<%BANNER%>
Biennial report
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075929/00013
 Material Information
Title: Biennial report
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Board of Conservation
Florida Geological Survey
Publisher: The Board
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Creation Date: 1961
Publication Date: 1936-1968
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Natural resources -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Conservation of natural resources -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Saltwater fishing -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Economic conditions -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida State Board of Conservation.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1936/38-1967/68.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vols. for 1936/38-1959/60 called 3rd-14th.
Numbering Peculiarities: 6th (1943/44) bound with the 6th Biennial report of the Florida Geological survey.
Numbering Peculiarities: Biennium ending Dec.31.
General Note: 13th (1957/58) has a subtitle "Salt water fishing."
General Note: Vols. for 1961/62-1963/64 include biennial reports of the individual divisions of the Board of Conservation.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001589422
oclc - 01410803
notis - AHL3395
System ID: UF00075929:00013
 Related Items
Preceded by: Biennial report to State Board of Conservation
Succeeded by: Biennial report - Florida Department of Natural Resources

Full Text



Biennial

Report

1961-62


FLORIDA
BOARD OF CONSERVATION
TALLAHASSEE


333


117-62
o-.2










UNIVERSITY

OF FLOP "



FLORIDA

BOARD OF CONSERVATION




FARRIS BRYANT
Governor

TOM ADAMS J. EDWIN LARSON
Secretary of State Treasurer

RAY E. GREEN THOMAS D. BAILEY
Comptroller Supt. of Public Instruction

RICHARD ERVIN DOYLE CONNER
Attorney General Commissioner of Agriculture

RANDOLPH HODGES
Director of Conservation

















c9Jlnida State 6oait oi CoT eonevatin






March 1, 1963

Honorable Farris Bryant, chairman
Florida Board of Conservation
Tallahassee, Florida

Dear Governor Bryant,

It is with pride that I submit this biennial report covering the years 1961-
1962. This is the first report since the reorganization of the Florida Board of
Conservation and embraces the activities of the five divisions created by the
1961 Legislative Act

This report reflects the coordination and expansion of the duties and re-
sponsibilities of the Conservation Department. It shows substantial progress
in all areas.

Respectfully yours
Randolph Hodges, director



















Preface
The 1961 Legislature consolidated under the Board of Conservation the
state agencies concerned with development of waterways, geology, salt
water fisheries and water resources.
The merging of these closely-related activities in a single department
achieved three principal purposes:
1. State-wide recognition of the importance to Florida of the full
development of these resources and an understanding of the urgency
of planning Florida's development programs.
2. Coordinated, under effective leadership, direction of the several
state agencies participating in these natural resource programs.
3. Presentation of a unified Florida effort at the national level in order
to achieve federal support for all state projects in this field.
Members of the Board of Conservation have been kept informed of
current activities and have provided guidance as needed.
The reports of the individual divisions of the Board of Conservation are
summarized briefly in the interest of economy, yet present a complete
report of the activities of the Department.
Detailed information on the projects and programs of the divisions of
the Board are available in technical papers and publications and will be
furnished on request.









TABLE OF CONTENTS


Page
Letter of transmittal ..................................... ......... 1

Preface ...... ................ ... ......... ... ... ............. 2

Organizational chart ................. ............................. 4

Division of Administration ...... .................................... 5
Division of W aterways Development .............................. 10

Division of Salt W ater Fisheries ...................... ............ 13
Research .................................... ................ 17
Statement of Expenditures ...................................... 20
Oyster leases ........... .................................... 29

Division of Water Resources and Conservation .......................... 31
Statement of Expenditures ....................... ............... 42

Division of Geology ................ ................................ 57



ILLUSTRATIONS

Florida's Integrated Inland Waterways System ......................... 9

Research staff ...................................... ............... 16

Oyster tonger ...................................................... 18

Estimated available safe annual water supply ......................... 35

W ater management authorities ....................................... 36

Principal aquifers ........................................... 53

Areas of completed studies .......................................... 54

Status of area projects ............... .............................. 55

Measuring stations and sampling sites .................................. 56

3





ORGANIZATIONAL AND FUNCTIONAL CHART
OF THE
FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 370, FLORIDA STATUTES, 1961

BOARD OF CONSERVATION
Governor


Secretary of State
Attorney General
Comptroller


State Treasurer
Superintendent of Public Instruction
Commissioner of Agriculture


DIRECTOR
May also serve as Director of any of the Divisions
of the Board and shall serve as Director of the
Division of Administration.


STATE SOIL CONSERVATION BOARD
(Same membership as
Board of Conservation)
Chap. 582. F.S, -. The Board, except as
provided in Chap. 582, shall act in conjunc-
tion with, butat all times under and subject
to, the control and supervision of the Board of
Conservation.


S Division of
SAdministration



S Weather Modification
Secs. 373.261-373.391,
F.S.



Archeology
Chap. 376, F.S.


Other functions and
duties of the Board
not specifically
assigned by law to
some other division.



I
THE CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN
FLORIDA FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT,
created pursuant to Chap. 25270,
Acts of 1949.


I
Division of
Salt Water Fisheries



Administer, coordinate,
and enforce Secs. 370.03-
370.17 and Chap. 371, F.S.


I
THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA
WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT,
created pursuant to Chap. 61-691.


I
S Division of Water
Resources and Conservation


Administer, coordinate and
enforce Secs. 373.021-373.251
and Chap. 378, F.S.



Guide and coordinate the
activities of all flood
control districts, or water
management districts, now in
existence or hereafter
created, under Chap. 378,
F.S., or by special act.




I
OTHER FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICTS
OR WATER MANAGEMENT
DISTRICTS,
created by special acts or created
by the Board pursuant to Chap.
378, F.S.


A Division of
Waterways Development


Coordinate the activities
of all public bodies, author-
ities, agencies and special
districts charged with the
development of waterways
within the state, now in
existence or hereafter created
by general or special act.

Foster, promote, and guide
development of an integrated
system of waterways within the
state.


Disburse to the Canal Authority
of the State of Florida moneys
received from the Trustees of
the I. I. Fund for that purpose,
within certain limitations.


II I
THE CROSS FLORIDA THE FLORIDA INLAND THE WEST COAST INLAND
CANAL NAVIGATION NAVIGATION DISTRICT, NAVIGATION DISTRICT,
DISTRICT, created pursuant created pursuant to created pursuant to
to Secs. 374.301-374.521, Chap. 14723, Acts of Chap. 23770, Acts of
F.S. 1931, as amended. 1947, as amended.


Division of
Geology

I
Administer, enforce and
coordinate the functions
of the geological depart-
ment in Secs. 373.011-
373.012 and Chap. 377,
F.S., relating to conservation
of oil and gas resources.
























OTHER SPECIAL DISTRICTS,
created by special acts
or created by the Board,
at the request of local
groups, pursuant to Secs.
374.75-374.95, F.S.


I


I













DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATION
FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
TALLAHASSEE


FIRST BIENNIAL REPORT
1961- 1962


RANDOLPH HODGES
DIRECTOR










INTRODUCTION
The Division of Administration was activated July 1, 1961, when the 1961
Legislative Act (Section 370.02, Florida Statutes) reorganizing the Florida
Board of Conservation became effective.
The reorganization act brought under a single director, responsible to the
Board, the Salt Water Fisheries Department (known familiarly as the Conser-
vation Department), the Department of Water Resources and Conservation
and the State Geological Survey. These departments previously had operated
independently, each reporting directly to the Board of Conservation. The 1961
legislation also created two new divisions, Administration and Waterways De-
velopment.
The Division of Administration is charged with administering, coordinating
and enforcing weather modification (Sections 373.261-378.891) and archeology
statutes (Chapter 376). It also has the duty of rendering any services required
by the Board and the several divisions which can be centralized effectively and
advantageously.

ACTIVITIES
Carrying out the mandate of the Legislature, the Director has centralized
fiscal operations of the various divisions under the Division of Administration.
This has resulted in tighter internal control over expenditures of the various
divisions and improved inventories of stocks of materials and equipment.
The transition by necessity could not be carried out overnight, but savings
have been achieved through uniform and more efficient accounting procedures.
More substantial savings because of a centralized fiscal operation will be re-
flected in general administrative expenditures of the several divisions during
the 1963-65 biennium.
An efficient centralized purchasing procedure also has been created under
the Division of Administration.
All requests for purchases must be submitted to the purchasing agent. He
investigates to determine need, prepares specifications and issues bid calls, re-
ceives bids and issues purchase orders. Emergency purchases in the field are
limited to $25, unless advance approval is obtained from the purchasing agent.
The centralized purchasing operation has produced substantial savings
during the past 18 months. Unit prices for printing, commodities and equip-
ment show reductions ranging from 3 to 15 per cent.
Steps have been taken during the past 12 months to centralize personnel
procedures. The position of personnel director in the Division of Salt Water
Fisheries has been abolished and the responsibilities for personnel administra-
tion for the several divisions has been assumed by the Fiscal Officer of the
Division of Administration.
Information and education services of the several divisions in effect have
been centralized under the Director of Conservation. Services in this field have
been expanded greatly, with no increase in personnel. Stronger emphasis has
been placed on providing the public with information through mass news media
-newspapers, radio and television stations. More than 500 personnel appear-









ances have been made by members of the headquarters and field staffs before
civic, fraternal, outdoors and youth organizations to create better understanding
of conservation goals.
Production of an educational motion picture, "Men in Grey," was completed
in May, 1962.
It is proposed to formally establish an Information and Education Section
within the Division of Administration during the next biennium, abolishing
the separate information services of the several divisions.
During 1962, full responsibility for administration of leases for the taking
of dead oyster shell from submerged lands was assigned to the Division of
Administration of the Board of Conservation. The Director successfully rene-
gotiated outstanding leases, increasing the average return from dead shell from
10 cents per cubic yard to in some instances 26.66 cents per cubic yard. The
returns to the State from sale of dead oyster shell totaled $145,107.72 during
fiscal 1961-62, compared to $118,417.87 during the previous fiscal year.
It is estimated that shell leases royalty receipts accruing to the State in
the future will average $200,000 a year.
Returns from dead shell leases are earmarked by law for the research
program of the Division of Salt Water Fisheries. The increased receipts have
permitted urgently needed expansion in vital research fields.
Activity in the weather modification field has been dormant during the
biennium. However, the only permit ever issued under the law was renewed by
the holder, Ervin P. Krick Associates.
Because of financial limitations, Chapter 376, Florida Statutes, authorizing
employment of a state archeologist, has not been implemented. The need for
a statewide archeological survey and prevention of destruction of priceless
historical and archeological sites remains urgent. It is proposed to implement
Chapter 376 during the coming biennium.
Funds appropriated by the 1961 Legislature for operations of the Division
of Administration have proved inadequate. The Director has carried out his
responsibilities by transferring to the Division of Administration, with Budget
Commission approval, funds appropriated to the Division of Salt Water Fish-
eries for general administration.

HURRICANE PROTECTION
An increasing amount of attention has been focused recently on the possi-
bility of providing hurricane protection and beach erosion control works, all in
an effort to preserve our natural resources and to prevent loss of life and to
alleviate damages to property.
Federal funds have been made available to the Corps of Engineers for
such studies. An awareness of the importance to the State of Florida of such
protection gives recognition to this program. It may be wise to take advantage
of the available federal assistance on such projects as may be appropriate.
The tremendous ratio of economic benefits to cost that can be reflected to
the state and the local communities as a result of such construction works is
astounding.
These projects are closely allied with flood control, navigation and conser-









vation of natural resources. Because the federal budget which presents these
items to Congress also includes the flood control accounts, requiring simultaneous
justification, the Governor, by proclamation on December 20, 1962, assigned
responsibility to the Board of Conservation for coordination of all federal projects
under jurisdiction of the Corps of engineers which concern hurricane protection
works and beach erosion control projects.
Although this office is not now organized or manned to handle this work,
need is apparent for the State Legislature to consider this assignment on a per-
manent basis so that the Board of Conservation may be provided authorization
and funds to perform it.
As of this time, such work as has been accomplished in this activity has
consisted primarily of coordination of reports with the Corps of Engineers, with
the news media, with flood control districts and with local communities. It has
also included justification of requests before congressional committees and the
federal Bureau of the Budget for the projects in Florida.
The basic study of the Corps of Engineers analyzes the paths and actions
of hurricanes during the period of record and pinpoints areas where storm dam-
ages could be expected to occur again in the future based on storms of record.
In some areas it is considered feasible by constructing protective works to pre-
vent or alleviate extensive damage by flooding and reduce loss of life if such
storms re-occur. These local studies are prepared for specific areas if desired
by the state and the local community.
Similarly, the beach erosion control projects are matters of public interest
which can be of invaluable assistance to the state and the community if con-
structed to prevent or alleviate serious damage or loss of valuable real estate in
certain selected areas.
These two activities will receive a greater amount of attention during the
coming biennium and should be considered of great importance to Florida as
insurance against the loss of great numbers of lives and in preventing incalculable
damages to property.

