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Biennial report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075929/00012
 Material Information
Title: Biennial report
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Board of Conservation
Florida Geological Survey
Publisher: The Board
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Creation Date: 1959
Publication Date: 1936-1968
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Natural resources -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Conservation of natural resources -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Saltwater fishing -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Economic conditions -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida State Board of Conservation.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1936/38-1967/68.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vols. for 1936/38-1959/60 called 3rd-14th.
Numbering Peculiarities: 6th (1943/44) bound with the 6th Biennial report of the Florida Geological survey.
Numbering Peculiarities: Biennium ending Dec.31.
General Note: 13th (1957/58) has a subtitle "Salt water fishing."
General Note: Vols. for 1961/62-1963/64 include biennial reports of the individual divisions of the Board of Conservation.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001589422
oclc - 01410803
notis - AHL3395
System ID: UF00075929:00012
 Related Items
Preceded by: Biennial report to State Board of Conservation
Succeeded by: Biennial report - Florida Department of Natural Resources

Full Text

FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION


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1959-1968


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UNIVERSITY

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FLORIDA STATE BOARD


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CONSERVATION








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FOURTEENTH


BIENNIAL


REPORT

1959-1960


TALLAHASSEE






13. I

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FLORIDA STATE BOARD

OF

CONSERVATION


FARRIS BRYANT
Governor


DOYLE CONNOR
Commissioner of Agriculture

THOMAS D. BAILEY
Supt. of Public Instruction

RICHARD ERVIN
Attorney General


TOM ADAMS
Secretary of State

J. EDWIN LARSON
Treasurer

RAY E. GREEN
Comptroller


ERNEST MITTS
Director of Conservation






















Lo ida zStaLt Board- of Coz nea'"tion

P. O. DRAWER 551 TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA

ERNEST MITTS SEAFOOD AND
DIRECTOR SPONGE INDUSTRIES

March 9, 1961

Honorable Farris Bryant
Governor
Tallahassee, Florida

Dear Governor Bryant:

We respectfully submit this Fourteenth Biennial Re-
port covering the years 1959-1960. The period covered is
characterized by change, not only in the scope and signifi-
cance of the problems encountered, but by the methods and
approaches used to solve them.

We are proud to outline substantial progress in some
areas of our responsibilities. But as we triumph against
many of our problems, several old and new ones are still
standing in our way.


Salt water conservation problems in a dynamic Florida
will continue to offer powerful challenges to us all.


Respectfully,
Ernest Mitts
Director












Table of Contents


Page


Overview

Administration

Oyster Division

Research

License Division

Landings (production statistics)


1

3

20

23

29

. .-. ---.... .-.. -. ... 32




































This is a close-up aerial view of newly created real estate. It is typical of all dredge
and fill projects. Their construction together with pollution constitute the greatest
existing menaces to salt water fishing.


OVERVIEW


The most commanding and serious problem facing salt water con-
servation in Florida today is the headlong destruction of sanctuaries and
nursery areas by the improvident management of shallow water embay-
ments and river mouths.
Two types of damage predominate: pollution and dredging and
filling.1 Both result from rapid population growth of coastal areas.
There is a tragedy in all of this because these damages do not auto-
matically and necessarily result from urbanization. They follow from in-
difference on the part of the local citizenry.
Some areas have been more careless than others in the handling of
submerged lands. In a few instances, responding to an alert and agres-
sively conservation minded electorate, public officials have effectively
halted damage to fishery resources. In other localities much of the
beauty and productivity of shallow waters have been forfeited to indus-
trial lack of responsibility and eager real estate developers and speculators.

1. With dredging and filling, bottom muds are pumped up to create real estate in bays
where previously open water existed.










The State Board of Conservation has been active in these matters
even though not cloaked in any official responsibility. Biologists have
studied specific areas and have made many general investigations. Re-
ports and recommendations have been made available to guide the policy
making legal custodians of submerged lands. The Board has prepared
published reports for general use describing the values to be derived
from protection of brackish water habitats.
This program of public education will continue.
One part of our marine resources showed great strides forward
during the biennium and promised greater progress for the future.
The bright spot was the shellfish industry.
At the same time that the oyster industries of most other states
showed alarming declines, Florida showed a rapidly accelerating increase
in production.
A program of clam research, carried on partly by the Oceanographic
Institute of Florida State University and by the Board of Conservation,
revealed vast potentialities in this field. Northern clams grow several
times as rapidly in Florida waters as they do in their native colder
habitat. The discovery of additional offshore sources of the Callico Scallop
indicated future increases in production. Oysters, clams and scallops are
discussed in more detail under OYSTER DIVISION, later in this report.
Mullet remained a problem. Demand and price declined. More ef-
ficient methods of catching mullet were developed during the biennium,
but were not available to the industry. It was felt in some sections of
the coast that more efficient gear would reduce employment opportunities
for gill-net and seine fishermen. An act prohibiting the use of purse
seines for the capture of food fish was passed many years ago by the
Legislature and is still in full force.
Florida's early compliance with the provisions of the Bonner Act
necessitated a rapid and extensive enlargement of the Board's License
Division.
Increased interest in the creation of offshore fishing reefs prompted
the establishment of rules and procedures for such activity. Proposed
sites for the dumping of junk must be inspected by biologists of the Board
before permission is granted for the operation.
Stability and continuity were guaranteed the administration of the
Board when, in 1959, the Legislature took the office of director from
gubernatorial patronage and placed it under the Cabinet.











ADMINISTRATION

The emphasis of this report must be with the two year period
ending 31 December 1960. Therefore, the initial information presented
here will apply to that period, although some general material covering a
somewhat larger period will also be included. The latter will make this
report and those succeeding it more intelligible.

A growing Florida has provided the Board with an understandable
increase in administrative tasks. The tables below reflect the scope of
administrative functions that were handled during the biennium.

SALES OR APPLICATIONS FOR PURCHASE OF STATE-OWNED SUB-
MERGED LAND SINCE THE 1957 SESSION OF THE LEGISLATURE
(As Received at FSBC Marine Laboratory to February 22, 1961. Does not include
bottom used to provide material to be used as fill.)


County Parcels of Land
Pinellas 104
Pasco* 7
Monroe** 192
Dade 28
Lee 9
Franklin 4
Gulf 6
Hillsborough --_. __-- 7
Charlotte 14
St. Johns 3
Manatee 14
Duval .-__- 4
Palm Beach 55
St. Lucie 4
Indian River 12
Brevard 11
Taylor 2
Martin 14
DeSoto 1
Sarasota 6
Bay 1
Polk 2
Collier 8
Volusia 6
Okaloosa 1
Broward 1
Escambia 1
Orange 2
Hendry 1
Citrus 1
521


Acreage
4883.78
2199.44
1994.33
1174.74
872.26
794.48
688.26
643.71
302.52
240.44
232.08
172.54
137.68
114.75
92.20
78.48
73.60
30.37
25.67
21.59
21.55
10.61
8.08
7.33
6.32
4.00
2.16
1.96
1.00
.73

14,836.66


(All of the above information is minimal. Many projects, previously arranged, were
completed during this period without a record being made with the
Board of Conservation.)

*No notice for purchase of 5000 acres for the Emerald Beach development has been
received from the IIF.
"Not included under Bulkhead Act of 1957.










MAINLAND


Soaun


REEF


The hard work and in-
terest of many conser-
vation minded citizens
was rewarded in 1960
by the establishment of
the Nation's first un-
derwater park in the
Florida Keys. The chart
shows the location of
the new preservation.


Pennekamp

Coral Reef

Preserve


REEF










SEAFOOD PROMOTION

The department's Home Economist is in the fourth year of a con-
tinuing, carefully planned campaign to promote the use of Florida sea-
foods both in Florida and other states. This is being accomplished as
follows:
Personal appearances, talks, and demonstrations are given to social,
civic, educational and other groups. Regular weekly television programs
are presented in all sections of the state, as well as adjoining states.






..-r.
.4.
















The Board's home economist, Sarah Alberson, uses all available mass media. Here she
brings the message of good things from the sea to a television audience.

Exclusive sets of recipes and photographs are released to all news-
papers in Florida and the large daily papers in surrounding states, twice
a month. Special material is released to radio, television and outdoor
editors. Feature articles are prepared for state and national magazines.
An important part of this work consists of panel discussions and
talks on marketing and promotion of seafoods, as well as surveys on con-
sumer trends, popularity of products and comments from users, in co-
operation with members of the seafood industry providing restaurants
and institutions with recipes, hints and facts about seafoods and nutri-
tion, and giving assistance in advertising and special publicity events.
Instructions and demonstrations are given to students, school lunch
personnel, home demonstration leaders and others.
Sports fishing groups are supplied with information on the prepara-
tion and care of seafoods, instructions on outdoor cookery, smoking, freez-
ing, canning, and new methods of preservation.










Special material is released in cooperation with State and national
agencies during promotions such as National Seafood Week, Better Nutri-
tion Week, Lent and holidays.
Added to the program during 1959-60 were such activities as educa-
tional TV series, seafood cooking schools in larger cities, and a weekly
marketing bulletin pointing out the best buys in seafoods.
A new 62 page recipe book with attractive black and white and color
illustrations was printed.
The results of the promotional activities can be noted by these fig-
ures:
During the 1959-60 period there were 214 appearances on TV, result-
ing in 9,725 letters from 417 cities. One program over WSB-TV in Atlanta,
Georgia, brought in 1,711 letters. 76 full programs were presented to
clubs and educational groups.
There were 446 releases sent out to newspapers, radio and television;
16 full page feature articles, many with colored photographs on seafood
preparation.
Attendance at 7 large food shows; 18 festivals, fairs and conventions.
The home economist personally called on dealers in all cities where she
traveled.
Publications
ALBERSON, Sarah D. Home Economist
Florida's Favorite Seafoods-1960

Mimeograph
My Favorite Seafood Receipes-1959
How to Bone and Dress Shad
Home Smoking of Seafood Products
Canning and Pickling Seafoods
Outdoor Cookery
Cooking Seafoods for a Crowd
Freezing Seafoods

STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
WARNING TICKETS
Calendar Number
Year Issued
1958 326
1959 754
1960 1,216














STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION

REPORT OF ARRESTS FISCAL YEAR 1958-59 DISPOSITION


No. of
Arrests


County


Bay --
Brevard
Broward
Dade
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Franklin
Gulf
Indian River
%j Lee
Levy
Manatee
Martin --_
Monroe
Nassau __.
Palm Beach --
Pasco
Pinellas _
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sarasota
Taylor
Volusia
Wakulla
Washington

