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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075929/00015
 Material Information
Title: Biennial report
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Board of Conservation
Florida Geological Survey
Publisher: The Board
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Creation Date: 1965
Publication Date: 1936-1968
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Natural resources -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Conservation of natural resources -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Saltwater fishing -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Economic conditions -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida State Board of Conservation.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1936/38-1967/68.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vols. for 1936/38-1959/60 called 3rd-14th.
Numbering Peculiarities: 6th (1943/44) bound with the 6th Biennial report of the Florida Geological survey.
Numbering Peculiarities: Biennium ending Dec.31.
General Note: 13th (1957/58) has a subtitle "Salt water fishing."
General Note: Vols. for 1961/62-1963/64 include biennial reports of the individual divisions of the Board of Conservation.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001589422
oclc - 01410803
notis - AHL3395
System ID: UF00075929:00015
 Related Items
Preceded by: Biennial report to State Board of Conservation
Succeeded by: Biennial report - Florida Department of Natural Resources

Full Text


FLORIDA

BOARD OF CONSERVATION

TALLAHASSEE


BEACHES SHORES


IIMII, ,.,


Report, 1965-66


Biennial
R?3
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UNIVERSITY



OF


CONSERVATION








CLAUDE R. KIRK, JR.
Governor






TOM ADAMS EAKL FAIRCLOTH FRED O. DICKINSON, JR.
Secretary of State Attorney General Comptroller



i .-Z



BROWARD WILLIAMS FLOYD CHRISTIAN DOYLE CONNER
Treasurer Supt. of Public Commissioner of
Instruction Agriculture



I;



RANDOLPH HODGES
Director of Conservation
COVER: Educational exhibit at Manatee County Fairgrounds, Palmetto, graphically
pictures responsibilities of Florida Board of Conservation.














TABLE OF CONTENTS


Page

Letter of Transmittal 2

Preface 3

Division of Administration 5

Division of Water Resources 17

Division of Geology 31

Division of Salt Water Fisheries 59

Division of Waterways Development 97

Division of Beaches and Shores 111


















Florida Board of Conservation

TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA

February 15, 1967


Honorable Claude R. Kirk, Jr.
Chairman
Florida Board of Conservation
Tallahassee, Florida

Dear Governor Kirk:
I herewith submit biennial report of the Florida Board of Conservation
covering activities of the six divisions during the years 1965-1966.

Respectfully yours,

Randolph Hodges
Director

















PREFACE
The Florida Board of Conservation is a statutory agency (Section
370.02), the members of which are the Governor, Secretary of State, At-
torney General, Comptroller, State Treasurer, Superintendent of Public
Instruction and Commissioner of Agriculture, the seven elective admin-
istrative officers referred to familiarly as the Cabinet.

Under law, the duties of the Board are to conserve and develop the
natural resources of the State and to administer the provisions of Chap-
ters 370, 371, 373, 376, 377 and 378.

The Board of Conservation is organized into six divisions: Admin-
istration, Salt Water Fisheries, Water Resources and Conservation, Wa-
terways Development, Geology and Beaches and Shores.

The Director of Conservation acts as the agent of the Board in coor-
dinating and directing its activities in the discharge of its responsibilities.

The activities of the six divisions during calendar years 1965 and
1966 in the discharge of the duties imposed by statute are summarized
in this report.





























There is a Florida Seafood to please
everyone's palate.


WARNING
. WATCH YOUR WAKE


Signs such as this have been placed
in inland waters of Florida to alleviate
wake damage.






DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATION
FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
TALLAHASSEE


1965-66


Randolph Hodges
Director







RESPONSIBILITIES

Section 370.02 (4) charges the Division of Administration with the
duty and responsibility of rendering any services required by the Board
and the several divisions that can advantageously and effectively be cen-
tralized.
It also is responsible for carrying out any duties of the Board not
specifically assigned by law to some other division.
The duty of administering, coordinating and enforcing Chapter 376,
the archeology statute, and Sections 373.261-373.391, weather modification
is also assigned by law to the division.
The Director of Conservation is designated by law as Director of the
Division of Administration.







ACTIVITIES
Centralized under the Division of Administration are the fiscal, per-
sonnel, purchasing and information and education services of all divisions
of the Board.
The division also administers Chapter 537, Florida Statutes, the 1965
Ship and Yacht Brokers Act, which provides for the licensing and regu-
lation of persons and firms engaged in yacht brokerage.
In April, 1965, the division implemented Chapter 376 by employing
a State Archaeologist.
The Department's fiscal officer is also the personnel director. With
the substantial work burden placed upon the fiscal office by the disburse-
ment of funds from the Water Resources Development Account, created
by the 1965 Legislature; the increase of approximately 10 percent each
year of the biennium in boat registrations, and the administration of
the Yacht and Ship Brokers Act; a personnel assistant was added to the
staff. The personnel assistant is responsible for the heavy volume of
paper work involved in employment procedures governed by the State
Merit System. In addition, he also serves as property custodian.
The fiscal office has the duty of auditing all accounts receivable
from the sale of dead oyster shells. This is the primary source for finan-
cing of the biological research program of the Division of Salt Water
Fisheries.
Net returns to the State from sale of dead oyster shell dredged from
state-owned submerged lands totaled $261,145.03 for fiscal 1964-65 and
$215,655.47 for fiscal 1965-66. The Tampa Port Authority receives 50
percent of the revenue from sale of dead oyster shells from waters under
its jurisdiction. During fiscal 1964-65, the Tampa Port Authority received
$119,069.48 from the dead shell revenue and during fiscal 1965-66, a
total of $91,746.22.
The fiscal office also is responsible for distribution of boat registra-
tion certificate tax revenue to the several counties. Under the provisions
of Chapter 371, $2.50 of each boat registration certificate tax is earmarked
for the State's Motorboat Revolving Trust Fund, from which the Legis-
lature appropriates a fixed sum for administration of Chapter 371. The
balance of the boating revenue is returned to the several counties on the
basis of the number of boats registered in each.
The Board of Conservation distributed among the 67 counties a total
of $653,358.62 in boating revenue during the fiscal 1964-65. The counties
derived a total of $710,769.84 from boat registration taxes during fiscal
1965-66. Under law, each county's share is divided, two-thirds to the
County School Board and one-third to the Board of County Commissioners.
Funds accruing to the State's Motorboat Revolving Trust Fund over
and above the amount appropriated by the Legislature for administration

7







of the boat registration and safety act are paid into the land acquisition
fund of the Outdoor Recreation Program. During the past two years,
the recreation program has received a total of $500,000 from boat regis-
tration certificate tax revenue.
During 1965 and 1966, the division continued to purchase liability
and workmen's compensation insurance on the basis of competitive bids.
Since July, 1962, the Board of Conservation has acted as a self-insurer of
automotive, marine and other equipment. As during the previous three
years, losses during the 1965 and 1966 were less than premiums formerly
paid to casualty insurance companies.
All purchases for the Department are made through the purchasing
agent. Every effort is made to abide by the spirit as well as the letter
of state purchases laws. During the past two years, no emergency field
purchases has been permitted without expressed approval of the purchas-
ing agent and the issuance of a purchase order number by the purchasing
agent. All proposed expenditures of capital outlay must have the prior
approval of the Director.
In September, 1963, the Outdoor Recreational Development Council
made available to the Board of Conservation $50,000 to be expended on
small recreational projects such as artificial fishing reefs and boat launch-
ing facilities in the salt waters of the State. This program was assigned
to the Division of Administration.
The Director, seeking to spread the funds as far as possible and to
the benefit of the most people, determined to disburse the money to in-
terested coast counties on a matching basis. The maximum in matching
funds for which any county could qualify was fixed at $1,900.
As of Dec. 31, 1964, projects had been constructed in 10 counties and
matching funds contributed by the Board of Conservation.
During 1965, a total of $17,184.09 of these matching funds was paid
out as projects were completed in Dixie, Okaloosa, Citrus, Manatee, Pasco,
St. Johns, Gulf and Sarasota counties and the City of Gulf Breeze.
The Board of Conservation also furnished materials for reconstruc-
tion and enlargement of the public launching ramp on Gandy Causeway
in Tampa. The State Road Department furnished all equipment and
labor for the job.
A total of $10,280 in small recreational project matching funds was
distributed during 1966 among Volusia, Saint Lucie, and Pinellas coun-
ties and the Cities of Pompano Beach and Madeira Beach. Matching
funds of $1,900 also were committed to the City of North Miami to assist
in construction of a new boat ramp.
As of Dec. 31, 1966, about $3,900 remained of the original $50,000
allocation to the Board.







Information and Education
Information and education services were improved during the past
two years, although further strengthening is urgent if the public support
so necessary for the success of any program for development and preser-
vation of natural resources is to be generated.
Far too many Floridians still have not fully grasped the strain being
placed upon our natural resources by the still-fabulous growth pattern,
and the necessity for positive action to assure wise resource use programs
that will leave these invaluable assets for the benefit of future Florida
citizens. Only through an adequately-financed, aggressive education cam-
paign can the public be made aware of the problems of conserving nat-
ural resources and aroused to support programs to support them,
But progress has been made during the past two years in this direc-
tion. The Information and Education Department has averaged about
30 letters a day during the past two years, seeking answers to questions
about the State's conservation programs or requesting informational lit-
erature.
A comprehensive guidebook for salt water sports fishermen was pro-
duced early in 1965. This has proved to be one of the most sought-after
publications of the Board of Conservation.
The I & E section also has produced nine educational pamphlets
aimed at school-age youngsters during the past two years.
In October, 1965, the first issue of the Florida Conservation News
went to press. This monthly publication, an eight-page tabloid, reports
on the activities and plans of the various divisions of the Board. It re-
placed the Florida Water News, which had been published for several
years by the Division of Water Resources.
Distribution has increased from 1,700 to 5,000 since the first issue
was published. It is anticipated that circulation will reach 10,000 during
the 1967-69 biennium.
In January, 1966, the I & E Department initiated weekly salt water
sports fishing reports. The reports tell what fish are being caught, where
they are being taken, and what baits are proving most successful. The
reports are compiled from information supplied by conservation officers
in each of the 11 law enforcement areas.
The initial report was sent to three outlets within the State. In
December, 1966, some 70 radio and television stations and newspapers
throughout the Southeast were disseminating these reports to the public.
Two national outdoors magazines also are publishing quarterly Florida
salt water fishing reports prepared especially for their use.
During 1966, a series of public service announcements dealing with
Board of Conservation activities were recorded and distributed to Florida
9







radio stations. These 20 second conservation messages, 12 each to a record,
were widely used by the radio stations.
During 1966, members of the information and education staff worked
diligently to develop friendly relations with the various organized con-
servation groups. Staff members attended, to the extent possible, meet-
ings of Isaac Walton League, Florida Wildlife Federation, Audubon So-
ciety chapters and other conservation organizations. This has bettered
communications between the Board and these organizations. Many times,
it was found that opposition to Board policies and programs was due to
misunderstanding of the Board's aims by the conservation groups.
In a cooperative venture with the Development Commission, the De-
partment contracted with Dave Newell, one of the nation's well-recognized
experts on sports fishing, to produce a new motion picture on tarpon
fishing to be added to the film library.
During the biennium, members of the I & E staff made a total of
213 speaking appearances before conservation and civic clubs to discuss
the programs and goals of the Board. Seventeen guest appearances on
TV shows were made during 1965 and 23 during 1966.
Films from the I & E library were shown on TV stations in New
York, Chicago, Denver, Los Angeles and Dallas as well as on 11 Florida
stations. Film showings to school groups and clubs averaged two a week
during the two year period.
The Director proved one of the Department's more valuable educa-
tional tools. He made 53 speeches during 1965 and 49 during 1966, in
each of which he outlined the responsibilities of the Board and the pro-
grams through which they are carried out.
The display of educational exhibits at various fairs and expositions,
trade shows and conventions is a major activity in the informational
program.
The Conservation Department is a regular exhibitor at the Pensacola
Interstate Fair, North Florida Fair at Tallahassee, the Bay County Fair
at Panama City, the Putnam County Fair at Palatka, the Pasco County
Fair at Dade City, the Dade County Youth Fair at Miami, the Manatee
County Fair at Palmetto, the South Florida Fair at West Palm Beach,
the Florida State Fair at Tampa, the Kissimmee Valley Livestock Show
and Fair at Kissimmee, the Central Florida Fair at Orlando, the Hernando
County Fair at Brooksville, the Martin County Fair at Stuart, the Miami
Sport, Travel and Vacation Show, the Jacksonville Travel and Vacation
Show, the Monroe County Fair at Key West, the Bradford County Fair
at Starke, the Levy County Fair at Williston, and the Florida Forestry
Festival at Perry.
Department displays also have been exhibited at the annual Florida
Conservation Week Headquarters each of the past three years.







Yacht and Ship Brokers Act
The Legislature gave a new responsibility to the Division of Admin-
istration when it enacted the Yacht and Ship Brokers Act of 1965.
The law requires the licensing of all persons, firms or corporations
engaged in yacht brokerage. Yacht brokerage is defined by law as the
buying, selling, chartering, renting or leasing for others, vessels of more
than 25 feet in length.
Under the statute the licenses are issued on a calendar year basis
and the first licenses were issued for 1966. The law limited expenditures
for administration and enforcement to the revenue received from licenses.
During 1966, licenses were issued to 128 brokers and 262 yacht saelsmen.
The fee fixed by law for an original broker's license is $100, the fee for
an original salesman's license $10. A broker's license may be renewed
for a $50 fee. The renewal fee for a salesman's license is $10.
The administration of the act, Chapter 537, Florida Statutes, is by
the Division of Administration. The ministerial function of issuance of
licenses is done by the License Department of the Division of Salt Water
Fisheries as a matter of practical administration. The Board of Conser-
vation approved the addition of one employee to the Division of Admin-
istration staff to serve as a field supervisor of regulatory responsibilities.
With the prime source of revenue, the fees for brokers' license, halved
with the renewal period in December, it became obvious that the Yacht
and Ship Brokers Act will not produce sufficient money to meet Depart-
ment costs of administration and enforcement. Consideration should be
given by the 1967 Legislature to increasing the fee for renewal of a
broker's license to $100 and to increasing the fee for original and renewal
licensing of salesmen to $25 if this function is to be administered and
enforced properly and remain self-supporting.

Archaeology
Chapter 376, Florida Statutes, providing for employment by the Di-
vision of Administration of a state archaeologist was enacted by the 1963
Legislature. However, no funds were provided to implement the statute.
The 1965 Legislature provided salary money for the State Archaeol-
ogist, who was hired in April, 1965. But no operating funds were ap-
propriated.
Through careful management of expenditures, funds were made avail-
able by the Division of Administration and the Division of Geology to
permit a limited, but worthwhile, program of archaeological research dur-
ing the biennium.
Upon the initiative of the Conservation Director, a cooperative agree-
ment was reached with the State Road Department that provides for the
salvage of all archaeological sites threatened by interstate highway con-
struction. This agreement makes available for this work federal funds







in a ratio of 90 federal-10 per cent state for the location and excavation
of threatened sites.
Several hundred archaeological sites in Florida were destroyed as
urban centers grew and expanded during the past two years, and only
a small minority were salvaged.
The salvaged sites were selected for research on the basis of historic
value, cultural content and availability of research funds. Those sites,
in the order excavated, were:


Site
Union Gun Boat
Richards Hammock

San Carlos West
Guest Mound
St. Marks Dock
Mourings Mound
Ft. Stansbury
Westcott Green
St. Marks Military
Cemetery
Capital Center


County
Gadsden
Gulf

Duval
Palm Beach
Wakulla
Collier
Wakulla
Leon
Wakulla

Leon


Period
Civil War
Deptford
Weeden Island
St. Johns I
St. Johns II
Historic
Glades
Historic
Civil War
Historic

Historic


Approximate
Date Range
1863
400 BC-1300 AD

400 BC-800 AD
800 AD-1300 AD
1790-1840
0-800 AD
1837-1843
1863
1818-1840

1820-present


In compliance with chapter 376 an archaeological survey of Florida
was initiated. A statewide archaeological site file has been established
and contains information relating to all known sites of historic impor-
tance. Approximately 140 new sites have been located since April, 1965.

Miscellaneous
The Director of Conservation, in addition to his responsibilities to
coordinate the activities of the several divisions to assure that the direc-
tives and policies of the Board are executed properly and efficiently, serves
by statute as Chairman of the Florida Boating Council, a member of the
Outdoor Recreational Planning Committee and one of three Florida rep-
resentatives on each the Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission and the
Atlantic States Marine Fisheries.
He is also a member of the National Advisory Council to the Na-
tional Rivers and Harbors Congress and is active in the affairs of the
American Waterways Association and the Mississippi Valley Association.
He is, by designation of the Governor, a member of the Advisory
Committee on Water Quality Control, which is charged with developing
water quality criteria recommendations for consideration by the 1967
Legislature.
As the agent of the Board, he has been called upon frequently dur-







ing the past two years to represent the State at Washington in conferences
with officials of the federal Bureau of the Budget and the Florida Con-
gressional Delegation relating to the State's water-related public works
projects and with federal fisheries authorities in matters relating to the
salt water fishery.
He is the Board's agent in dealing with the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers at the district, regional and national level. He also is the
Board's agent in exercise of its supervisory responsibility over Central
and Southern Flood Control District, Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District, the Canal Authority of Florida and the several navigation
districts.
Conflict of Interest
The Board of Conservation on July 26, 1966, formally adopted, upon
recommendation of the Director, a so-called conflict of interest resolution
establishing rules and regulations governing the official conduct of all
employees of the Board.
The Board was the first state agency to spell out a conflict of interest
policy so that public confidence in the integrity of its staff would be
assured.
Violation of the rules laid down in the conflict of interest resolution
constitutes grounds for disciplinary action, including dismissal from em-
ployment.
Under the conflict of interest policy:
(1) No employee of the Florida Board of Conservation shall have
any financial interest, direct or indirect, with any firm or individual en-
gaged in business transactions with the Board or any of its divisions.
(2) No employee of the Florida Board of Conservation shall have
any financial interest, direct or indirect, with any firm or individual sub-
ject to supervision or regulation by the Board or any of its divisions.
(3) No employee of the Florida Board of Conservation shall engage
for personal gain in any business transaction with the Board or any of
its divisions, or any other activity which would be a conflict of interest.
(4) No employee of the Florida Board of Conservation shall request,
solicit, demand, accept, receive or agree to receive any gift, favor, service
or other thing of value from any firm or individual transacting business
with the Board or any of its divisions.
(5) No employee of the Florida Board of Conservation shall request,
solicit, demand, accept, receive or agree to receive any gift, favor, service
or other thing of value from any firm or individual for performance of.
or failure to perform, any of his official duties.
(6) No employee of the Florida Board of Conservation shall accept
any employment, or engage in any activities for personal gain, outside
his official duties without the knowledge and consent of the Director of
the Board.










FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Division of Administration
Statement of Actual Expenditures


For the Fiscal Year, 1964-65
Other
Personal


Operating
Capital


Department Salaries Services Expenses Outlay Total

General Administration $ 38,642.50 $ 2,598.25 $ 30,666.48 $ 1,620.59 $ 73,527.82
Accounting & Personnel Department 32,595.00 4,800.57 122.83 37,518.40
Purchasing Department 11,531.92 359.02 11,890.94
Education & Information 17,858.73 14,000.61 326.25 32,185.59
Airplane & Pilots Expenses 8,280.00 10,964.78 19,244.78


Total Expenditures $ 108,908.15 $ 2,598.25 $ 60,791.46 $ 2,069.67 $ 174,367.53


For the Fiscal Year, 1965-66
Other Operating
Personal Capital
Department Salaries Services Expenses Outlay Total

General Administration $ 44,948.68 $ 2,630.90 $ 32,527.40 $ 4,848.36 $ 84,955.34
Accounting & Personnel Department 36,407.89 3,730.76 2,131.14 42,269.79
Purchasing Department 13,082.49 640.72 283.02 14,006.23
Education & Information 14,574.92 9,814.43 2,732.65 27,122.00
Airplane & Pilots Expenses 8,859.96 4,677.06 252.99 13,790.01
Legal Department 4,900.00 403.44 1,202.45 6,505.89
Marine Salvage (2,183.61) 1,872.45 (4,323.14) (4,634.30)

Total Expenditures $ 120,590.33 $ 2,630.90 $ 53,666.26 $ 7,127.47 $ 184,014.96


-*


^'


P-1





FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Division of Administration
Statement of Actual Revenues
Fiscal Year Fiscal Year
YACHT AND SHIP BROKERS TRUST FUND 1964-1965 1965-1966
Licenses
Brokers Original License $ 11,000.00
Brokers Branch Office License 225.00
Salesmans License 2,150.00
Temporary Salesmans License 100.00
Transfer of Salesmans License 50.00
Total Licenses $ 13,525.00
Leases, Rentals, and Fees
Examination Fees $ 1,215.00
Bond Fees 1,000.00
Overage 35.00
Total Leases, Rentals, and Fees $ 2,250.00
TOTAL YACHT AND SHIP BROKERS TRUST FUND $ 15,775.00
Less: Refunds $ 70.00
TOTAL YACHT AND SHIP BROKERS TRUST FUND $ 15,705.00


FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Division of Administration
Yacht and Ship Broker's Trust Fund
Statement of Actual Expenditures

For the Fiscal Year, 1965-66
Other Operating
Personal Capital
Department Salaries Services Expenses Outlay Total
General Administration $ 1,774.10 None $ 1,23653 $ 500.25 $ 3,510.88
Total Expenditures $ 1,774.10 None $ 1,236.53- $ 500.25 $ 3,510.88




























































FOUR-RIVER BASINS-The construction phase of the Four River Basins
project got underway in 1966 with the start on the Lake Tarpon Outfall Canal.
This canal, designated as C-531, when completed will help control floods and
will augment the fresh water now flowing into Upper Tampa Bay.


16






DIVISION OF WATER RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION
FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
TALLAHASSEE


1965-66


A. O. Patterson
Division Director







RESPONSIBILITIES
Administration of Florida's Water Resource Law is charged to the
Division of Water Resources and Conservation.
This Division is also responsible for the management of Florida's water
resources for maximum beneficial utilization. To accomplish this the
Division is directed to conduct cooperative studies and research, to collect,
compile and analyze data, to cooperate with local, county, state and federal
agencies, and to enforce the artesian well control law.
Another primary responsibility is keeping state officials, legislators
and the people of Florida informed on the status of Florida's water resources.
This requires studies of water use and water needs; constant liaison with
agencies that withdraw water or impound, divert and store it; the gathering
and analyzing of basic data from cooperating state and federal agencies.
The Division conducts specific water use studies and obtains informa-
tion on stream flows, lake levels, ground-water elevations and growth rates.
The responsibility of guiding and coordinating activities of flood
control and water management districts is also assigned to the Division. The
unity of effort in this field has achieved increased federal appropriations
for navigation and flood control and water management projects in Florida.
A part of the supervision of water management districts includes super-
vision of withdrawals from the Water Resources Development Account.







Legislative Changes
The 1965 session of the Legislature created the Water Resources
Development Account to replace the Flood Control Account. This broad-
ened law has done much to stimulate the development of water conserva-
tion and navigation projects.
In addition to flood control and water management districts created
under Chapter 378, and navigation districts created under Chapter 374,
any other flood control or water management or navigation district created
by special act is eligible to obtain money from the Water Resources Develop-
ment Account.
Money from the account may be used for flood control and water man-
agement districts, for highway bridge construction in connection with the
projects, and for administration and promotion, as well as the previously
approved uses for constructing district works and acquiring water storage
lands. Navigation districts may use money from the Water Resources
Development Account for highway bridge construction, rights of way,
water storage land, and for administration and promotion.
The 1965 Legislature amended Chapter 373, Florida Statutes, (Water
Resources Law) to remove the calendar year basis for determination of
minimum streamflow and lake level, thus permitting the use of "water
year" (October 1 September 30).
Further, the definition for streamflow was amended to permit the
determination of minimum calendar month flow. A new definition was
provided to replace minimum ground-water elevation. It defines mean low
ground-water level as the water level below which irreparable damage would
be done to the ground water. Determination is to be made by the Division
of Water Resources.
The 1965 Legislature also amended that portion of the Water Re-
sources Law regulating the flow of water from artesian wells. It provides,
in addition to valving and capping, for the plugging of a water supply
well if the water is highly mineralized or unusable as determined by the
Division of Water Resources, Florida Board of Conservation.
Deleted from the Law was the section on liens; retained was the pro-
vision that the owner shall pay the cost of plugging, valving or capping.
The provision for access by agents of the State Board of Conserva-
tion to wells was broadened to permit entry for water resources investi-
gation if the landowner cannot be found to obtain his permission.

Florida's Water
Statewide, rainfall generally has been normal or above normal dur-
ing the past two years. Streamflow averaged at least normal in all parts
of the state and in some instances, it was excessive. Many lakes have
been on the rise and at the close of the biennium most lake levels were

19







normal or above. Ground-water levels generally improved as a result of
increased rainfall and were above normal in all parts of Florida, except
the northwest. A summary of surface water and ground-water con-
ditions for the 1965 and 1966 water years (October 1 to September 30)
is presented in Figure 1.
Rainfall for 1965 was nearly equal to the long-term average with
55.8 inches reported. Distribution was fairly uniform. It ranged from
90 percent of normal in the south central division to 127 percent of
normal in the northwest division. The northwest division reported 74.2
inches for the largest division rainfall for the year. This was the fourth
consecutive year of above average rainfall in northwest Florida.
In 1966, total rainfall was approximately 13 percent above normal
with 62.5 inches reported. This was the wettest year statewide of the
past four years.
The lower east coast division reported the highest total rainfall with
approximately 81.5 inches. All divisions reported at least normal rainfall
and most reported above normal rainfall.
The 1966 rainfall broke the drought which had plagued the lower
peninsula for the past four years. By mid-year problems of too much
water were prevalent in some areas, particularly on the lower peninsula.
Of the four hurricanes reported in 1965, only one, Betsy, made
landfall, striking the tip of Florida and then devastating the Louisiana
Gulf Coast. Although this was the most destructive hurricane of record,
the damage in Florida was confined to the Keys and was not as great
as the amount attributed to Donna (1960) or Dora (1964).
Hurricane Alma had a helping hand in the 1966 rainfall picture.
As well as being the earliest hurricane on record, Alma's visit to Flor-
ida (she became a full hurricane June 8, 1966) brought record amounts
of rainfall to the southern part of the state. Totals ranged up to 21
inches in the conservation areas of the Central and Southern Florida
Flood Control District and along the southeast coast. North Florida
also received a large amount of rainfall when Alma, greatly diminished
in strength, came inland near Appalachicola and moved to the north-
east.
Average streamflow was excessive in both northwestern and north-
ern Florida during 1965, but was excessive only in the north in 1966.
Nowhere in the state did average streamflow during the biennium set
new record low levels. Toward the end of 1966 some streams in the
western part of the state were at their lowest level of flow for the past
two years.

































1965


1966 \5
North Central
STREAMFLOW GROUND WATER
EXCESSIVE % ABOVE South Central
South Central
MEDIAN AVERAGE Q

DEFICIENT BELOW Q Lower
ROSE Everglades
I(T East
FELL C/t






FIGURE 1-Surface water and ground water conditions in Florida for the
1965 and 1966 water years.







During the biennium, flow from Silver Springs was excessive, being
within the highest percent of record. The Springs are a barometer of
water resource conditions in the recharge area of Central Florida. High
flow has been recorded at this station since July 1964, when the area
recovered from a 33-month drought period.
Most lake levels were either normal or below normal in 1965; how-
ever, above normal rainfall in 1966 caused the lake levels to rise until
at the end of the year all but two lakes were normal or above. Two
lakes set new records for high levels, Lake Kerr near Eureka and Lake
Jackson at Tallahassee.
Lake Okeechobee rose to above normal during October, 1965, and
has been held approximately one foot above the long-term average since
then. Prior to October, the level had been maintained near average. At
the end of the biennium all conservation areas were at their regulation
stages. This is the first time all three areas have been at regulation level
since being constructed. Conservation areas 1 and 2A achieved continu-
ous regulation levels during December 1965. Regulation levels had pre-
viously been reached by each but were maintained only for a short pe-
riod of time. Conservation area 3 rose to regulation level the last part
of May 1966, and has been maintained at optimum stage or above ever
since.


ACTIVITIES
Supervision of the water management districts and the gathering of
water use and water needs data, the control of artesian wells and the
conduct of lake level studies were the principal areas of Division activ-
ity during the biennium.

Supervision of Water Management Districts
Granting of Water Resource Development Account funds to other
agencies required close supervision of this account by the Division of
Water Resources.
The two principal water management beneficiaries were the Cen-
tral and Southern Florida Flood Control District and Southwest Florida
Water Management District. However, the Canal Authority also used
funds from this account for the Cross Florida Barge Canal.

State Soil Conservation Board
Activities of the State Soil Conservation Board are under the super-
vision of the Board of Conservation. The Division of Water Resources
has been delegated this responsibility and throughout the biennium met
regularly with the board of directors.
Through the efforts of the Board of Conservation, funds were pro-
vided during the biennium for a second small watershed planning party.







However, these funds were not sufficient to permit the hiring of a
full party. An increase in funds is being requested for the next biennium.

Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District
The State's share of the costs for construction and land was pro-
vided through the Water Resources Development Account. A total of
$11,322,636 was released for the District, with a large amount of the to-
tal used for land acquisition.
Federal funds received by the District totaled $24,650,000 for the
two fiscal years. The federal and state funds were used in the construc-
tion of levees, canals, spillways and dams, pumping stations and other
flood control works. Large areas of the upper St. Johns Reservoir lands
were purchased, making it possible to start construction on this phase
of the project.
Works were completed in the major regions of the Caloosahatchee
River and the Kissimmee River and on the larger lakes of the upper
Kissimmee Basin.
The first construction contract for the upper St. Johns Canal C-54
was let during this period.

Southwest Florida Water Management District
During the 1965-66 biennium, the Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District program moved from the planning stage to the con-
struction stage.
The inflatable water control dam on the Withlacoochee River at
Carlson's Landing between Citrus and Sumter counties was completed.
This dam has made possible the maintaining of higher water levels
at Lake Panasoffkee during periods of low rainfall and provides diver-
sion of the Withlacoochee River into the Tsala Apopka chain of lakes.
Construction was started on two works of the Four Rivers Basin
Project: the Tampa Bypass Canal and the Lake Tarpon Outfall Canal.
In addition to canal sections, contracts were let for several bridges over
the two canals.
In 1965 ground water was below normal in all parts of the state
except in the vicinity of Tallahassee and Ocala. In 1966 all ground-
water levels rose to above normal except for western Florida, which has
had levels below normal for the past two years. Ground-water levels in
the northern part of Florida showed a general decline, whereas the levels
in the southern part of the state showed a rise for the year.
Ground-water levels in the Jacksonville and Panama City industrial
areas at the end of the 1966 water year were slightly above the year-end
levels of 1965. At Pensacola, year-end levels were 2.7 feet below 1965
levels, while at Tampa the 1966 levels were 4.6 feet lower. However, at


































I NORTHWEST FLORIDA
2 SUWANNEE-ST. MARYS
3 ST. JOHNS
4 SOUTHWEST FLORIDA
5 OKEECHOBEE-EVERGLADES


FIGURE 2-The areas shown are the five river basins into which the state has been
divided for river basin studies.






the end of both 1965 and 1966 all levels were below the long-term av-
erage except at Panama City.
The federal appropriation for the Four Rivers Basin Project was
$840,000 for the 1965 fiscal year and $1,000,000 for the 1966 fiscal year.
The 1965 Legislature provided $5,435,500 in the Water Resources
Development Account for the Southwest Florida Water Management Dis-
trict to be used for construction and land acquisition. With this money,
the District was able to purchase lands in the Hillsborough River Res-
ervoir, as well as reservoir lands in the Green Swamp area.

River Basin Studies
River basin studies were started in 1964 with the undertaking of
the Florida West Coast Tributaries Study. The study area included all
or part of eighteen counties in southwest Florida.
It was the first of five studies that will be made by the Division.
As a basis for the studies, the State has been divided into five basin
groups; northwest Florida, Suwannee-St. Mary's, St. Johns, Southwest
Florida, and Okeechobee-Everglades area as shown in Figure 2.
These river basin investigations are being made in cooperation with
the Soil Conservation Service of the U. S. Department of Agriculture
and other cooperating agencies. The report of the Southwest Florida
study was printed and released during 1966.
The second of the river basin studies, the St. Johns River Basin,
was started during this biennium. Data for this study are now being
collected by the many cooperating agencies. It is expected that the
study will be completed, and the report available shortly after July 1968.
The purpose of these five studies is to provide information as to
the water needs and water availability by the various segments of the
economy so that water management plans can be prepared for each of
the five study areas and a master plan developed for the entire state.
In this way future shortages of water and land resources can be pre-
vented or alleviated to a great extent by proper planning.
One phase of the data being collected is a study by the Corps of
Engineers that was arranged by the Division through the cooperation
of the several counties in the St. Johns basin. This study, a flood plain
identification study, will point out the areas of flood hazards within the
basin.
Special Studies
During this biennium a "Gazetteer of Florida Streams," which pro-
vides valuable data on the streams of Florida, was completed and pub-
lished. A similar study on the lakes of Florida was started and will be
completed in the next biennium.
A special study on lakeshore identification was undertaken by the
Division. This study seeks to identify the average high water level of






the lakes of Florida by geologic and botanical evidence collected in the
field. The study was conducted by collecting data on representative
lakes throughout the state.
A report of the study will be published early in 1967.

Suwannee Experimental Dam
The Suwannee River Experimental Dam at Suwannee Springs which
was constructed in 1962 and damaged by a flood in 1963, has not been
repaired. Plans are in progress by the Suwannee River Authority for
the rebuilding of the dam into a permanent structure. An interim re-
port of the Suwannee Experimental Dam Study was published during
this biennium.
Artesian Well Control
The Florida Legislature, recognizing the need for stopping the waste
of water from uncontrolled artesian wells, enacted Section 373.31 of the
Florida Statutes. This requires that all flowing artesian wells shall be
capped or valved and the flow shall be limited to that necessary for
ordinary use.
Since capping or installation of valves does not always stop the flow
of water or under some conditions may cause damage to the fresh-water
supply by forcing highly mineralized artesian water to flow into overly-
ing fresh-water reservoir, the Legislature in 1965 amended this section
of the Florida Statutes to allow for plugging of the wells when it is
deemed necessary by the Division of Water Resources.
Most of the problem wells reported in the state have been in the
lower peninsula, particularly the coastal areas.
Along the Gulf Coast from Manatee County to Collier County, the
problems are especially acute due to expanding residential development
in an area of historically poor and inadequate fresh-water resources.
Considerable interest has developed in the plugging of wells in these
coastal counties.
Another area where artesian well control is a considerable problem
is the East Coast from Daytona Beach to Vero Beach.
The Division has continued during this biennium to provide assis-
tance to developers, counties and individuals in the identification of the
problem and in the capping or plugging of the wells.
Each well presents a special case and individual specifications are
often necessary. Frequently an electric log must be run to locate the
water-bearing zones and to evaluate the condition of the well casing.
Through the cooperation of the Division of Geology, electric well logs
have been run at no expense to the well owner in many cases. Plug-
ging is accomplished through the use of neat cement, either as a con-
tinuous plug or alternately with clay plugs.