SHELL LEASE ROYALTY RECEIPTS

ROYALTY RECEIPTS
Lease Lessee Area Covered
No. 1960-61 1961-62
460
1788 Benton & Company, Inc.......Tampa Bay........... $ 63,000.00 $36,459.70
639 Bay Dredging and Construc-
1703 tion Company ............ Tampa Bay............ 180.00 16,445.73
753
1718 Radcliff Materials, Inc........Northwest Florida..... 43,884.51 76,730.13
1082 Fort Myers Shell Company,
1344 Inc.......................Caloosahatchee River.. 10,976.56 8,303.67
1504 Edison Shell Co., Inc.......... Caloosahatchee River.. 60.00 1,782.70
1585 Bradenton Dredging and Shell
Company, Inc.............. Manatee River........ 316.80 1,958.70
1684 Edison Shell Co., Inc.......... Charlotte Harbor.................. 3,427.09
$118,417.87 $145,107.72










FLORIDA'S INTEGRATED INLAND
WATERWAYS SYSTEM


1 ATTAHOOCHEE rl-' FERNANDINA


aI 8 utho r
SS C RA
APALACHI I PALA A --


PRINCIPAL COMPONENTS YA 0 N
I. Cross-Florida Barge Canal: Authorized
12' deep, 150' bottom, 5 locks. \ ': SAT SV LLE
2. Port Canaveral Lock and Canal to Atlantic -b-a-
Intracoastal Waterway: Canal existing, Lock
authorized. MPAi'
3. Sanford-Titusville Canal:needed and under study. T BU.-___',
4. St. Marks to Anclote: needed and under study. I t -
5. St. Johns River, Jacksonville to Sanford: authorized -- I RCE
and existing 12' 9 ---d 8 UARTf









M. AiN LtEoGD Y Wate: Authorized. Needed-not yet authorized
SAtlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Fernandina to e Miamio: ARLQTT
Authorized and existina- 12' Fernandina to Ft. Pierce. ARKEYR
Authorized- 0' Ft. Pierce to MiamiAuthorized-not under construction
Existing.- 10' Ft. Pierce to Palm Beach,8' Palm Beach to L
Miami.
7. Miami- to Key West: Authorized -7', E -7' to Cross Bank, AM
Open bay to Key West. !
8. Okeechobee Waterway: Authorized and existing- 8'uhorized
9. Intracoastal Waterway, Anclote to Ft. Myers: Authorized -9'OF CONSERATIO
(under construction), 0SS
10. Open Bay Section- Existing7
II. Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, St. Marks to Pensacola:
Authorized-12', Exisflng-12' Carrabelle to Pensacola. KEY WEST
12. Apalachicola River, Apalachicola to Alabama-Georgia
Boundary. U1 Existing or under construction
KIMn Authorized-not under construction
MAP AND LEGEND BY so Needed-not yet authorized
STATE DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION
























DIVISION OF
WATERWAYS DEVELOPMENT

The 1961 Florida Legislature, in reorganizing the Department of Conser-
vation, authorized establishment of a Division of Waterways Development.
This division was charged with:
(a) Coordination of activities of all public bodies, authorities, agencies,
and special districts charged with the development of waterways within
the State of Florida.
(b) Fostering promotion and guiding development of an integrated sys-
tem of waterways within the State of Florida.
(c) Dispersing to the Canal Authority as appropriate any funds available
to the Board of Conservation from the Trustees of the Internal Im-
provement Fund for the purpose of acquiring Rights-of-way for an
authorized waterways development project.
There were no funds appropriated to allow activation of the Division.
However, the importance of waterways development in relation to the
overall water resources development projects to the State of Florida and as
a primary step in expanding the industrial development of Florida dictated
early action in this activity.
Also, in recognizing the interest of the federal government in the Florida
waterways projects, need was apparent for the Board of Conservation to take
prompt essential actions in Florida's effort to foster development of the Cross-
Florida Canal and the West Coast Inland Waterway.
It, therefore, became necessary for the Director and the Assistant Director
of the Board of Conservation to assume the responsibilities assigned by the
Legislature in connection with the waterways development, without awaiting
funding for an appropriate organization to properly execute the duties assigned.
Actions taken in connection with the Cross-Florida Canal and the West Coast
Inland Waterway could not have been deferred without jeopardizing the
projects.









Bi-annual reports by the Florida Canal Authority and of the authorized
navigation districts of Florida are understood to have been submitted directly
to the Governor.
The Board of Conservation has worked very closely with these organiza-
tions in their programs for developing, gaining authorization and financing these
projects. Coordination of plans for promoting the projects were prepared by the
Board of Conservation for presentation by the Governor to the appropriate com-
mittees of the Congress and to the federal Bureau of the Budget.
Coordination of plans and efforts of these organizations with the Corps of
Engineers and with the Congressional committees in an effort to obtain neces-
sary federal and state legislative support and financial aid has been an important
phase of the work performed by the Board of Conservation.
Federal Public Works projects or activities in Florida that are within the
coordinating responsibility of the Board of Conservation are described below.
From Trenton, N. J. on the Atlantic coast to Ft. Pierce, Florida, an inland
protected waterway is constructed to project dimensions of 12 ft. by 125 ft.
From Ft. Pierce to Miami the existing channel is 8 ft. by 100 ft. but is being
constructed to project dimensions of 10 ft. by 125 ft. From Miami to Cross-
Bank along the Keys, the inland waterway has limiting project dimensions of 6
ft. by 75 ft., and from Cross-Bank to Key West open waters are used but with
a protected route existing which will provide 5 foot depth.
Along the Gulf coast from Brownsville, Texas, to Carrabelle, Florida, there
exists an inland protected waterway with project dimensions of 12 ft. by 125
ft. From Carrabelle, Florida, to Anclote, Florida, an open Gulf route is used,
but a protected route is being studied. From Anclote to the Caloosahatchee
River an inland protected waterway is being constructed to project dimensions
of 9 ft. by 100 ft.
The Okeechobee waterway between Ft. Myers and Stuart via Lake Okee-
chobee, serves primarily for flood water runoff from Lake Okeechobee but also
has an existing navigation channel with limiting project dimensions of 8 ft. by
80 ft. and controlling lock dimensions of 50 ft. by 250 ft. and 10 foot depth.
The St. Johns River is navigable from its mouth at Jacksonville to Sanford
with project dimensions of 13 ft. by 200 ft. to Palatka and 12 ft. by 100 ft. to
Sanford.
The proposed Cross Florida Barge Canal from Yankeetown on the Gulf
to the St. Johns River near Palatka is authorized for construction to project
dimensions of 12 ft. by 150 ft. with 5 locks of controlling dimensions 84 ft. by
600 ft. and 14 ft. depth.
Ports and Harbors in Florida currently of great importance to Florida and
requiring a coordinating effort by the Board of Conservation to obtain Federal
support to improve and maintain their navigable channels, turning basins, and
harbor facilities, include: Jacksonville, St. Augustine, Cape Canaveral, Ft.
Pierce, Port Everglades, Palm Beach, Miami, Key West, Tampa, St. Petersburg,
Cedar Key, St. Marks, Apalachicola, Port St. Joe, Panama City and Pensacola.
Request has been made of the Budget Commission to seek funds from the
1963 Legislature to provide the nucleus of an organization to perform the work
of the Division as envisioned by the 1961 Legislature.











DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATION
STATEMENT OF ACTUAL EXPENDITURES
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1961-62


Description


SALARIES AND OPERATING EXPENSES
Personal Services
Salaries and W ages ..............................................
Other Personal Services. ..................................... .
Contractual Services
Express, Freight, and Parcel Post ................................
Post Office Box Rental.............................. .........
Postage.................................................... ..
Telephone and Telegraph.......................................
General Printing and Reproduction Services ........................
Repairs-Buil ding........................................... .
Repairs-Field Equipment, radio, trailer...........................
Repairs-Marine Equipment........................ ..........
Repairs-Office Equipment. .............. ......... .....
Travel .....................................................
Utilities ................... ...............................
Storage ........................................................
Clipping Services. ............. .............................
Miscellaneous ... ...........................................
Materials and Supplies
Bedding, Clothing, Linens, and Other Textile Products ..............
Building and Construction Materials and Supplies ..................
Coal, Fuel Oil, and other Heating Supplies. ........................
Educational, Medical, Scientific and Agricultural Supplies ...........
Food Products ..................................................
Maintenance Materials and Supplies. ...............................
Motor Fuels and Lubricants ......................................
Office Materials and Supplies .....................................
Other Materials and Supplies .....................................
Current Charges and Obligations
Insurance and Surety Bonds ......................................
Rental of Buildings and Equipment...............................
Other Current Charges and Obligations ............................

TOTAL SALARIES AND OPERATING EXPENSES ................................

OPERATING CAPITAL OUTLAY
Books........................................................
Buildings and Fixed Equipment.... .................................
Educational, Medical, Scientific, and Agricultural Equipment.........
Automotive ................................................
Field Equipment (Trailers) .......................................
M arine (boats, outboard motors) ..................................
Office Furniture and Equipment .................... ...........
Other Capital Outlay ............................................
Repairshop Equipment.......................................

TOTAL OPERATING CAPITAL OUTLAY ............ .........................

N ON-OPERATING
Distributions and Transfers to State Funds............................
Revolving and Working Fund Established ............................

TOTAL NON-OPERATING ................................................

TOTAL COST FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1961-62..............................


$ 27,025.16
5,281.50


50.00
726.97
295.03
160.38


5,902.36


155.44



294.30


233.34
33.04


166.00

$ 40,323.52


$ ............




465.56



$ 465.56


$ 1,500.00

1,500.00

$ 42,289.08


Administration














DIVISION OF SALT WATER FISHERIES
FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
TALLAHASSEE

















FIFTEENTH BIENNIAL REPORT
1961- 1962





RANDOLPH HODGES
DIRECTOR


























OVERVIEW

During the calendar years 1961 and 1962, Florida's population increased
about three quarters of a million. At the end of this period we ranked ninth
nationally in number of residents.
This population surge, one of the largest recorded for the U. S., under-
standably brought problems to salt water fishing. Many people prefer to live
near water, especially oceans, and urbanization is accelerated accordingly in
coastal areas. Shorelines also attract fishermen, sports and commercial, and we
have, as a result, conflicting interests in those areas.
Rapid population growth tends to sully the waters with industrial wastes
and sewage. Diversions of water are made by canals and channels. Causeways,
breakwaters and jetties retard normal flow. Dredging and filling eliminates
permanently vast areas of underwater feeding and nursery areas for important
marine and brackish water animals.
Large populations result in greater fishing pressure. New and more effi-
cient ways of taking and catching are developed and many of these upset
established economic order and custom and are often resisted vigorously by
some segments of the population. In other cases, innovations are alleged to
damage the basic resources and are thus in bad repute.
All of these activities and the ensuing controversies come under the juris-
diction and within the purview of the Salt Water Fisheries Division of the State
Board of Conservation. Much technical and administrative effort was expended
on seeking, finding, and putting into operation solutions to problems occasioned
by disputes.
Aided by the aggressively interested governorship of Farris Bryant, re-
markable progress was made during the biennium, not only with new chal-
lenges but with several old, chronic troubles was well.
Among the many achievements, the following are especially worthy of
note:








1) Positive measures were taken to improve the perennial problem of de-
clining demand and consumption of mullet, the State's still number one food
scalefish. Typical steps:
a) Because of the widespread erroneous belief that mullet is inferior,
and because another name was already in widespread use among
Florida's large Latin population, the Spanish name Lisa was formally
adopted as a popular synonym.
b) The healthful qualities of Lisa were given widespread publicity,
particularly the presence of polyunsaturated fats. These have lately
been shown to be of use in controlling cholesterol deposition in circu-
latory disease.
c) Already established methods of canning Lisa were brought out of
file cabinets and put to use under Board sponsorship. An initial pilot
pack of 5,000 cans was distributed widely in public meetings and
demonstrated before culinary staffs of leading State institutions.
d) The interest created by (c), above, resulted in the commercial
production of canned Lisa by one private company. At the end of the
biennium the product was on sale in about four cities in Florida. The
production of canned Lisa for the public was a development of the
latter part of 1962, and the small distribution area is expected to expand
and to spread over southeastern United States during the next bien-
nium (1963-64).
e) Technical advice and free consultation services were offered to any
person, firm or corporation interested in processing Lisa. Smoked
products were encouraged including the ever popular smoked Lisa
spread, particularly tasty in canapes and hors d'oeuvres.
2) Law enforcement men were designated "officers." As a group, they
were called the "patrol." Area supervisors were appointed "Lieutenants" and
the chief law enforcement officer was commissioned "Commander." Intermedi-
ate ranks bore appropriate titles based upon Navy equivalency. Law enforce-
ment activity was stepped up substantially. The Conservation Patrol, although
virtually unchanged numerically, made 1,275 arrests in fiscal 1961-62, compared
to 580 in fiscal 1959-60.
3. The staff and program of research in St. Petersburg Laboratory were
enlarged. In addition, field stations were established during the summer of
1962 in St. Augustine and Pigeon Key (Monroe County). For more informa-
tion, see Research).
4. The Florida Boating Safety Council is an interagency association com-
posed of the Governor's Office, the Salt Water Fisheries Division, Game &
Fresh Water Fish Commission, Florida Sheriffs' Association and the U. S. Coast
Guard (Advisory).
The Attorney General's Office also participates cooperatively.
The organizational meeting was held in January 1962, at which time
arrangements were made for the now well-known boating safety teams, com-
posed of officers of the Conservation Patrol, Game & Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission and Deputy Sheriffs. These teams (2) travel over Florida promoting
boat safety by public appearances and on-the-water inspections.






L, : -P s?~a ;-
luuT~ _1 II~


rw
9


LI


Pictured at the St. Petersburg Laboratory are:
The research staff of the Salt Water Fisheries Division is a vital arm of Florida's Back row: Larry Gillespie, George Tom Martin, Robert M. Ingle, director of
conservation effort. These marine biologists and chemists develop the facts necessary research; Robert Topp, Walter Havens, Maxine Switzer.
to sound management practices. Top priority in the research program is seeking a Front row: Claudia LeDuc, Jean Williams, Bonnie Eldred, Vernon Senterfitt.
solution to Red Tide. Violet Stewart, Lula Bravos, Jane Biggs, Kenneth D. Woodburn.