TOTAL

% of Total


11
65
7
33
8
3
9


7
25
6
13
10
9
25
26
135
6
52
4
25
1
11
8
16
1
36
1
3

556

100.0


Guilty


10
52
7
5
3
1
9
4
17
4
5
8
1
8
9
18
6
33

13
1
11
4
8

23
1
3

264

47.5


Estreated
Bond


4
1
7


127

22.9


Suspended
Released Sentence


43

07.7


54

09.7


Guilty
Sentence
Pending Minor Withheld


68

12.2












STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
REPORT OF ARRESTS FISCAL YEAR 1959-60 DISPOSITION


No. of
Arrests


County


Bay
Brevard
Broward
Citrus
Collier
Dade
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Franklin
Gilchrist
Gulf
Hillsborough
Indian River
Lee
00 Leon
Levy
Manatee
Martin
Monroe
Nassau
Orange
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
St. Lucie
St. Johns
Sarasota
Seminole
Taylor
Volusia
Wakulla

TOTAL


% of Total


15
52
16
6
9
17
10
5
10
6
57
4
10
5
16
1
2
1
12
12
144
6
1
34
2
37
1
15
21
29
3
1
18
2

80

100.0


County


Estreated
Bond


Suspended
Released Sentence


03.1


Guilty
11
25
4
3
5
8
6

3
2
52
2
7
2
9


11
6
24
3

22

17
1
7
15
23
1

15


284


Guilty
Sentence
Pending Minor Withheld


1
1
1

115

19.8


2

00.3


02.8


1
1

108

18.6


37

06.4
























U. S. FISH & WILDLIFE SERVICE
DATA

VESSELS FISHING TORTUGAS GROUNDS


STATE


1956


Alabama
Connecticut
Florida
Georgia
Maryland
Massachusetts
Mississippi
Louisiana
New York
North Carolina
Pennsylvania
South Carolina
Texas


1
377
71
2
1
1
9
1
98
1
42
20


TOTAL 630


NUMBER
1957
15

344
81


6
14
1
141
2
57
30

691


OF VESSELS
1958
17

380
83


9
12
1
138
2
67
25

734


1959
3

358
89


681












STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
STATEMENT OF ACTUAL EXPENDITURES
For the Fiscal Year 1959-60


Description
Salaries and Operating Expenses:
Personal Service
Salaries and Wages
Professional Fees
Contractual Services
Express, Freight and Parcel Post
Post Office Box Rental
Postage
Telephone and Telegraph
General Printing and Reproduction Services -----
Repairs-Automotive-Airplane, batteries
Repairs-Field Equipment, radio, trailer -----
Repairs-Marine Equipment
Repairs-Office Equipment
Travel
Utilities
Storage
Clipping Services
Miscellaneous
I. B. M. _
Materials and Supplies
Bedding, Clothing, Linens and Other Textile
Products
Building and Construction Materials and Supplies --
Coal, Fuel Oil and Other Heating Supplies .....---
Educational, Medical, Scientific and Agricultural
Supplies
Food Products
Maintenance Materials and Supplies
Motor Fuels and Lubricants
Office Materials and Supplies
Other Materials and Supplies
Current Charges and Obligations
Insurance and Surety Bonds
Rental of Buildings and Equipment

TOTAL SALARIES AND OPERATING EXPENSES ....


General St. Petersburg Oyster
Office Laboratory Division


$418,880.11 $46,145.48 $18,039.40


821.53
18.00
4,466.94
12,411.46
6,036.74
20,046.75
2,709.01
15,939.43
491.43
76,072.08
938.15

981.62
51,575.45


8,462.91

155.48

1,376.95
7,415.71
384.44
62,183.40
5,111.69
11,796.85

25,989.94
4,932.51

$739,198.58


14.05
4.50
629.08
1,127.35 252.28
3,524.45
728.88
122.75 4.13
5.80 4,508.64
793.91
1,968.54 1,622.40
103.57
30.00

160.80 625.00


Trust Trust All Funds


$14,174.55
342.85

382.71

2,233.47
1,330.21


6,759.31


145.44
195.21


883.72
8,485.64


100.00

4,508.47 50.40 426.25
6.50
308.60 1.72
1,061.51
997.07 1,558.37
630.87 53.06 108.75

150.92
3,025.00 1,036.50

$63,968.72 $28,371.19 $37,028.20


$41,981.00


$ 539,220.54
342.85


1,218.29
22.50
7,329.49
15,121.30
143.35 16,463.85
20,775.63
95.13 2,931.02
10.11 20,463.98
198.50 1,629.28
179.15 80,037.38
1,041.72
30.00
981.62
112.40 53,357.37
8,485.64

8,462.91
100.00
155.48


46,595.33

35.50

1,188.55
128.58

275.00

$90,942.60


52,957.40
7,422.21
730.26
63,244.91
8,855.68
12,718.11

26,140.86
9,269.01

$ 959,509.29


Motorboat Bioloaical


Total

















(Continued)

STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
STATEMENT OF ACTUAL EXPENDITURES
For the Fiscal Year 1959-60


Description
Operating Capital Outlay
Books
Building and Fixed Equipment
Educational, Medical, Scientific & Agricultural
Equipment
Automotive
Field Equipment (Trailers)
Marine (boats, outboard motors)
Office Furniture and Equipment
Other Capital Outlay
Repairshop Equipment

Total Operating Capital Outlay

Non-Operating
Distributions and Transfers-To State Funds .......----
Revolving and Working Fund Established

Total Non-Operating

Total Cost for the Fiscal Year 1959-60


General St. Petersburg Oyster
Office Laboratory Division

$ 125.39

37.74 1,356.86
63,638.04 2,960.00
11,848.97
18,332.19
3,404.84 1,071.42
2,587.73


Motorboat Biological Total
Trust Trust All Funds

$ 837.20 $ 962.59
None


5,462.41
534.74


2,780.37 4,174.97
66,598.04
11,848.97
18,332.19
901.45 10,840.12
3,122.47
None


$ 99,849.51 $ 2,553.67 $ 2,960.00 $ 5,997.15 $ 4,519.02 $ 115,879.35


2,394.09
100.00


2,394.09
100.00


2,494.09 $ 2,494.09

$841,542.18 $66,522.39 $31,331.19 $43,025.35 $95,461.62 $1,077,882.73












(Continued)
STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
STATEMENT OF ACTUAL EXPENDITURES
For the FiscalYear 1958-59


General St. Petersburg
Office Laboratory


Oyster
Division


Salaries and Operating Expenses:
Personal Services
Salaries and wages ___ ---- ___ _
Professional Fees & Consultant Services ...-......-
Contractual Services
Advertising Florida's Commodities and Resources
Express, Freight, and Parcel Post
Post Office Box Rental
Postage
Telephone and Telegraph
General Printing and Reproduction Services --...---
Repairs-Automobile-Airplane
Repairs-Field Equipment, radio and Trailers -..-
Repairs-Marine Equipment
Repairs-Office Equipment
Travel
Utilities .
Clipping Services
Miscellaneous
Materials and Supplies
Bedding, Clothing, Linens, and Other Textile
Products --....
Coal, Fuel Oil and Other Heating Supplies ..-.--.--...
Educational, Medical, & Scientific Materials
and Supplies
Food Products
Maintenance Materials and Supplies
Motor Fuels and Lubricants -
Office Materials and Supplies
Other Materials and Supplies
Current Charges and Obligations
Insurance and Surety Bonds
Rental of Buildings and Equipment
Other Current Charges and Obligations

Total Salaries and Operating Expenses


$416,322.93
750.00

12.50
144.01
20.25
7,688.18
11,058.11
6,290.43
13,282.03
3,560.15
20,336.58
550.83
74,107.44
982.42
729.48
20,967.07


6,584.29
133.61
1,555.07

5,959.82
817.93
60,839.46
5,814.35
8,466.26


$37,094.99 $21,869.95 $68,288.66


16.90

270.06
732.69
1,559.02

225.44
200.37
1,086.28
1,730.50


5,808.02

312.56

1,220.51


125.05

584.03
9.00
590.75

782.75
439.61



29.40


11.00
7.88
212.18
476.89
315.87

201.69
250.13
939.27
1,491.25


62,957.40


23.18
1,376.36

15.00


300.06

838.55


$543,576.53
750.00

12.50
171.91
28.13
8,170.42
12,392.74
8,165.32
13,866.06
3,996.28
21,377.83
2,576.38
78,111.94
1,422.03
729.48
20,971.05


6,613.69
133.61
70,320.49

5,959.82
1,453.73
62,215.82
7,873.41
8,481.26


23,843.95 100.65 23,944.60
4,755.20 2,300.00 1,348.00 8,403.20
4,870.00 4,870.00

$700,442.35 $52,561.32 $27,293.73 $136,290.83 $916,588.23


Description


Biological
Trust


Total
All Funds



















(Continued)

STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
STATEMENT OF ACTUAL EXPENDITURES
For the Fiscal Year 1958-59


General St. Petersburg
Office Laboratory


Oyster
Division


Operating Capital Outlay
Educational, Medical and Scientific Equipment .-- --- $ 3,071.45
Automotive 235.00
Field Equipment (Trailers) 2,149.27
Marine (Boats, Outboard Motors) 36,863.58
Office Furniture and Equipment 2,077.88
Other Capital Outlay 878.47

Total Operating Capital Outlay $ 45,275.66

Non-Operating
Distributions and Transfers $ 2,080.50
Revolving and Working Fund Established
Total Non-Operating $ 2,080.50
TOTAL COST FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
1958-59 $747,798.51


$ 8,795.79


254.73
2,303.68


146.25


$11,354.20 $ 146.25


None


$ 54.78 $ 11,922.02
235.00
2,149.27
37,264.57
4,381.56
878.47

$ 54.78 $ 56,830.89


None None


$63,915.52 $27,439.98 $136,345.61


$ 2,080.50

$975,499.62


Description


Biological
Trust


Total
All Funds

















Genera


STATE BOARD OF CONSERVATION
GENERAL REVENUE AND MOTORBOAT TRUST FUND
STATEMENT OF ACTUAL REVENUES

Fiscal Year Fisc
1 Revenue 1958-59 195


Licenses and Permits
Wholesale Dealers $33,500.00
Non-Resident Wholesale Dealers 800.00
Retail Dealers 41,760.00
Non-Resident Retail Dealers 500.00
Permit Stamps 1,745.00
Bait Shrimp Permits 128.00
Shrimp Net Permits 50.00
Live Bait Shrimp Dealers 175.00
Fish Camp Operators _............ 6.00

Total Licenses and Permits ... ... $78,664.00

Revenue From Use of Money and Property
Leases, Rentals and Fees ._.. $ 2,612.50
Fines, Forfeits and Other Penalties
Sale of Confiscated Items ---------- $ 295.62
Miscellaneous
Overage $ 745.46
Other 287.50

Total Miscellaneous $ 1,032.96
TOTAL GENERAL REVENUE $82,605.08



Fiscal Year
Motorboat Trust Fund 1958-59
Fees None
Motorboat Registration Certificates None
Commercial Boat Licenses 111,381.48
Non-Resident Commercial Boat Licenses -__---- 4,800.00
Non-Resident Commercial Fishing Licenses -- 4,425.00
Purse Seines Licenses 550.00
Change of Ownership None
Other-Overage None

Total Motorboat Trust Fund1 $121,156.48

Grand Total Before Adjustments $203,761.56

Less: Returned Checks 4.55
Refunds-Licenses 1,343.15
Total Adjustments $ 1,347.70

GRAND TOTAL $202,413.86


al Year
>9-60


$32,800.00
600.00
43,110.00
275.00
1,750.00
100.00
50.00
125.00
20.00

$78,830.00

$ 2,724.65
$ 174.87

$ 6.35
1,706.50

$ 1,712.85
$83,442.37


Fiscal Year
1959-60
$ 3,671.60
216,720.99
41,169.45
3,750.00
6,125.00
450.00
5,686.05
805.05

$278,378.14

$361,820.51
58.15
262.15

$ 320.30

$361,500.21


1. The motorboat trust Fund was established by the 1959-61 Legislature. The Revenue
for the year 1958-59 was deposited in the General Revenue Fund.