FUTURE NEEDS
One of the more acute problems of the water resource program
was started on the way to solution when the Legislature provided funds
for the acquisition of water storage lands necessary for the development
of the upper St. Johns Basin in the Central and Southern Florida Flood
Control District and the reservoir areas of the Southwest Florida Water
Management District.
If the water resource program is to move ahead on a proper time
schedule, funds will be needed from the 1967 Legislature for the pur-
chase of additional storage lands in both of these federal-state coopera-
tive projects. The longer the delay in the purchase of these lands, the
higher the cost as land prices normally rise with increased demand.
The collection of data through the river basin investigation pro-
gram, in cooperation with the federal and other agencies, should be
pushed forward. The collection of these data in all areas of the state
is needed before a master water management plan can be developed.
Recent federal legislation (Public Law 89-80) provides for increased
federal cooperation with states in the inventorying and planning of land
and water resource needs. Matching funds will be required from the
1967 Legislature if this vital program is to move ahead.
Salt-water intrusion has continued to be a problem in the coastal
counties of the state. Studies should be continued leading to the estab-
lishment of a statewide salt-water intrusion line. As a further protection
to our ground-water resources, a well drilling code that would establish
well-drilling standards should be enacted. The present artesian well con-
trol program is greatly under-manned and should be expanded to pro-
vide assistance to all sections of the state.
Florida faces flood-plain type problems even though there are very
few large river valleys. Man's encroachment on the river bottoms, on
flat marsh lands, and around many lakes, has created flooding problems.
Studies of flood-prone areas should be expanded. One area, the St. Johns
Basin, will be studied by the U. S. Corps of Engineers beginning in the
next biennium. 4jc-ql e (_? C T(i\ e ec/ L /Icl C3-
The Water Resource Research Center at the University of Florida,
which was established through the Water Resource Research Act of 1964,
should be enc urged to devote more research to projects of water use
and conservation. The work at the center should be brought in closer
coordination vith various state agencies, and these agencies should be
encouraged t participate in research and to conduct field studies.
Water quality will continue to become a more difficult problem as
the state develops through urban and industrial expansion. The use of
Florida's water resources for recreation, municipal water supply, industry,
agriculture, and for fish and game, is vitally affected by the quality of
the water. It has become increasingly apparent that sound, enforceable
controls over both water quality and use must be developed.
27









FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Division of Water Resources and Conservation
Water Resources Development Account
Statement of Actual Expenditures


Department

Contribution to Flood Control Account ....................

Total Expenditures


For the Fiscal Year, 1964-65
Other
Personal
Salaries Services

None None

None None


For the Fiscal Year, 1965-66
Other Operating
Personal Capital
Department Salaries Services Expenditures Outlay Total

Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District
Land None None $1,795,945.85 None $1,795,945.85
Construction None None 3,839,688.00 None 3,839,688.00
Southwest Florida Water Management District
Land None None 63,247.25 None 63,247.25
Construction None None 271,033.63 None 271,033.63
Contribution for Waterways Development
Lump Sum None None None None None
Soil Conservation Board None None 66,191.77 None 66,191.77

Total Expenditures None None $6,036,106.50 None $6,036,106.50


Expenditures

$5,996,750.96

$5,996,750.96


Operating
Capital
Outlay

None

None


Total

$5,996,750.96

$5.996.750.96









FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Division of Water Resources and Conservation
Statement of Actual Expenditures


For the Fiscal Year, 1964-65
Other
Personal


Operating
Capital


Department Salaries Services Expenses Outlay Total

General Administration $ 70,583.05 $ 900.00 $ 12,907.54 $ 2,398.92 $ 86,789.51
Ground Water Conservation 325.89 325.89
Administration of Water Conservation Districts ...... 157.03 157.03
Long-Range Water Resources Availability Studies .... 840.73 3,892.71 4,733.44
Complaints and Emergencies 2.25 2.25
Florida Water News 1,008.97 1,008.97
Public Information and Education 2,049.82 225.50 2,275.32
Supervision of Flood Control Districts 67.60 67.60
River Basin Inventory 701.53 701.53

Total Expenditures $ 70,583.05 $ 900.00 $ 18,061.36 $ 6,517.13 $ 96,061.54

For the Fiscal Year, 1965-66
Other Operating
Personal Capital
Department Salaries Services Expenses Outlay Total

General Administration $ 77,704.76 $ 900.00 $ 13,455.62 $ 4,853.08 $ 96,913.46
Coordination of Water Districts 63.54 259.15 322.69
Water Resources Studies 757.87 286.20 1,044.07
Artesian Well Control 25.47 25.47

Total Expenditures $ 77,704.76 $ 900.00 $ 14,302.50 $ 5,398.43 $ 98,305.69






DIVISION OF GEOLOGY
FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
TALLAHASSEE



RESPONSIBILITIES
The duties, responsibilities, and organization of the Division of Ge-
ology are set forth in Sections 373.011, 373.012, 370.02 (8) and 377.07,
Florida Statutes. The Division is required to:
1. Conduct surveys and explorations of minerals, water supplies, and
other natural resources of the State.
2. Collect, maintain, and display specimens illustrating the geolog-
ical and mineral resources of the State.
3. Prepare and publish reports of surveys and special papers.
4. Administer the laws regulating the search for oil and gas, and
controlling the production.
The Division of Geology has acquired large collections of vertebrate
and invertebrate fossil remains, and rock and mineral collections which
are displayed, in part, at the Geology Department of Florida State Uni-
versity. Although charged with this responsibility, space considerations
prohibit the complete display of this material at the division office
building.
The preparation and production of geologic reports and special pa-
pers are performed within the division.
Of great importance is the Division's responsibility to disseminate in-
formation other than through formal Survey publications. This is in a
myriad of forms, such as preparation and distribution of Florida rock
and mineral sets for school children; the identification of rocks, minerals,
and fossils; speeches to groups; counseling of any citizen with respect to
geologic and hydrologic questions; and general evaluations to the citizen
of his possible mineral resources and the expected remuneration to him
by industry.
A recently developed responsibility is in land reclamation. Since
there is no statutory requirement for reclaiming of mined lands, the
division has endeavored to encourage land reclamation both by individ-
ual contact with Florida's mining industries and on a national level
through participation in the creation of an Interstate Mining Compact
Commission.






DIVISION OF GEOLOGY
FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
TALLAHASSEE


1965-66


Robert O. Vernon
Division Director







ACTIVITIES
The Division of Geology was created by the 1907 State Legislature
as the Florida Geological Survey. It became a division of the Board of
Conservation under the reorganization bill enacted by the 1961 Legislature.
The division is the only state organization with responsibility of in-
vestigating and reporting on the State's geology and mineral resources
(including water). It has regulatory and law enforcement responsibil-
ities in the administration of the Oil and Gas Regulatory Act through
the Florida Board of Conservation.
Florida's mineral resources contributed only seven million dollars to
the State's economy in 1907, the division's first year. But, in 1966, the
mineral output evaluation exceeded 300 million dollars, which includes
an estimated 21-25 percent unreported. The growth of the mineral in-
dustry is directly related to the knowledge obtained from generalized and
detailed investigations of the geology of Florida. The Division of Geol-
ogy and the U. S. Geological Survey are the largest organizations actively
and continuously conducting investigations on Florida's geology, water
and mineral resources.
Educationally the division functions as the principal agency that dis-
seminates geological information through correspondence, conferences,
talks, personal contacts and publications. Because the division office is
the logical depository for geological information the staff services hun-
dreds of inquiries each year.
In 1965-66, personnel of the division had 22 projects pertaining to
general geology and mineral resources and the division has cooperated
with the Water Resources Division of the U. S. Geological Survey on 45
published projects pertaining to the water resources.
This work has been published by the division in 43 Reports of In-
vestigation or Bulletins and 10 miscellaneous publications. The division
has served as consultant to municipal, county, and other state organiza-
tions, enabling a greater utilization of the geological and hydrological
resources of Florida. Continuing and completed investigations have yielded
34 published and about 20 unpublished open-file reports which have con-
tributed to the economic development of Florida.
The division maintains a library of rock cuttings and cores from
wells drilled in the State. These samples are utilized, not only by the
division, but also by the many industry geologists who seek information
on the State's mineral resources.
The division has maintained an active liaison with the water-well
drillers in Florida through individual contacts and through participation
in the well-driller's association activities. This contact serves as a profes-
sional and educational aid to the well drillers on Florida geology and
hydrology. It also facilitates the collection of geologic and hydrologic
data that otherwise would not be available to the Division.
32








Continued Activities
Long-range plans for the next two years indicate the Division should
undertake 47 water resources, 6 economic geology, 4 geophysical, and 22
basic geological studies, if it is to meet its responsibilities. These are
planned to encompass 48 counties and to be published as 15 maps, 24
Information Circulars, 24 Reports of Investigations, 8 Bulletins and 8
Miscellaneous Reports.
Land Reclamation
The land mined for limestone, sand and gravel, phosphate and clay
can be utilized as sumps for the drainage of low areas, as water manage-
ment and storage lands and for recreation. Because most of the material
mined is utilized or sold the resulting pits rarely can be reclaimed to the
original contour, but planning in urban areas has developed high valued
real estate for home sites.
The phosphate industry has made a determined effort to restore its
mined lands to use in recent years. The following photographs and table
1 show the result of this planned effort. Much of this land has been
incorporated in urban development, recreation sites, golf courses, citrus,
forest and other agricultural lands and some has been donated for water
storage and management, wildlife and fish management.
Table 1
Land Mined and Reclaimed'
(acres)
1964 1961 thru 1964 Projection Acres Donated
1965 thru 1969 1965
Company Mined Reclaimed Mined Reclaimed Mined Reclaimed 1964 thru 1969
A 251 131 950 301 1,670 1,215 -
B 555 491 1,900 1,614 3,500 3,800 5 -
C 336 175 874 474 1,500 1,000 -
D 177 0 633 174 950 790 -
E 487 493 1,858 2,351 2,635 2,635 4 1,300
F 165 115 605 520 875 400 -
G 494 472 1,802 1,186 3,000 3,100 5 200
H 314 215 1,266 935 2,000 1,000 94 350
TOTALS 2,779 2,092 9,888 7,555 16,130 13,940 108 1,850
% Reclaimed 75% 76% 86%
1 From Florida Phosphate Council, March 16, 1965
Well Files
During the last biennium the filing system of the well and sample
localities has been changed. At the same time, we have retained the old
system of assigning an accession number to each well as received. For
ease in finding a well of which only an accession number is known there
is a cross-index file in numerical order.
The well numbering system is based on the land description of the
locality or well, and uses the rectangular system of section, township and
range for identification. The number consists of five parts. These are:
1) a prefix of three letters designating L for locality or W for well, and
a series of county abbreviations, 2) the township, 3) the range, 4) the section,
and 5) the quarter/quarter location within the section.





































2. This photo shows typical post-mining landscape before reclamation.


3. Same area as shown in #2, but after reclamation.







The basic rectangle is the township which is 6 miles square. It is
consecutively measured by tiers both north and south of the Florida base
line-an east-west line that passes through Tallahassee. This basic rectan-
gle is also consecutively measured both east and west of the principal
meridian-a north-south line that passes through Tallahassee. Each town-
ship is divided equally into 36 square miles called sections, and are num-
bered 1 through 36.
The sections are divided into quarters with the quarters labeled "a"
through "d" from left to right and top to bottom. In turn, each of these
quarters is divided into quarters with these quarter/quarter squares la-
beled "a" through "d" in the same manner. The "a" through "d" des-
ignation of quarters may be carried to any extent.
The location of the well W Ln-2N-2E-21 db would be in Leon County,
township 2 North, Range 2 East, Section 21, in the center of the south-
east quarter of the northeast quarter of the section.
When there is more than one well or locality in a square 40-acre
tract (quarter/quarter section) each is identified by an accession number.

Well Sample Library
Number of wells in our files as of January 1, 1967 8,011
July 1, 1965 through June 30, 1966:
Oil Well Samples 5,964
Core Boxes 233
Water Well Samples 16,553
Total Samples Processed: 22,750
Total Wells (W-7195 to W-7797) Processed: 602
July 1, 1966 through December 31, 1966:
Oil Well Samples 1,843
Core Boxes 110
Water Well Samples 4,886
Total Samples Processed: 6,839
Total Wells (W-7797 to W-8012) Processed: 214
Estimate: January 1, 1967 through June 30, 1967:
Samples 10,000

Total Reported Footage Drilled
July 1, 1965 through June 30, 1966
Total depths of all wells in feet 366,658
Total depths of all oil wells 203,286
Total depths of all water and test wells 163,372
July 1, 1966 through December 31, 1966
Total depths of all wells in feet 87,287
Total depths of all oil wells 37,645
Total depths of all water and test wells 49,642







Library
Volumes Added 148
Volumes Bound 1,245
Library Users 4,324
Inventoried Holdings
Book Collection 1,948
Bound Periodicals 4,716
Miscellaneous Pamphlets:
Subject, State and Foreign Files 4,791
Maps 9,525
Total 20,960

The period of record, 1965-66, has been one of reorganization and
growth for the Library of the Division of Geology. The library has
moved toward a scientific and research library of recognized excellence.
Though there is much to be done, a large number of projects either
have been completed or begun.
During this two year period, the first complete inventory was fin-
ished; accurate records were set up on all library holdings; the subject
file of current and historic miscellaneous reports was expanded and re-
organized; the reference collection was re-inventoried, estimated as to
value, and recorded on IBM cards; a tremendous amount of periodicals,
U. S. and State publications were bound, making them much more per-
manent and accessible; the bibliography of Florida geology was brought
up to date; a great deal of publication indexing was done; many new
publications were added to the collection; routine library procedures
were carried out; and assistance was given to an increased number of
users.
Much work remains to be done on the card catalog; State and foreign
publications will need binding as required; the reference collection will
be enlarged; and something is going to have to be done very shortly
toward acquiring more shelving space. At present there is almost no
expansion room. The Library should be enlarged each year, if it is to
provide the background for research and publication.

Oil Exploration, 1965-66
SUNOCO-FELDA OIL FIELD
The Sunoco-Felda oil field, the newer of Florida's two currently pro-
ducing fields, which was discovered by the Sun Oil Company on October
9, 1964, is located in Hendry and Collier counties of South Florida. On
December 31, 1966 this field contained 26 producing wells, drilled on
160-acre spacing.
Field drilling 1965 and 1966 resulted in 23 producing wells (table
2, part B); also during this biennium drilling was completed on six (table






Table 2. Development wells drilled in 1965 and 1966-Total Development Footage 279,183


Company


Well No. Landowner


Depth in feet


A) Sunniland field (operated by Humble Oil and Refining Co.)


Humble


Total, Sunniland field

B) Sunoco-Felda field (operated


24 Gulf Coast Realties


14,500


14,500


by Sun Oil Co.)


Sun 4-2 The Collier Co.


Sun 24-1
Sun 24-4
Sun 19-4
Sun 29-2
Sun 29-3
Sun 29-4
Sun 30-4
Sun 32-2a
Sun 32-4
Sun 1
Sun 1
Sun 20-4
Sun 21-3
Sun 28-1
Sun 28-2
Sun 28-3
Sun 28-4
Sun 29-1
Sun 33-1
Sun 33-2
Sun 33-3
Sun 33-4
Total, Sunoco-Felda field
Total Development Footage, 1965 and 1966


Lee-Tidewater
Lee-Tidewater
Red Cattle Co.
Red Cattle Co.
Red Cattle Co.
Red Cattle Co.
Red Cattle Co.
Red Cattle Co.
Red Cattle Co.
Red Cattle Co. "A"
Red Cattle Co. "B"
Sunoco-Felda
Sunoco-Felda
Sunoco-Felda
Sunoco-Felda
Sunoco-Felda
Sunoco-Felda
Sunoco-Felda
Sunoco-Felda
Sunoco-Felda
Sunoco-Felda
Sunoco-Felda


11,488
11,551
11,545
11,549
11,478
11,489
11,461
11,484
11,493
11,471
11,491
11,675
11,525
11,550
11,470
11,477
11,612
11,469
11,474
11,474
11,480
11,487
11,490


Collier


264,683
279,183


County


464 BOPD thru perforations at
11,583-11,590 (Sunniland
Limestone)



336 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)
53 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)
28 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)
66 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)
164 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)
302 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)
333 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)
112 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone) oo
115 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)
306 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)
54 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)
56 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)
5 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)
90 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)
53 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)
318 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)
267 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)
152 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)
210 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)
306 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)
336 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)
355 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)
33 BOPD (Sunniland Limestone)


Results


Collier
Hendry
Hendry
Hendry
Hendry
Hendry
Hendry
Hendry
Hendry
Hendry
Hendry
Hendry
Hendry
Hendry
Hendry
Hendry
Hendry
Hendry
Hendry
Hendry
Hendry
Hendry
Hendry




























































A producing oil well in the Florida Sunnyland field.


38






3, part C) of the nine dry-holes which define the limits of the field to
the north, south, and east. Field limits northwest of the main part of
the field have not been established, though wells located here have yielded
only marginal production. At the present time, also, there is insufficient
control to determine definitely if the recently completed No. 1 Red Cat-
tle Company "B" producing well, a 31/2-mile step-out from nearest pro-
duction, is a northwest extension of the original field, or a new field
discovery.
The Sunoco-Felda field produces on pump from the microfossilifer-
ous limestone of the Roberts zone, which is reached at a depth of about
11,460 feet, and which occurs about 60 feet below the top of the Sunni-
land Limestone of Lower Cretaceous-Trinity Age. It appears that a per-
meability trap is responsible for the oil accumulation in the field. The
producing interval, in upgradient wells to the north, is tight and pro-
duces a large percentage of salt water.
The yield of the better wells in the field ranges from 320 to 370
BOPD. During the month of November 1966, production was 76,696
barrels of oil, with an estimated 88,874 barrels of salt water. Cumula-
tive production from the field since its discovery through November 31,
1966, is 1,619,817 barrels of oil, the gravity of which is about 24.5 de-
grees API.

SUNNILAND OIL FIELD
The Sunniland Oil Field, discovered in 1943, and operated by the
Humble Oil and Refining Company, is located in Collier County about
18 miles south of the Sunoco-Felda field. During the month of Novem-
ber, 1966, this field produced 55,624 barrels of oil from 15 wells. Cum-
ulative production from the field through November 31, 1966, is 9,871,696
barrels of oil with a gravity of 19 to 26 degrees API. At this time it is
thought that 35 million barrels of oil probably is a reasonable figure for
the initially recoverable reserves of the field.
Production in the Sunniland field is obtained from calcareous rock
containing disoriented macrofossils (rudistids), which is reached at a depth
of about 11,500 feet. Productive zones begin at the top of the Sunniland
Limestone and extend to a depth about 75 feet lower in the section. The
lowermost of these zones is correlative with the productive Roberts zone
of the Sunoco-Felda field.
A pumping test conducted December 7, 1965, on the Humble, No.
24 Gulf Coast Realties Corporation producer, which was the last well
completed in the field, recovered 464 BOPD with 8 percent Bottom
Sediment and Water from perforations at 11,583-11,590 feet in the Sun-
niland Limestone. Oil shows were not found in the deeper zones in this
structurally-high well, which bottomed at 14,500 feet.
39






Table 3. Exploratory wells drilled in 1965 and 1966-Total Exploratory Footage 200,299
Company Well No. Landowner Depth in feet


County


A) Rank exploratory wells
Mobil
Mobil
Mobil
Michaels
Thayer-Davis
Gulf American
Gulf American
Sun
Sun
Southern Triangle
Sun
Sun
Texaco


1 Camp Phosphate
1 Garby
I Harbond
1 Ripley
1 Ripley
1 East Gate
1 Golden Gate
1 Alico
12-2 Alico "B"
2 Lawless, et al
1 Alico "A"
1 Harriss-Holmes
I Miller Mill Co.