-aA
11









5. The demise of the Northern producing centers focused attention on
Florida's oyster potential. Calendar 1961 was the greatest year of record with
a total of 3,326,601 pounds of meats being reported. Although figures for 1962
are preliminary, first returns indicate another record breaking year with at
least a 100% increase over the previous twelve month period.
6. Oyster interest was also apparent in the growth of private cultivation.
At the beginning of the biennium, there were just 2,000 acres of water bottom
under lease. As the year 1962 closed, there were three times that number
privately controlled (6,016).
7. Strong demand and faltering domestic production resulted in many
Florida shrimp producers moving substantial numbers of vessels to Caribbean
and Central American ports. Other parts of the world increased their locally-
owned fleets, resulting in greater imports into the United States.
8. Biologists and administrators of the Salt Water Fisheries Division, work-
ing closely with their colleagues in other states of the Gulf of Mexico, and
through the Gulf States Marine Fisheries Association, were able to bring a
realization to the U. S. Congress that the American shrimp industry was in
serious trouble.

RESEARCH

Sensible and careful management of Florida's salt water resources must
be based upon knowledge and understanding. In order that this background
may be available, a strong program of research is essential.
During the past two years the scientific investigation of the Salt Water
Fisheries have continued to expand. As in previous biennia, the investigations
were carried out in two ways:
(1) By Board of Conservation personnel in state-operated laboratories.
(2) By contract with the University of Miami.
Contracts were diminished while the work of scientists in the direct employ
of the Salt Water Fisheries Division increased.
During the biennium research projects were carried out on:
(a) Spiny lobsters
(b) Canning of Lisa
(c) Offshore fishes
1. migration
2. growth
3. fishing intensity
4. fishing methods
(d) parasites of shrimp
(e) Vitamin B12 in sea water (presumed precursor of Red Tide).
(f) Ecology of Florida Bay
(g) Shrimp biology
1. Tampa Bay and offshore waters
2. Northeast coast and St. Johns River Valley.
Published reports on these and other previous projects are available to
interested persons.




























I C-
d.-=-C1~-"


is- r


it IrZ


Florida's oyster industry is booming with harvesting at an all-time high to meet the national demand created by drastic re-
duction of production in northern beds ravaged by disease. In this typical scene in Apalachicola Bay a longer brings up
oysters while his partner culls out those less than the legal size of three inches.


"L IU*L"











DIVISION OF SALT WATER FISHERIES
GENERAL REVENUE AND MOTORBOAT TRUST FUND
STATEMENT OF ACTUAL REVENUES

Fiscal Year Fiscal Year
1960-1961 1961-1962


GENERAL REVENUE
Licenses and Permits
W wholesale D ealers ...............................
Non-Resident Wholesale Dealers ..................
R etail D ealers.................................
Non-Resident Retail Dealers................. ...
Alien Retail D ealers .............................
Perm it Stam ps............. .....................
Bait Shrimp Permits .............................
Shrimp Net Permits.............................
Live Bait Shrimp Dealers ........................
Fish Camp Operators ............................
Special Perm its .................................
Total Licenses and Permits.. ................... ..
Revenue from Use of Money and Property, Leases,
Rentals, and Fees ...............................
Fines, Forfeits and Other Penalties, Sale of Confiscated
Item s.................. ..........
Miscellaneous-
Overage.. ......................................
Other ........................................
Total Miscellaneous ..............................
TOTAL GENERAL REVENUE BEFORE ADJUSTMENTS .........
Less: Returned Checks..............................
R efunds.....................................
Total Adjustments. ................................
TOTAL GENERAL REVENUE .............................
MOTORBOAT TRUST FUND:
Fees........................... .................
Motorboat Registration Certificates...................
Commercial Boat Licenses .................. ......
Non-Resident Commercial Boat Licenses ..............
Non-Resident Commercial Fishing Licenses............
Purse Seines Licenses ...............................
Change of Ownership ...............................
Duplicates .........................................
Other Overage ... ............................ ..

Total Motorboat Trust Fund before Adjustments. .....

Less: Refund Checks...............................
Refunds.....................................

Total Adjustments.................................

TOTAL MOTORBOAT TRUST FUND ........................
BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH TRUST FUND
Sale of Dead Shell..................................
Federal Grant .....................................

TOTAL BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH TRUST FUND...............

GRAND TOTAL.......................... ..... .........


$ 32,800.00
600.00
44,630.00
175.00
50.00
1,705.00
122.00
75.00
50.00
20.00
5.00
$ 80,232.00


$ 45,500.00
900.00
56,150.00
125.00
100.00
2,327.50
268.00

100.00
46.00
464.80
$ 105,981.30


$ 3,009.50 $ 9,208.45


39.67
151.00
$ 3,200.17
$ 83,432.17
$ 10.00
150.00
$ 160.00
$ 83,272.17

$ 3,391.91
35,217.00
41,478.74
3,375.00
6,675.00
350.00
13,348.55

851.58

$ 104,687.78

$ 7.80
816.54

$ 824.34

$ 103,863.44

$ 93,331.62
3,910.00

$ 97,241.62

$ 284,377.23


49.70

$ 9,258.15
$ 115,239.45
$ ........
222.50
$ 222.50
$ 115,016.95

$ 3,738.25
;51,532.00
44,928.15
4,775.00
7,475.00
200.00
25,425.45
1,418.00
1,701.68

$ 341,193.53

$ 9.45
2,087.20

$ 2,096.65

$ 339,096.88

$ 266,246.16
7,820.00

$ 274,066.16

$ 728,179.99










DIVISION OF SALT WATER FISHERIES
STATEMENT OF ACTUAL EXPENDITURES

For the Fiscal Year 1960-61

General St. Petersburg Oyster Motorboat Biological Total
Description Office Laboratory Division Trust Trust All Funds


SALARIES AND OPERATING EXPENSE:
Personal Services
Salaries and Wages.............................
Professional Fees ...............................
Contractual Services
Express, Freight, and Parcel Post................
Post Office Box Rental.........................
Postage.......................................
Telephone and Telegraph........................
General Printing and Reproduction Services.......
Repairs-Automotive-Airplane, batteries.........
Repairs-Field Equipment, radio, trailer...........
Repairs-Marine Equipment.....................
Repairs-Office Equipment.....................
Travel........................................
U utilities .......................................
Storage .......................................
Clipping Services...............................
M iscellaneous..................................
Materials and Supplies
Bedding, Clothing, Linens, and other Textile Products
Building and Construction Materials and Supplies..
Coal, Fuel Oil, and Other Heating Supplies........
Educational, Medical, Scientific and Agricultural
Supplies ....................................
Food Products.................................
Maintenance Materials and Supplies..............
Motor Fuels and Lubricants ....................
Office Materials and Supplies ...................
Other Materials and Supplies ...................
Current Charges and Obligations
Insurance and Surety Bonds .....................
Rental of Buildings and Equipment ..............
Other Current Charges and Obligations ..........

TOTAL SALARIES AND OPERATING EXPENSES. ...............


$431,663.67


670.92
18.00
4,515.26
15,947.60
8,516.28
22,629.59
3,277.65
15,274.38
156.20
83,185.44
705.62
824.59
648.72
28,138.53

10,486.46
139.38
8.00

2,310.47
3,200.09
5,106.34
68,919.,83
7,172.80
3,199.63

33,379.44
23,949.38
99.57

$774,143.84


$45,198.14 $33,601.81 $23,063.41 $48,522.89 $ 582,049.92


194.88

251.63
1,074.45
5,235.98

138.59
33.59
1,857.20
2,146.02
44.00


15.35


3.50


845.08
41.20
828.76
10.00
1,124.26
169.10
1,152.48
110.16
267.50

1,997.50


97.09

2,000.00
.........."
2,419.90



1,511.50


166.02


213.00


2,939.97


......... 16 .16 ........ ..........
. . . . . . . . . . .


2,905.80

481.77

633.87
7.93


3,250.00
14.00

$63,483,20


636.18


1,803.44
32.63
521.39

227.64
1,492.50
25.00

$44,906.29


856.09
5,004.20


11,418.00


$46,370.19


37,491.83
..........
15.00

380.76


325.00


$90,054.47


966.39
18.00
6,766.89
17,867.13
16,213.36
23,624.37
3,426.24
16,432.23
2,182.50
88,208.44
859.78
1,092.09
648.72
33,091.35

10,486.46
155.54
8.00

43,344.28
3,200.09
5,603.11
70,723.27
9,076.15
8,733.15

33,607.08
40,434.88
138.57

$1,018,957.99















(Continued)

DIVISION OF SALT WATER FISHERIES
STATEMENT OF ACTUAL EXPENDITURES
For the Fiscal Year 1960-61

General St. Petersburg Oyster Motorboat Biological Total
Description Ofice Laboratory Division Trust Trust All Funds


OPERATING CAPITAL OUTLAY
Books ............................ .... ........... ........ ......... S.......... $.. ...... ......... $ .
Building and Fixed Equipment........................................................................................
Educational, Medical, Scientific, and Agricultural Equip-
ment ...................................... 1,044.51 5,264.69 827.46 .......... .......... 7,136.66
Automotive. ..................................... 55,722.22 .......... .......... ......... ........... 55,722.22
Field Equipm ent (Trailers) ......................... 1,253.32 .......... .......... .......... .......... 1,253.32
M marine (boats, outboard motors) .................... 12,321.67 .......... .......... .......... .......... 12,321.67
Office Furniture and Equipment ..................... 2,865.93 3,313.18 .......... 2,070.53 .......... 8,249.64
Other Capital Outlay .............................. 642.80 .......... .......... 478.75 .......... 1,121.55
Repairshop Equipment.............................. 1,019.75 .......... .......... .......... .......... 1,019.75
TOTAL OPERATING CAPITAL OUTLAY .................... $ 74,870.20 $8,577.87 $ 827.46 $2,549.28 $........ $ 86,824.81
NON-OPERATING
Distributions and Transfers-to State Funds.......... $ 2,955.40 $... $ .... $........ $3,542.76 $........ $ 6,498.16
TOTAL NON-OPERATING................. ........... $ 2,955.40 $......... .......... $3,542.76 $......... $ 6,498.16
TOTAL COST FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1960-61............. $851,969.44 $72,061.07 $45,733.75 $52,462.23 $90,054.47 $1,112,280.96










DIVISION OF SALT WATER FISHERIES
STATEMENT OF ACTUAL EXPENDITURES

For the Fiscal Year 1961-62

General Biological Oyster Motorboat Total
Description Office Trust Division Trust All Funds


SALARIES AND OPERATING EXPENSES
Personal Services
Salaries and W ages ..................................... ...
Other Personal Services .....................................
Contractual Services
Express, Freight, and Parcel Post ..........................
Post Office Box Rental......................................
Postage. ....... .....................................
Telephone and Telegraph....................................
General Printing and Reproduction Services .................
Repairs-Automotive-Airplane, batteries.....................
Repairs-Field Equipment, radio, trailer ......................
to Repairs- Marine Equipment.................................
o Repairs-Office Equipment...................................
T rav el .......................... .............. ........
Utilities .................. ..................... ..........
Storage.................................. ..............
Clipping Services. .................................. ......
M miscellaneous .. ...........................................
Materials and Supplies
Bedding, Clothing, Linens, and other Textile Products...........
Building and Construction Materials and Supplies.............
Coal, Fuel Oil, and other Heating Supplies ....................
Educational, Medical, Scientific, and Agricultural Supplies ......
Food Products .............................................
Maintenance Materials and Supplies.........................
Motor Fuels and Lubricants. .................................
Office Materials and Supplies .............. ............
Other Materials and Supplies ................................
Current Charges and Obligations
Insurance and Surety Bonds.................................
Rental of Buildings and Equipment .................. ......
Other Current Charges and Obligations .....................

TOTAL SALARIES AND OPERATING EXPENSES .........................


$464,823.82 $50,322.44
3,039.37 32,589.17


711.12

8,888.49
19,082.82
6,107.43
19,464.02
1,872.30
17,122.01
147.22
78,480.28
792.33
20.80
473.88
10,774.34

10,751.15
42.86

4,803.84
1,745.43
2,085.99
65,161.35
7,620.24
2,774.04


419.64
9.00
1,214.83
2,013.14
2,006.75
511.69
110.20
124.42
1,861.66
4,527.37
175.00

29,037.89



8,931.62

698.45
1.77
2,535.04
7.92


$25,387.31 $28,773.01
6,336.70 1,708.00


7.45
1.50
60.00
233.86
25.00
172.43

131.47

1,861.78
81.19
30.00

62.50



86.85

37.63
1,306.99
67.50
75.82


34,040.39 ......... ........
47,770.64 5,450.00 430.00
418.30 21.00 25.00

$809,014.46 $142,569.00 $36,420.98


67.36

2,060.00
97.40

2,313.51
136.53

31.08
5,249.67


2,708.60

178.21

162.59

32.66

1,100.59
877.11

12,241.46

$57,677.78


$ 569,306.58
43,673.24

1,205.57
10.50
12,163.32
21,427.22
8,139.18
22,461.65
2,119.03
17,377.90
2,039.96
90,119.10
1,048.52
50.80
473.88
42,583.33

10,929.36
42.86

13,984.90
1,745.43
2,854.73
66,470.11
11,323.37
3,734.89

34,040.39
65,892.10
464.30

$1,045,682.22














(Continued)
DIVISION OF SALT WATER FISHERIES
STATEMENT OF ACTUAL EXPENDITURES
For the Fiscal Year 1961-62

General Biological Oyster Motorboat Total
Description Office Trust Division Trust All Funds


