, was released for the first time and met
with such a ready acceptance that two reprints had to be secured
before the end of the biennium. Likewise, a popular 8-page
leaflet entitled, The Work of the Florida Forest and Park Service,
which made its appearance in the last half of the biennium, had
to be reprinted within the year.







SEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT 17


APPENDIX




Table Subject Page

I. FINANCIAL REPORT, July 1, 1940-June 30, 1941........ 18

II. FINANCIAL REPORT, July 1, 1941-June 30, 1942...... 19

III. FIRE CONTROL REPORT........................... 20

IV. FIRE ANALYSIS ........................... ..... 20








FLORIDA FOREST AND PARK SERVICE


TABLE I
FINANCIAL REPORT
July 1, 1940-June 30, 1941


STATE APPROPRIATION
Debits


Credits


1940-1941 Appropriation ..................... $210,000.00 $
Expenditures ............................... 210,000.00

$210,000.00 $210,000.00

INCIDENTAL FUND
Balance July 1, 1940........................$ 3,445.34
Receipts-U. S. Government.................. 105,564.72
Receipts-Landowners ...................... 155,141.07*
Receipts-Nursery .......................... 14,666.99*
Receipts-Highlands Hammock State Park.... 4,085.28
Receipts-Hillsborough River 'State Park...... 3,359.80
Receipts-Fort Clinch State Park............. 175.00
Receipts-Gold Head Branch State Park...... 2,481.55
Receipts-Blackwater River State Forest...... 21,191.32*
Receipts-Myakka River State Forest......... 1,159.44
Receipts-Forestry Training Camp........... 1,083.55
Receipts-Fiscal Branch ..................... 356.70
Receipts-Unanticipated Revenue............. 13,190.65*
Expenditures ............................... 308,154.72
Balance-June 30, 1941.................... 17,746.69

$325,901.41 $325,901.41

REPLACEMENT FUND
Balance July 1, 1940........................$ 200.00 $
Expenditures ............................... 197.31
Balance-June 30, 1941..................... 2.69

$ 200.00 $ 200.00


RECAPITULATION


Receipts
State Appropriation ........... $210,000.00
Incidental Fund............... 325,901.41
Replacement Fund............ 200.00

$536,101.41


Expenditures
$210,000.00
308,154.72
197.31

$518,352.03


Balance
$
17,746.69
2.69

$ 17,749.38


In addition to the above funds, $17,922.32 in private expenditures were
recognized as labor in lieu of cash. These expenditures are made under
cooperative agreements and are largely under the supervision of the
Florida Forest and Park Service.
*Gross receipts from which refunds have not been deducted. These refunds
are, of course, included in the total expenditures from this fund.








SEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT 19


TABLE II
FINANCIAL REPORT
July 1, 1941-June 30, 1942
STATE APPROPRIATION
Debits
1941-1942 .................. .. ..............$300,000.00
Receipts (Refunds on Travel Requests)....... 3.30
Expenditures ...............................
Balance-June 30, 1942.......................
$300,003.30


INCIDENTAL FUND
Balance July 1, 1941.........................$ 17,746.69
Receipts-U. S. Government.................. 124,640.65
Receipts-Landowners ....................... 143,349.27*
Receipts-Nursery .......................... 12,618.26*
Receipts-Pine Log State Forest............... 150.00
Receipts-Cary State Forest ................. 235.00
Receipts-Myakka River State Forest......... 1,574.55
Receipts-Blackwater River State Forest...... 22,505.12*
Receipts-Forestry Training Camp........... 678.46
Receipts-Unanticipated Revenue............. 13,336.24*
Expenditures ...............................
Balance-June 30, 1942......................


$33
REPLACEMENT FUND
Balance July 1, 1941........................ $
Expenditures ...............................

$
STATE PARK FUND
Receipts-Highlands Hammock State Park.....$
Receipts-Hillsborough River State Park.......
Receipts-Gold Head Branch State Park.......
Receipts-Myakka River State Park...........
Receipts-Fort Clinch State Park.............
Receipts-Camp O'Leno.......................
Receipts-Unanticipated Revenue..............
Expenditures ................................
Balance-June 30, 1942......................