14










TABLE OF ORGANIZATION OF AGENCY


COMMISSIONER ATTORNEY SUPERINTENDENT SECRETARY
AGRICULTURE COMPTROLLER GENERAL GOVERNOR OF PUBLIC TREASURER OF STATE
INSTRUCTION






I I I I I I
DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH R C OSERATIO ASSISTANT DIRECTOR




II II I III EDUCATION I
ul rCHIFF nYUTFP KAPIMF I irFN

I I I I I I I I I I
GEN. AGENT GEN. AGENT GEN. AGENT GEN. AGENT GEN. AGENT GEN. AGENT GEN. AGENT GEN. AGENT GEN. AGENT

AGENTS I I I I AGENTS AGENTS AGENTS AGENTS AGENTS AGENTS AGENTS AGENTS
AGENTS AGENTS AGENTS AGENTS AGENTS AGENTS AGENTS 1 AGENTS AGENTS













Crawfish Permits
(Traps-99,895)
Dade County Bait Shrimp
Duval County Bait Shrimp
Escambia County Bait Shrimp
St. Johns Bait Shrimp
Commercial Fisherman
Camp Operator
Bait Dealer
St. Johns County Net
Bait Shrimp State Wide
Dade County Silver Mullet
Special Permits
Scientific
Exhibition
Shrimp Landing Permits
Bay County
Brevard County
Charlotte County
Citrus County
Clay County
Collier County
Dade County
Duval County
Escambia County
Franklin County
Gulf County
Hillsborough County
Lee County
Levy County
Manatee County
Martin County
Monroe County
Nassau County
Okaloosa County
Palm Beach County
Pasco County
Pinellas County
St. Johns County
St. Lucie County
Santa Rosa County
Sarasota County
Volusia County
Wakulla County
Walton County
Out of State
Alabama
Georgia
Louisiana
Mississippi
New Jersey
North Carolina
South Carolina
Texas


TOTAL PERMITS ISSUED during 1958-59


1958-59 PERMITS


814


7
1


23
56
13
96
7
7
4
177
7
73


1,433


23
3
2
1
5
5
6
89
97
131
13
111
72
1
12
1
127
149
18
5
12
33
62
3
4
4
16
3
6
419
89
102
23
1
1
100
67
36


5(
2


2,696














Crawfish Permits
(Traps-98,899)
Dade County Bait Shrimp
Duval County Bait Shrimp
Escambia County Bait Shrimp
Okaloosa County Bait Shrimp
St. Johns Bait Shrimp
Commercial Fisherman --
Camp Operator
Bait Dealer
St. Johns County Net
Santa Rosa County Bait Shrimp
Dade County Silver Mullet
Special Permits
Scientific
Exhibition
Bait Shrimp State Wide
Shrimp Landing Permits ----.---
Bay County
Brevard County
Broward County
Charlotte County
Citrus County ----... -----.-. ..-- .. --.-.--
Clay County
Collier County
Dade County
Duval County
Escambia County
Franklin County
Gulf County -
Hillsborough County
Lee County -.-.
Levy County
Manatee County
Monroe County
Nassau County .....-- -
Okaloosa County -- ----- -
Palm Beach County
Pasco County
Pinellas County
St. Johns County
St. Lucie County
Santa Rosa County -----..._.--
Sarasota County
Volusia County
Wakulla County
Walton County
Out of State
Alabama
Georgia
Louisiana
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Texas
TOTAL PERMITS ISSUED DURING 1959-60


1959-60 PERMITS


848

27
57
9
8
65
50
10
5
2
18
9
102
77
25


171
1,171


19
3
1
3
2
6
12
5
60
41
103
11
140
43


1
8
30
45
3
3


1
92
1
59
14


2,487











1960-61 PERMITS
(Through December 1960)

Crawfish Permits 1,033
(Traps-117,689)
Dade County Bait Shrimp 25
Duval County Bait Shrimp 47
Escambia County Bait Shrimp 7
Okaloosa County Bait Shrimp 8
St. Johns Bait Shrimp 55
Commercial Fisherman 44
Camp Operator 9
Bait Dealer 2
St. Johns County Net 2
Santa Rosa County Bait Shrimp 22
Dade County Silver Mullet 10
Special Permits --- 112
Scientific 80
Exhibition 32
Bait Shrimp State-Wide 142
Shrimp Landing Permits -- 906
Bay County 24
Brevard County 4
Charlotte County -.- 1
Citrus County 1
Clay County _. 2
Collier County 9
Dade County 3
Duval County 45
Escambia County 31
Franklin County 100
Gulf County 5
Hillsborough County .....------ 57
Lee County ... 81
Manatee County 3
Monroe County 114
Nassau County 77
Okaloosa County 19
Palm Beach County 1
Pinellas County 14
St. Johns County 27
St. Lucie County 2
Santa Rosa County 4
Volusia County 13
W akulla County ----..-- .... ... .....------- ..- ....- ... ... 3
Walton County 3
Out of State 263
Alabama 10
Georgia 74
Louisiana ...---- -.. 2
New York 1
North Carolina 101
Pennsylvania 1
Rhode Island 1
South Carolina 55
Texas 18
TOTAL PERMITS ISSUED FOR 1960-61 THROUGH DECEMBER 1960 2,369







18























Frozen Crawfish
Dealers
Freezers
Crawfish Tails
Dealers
Freezers
Crawfish Meat
Dealers
Freezers


Frozen Crawfish
Dealers
Freezers
Crawfish Tails
Dealers -
Freezers
Crawfish Meat
Dealers
Freezers


1959
CRAWFISH & STONE CRAB
DECLARATIONS
(At the Beginning of Closed Season)
Pounds
Frozen Stone Crabs
825,1771/ Dealers
541,1271/2 Freezers
Stone Crab Claws
110,618 Dealers
55,2511/2 Freezers
Stone Crab Meat
15,8531/2 Dealers
3,826 Freezers


1960
CRAWFISH & STONE CRAB
DECLARATIONS
(At the Beginning of Closed Season)
Pounds
Frozen Stone Crabs
-- 616,771 Dealers
272,7241/2 Freezers
Stone Crab Claws
160,7421/2 Dealers
_-103,202 Freezers
Stone Crab Meat
9,2811/4 Dealers
7,305 Freezers


Pounds

2,050
2,042

44,169
8,499

6,960
6,660


Pounds

9,732
480

22,522
3,969

750
96
















". i


** L .' -. .
,. ,- .^^ J .'* : -,I -* .,' fl -.


4 v* 7*** *


During the first two weeks of life, baby oysters swim. Then they must find a place of
attachment or perish. An effective method of cultivation consists of planting oyster
shells on bay bottoms to provide a setting place. In the photo, several barge loads of
shell are being towed to an oyster growing area where they will be used to create
artificial oyster reefs.


OYSTER DIVISION


The 1947 Legislature, fearful that a tremendous post-war decline in
oyster production presaged a complete collapse of the industry, created a
Division of Oyster Culture. By doing so, they established the first re-
search organization ever to function within the Board of Conservation.
The directors of the organization were, by statute, required to be
aquatic biologists of recognized standing and the activities were centered
around scientific pursuits.
The Division of Oyster Culture was activated in February of 1949
and began at once a state-wide program of research with heavy emphasis
on centers of production located along the coast of northwest Florida.
The principal research projects were completed and written up by
1954. Since that time, rehabilitation projects, based upon information ob-
tained, have continued in several oyster producing coastal counties.
The results have exceeded expectations and have shown the wisdom
of the scientific approach established by the 1947 Legislature. Today,


~4ci~





































Scientists have long known of commercial quantities of a deep water scallop off Florida's
west coast. Although its presence in the Atlantic was also known, the extent of the
population was not fully appreciated prior to U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service exploratory
fishing trips during the past two years. The so-called Calico Scallop, shown here, was
found to populate extensive areas off the east coast. The open shells, with viscera
removed, show the edible muscle. In size and taste, this meat is practically indistin-
guishable from the well-known bay scallop.


Florida is probably the only major oyster producing area in North
America that can show such a rapid increase in the production of native
oysters.

Florida's results from the scientific approach to oyster problems pro-
vides a recommendation for a similar attack on other sections of the sea-
food economy that have declining or endangered production.

During the summer of 1959 there were no oyster rehabilitation pro-
jects. But in 1960, planting operations took place in three counties, set-
ting new records for the amount of work accomplished.


Summer, 1960

Franklin County-Shell 250,000 bushels

Walton County-Shell 72,000 bushels

Wakulla County-Oysters transplanted ------- 4,032 bushels

































Recent experiments have revealed that northern clams, planted in Florida waters, have
an unusually rapid growth rate. The top clam, above, shows the size at which clams
were received from Connecticut. Middle row shows growth after about two months.
Bottom row shows growth after five months. Clams were planted in Sarasota Bay.


The pervasive inter-relationship of all science, even though geograph-
ically diffused, is illustrated in the case of clams.

For more than 30 years, Dr. Victor Loosanoff, of the U. S. Fish and
Wildlife Service, Milford Harbor, Connecticut, worked to develop artificial
methods for the production of clams. During the past five years his meth-
ods have become extremely well-refined and he can now, with little ad-
vance notice, produce several million baby clams with relative ease.