Total footage, rank exploratory wells (all P & A)
B) Dry outpost wells to the (abandoned) Forty mile bend field
Serio 1 St. of Florida


Total footage, dry Forty mile bend outpost
C) Dry outpost wells to the Sunoco-Felda field
Sun 3-2 The Collier Co.
Sun 4-3 The Collier Co.
Sun 5-1 The Collier Co.
Sun 15-3 Consolidated Financial
Corp.
Sun 32-3 Red Cattle Co.
Sun 27-3 Sunoco-Felda
Total footage, dry outpost wells to the Sunoco-Felda field
Total Exploratory footage, 1965 and 1966


Citrus
Citrus
Citrus
Columbia
Columbia
Collier
Collier
Collier
Collier
Hendry
Hendry
Okeechobee
Santa Rosa


4,490
5,556
4,794
3,078
5,050
13,345
12,167
11,700
11,630
11,348
11,575
9,840
14,472




11,615


11,615


11,675
11,630
11,491

11,649
11,619
11,575


P & A Up. Cret. test
P & A Up. Cret. test
P & A Up. Cret. test
P & A Up. Cret. test
P & A Up. Cret &8 Paleozoics test
P & A Sunniland and "CD" test
P & A Sunniland test
P & A Sunniland test
P & A Sunniland test
P & A Sunniland test
P & A Sunniland test
P & A
P & A




P & A Sunniland test, drilled
3700' north of discovery well for
abandoned Forty Mile Bend field


P&cA
P&A
P&A

P&cA
P&A
P &A


69,639
200,299


Results


119,045


Dade


Collier
Collier
Collier
Hendry

Hendry
Hendry







Exploration
EXPLORATORY DRILLING
Table 3 shows that 20 holes were plugged and abandoned as dry
holes in 1965-66. The exploratory drilling footage totaled 200,299 feet,
drilled under the following exploratory classifications:
Wildcat exploratory wells (13) 119,045 feet
Step-out well to the abandoned Forty Mile Bend field 11,615 feet
Six unsuccessful Sunoco-Felda field outpost wells...... 69,639 feet
Total 200,299 feet

Three additional tests are not included in the totals of Table 3 be-
cause the wells have not reached total depth. The information on these
tests, as of December 31, 1966, is as follows: 1) the Mobil, No. 1 Bab-
cock Ranch "A" well, which is located in Charlotte County of South
Florida, and which has a proposed depth of 12,500 feet, was drilling at
3,308 feet. This prospect is located on an 89,000-acre block farmed out
by Mobil from Gulf, which holds the primary lease, 2) the Jett-Phillips,
No. 1 Buckeye Cellulose, et al well, located in Lafayette County of north-
ern Florida, was waiting on orders at 6,774 feet, 3) the Thayer-Davis, No.
1 Hill well, staked in Hernando County of the central part of the State,
commenced spudding operations with a small rig on December 27, 1966.
At the end of the year the operator was awaiting the arrival of a big
rig to continue drilling this well to its proposed total depth of 5,500 feet.

GEOPHYSICAL ACTIVITY
The interest in offshore geophysical activity in Florida which began
in 1964 continued throughout 1965 and 1966. During the biennium, 22
permits were issued to six major companies and two independents for
geophysical work in State and Federal waters, offshore from the west
coast of Florida. The work performed in these areas consisted of ap-
proximately 39 crew weeks of surveying with the reflection seismograph
(some conventional, some vibroseis and some LoFES), and more than
22 weeks of gravity meter surveying. Also in this year, 9 crew-weeks of
reflection seismographic work was performed offshore from the east coast
of Florida near St. Augustine.
Information available to the division on geophysical activity on the
Florida mainland pertains only to 1965. Crew weeks performed during
this year were:
Part of the State Geophysical activity
Northwestern 36 weeks of seismic
Central 8 weeks of seismic
Southern 78 weeks of seismic
24 weeks of photo-gravity
141/2 weeks of gravity







The Continental, Humble, Mobil, Phillips and Texaco companies
are known to have participated in the geophysical evaluation of the land.
LAND
On December 31, 1966, leases of State lands totalled 3,910,460 acres;
all located offshore from the west coast of Florida.
Current figures on the mainland acreage held under oil and gas lease
are not available to this office. In 1964 these figures totalled 2,288,548
acres.

PROPOSED EXPLORATORY ACTIVITY
Under the terms of an agreement concluded in December, 1964, be-
tween Coastal Caribbean Oils and Minerals, Ltd., and the Socony Mobil
Oil Company, Inc., the latter company may earn a 50 percent interest
in Coastal's Florida State lease 248, which covers the submerged lands of
Lake Okeechobee, and leases 224-A and 224-B, which consist of 3,910,460
acres of water bottoms extending along the west coast of Florida from
Apalachicola to somewhat south of Naples. Mobil will earn this interest
when, and if, it has spent $10 million on the properties, or has conducted
the exploration and drilling program prescribed through 1974, whichever
occurs first. The first well to be drilled under this agreement will be a
seismic prospect located about 51/ miles offshore from Charlotte Harbor
(Charlotte County). Drilling of this well was scheduled to commence be-
fore March 27, 1966, but was postponed because of a delay in the issu-
ance of a State permit. On December 13, 1966, however, this permit was
granted. Mobil now has until March 27, 1967, to comply with the well
commitment, required under the terms of the original lease, as amended
by two six-month extensions of the date for commencing the well.

RULES AND REGULATIONS
State Board of Conservation Order No. 3 granted the Humble Oil
and Refining Company permission, effective January 11, 1966, to dispose
of the salt water produced in the Sunniland field by injection into per-
meable rock of the subsurface which occurs between 2,830 and 3,300 feet,
and which contains very saline formation waters (16,000 ppm chloride
ions). Such injection will not be harmful to potable water or to surface
areas.
On May 15, 1966, State Board of Conservation Order No. 4 granted
the Sun Oil Company permission to inject salt water into the Roberts
Pool of the Sunoco-Felda field to conserve reservoir energy. The entire
salt water production of the field, which is about 54 percent of the total
fluid produced, and which amounts to approximately 2,950 barrels per
day, is being returned to the reservoir through perforations from 11,499-
11,509 feet in a downgradient dry hole.
On June 21, 1966, State Board of Conservation Order No. 5 estab-
lished 160 acres as the spacing unit for the Roberts Pool of the Sunoco-
Felda field.














Table 4. Mineral production in Florida1
1965 19662
Mineral
Quantity Value Quantity Value
(thousands) (thousands)
Clays thousand short tons 651 $ 9,752 766 $ 10,345
Lime do 101 1,558 W W
Natural gas million cubic feet 107 14 105 14
Peat short tons 19,253 109 17,000 109
Petroleum (crude) thousand 42-gallon barrels rl,464 W 1,780 W
Phosphate rock thousand long tons 19,253 141,258 W W
Sand and gravel thousand short tons 7,298 6,377 7,651 6,683
Stone do 35,730 41,148 35,261 41,372
Value of items that cannot be disclosed:
Cement, magnesium compounds, natural gas liquids, rare-earth
metal concentrates (1965), staurolite, titanium concentrates,
zirconium concentrates, and values indicated by symbol W .................... XX 49,104 XX 211,578
Total XX $249,320 XX $270,101


r
W
XX
(1)
(2)


Revised.
Withheld to avoid disclosing individual company confidential data; included with "Value of items that cannot be disclosed."
Not applicable.
Production as measured by mine shipments, sales, or marketable production (including consumption by producers). Reported to the U. S.
Bureau of Mines and the Division of Geology-State Board of Conservation.
Estimated from producers' reports and other sources.







On June 28, 1966, the State Board of Conservation adopted rules
and regulations controlling geological and/or geophysical operations on
submerged lands, other than inland waters of Florida. These rules and
regulations also are applicable to Federal lands seaward of Florida's
boundaries.
On November 15, 1966, a revision of the rules and regulations, largely
pertaining to spacing and plugging, governing the oil industry in Florida
was adopted. This revision is now available for public distribution.

Mineral Industry-1965-66
The mineral industry in Florida is exceeded in dollar value to the
State only by agriculture and tourism. (see Table 4). The mineral econ-
omist, farmer and tradesman are agreed that a better balance between
the varied facets of the State's economy would benefit each. In achiev-
ing this balance, the role of mineral industries far exceed the value of
the product at the mine, and the future of agriculture and the tourist
trade depend in part on the welfare of the mineral industry. Fertilizers,
dusting powders, peat, phosphate rock, limestone, and dolomite sustain
agriculture; and limestone, dolomites and some sandy clays are used in
large quantities as road base courses and as road-metal to construct the
excellent roads throughout the State.
The total value of mineral production in Florida for 1965 and 1966
increased over the 1964 production, 8 percent each year, or $19 million
in 1965 and $21 million in 1966, according to reports submitted to the
U. S. Bureau of Mines and the Division of Geology. Gains in value were
reported for clay, phosphate rock, sand, gravel, and crude petroleum for
both years. Gains in magnesium compounds, stone, natural gas, ilmenite
and zircon were noted in 1965 and for staurolite in 1966.
Decreases in value were recorded in masonry and portland cement,
lime, and rare earth concentrates during both 1965 and 1966 and in
crushed oyster shells, staurolite and rutile in 1965 and in titanium con-
centrates, zirconium concentrates, peat, stone and natural gas in 1966.
The State continued to lead the nation in phosphate rock and fuller's
earth production and was the only producer of staurolite.
The estimated marketable production of raw phosphate rock increased
1.2 million tons over the 1964 production and was valued at $6.6 million
at the mine. An all time high production of 18.3 million tons valued at
$131 dollars was set for 1965 and this high was exceeded in 1966, but the
figures are concealed because of new production schedules. Florida con-
tinues to lead the Southeastern States in crushed limestone production,
the output increasing about 6 percent and the value about 4 percent over
1964. The total output and value of clay were considerably higher in
1965-66 than 1964. One new lime kiln was placed in operation by the
Dixie Lime and Stone Company.
The heavy minerals production has declined due to curtailed min-
ing, but a new and cheaper chlorinization processing method for produc-







ing titanium and the development of the Reichert Cone Concentrator,
a more efficient method of mining, and need for titanium metal in the
space effort, will probably rejuvinate the industry.
The production of crude petroleum, natural gas liquids showed in-
creases in both years, but peat, which is used largely as a soil conditioner
or fertilizer filler, remained about the same as for 1964.

Cooperative Water Resources Investigations
The broad objective of the cooperative program with the Water
Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey is to determine and
evaluate the quantity and quality of Florida's water on the surface and
underground; whether under natural conditions or under conditions of
present or potential development and use. The program involves sys-
tematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data, continued research
to improve the understanding of physical laws, processes, and mechanics
of various phases of the hydrologic cycle; and publication of the findings.
Hydrologic studies made in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey
provide fundamental information needed for locating, planning, design-
ing and constructing water resource projects, highways, bridges, and other
structures at or near water bodies; and for water management and reg-
ulation.
The program of water resources investigations in Florida during the
1965-66 biennium was continued in cooperation with the Division of Ge-
ology, seven counties, municipalities, and water districts, and with other
State and Federal agencies. Financial support for the cooperative pro-
gram is shared equally by the various state and local agencies and the
Federal Government. During the biennium, cooperative areal water-re-
sources studies, as shown on the map, were in progress during all or part
of the period. In addition to these areal studies, several hydrologic in-
vestigations were conducted, of which the following will provide some of
the much needed information for an orderly development of the State's
water resources.
1. A study to analyze the low-flow characteristics of selected Florida
streams. The study will provide data needed for regulation and
development of water supply for pollution alleviation, for design
and operation of waste disposal systems, and for recreation plan-
ning.
2. A study to determine relations between the chemical quality of
Florida streams and environmental parameters. The study will
provide a reconnaissance of the quality of surface waters and pro-
vide a foundation for more specific studies.
3. A study on lake hydrology. Lakes are a prime hydrologic feature
in Florida and the study is to provide a fundamental understand-
ing of the fluctuations of lakes with differing environments.







4. The development of an analog model of the Biscayne aquifer in
southeastern Florida. The model will provide the means of eval-
uation of existing and planned developmental measures and thus
provide a method of alternate choice.
5. An inventory of use of water in Florida in 1965 was made as part
of the national inventory made every 5 years. A summary report
will be prepared for Florida.
As a part of the water-resources studies in Duval County and in the
City of Cocoa well-field area, two deep-test-salinity-monitoring wells were
installed. These wells are so constructed that several vertical zones within
the wells are isolated, permitting selective water sampling and water-level
measurements.
Special effort was devoted to devising methods of prognosticating
stream flow and water levels as a part of monthly current reporting.
Prognostication of the probable range will significantly assist those con-
cerned with regulation of water and planning for water related activities.
Delineation of the major drainage basins in Florida was completed as
the nucleus of a computer system of data storage, retrieval, and hydro-
logic analysis. An atlas map of the drainage basins was readied for pub-
lication.
Approximately 45 reports of several types and in many media were
approved for publication during the biennium. These included 17 book-
type reports, 16 maps, 17 articles for scientific, technical, and trade jour-
nals, and 5 leaflets. In addition to the above cited efforts, 7 reports and
short papers were approved for open-file release. Included in the open-
file category were such reports as administrative releases to other Federal
agencies, and short technical articles released to specific state agencies,
such as, bridge-site studies undertaken for the State Road Department.
During the biennium, 32 reports were published; of these, 10 were book-
type reports, 12 were maps, 5 were journal articles, and 5 were leaflets.
In addition to approved and published reports, a number of reports were
in preparation during the 1965-1966 period. Included in this category
were no less than 40 reports ranging from definitive book-type manu-
scripts to non-technical leaflets aimed at the lay audience.
Reports on the Green Swamp area, the Econfina Creek basin, Escam-
bia-Santa Rosa County area, and the coastal areas of West-Central Florida
discuss in detail the relation of precipitation, surface water, ground water,
and evapotranspiration. The report on the Duval-Nassau County area
presents a history of the development of ground-water supplies in the
Jacksonville area, discusses the current trends in aquifer development,
and presents some plans and objectives to insure future ground-water
supplies. The interaction of hydrology and the population explosion
are examined in detail in a report on the effects of the Area B flood
control project on urbanization of Dade County.







Other approved book-type reports were concerned more with water
resources of counties or smaller areas. A region on the Immokalee area
of Collier County, on the other hand, was concerned mainly with devel-
oping a relatively small municipal water supply from ground-water sources
in a predominately truck farming region. Of interest to geologists was
an exhaustive report on the surficial geology and stratigraphy of Escam-
bia and Santa Rosa counties. Salt water encroachment and its control is
an ever-present problem in Florida and was the subject of a report on
the Miami River and its tributaries in Dade County.
Many kinds of map reports were approved and produced during the
biennium. Map reports are generally of two discrete types-those that
portray an aspect of hydrology on a state-wide basis as a part of the
water atlas, and those that present a more detailed analysis of hydrology
in a small area such as an urban area, river basin, or a county. Among
the state-wide atlas maps were those delineating principal aquifers, dis-
solved solids in the principal aquifer, chloride concentration in the prin-
cipal aquifer, hardness of water in the principal aquifer, and runoff in
Florida. The localized map reports included portrayal of chloride in
ground water in Pinellas County, fluoride in ground water in northwest
Florida, availability of ground water in Orange County, availability of
surface water in Orange County, and the chemical character of the St.
Johns River near Cocoa, Florida.
The journal reports were concerned mainly with one aspect or a
technical detail of geology, hydrology, and biology and were slanted to-
ward the technical reader. Journal articles reported on such points of
interest as waste injection into limestone in northwest Florida, packer
testing of wells near Sarasota, relations of geohydrology and oceanography
in "boulder zone" in the Florida peninsula, biological zonation related
to ground water at Biscayne Bay, water management in southeast Florida,
and correlation of water-level fluctuations in wells.
Among the reports currently in preparation, three are of especial
interest to those concerned with the phosphate mining and processing
areas in the Peace and Alafia River basins. One, a book-type report, is
a detailed study of the occurrence of fluoride in the Peace and Alafia
River basins. The second is a study of the chemical character of arte-
sian water in the southern Peace basin. The third is an analysis of the
effects of ground-water withdrawal in the Peace and Alafia River basins.
Other reports in preparation deal with the hydrology of Orange County.
the availability of ground water in Marion County, the geology and aq-
uifers of Bay County, water-level fluctuations of Lake Jackson near Tal-
lahassee, and statistical summaries of Florida streams. Also, in prepara-
tion is a map presentation of the water resources of Escambia and Santa
Rosa counties which is a digest of the book-type report and which will
be useful to those concerned with planning and developing of water
supplies.







Special efforts continued during the biennium on preparing brochures,
leaflets, and maps on water resources for chambers of commerce, school
children, and other interested lay readers. Brochures are designed with
a maximum of diagrams and a minimum of text. Leaflets covering a
variety of topics were prepared including control of sea-water intrusion
in Broward County, the source of drinking water in Jacksonville, and
the control of salt intrusion in Dade County.
The hydrologic networks were continued in approximately the same
magnitude as the previous biennium. The networks consisted of about
300 stream discharge stations, including 230 continuous record sites, 300
lake, stream and estuary stage stations including about 80 partial record
flood stage stations, 265 water quality stations of various categories on
streams, lakes, and canals, 800 observation wells including about 200 con-
tinuous record wells and 200 salinity monitoring wells.
A discharge and water quality monitoring station was installed on
the Caloosahatchee River at Olga. This station will provide information
near the planned point of diversion of water for the Lee County area.
Also, a recording salinity gage was established on the St. Johns River at
Jacksonville. Quality of water stations were established at Century on
the Escambia River and at DeLand on the St. Johns as part of the In-
ternational Hydrologic Decade program. A digital telemetering station
was operated on the Hillsborough River at Zephyr Hills to provide flood
warning for the Tampa area. A radio-transmitting gage was installed at
station P-33 in the Everglades National Park to provide current records
of water level. These two remote transmitting gages complement the tel-
emetering station on the Miami Canal at Pennsuco which for about 25
years has provided flood warning and downstream control dam operation
information.
Records of surface-water quality were obtained continuously or pe-
riodically at about 265 stations in Florida. Of these, about 150 are on
streams, 50 on canals, and 65 on lakes. Quality of water stations are
being maintained on some but not all of the interstate streams. Present
stations on interstate streams are the Escambia, Apalachicola, Ochlock-
onee, St. Marys, Yellow, Withlacooche, and Choctawhatchee rivers.
The daily sampling or continuous recording stations constitute the
primary or base monitoring stations. At present about 65 such stations
are being maintained, including about 10 recording conductivity stations.
However, the five base monitoring stations at which daily samples are being
obtained for complete analyses are inadequate and should be expanded
to include stations on all significant streams and some lakes where pollu-
tion is occurring or is anticipated to occur. Installation of a number of
continuous digital recording gages for quality would facilitate automatic
processing of records by electronic computers.
Special pesticide analyses are being made for 24 locations in Florida
as a base survey to determine the potential problem of pesticide pollution.