$ 1


6,834.24 $336,834.24

2.69 $
2.69

2.69 $ 2.69

7,160.36 $
3,912.88
5,285.55
194.25
50.00
728.35
2,429.62
15,292.83
4,468.18
9,761.01 $ 19,761.01


RECAPITULATION
Receipts Expenditures Balance
State Appropriation........... $300,003.30 $300,001.27 $ 2.03
Incidental Fund................ 336,834.24 310,388.23 26,446.01
Replacement Fund............ 2.69 2.69
State Park Fund.............. 19,761.01 15,292.83 4,468.18

$656,601.24 $625,685.02 $ 30,916.22
In addition to the above funds, $18,530.61 in private expenditures were
recognized as labor in lieu of cash. These expenditures are made under
cooperative agreements and are largely under the supervision of the
Florida Forest and Park Service.
*Gross receipts from which refunds have not been deducted. These refunds
are, of course, included in the total expenditures from this fund.


Credits
$
300,001.27
2.03

$300,003.30

$


310,388.23
26,446.01









TABLE III
FIRE CONTROL REPORT

No. of Cooperators Acreage Protected % Area Burned
Date
Date Indiv. Group Co. Indiv. Group County Total Indiv. Group County Sa
Agree. Units Units Agree. Units Units State Agree. Units Units S
June 30, 1940 428 105 5 I 2,166,096 698,499 1,475,234 4,339,829 || 1.9 1 1.55 5.76 1 3.17
June 30, 1941 435 103 8 2,229,693 702,794 2,050,349 4,982,836 | 4.5 5.8 4.3 4.3
June 30, 1942 461 110 7 i 2,218,923 721,819 I 2,009,349 | 4,950,091 |I 1.72 I 1.74 I 3.3 | 2.36


TABLE IV
FIRE ANALYSIS

Number of Fires Acreage Burned Damage
Cause Number % Total Acres % Total Value % Total

1st yr. 2nd yr. 1st 2nd 1st yr. 2nd yr. 1st 2nd 1st yr. 2nd yr. 1st 2nd
^au % oa


Lightning ......
Railroads .......
Campers .......
Smokers .......
Brush Burning..
Incendiary .....
Lumbering .....
Miscellaneous ..
Unknown ......


1U'
97
94
279
314
4,641
69
33
193


86
44
60
163
194
3,928
22
55
128


1.8
.9
1.3
3.4
4.2
84.
.5
1.2
2.7


1,162
1,167
969
34,741
6,025
155,338
9,325
569
5.936


758
402
781
1,615
3,425
105,267
569
1,226
3.014


$ 2,036
3,963
1,565.
47,623
9,774
221,997
11,955
452
8.752


$ 547
526
1,767
2,050
5,343
144,312
770
2,136
3.495


Total ...... 5,827 4,680 215,232 117,057 $308,117 $160,946





141694.

LIST OF AVC

Forest Trees in 8; 80i
Utsal Forestry, Bulle No. 19
ng andMarketing Pulpwood, o. 12;
TiUmber for Inreasd No. 18
Farm Forstry, BulIatl No

Pi ns.e Peay, Circular Po. w S '2;
o of Pine, a song, OhCular '.
atio. report of a teaching

n y Sence Teaching Unita
Grade 1-The "


Grade 6-TBe the T
SW6ods That the Farmer 0 w o leaflet for
4 8 pm, 1986.
l te aral Slceanc and C Teaching A 4id
revised 1942.
ugh River State Park.
k of the Flprds Forest a. vis16 pape, 1941. '

, t toi Public Ow hip, by Carl ; from the Farm J
f lidcl ,Forestry the Florida F Lenthal Wyman;
S Grower DeeseuT 1981.
Sep 1985.
otr, Cash ,. wp for rF C. LH Coulter;
Grower, Sept 1985.
S Heels of the Woods, by dredge; from A
Febraary, 193
IRm tdStujdy-Whyml How? by f0"a F. Dillmann; from
Sazine, Augu eber, 1988.
:4o ngi the Fore 'Meet.the N|.emand, by Lewis ."
Civil Enginee Junme, 1988.
p to Prune Sotuma Pines, by, 3 on H. Paul; from Boa
berman, Decee 1988.
*'Ilrove Year Turot Woods, byl *I 0. Boynton; from ATf
S September, 191I
rids State Parb J review, by pinam F. Jacobs; front
SSouthland, N:ov. ,1989. .
t Forestry, byl. A..wmith; fro Aerlean Forests July,
Sams of Santa Mby Willia PJacobs; from The J
'Florida Educat on ton, ober, 1941.
4*tia Cavnr -4 ound WW land, by Scoggia,
Glovannoli, from a H l y, 1942.
SSaga of SouthefH by tt a, from AmEie
September, 19g.
l ne blicatiea
Course in tion of a's Forests; 91 paMr,.t
nal Conser 1940.
Ia' ate Par WYou, 1 1941.
ForestTr 98. repnted 1948.
I ,-I:




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