OPERATING CAPITAL OUTLAY
Books................................... .................. $ 25.40 $1,037.34 $ 14.62 $......... $1,077.36
Buildings and Fixed Equipment.......................... 490.17 .......... ......... 490.17
Educational, Medical, Scientific, and Agricultural Equipment...... 1,376.19 10,310.67 156.50 .......... 11,843.36
Automotive ................... ............................... 54,209.74 4,478.70 .......... 163.20 58,851.64
Field Equipment (Trailers) ..................................... 14,420.96 ......... ......... .. ........ 14,420.96
Marine (boats, outboard motors) ................... .......... 17,578.79 .................... .......... 17,578.79
Office Furniture and Equipment ................................ 2,432.05 4,948.46 508.40 1,747.15 9,636.06
Other Capital Outlay.......................................... 137.78 95.25 .......... 13.90 246.93
Repairshop Equipment......................................... 206.73 .......... ........ ...... 206.73
TOTAL OPERATING CAPITAL OUTLAY ......................... ........ $ 90,387.64 $21,360.59 $ 679.52 $1,924.25 $ 114,352.00

NON-OPERATING
Distributions and Transfers-to State Funds..................... $ 3,793.23 $ ........ ........ $9,628.24 $ 13,421.47
Revolving and Working Fund Established.... ................. .... 100.00 .......... ........... 100.00 200.00
TOTAL NON-OPE ATIN .. ............. .............. .. $ 3,893.23 $......... $ ......... $9,728.24 $ 13,621.47
TOTAL COST FOR TrE FISCAL YEAR 1961-62......................... $903,295.33 $163,929.59 $37,100.50 $69,330.27 $1,173,655.69










STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION

REPORT OF ARRESTS FISCAL YEAR 1960-61
DISPOSITION

Guilty-
County' Number of Estreated Suspended Sentence
Arrests Guilty Bond Released Sentence Pending Minor Withheld


Dade.................... 36 12 1 1 10 11 ...... 1
D uval................... 20 ...... 4 9 1 5 ...... 1
Hillsborough ............ 1 ...... 1 .............
Pinellas.................. 28 8 3 2 5 1 ...... 9
Palm Beach.............. 60 33 5 3 4 8 ..... 7
Volusia.................. 24 13 5 2 2 2 .
Escambia................ 14 4 4 1 3 1 ...... 1
Broward................. 16 13 ...... 1 ...... 1
Manatee ................. 16 12 4 .....
Sarasota................. 37 22 2 ...... 2 4 7
Seminole................. 5 4 ............ 1 ........
L ee ..................... 1 1 .................
Brevard................. 46 14 22 1 2 7 .....
. St. Johns. ................ 24 18 .... ...... 1 ...... 5
S Bay..................... 31 14 ......3 9 4 1 ..
St. Lucie................ 9 8 ............ 1 ..
Pasco ................... 2 ...... 2 ...............
Indian River............. 8 6 2 ..............
Santa Rosa.............. 12 9 1 ...... 2 .. ......
W alton .................. 3 2 1 ...............
T aylor.................. 2 2 ..............
Monroe ................. 127 20 23 4 .7 69 1 3
N assau .................. 1 1 .................
M martin .................. 16 6 2 1 6 ...... 1
Okaloosa................. 10 2 3 1 1 3 .....
C itrus................... 4 2 2 ..............
Clay.................... 6 ...... 2 1 ...... 3 .....
D ixie.................... 11 1 4 ... 6 .......
G ilchrist................. 2 ... 2 ..
Franklin................. 62 44 4 7 5 2 .
Flagler .................. 16 7 1 3 2 3 ......
Collier .................. 12 8 4 .............
W akulla ................. 4 2 2 ...............
Gulf..................... 4 4 .................

TOTAL........... 670 292 104 40 58 136 4 36

PERCENT OF TOTAL........ 100.0% 43.6% 15.5% 6% 8.7% 20.3% .6% 5.4%







STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION

REPORT OF ARRESTS FISCAL YEAR 1961-1962
DISPOSITION

Guilty-
County Number of Estreated Suspended Sentence
Arrests Guilty Bond Released Sentence Pending Minor Withheld


Dade.................... 65 3 16 3 22 13 ...... 8
Duval................... 83 10 28 12 17 10 ...... 6
Hillsborough............. 14 ...... 11 1 ...... 2 .....
Pinellas................. 39 23 5 ...... 3 ...... 8
Palm Beach.............. 159 43 79 1 ...... 14 14 8
Volusia.................. 18 ...... 15 ...... 1 2 ..
Escambia.......... ...... 35 3 18 1 9 4 .
Broward................. 150 10 99 15 ...... 7 ...... 19
Manatee................... 27 2 9 13 1 2
Sarasota................. 26 3 7 2 ...... 5 2 7
Seminole................. 5 ...... 3 ............ 2 .....
Lee...................... 10 ...... 9 ...... 1 ..
Brevard................. 83 5 67 1 ...... 9 ...... 1
St. Johns................. 15 2 9 1 1 1 ...... 1
Putnam ................. 1 ...... 1 ............
Bay..................... 24 5 1 4 1 13 ......
t St. Lucie ................ 12 2 4 3 ...... 3
Pasco................... 4 2 1 .... 1 .
Indian River............. 16 6 6 ...... 1 ...... 1 2
Santa Rosa.............. 27 6 16 1 ...... 4 ..
W alton.................. 7 ...... 6 ...... ...... .. ...... 1
Taylor................... 3 ...... 1 2.. 2 .... ......
Monroe.................. 210 43 82 48 13 22 ...... 2
L evy .................... 1 ...... 1 ..............
Nassau................... 2 ...... 2 ..........
M artin .................. 31 8 17 1 ...... 2 1 2
Okaloosa................. 25 3 13 1 1 2 ...... 5
C itrus................... 15 ...... 13 ...... ...... 2......
Clay..................... 4 ..... .......... 1 3 .....
H olm es.................. 1 ...... 1 ..............
Charlotte................. 2 ...... 1.. .........
D ixie.................... 6 1 1 1 2 1 ...... 1
Gilchrist................. 2 ..... .. ...... ...... 2 ....
Franklin................. 114 13 71 14 ...... 15 1 ..
Flagler.................. 12 ...... 7 1 ...... 3 1 .
Collier................... 8 ...... 6 2 ..........
W akulla ................. 2 ...... 1 1...
G ulf .................... 15 14 1 ..............
Liberty.................. 2 2 .................


TOTAL..........


1275 182 649 130 74 146 20 74


100% 14.3% 50.9% 10.2% 5.6% 11.5% 1.6% 5.6%


PERCENT OF TOTAL .......












1960-1961 PERMITS

Crawfish Perm its ............................................................ 1,073
(Traps-120,327)
Dade County Bait Shrimp. ................................................... 30
Duval County Bait Shrimp..................................................... 56
Escambia County Bait Shrimp .................................................. 7
Okaloosa County Bait Shrimp .................................................. 8
St. Johns County Net. ......................................................... 2
St. Johns Bait Shrimp......................................................... 55
Commercial Fisherman ............................................ 44
C am p Operator .................................................... 9
B ait D ealer.................................. ....... ........... .. 2
Santa Rosa County Bait Shrimp ................................................ 22
Dade County Silver Mullet. .................................................... 11
Special Perm its ................... ........................ ................ 139
Scientific........................ ................................... 92
E exhibition ......................................................... 47
Bait Shrimp State Wide ....................................................... 169
Shrimp Landing Permits ....................................................... 1,138
Bay County ....... .................................... ..... 36
Brevard County. ................................................... 4
Charlotte County .................................................. 3
Citrus County ..................................................... 1
Clay County................. ..... ................................ 2
Collier County ................. ................................. 9
Dade County. ..................................................... 5
Duval County .............................. ....... ................ 51
Escambia County ................... .............................. 36
Franklin County. ............................... .................. 124
Gulf County. ..................................................... 6
Hillsborough County....................................... ........ 65
Lee County........................................................ 81
Manatee County ...................................... .......... 3
Monroe County. ................... ............................... 121
N assau County ...................................... .............. 81
Okaloosa County ................................................... 26
Palm Beach County ................................................ 2
Pinellas County. ............................. ........ ............. 15
St. Johns County ................................................... 37
St. Lucie County.................................................... 2
Santa Rosa County. ................................................ 2
Volusia County .. ................................................. 14
W akulla County ................................................... 3
Walton County. ................................................... 6
Out-of-State. ..................................... ............................ 403
A labam a ... ..................................................... 93
Georgia .. .... .......... ......................................... 92
Louisiana ......................................................... 21
Mississippi. ........................................................ 2
New York. ........................................................ 1
North Carolina .................................................... 108
Pennsylvania. ..................................................... 1
R hode Island.......................... ...................... 1
South Carolina............................................. ......... 58
Texas............................................................. 26

TOTAL PERMITS ISSUED DURING 1960-61 ......................................... 2,710











26










1961-1962 PERMITS

Crawfish Permits .................................. ........... ............. 1,303
(Traps-149,950)
Dade County Bait Shrimp ..................................................... 27
Duval County Bait Shrimp..................................................... 71
Escam bia County Bait Shrimp ................................................. ..28
Okaloosa County Bait Shrimp .................................................. 13
St. Johns County N et .......................................................... 3
St. Johns B ait Shrim p ......................................................... 98
Commercial Fisherman ............................................... 78
Camp Operator ..................................... ................ 16
B ait D ealer............ ............................................. 4
Santa Rosa County Bait Shrimp ................................................ 34
Dade County Silver Mullet ..................................................... 14
Volusia County B ait M ullet .................................................... 1
Special Perm its ......................................................... ..... 169
Scientific................................. ......................... 115
Exhibition ....................................................... ... 54
Oyster Dredge .... ....................................................... ... 5
Oyster Planting ... ................ ............................... ......... .. 36
Bait Shrimp State Wide .................. ..................................... 162
Shrimp Landing Permits ....................................................... 1,191
Bay County ................... .................. .. ..... ............. 46
Brevard County....................................................... 1
Charlotte County.................................... ................ 5
C itrus C county ....................................................... 1
Clay County ........................................................ 1
C ollier C county ....................................................... 3
D ade C county .................................... .................... 7
D uval County ................... ............... ................ 49
Escambia County ................................................... 74
Franklin County .................................................... 157
Gulf County......................................................... 10
Hillsborough County ................................................. 65
Lee County........................................................... 98
M anatee C county ..................................................... 2
Monroe County.... ................................................. 143
Nassau County ..................................................... 48
Okaloosa County..................................................... 14
Pasco County ........................................................ 1
Pinellas County .................. ................................... 11
St. Johns County..................................................... 26
St. Lucie County..................................................... 2
Santa Rosa County ............................... ................... 17
Sarasota County ............................................ ......... 1
Volusia County ..................................................... 14
Wakulla County ..................................................... 9
Walton County....................................... ............. 8
Out-of-State. ................................... .................... 378
A labam a ................................................. 117
G eorgia .................................................. 10 1
Louisiana ................... ............................. 4
M ississippi ............................................. 5
New York................................................. 1
North Carolina ........................................... 74
South C arolina ............................................ 45
Texas................................................... 31
Pinellas County Net Permits ................................................... 578*
Pinellas County Commercial Fishermen .......................................... 1,114

Pinellas County Net Permits.......................................... 578*
Pinellas County Commercial Fishermen ............................... 1,114

Total Fishing for remuneration. ............................. 1,692
TOTAL PERMITS ISSUED DURING 1961-62.......................................... 4,847

A net permit obviates the necessity for a commercial fisherman permit. Consequently, net
permits must be added to commercial fisherman permits to derive the total number of persons ,
fishing for remuneration.

27












1962-1963 PERMITS

(Through December, 1962)

Crawfish Permits ............................................................ 1,525
(Traps-181,033)
D ade County Bait Shrimp ...................................................... 31
D uval County Bait Shrim p ..................................................... 75
Escambia County Bait Shrimp .................................................. 29
Okaloosa County Bait Shrimp .................................................. 7
St. Johns County Net.......................................................... 2
St. Johns Bait Shrim p ......................................................... 150
Commercial Fisherman ................................................ 130
Camp Operator...................................................... 17
B ait D ealer ......................................................... 3
Santa Rosa County Bait Shrimp ................................................ 31
Sound Bay Bait Shrim p ........................................................ 22
Dade County Silver Mullet..................................................... 8
Volusia County Bait M ullet .................................................... 8
Shell Stock Perm its ............................................................ 46
Special Permits .............................................................. 221
Scientific................................................ ............. 103
Exhibition .................................... ...................... 118
Oyster Dredge ................... ........................................... 1
Oyster Planting ............................................................... 20
Bait Shrimp State Wide........................................................ 144
Shrimp Landing Permits ....................................................... 1220
Bay County ........................................................ 27
Brevard County....................................................... 2
Charlotte County .................................................... 1
Citrus County ....................................................... 1
Clay County ........................................................ 2
Collier County. ...................................................... 7
Dade County ...................................................... 8
Duval County. ...................................................... 67
Escambia County ................................................... 153
Franklin County ................. ............................... ... 155
Gadsden County ..................................................... 1
Gulf County...................................... ................... 11
Hillsborough County .................................................. 100
Indian River County ............................................... 1
Lee County........................................................ 27
M anatee C county ..................................................... 3
M onroe County ................... ................................. .. 147
Nassau County ....................................................... 90
Okaloosa County .................................................... 18
Pasco County....................................................... 1
Pinellas County ................... .................................. 8
St. Johns County.................................................... 19
St. Lucie County.............................. ........................ 1
Santa Rosa County....... .................................... ....... 28
Volusia County. ..................................................... 13
W alton County ..................................................... 19
Out-of-State................. ................................... 310
Alabam a......................................... ...... 72
G eorgia ............... .................................. 93
N orth Carolina.............................. ............. 77
South Carolina. ........................................... 50
Texas............ ....................................... 18
Pinellas County Net Permits .................................................... 533
Pinellas County Commercial Fishermen .......................................... 485