During the previous biennium (1957-58), Dr. Winston Menzel. shell-
fish biologist with the Oceanographic Institute, Florida State University,
obtained several hundred thousand of the clams produced in Milford Har-
bor, Connecticut. When procured, the clams were little more than pin-
head size. Growth in Florida proved to be significantly more rapid than
it is in northern production centers.

Subsequent studies, in which the Board of Conservation cooperated,
have confirmed this accelerated growth. So long as protection is given
against predatory crabs during clams' early life, the waters of Florida ap-
parently provide an unusually favorable habitat for their cultivation.

These studies are continuing.









Scientists have recognized, for many years, that Florida offshore
waters contain a small scallop, closely resembling the common bay scallop.
In recent years, several progressive seafood producers of the west coast
have attempted to develop the rather large and promising beds of these
offshore animals. The relatively large amount of hand labor involved re-
sulted in a lack of financial success for most of these ventures.
During the biennium, research vessels of the U. S. Fish and Wildlife
Service revealed that there existed off Florida's east coast vast quantities
of these offshore scallops (now nicknamed "Calico Scallop"). The stimu-
lus of these known resources resulted in the development of a machine
which reduced the amount of hand labor considerably. By the close of
1960, several east coast producers were getting ready to bring in and mar-
ket this previously unexploited resource.



RESEARCH

The Board of Conservation is dedicated to the sound management of
Florida's marine resources. The attainment of this goal will depend upon
knowledge-knowledge gained through years of patient collection of data
and deliberate analysis of them.
In order to more effectively progress in the study of our salt water
wealth, the Board made two significant changes during the past two years.
1) The staff and program of the Board's own laboratory in St. Pe-
tersburg were expanded.
2) The program of the Marine Laboratory of the University of Mi-
ami has been consolidated.



Research Performed

by the

St. Petersburg Marine Laboratory

SHRIMP PARASITES
Supported in part by a grant from the U. S. Public Health Service,
the department laboratory is investigating the parasites of shrimps from
southeastern United States and the Caribbean. Notice is taken of the pro-
tozoa, helminths and other, incidental types encountered. So far, the
































Although only six years old, the marine sciences library of the Board's laboratory in
St. Petersburg has become one of the best in southeastern U. S. Many of Florida's
problems are helped by reference to research on similar subjects in other parts of the
world. Here the librarian accessions some newly arrived scientific reports from New
Zealand.


studies have been broad and concerned primarily with occurrence of the
various types in each area. Later, life history studies are planned.

Aside from the basic biological information derived which will yield
understanding of debilitation, mortality and perhaps abundance of shrimp
in some cases, it is hoped that one or more of the parasites may serve as
natural tags. If they do not serve this purpose as they naturally occur,
there is a possibility that they may be made to identify migrating shrimp
through artificial introduction in some cases.


BASIC SHRIMP BIOLOGY

Data collected over a four year period were analyzed and several pub-
lications were prepared. All of this work is aimed at a greater elucidation
of the basic dynamics of shrimp populations. The final analysis will pro-
vide quantitative evaluation of migration, growth, natural mortality and
loss due to fishing. With this understanding, administrators will have
more detailed facts which can form the background for regulations.

Reports presently being prepared cover investigations made in Tortu-
gas, Tampa Bay and Apalachicola.










REEF FISHES
Studies are being made on the growth, migrations and population
densities of the fishes of relatively shallow water reefs in the Florida Keys
and Tampa Bay areas.
It is hoped that light will be shed on several old and perplexing prob-
lems. Among these are: effects of fishing on reef populations; importance
of homing instinct; effects of spearfishing on success of hook and line ef-
forts; seasonal changes in population characteristics; rate of colonization
of new, artificial reefs.
Emphasis during the first year was on barracuda.

TAXONOMY OF MINOR FISH SPECIES
Because of their bulk and the vital role they play in the basic dynamics
of several fish habitats, efforts were begun to clarify the taxonomic status
of several of the more common small sized fishes. Because of their size,
they are of no direct importance for either sportsmen or commercial fish-
ermen, but they form important parts of the populations and dynamics of
grassy flat nursery areas and reefs.

ALGAE AND SUBMERGED SPERMATOPHYTES
Several reports were prepared on previous work on coastal water
flora. Much of this revealed hitherto unknown facts about some of the
dominant botanical organisms that serve as cover in Florida's salt water
nurseries. Plans were completed for pilot plantings to determine the effi-
cacy of rehabilitation projects. Coastal changes wrought by rapid urban-
ization have damaged much of Florida's "under-water meadows." It is
hoped that anticipated studies will reveal methods by which these sanctu-
aries can be reestablished.

RED TIDE
Records continue to be made of aerial inspections and density of con-
centrations of Gymnodinuim breve.
These will serve in later analyses to demonstrate occurrences of red
tide with meteorological phenomenon such as rainfall, temperature and
sunlight. Such correlations will improve methods of prediction.

BASIC ESTUARINE AND COASTAL ECOLOGY
In the course of studies made in the areas of proposed dredging and
construction projects, detailed ecology data are obtained. This informa-
tion provides the basis of recommendations and advice the Conservation
Department gives to legally constituted authorities to aid in deciding the
disposition of government owned submerged acreage.
All data is placed on specially designed cards which are kept for
later analysis. Eventually all of this will be organized into a compendium
of material covering the hydrology and habitat characteristics of all ani-
mals and plants encountered.




'
J- :-
s


Studies on reef fishes, long overdue, were begun in 1960. Here a biologist takes a census
of inhabitants of a reef near the lower east coast.

(Lists of all past publications and reports of the Board and its St.
Petersburg Laboratory are available on request.)
The first Board of Conservation Marine Laboratory inventory was
completed January 1961. At that time, the library collection totaled ap-
proximately 4,667 items which includes books, journals, magazines, re-
prints and reports.
1960
Books 307
Journals (includes exchanges and subscriptions, also
some on microcards) 1252
Reprints 2003
Microfilm 254
Miscellaneous (reports, etc.) 851
Microcards (some listed in above journals) _- 150
The Board of Conservation has an exchange mailing list of approxi-
mately 700 institutions and individuals which are sent the Florida State
Board of Conservation publications and the contributions from the Marine
Laboratory.
General Mailing List 402
Parasitological Mailing List 105
Botanical Mailing List 31
Fish Mailing List 98


t) .










Research Performed

by the

University of Miami Marine Laboratory

SPECKLED TROUT
Studies originally begun in Cocoa, and later transferred to northwest
Florida, were continued near Fort Myers.
Information presently being sought includes migration, growth, re-
production and regional size characteristics.
Projected studies will heavily emphasize tagging in an effort to de-
rive facts concerning population dynamics.

FLORIDA BAY ECOLOGY
Studies were continued on the basic productivity of a relatively pris-
tine, coastal habitat. Basic hydrographic data were obtained and popu-
lation and growth studies were made on typical, common and important
index organisms.
Chemical checks were made to establish the salient features of the
area. An effort will be made later to relate these to population fluctua-
tions and relative success of various organisms basic to the over-all habi-
tat.

STATISTICS
Accurate reports on landings were sought on all commercial species.
Fish tickets, providing information on gear, number of hours of fish-
ing, type of boat, number of men per crew, etc., were used in greater num-
bers than in the previous year. Again, use of these tickets was on an indi-
vidual and voluntary basis.
Facts obtained from the tickets aided in establishing catch per unit of
effort for several species in widely separated localities and will also serve
in many ways in future evaluations of the various fisheries.

SCRAP FISH TECHNOLOGY
Experiments are under way to determine the feasibility of simple
chemical digestion of scrap fish on board ship. This preliminary process-
ing may advance the use of fish species that are presently neglected.
(Lists of publications available from the U. of Miami Marine Labora-
tory are available on request. These are long, comprehensive, and include
publications prepared under the auspices of the State Board of Conserva-
tion.)


















LICENSE DIVISION

The 1959 Session of the Legislature passed a comprehensive revision
of Florida's boat registration laws. Under this new statute, coverage was
expanded. All pleasure craft of greater than 10 horsepower and all com-
mercial boats, regardless of size, were obliged to be registered.
This greater scope required substantial increases in personnel and the
acquisition of electronic data processing equipment. The responsibility
was met and, despite unprecedented increases in the numbers of licenses
concerned, an orderly and prompt system was put into effect within a few
months after the law changed.

License Statistics
Type License 1958-1959 1959-1960
Wholesale 690 657
Retail 4,195 4,232
Commercial boats (salt water) 12,015 15,000
Commercial boats (fresh water) 18,000 (a)
Pleasure boats 7-1-59 to 12-30-60 124,171 (b)
Non-resident Commercial Fishing License -___ 175 245
Purse Seines 16 18
(a) Commercial boats used in fresh water are issued by the Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission, but these records upon completion are
filed with the State Board of Conservation.
(b) Pleasure boat registration is valid for a period of two years (1 July
1959, to 30 June 1961). After the two year period re-registration
will be required.



















_r ___ K1_


-0

There are many benefits from Florida's new boat law. Statistics are vastly improved
and ownership is easily established. Also, registration numbers must be prominently
displayed. This facilitates identification in the case of stolen or lost boats. The picture
shows several boats with the new look (registration numbers) much in evidence. The
first two letters (FL) indicate that the skiffs are Florida registered and the final
letters (SA) show that they are used commercially.

29


I '~


-


~fZ--~Lik, Ir









I r j










*5i
I








'Av.
". dr,


or:

d.o








One of the most rapidly expanding segments of the seafood industry is the production
of blue crab meat. Here a plant worker prepares newly caught crabs for processing.