Radioactivity resulting from atomic reactions such as fallout from atmo-
spheric nuclear explosions constitute a special pollutant and require spe-
cial analytical determinations. Presently radiochemical determinations are
being made on water samples collected monthly from the Apalachicola
River at Chattahoochee. Tritium analyses are made monthly on samples
collected from the Apalachicola and Kissimmee rivers and rainfall sam-
ples at Ocala.
A special mass sampling of waters at 460 surface-water gaging sites
in Florida was made in April, May, and June 1966 as a base or nucleus
of a needed program to annually assess the quality of surface waters of
Florida.
A punch card system for the storage and retrieval of well informa-
tion and quality of water data was put into operation and constitutes a
significant advance in operational procedures. Also, continuing progress
was made on the automatic processing of stream records.
A "Water Mapping, Monitoring, and Research Program" for Florida
was prepared and published as Special Publication 13 of the Florida Ge-
ological Survey. This program provides the broad framework into which
future investigations may be fitted. The report portrays the water prob-
lems in Florida and the need for an expanded and broadened program
of studies.
During 1965-66, the cooperative program failed to keep pace with
the increasing demand for water information and the complexity of water
problems being generated by Florida's increased population. Additional
matching funds are needed surely to support and expand the cooperative
studies. During the past 8 years, the funds appropriated by the legislature
have remained fixed. This has necessitated that an increasingly greater
share of funds be secured from counties, cities, and water districts to sup-
port the increased needs for water records and investigations. This has
resulted in an inadequate and undefinitive permanent program for meet-
ing the full needs of the State. The local funds are used in great part
to meet local needs and often lack continuity. This approach also has
not provided the means to adequately maintain the highly competent
professional staff required to tackle the emerging complex water problems
brought about by the increased demand for high quality water.
If a water resource study program, commensurate with the expected
increase in population in Florida, is to be developed, it will require an
increase in per capital cost of the program from the present 2 cents to
one of about 10 cents per capital.
The projected demand for cooperative water resources investigations
in Florida is such that in 1975 the total annual cost to each individual
will be less than the cost of a pint of milk, a cup of coffee, a can of
beer, or a package of cigarettes.




STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
DIVISION OF GEOLOGY


S10 20 30 40 50 mies


obt a?


AREAL WATER RESOURCES INVESTIGATION, 1965-1966














FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Division of Geology


Statement of Actual Revenues

GENERAL REVENUE
Sale of Publications and Mineral Samples ......................
Fees for Drilling and Plugging Wells
TOTAL GENERAL REVENUE
UNITED STATES COOPERATIVE TRUST FUND
Revenue from City and County Grants
Miscellaneous Revenue
TOTAL UNITED STATES COOPERATIVE TRUST FUND ....................
GRANTS AND DONATIONS TRUST FUND
Revenue from United States Grants
Revenue from Other Grants
Less: Refunds
TOTAL GRANTS AND DONATIONS TRUST FUND
GRAND TOTAL DIVISION OF GEOLOGY


Fiscal Year Fiscal Year
1964-1965 1965-1966
$ 4,094.58 $ 3,176.72
1,550.00 1,570.00
$ 5,644.58 $ 4,746.72

$ 160,481.75 $ 240,487.50
2,000.00 2,500.00
$ 162,481.75 $ 242,987.50

$ 16,946.00 $ 19,869.00
6,800.00
346.32
$ 23,399.68 $ 19,869.00
$ 191,526.01 $ 267,603.22














FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Division of Geology
Statement of Actual Expenditures


For the I


Department Salaries
General Administration $ 148,127.08
Preparation of Reports
Special Research
Economic Evaluation of Samples from Wells ..........
Special Work Assisting in Determining the
Cause of Troubles in Water Wells and
Improvement of Quality of Water ....................
Study of Geology as Recorded in Well Cuttiqg,
Preparation of Logs and Sections to help
Contractors, Engineers, Architects, and
Water Drillers
Other Activities
Insurance
Total Expenditures $ 148,i27.08


Fiscal Year, 1964-65
Other
Personal
Services

$ 11,845.61
500.00


Expenses
$ 18,242.32
18,011.85
8,045.71
2,077.53


Operating
capital
Outlay

$ 3,746.14
152.63
211.08


5,099.56


Total

$ 181,961.15
18,164.48 N
8,754.79 1
2,077.53


5,099.36


9,278.85 82.75 9,361.58
6,119.96 693.79 6,813.75
2,379.30 2,379.30
$ 12,345.61 $ 69,252.86 $ 4,886.39 $ 284,611.94













FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Division of Geology
Statement of Actual Expenditures


For the Fiscal Year, 1965-66
Other
Personal


Operating
Capital


Department Salaries Services Expenses Outlay Total

General Administration $ 163,039.23 $ 11,114.26 $ 24,066.08 $ 1,267.01 $ 199,486.58
Geological Studies 43,067.59 748.92 43,816.51
Special Research 6,123.84 17.75 6,141.59
Special Investigation 1,067.63 1,067.63
Archaeological Studies 1,923.48 1,923.48
Archaeological Salvage 594.31 468.00 1,062.31
Archaeological Program 104.40 104.40

Total Expenditures $ 163,039.23 $ 11,114.26 $ 76,842.93 $ 2,606.08 $ 253,602.50














FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Division of Geology
Grants and Donations Trust Fund
Statement of Actual Expenditures


Department


For the Fiscal Year, 1964-65
Other
Personal
Salaries Services


Expenses


Operating
Capital
Outlay


Total


General Administration $ 3,850.00 $ 7,360.02 $ 6,977.19 $ 183.07 $ 18,370.28

Total Expenditures $ 3,850.00 $ 7,360.02 $ 6,977.19 $ 183.07 $ 18,370.28


For the Fiscal Year, 1965-66
Other Operating
Personal Capital
Department Salaries Services Expenses Outlay Total
General Administration $ 4,960.00 $ 2,139.75 $ 11,112.70 $ 85.00 $- 18,297.45

Total Expenditures $ 4,960.00 $ 2,139.75 $ 11,112.70 $ 85.00 $ 18,297.45


i<











FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Division of Geology
U. S. Cooperative Trust Fund
Statement of Actual Expenditures


Department

Payments to U. S. Treasurer

T Total Expenditures
itn


Department


For the Fiscal Year, 1964-65
Other
Personal
Salaries Services


None


None


None


None


For the Fiscal Year, 1965-66
Other
Personal
Salaries Services


Payments to U. S. Treasurer None None $ 196,800.00 None $ 196,800.00

Total Expenditures None None $ 196,800.00 None $ 196,800.00


Expenses

$ 172,805.00

$ 172,805.00


Expenses


Operating
Capital
Outlay

None

None


Operating
Capital
Outlay


Total

172,805.00

172,805.00


Total







Objectives
When the funds are made available, it will be possible to have a
cooperative program of water resources to meet the following objectives.

I. Statewide Hydrologic Endeavors
Maintain highly competent staff of specialists for technical ad-
vice, program direction, staff studies on the hydrology of Flor-
ida, investigations of the effects of development on the quality
and quantity of waters, development and utilization of elec-
tronic computers in current reporting and in forecasting of
hydrologic conditions, and providing information to various
agencies and the public.

II. Water Resources Investigations
a. Descriptive investigations. Complete coverage-of the state in
about 10 years and provide for updating every 20 years or so
as appropriate. Essentially 30 counties remain to be covered
with basic reports. Local county and city funds when avail-
able will aid in establishing priority and increasing intensity
and scope of study.
b. Quantitative investigations. As the population increases, wa-
ter problems increase and the emphasis will gradually shift
from descriptive to quantitative studies. Local funds in the
amount of possibly 10 to 25 percent of total cost may be solic-
ited to aid in funding the studies.
c. Water management or continuing investigations. The grad-
ual shift to continuing evaluations in heavily populated areas will
be supported by about 25 percent of State funds to insure local
support and recognition of the importance of current assessment
of the quantity and quality of the water supply.

HI. Hydrologic Records
a. Primary (long term) network. Full support by the State of
the primary network of stream and canal gaging, lake and
ground-water stage stations, quality of water monitoring sta-
tions, and collection and processing of fundamental informa-
tion on geologic and hydrologic characteristics of wells, quality
of waters, and use of waters in the State. First emphasis to
be placed on expanding water-quality network on streams and
automatic storage, retrieval, and processing of ground and qual-
ity of water data.
b. Secondary (short term) network. Full to partial support by
State, dependent on situation.
c. Water management network. Partial support by State as
needed to satisfy needs for water allocations and control.


















- i fO~ r -- -prc. -.-" -
~?ii~a. r-' -6


V


The Salt Water Fisheries Division Conservation Patrol spends many hours patroling the coastal waters off Florida.


Li d%


0~~~'~'-~9
~44-.C






DIVISION OF SALT WATER FISHERIES
FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
TALLAHASSEE


RESPONSIBILITIES
The Division of Salt Water Fisheries is charged by Section 370.02 (5),
Florida Statutes, with the duty to preserve, manage and protect the ma-
rine, crustacean, shell and anadromous fisheries resources of Florida.
The division also is charged by statute with the duty:
To regulate the operations of all fishermen and vessels of this state
engaged in the taking of such fishery resources within or without the
boundaries of state waters,
To issue licenses or provide for the issuance of licenses, prescribed
by the Legislature, for the taking of the products of any or all such
fisheries and the processing at sea or on shore within the state,
To secure and maintain statistical records of the catch of each such
species by various gear, by areas and by other appropriate classifications,
To conduct scientific, economic and other studies and research, and
to enter into contracts for such studies and research.
The duties and obligations of the Division of Salt Water Fisheries,
enumerated above, by mandate of the Legislature shall be directed to
the broad objective of managing the salt water fisheries in the interest
of all the people of Florida to the end that they shall produce the max-
imum sustained yield consistent with the preservation and protection of
the breeding stock.
The division also is charged by law with the administration, coordi-
nation and enforcement of Chapter 371, Florida Statutes, the state motor
boat registration and safety law.






DIVISION OF SALT WATER FISHERIES
FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
TALLAHASSEE


1965-66


Randolph Hodges
Division Director







ACTIVITIES
Law enforcement, research, marketing and education are the tools
through which the Division of Salt Water Fisheries carries out its duties
and obligations.
Law enforcement is carried out through the Florida Conservation
Patrol, a uniformed police organization.
Research is centered in a marine laboratory, located at Bayboro
Harbor, St. Petersburg, and sub-stations at Key West and Stuart. The
Key West sub-station was activated during the 1965-66 biennium under
authority of a 1965 Legislative Act to make special studies of the Flor-
ida lobster (crawfish of the species panulirus argus).
Marketing is a relatively new program, initiated on a small scale
late in 1964, designed to restore the economic stability of the state's
commercial fishing industry and to develop it to its full potential.
The education program is centralized under the Division of Admin-
istration. However, each member of the staff of the Division of Salt
Water Fisheries, uniformed, scientific and administrative, serves as a per-
sonal education officer of the division, disseminating information to the
public regarding the duties and programs of the division.
The Director of the Board of Conservation, exercising the discretion
granted him by Section 370.02 (2c) also serves as director of the Division
of Salt Water Fisheries.

LAW ENFORCEMENT
The Florida Conservation Patrol, the uniformed police force charged
with enforcement of salt water fisheries conservation laws and the Florida
motorboat law, has made significant advances during the past two years
in its administrative and law enforcement procedures.
To meet the sharp population growth, and resultant increase in
fisheries activities, in extreme West Florida, a new law enforcement dis-
trict was created August 16, 1966 to embrace Escambia, Santa Rosa and
Okaloosa counties. District headquarters were set up at Pensacola.
Other area offices are located at Panama City, Tallahassee, Inglis,
St. Petersburg, Ft. Myers, Marathon, Miami, West Palm Beach, Titus-
ville, and Jacksonville. Each of the 11 law enforcement areas is headed
by a lieutenant, and each area headquarters is equipped with a short
wave radio transmitter to provide a statewide network for instantaneous
communication.
During the biennium, secretaries, who double as radio operators,
were employed in each of the area offices. This not only speeds the
preparation of the increased volume of paper work generated in the
district office by population growth, but provides full-time service to
the people of the area, particularly those engaged in the fisheries in-
dustry.







The basic responsibility of conservation officers is to enforce gen-
eral salt water fisheries conservation laws of statewide application. In
addition, they have the duty of enforcing the approximately 250 special
acts applicable in one or more counties within their area.
Pleasure boating has increased approximately 10 percent during each
of the past two years. Enforcement of the boat registration and safety
law has become an increasingly important phase of the conservation of-
ficer's work. For example, over the July 4th holiday weekend last year,
conservation officers issued 270 citations to owners of boats which were
not registered properly.
Civil Defense
As a full partner in Florida's civil defense organization, the Con-
servation Patrol plays a major role in the protection of the people dur-
ing natural disasters, particularly hurricanes and tornadoes.
Conservation officers, each a skilled handler of small boats and
equipped with a powerful, heavy duty boat, have the responsibility
during hurricanes and accompanying floods of evacuating low-laying
shoreline areas and offshore islands when threatened by tropical storms.
They also assist other state law enforcement agencies and local police
authorities in securing storm-damaged property from thieves and looters.
When Hurricane Betsy struck the Florida Keys with devastating
effect on Sept. 6, 1965, 30 conservation officers were rushed from near-
by areas to assist the 10 men regularly assigned to the Keys. Hundreds
of small boats, both commercial and pleasure, were shepherded to safe
anchorages to ride out the hurricane, scores of persons were evacuated
to safe shelter with their most treasured belongings. After the hurricane
passed, the conservation officers joined in the tremendous job of clean-
ing up the debris and restoring life, as far as possible, to normalcy.
When a series of destructive tornadoes struck five Central Florida
counties April 4, 1966, a special detail of 27 conservation officers was
pressed into duty to aid Florida Highway Patrol officers and local au-
thorities in assisting victims of the howling winds which claimed 11
lives, injured several hundred persons and caused property damage in
excess of $16 million.
Conservation officers twice were called out for emergency duty by
hurricanes during 1966, by Alma during the period of June 6-10 and
by Inez during the period Sept. 23 through Oct. 7.
Alma roared out of the Carribbean aimed straight for the keys. The
eye of the storm veered first toward Miami, then swept back offshore
the Keys, and twisted into the Gulf, running some 60 miles offshore
until it crossed land near Carrabelle in Franklin County, traveled north
across Leon County and finally blew itself out in northern Georgia. It
was accompanied by torrential rains and abnormally high tides which
caused serious flooding all long the coast from Fort Lauderdale to Key
West and north to Apalachicola.




































A Conservation Officer checks a spiny lobster for legal length.


Conservation Director Randolph Hodges was the principal speaker at the annual
meeting of the Florida Division of the Izaak Walton League of America.







Sixty-three conservation officers, posted at strategic posts along the
coastline from Fort Lauderdale to Key West and up the Gulf to Apala-
chicola each logged an average of 18 hours continuous emergency duty
during Hurricane Alma.
Hurricane Inez raked the keys with violently destructive force. Thirty
conservation officers from nearby areas were sent into the keys during
the storm emergency to assist the officers regularly assigned to duty in
Monroe County and local authorities in rescue and police work.

Search and Rescue
One of the least-heralded, but more vital activities of the Conser-
vation Patrol is search and rescue. Public service calls answered by con-
servation officers totaled 1,166 during 1965 and 1,134 during 1966. Of
these, 203 in 1965 and 197 in 1966 involved search and rescue missions.
Many a fishing party, stranded far offshore by a motor failure, often
without food or fresh water, has been saved from possible disaster by
a Conservation Patrol search boat.
A sudden shift in the wind bringing with it high waves and squalls
often has rendered a small boat helpless. In a number of cases, conser-
vation officers, working under adverse conditions, have scoured the area
where a missing boat was last known to be, located the craft, given what
aid those aboard might need, and towed the boat safely back to shore.
Department airplanes are invaluable in search and rescue missions.
The single engine Cessna 210, used primarily for law enforcement patrol
work, frequently is called upon to assist surface craft in locating missing
boats. More often than not, the pilot will spot the missing boat and
radio its position to searching surface vessels so that rescue is effected.
The twin-engine Cessna 310, which has the multiple duty of law
enforcement patrol, research survey, and executive transportation, also
participates in search and rescue work.