TOTAL PERMITS ISSUED FOR 1962-63 THROUGH DECEMBER 1962 ..................... 4,558







28











OYSTER LEASES
1961-1962

OYSTER LEASES GRANTED OYSTER LEASES GRANTED
EXISTING OYSTER LEASES JANUARY 1, 1961, JANUARY 1, 1962, CUMULATIVE TOTAL
COUNTIES AS OF THROUGH THROUGH AS OF
DECEMBER 31, 1960 DECEMBER 31, 1961 DECEMBER 31, 1962 DECEMBER 31, 1962

Number Number of Number Number of Number Number of Number Number of
of Leases Acres of Leases Acres of Leases Acres of Leases Acres

Bay.............. 4 22.67 ........ .......... ........ ...... 4 22.67
Brevard............ 3 15.69 6 33.85 4 20.00 13 69.54
Charlotte.......... ...... ......... 4 178.25 45 1,408.37 49 1,586.62
Citrus............. 1 79.70 .. ........ ........ ......... 1 79.70
Collier............ ................ 1 18.98 ........ .......... 1 18.98
Duval............. 11 699.99 ........ ......... 1 65.00 12 764.99
Flagler............ ...... .......... 2 2.128 ........ ........ 2 2.128
Franklin.......... 9 764.50 2 35.45 5 595.90 16 1,395.85
Gulf .............. 1 105.20 ........ ................. .......... 1 105.20
Hillsborough....... 1 6.90 ... ................. .......... 1 6.90
Indian River....... 1 1.99 .. ...... ........ .......... 1 1.99
Lee............... 5 30.82 4 39.82 1 24.88 10 95.52
Levy............. ................ 2 97.19 ........ ........ 2 97.19
Pinellas ........... 3 16.01 3 43.40 8 179.79 14 239.20
St. Johns.......... 2 9.72 .............. ........ .......... 2 9.72
Santa Rosa........ ...... .......... 3 16.93 ........ ....... 3 16.93
Sarasota........... ...... ....... ....... ......... 1 2.10 1 2.10
Volusia............ 15 122.10 3 22.16 7 74.84 25 219.10
W akulla........... 1 28.78 ...................... .......... 1 28.78
Walton............ ...... .......... 2 749.62 16 503.425 18 1,253.045

TOTALS........ 57 1,904.07 32 1,237.778 88 2,874.305 177 6,016.353

The smallest lease is located in Bay County and contains .43 acre.
The largest lease is located in Walton County and contains 679.30 acres.










1961
CRAWFISH AND STONE CRAB DECLARATIONS
(At the Beginning of Closed Season)

Frozen Crawfish Pounds Frozen Stone Crabs Pounds
Dealers................... 715,063 Dealers.................... 7,773
Freezers................... 258,655 Freezers................... ........
Crawfish Tails Stone Crab Claws
Dealers................... 94,084 Dealers. .................. 44,215
Freezers .................. 36,149% Freezers................... 3,750
Crawfish Meat Stone Crab Meat
Dealers................... 15,636 Dealers...........................
Freezers.................. 9,901 Freezers................... ........

1962
CRAWFISH AND STONE CRAB DECLARATIONS
(At the Beginning of Closed Season)
Frozen Crawfish Pounds Frozen Stone Crabs Pounds
Dealers.................... 618,636 Dealers ................... 2,259
Freezers ................... 155,4301 Freezers................... 1,239
Crawfish Tails Stone Crab Claws
Dealers ................... 156,958 Dealers. .................. 34,395
Freezers .................. 129,228% Freezers................... 4,474
Crawfish Meat Stone Crab Meat
D ealers................... 11,638 Dealers ................... 267
Freezers................... 7,394 Freezers................... 267

LICENSE STATISTICS
Type License 1960-1961 1961-1962
Wholesale Seafood Dealers ................................... 651 686
Retail Seafood Dealers..................................... 4,399 4,510
Non-Resident Commercial Fishing ................ ......... 269 305
P urse Seines ................................................ 11 7
Non-Resident Sponge ........................................ 0 2
Commercial Boats (Salt Water) ............................... 14,530 15,391
Commercial Boats (Fresh Water).............................. 18,000 19,000
Transfer of Ownership on Boats (Pleasure and Commercial) ...... 24,862 29,948
Duplicate Boat Registration Certificates* ............................. 731
Pleasure Boats .............................................. .........
Total Number of Pleasure Boats Registered through June 30, 1962............... 157,701
Law passed in 1961 Legislature requires a fee of $1.00 for a duplicate certificate.

FLORIDA CONSERVATION PATROL
Public Service Statistics
1962
Man Hours
Assisting in criminal investigations and cases at the request of local
law enforcement authorities ....................... ........ 283:15
Assisting stranded motorists. ................................... 154:55
Assisting disabled boats ....................................... 227:30
Safety patrols at regattas, aquatic meets, scuba diving tournament,
boat-a-cades, etc ........................................ 555:00
Search and rescue missions at sea ........................... 819:35
Disaster patrol and relief -
1. Tornado at Milton, January 5-8........................ 900:00
2. Floods at Sarasota, September 21-23. ................. .. .. 90:
Total.......................................... 2940:15












DIVISION OF WATER RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION


FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
TALLAHASSEE


THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT
1961-1962





JOHN W. WAKEFIELD
DIRECTOR























RESPONSIBILITIES

Primary responsibility of the Division of Water Resources and Conservation
is keeping state officials, legislators and the people informed on the status of
Florida's water resources. This requires studies to determine the most advan-
tageous and best methods of obtaining the maximum beneficial use, development
and conservation of Florida's bountiful water resources.
The Division obtains basic information on streamflows, lake levels, ground-
water elevations, water use, growth rates and a multitude of other details from
state and federal agencies.
It also is the Division's responsibility to cooperate with water management
districts and local, county and state governmental organizations or agencies
created for the purpose of utilizing and conserving the waters of the state.
The power to authorize the diverting, storing and use of surplus surface
and ground waters is reserved to the Florida Board of Conservation. In addi-
tion, it can create water management districts and promulgate rules and regula-
tions governing the use of water in critical areas. Actual use of these powers
depends upon the recommendations and advice of the Division of Water Re-
sources and Conservation.
The Division has become the accepted counselor and coordinator for both
state and local agencies concerned with water management. With the coopera-
tion of many agencies, the Division promotes the safeguarding and wider use
of Florida's water resources, and protects the public interest in the conservation
and use of water.
Water resource development depends far too often on the weather at the
time a proposal is made rather than the facts. The Division of Water Resources
and Conservation battles public ennui, as does every other water resource agency.
The Division is undertaking detailed studies from which plans can be
quickly drawn to justify adequate water resource conservation in any given area,
and to insure planning for ample water to meet all needs within the foreseeable
future.









FLORIDA'S STAKE IN WATER
Water resource wise, Florida is a "have" state. Her water resources have
been appreciated by citizen and visitor alike. They enjoy the invigorating pleas-
ures of water sports or the soul-soothing peaceful pursuit of fishing. They bask
in a climate tempered by thousands of lakes and enjoy the products of a well-
watered agriculture. In recent years, water using industries have been evaluating
with considerable interest the water resources of Florida.
Much of the tourist, residential and industrial development of Florida has
been a direct result of the abundance of surface and ground water, and ocean
,shorelines, the 53-inch-plus average annual rainfall, thousands of lakes, tremen-
dous ground-water reservoirs and the great natural reservoir for surface water
contained in the Everglades.
The quality of these surface and ground waters is very good, except on the
lower peninsula and along portions of the seacoast where salt water has been
and will continue to be a problem.
The 53-inch-plus average annual rainfall, combined with the flat topography
and poor drainage of the state, makes many areas subject to summer floods.
Before the influence of man was felt in Florida, nature handled the water from
torrential tropical storms by providing shallow expansion areas into which the
overflowing lakes and streams could spread.
The great artesian aquifers were and still are fed from uplands where th:e
water is held in numerous lakes and swamps, thus providing the water to trickle
downward into the porous limestones. By storing water in this way, nature also
provided water for the relatively long dry period. Population growth and urban
and agricultural development have reduced the natural storage areas and in-
creased the speed and quantity of surface runoff, causing floods and over-
drainage.
During the biennium, Florida experienced severe drought conditions, the
worst since the mid-1950's. Ground-water levels declined, streamflows all but
stopped and lake levels dropped to record lows.
The average rainfall for the biennium was 47.1 inches compared to 53.3
inches, the normal average. This contrasts sharply with the preceding biennium's
wet average of 68.6 inches. Accordingly, water conservation needs, rather than
flood protection were uppermost in mind during the biennium.
Without ample water supplies Florida would become a desert surrounded
by salt water. As demands for water for recreation, agriculture, municipalities
and industries mount, increased pressure is exerted for the state to exercise
its police powers and protect and conserve the water resources for the benefit
of the greatest number of people.



OVERALL PROBLEMS
Basically the problem is to protect Florida's residents, industries and farm-
lands from destruction due to floods, while at the same time conserving water









to support a growing population, including related businesses and industries,
during the yearly dry seasons and the abnormally dry years. This protection
is needed today, and provision must be made through planning for sufficient
water for the demands expected in the year 2000 A.D.
Flood waters must be channeled for rapid safe removal without overdrain-
age. Surface reservoirs or conservation areas must be developed to store many
acre-feet of water for release during the dry season. These reservoirs, in part,
replace the loss of natural reservoirs whose loss has increased the frequency
and severity of both floods and droughts. Because of Florida's flat topography,
there are no valleys which can be dammed for the storage of water. Instead,
large shallow areas must be diked this in the face of rapidly rising land costs.
Of even greater importance than floodways and storage pools, is the pro-
tection of the recharge areas, areas where the rainfall can soak into the ground-
water reservoirs or aquifers. Ground-water is Florida's principal water resource.
Destruction of the recharge areas will ultimately result in depletion of the
ground-water the well will have indeed run dry.
Most of the engineering studies for water resources development that have
been made to date, whether by federal, state or local agencies, have been initi-
ated by the need for flood control and land reclamation, with water conservation
largely an important but coincidental benefit. Future water requirements have
been based on available data which, with some exceptions, has necessarily been
general in nature due to insufficient basic data and to the fact that almost every-
one has assumed that there are ample water resources to meet any foreseeable
demands.
Concerned over the adequacy of the water resources to meet Florida's
tremendous growth, the Division of Water Resources and Conservation prepared
a rough preliminary study of the water availability and use requirements based
on projected estimates of permanent population and the amount of water avail-
able under average conditions considering rainfall and evaporation, areas of
land and water surfaces, and reflecting geological and hydrological consider-
ations.
The study led to the map developed in Figure 1 and the conclusion that
possible shortages might occur in certain regions and the more detailed investi-
gations region by region were advisable.


APPROACH TO PROBLEMS
Among the activities of the biennium which were particularly noteworthy
were the creation of the Southwest Florida Water Management District and
the initiation of construction on the long awaited low-level dam on the Suwannee
River.
Two programs that will have far-reaching effects and which will set prece-
dences in water resources development in Florida are the Water Resources
Regulatory District in Northwest Hillsborough County and the program of long-
range planning for comprehensive water resources management, that was initi-
ated with the Mid-Gulf study.






















FIGURE I.
ESTIMATED AVAILABLE SAFE ANNUAL
WATER SUPPLY IN INCHES-
(excludes stream flow from out of state)


22-26 inches per year

18 -22 inches

14 18 inches

10 14 inches

6 10 inches

Less than 6 inches


K
E:


- & %A b -.^





























FIGURE 2.

WATER MANAGEMENT AUTHORITIES OF FLORIDA

. Dead Lakes Water Management District
2. Suwannee River Authority .
3 Alachua County Recreation and Water Conservation and Control Authority
4. Peace River Valley Water Conservation and Drainage District
5. Tsala Apopka Basin Recreation and Water Conservation and Control Authority
6. Sumpter County Recreation and Water Conservation and Control Authority
7 Oklawaha Basin Recreation and Water Conservation and Control Authority
8. Lake Apopka Recreation and Water Conservation and Control Authority
9. Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District
10. Southwest Florida Water Management District


d
3A









Southwest Florida Water Management
In response to the 1960 floods, emergency flood management studies in
Southwest Florida were financed by the State Cabinet. Six reports on water
management needs for the area were published in 1961. Concurrently the needs
of the area were discussed with the local people and their leaders.
The 1961 Legislature created the 14-county Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District (Figure 2). The U. S. Army, Corps of Engineers, recommended
a project for flood control and water conservation designated as the "Four Rivers
Basin Project."
Assistance was rendered by the division on organization, taxing, and pro-
gram development as the district and basin boards began to realize the great
potentials of the district to conserve and manage the water resources of the
region.
Suwannee River
A study of a low-head dam in the Suwannee River at Suwannee Springs,
initiated in 1960 under a trust fund grant from the Suwannee River Authority
and the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund, was activated by a $30,000
appropriation from the 1961 Legislature to construct the dam.
The purpose of the dam is to make possible better utilization of the river
by providing a navigable depth for recreation boating at low-flow stages.
Release of the funds late in 1962 permitted construction of an H-pile and
timber stop-log dam to get underway by the end of the year.
Water Resources Regulatory District Number One
Competing demands for the available water in Northwest Hillsborough
County caused the Hillsborough Board of County Commissioners to request the
creation of a water conservation and development district under the provisions
of the water resources law.
A public hearing on August 25, 1961 was held in Tampa, at which testimony
favored creation of the district. Accordingly, Water Resources Regulatory Dis-
trict No. 1 in Northwest Hillsborough County was created by the Florida Board
of Conservation on November 7, 1961.
Objective of the district is to control the use of ground and surface waters
to the extent necessary to minimize conflicts between users. A public hearing
was held July 19, 1962 in Tampa on proposed rules and regulations.
Because of the precedent setting importance of the district to the manage-
ment of Florida's waters (ground and surface), study is still under way.
Mid-Gulf Study
Spurred by indications of a potential water shortage, the division undertook
a cooperative long-range planning study of the Mid-Gulf basins area which lies
along the west side of the Florida peninsula and includes all or parts of Hills-
borough, Pinellas, Pasco, Hernando and Citrus counties.
In order to make the study a comprehensive one on required water resources
to serve anticipated land uses and economic development, the contributions of
many city, county, state and federal agencies and industrial firms and individuals
are being employed.