LANDINGS AND VALUE BY SPECIES, EAST AND WEST COAST OF FLORIDA-1958
FOOD FISH


EAST COAST


Value


WEST COAST


Landings
in
Pounds


Value


TOTAL
Landings
in
Pounds


Amberjack 21,488
Barracuda 1,935
Bluefish 844,869
Bluerunner 98,949
Bonito 2,337
Cobia 8,064
Catfish: Freshwater ------ 2,278,999
Catfish: Saltwater--- 48,711
3 Croaker 118,273
Dolphin 14,939
Drum: black 56,531
Eel 6,705
Flounder 162,210
Grouper _____- -_ 221..877
Grunt 29,269
Hogfish 4,724
Jack: common 87,442
Jewfish 34,344
King mackerel 1,799,777
King whiting 1,341,252
Mullet: black 3,335,452
Mullet: silver 180,199
Muttonfish 77,422
Permit 1,194
Pigfish 5,367
Pompano ___ 213,261


Species


Landings
in
Pounds


Value


$ 1,074
116
92,936
4,947
140
726
319,060
3,410
11,827
1,793
4,918
235
25,954
24,850
2,195
850
2,623
2,748
206,974
107,300
183,450
14,416
17,033
143
590
107,697


33,302
12,612
1,438,049
806,394
1,651
10,298
27,238
269,826
20,467
1,184
89,677
507
62,350
4,154,967
52,362
19,839
718,358
41,786
1,406,143
52,362
32,342,469
958,129
40,026
11,909
14,022
518,286


$ 1,332
631
158,185
32,256
99
618
3,813
26,983
1,433
101
3,587
18
11,223
457,046
3,927
2,976
21,551
3,343
133,584
3,404
2,037,576
57,488
8,005
1,072
1,178
245,149


54,790
14,547
2,282,918
905,343
3,988
18,362
2,306,237
318,537
138,740
16,123
146,208
7,212
224,560
4,376,844
81,631
24,563
805,800
76,130
3,205,920
1,393,614
35,677,921
1,138,328
117,448
13,103
19,389
731,547


$ 2,406
747
251,121
37,203
239
1,344
322,873
30,393
13,260
1,894
8,505
253
37,177
481,896
6,122
3,826
24,174
6,091
340,558
110,704
2,221,026
71,904
25,038
1,215
1,768
352,846












FOOD FISH (Continued)


Landings Landings Landings
in in in
Species Pounds Value Pounds Value Pounds Value
Redfish: channel bass ---. 103,433 16,549 626,831 82,115 730,264 98,664
Sandperch 96,977 7,166 162,885 11,304 259,862 18,470
Sardine 74,427 2,233 74,427 2,233
Sea bass: common 39,146 4,502 6,750 898 45,896 5,400
Sea trout: gray 28,720 3,274 28,720 3,274
Sea trout: spotted 762,776 175,438 2,927,518 644,054 3,690,294 819,492
Sea trout, white ----- 81,759 9,402 81,759 9,402
Shad 587,586 64,792 4,780 680 592,366 65,472
Shad: hickory 19,217 480 800 20 20,017 500
Sheepshead 59,135 4,731 85,900 7,731 145,035 12,462
CO Snapper: mangrove ------- 103,688 17,627 352,449 52,867 456,137 70,494
K Snapper: red 589,377 188,601 5,844,400 1,519,544 6,433,777 1,708,145
Snapper: vermilion .----- 159 30 3,692 701 3,851 731
Snapper: white --- 11,187 783 46,625 3,963 57,812 4,746
Snapper: yellowtail --.---- 86,488 22,054 261,299 57,486 347,787 79,540
Spanish mackerel 7,307,514 514,526 3,829,558 325,512 11,137,072 837,038
Spot 419,535 41,954 109,781 7,136 529,316 49,090
Sturgeon 14,856 2,674 14,856 2,674
Trigger fish 2,261 147 15,164 607 17,425 754
Triple tail 2,946 147 867 52 3,813 199
Tile fish 4,043 485 4,043 485
Warsaw 19,819 1,784 172,119 12,909 191,938 14,693
Unclassified:
Bottomfish 294,412 19,137 612,185 42,853 906,597 61,990
Miscellaneous 11,425 571 9,900 495 21,325 1,066


TOTAL FOOD FISH


-_21,541,391 2,219,298 58,352,801


6,002,299 79,894,192 8,221,597






























































The natural curiosity most people have for things of the sea gets a chance for expres-
sion. The Board of Conservation display which is presented widely in Florida expositions
is shown, in part, in this photo taken at the Tampa Fair. An agent is always on hand
to answer questions.











NON-FOOD FISH


Species
Alewives
Ballyhoo
Cigarfish
Menhaden
Sharks
Tenpounder: ladyfish ---
Trashfish
TOTAL NON-FOOD FISH


C Clam --__
4^ Conch
Crab, blue: hard --
Crab, blue: soft
Crab, stone
Spiny Lobster (Crawfish)
Oyster
Scallop
Shrimp: heads on:
Campeche
Tortugas
Upper East Coast'
Upper West Coast
Central West Coast
Central America ----.---
TOTAL SHRIMP -


EA
Landings
in
Pounds
87,082
30,056

7,871,183

36,611
537,634
8,562,566


1,374
30
7,996,509

30,781
622,787
29,759


LST COAST

Value
2,612
4,208

84,204


WEST COAST


Landings
in
Pounds
39,800
65,584
200,559
9,100,427
800


1,098 456,334
13,441 113,885
105,563 9,977,389
SHELLFISH, ETC.
426 18,673
6 480
359,343 8,693,449
756
12,312 287,235
183,722 2,331,528
8,213 794,970
401,283


5,504,003 2,205,562



5,504,003 2,205,562


13,995,837
24,198,937
8,430
3,986,958
1,428,573
1,987,842
45,606,577


Value
1,592
9,182
16,045
139,249
24
13,690
2,847
182,629


5,789
96
460,753
378
117,766
652,828
224,182
80,257

6,119,414
7,795,685
3,372
1,191,023
331,996
870,467


TOTAL


Landings
in
Pounds
126,882
95,640
200,559
16,971,610
800
492,945
651,519
18,539,955


20,047
510
16,689,958
756
318,016
2,954,315
824,729
401,283

13,995,837
24,198,937
5,512,433
3,986,958
1,428,573
1,987,842


Value
4,204
13,390
16,045
223,453
24
14,788
16,288
288,192


6,215
102
820,596
378
130,078
836,550
232,395
80,257

6,119,414
7,795,685
2,208,934
1,191,023
331,996
870,467


16,311,957 51,110,580 18,517,519


1. Upper east coast shrimp reported on the west coast were caught in upper east coast grounds but landed at a west coast port.


















SHELLFISH, ETC. (Continued)


Species
Squid
Turtles: green ---- .---
A Terrapin: Diamond back ---
1 Sponge:
Glove
Grass
Wool
Yellow
TOTAL SHELLFISH
(Excluding Shrimp) ..-.
GRAND TOTAL ----._


EAST COAST
Landings
in
Pounds Value
3,925 550
268 43
1,500 375


WEST COAST


Landings
in
Pounds
9,163
4,565


264
1,891
19,263
2,125


8,686,933
14,294,893


565,490
5,095,913


12,565,675
126,502,412


Value
1,374
730


1,922
7,270
197,627
9,128

1,760,100
24,256,985


TOTAL
Landings
in
Pounds Value
13,088 1,924
4,833 773
1,500 375


264
1,891
19,263
2,125

21,252,578
170,797,305


1,922
7,270
197,627
9,128

2,325,590
29,352,898
















LANDINGS OF MARINE PRODUCTS BY COUNTY, 1958


County
Bay & Gulf
Brevard
Broward
Charlotte
Citrus
Collier
co Dade
01 Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Franklin
Hillsborough
Indian River
Lee
Levy
Manatee
Martin
Monroe
(Continued)


Food
Fish
6,571,186
1,891,307
48,647
4,529,323
1,653,679
6,002,566
1,729,251
773,755
1,382,033
3,156,746
3,401,672
2,131,165
702,015
9,086,586
1,139,520
5,141,773
1,937,984
3,860,753


Non-Food
Fish
507,514
463

1,488
5,931
18,911
33,368
55,803
240,241
33,291
9,061,984
395
314,049
44,211
36,570
8817
34,038
67,820


Shellfish,
Excluding
Shrimp
309,731
5961
27,255
467,090
11,2002
296,685
598,462
2
4,022.782
15,866
1,869,790
342,429
630.741
1 809,375
2,804,1632
90,009
77,062
2,423,2983


Grand
Shrimp Total
506,501 7,894,932
890,100 2,782,466
75,902
104,104 5,102,005
1,670,810
1,033 514 7,351,676
2,361,081
829,558
1,345,710 6,990,766
724,796 3,930,699
2,726,706 17,060,152
12,831,004 15,304,993
1,646,805
7,674,112 18,614,284
3,980,253
5,240,599
2,049,084
19,442,937 25,794,808









































During the past two years the supply of sponges has become more abundant and fishing
effort increased. Here a fisherman from Tarpon Springs prepares to air dry his catch
before putting it on the market.






P,










-- I I I I











Typical of the fishing piers being erected over the coast of Florida is this new one just
outside of Ft. Myers. In 1960 there were 41 such structures in use along the coast that
were built specifically for angling.


















LANDINGS OF MARINE PRODUCTS BY
(Continued)


County
Nassau
Okaloosa
Palm Beach
Pasco and Hernando
S Pinellas
S Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sarasota
Taylor
Volusia
Wakulla


Food
Fish
78,681
2,048,921
6,895,397
894,088
5,451,235
2,673,800
457,592
1,940,786
1,692,391
423,842
1,803,898
393,631


Non-Food
Fish
7,797,581
125,601
513
50
6,835
129,523
120
10,513

267
2,157
1,870


COUNTY, 1958


Shellfish,
Excluding
Shrimp
1,445,447
821
6,149

54,6883
137,573
5,517
932,414
35,640

802,9351
2,034,860


Grand
Total


Shrimp


1,543,168 10,864,877
23,105 2,198,448
6,902,059
894,138
539,798 6,052,556
2,940,896
1,077,622 1,540,851
52,200 2,935,913
1,728,031
424,109
595,203 3,204,193
2,430,361


TOTAL 79,894,192


18,539,955 21,252,578 51,110,580


1. Blue crabs landed in Brevard county are included in Volusia county's total.
2. Blue crabs landed in Citrus and Dixie counties are included in Levy county's total.
3. Sponges landed in Monroe county are included in Pinellas county's production.


170,797,305






































Another old automobile body goes over the side of the barge in the creation of an
artificial fishing reef. This shot was made off Palm Beach.


Another auto shell pauses momentarily on the surface, sustained by enclosed air, before
descending to the bottom. This hulk will provide shelter for reef fishes where they can
be caught by anglers.