The Conservation Officer
The duties of the conservation officer are many and varied.
He is first a police officer, whose prime responsibility is to enforce
the laws enacted by the Legislature for the preservation of Florida's vast
marine resources.
This entails checking shrimp catches to determine that the shrimp
meet the requirements of the so-called count law that the shrimp are of
a size that takes no more than 47 with heads or 70 without the heads
to weigh a pound; checking crawfish catches to determine that none is
taken having a carapace measurement of less than three inches or a tail
measurement of less than 51/2 inches; checking oyster catches to deter-
mine that no oyster is taken that measures less than three inches from
tip to tip of shell; that no stone crab is taken that has a claw measur-
ing less than four inches.
The conservation officer also enforces the length limits fixed by







law for the taking of such fin fishes as blue fish, pompano, flounder,
mackerel, sea trout, red fish and snook.
He protects the game fishes-snook, sailfish, tarpon, and striped bass
-by enforcing the bag limits set by statute. He guards the Florida
lobster (crawfish), oyster, stone crab and sea turtles against poachers
during the closed seasons on these invaluable marine animals.
He is responsible also for enforcing the requirements of law that
all wholesale and retail seafood dealers must be licensed, that all com-
mercial fishing boats must be licensed, and that all pleasure boats pro-
pelled by machinery in excess of 10 horsepower must pay a boat regis-
tration certificate tax.
The conservation officer protects the public health by enforcing the
prohibitions against the taking of shellfish from waters closed by the
State Board of Health because of pollution.
The conservation officer emphasizes preventive law enforcement. He
seeks to inform and educate the commercial and sports fishermen of the
conservation laws, knowing that most citizens are law-abiding and will.
obey the law when fully informed of it. A first offender who convinced
the conservation officer he was not fully informed of the law or a minor
violator is more likely to be given an official warning than an arrest
ticket. During 1965, conservation officers issued 6,126 official warnings.
During 1966, official warning tickets handed out totaled 5,836.
But the wilful and chronic violator of the conservation laws finds
the conservation officer a hard man. Patrol officers made 1,799 arrests
during 1965 and 2,082 during 1966.
The conservation officer is a water policeman, and that is where he
generally can be found, on the water. The Patrol logged 49,689 hours
of water patrol during 1965 and 56,281 hours during 1966.
The conservation officer is also a friend and helper to the fisherman,
commercial and sports. He devotes many hours to advising sports fish-
ermen of not only the laws, but where the fish may be biting, the bait
that is proving most successful on a given day, where launching ramps
are located, where public parks and campsites can be found and how to
reach them. He tows to shore those fishermen and pleasure boaters who
run out of gas or have a motor breakdown. He gives tips on safe boat
handling and proper safety equipment.
The work of a conservation officer is far from dull. He encounters
many strange problems, and solves them, as he patrols the shores of
Florida. Take Aug. 13, 1966, for example. A school of between 50 and
60 whales was found beached on the shallow flats along a 20-mile stretch
between Grassy Key and Maraton in Monroe County. An alarm was
raised and conservation officers took to their boats. Ropes were thrown
around the whales, and pulled taut. And one by one, the floundering
sea mammals were towed to deep water and freed. Not more than a
half dozen of the whales failed to survive.







Problems
The greatest single problem facing the Florida Conservation Patrol
is insufficient manpower to carry out its responsibilities as Conservation
Director Hodges believes the people of Florida want them carried out.
As 1966 came to a close, the Patrol numbered 105 officers, includ-
ing supervisors. This was only two short of the full authorized strength.
These 105 uniformed men are responsible for patroling a 7,700-mile
shoreline extending from the Florida-Alabama line west of Pensacola
along the Gulf of Mexico to Dry Tortugas and Key West, then up the
Atlantic to the Florida-Georgia line north of Fernandina Beach.
Conservation officers are required to work a six day week, and the
average work day extends more than 10 hours. Despite this, law en-
forcement is not as rigid as the need for protecting one of the world's
greatest fisheries demands. During the closed season on sea turtles it is
necessary to send officers regularly assigned to the West Coast to the
East Coast for temporary duty to prevent extinction of the great turtles
from the raids of poachers on egg filled nests. Officers also have to be
shifted into the Keys during the closed season on crawfish to protect the
animals from illegal trappers. Enforcement of special netting regulations
during the peak tourist seasons in Tampa and Boca Ciega Bays requires
beefing up of local conservation manpower by drawing men from other
enforcement areas. The same is true during the closed season on oysters
in Apalachicola Bay.
However, when law enforcement personnel must be drafted from one
area to meet emergencies in another, conservation suffers in their home
area.
The increasing loss of well-trained, experienced law enforcement
personnel is also a grave problem. During the past two years, there has
been an annual turnover in law enforcement personnel in excess of 20
percent. Virtually every officer who has resigned has been a veteran of
five or more years with the Patrol. A majority of these experienced,
trained and tested officers resigned to accept employment with other
law enforcement agencies; state, county and municipal which offer sub-
stantially higher pay for fewer hours of work. The starting salary for a
conservation officer under existing State Merit System schedules is $330
a month; the maximum attainable is $420 a month.
In the budget Director Hodges has submitted to the State Budget
Commission for review, funds have been requested to permit addition
of 136 men to the Patrol personnel and payment of salaries that would
place conservation officers more near to parity with those paid by other
state law enforcement agencies.








FLORIDA CONSERVATION PATROL
REPORT OF ARRESTS AND DISPOSITION
FISCAL 1964-65


COUNTY
Dade
Duval
Hillsborough
Pinellas
Polk
Palm Beach
Orange
Volusia
Escambia
Broward
Alachua
Lake
Marion
Manatee
Sarasota
Seminole
Lee
Brevard
St. Johns
Putnam
Bay
St. Lucie
Jackson
Osceola
Pasco
Indian River
Santa Rosa
Walton
Taylor
Monroe
Nassau
Martin
Okaloosa
Citrus
Clay
Washington
Charlotte
Dixie
Gilchrist
Okeechobee
Calhoun
Franklin
Flagler
Collier
Wakulla
Gulf
Liberty


NO. OF ARRESTS
299
141
72
216
15
270
1
65
77
163
2
2
5
21
34
10
56
50
45
8
83
26
7
3
10
29
14
17
9
377
16
57
32
27
20
4
13
14
2
19
1
137
16
31
18
5
4

2543


GUILTY
51
73
4
91

201

50
70
88
1


6
19
3
36
25
29
4
52
2
2

3
11
10
3
8
89
9
27
13
5
9
2
1
2

7-

112
7
23
9
3


1153

66


EST. BOND NOL PROSS
2 6
3 13
22 32
81 4

11 7

2 3
I
3 12





2 3
2 -
1 2
11
2 3
1 1
2 8
1 -
1 1

6 -
3 1
I- 3
2 5

7 33
1 5
9 7
6- 9
1 6
3 4
1
1 -
3 4

1 5
1
1 17
2 4
1 5
2
I
1 3

189 214


PENDING
143
27
13
18
15
37
1
6
6
30
1
2
5
8
2
5
7
6
5
2
17
8
1
3
1
4
1
7
1
216

13
8
14
2
1
2
5
2
18

6

1
4



674








FLORIDA CONSERVATION PATROL
REPORT OF ARRESTS AND DISPOSITION
FISCAL 1965-66

COUNTY NO. OF ARRESTS GUILTY EST. BOND NOL PROSS PENDING
Dade 377 67 1 20 198
Duval 173 108 4 8 34
Hillsborough 66 1 36 6 23
Pinellas 207 29 74 13 47
Polk 15 1 14
Palm Beach 229 162 13 7 20
Orange 2 2
Volusia 16 4 1 2 8
Escambia 37 33 3
Broward 99 36 8 17 31
Alachua 3 1 1 1
Lake 2 2
Marion 7 1 1 5
Manatee 27 15 3 2 7
Sarasota 39 13 2 3 13
Seminole 7 1 6
Lee 67 48 6 8
Brevard 16 4 3 1 8
St. Johns 54 29 1 8 12
Putnam 15 9 5
Bay 94 45 4 17 25
St. Lucie 26 9 5 2
Jackson 1 I
Osceola 3 3
Pasco 9 5 1 3
Indian River 12 8 3
Santa Rosa 9 6 3
Walton 17 4 1 1 11
Taylor 9 1 4 4
Monroe 406 133 4 32 214
Levy 7 2 2 3
Nassau 6 4 1
Martin 60 33 13 13
Okaloosa 35 10 3 6 12
Citrus 37 19 6 4 5
Clay 31 19 1 4 6
Washington 1 1 -
Holmes 1 1 -
Charlotte 7 3 1 -
Dixie 10 1 4 1 3
Gilchrist 2 2
Okeechobee 18 1 5 1 11
Calhoun 1 1 -
Franklin 130 95 2 14 29
Flagler 19 8 8 2 -
Lafayette 1 1
Collier 17 9 4 2 2
Wakulla 22 7 2 2 10
2449 967 216 201 814








RULES
Section 370.021, Florida Statutes, vests in the Board of Conserva-
tion authority to adopt rules and regulations necessary or convenient to
carry out the duties, obligations, powers and responsibilities.
These rules have the effect of law and their violation is defined by
statute as a misdemeanor.
Rules adopted by the Board upon recommendation of the Director
during the past two years included:
Establishment of a shrimp sanctuary in Bay County waters to pro-
vide a permanent breeding ground.
Provision of a penalty for violation of the prohibition against the
taking or possession of oysters of less than legal size in Gulf, Franklin
and Wakulla counties.
Extension and minor amendments for the so-called Rule 20 fixing
commercial fishing areas in Pinellas County waters.
Amendment of the rule governing netting operations in Hillsborough
County waters to include additional areas to those closed to netting.
Prohibition against the taking of sea turtles with so-called snatch
hooks in Palm Beach County waters.
Regulation of gear for taking of shrimp in Escambia and Santa Rosa
counties.
Prohibition of the use of airboats for shrimp trawling in Lee County
waters.
Requirement that Class 2 motorboats (26 feet to less than 40 feet
in length be equipped with two approved Type B class 1 fire extinguishers,
or one Type class 2 fire extinguisher to bring state regulations into con-
formity with federal regulations.







RESEARCH

Fisheries
OYSTERS
Work has continued on oyster nutrition and results using finely
ground cornmeal have been extremely gratifying. Glycogen content was
substantially increased, color was improved, and shell growth was noted.
Additional substances (mostly cereal grains) are also being tested.
With a known nutritional factor, other variables may now be measured,
and studies are planned to determine temperature and salinity effects
and optima.
A study on the occurrence of the marine fungus Dermocystidium
marinum in Florida west coast oysters is under way. Oyster mortality
from this fungus has seriously affected production in several areas.
CLAMS
Preliminary studies completed in Tampa Bay have shown a commer-
cial clam potential. Because of the results from this study and the avail-
ability of federal funds under PL 88-309 a large scale study of the clam
populations of Tampa Bay and other areas has been initiated.
FISH
The studies on age, growth, and reproduction in the red grouper,
Epinephelus morio are continuing. Preliminary results show that the red
grouper matures as a female in four to five years. Many of these females
then become the functional males of the population at eight to fourteen
years of age. No males have been found with a standard length of less
than 20 inches.
In conjunction with the samples received from Project Hourglass,
an ecological analysis of offshore bottom fishes along the lower west coast
of Florida is under way. This project will provide indications of pop-
ulation size, growth rate, seasonality and spawning activity of many com-
mon bottom fishes.
Also in progress is a report taken from the available literature con-
cerning the spawning times of Florida shore fishes. This will provide a
handy reference for summary spawning data of many common species.
The Florida Board of Conservation fish reference collection is still
being expanded and fishes are available for loan to any interested sci-
entists. An annotated listing of the specimens in the collection is now
available.
LARVAL FISH
A recent publication has linked the larval forms of the worm eel
Myrophis punctatus to the adult. There are several other species of fish
beside the eels which have a leptocephalid type of larva, and studies are
in progress to link the larval with the adult forms. Manuscripts are cur-
rently being prepared on the tarpon, bonefish, and ladyfish.







FISHERIES TECHNOLOGY
Experiments are being conducted to find multiple uses for sharks
and shark products. Vitamin A from the livers is no longer in demand,
but shark hides are still valuable. By finding other commercial uses
(fishmeal, fresh meat, etc.), it is hoped that shark fishing may again be-
come a profitable business.
Studies on the production of fishmeal from various fish sources,
(scrap fish, waste from filleting operations, shark carcasses, and others)
are also under way. If uses can be found for these waste products, this
will reduce costs and increase profits for commercial interests.
Different types and methods of handling frozen lisa fillets are being
tested with regard to their efficiency in inhibiting rancidity. Objective
chemical tests and taste panel judgments are used to determine which
methods are preferable.
INVERTEBRATES
The reference invertebrate collection begun in January 1965 is still
growing rapidly and now contains over 700 Florida species of mollusks,
decapod crustaceans, and echinoderms.
The Hourglass program is the largest contributor to the collection.
With this continuing systematic sampling, it is now possible to determine
seasonal periodicity, depth ranges, spawning seasons, growth rates, and
other biological patterns of many invertebrates. This processing and rec-
ord keeping now dominates the activities of the invertebrate section.
An additional trawling and trapping cruise is made each month by
the R/V Hernan Cortez for the purpose of determining if there is a
commercial potential for the shovel-nosed (scyllarid) lobsters off the west
coast of Florida. A much clearer picture of the life history of this lob-
ster will also result from this study.
SPINY LOBSTERS
Spiny lobster studies dealing with larval and postlarval periodicity,
habitat preferences, salinity tolerance, age, and growth rates are in prog-
ress at the Stuart and Key West field laboratories. Some additional larval
examinations have been done recently in St. Petersburg.
LARVAL CRABS
Studies of the larval stages of the blue crab, stone crab, and related
species is continuing. Attempts are being made to raise many of these
larvae from the eggs and additional stages are being separated from plank-
ton samples. Detailed information on spawning grounds, spawning pe-
riods, growth, migration and natural habitats will be available when
this study is completed.
SEAWEEDS
Interest in commercial utilization of seaweeds prompted a prelimi-
nary survey of the west coast of Florida for concentrations of these plants.
A preliminary report is being prepared.
Samples from the Hourglass Cruises are being retained for study.










































Captured shark to be used by
revive the once vigorous shark


the Research Department in studies attempting to
industry in Florida.


-

S. --. ..


Gaps being made in coon oyster reefs near Cedar Key as part of the Research
Department's experiment in Oyster Cultivation.







DRIFT BOTTLE STUDIES
A cooperative study by the Florida Board of Conservation and Woods
Hole Oceanographic Institution is in progress. This study is using drift
bottles and sealed drifters to obtain additional information on the speed
and direction of seasonal currents in the Gulf of Mexico. Such informa-
tion is necessary for the complete understanding of larval transport.

Red Tide
CHEMISTRY
Chemical studies to determine the concentrations of iron, phosphate,
nitrite, silica, salinity, humic acid, carbohydrates, organic nitrogen, and
amino acids in both fresh and salt waters are continuing. It is hoped
that some of this information may be correlated with the occurrence of
the Red Tide organism Gymnodinium breve. Such a correlation has been
found with heavy rainfall, increased iron content in rivers, and increased
fresh water runoff.
A comprehensive study of the nutritional, chemical, and physical fac-
tors influencing the growth and reproduction of G. breve in the labor-
atory has also been initiated.
BIOASSAY OF SEA WATER FOR VITAMINS
Water samples are also being analysed for the presence of certain vita-
mins (B1Q, Thiamin, Biotin) in an effort to link the presence of these
vitamins to blooms of the Red Tide. No such correlation has yet been
found.
DINOFLAGELLATES
Studies on the dinoflagellates occurring in conjunction with the Red
Tide organism G. breve (also a dinoflagellate) are continuing. To date,
over 120 species and 31 genera have been identified.
DIATOMS
These important unicellular algae are a major contributor to the
primary food chain. Studies are being conducted to determine the species
present and to gather data on their abundance and seasonality. This in-
formation will be used to determine the possible role of diatoms in rela-
tion to outbreaks of Red Tide.
ARTIFICIAL CULTIVATION OF PHYTOPLANKTON
Many of the more common phytoplankton are being cultivated in
the laboratory to determine ease of maintenance and nutritional require-
ments.
Related Responsibilities
RESEARCH VESSEL HERNAN CORTEZ
The primary sampling program of the R/V Hernan Cortez is called
Project Hourglass, and has been designed to meet the scientific require-
ments of the Fisheries and Red Tide Divisions of the Marine Laboratory.
This program consists of monthly samplings in an offshore area between







Ft. Myers and St. Petersburg, out to a depth of 40 fathoms. The same
stations are sampled each month and the catch is preserved and brought
back to the laboratory for study.
This project is considered one of the most important programs now in
progress and is supplying vast quantities of data on hundreds of different
species. From these data we are gathering information on the growth
rates, size ranges, spawning periods and areas of seasonal occurrence and
abundance of a large number of species, many of which are commercially
important, and more of which may become commercially important.
Additional cruises are made during the remainder of the month, in-
volving trapping, trawling or other sampling as requested by laboratory
project leaders.
LIBRARY
The Florida Board of Conservation Marine Laboratory library con-
tinues to expand and now has 762 books, 312 microfilms, 298 sets of
microcards, 6400 reprints, and a journal collection of several thousand
serial publications.
SURVEY AND MANAGEMENT
The normal work of reviewing coastal projects detrimental or bene-
ficial to marine resources is continuing.
The publication of pamphlets and educational material concerning
marine resources is being accelerated, and a wide variety is now available
on request.
Commercial Landings
The commercial catch of fish and shellfish landed at Florida ports
during 1965 totaled 200,081,923 pounds with a dockside value of $33,-
497,406. This was an increase over the previous year of more than 22
million pounds in landings and an increase in value of more than $4 mil-
lion. Record landings of crawfish (spiny lobster) and blue crabs were
recorded in 1965.
More than 163 million pounds of the 1965 Florida landings entered
into the food market, with 36 million pounds used for bait or produc-
tion of fish meal, oil and solubles.
Total shrimp landings in 1965 were 43.2 million pounds, a decrease
of 1.3 million pounds from 1964, but the 1965 value of the shrimp land-
ings, $16.3 million, was an increase of $1 million of the 1964 figure.
The record blue crab landings totaled 26.6 million pounds, with
the price to crab fishermen averaging six cents a pound. The record
crawfish landings totaled 5.7 million pounds. The average price received
in 1965 by crawfishermen was 56 cents a pound, about 13 cents more
than the 1964 average price.
However, .landings of Florida's most abundant food fish, mullet,
decreased about 3.6 million pounds from 1964 with a total of 34.2 mil-
lion pounds.