The Mid-Gulf region is to be expanded to include most of the area of the
Southwest Florida Water Management District.
Other Long-Range Studies
Long-range studies will be initiated as rapidly as time and appropriations
will permit in other areas where preliminary study indicates a possible need.
The Division of Water Resources and Conservation hopes to start long-range
detailed inventories and planning studies for the Mid-Atlantic and Southeastern
Region during the next biennium.
Until the Gulf Coast study, now underway is completed, these new studies
will consist primarily of gathering the data already available from other agencies
and the start toward inventorying present water use.
Peace River Study
Early in 1962, the field geologist was transferred from Tallahassee to Lees-
burg. This placed an experienced staff member closer to the ground-water prob-
lem areas of Florida and enabled the division to assist the Peace River Valley
Water Conservation and Drainage District in a water resources study, in co-
operation with the U. S. and Florida Geological Surveys.

Flood Control Account
Reorganization of the Florida Board of Conservation into five divisions
and of the Canal Authority of Florida as authorized by the 1961 Legislature,
placed Florida's water management districts and navigation authorities more
firmly under the supervision of the Board of Conservation.
This strengthened the state's position in preparing a unified request for
federal authorizations and appropriations for navigation and flood control
projects in Florida.
The Division of Water Resources and Conservation assisted in the many
preparations that went into the final request, through review and comment on
Corps of Engineers flood control and waterways development projects.
This unity of effort has already achieved authorization of the new $100-
million "Four River Basins Project" for flood control and water conservation
in the area of the Southwest Water Management District and the largest federal
appropriations in the history of the Central and Southern Florida Flood Control
District in both years of the biennium.
Even this outstanding progress, however, fails to keep pace with the increas-
ing needs. Since authorization of the Central and Southern Florida project in
1948, the construction cost index has probably risen at a faster rate than that
of construction on the project.
The Flood Control Account, which receives appropriations from the State
Legislature, pays the non-federal share for construction works required by the
cooperative projects and finances the purchase of water storage lands. In the
coming biennium, both the Central and Southern Florida Flood Control Dis-
trict and the Southwest Florida Water Management District will receive funds
from this account.
A detailed study by consultants to the Florida Board of Conservation points









out that completion of these projects, within a reasonable period of time, will
require increased federal appropriations and a substantial increase in state match-
ing funds.
But this matching money represents only a small part of the immediate
need. In order to proceed with the construction projects themselves, it will be
necessary for the state to acquire considerable land for water storage areas.
This is especially urgent in the Green Swamp area of the Southwest Florida
Water Management District and in the Upper St. Johns River Basin of the
Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District.
Obviously, the quicker such lands are acquired, the less the cost by avoiding
escalating real estate values. The state government is working on some sug-
gested possible solutions to the financing of water resources development pro-
grams.

Cooperation with Districts
Florida has 10 principal water management districts or authorities compris-
ing one or more counties (Figure 2). In addition, many counties have special
acts relating to water resources activities within their boundaries. Numerous
drainage districts also exist throughout the state, particularly on the lower
peninsula.
A variety of miscellaneous studies, ranging from salt-water intrusion prob-
lems to disappearing lakes were undertaken. Geological and ground-water
studies of limited scope were made in Brevard, Osceola, Pasco and Volusia
counties. The geology and hydrology of a number of lakes were checked and
several salt-water intrusion problems on both coasts of the peninsula were in-
vestigated.
Several water resources management problems were indicative of the type
of complex problem that can be expected to develop along the populous east
coast. Proposed industrial development in Volusia County threatened to inter-
fere with the recharge area of the only principal ground-water aquifer.
On the lower peninsula, the east coast area in general is vulnerable to salt-
water intrusion of the shallow ground-water aquifer. Thus, it was only logical
for two municipalities to be concerned over the threat to their public water
supplies of salt-water encroachment along the principal drainage canals.
Structures of the Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District pro-
vide primary protection, but in several instances public water supplies are using
well fields located on the downstream side of control structures. Salinity control
dams are indicated, but the problem of economical structures to permit the
passage of pleasure craft must be solved.
Low-water levels and minimal flows in the Everglades during 1962 led to
a Corps of Engineers decision to request funds to study the problem of water
allocation, specifically for maintenance of the natural flora and fauna of Ever-
glades National Park, and in general the water allocation problems of the entire
Everglades area.
Wild Flowing Wells
Intense utilization of the ground-water has drawn attention to the need to









protect its quality and quantity through an adequate well drilling code. The
only law (Chapter 373, Florida Statutes) dealing with water wells (other than
public supplies) requires the capping of wild-flowing wells.
Mere capping or valving, study shows, does not always stop the flow of
water. Instead, capping may force highly mineralized water into shallow fresh-
water zones. An attempt to secure authority for the adoption of a well code
in the 1961 Legislature was unsuccessful.
Present policy is to recommend special legislation for counties where the
problems are severe, such as in Sarasota County, and to work with individual
landowners in plugging wells that create definite problems.
Information and Education
An effective program of information on water conservation, given in our
school system 10 or 20 years ago, would have solved or minimized many of the
serious problems of today. Programs in the conservation of natural resources
are generally planned to meet expected requirements in the year 2000 A.D.
These programs require not only legislative action and financial support, but
public understanding of the problems and support of the programs.
The water resource law provides that the Division of Water Resources and
Conservation shall ". provide for the dissemination to the public of current
and useful information...". During the biennium the Division published a
monthly water resources newsletter, displayed an exhibit at local fairs, initiated
a program of resource-use education to aid public school teachers to include
water resource-use education in their classes, and distributed countless pieces
of educational material.
Fostering a favorable public awareness of Florida's water resources problems
and needs was aided by more than 50 public presentations, including television,
before civic clubs, garden clubs, professional societies and other groups. The
business of cooperating and advising accounted for participation in or attend-
ance by the staff at some 300 meetings and conferences.

Federal Water Resources Activities
Most activity in the field of plans and works was federally oriented. In
north and northwest Florida, the U. S. Study Commission, Southeast River Basins
was completing very comprehensive land and water use studies, preparatory
to the submission of its final report to the President in 1963.
In Central Florida, the U. S. Army, Corps of Engineers, had completed the
Four River Basins study and made recommendations for a $100-million pro-
gram, which the Congress subsequently authorized. The Corps of Engineers, in
cooperation with the Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District, had
the most active biennium, construction-wise, in the history of the District.
Throughout Florida the Water Resources Division, U. S. Geological Survey
was collecting data and making pertinent studies of the ground and surface water
resources upon which all planning depends.
Activity in the small watershed program of the Soil Conservation Service,
U. S. Department of Agriculture, was encouraging as previously planned projects
were placed under contract or construction was completed.








On the other hand it was discouraging to note that 16 applications repre-
senting over one million acres were awaiting planning authorization, a backlog
equal to a four-year workload for one planning party. The Department of Agri-
culture small watershed needs inventory revealed that 228 Florida watersheds
could be benefited; an estimated 40-year workload.
A partial solution is a state appropriation to finance an additional planning
party.








TABLE I

DIVISION OF WATER RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION
STATEMENT OF ACTUAL EXPENDITURES
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1960-61

Emergency Suwannee River Total
Description General Office* Funds** Trust Fund t All Funds


SALARIES AND OPERATING EXPENSES:
Personal Service
Salaries and W ages ........................................
Professional Fees .........................................
Contractual Services
Express, Freight, and Parcel Post...........................
Postage.................................................
Telephone and Telegraph ..................................
General Printing and Reproduction Service..................
Repairs-Automotive. ...................................
Repairs- Office Equipment ................................
R epairs- Exhibit ........................................
R epairs- Offi ces ..........................................
Travel..................................................
Utilities.................................................
Storage of E exhibit .......................................
Janitor Service ...........................................
Right-of-Way and Easements for Dam......................
Material and Supplies
Building M material and Supplies .............................
F uel O il ............... ..................................
Educational Material and Supplies.........................
Maintenance Material and Supplies Janitor..................
M otor Fuel and Lubricants ................................
Office Material and Supplies ...............................
Material and Supplies- Tarpaulin ..........................
Automotive Supplies-Tires-Licenses......................
Current Charges and Obligations
Insurance and Surety Bonds.............................
Rental of Buildings and Equipment.........................
Membership Fees to National Organizations .................

TOTAL SALARIES AND OPERATING EXPENSES .......................

OPERATING CAPITAL OUTLAY
Office Furniture and Fixtures.............................

TOTAL OPERATING CAPITAL OUTLAY ..............................

TOTAL COST FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1960-61........................


$ 55,264.03
250.88

727.73
556.00
980.21
2,839.26
798.21
563.22
98.60
279.10
10,530.31
160.24
5.00
245.80


85.45
30.43
410.84
37.74
874.39
1,198.18

135.10

564.36
405.42
25.00

$ 77,065.50


982.70

$ 982.70

$ 78,048.20


$ ...........
68,349.84


150.00

1,256.98











240.73










$ 69,997.55
..............

























$ ............
$ 69,997.55
S 69,997.55


$ ...........
3,455.52




152.51



152.42



3.00



213.75
. . . . .


6.58
. . . ...





$ 3,982.78



$ ...........

$ 3,982.78


* Appropriation to Division for normal operating expenses.
** Authorized by State Cabinet for flood control studies in Southwest Florida.
t Carried over from previous fiscal year (1959-1960).


$ 55,264.03
72,056.24

727.73
706.00
980.21
4,248.75
798.21
563.22
98.60
279.10
10,681.73
160.24
5.00
245.80
3.00

85.45
30.43
865.32
37.74
874.39
1,198.18
6.58
135.10

564.36
405.42
25.00

$151,045.83


982.70

$ 982.70

$152,028.53







TABLE II

DIVISION OF WATER RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION
STATEMENT OF ACTUAL EXPENDITURES
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1961-62

Suwannee River Total
Description General Ofice* Trust Fund** All Funds


SALARIES AND OPERATING EXPENSES
Personal Service
Salaries and Wages..... .................................................
Professional Fees .. ....................................... .........
Contractual Services
Express, Freight, and Parcel Post ...........................................
P ostage..... ...........................................................
Telephone and Telegraph................................................ .
General Printing and Reproduction Services....................................
Repairs- Automotive .......... .......................... ................
Repairs- Office Equipment.................... .......................... ..
Repairs-Exhibit. .................................................. ....
Repairs- Offices ................. ................... ..........
Travel........................ ..... .. ..... ..........................
Utilities .................................. ........ ..................... .
Storage of E exhibit ..................... .............................. ...
Janitor Service.................................... ...... .............
Pest Control ........................................... ..... ........... .
Material and Supplies
Fuel Oil...................... .......................................
Educational M material and Supplies............................................
Maintenance Material and Supplies- Janitorial.................................
Motor Fuel and Lubricants................................................
Office Material and Supplies ................................. .........
M material and Supplies- Tarpaulin ............................................
Automotive Supplies- Tires- Licenses ......................................
Current Charges and Obligations
Insurance and Surety Bonds .................................................
Rental of Buildings and Equipment...........................................
Membership Fees to National Organizations ...................... ............

TOTAL SALARIES AND OPERATING EXPENSES........... ............................. .
OPERATING CAPITAL OUTLAY
Books ........................ ....... .... .......... ... ....... ..... .......
Scientific Equipment ................................................. ..........
Motor Vehicle-Passenger ...................................... ............
Trailer ......... ............... ................................. .............
Boat.......................................................
Office Furniture and Fixtures ................. ......................... ......

TOTAL OPERATING CAPITAL OUTLAY. .................................................
TOTAL COST FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1961-62............................. ...........


$ 65,387.79
1,941.35

480.54
661.73
1,170.31
2,063.89
266.09
695.08
326.62
1,532.88
11,834.68
576.55
15.00
298.85
135.00

25.27
704.96
67.49
1,058.59
1,612.13
38.10
60.10

212.90
144.05
39.50

$ 91,349.45

$ 47.50
279.98
1,599.60
350.00
116.55
1,103.12

$ 3,496.75
$ 94,846.20


$. ...........





24.85



214.25






16.30










$ 255.40

S... ........
400.74




$ 400.74
$ 400.74
$ 400.74


* Appropriation to Division tor normal operating expenses. ** Curri,~d aver fasaaa previa~us fteal year.


$65,387.79
1,941.35

480.54
661.73
1,170.31
2,088.74
266.09
695.08
326.62
1,532.88
12,048.93
576.55
15.00
298.85
135.00

25.27
721.26
67.49
1,058.59
1,612.13
38.10
60.10

212.90
144.05
39.50

$91,604.85

$ 47.50
680.72
1,599.60
350.00
116.55
1,103.12

$ 3,897.49
$95,502.34


** Carried over from previous fiscal year.


* Appropriation to Division for normal operating expenses.

















TABLE III
DIVISION OF WATER RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION
FLOOD CONTROL ACCOUNT
STATEMENT OF ACTUAL EXPENDITURES FOR FISCAL YEARS 1960-61 and 1961-62

Central and Southern Southwest Florida Total
Florida Flood Control Water Management All Funds
District District t

Fiscal Year 1960-61

Operating Capital Outlay
Other Structures and Improvements ................................... $ 763,369.11* .......... $ 763,369.11
Other Operating Capital Outlay .......................................... 34,234.46** .......... 34,234.46
Total Cost for the Fiscal Year 1960-61 .................................... $ 797,603.57 ......... $ 797,603.57


Fiscal Year 1961-62

Other Structures and Improvements ...................................... $2,813,800.00* .......... $2,813,800.00
Other Operating Capital Outlay .......................................... None
Reimbursable Advance for Expenses....................................... ........... $67,201.50 67,201.50
Total Cost for the Fiscal Year 1961-62 ................................... $2,813,800.00 $67,201.50 $2,881,001.50

Local interest contribution to U.S. Army Engineers for share of cost of project construction.
** Share of cost in connection with relocating highway bridges crossing project.
t Not operative during fiscal year 1960-61.