LANDINGS BY SPECIES BY COUNTY 1958
FOOD FISH
Species Bay & Gulf Brevard Broward Charlotte Citrus Collier
Amberjack 251 332 2,590 5,796
Bluefish 798,525 2,476 1,735 31,209 2,009 24 462
Bluerunner 694,227 1,816 179 1,640
Bonito 590
Cobia 345 176 1,787 513
Catfish (fresh water) -.. 16,426
Catfish (sea) 1,662 200 21,226 300 1,375
Croaker 2,621 651
Dolphin 1,858
Drum (black) 4.580 7,459 10,852 400 15,846
Flounder 7,336 43,450 738 178
. Sandperch, mojarra 3,617 511 44,381 26,515
0 Grouper 624,527 14,722 4,535 13,342 16,909 29,392
Grunt 200 1,046 57 1,136
Jack (common) ------------. 338,902 2,289 200 60,824 300 99,511
Jewfish __104 2,487 264 14,888 111 4,627
Kingfish mackerel 97,609 9,894 9,479 79,983 1,496 608,789
Mullet (black) 2,022,065 1,102,894 3,537,083 1,507,892 3,934 463
Mullet (silver) 45,951 8,177 322,219
Muttonfish 3,743 434 103
Permit 493 4,470
Pigfish 414 256
Pompano 26,224 32.508 1,966 95,874 162 91,378
Redfish (channel bass) .. 8,595 7,016 187,928 30,459 52,829
Sea trout (spotted) -- 84,771 244,790 285,767 78,147 277,224
Sea trout (white) 2,261 2,880
Shad hickory 800
Sheepshead 1.110 7,688 2,925 3,322 23,453
Snapper (mangrove) -.- 39,278 995 1,338 11,049 3,520 51,012












LANDINGS BY SPECIES BY COUNTY 1958 (Continued)
FOOD FISH
Species Bay & Gulf Brevard Broward Charlotte Citrus Collier
Snapper (red) 1,071,316 112,070 137 838 424 2,165
Snapper (vermilion) 3,692
Spanish mackerel 556,824 59,551 1,755 51,871 2,210 298,826
Spot 21,459 47,743 16,852 1,336
Sturgeon 118
Triple tail 867 621
Warsaw grouper 31,928 235 14,024
White snapper (porgy) -- 28,133 1,218
Whiting, kingfish 9,625 150,250 205
Yellowtail 3,799 831
Sea bass (common) ...---- 3,434
Sardine 24,227
-. Unclassified:
Bottomfish 1,209 32,277 48,099 5,749 120,770
Miscellaneous' 142 220 277 78 91 880

TOTAL FOOD FISH ..----. 6,571,186 1,891,307 48,647 4,529,323 1,653,679 6,002,566

NON-FOOD FISH
Alewife 21,723
Ballyhoo 700
Cigarfish 175,518
Menhaden 10,303 86 169
Shark 300
Tenpounder, ladyfish ----- 297,590 9,411
Trash fish 1,680 377 1,488 5,631 9,331


TOTAL NON-FOOD FISH _.


507,514 463


1,488 5,931 18,911











LANDINGS BY SPECIES BY COUNTY 1958 (Continued)


SHELLFISH,
Brevard


Clams
Crabs (blue, hard) ..-----....
Crabs (stone)
Spiny lobster (crawfish) .....
Oysters
Scallops
Shrimp (heads on) :
Campeche
Tortugas
Upper east cost
Upper west coast -----------

TOTAL SHRIMP
Squid

TOTAL SHELLFISH .-....--
GRAND TOTAL


Species
Amberjack
Barracuda
Bluefish
Bluerunner
Cobia
Catfish (fresh water) ----..-
Catfish (sea)
Croaker


27,255


60,206
247,712


506,501

506,501
1,472


309,731
7,894,932


464,866
2,224


11,200


3,881
100,223


890,100


890,100


596
2,782,466


Dade
County
5,817
256
72,357
68,954
349


Dixie
County


25,260


27,255
75,902

Duval
County


3,370


108,795
36,028
35,888


104,104


467,090 11,200
5,102,005 1,670,810

Escambia Franklin
County County
8,121


50,118
804


21,691
6,360


4,477
578


9,891
194,547
10,937


Species


Bay & Gulf


ETC.
Broward


Charlotte


Citrus


Collier


162,261
132,698
1,726


1,033,514



1,033,514


296,685
7,351,676

Hillsborough
County


17,542











LANDINGS BY SPECIES BY COUNTY 1958 (Continued)
FOOD FISH
Dade Dixie Duval Escambia Franklin Hillsborough
Species County County County County County County
Dolphin 2,559 200
Drum (black) 609 21,841 669 4,221 3,562
Eel 507
Flounder 2,392 50,819 4,856 10,130 1,215
Sandperch mojarra ---. ---- 7,884 140 1,515 31,572
Grouper 65,779 2,633 14,262 187,035 983,287 301,394
Grunt 23,084 11,812 608
Hogfish 3,944 4,433 528
Jack (common) 10,354 3,889 3,450 7,711 420 5,377
Jewfish 2,162 12,643 1,083 544
S Kingfish (mackerel) .----.. 250,059 110 477 5,934 8,755
Wo Mullet (black) 29,497 605,330 262,229 342,912 1,775,536 1,020,156
Mullet, (silver) 153,187 1,000 1,092 6,605
Muttonfish 15,330 813
Permit 343
Pigfish 100 8,472 185
Pompano 38,928 3,226 2,374 2,281 650 2,611
Redfish (channel bass) --- 7,994 23,945 2,189 15,394 25,745
Sea trout (gray) 9,320
Sea trout (spotted) .--. 4,273 92,684 77,010 25,862 109,343 129,554
Sea trout (white) 117 427 26,127
Shad 219,033 1,131
Sheepshead 232 1,137 487 5,338 3,277
Snapper (mangrove) ....... -- 33,369 4,608 1,179 3,750
Snapper (red) 11,998 258 27,650 2,287,406 200,444 473,721
Spanish mackerel 827,143 768 1,162 121,097 10,787 29,302
Spot 390 1,631 22,550 2,725 16,492 2,747
Sturgeon 2,000











LANDINGS BY


Species
Trigger fish
Warsaw grouper
White snapper (porgy) ......-.
Whiting, kingfish
Yellowtail
Sea bass (common) ......- _
Unclassified:
Bottom fish
Miscellaneous
TOTAL FOOD FISH .........


Alewife (herring) ----
Ballyhoo
Menhaden ________ --
Tenpounder ladyfishh) ---..
Trash fish
TOTAL NON-FOOD FISH


Dade
County


251
3,622
625
74,373
224


13,435
7,448


SPECIES BY COUNTY 1958
FOOD FISH
Dixie Duval
County County


738


481
438,624


7,050


1,103
72


252
41


(Continued)


Escambia
County
6,904
58,377
9,626
1,223
199


108


Franklin Hillsborough
County County


2,612

9,005


17,327
177


18,520
98


24,717
119


1,729,251 773,755 1,382,033 3,156,746 3,401,672 2,131,165

NON-FOOD FISH
356 10,345 300 17,777
30,056
50 54,625 438 9,030,523 395
1,100 500 32,322 2,734
1,806 678 229,896 231 10,950
33,368 55,803 240,241 33,291 9,061,984 395


Conch
Crab (blue, hard).
Crab (blue, soft)
Crab (stone)
Spiny lobster (crawfish) ....-
Oyster
Scallops


30
3,705


SHELLFISH, ETC.


4,000,258


20,113
574,614


22,524


5,162 1,106,922



2,147 713,230
1,008 49,638


341,673
756












LANDINGS BY

Dade
County


Species


SPECIES BY COUNTY 1958 (Continued)
SHELLFISH, ETC.


Dixie
County


Duval
County


Escambia
County


Shrimp (heads on):
Campeche
Tortugas
Upper East Coast -...-.-----
Upper West Coast -...--
Central West Coast --......
Central America -.......-
TOTAL SHRIMP
Squid
TOTAL SHELLFISH ------. 598,462
GRAND TOTAL 2,361,081


1,345,710


1,345,710


7,549
4,022,782 15,866
829,558 6,990,766 3,930,699

FOOD FISH


10,543,445
119,772

724,796 2,726,706 4,842
652,788
1,510,157
724,796 2,726,706 12,831,004


1,869,790 342,429
17,060,152 15,304,993


Species


Amberjack
Barracuda
Bluefish
Bluerunner
Bonito
Cobia
Catfish (fresh water) .--
Catfish (sea)
Croaker
Dolphin
Drum (black)
Flounder


Franklin Hillsborough
County County


Indian
River
County


26,383


315
1,710

1,500


Lee
County


2,368

20,243
844

5,235

3,532


3,890
26,457


Levy
County


2,401


140


1,005


Manatee
County


136,490
1,899
1,061

287
140


32,197
990


Martin
County


1,078
159,656
4,235



11,826
61,302


7,961
667


Monroe
County
4,124
1,928
158,792
36,263

1,010


235
916
710
502


Species










LANDINGS BY SPECIES BY COUNTY 1958 (Continued)
FOOD FISH
Indian
River Lee Levy Manatee Martin Monroe
Species County County County County County County
Sandperch 642 14,616 608 6,764 75,421 7,379
Grouper 1,152 151,820 3,328 43,840 1,066 159,518
Grunt 885 465 3,163 715 27,490
Hogfish 1,371 238 14,025
Jack (common) 1,868 81,728 1,500 62,622 22,104 8,808
Jewfish 12.515 506 570 3,216
Kingfish (mackerel) _----- 20,007 39.660 445 63,234 12,561 380,221
Mullet (black) 315,668 6,959.847 978,398 3,828,532 204,216 37,954
Mullet (silver) 1,075 124,744 217 206,212 210,129
Muttonfish 1.510 138 397 11,772 37,878
Permit 2,843 1,705 843
Pigfish 200
b Pompano 10,255 62,987 3,988 83,396 31,266 73,215
Redfish (channel bass) 8,323 127,487 19,829 53,037 6,460 2,070
Sea trout (grey) 998 14,341
Sea trout (spotted) ..------... 117,800 875,225 105,152 267,152 42,173 71,608
Sea trout (white) 4.455 230 42,361
Sheepshead 20.267 313 8,348 41,573 398
Snapper (mangrove) --....- 1,723 134,116 2,557 3,198 5,854 75,605
Snapper (red) 1,779 140,575 117 13,345 1,198 13,208
Spanish mackerel 6,402 62,121 4,157 189,925 901,451 2,172,230
Spot 140,783 2.991 3,198 25,393 43,992 3,646
Trigger fish 5,086 320
Triple tail 2,276
Warsaw grouper 194
White snapper (porgy) ...-- 1,333 573 7,145
Whiting, kingfish 143 490 8,776 169,427 5,512
Yellowtail 4,635 1,599 255,457
Sea bass (common) --.....-...... 7,148 1,216 1,675
Tile fish 4,043
Unclassified:










LANDINGS BY SPECIES BY COUNTY--1958 (Continued)
FOOD FISH


Lee
County


Levy
County


Manatee
County


Bottom fish
Miscellaneous
TOTAL FOOD FISH ...........