Complete figures on 1966 landings were not available as this report
went to press. However, a decrease was indicated in the figures for the
10 months ended Oct. 30.
Landings through October, 1966, totaled 157,437,770 pounds. This
compared with landings totaling 159,887,416 for the same period of 1965.
The dollar value of the total landings was not available.
The golden crop of the Florida fishery, shrimp, showed a sharp
decline in landings during the first 10 months of 1966. Landings of
shrimp at Florida ports through October totaled 26,434,002 pounds, com-
pared with landings of 32,259,713 pounds during the same period of 1965.
Blue crab landings were running about 2.5 million pounds under
the record 1965 year and crawfish landings were off nearly 300,000 pounds
from the record production of the previous year.
Mullet landings during the first 10 months of 1966 also were down
about 2.5 million from the 1965 figure.
Fishermen, however, appeared to be obtaining better prices per pound
based on the dockside value of landings during the month of October.
October shrimp landings totaled 3.4 million pounds with a value of $1.4
million. This compared with October, 1965, landings of 5.3 million
pounds with a value of $1.7 million.
October mullet landings totaled 3.2 million pounds compared to
landings of 4.3 million pounds in October, 1965. But the value of the
October, 1966, mullet landings was $224,093 compared with a value of
$234,226 for landings of 1.1 million pounds more of the fish in Oc-
tober, 1965.
MARKETING AND PROMOTION
The Board of Conservation has developed during the past two years
what is acclaimed throughout the nation as the most comprehensive and
progressive seafood marketing promotion program in the United States.
This has been done without the expenditure of one penny of the general
revenue funds of the State.
The seafood industry historically has been one of the principal props
in Florida's general economy. Few states can boast the quantity, quality
and variety of the seafood resources in the salt waters of Florida. Despite
this, Florida's seafood industry went into a decline during the great de-
pression of the early thirties, from which it never fully recovered.
In the years following World War II, the seafood industry in New
England and the West Coast expanded and prospered. Foreign imports
claimed each year-an increasing percentage of the American seafood mar-
ket. In 1965, a total of 31.8 million pounds of seafood was imported in
Florida from foreign sources.
The Florida industry, meanwhile, was struggling to survive. Com-
mercial fishing became more and more a hazardous economic venture.
The fishermen, at best, earned a scant livelihood for himself and his family.
Black mullet, the most abundant of food fishes in Florida waters


































The Marketing Department promotes Florida Seafood by means of attractive displays.

The Marketing Department promotes Florida Seafood by means of attractive displays.







and which has few peers in flavor and nutritional values, was a drug on
the market. The mullet fishermen could work his nets but three days a
week and the price he received for his catch often was no more than a
penny a pound.
Conservation Director Randolph Hodges was convinced on the basis
of his many years of close business association with the seafood industry
that Florida's problem was failure to properly exploit its undeniably
superior resources in the markets of the nation and the world.
State policy long had recognized it was the responsibility of the Board
of Conservation to maintain the Florida seafood industry in good health.
But no industry can survive without markets for its products. The pros-
perity of Florida's agriculture industry can be credited to no small degree
by the aggressive promotion of its product with full and generous as-
sistance from the State Department of Agriculture.
The Florida seafood industry was in no position financially to em-
bark on its own on a marketing program. It needed help from the State
through the Board of Conservation. The 1963 Legislature recognized
this when upon the recommendation of Director Hodges it broadened
the use of revenue from sale of dead oyster shells, previously earmarked
exclusively for biological research, to permit spending of some of these
funds for marketing research and promotion.
Armed with these funds, the Board entered into a contract by which
it paid $15,000 to the U. S. Bureau of Commercial Fisheries to finance a
special nationwide promotion program of Florida seafood by the long-
established marketing organization of the federal agency. To coordinate
the Board of Conservation's activities in this venture, a marketing expert
was employed.
From the humble beginning, the marketing department has grown
to a marketing chief, two fishery marketing specialists and five profes-
sional home economists. This expansion was made possible when the
1965 Legislature, at the request of the industry, increased wholesale sea-
food dealer license fees $50 each and earmarked the additional revenue
for seafood promotion, and the enactment of Public Law 88-309 by the
Congress.
Under the federal law, matching funds are made available for state
seafood marketing programs on the basis of $3 for each $1 of state money.
With about $73,000 in state funds available from wholesale dealer license
fees and dead shell receipts, the Board of Conservation qualifies for fed-
eral matching funds of approximately $220,000 each year.
The marketing program is headquartered at Tallahassee, but one
home economist each is stationed in St. Petersburg, Miami and Atlanta.
Present plans provide for the assignment of a home economist to the
Jacksonville area, with another to be stationed in the rapidly-growing
Central Florida area.
The home economists, each of whom is, or will be equipped with a






test kitchen, develop and test new seafood recipes for public distribution
through newspapers, television, radio and direct mail. They appear in
behalf of Florida seafood on television and radio stations in their areas,
maintain close liaison with food editors of newspapers and magazines,
prepare and make available to the food editors articles on seafood cookery,
and conduct seafood cookery demonstrations at schools, institutions and
women's organizations.
Production of promotional materials and liaison with marketing out-
lets is a prime responsibility of the marketing specialists. The marketing
chief devotes much of his time on expansion of existing seafood processing.
plants and development of new seafood industrial installations.
Strong emphasis has been placed in the seafood marketing and pro-
motion program on building new markets for mullet, but no Florida
seafood product has been overlooked.
A major development during 1966 was the opening of a new fish
cannery at Miami, the only cannery of its type in the State. The plant
cans mullet, mackerel and bonito, but specializes in mullet, canning the
fish under the name of Lisa, the Spanish name for the fish.
Through the efforts of the marketing department of the Board, canned
Lisa won acceptance by public school food services during 1966. During
October, a special Lisa Day was set up in twenty county school systems
as a feature of National School Lunch Week. More than 330,000 school
children were introduced to canned Lisa in school lunchrooms on Lisa Day.
Many schools have made Lisa a part of their year-round menu planning.
State institutions also have accepted canned Lisa for their food services.
Since the cannery opened last May, it has canned and sold 236,000
pounds of mullet. This represents a brand new market for approximately
800,000 pounds of the whole fish.
Introduction of canned Lisa to the consumer market through grocery
stores is planned early in 1967.
Promotional materials are being prepared for six major cafeteria
chains in the South aimed at increasing restaurant sales of Florida sea-
food. The promotional material is designed to meet the individual needs
of each chain and included food photography and how certain foods are
served. Posters, table cards and serving line placards will promote sales
of Florida Spanish mackerel, lobster, red snapper and mullet.
Promotional. materials also are made available to individually-owned
restaurants and include placemats, table tents and menu clip-ons designed
to increase sales of Florida seafood to restaurant patrons.
The marketing department has participated actively in seven national
and regional food trade expositions, and has furnished fresh, frozen and
canned Florida mullet for display by the U.S. Bureau of Commercial
Fisheries at international trade shows in England, Austria, Italy, France
and Germany.
Through assistance given by the marketing department, the Republic
of Congo purchased 30,000 pounds of Florida canned bonito.
77







Conservation Director Hodges was successful recently in obtaining
approval by federal authorities for inclusion of Florida Lisa on the list
of a U.S. fisheries products which may be purchased under a $100,000
loan granted the Congolese government under a foreign aid program.
The public interest generated by the seafood marketing and promo-
tion program is demonstrated in the mailing of more than 1.5 million
Florida seafood recipe books. The recipe books are sent only to those
who write in requesting a copy. Four recipe books for public distribu-
tion have been designed by the marketing department.
Among the promotional materials produced and distributed during
1966 were 45,000 Florida Favorite Seafoods recipe books; 1,120,000 sea-
food placemats to restaurants; 6,000 menu flyers for the Dutch Pantry
restaurant chain; 100 posters, featuring fillets of mullet, for display with-
out cost in wall advertising panels made available by Transportation Dis-
play, Inc., in airport terminals at Miami, Tampa, and Ft. Lauderdale
and several out-of-state terminals; I million Southern Seafoods recipe books,
2,000 retail seafood market posters for National Fish and Seafood Month
(October); 12,000 "Eat Florida Seafood" auto tags, 200 radio tapes for
the Lenten Season; 220 television tapes featuring the Shrimp Christmas
Tree for showing during the holiday season; 50,000 table tents, 5,000
store banners and 5,000 freezer strips feature blue crabs; 208,000 Lisa
table tents, of which 100,000 were distributed to school lunchrooms, and
50,000 oyster table tents.
As this report went to press, nine seafood processors had indicated
strong interest in establishing new processing plants, canneries or portion-
controlled facilities in Florida at a total investment of up to $5 million.

Licensing
The License Department of the Division of Salt Water Fisheries
registers all commercial fishing vessels and pleasure boats propelled by
machinery in excess of 10 horsepower, processes all applications of trans-
fers of registration due to change of boat ownership and issues wholesale
and retail seafood dealer licenses.
It is also the responsibility of the License Department to compile
and forward to the U.S. Coast Guard reports on boat registration figures
and boating accident reports filed with the Board of Conservation. These
reports are required by federal law.
During the 1964-65 fiscal year, the License Department issued 828
wholesale and 5,010 retail seafood dealer licenses. During the 1965-66
fiscal year, wholesale seafood dealer licenses totaled 741 and retail licenses
totaled 4,897.
The decrease in wholesale licenses issued is attributed to the decision
of a number of small food establishments, which engaged in seafood whole-
saling as a sideline, to discontinue seafood wholesale activities after the
1965 Legislative increased the license fee from $50 to $100 a year. The
decrease in retail licenses resulted from the decision of a major chain
78







grocery corporation to discontinue sale of seafood products in its more
than 400 Florida stores.
Commercial boat registrations totaled 17,409 during fiscal 1964-65 and
increased to 21,763 in fiscal 1965-66. Pleasure boat registrations totaled
128,723 during the 1964-65 fiscal year and rose to 136,706 during the
1965-66 fiscal year.
Commercial boat registrations during the first six months of the 1966-
67 fiscal year totaled 18,113. Pleasure boat registrations during the same
period totaled 121,132.
Through Nov. 30, 1966, the license department had issued 714 whole-
sale seafood dealers licenses for the licensing year started July 1, and 4,873
retail licenses.
Boat ownership transfers processed during fiscal 1964-65 totaled 29,923.
This figure rose to 31,377 during fiscal 1965-66.



LICENSES ISSUED AND BOATS REGISTERED
1964-1965


Retail Seafood Dealers Licenses
Non resident Retail Seafood Dealers Licenses
Wholesale Seafood Dealers Licenses
Non-resident Wholesale Seafood Dealers Licenses
Wholesale Permit Stamps
Seafood Freezer Stamps
Duplicate Certificates
Duplicate Decals
Transfers of Ownerships-Boats
Changes of Classification-Boats
Non-resident or Alien Commercial Fishing Licenses
Non-resident or Alien Sponge Tax
Special Purse Seine Licenses
Commercial Boats Registrations
Pleasure Boat Registrations


5,010
5
828
12
852
0
1,454
909
29,923
212
452
19
11
17,409
128,723


LICENSES ISSUED AND BOATS REGISTERED
1965.1966
*Retail Seafood Dealers Licenses 4,897
Non-resident Retail Seafood Dealers Licenses 9
Wholesale Seafood Dealers Licenses 741
Non-resident Wholesale Seafood Dealers Licenses 12
Wholesale Permit Stamps 749
Seafood Freezer Stamps 0
Duplicate Certificates 1,571
Duplicate Decals 1,025
Transfers of Ownership 31,377
Changes of Classification 191
Non-resident or Alien Commercial Fishing Licenses 535
Non-resident or Alien Sponge Tax 15
Special Purse Seine Licenses 20
Commercial Boat Registrations 21,763
Pleasure Boat Registrations 136,706
*Decrease in retail seafood dealers licenses was caused by one of the larger chain store corporations
discontinuing seafood in their some four hundred establishments.

79


O







Motorboat Safety
Florida's motorboat safety program entered a new phase during the
past year with the activation of a Junior Boatsman's Boating Safety Course
aimed at youngsters in the 10-14 years age bracket.
The motorboat safety program is carried out under guidelines recom-
mended by the Florida Boating Council. The Council recommended the
activation of a youth water safety program at the suggestion of the Gov-
ernor.
The Junior Boatsman's program is designed to educate the youngsters,
who will be the boat owners of the future in Florida's fastest growing
outdoor recreational activity, in the basic rules of protecting life and
property when boating. It does not attempt to make skilled boat handlers
of the youngsters, but is designed to-instill in them recognition of the
necessity for protecting themselves by safe practices when on the water.
Statistics issued by the U.S. Coast Guard show that the most accident-
prone boat operators are in the 18-25 age group. It is our hope that by
teaching the 10-14 age group primary principles of water safety we can
develop safe boaters of those who in a few short years will be among
what is now the most dangerous group using our waters for recreational
purposes.
The junior program is carried on in cooperation with the sheriffs
of the several counties, U.S. Power Squadron units, particularly the ladies
auxiliary organizations, the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary flotillas, the Amer-
ican Red Cross and local school authorities.
During 1966 more than 30,000 youngsters participated in the Junior
Boatsman's Safety Program. Commitments already made indicate that up
to 100,000 youngsters will join the program during calendar 1967.
The Board of Conservation furnishes instructional materials for the
junior safety courses, provides a safety kit, which includes water safety
educational material, to each youngster taking the junior course, and
upon request assigns it's boating safety officers to instruct the course.
Six two-man teams, authorized by the 1963 Legislature, are assigned
exclusively to boating safety education work. Their prime responsibility
is to inspect pleasure boats for legally-required safety equipment. They
also appear before various organizations to speak on boating safety, and
make frequent television appearances to help spread the water safety
message.
The safety officers also handle boating safety exhibits at major boat
shows in Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa and St. Petersburg, and upon re-
quest handle the policing of boatacades and regattas.
During 1965, the safety teams inspected 11,341 pleasure craft. Of
this number, 6,142 were awarded special decals for display on their boats
to indicate the vessels met the safety equipment requirements of state law.
In the course of their inspection work, the safety officers issued 169







citations for flagrant violations of the boating safety laws and issued 334
official warnings.
Inspections trailed off to 8,029 during 1966 as the boating safety of-
ficers were called up to serve as active instructors in the junior program.
With the anticipated expansion of the Junior Boatsman's Safety Pro-
gram, it is expected that the safety officers will be called upon to devote
an increasing share of their working time to this program, with less em-
phasis placed on the inspection of pleasure boats.
It is the considered opinion of the Florida Boating Council, in which
the Conservation Department concurs, that the safety officers will provide
greater service to the cause of boating safety by instructing youngsters in
basic safety practices than to limit their activities to boat inspections.
Boating accident reports filed with the Board of Conservation indicate
that the motorboat safety education program is producing results. During
1963, a total of 79 persons are known to have lost their lives in boating
accidents in Florida waters. Boating accidents reports for 1966 show 53
fatalities in boating mishaps. The number of boating accidents in which
casualties were suffered or property damage in excess of $50 was reported
has dropped approximately 20 per cent since 1963.


OYSTER LEASES
GRANTED DURING 1965
COUNTY NUMBER OF LEASES
Brevard 6
Charlotte 5
Indian River 2
Nassau 3
Pinellas 19
St. Johns 1
St. Lucie 2
Volusia 4
TOTALS 42


NUMBER OF ACRES
114.76
125.00
23.47
83.30
442.26
9.06
37.00
12.25
847.10


OYSTER LEASES
GRANTED DURING 1966


COUNTY
Brevard
Gulf (Clam Lease)
Pinellas
St. Johns
Volusia
TOTALS


NUMBER OF LEASES
4
1
17
2
1

25


NUMBER OF ACRES
18.38
4.94
321.99
34.07
2.90
382.28








1965-66 PERMITS

Crawfish Permits 2,275
(Traps-274,750)
Dade County Bait Shrimp 46
Duval County Bait Shrimp 53
Escambia County Bait Shrimp 25
Okaloosa County Bait Shrimp 13
St. Johns County Net 5
St. Johns River Bait Shrimp 117
Commercial Fishermen 96
Camp Operator 15
Bait Dealer 6
Santa Rosa County Bait Shrimp 21
Sound Bay Bait Shrimp 25
Dade County Silver Mullet 13
Volusia & Flagler Counties Bait Mullet 5
Special Permits 372
Scientific-129
Exhibition-243
Oyster Planting 42
Bait Shrimp Statewide 206
Shrimp Landing Permits 1,668
Bay County 79
Brevard County 5
Citrus County 1
Clay County 2
Collier County 7
Dade County 11
Dixie County 1
Duval County 59
Escambia County 313
Franklin County 218
Gulf County 10
Hillsborough County 188
Lee County 56
Leon County 5
Manatee County 5
Monroe County 150
Nassau County 83
Okaloosa County 38
Pasco County 4
Pinellas County 8
St. Johns County 21
St. Lucie County 1
Santa Rosa County 62
Volusia County 11
Wakulla County 21
Walton County 17
Out of State 292
Alabama 92
Georgia 103
Mississippi 1
North Carolina 38
South Carolina 45
Texas 13
Pinellas County Net Permits 274
Pinellas County Commercial Fishermen 709
TOTAL PERMITS ISSUED DURING 1965-66 5,869







1965
CRAWFISH AND STONE CRAB
DECLARATIONS
Frozen Crawfish
Dealers 541,355 1/2 Pounds
Freezers 127,272

Crawfish Tails
Dealers 172,192
Freezers 62,334

Crawfish Meat
Dealers 10,240
Freezers 1,372

Frozen Stone Crabs
Dealers 0
Freezers 310

Stone Crab Claws
Dealers 14,390
Freezers 4,403

Stone Crab Meat
Dealers 0
Freezers 1,237




1966
CRAWFISH AND STONE CRAB
DECLARATIONS
Frozen Crawfish
Dealers 1,359,234 1/2 Pounds
Freezers 566,066

Crawfish Tails
Dealers 358,389
Freezers 182,989

Crawfish Meat
Dealers 17,891 1 Pounds
Freezers 16,233
Frozen Stone Crabs
Dealers 3,204
Freezers 600

Stone Crab Claws
Dealers 40,888
Freezers 3,112

Stone Crab Meat
Dealers 0
Freezers 7,915
















FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Division of Salt Water Fisheries

Statement of Actual Revenues


GENERAL REVENUE
Licenses and Permits
Wholesale Dealers License
Non-Resident Wholesale Dealers Licenses
Retail Dealers Licenses
Non-Resident Retail Dealers Licenses
Alien Retail Dealers Licenses
Permit Stamps
Bait Shrimp Permits
Live Bait Shrimp Dealers
Fish Camp Operators
Special Permits
Alien Sponge Licenses
Total Licenses and Permits

Leases, Rentals, and Fees
Oyster Leases
Total Leases, Rentals, and Fees

Miscellaneous
Overage
Other
Total Miscellaneous
TOTAL GENERAL REVENUE BEFORE ADJUSTMENTS ......................
Less: Returned Checks
Less: Refunds
Total Adjustments
TOTAL GENERAL REVENUE


Fiscal Year Fiscal Year
1964-1965 1965-1966

$ 40,950.00 $ 37,300.00
1,900.00 1,600.00
49,890.00 48,850.00
150.00 250.00
50.00
2,050.00 1,872.50
216.00 192.00
125.00 150.00
34.00 30.00
260.00 225.00
1,150.00 750.00
$ 96,725.00 $ 91,269.50


$ 5,859.39 $ 6,145.23
$ 5,859.39 $ 6,145.23


$ 60.67 $ 264.63
147.00 223.50
$ 207.67 $ 488.13
$ 102,792.06 $ 97,902.86
482.50 237.50
3,275.10 1,467.80
$ 3,757.60 $ 1,705.30
$ 99,034.46 $ 96,197.56















FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Division of Salt Water Fisheries

Statement of Actual Revenues


MOTORBOATING REVOLVING TRUST FUND
Motorboat Registration Certificates
Fees
Commercial Boat License
Non-Resident Commercial Boat License
Non-Resident Commercial Fishing License ....................
Purse Seines License
Change of Ownership
Duplicates
Change of Classification
Overage
Other
TOTAL MOTORBOATING REVENUE BEFORE ADJUSTMENTS ..........
Less: Returned Checks
Less: Refunds
Less: Counties Share of Registration Certificates ........
Total Adjustments
TOTAL MOTORBOATING REVOLVING TRUST FUND REVENUE ....