DIVISION OF GEOLOGY


FLORIDA BOARD OF CONSERVATION
TALLAHASSEE







^^?tE'S^s0

M'sto E !


FIFTEENTH


BIENNIAL


REPORT


1961 -1962


ROBERT O. VERNON
DIRECTOR















INTRODUCTION
The Florida Geological Survey was created in 1907, and was an executive
department responsible to the Governor until 1933, when it was included in the
Florida Department of Conservation with the Salt Water Fish Commission and
the Department of Game and Fresh Water Fish. In 1935, the Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission was made a constitutional department; and the Salt
Water Fish Commission (State Department of Conservation) and the Geological
Survey operated as distinctive departments, obtaining funds individually from
General Revenue by appropriation of the Legislature, administering the affairs
of the departments separately, but being loosely held together administratively.
In 1959, both departments were made responsible to the State Board of Conser.
ovation, although the administration remained the same.
In 1961, the Legislature created five divisions within the State Board of Con-
servation, each responsible to the Director of the Board. In this reorganization,
the Florida Geological Survey was renamed the Division of Geology. All the
responsibilities previously assigned to the Survey were retained by the Division
of Geology, and the responsibilities for administering the Oil and Gas Act were
officially made a function of the Division.
The Division of Geology is, therefore, organized into two sections: (1) The
Florida Geological Survey, and (2) the Oil and Gas Section. This has the advan-
tage in that a long series of publication journals will not be interrupted. The
Survey section will continue the development of geologic and hydrologic data,
and the publication of the results of these studies, as it has in the past.

LEGISLATIVE AUTHORITY AND DUTIES
The duties, responsibilities and organization of the Division of Geology are
set forth in the Florida Statutes under Section 373.011, 373.012, and under Sec-
tions 370.02(8) and 377.07, by which the Division is given the power, authority
and duty to administer, carry out, and enforce the provisions of the oil and gas
laws of Florida. Briefly, the Division would:
(1) Conduct surveys and explorations of minerals, water supplies, and other
natural resources of the State.
(2) Collect, maintain, and display specimens illustrating the geological and
mineral features of the State.
(3) Prepare and publish reports of surveys and special papers.
(4) Administer the law regulating the search for oil and gas, and controlling
the production.









ACTIVITIES
The Division has met its responsibilities under the Florida Statutes and re-
corded its work in 62 pages on the geology and hydrology of Florida. Progress
in many of the areas of Florida has been based upon the data developed in these
studies. There are presently underway 43 major studies, including five county
geologic and hydrologic projects, that will provide the data on the State's mineral,
water and other natural resources required by an expanding, vigorous and healthy
economy. We anticipate that at least 90 important papers will be developed,
based on the studies now being made and anticipated for the forthcoming bien-
nium. Much of this study will be directed toward providing data on the State's
water resources, in order to meet problems created by the steadily increasing
withdrawals of water accompanying an anticipated population expansion of 180
percent during the next 10 years.
As consultants to the citizens of Florida, the Division is proud to have as-
sisted in the establishment or expansion of about 100 companies that produce
or use the State's minerals. More than 114 contacts relating to problems, produc-
tion or availability of mineral resources were made at the office, including in-
quiries and information on clay, phosphate, mineral resources, oil, water, dolomite
and limestone, road base course materials, lakes, foundation problems, sewage
disposal and the lock-barge canal. Interest in water, oil and phosphate headed
the list of inquiries.
The Division of Geology has, over a period of 54 years, accumulated a library
of rock cuttings from wells. While these have been utilized for county studies,
this important resource has never been completely analyzed and tabulated. All
of the cuttings are now being analyzed and studied. The upper 100 feet are
being worked carefully for any leads to new mineral resources, and for expansion
of reserves at the present mines. Where a commodity is indicated, field checks
will be given and, if proved, the areas will be mapped; samples will be collected
and analyzed.
Area mineral studies and specific mineral commodity evaluations are being
made. These will include considerations of the nature of the resource, its pos-
sible uses, and possible areas of expansion of present mining and mineral utiliza-
tion. Some preliminary pilot tests will be made where these are thought to be
helpful. Data on the problems associated with mining, uses, transportation and
sales of specific minerals, or of areas where these may be combined with other
minerals, are tabulated in each study.
Large reserves of high calcium limestones are present in many areas of the
State. The use of this rock has been limited to road base courses and to soil
conditioning. Only a small tonnage is now being used in agriculture. Silty clays
in the same areas offer the possibility of blending these with limestone in manu-
facturing cement and mortar, and for numerous other purposes.
A manuscript of a study of the clays of the Panhandle is near completion,
and field work has been started on clay deposits along the St. Johns River, glass
sand in the Central Highlands, and a complete mineral inventory is three-fourths
accomplished.








The data developed from the well studies will be coordinated with electric
well logs, where available, and regional maps will be prepared to illustrate the
stratigraphy and geology. These studies will be fundamental to the search for
oil, gas, other minerals, and to studies of the water resources undertaken by the
personnel of both the Division of Geology and the U.S. Geological Survey.
Specific county water studies can thus be set into the general framework of
structures, stratigraphy and geology determined by these basic regional and
statewide studies.
The geologic well data will provide the details necessary to plot:
(1) Maps of the top of the principal artesian aquifer.
(2) Isopach maps giving casing requirements for wells that penetrate
the principal artesian aquifer.
(3) Several maps of the top of selected beds to illustrate the geologic
structures, the inclination of the beds, the stratigraphy, and the
relationship of aquifers to aquicludes.
(4) Geologic sections throughout the State.
When these data are fully developed, it will be possible to more accurately
forecast the casing requirements for various wells, prospective depths for wells
and the areas of water production.
From all these maps and data, a comprehensive compilation of the geology
of Florida will be published. It is proposed that the geology of Florida will
include six parts under the general headings of:
(1) Landforms (3) Structure (5) Economic geology
(2) Stratigraphy (4) Guide fossils (6) Hydrology
The first of the comprehensive study of the "Geology of Florida" has been
completed. This report on landforms is scheduled for publication in 1963. The
series of studies planned to be included in the "Geology of Florida" will termi-
nate with the publication of a detailed geologic map issued in a folio of eight
sheets on a scale of 1/250,000. Each map will be issued in color upon base maps
showing topographic features as supplied by the U.S. Geological Survey, Topo-
graphic Division.
It is anticipated that a test hole will be placed by the Division at the corners
of all townships where information is not available, by use of a Failing 1500 drill
which is being requested from the 1963 Legislature. These holes will provide
the necessary data on the subsurface geology and the thickness of the Pleistocene
deposits. The drill will also provide the only accurate information on the presence
and reserve of the State's exploitable minerals.
The Division of Geology is the principal State agency that cooperates with
Water Resources Branch of the U.S. Geological Survey, and, together, these
departments develop water resource and geologic facts covering the occurrence,
movement, management, quantity and quality of surface and ground waters of
Florida. Such data are helpful to the Division of Water Resources and Conserva-
tion and the water management districts in meeting their responsibilities. The
Waterways Division will require accurate data on base flows of all waterways
it seeks to develop.








Because of the large demands for water now developing in some areas as a
result of population explosions, expanded per capital and industrial use, or accel-
erated space programs, needs for the development of water-resource data exist
in Okaloosa, Lee, Charlotte, Sarasota and Manatee counties, in the Econfina
River basin and adjacent to Canaveral. Studies in these areas are underway,
but municipal, county and local funds must be made available if the studies are
to be completed.
Renewed interest in the construction of the Cross-Florida Barge Canal, and
the appropriation of funds in 1961 to the Corps of Engineers for a realignment
survey and feasibility study make it desirable that the inventory of water levels
along the route of the canal be accelerated and the density of the grid of meas-
ured wells be increased.
Some of the water problems that must be met are:
(1) The population growth and an inventory of potable water supplies.
(2) Flood problems resulting from urban expansion and increased
runoff, and flood plain occupancy. Zoning is badly needed.
(3) Planning problems in the use of water, including the control and
expansion of use in supply and pollution abatement.
(4) Construction of transverse coastal canals:
a. Stagnation of water because of low B.O.D. and algae growth.
b. Salting of coastal areas requiring tidal gates.
c. High fertility develops if no central waste treatment and dis-
persal is available.
The successful management and control requires a knowledge of the origin,
movement and discharge of the water resources through the State.









THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
WATER RESOURCES COOPERATIVE STUDY
The broad objective of the cooperative program with the Water Resources
Division of the U.S. Geological Survey is to determine and evaluate the quantity
and quality of Florida's water, on the surface and underground, whether under
natural conditions or under conditions of present or potential development and
use. The program involves systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of
data, continued research to improve the understanding of physical laws, processes,
and mechanics of various phases of the hydrologic cycle, and publication of
the findings. Hydrologic studies made in cooperation with the U.S. Geological
Survey provide fundamental information needed for locating, planning, designing
and constructing water-resource projects, highways, bridges, and buildings at or
near water bodies; and for water management and regulation.
Water resource investigations in Florida during the 1961-62 biennium were
continued in cooperation with several counties, municipalities and water districts,
and other State and Federal agencies. The program of investigations is carried
out by the three operating branches of the Water Resources Division of the
U.S. Geological Survey: the Surface Water Branch and Quality of Water Branch
at Ocala, and the Ground Water Branch at Tallahassee.
In addition to maintaining the basic water records for a long-term appraisal
of Florida's water resources and to provide data for operational projects, 20
reports and accompanying maps were published during the biennium. The status
of these studies on water are presented in four maps, figures 1, 2, 3, and 4.


THE MINERAL INDUSTRY OF FLORIDA IN 1960 and 1961
(with preliminary estimates for 1962)
Each year of the reported period the mineral production in Florida reached
a new high. From a total value of $177 million in 1960, the production was valued
at $191 million in 1961, and is estimated to exceed $193 million in 1962. The
annual increase in value continued a trend that began in 1945 when the total
mineral production was valued at $25 million.
Florida has led the Nation in production of phosphate rock for 69 consecu-
tive years, zircon for 23 consecutive years, staurolite for 6 consecutive years,
and fullers earth for 5 consecutive years. The State has ranked second in value
of output of titanium concentrates for 7 consecutive years and has led the south-
eastern states in total stone production for the past 3 years. Florida ranks third
in the value of oyster shell dredged, increasingly important as a raw product
in cement, lime, and magnesium-oxide production.
Throughout the reported period, 1961-63, the value and tonnage of fullers
earth, lime, magnesium compounds, crude petroleum, phosphate rock, rare-earth
concentrates, stone and zircon have increased. Decreases were recorded in the
production and value of cement, kaolin, miscellaneous clay, peat, and gravel,
staurolite and titanium concentrates.









NEEDS OF THE DIVISION
The requested 1963 budget of the Division of Geology, to cover salaries,
is based upon the pay plan as established by the Merit System and adopted by
the Personnel Board for budgetary purposes. It is hoped that the Division will
be permitted to increase its activity by the addition of:
(1) State Archaeologist; Florida Statute 876 authorizes the State Board of
Conservation to employ a State Archaeologist to conduct surveys of
historical and archaeological sites in Florida, and to preserve records
of these that are now being destroyed, or being threatened by destruc-
tion. Because of the similarity of work between the Division of Ge-
ology and archaeology, this position is being requested for geology,
rather than administrative.
(2) An Economic Geologist, who will work closely with the Development
Commission to promote new mineral industries, aid in the expansion
of established mineral industries and provide details of water and
minerals to prospects. During the biennial period, more than 114 com-
panies utilizing mineral resources in Florida were established in Flor-
ida, or expanded their facilities and utilized data on water and minerals
developed by the Division.
The Division's 1963 request for necessary and regular expenses reflects the
anticipated increases in costs of materials and travel, an increase in production,
completion and publication of data on water, minerals and soils. The program
of water data development, done in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey,
needs to be expanded by about 130 percent to meet the State's demands for
water. Our printing of data developed with the expanded work program will
about double. These data must be published and made available to the plan
and design engineers and citizens of Florida.
The Division's Capital Outlay expenditures anticipate the replacement of
several items now completely worn out. These include a well core drilling unit
that must be replaced, if the mineral and water data program is not to be
abandoned. A varityper and four museum cases that are in excess of 30 to 50
years old, respectively, can be maintained only if parts are made specifically for
them-a cost that approaches the cost of replacements.
Museum building: The Florida Statutes require that the Division collect and
display specimens of the rock, minerals and remains of geologic life that are
typical of Florida. A priceless collection, representing specimens gathered over
the past 58 years, is now stored because of the lack of space necessary to organize
and display the collection. There is a great need for a building, both as a teach-
ing aid to the University and citizens of Florida and as assistance in promoting the
development of the mineral wealth of the State.
In 1957 the Legislature appropriated funds to construct a museum, but a
prolonged freeze and resulting drop in income prevented the release of funds.
The Division will work closely with Florida State University to meet its needs
for a museum as a teaching aid, and will request these needed funds at some
future date.









PUBLICATIONS
The studies of the Division of Geology since its creation in 1907 have cul-
minated in several hundred papers on the geology, mineral, water, and other
natural resources. With the increased cooperative program of water studies
by the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, the rates of works
and publications have accumulated in recent years to where more has been
published in the past 10 years than during the preceding 46 years of service.
These papers are not listed here, but their titles have been published in a "List
of Publications." The reports and list are available upon request at the Division
offices.