Ballyhoo
Menhaden
Shark
Tenpounder, ladyfish ...--
Trash fish
TOTAL NON-FOOD FISH _-

._ Conch
V Crab (blue, hard)
Crab (stone)
Spiny lobster (crawfish) ..---
Oyster
Scallops
Shrimp (heads on):
Campeche
Tortugas
Upper East Coast .......--
Upper West Coast ------.....
Central West Coast ....-..---
Central America
TOTAL SHRIMP
Squid
Turtles: green
TOTAL SHELLFISH .--.....-
GRAND TOTAL


33,956
167


190,494
180


8,358
78


59,262
510


95,623
3,688


76,213
8,142


702,015 9,086,586 1,139,520 5,141,773 1,937,984 3,860,753
NON-FOOD FISH
64,884
214,198 199 12,188 50
500
35,433 6,328 8,617 78 300
64,418 37,684 36,070 200 21,772 2,586
314,049 44,211 36,570 8,817 34,038 67,820
SHELLFISH, ETC.
480
630,741 1,682,655 2,790,7683 80,597 77,062 12,945
21,901 11,135 9,412 79,162
1,264 2,328,406
1,458
102,009

2,950,402 498,109
4,478,285 18,467,143
8,430
1,008
235,987
477,685
7,674,112 19,442,937
88


630,741
1,646,805


2,260
1,809,375 2,804,163
18,614,284 3,980,253


2,305
90,009 77,062 2,423,298
5,240,599 2,049,084 25,794,808


Indian
River
Species County


Martin
County


Monroe
County












LANDINGS BY


Species
Amberjack
Barracuda
Bluefish
Bluerunner
Bonito
Cobia
Catfish (fresh water) --.
Catfish (sea)
Croaker
Dolphin
Drum (black)
Eel
00 Flounder
Sandperch
Grouper
Grunt
Jack (common)
Jewfish
Kingfish, mackerel ..--
Mullet, (black)
Mullet, (silver)
Muttonfish
Permit
Pigfish
Pompano
Redfish (channel bass) ...-
Sea trout (grey)
Sea trout (spotted) ...............-
Sea trout (white)


Nassau
County


13,116


SPECIES BY
FOOD
Okaloosa
County
1,583

94,258
69,188


100

24,441


1,377

827
354
135,868

191
617
35,067
465,649
8,241


223
18,528
1,472

40,054


COUNTY 1958
FISH
Palm Beach
County
3,072
410
429,091
13,468
1,025
2,021

202
4,167
8,245
1,350

695
5,888
25,610
554
3,801
14,493
1,268,110
12,312
9,550
44,994
825
544
66,660
121
251
978


(Continued)

Pasco &
Hernando


1,026


188

146
507
1,606
1,770
2,673

1,930
843,517
5,925


546
122
3,958

21,814


Pinellas
County
10,412
10,646
35,803
627


1,299


9,396

6,166
17,002
1,171,456
400
39,973
3,560
55,280
2,929,646
7,613

1,398
428
5,004
31,774

224,025
2,776


Putnam
County


2,170,204


6,705






93,533
11,866




3,722











LANDINGS BY

Nassau


Species County
Shad
Shad (hickory)
Sheepshead
Snapper (mangrove) ---
Snapper (red)
Spanish mackerel ----.........-
Spot
Sturgeon
Trigger fish
Warsaw grouper
White snapper (porgy) --- -..
Whiting (kingfish) -...-----...-. 65,565
Yellowtail
Sardines
Unclassified:
Bottom fish
Miscellaneous
TOTAL FOOD FISH ----........ 78,681

Alewife (herring) ---------------
Cigarfish
Menhaden 7,638,000
Tenpounder (Ladyfish) ----.-
Trash fish 159,581
TOTAL NON-FOOD FISH -_ 7,797,581

Clams 165
Crab (blue, hard) 1,442,018


SPECIES BY COUNTY 1958
FOOD FISH
Okaloosa Palm Beach
County County


11,630
1,007,026
35,264
1,605
12,738
2,854
78,715
843


3,376
18,941
3,026
4,930,657


(Continued)


Pasco &
Hernando
375

658
187

5,627
208


225
3,653


6,648


147 10,166
61 268


Pinellas
County
3,218

11,026
6,941
524,378
261,552
234


Putnam
County
368,553
19,217


199

50,200


1,165
30


27,998
805


2,048,921 6,895,397 894,088 5,451,235 2,673,800
NON-FOOD FISH
76,381
25,041
3.681 433 13
96,560 50 1,918
319 80 4,904 53,142
125,601 513 50 6,835 129,523
SHELLFISH, ETC.


767 688


16
16,256


137,305


v












LANDINGS BY


Nassau
County


Species


Crab (stone)
Spiny lobster (crawfish) .--
Oyster 1,764
Scallops
Shrimp (heads on) :
Upper East Coast ...------. 1,543,168
Upper West Coast ---..-_..
Central West Coast --.----
TOTAL SHRIMP 1,543,168
Squid
Turtles: green
U Terrapin: diamond back --.. 1,500
S Sponges:
Glove
Grass
Wool
Yellow
TOTAL SHELLFISH .-----.. 1,445,447
GRAND TOTAL 10,864,877

St. Johns
Species County


Amberjack
Barracuda
Bluefish
Bluerunner
Bonito


7,532


SPECIES BY COUNTY 1958
SHELLFISH, ETC.
Okaloosa Palm Beach
County County


5,461


23,105


23,105


821 6,149
2,198,448 6,902,059
FOOD FISH


St. Lucie
County


140,996
10,476
1,293


Sarasota
County


647

32,765


(Continued)


Pasco &
Hernando


Pinellas
County


Putnam
County


13,943
132
26
772



539,798


539,798


2644
1,891
19,263
2,125


54,688 137,573
894,138 6,052,556 2,940,896


Taylor
County


2,669


Volusia
County


Wakulla
County


9,677
161
1,273


-- ----











LANDINGS BY SPECIES BY COUNTY 1958 (Continued)


Species
Cobia
Catfish (sea)
Croaker
Dolphin
Drum (black)
Flounder
Sandperch
Grouper
Grunt
Jack (common)
Jewfish
Kingfish mackerel --......
^ Mullet (black)
Mullet (silver)
Muttonfish
Permit
Pigfish
Pompano
Redfish (channel bass) .---
Sea trout (grey)
Sea trout (spotted) ..---
Sheepshead
Snapper (mangrove) --.--.-
Snapper (red)
Spanish mackerel
Spot
Trigger fish
Warsaw grouper
White snapper (porgy) --- .
Whiting, kingfish


St. Johns
County


13,707

4,250
31,658
207
1,619


265
167
14,363


2,579
4,007
824
871
185

28,012
531
2,186



357,132


FOOD
St. Lucie
County
2,790
140

1,517
3,691
1,859
6,424
50,429
2,785
43,313
835
224,186
187,224
4,360
336


24,747
14 532
2,746
105,155
5,062
41,341
176,701
578,356
130,309

4,554
482
69,563


FISH
Sarasota
County
210



143
329
7,915
272,134

3,929

27,153
946,829
9,204

142

48,470
48,198

128 462
4,248
3,808
100,618
26,962
620


Taylor
County


590


32,670
5,338



251,451



3,554
170
6,365

105,153
456

2,675

8,644


Wakulla
County


275




24,208




355,209
800


Volusia
County
2,281

300
640
7,870
19,909

42,703


625
5,314
1,113,516



4,315
1,978
35,270
163
169,726
114

226,806
506
31,556
1,498
530
312
89,824


1,508

5,521


5,860












LANDINGS BY


Species
Sea bass (common) ---..___
Unclassified:
Bottom fish
Miscellaneous
TOTAL FOOD FISH .-........-

Menhaden
Trash fish
TOTAL NON-FOOD FISH -


St. Johns
County
204

377
623
457,592


120
120


Clams 1,194
Crab (blue, hard) ______ 37
Crab (stone)
Spiny lobster (crawfish) -....-
Oyster 4,286
Scallop
Shrimp (heads on):
Upper East Coast .....-----... 1,077,622
TOTAL SHRIMP 1,077,622
Squid
TOTAL SHELLFISH -. 5,517
GRAND TOTAL 1,540,851


SPECIES BY COUNTY 1958
FOOD FISH
St. Lucie Sarasota
County County
5,527 3,997

85,271 25,166
79 118
1,940,786 1,692,391
NON-FOOD FISH
4,303
6,210
10,513
SHELLFISH, ETC.
18,654


916,961

15,453


(Continued)


Taylor
County
1,130

2,912
65
423,842


267
267


Volusia
County
13,864

22,972
195
1,803,898

1,925
232
2,157


787,7382
10,122


16,632


1,150


210
144


52,200
52,200

932,414 36,640
2,935,913 1,728,031


595,203
595,203
3,925
802,935
424,109 3,204,193


1. All species totaling less than 100 pounds are included under miscellaneous.
2. Crabs landed in Brevard County are included in Volusia County's total.
3. Crabs landed in Citrus and Dixie Counties are included in Levy County's total.
4. Sponges landed in Monroe County are included in Pinellas County's production.


Wakulla
County


200
50
393,631


1,870
1,870


2,028,367


6,493





2,034,860
2,430,361












LANDINGS AND VALUES BY SPECIES, EAST AND WEST COASTS OF FLORIDA, 1959
FOOD FISH


Species
Amberjack
Barracuda
Bluefish
Bluerunner
Bonito
Cobia
Catfish: freshwater ---
Catfish: sea
Ui Croaker
W.0 Dolphin
Drum: black
Flounder
Grouper
Grunt
Hogfish
Jack: common ----- -
Jewfish
King mackerel
King whiting
Mullet: black
Mullet: silver
Muttonfish
Permit
Pigfish
Pompano
Redfish: channel bass --_________


EAST COAST
Landings Value
in pounds in dollars


32,547
3,364
1,283,852
75,185
3,278
8,346
2,744,592
30,838
60,183
8,091
52,337
108,790
191,642
27,278
5,423
77,049
8,947
2,195,727
795,927
2,610,972
147,754
35,490
1,287
2,683
115,495
131,103


1,627
135
136,088
4,511
197
835
384,243
2,159
6,018
1,052
4,553
17,950
22,442
2,046
949
2,466
716
252,509
70,042
130,549
12,559
7,063
129
215
64,908
19,272


WEST COAST


Landings
in pounds


12,571
6,235
900,453
616,573
912
16,181
23,080
357,219
55,449
7,369
85,499
142,795
5,750,301
114,729
13,973
831,173
53,129
1,238,616
24,778
30,444,446
669,271
77,557
29,401
7,209
410,519
692,444


Value
in dollars


390
249
99,950
24,663
55
890
3,231
35,722
4,270
663
4,104
21,419
655,534
8,031
2,096
19,948
3,188
110,237
1,734
1,735,333
44,172
15,667
2,499
577
237,280
:92,095


TOTAL
EAST & WEST
COAST


Landings
in pounds


45,118
9,599
2,184,305
691,758
4,190
24,527
2,767,672
388,057
115,632
15,460
137,836
251,585
5,941,943
142,007
19,396
908,222
62,076
3,434,343
820,705
33,055,418
817,025
113,047
30,688
9,892
526,014
823,547