MARINE BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH TRUST FUND
Royalties from Sale of Dead Shell
Less: Tampa Port Authority's Share
TOTAL MARINE BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH TRUST FUND ................

OYSTER CULTURE TRUST FUND
Receipts from Trustees of Internal
Improvement Fund

SALT WATER PRODUCTS PROMOTION TRUST FUND
Wholesale Licenses
Federal Grant Revenue
TOTAL SALT WATER PRODUCTS PROMOTION TRUST FUND ........
GRAND TOTAL DIVISION OF SALT WATER FISHERIES ............


Fiscal Year Fiscal Year
1964-1965 1965-1966
$ 965,641.95 $1,098,748.50
4,311.25 4,511.00
53,307.45 56,991.50
9,950.00 12,075.00
10,825.00 13,050.00
350.00 550.00
29,262.25 31,960.25
1,543.00 1,512.00
248.00 228.00
3,687.82 5,157.34
31.00 56.70
$1,079,157.72 $1,224,840.29
$ 86.50 $ 100.50
4,973.99 3,896.55
653,358.62 710,769.84
$ 658,419.11 $ 714,766.89
$ 420,738.61 $ 510,073.40


$ 380,214.51 $ 307,401.69
119,069.48 91,746.22
$ 261,145.03 $ 215,655.47



$ 51,880.00 $


$ $ 37,250.00
34,597.75
$ $ 71,847.75
$ 832,798.10 $ 893,774.18








FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Division of Salt Water Fisheries
Statement of Actual Expenditures

For the Fiscal Year, 1964-65


Salaries


Other
Personal
Services


General Administration
Licenses Department
Maintenance Department
Research Department
Mail Room
Switchboard
Airplane & Pilot's Expenses
Radio Communication
Purchase of Law Enforcement Equipment ................
General Administration- Law Enforcement ............
Area I Expenses
Area II Expenses
Area III Expenses
Area IV Expenses
Area V Expenses
Area VI Expenses
Area VII Expenses
Area VIII Expenses
Area IX Expenses
Repairs due to Accidents
Gas & Oil Credit Card Purchases
Area X Expenses
Shop Inventory
Insurance

Total Expenditures


$ 11,595.51
25,941.52
17,636.25
24,999.96

(315.00)
4,800.00


21,665.32
38,253.61
36,351.04
38,597.00
47,395.05
35,803.23
46,301.45
30,303.74
43,223.18
38,373.82


33,693.96


$ 968.75
2,739.19
1,081.87
4,335.79


331.25




404.38




523.75


$ 15,527.56
4,806.67
6,290.74
3,276.30
1,810.71
18,026.47
2,992.95
752.80
16.12
49,940.64
12,836.66
12,170.64
13,005.70
11,290.80
13,138.76
18,292.72
11,491.36
16,72326
16,199.83
(140.09)
80,362.63
11,505.12
1/ QOl 7\


$ 150.00

291.10



13,813.00
46,166.95
3,061.36
589.72
2,111.20
2,851.08
2,547.16


3,349.35
2,638.70
1,327.36


761.85


k )
20,676.54

$ 494,619.64 $ 10,384.98 $ 339,173.22 $ 79,658.83


Department


Expenses


Operating
Capital
Outlay


Total


$ 28,241.82
33,487.38
25,299.96
32,612.05
1,810.71
17,711.47
7,792.95
14,565.80
46,183.07
74,667.32
52,011.24
50,632.88
54,453.78
61,233.01
48,941.99
64,594.17
45,548.83
62,585.14
55,901.01
(140.09)
80,362.63
46,484.68
(1,821.67)
20,676.54

$ 923,836.67







FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Division of Salt Water Fisheries
Statement of Actual Expenditures


For the Fiscal Year, 1965-66
Other
Personal
Salaries Services


General Administration
Licenses Department
Maintenance Department
Research Department
Mail Room
Switchboard
Airplane & Pilots Expenses
Radio Communication
. Purchase of Law Enforcement Equipment ................
General Administration Law Enforcement ..........
Area 1 Expenses
Area II Expenses
Area III Expenses
Area IV Expenses
Area V Expenses
Area VI Expenses
Area VII Expenses
Area VIII Expenses
Area IX Expenses
Area X Expenses
Gas & Oil Credit Card Purchases
Repairs due to Accidents
Archaeological Salvage
Insurance
Shop Inventory

Total Expenditures


$ 15,712.39
28,037.34
17,915.00
26,512.92
(82.32)

5,280.00


7,609.92
55,283.35
40,169.36
37,890.09
57,197.65
45,355.00
61,034.92
36,408.65
48,575.26
48,659.64
44,142.00


2,661.29


$ 2,959.78
2,031.89
1,320.65

3,794.27


68.75


$ 21,825.56
8,143.09
2,152.81
3,238.28
872.60
19,242.65
2,434.26

104.46
45,348.72
12,416.38
9,143.59
11,973.67
13,100.07
12,390.90
23,062.69
9,734.24
14,413.63
20,105.71
13,880.13
73,865.31
426.62
1 470 76f


$ 8,587.50

100.45
14.10



150,042.01
227.80


831.27

448.82
804.00
417.39
641.55
50.00
29.71


$ 49,085.23
38,212.32
21,488.91
29,765.30
4,584.55
19,242.65
7,714.26

150,146.47
53,186.44
67,699.73
49,312.95
50,695.03
70,297.72
58,194.72
84,901.61
46,629.03
63,630.44
68,815.35
58,051.84
73,865.31
426.62
2,661.29
18,470.76


11,637.24 11,637.24

$ 578,362.46 $ 10,175.34 $ 347,983.37 $ 162,194.60 $1,098,715.77


Department


Expenses


Operating
Capital
Outlay


Total


Dphartment







FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Division of Salt Water Fisheries
Motorboating Revolving Trust Fund
Statement of Actual Expenditures

For the Fiscal Year, 1964-65
Other Operating
Personal Capital
Department Salaries Services Expenses Outlay Total
General Administration $ 14,199.96 $ 997.13 $ 22,575.76 $ 1,421.00 $ 39,193.85
License Department 23,873.75 867.50 15,336.89 2,176.52 42,254.66
IBM Department 27,295.83 160.00 17,287.94 346.87 45,090.64
Motorboating Safety Program 52,161.54 39,642.45 9,266.33 101,070.32

Total Expenditures $ 117,531.08 $ 2,024.63 $ 94,843.04 $ 13,210.72 $ 227,609.47


For the Fiscal Year, 1965-66
Other Operating
Personal Capital
Department Salaries Services Expenses Outlay Total
General Administration $ 16,227.32 $ 2,081.63 $ 35,610.18 $ 10,365.35 $ 64,284.48
License Department 27,031.55 431.75 6,453.88 423.00 34,340.18
IBM Department 28,545.85 80.00 14,914.93 94.80 43,635.58
Motorboating Safety Program 60,191.04 43,155.25 4,974.01 108,320.30

Total Expenditures $ 131,995.76 $ 2,593.38 $ 100,134.24 $ 15,857.16 $ 250,580.54









FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Division of Salt Water Fisheries
Marine Biological Research Trust Fund
Statement of Actual Expenditures

For the Fiscal Year, 1964-65


Salaries


Other
Personal
Services


General Administration
Boat Rentals
Algae
Spiney Lobster at Stuart
Field Surveys
Saint Augustine
Spiny Lobster
Plankton
Larval Fish
Library
Fish
Exploratory Fishing
Oysters
Vitamin B-12
Artificial Cultivation
Red Tide
Statistics
Maintenance
Administration of Dead Shell Leases
Hernan Cortez
Marketing


$ 89,000.53 $ 3,958.33 $ 43,715.09
1,493.16
1,425.00 114.24
1,790.00 2,632.73
6,700.00 477.99
6,600.00 408.75 5,238.37
5,800.00 776.43
4,005.00 362.01
8,150.97 24.59
3,600.00 226.00
5,680.00 1,835.73
57.40
6,500.00 2,330.46


2,100.00
6,049.19
1,586.58
3,476.39
6,030.00
2,496.47


1,058.00


512.40
1,954.72
1,735.44
168.00
10,940.78
10,282.20


$ 8,311.23

88.00
3,368.42

292.80

873.79
1,738.60
1,123.43
554.90
723.56
1,895.53
995.00



356.70

5,268.29


$ 144,985.18
1,493.16
1,627.24
7,791.15
7,177.99
12,539.92 -
6,576.43 oo
5,240.80
9,914.16
4,949.43
8,070.63
780.96
10,725.99
995.00
2,100.00
6,561.59
3,541.30
5,568.53
6,198.00
19,763.54
10,282.20


Total Expenditures $ 159,200.13 $ 7,215.08 $ 84,877.74 $ 25,590.25 $ 276,883.20


Department


Expenses


Operating
Capital
Outlay


Total









FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Division of Salt Water Fisheries
Marine Biological Research Trust Fund
Statement of Actual Expenditures

For the Fiscal Year, 1965-66


Salaries


Other
Personal
Services


General Administration
Shark Study
Boat Rentals
FSU Project
Algae
Stuart
Field Surveys
Invertebrates
Spiny Lobster
Phytoplankton
Larval Fish
Library
Fish
Oysters
Artificial Cultivation
Larval Crabs
Statistics, records, archives
Maintenance
Marketing
Hernan Cortez
Clams


$ 99,541.75 $ 3,544.01 $ 28,594.70
1,471.06
30.00
187.13
4,380.00 465.14
696.77 1,133.28 2,352.27
7,320.00 881.22
7,580.00 2,841.08
1,238.20


4,400.00
6,200.00
3,780.00
5,570.47
6,627.50
5,040.00
5,040.00
2,299.54
3,315.00
13,311.94
'7 8an nn


146.25


1,064.00
9ofin n


607.76
735.72
1,166.74
2,276.52

285.10
530.49
4,274.65
13,528.25
5 R8S4


6,575.00 49.90


$ 1,534.43 $ 133,214.89
875.45 2,346.51
30.00
187.13
1,223.64 6,068.78 o
547.64 4,729.96 0
40.00 8,241.22
133.10 10,554.18
1,238.20
4,400.00
200.00 7,007.76
352.92 4,868.64
840.00 7,723.46
233.63 9,137.65
5,040.00
5,325.10
54.70 2,884.73
429.95 8,019.60
4,286.57 32,190.76
985.00 13,958.84
6,624.90


Total Expenditures $ 189,057.97 $ 6,147.54 $ 66,849.77 $ 11,737.03 $ 273,792.31


Department


Expenses


Operating
Capital
Outlay


Total




FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Division of Salt Water Fisheries
Study of Red Tide
Statement of Actual Expenditures


For the Fiscal Year, 1964-65
Other Operating
Personal Capital
Department Salaries Services Expenses Outlay Total

General Administration $ 43,111.80 $ 4,014.74 $ 17,456.75 $ 6,077.58 $ 70,660.87
Inorganic 4,818.38 843.00 5,661.38
Phytoplankton 818.96 5,674.14 6,493.10
Microbiology 10,010.00 2,882.89 2,365.06 15,257.95
Organic Chemistry 7,664.88 3,146.38 10,811.26
Art Culture 1,901.01 3,374.39 5,275.40
Vitamin B-12 7,775.00 2,330.04 44.38 10,149.42
Coordination 1,890.11 335.00 2,225.11
Florida State University 12,000.00 58.60 12,058.60

Total Expenditures $ 60,896.80 $ 16,014.74 $ 39,821.62 $ 21,859.93 $ 138,593.09

For the Fiscal Year, 1965-66
Other Operating
Personal Capital
Department Salaries Services Expenses Outlay Total

General Administration $ 33,796.41 $ 1,788.75 $ 11,022.16 $ 90.00 $ 46,697.32
Inorganic 1,213.78 770.00 1,983.78
Phytoplankton 5,500.00 691.03 292.00 6,483.03
Microbiology 960.00 166.91 1,126.91
Organic Chemistry 7,920.00 110.00 5,309.00 641.45 13,980.45
Art Culture 384.50 384.50
Vitamin B-12 and Bioassays 6,600.00 2,623.34 1,042.50 10,265.84
Coordination 610.81 610.81
Contract and Consultation 12,000.00 12,000.00
Maintenance 389.82 389.82
Library 50.00 8.50 58.50

Total Expenditures $ 54,776.41 $ 13,948.75 $ 22,411.35 $ 2,844.45 $ 93,980.96



















FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Division of Salt Water Fisheries
Study of Crawfish in Monroe County
Statement of Actual Expenditures

For the Fiscal Year, 1965-66
Other
Personal
Department Salaries Services
General Administration $ 3,553.58 None

Total Expenditures $ 3,553.58 None


Expenses

2,016.14

2,016.14


Operating
Capital
Outlay

$ 11,203.66

$ 11,203.66


Total

$ 16,773.38

$ 16,773.38





















Department


FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Division of Salt Water Fisheries
Oyster Culture
Statement of Actual Expenditures

For the Fiscal Year, 1964-65
Other
Personal
Salaries Services


Expenses


Operating
Capital
Outlay


Total


General Administration $ 27,395.92 $ 805.00 $ 11,277.72 $ 6,582.10 $ 46,060.74

Total Expenditures $ 27,395.92 $ 805.00 $ 11,277.72 $ 6,582.10 $ 46,060.74

For the Fiscal Year, 1965-66
Other Operating
Personal Capital
Department Salaries Services Expenses Outlay Total

General Administration $ 27,392.89 $ 943.75 $ 6,745.96 $ 488.03 $ 35,570.63

Total Expenditures $ 27,392.89 $ 943.75 $ 6,745.96 $ 488.03 $ 35,570.63


Co
0c



















FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Division of Salt Water Fisheries
Salt Water Products Promotion Trust Fund
Statement of Actual Expenditures


Department
Seafood Promotion

Total Expenditures


For the Fiscal Year, 1965-66
Other
Personal
Salaries Services

$ 15,018.74 None

$ 15,018.74 None


Expenses

$ 61,455.43

$ 61,455.43


Operating
Capital
Outlay

$ 13,405.31

$ 13,405.31


Total

$ 89,879.48

$ 89,879.48



















J,
1L4 "'F
:: -I

en


The harbor at Port Everglades, Florida.







DIVISION OF WATERWAYS DEVELOPMENT
FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
TALLAHASSEE



RESPONSIBILITIES
It is the statutory duty of the Division of Waterways Development
to coordinate the activities of all public bodies, authorities, agencies, and
special districts charged with the development of waterways within the
state.
The Division also is charged by law with fostering, promoting, and
guiding development of a unified system of waterways within Florida.
The Division has authority under law to distribute to the Canal
Authority of the State of Florida, or other authorized agencies, any avail-
able state funds for use on a matching basis to acquire rights-of-way for
any waterways development project authorized by an appropriate federal
or state agency.
The Division of Waterways Development, in cooperation with other
Divisions of the Florida Board of Conservation, assists the Director of
Conservation in conducting the annual Governor's Conference on Water
Resources Development, analyzing the data received, and assisting the
Board in preparing its recommendation of projects to be presented to
the Congress in a unified Florida program of water-related public works
projects for which federal authorization and/or funds are sought.






DIVISION OF WATERWAYS DEVELOPMENT
FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
TALLAHASSEE


1965-66


Roger Bachman
Division Director







ACTIVITIES
The increasing importance in conservation of Florida's water re-
sources is recognized in the continued growth of the integrated program
of water oriented public works projects requiring federal, state, and local
support.
This unified program, growing out of the annual Conference on
Water Resources Development, establishes a comprehensive basis for pre-
sentation of the federal appropriation requirements to Congress each year.
Increasing effectiveness of this method of coordinated planning is dem-
onstrated by the fact that the federal appropriations for fiscal year 1967
exceeded $41 million, whereas the average prior to 1961 was approxi-
mately $14 million.
The 107 mile long Cross-Florida Barge Canal continues to be
the most significant project under construction. Construction started
in December 1964, is scheduled to be complete in 1973, and will
provide a 12-foot deep, 150 foot wide waterway having an ultimate
cost in excess of $158 million.
The segment of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway from Fort Myers to
Tarpon Springs is being completed. Formal dedication was scheduled for
February 25, 1967.
The Palm Beach Harbor modification, increasing the harbor depth
from 27 to 33 feet, has been resumed and is now scheduled to be com-
pleted in 1968. Federal funds in the amount of $1.8 million have been
appropriated for this work in fiscal 1967 and $5.6 million total to date.
Modification of the Key West Harbor to include a breakwater at
the entrance of the harbor, an enlargement of the turning basin, and
improvement of the channels for use by the fishing fleets is scheduled to
commence during 1967 at an initial federal cost of $600,000.
Canaveral Harbor, with a connecting lock to reach the Atlantic In-
tracoastal Waterway, has been completed. Only the sand transfer facil-
ities at the entrance to the harbor remain to be completed. This con-
struction is funded for initiation in 1967.
Deepening of the channel to the Jacksonville Harbor from 34 to 38
feet for a distance of 20 miles inland from the Mayport Jetties has been
authorized. Federal funds in the amount of $80,000 for construction de-
sign have been appropriated as the first installment to start this project.
A federal appropriation of $700,000 is funded for maintenance dredging
of the Jacksonville Harbor, to include the channel to the Blount Island
port facilities.
Preconstruction planning for the Ponce de Leon Inlet has been funded
for the current fiscal year and a construction start is hoped to be achieved
in 1968. Fiscal 1967 appropriations include $60,000 for engineering.
Improvement of East Pass to Choctawhatchee Bay at Destin, Florida,
is funded for a construction start during the current fiscal year.