UNITED STATES


EXPLANATION

Observotion well
Chloride simple
PRINCIPAL AQUIFERS
R'E Sand-ond-grovel


I I Floridon


SFloridon and/or others


Biscoyne

.----Approximate aquifer boundary

12,32
T T Observation wells
Chloride wells


0 10 20 30 40 50 mltes







UNITED


(.et, 0#
D' / >44




occ

"44












Ir
/ <























AREAS OF COMPLETED STUDIES ree 7
i4 ,













SINCE 1951

Eo

DESCRIPTIVE A




QUANTITATIVE 4



WATER MANAGEMENT

(Continuing) -)o
c











Sa 4

0 ID 2D 30 40 50 min r^^D^:- *
SINCE 19/















SICE 1951ng

~~4/oc "

DESCRIPTIVE0~X~l







THE INTERIOR


S/ & -.. f
'o / ,o




'oow






/. -.
#

FILD WOR N PR S
( 4















RIEP WORT IN PR0O N c






STATUS OER MANAGEMENT DISTRIOJECT ,
essoq
O i"o














































































* STREAM FLOW MEASURING STATIONS
in operation Oct. 31, 1962

A SURFACE WATER SAMPLING SITES
in operation Dec. I, 1962


-!4P!eg ,










APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
July 1, 1961-June 30, 1963

July 1, 1961, to July 1, 1962, to
June 30, 1962 June30,1963 Total

CURRENT
1. Geological Survey:
(a) Salaries......................... $141,173.00 $141,173.00 $282,346.00
(b) Expenses....................... 65,100.00 69,100.00 134,200.00
(c) Operating capital outlay.......... 12,600.00 8,500.00 21,100.00
(d) U.S. Geological Survey Cooperative
agreements ................... 135,000.00 135,000.00 270,000.00
2. Trust Funds:
(a) Hudson Pulp & Paper Corporation 1,000.00 1,000.00 2,000.00
(b) Peace River Valley Water Conser-
vation and Drainage District... 2,050.00 2,250.00 4,300.00
(c) City of Pensacola................ 2,000.00 2,000.00 4,000.00
(d) Escambia County ............... 2,000.00 .............. 2,000.00
(e) M anatee County ................ 2,000.00 .............. 2,000.00
(f) City of Sarasota ................. 1,000.00 .............. 1,000.00
(g) Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District................. 1,600.00 3,000.00 4,600.00
(h) West Coast Inland Navigation Dis-
trict ......................... .............. 1,000.00 1,000.00
(i) Santa Rosa County........... ............... 750.00 750.00
(j) National Science Foundation Grant
No. 14562
(Balance Fund $2,906.78)...... 7,906.78 ................ 7,906.78
(k) National Science Foundation Grant
No. 17902.................... 8,200.00 .............. 8,200.00
(1) U.S. Gypsum Company.......... 500.00 .............. 500.00
TOTAL................ .................. $382,129.78 $363,773.00 $745,902.78




FUNDS AVAILABLE, EXPENDITURES, AND BALANCES
January 1, 1961-December 31, 1962

1961 1962

SALARIES-GENERAL OFFICE
Funds Available:
Balance January 1.................................. 5,293.43 $ 5,499.58
General Revenue Release for January, February, and
March........................................... 29,705.00 29,790.00
General Revenue Release for April, May, and June...... 28,190.00 30,155.00
General Revenue Release for July, August, and September 41,250.00 33,468.00
General Revenue Release for October, November, and De-
cember ............................. .............. 29,000.00 32,395.00

Total available.................................... $133,438.43 $131,307.58
Expenditures:
Salaries and wages ................................... $120,287.73 $129,698.47

$ 13,150.70 $ 1,609.11
Less funds placed in reserve by Budget Commission July 1.. 7,651.12 1,075.08
BALANCE DECEMBER 31 .................................. $ 5,499.58 $ 534.03










FUNDS AVAILABLE, EXPENDITURES, AND BALANCES (Continued)
January 1, 1961-December 31, 1962

1961 1962


OTHER PERSONAL SERVICES--GENERAL OFFICE

Funds Available:
Balance January 1................................... $........... $ 2,588.85
General Revenue Release for January, February, and March ........... 2,370.00
General Revenue Release for April, May, and June. .................. 3,893.00
General Revenue Release for July, August, and September.. 3,921.00 3,421.00
General Revenue Release for October, November, and De-
cem ber ............... .............................. 3,500.00 3,421.00

Total available ................... ............. ..$ 7,421.00 $ 15,693.85

Expenditures:
Student assistants' labor ............................... 3,036.31 9,167.56
Professors' and graduate students' fees ................... 700.00 1,727.50
Casual common labor .................................. 1,095.84 1,198.25

Balance.......................................... $ 2,588.85 $ 3,600.54
Less funds placed in reserve by Budget Commission on July 1 ........... 1,490.22

BALANCE DECEMBER 31..................... ........ ....... ............ $ 2,110.32

EXPENSES-GENERAL OFFICE
Funds Available:
Balance January 1..................................... $ 6,124.99 $ 5,436.39
General Revenue Release for January, February, and March. 15,065.00 14,179.00
General Revenue Release for April, May, and June. ....... 14,958.00 16,179.00
General Revenue Release for July, August, and September.. 14,178.00 15,679.00
General Revenue Release for October, November, and De-
cember................. .......................... 14,180.00 15,679.00

Total Available ..................... ............. $64,505.99 $67,152.39


Expenditures:
Professional fees and consultant services.................. 1,797.00 .........
Communications and transportation of things............. 3,725.26 2,602.67
General printing and reproduction services ............... 10,690.39 14,406.10
Repair and maintenance ............................... 9,801.22 6,974.71
Travel ................ ............................. 10,270.96 14,517.42
Utilities ........................ .................... 4,049.90 3,252.09
Other contractural services ........... ................. 5,974.23 1,879.05
Building and construction materials and supplies .......... 52.00 34.77
Heating supplies (steam from F.S.U.). ................... 1,215.76 1,215.76
Scientific supplies................. ......... ....... 458.91 448.29
Maintenance materials and supplies...................... 1,497.36 2,213.48
Motor fuels and lubricants..... .......... ........... 2,424.70 2,639.74
Office materials and supplies ............................ 3,286.49 3,143.43
Other materials and supplies ........................... 1,258.00 2,252.41
Insurance and surety bonds............................. 967.49 .....
Rental of buildings and equipment ....................... 670.81 2,467.80
Other current charges and obligations.................... 929.10 1,005.35
Balance............. .............. .............. $ 5,436.41 $ 8,099.32

Less funds placed in reserve on July 1 by Budget Commission .02 2.69

BALANCE DECEMBER 31............................. $ 5,436.39 $ 8,096.63










FUNDS AVAILABLE, EXPENDITURES, AND BALANCES (Continued)
January 1, 1961-December 31, 1962


OPERATING CAPITAL OUTLAY-GENERAL OFFICE
Funds Available:
Balance January 1 ..................................... $ 3,566.18
General Revenue Release for January, February, and March ..........
General Revenue Release for April, May, and June ..................
General Revenue Release for July, August, and September.. 3,150.00
General Revenue Release for October, November and De-
cem ber.............. ............ .................. 3 ,150 .00

Total available............... ................... $ 9,866.18
Expenditures:
B ooks............ .......... ......................... 1 ,050 .91
Buildings and fixed equipment .......................... 502.21
Scientific equipment ................. ................. 1,688.70
Motor vehicles-passenger .............................. 3,906.19
Office furniture and equipment. ......................... 1,151.47
O their C capital O utlay .................................. .........

Balance ....................................... $ 1,566.70
Less funds placed in reserve on July 1 by Budget Commission .02

BALANCE JANUARY 1 ..................................... $ 1,566.68
EXPENSES-U.S. GEOLOGICAL COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS
Funds Available:
Balance January 1 ..................................... $..........
General Revenue Release for January, February, and March 33,750.00
General Revenue Release for April, May, and June ........ 33,750.00
General Revenue Release for July, August, and September.. 33,750.00
General Revenue Release for October, November, and De-
cember ................ ................... ........ 33,750.00

Total available. ................................. $135,000.00
Expenditures:
Contractual services ................................... $135,000.00

BALANCE DECEMBER 31 ................................... $.........
SALARIES-SPECIAL-FOR SURVEYS
Funds Available:
Balance January 1 .............................. ..... $...........
General Revenue Release for January, February, and March 975.00
General Revenue Release for April, May, and June ........ 975.00

Total available...................... ............. $ 1,950.00
Expenditures:
Salary for the Coordinator.............. ................ 1,256.67

BALANCE PLACED IN RESERVE JULY 1 ...................... $ 693.33
EXPENSES-SPECIAL-FOR SURVEYS
Funds Available:
Balance January 1 ..................................... $26,075.00

Total available .................................... $26,075.00
Expenditures:
Contractual services. ................................ .. $25,875.00

BALANCE PLACED IN RESERVE JULY 1 ...................... $ 200.00


$ 1,566.68
3,150.00
3,150.00
2,125.00

2,125.00

$12,116.68

505.09

2,774.95
3,558.76
2,684.10
101.61

$ 2,492.17
.05

$ 2,492.12



$ .........
33,750.00
33,750.00
33,750.00

33,750.00

$135,000.00

$135,000.00

$ .........



$ .........


$ .........



$ .........



$ ..........
$.........

$.........

$ .........

$. .........










FUNDS AVAILABLE, EXPENDITURES, AND BALANCES (Continued)
January 1, 1961-December 31, 1962

1961 1962


TRUST FUNDS-U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY COOPERATIVE
Funds Available:
Balance January 1 .................................... $ 1,500.00
Receipts January through December .................... 9,150.00

Total available.................................... $10,650.00
Expenditures:
Contractual services .......................... $ 8,600.00

BALANCE DECEMBER 31 ............................ . $ 2,050.00
TRUST FUNDS-NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
GRANT NO. 14562
Funds Available:
Balance January 1................................... $ 9,098.79
Budget Commission Release of September 12 ............. 5,000.00

Total available.................................... $14,098.79


Expenditures:
Salaries ...........................................
Other personal services-graduate students...............
Communication and transportation of things..............
General printing and reproduction services ................
T ravel ............... ...............................
Contractual services ...................................
Scientific materials and supplies...... ..................
Office materials and supplies ............................
Rental of equipment...................................
Scientific equipment. ..................................


$ 2,972.00
613.60
117.00
111.29
3,077.15
1,200.00
16.10
53.09
10.00
70.87


BALANCE DECEMBER 31......... .. ................. $ 5,857.69
TRUST FUNDS-NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
GRANT No. 17902
Funds Available:
Balance January 1 ..................................... $..........
Releases by Budget Commission......................... 6,000.00

Total available.................................... $ 6,000.00
Expenditures:
Salaries ................................ ............ $ 1,320.00
'Other personal services................................. 630.00
'General printing and reproduction services................ .........
Communication and transportation of things ............. 76.91
T ravel............................................... 1 ,021.81
'Books .................. ............................ .........
Scientific equipment ................................... 165.95

BALANCE DECEMBER 31.................... ............. $ 2,785.33
TRUST FUNDS-U.S. GYPSUM COMPANY'S TRUST
Funds Available:
January 1 Balance ................................ .. .........
Budget Commission Release in September ................ 500.00

Total available. ................................. $ 500.00
Expenditures:
Other personal services-Students' wages................. 179.00

BALANCE DECEMBER 31................................. $ 321.00


$ 2,050.00
19,600.00

$61,650.00

$11,650.00

$10,000.00




S 5,857.69
4,200.00

$10,057.69

$ 1,980.00
2,159.95
117.49
179.15
2,513.36
560.00
76.07
87.58

200.00

$ 2,184.09



$ 2,785.33
2,200.00

$ 4,985.33

$ 1,320.00
630.00
513.00

809.53
28.50

$ 1,684.30


$ 321.00

$ 321.00

321.00

. .........













TABLE I. MINERAL PRODUCTION IN FLORIDA'

1960 1961 1962

Value Value Value
Quantity (thousands) Quantity (thousands) Quantity (thousands)

Clays ............................thousand short tons.. 2522 $ 6,3572 513 $ 7,202 528 $ 7,494
Gem Stones....................... ................ (3) (4) ( ) (4) (3) (4)
Lime.........................thousand short tons.. 151 2,611 213 3,555 288 4,813
Natural gas .........................million cubic feet.. 30 5 30 5 30 6
Peat ......................................short tons.. 39,275 162 24,573 149 25,000 151
Petroleum (crude)........... thousand 42-gallon barrels. 369 (6) 371 (6) 413 (5)
Phosphate rock................... thousand long tons.. 12,321 82,530 13,789 95,590 14,074 97,372
Sand and Gravel................. thousand short tons.. 6,757 5,559 6,530 5,577 6,832 5,894
Stone ...........................................do. 27,6297 37,4197 28,855 36,305 29,836 34,341
Titanium concentrates.. thousand short tons gross weight. 286 7,489 (5) (6) .......... 44,956
Value of items that cannot be disclosed: Cement, clays (ka-
olin and miscellaneous clay, 1960), magnesium com-
pounds, rare-earth metal concentrates (1961), stauroline,
stone (dimension limestone, 1961, and marl, 1960),
zirconium concentrates, and values indicated by foot-
note 5...........................................38,154() ..........38,154(8) 44,797 .....

Total Florida 9 ........... ................................ 176,9238 .......... 190,933 .......... 193,061

1 Production as measured by mine shipments, sales, or marketable production (including consumption by producers).
2 Excludes kaolin and miscellaneous clay, included with "Value of items that cannot be disclosed."
3 Weight not recorded.
4 Less than $500.
5 Figure withheld to avoid disclosing individual company confidential data.
6 Preliminary figure.
7 Excludes certain stone, included with "Value of items that cannot be disclosed.'
8 Revised figure.
9 Total adjusted to eliminate duplicating value of stone and clay.