Value
in dollars


2,017
384
236,038
29,174
252
1,725
387,474
37,881
10,288
1,715
8,657
39,369
677,976
10,077
3,045
22,414
3,904
362,746
71,776
1,865,882
56,731
22,730
2,628
792
302,188
111,367












LANDINGS AND VALUES BY SPECIES, EAST AND WEST COASTS OF FLORIDA, 1959 (Continued)
FOOD FISH


Species


Sardine
Sea Bass: common -
Sandperch; mojarra _--
Sea Trout: gray
Sea Trout: spotted
Sea Trout: white
Shad
Sheepshead
Snapper: mangrove --
Snapper: red
(-1 Snapper: vermilion -
JP Snapper: white
Snapper: yellowtail -.
Spanish mackerel
Spot __--
Sturgeon
Tilefish
Triggerfish
Tripletail
Warsaw grouper
Unclassified:
Bottom fish
Miscellaneous
TOTAL FOOD FISH ---


Alewife
Ballyhoo


EAST
Landings
in pounds


45,490
89,647
33,620
768,106

539,540
46,213
44,746
629,138
1,297
5,999
86,390
2,352,071
827,845
235

2,946
821
13,598


COAST
Value
in dollars


5,231
6,096
3,900
184,345

64,745
3,836
7,607
174,900
311
420
22,461
211,686
75,334
35

162
49
1,224


324,288 21,079
6,210 404
16,576,380 1,929,058


20,434
5,413


WEST
Landings
in pounds
385
888
131,695

2,771,290
53,981

89,830
208,150
5,399,747
2,230
46,451
406,289
4,669,582
138,773
6,063
1,786
10,311
3,520
127,127


702,806
3,112
57,355,897


NON-FOOD FISH
613 50,060
758 117,670


COAST
Value
in dollars
8
107
9,087

629,083
5,830

7,186
32,471
1,420,133
535
3,252
89,384
401,584
8,326
1,061
179
516
225
8,899

52,710
233
5,794,806

2,503
16,474


TOTAL
EAST & WEST
COAST
Landings V
in pounds in d
385
46,378
221,342 1
33,620
3,539,396 81:
53,981
539,540 6
136,043 1
252,896 4
6,028,884 1,59
3,527
52,450
492,679 11
7,021,653 61
966,618 8
6,298
1,786
13,257
4,341
140,725 1


1,027,094
9,322
73,932,277

70,494
123,083


value
dollars
8
5,338
5,183
3,900
3,428
5,830
4,745
1,022
0,078
5,033
846
3,672
1,845
3,270
3,660
1,096
179
678
274
0,123


73,789
637
7,723,864

3,116
17,232












LANDINGS AND VALUES BY SPECIES, EAST AND WEST COAST OF FLORIDA, 1959 (Continued)


Species
Cigarfish; round scad --_--.--
Menhaden
Shark
Tenpounder; ladyfish -.-----
Trash fish
TOTAL NON-FOOD FISH

Clam
S Conch
, Crab: blue, hard
Crab: blue, soft
Crab: stone
Spiny lobster; crawfish -__.
Oyster
Scallop
Shrimp, Heads on:
Campeche
Tortugas
Upper East Coast ----
Upper West Coast --_
Central West Coast -------
Central America
TOTAL SHRIMP
Squid
Turtles: green
Turtle: loggerhead ---


EAST COAS
Landings
in pounds


46,636,852

1,013
663,872
_47,327,584

1,466

6,612,535

70,209
542,979
40,045


NON-FOOD FISH

T WEi
Value Landings
in dollars in pounds
294,702
362,208 17,589,710
1,912
31 171,622
13,277 5,197,936


376,887 23,423,612
SHELLFISH, ETC.
469 17,060
17,764
337,239 13,895,380
3,238
23,169 254,573
176,468 2,637,754
12,254 1,414,953
81,779


15,524,863
13,787,611
4,511,256 1,360,402 2,893
2,179,504
141,698
616,060
4,511,256 1,360,402 32,252,629


1,995

4,015


TOTA
EAST &
COAS
Landings
in pounds
294,702
64,226,562
1,912
172,635
5,861,808


308,325 70,751,196


5,459
4,263
680,874
1,690
99,283
778,137
404,677
19,287

5,263,625
3,762,634
992
469,678
40,587
214,470
9,751,986


299 9,886
6,620
602 100


18,526
17,764
20,507,915
3,238
324,782
3,180,733
1,454,998
81,779

15,524,863
13,787,611
4,514,149
2,179,504
141,698
616,060
36,763,885


791 11,881
993 6,620
15 4,115


ST COAST
Value
in dollars
23,281
205,263
96
5,320
55,388


L
VEST
T
Value
in dollars
23,281
567,471
96
5,351
68,665
685,212

5,928
4,263
1,018,113
1,690
122,452
954,605
416,931
19,287

5,263,625
3,762,634
1,361,394
469,678
40,587
214,470
11,112,388
1,090
993
617






















LANDINGS AND VALUES BY SPECIES, EAST AND WEST COASTS OF FLORIDA, 1959 (Continued)
SHELLFISH, ETC.


COAST
Value
in dollars


WEST
Landings
in pounds


COAST
Value
in dollars


TOTAL
EAST & WEST
COAST
Landings Value
in pounds in dollars


Sponges:
Glove 36 316 36 316
Grass 1,544 7,751 1,544 7,751
Wool 23,853 273,656 23,853 273,656
Yellow 1,894 8,391 1,894 8,391
TOTAL SHELLFISH
(Excluding Shrimp) _------ 7,273,244 550,500 18,366,434 2,285,588 25,639,678 2,836,083
GRAND TOTAL 75,688,464 4,216,847 131,398,572 18,140,700 207,087,036 22,357,547


Species


EAST
Landings
in pounds










SUMMARY OF MARINE LANDINGS BY COUNTY, 1959


Shellfish
Food Non-Food Excluding Grand
County Fish Fish Shrimp Shrimp Total
Bay & Gulf 5,441,971 377,119 104,789 340,391 6,264,270
Brevard 1,714,003 11,320 1,037,5541 563,448 3,326,325
Broward 66,417 1,456 60,694 128,567
Charlotte 4,066,543 20,892 560,433 56,205 4,704,073
Citrus 945,120 21,937 5,578,2962 6,545,353
Collier 5,296,746 5,089 95,341 309,801 5,706,977
Dade 1,261,744 6,591 492,025 1,760,360
Dixie 620,063 13,125 2 633,188
Duval 1,008,879 103,185 1,050,689 1,176,052 3,338,805
Escambia 3,486,065 30,729 38,194 397,774 3,952,762
Franklin 3,247,470 22,499,376 2,908,662 1,382,673 30,038,181
Hillsborough -- 2,878,766 49 322,622 11,351,012 14,552,489
Indian River -- 929,677 437,721 1,345,189 2,712,587
Lee 9,762,495 37,523 1,838,232 7,191,205 18,829,455
LA Levy 762,001 46,605 54,4472 863,053
"1 Manatee 4,346,186 11,776 83,486 4,441,448
Martin 1,062,434 42,761 47,995 1,153,190
Monroe 4,903,724 118,318 2,755,657 11,106,520 18,884,219
Nassau 60,989 46,378,156 1,486,616 1,375,811 49,301,572
Okaloosa 1,443,726 67,354 2,078 21,019 1,534,177
Palm Beach 3,348,482 200 38,316 3,386,998
Pasco & Hernando -- 968,089 702 514 969,305
Pinellas 5,593,241 153,283 58,759 96,029 5,901,312
Putnam 3,111,532 316,323 843,687 4,271,542
St. Johns 274,923 385 326,858 1,119,098 1,721,539
St. Lucie 1,987,160 17,914 530,953 6,641 2,542,668
Sarasota 2,764,533 4,975 27,424 2,796,932
Taylor 322,028 615 322,643
Volusia 1,749,863 11,572 12,6681 270,206 2,044,309
Wakulla 507,132 14,145 3,937,460 4,458,737
TOTALS 73,932,277 70,751,196 25,639,678 36,763,885 207,087,036
1. Blue crabs landed in Volusia and Brevard Counties have been combined to avoid disclosure of individual statistics.
2. Blue crabs landed in Citrus, Levy and Dixie Counties have been combined to avoid disclosure of individual statistics.











COUNTY LANDINGS BY SPECIES, 1959
FOOD FISH
Species Bay & Gulf Brevard Broward Charlotte Citrus Collier
Amberjack 423 1,262
Barracuda ---__ 126
Bluefish 409,198 7,391 1,719 13,349 485 48,984
Bluerunner 552,254 1,891 13,856
Bonito 912
Cobia 3,388 1,246 269
Catfish: fresh water --- 11,071
Catfish: sea 8,409 1,029 15,879
Croaker 664
Dolphin 2,540
Drum: black 2,846 6,803 7,542 17,671
Flounder 12,359 14,684 1,503 439 271
tn Grouper 683,307 26,749 5,199 101,371 5,068 88,708
00 Grunt 843 141
Hogfish 144
Jack: common 487,246 1,975 314 17,731 5,643 137,580
Jewfish 350 365 5,812 6,291
King mackerel 12,606 38,936 14,658 31,862 1,842 353,321
King whiting 2,355 68,423 281 1,045
Mullet: black 1,274,030 750,650 3,215,318 792,048 3,250,121
Mullet: silver 33,729 3,661 4,500 95,984
Muttonfish 500 784 2,675
Permit 103 682 5,917
Pigfish 347 221
Pompano 19,475 15,653 947 35,614 85,996
Redfish: channel bass .-.._.... 2,381 8,058 131,764 31,570 52,213
Sandperch; mojarra -------- 417 316 64,971 43,142
Seatrout: gray 5,337
Seatrout: spotted 90,374 237,236 641 249,570 86,678 144,749
Seatrout. white 1,492 1,429 5,852











COUNTY LANDINGS BY SPECIES, 1959 (Continued)
FOOD FISH


Species
Sheepshead
Snapper: mangrove -----
Snapper: red
Snapper: vermilion --
Spanish mackerel
Spot
Sturgeon
Tripletail
Warsaw
White snapper; porgy --_----
Yellowtail
Seabass
Sardines
Un Unclassified:
sO Bottom fish
Miscellaneous
TOTAL FOOD FISH -------

Alewife: herring
Cigarfish; round scad -------
Menhaden
Shark
Tenpounder; ladyfish -------
Trash fish
TOTAL NON-FOOD FISH _

Clam
Crab: blue, hard
Crab: blue, soft


Bay & Gulf
543
1,264
929,117
111
829,921
10,449


2,041
42,001
16,113

497
385

3,405


Brevard
2,651

129,679

168,459
182,256


462


45,275
910


Broward


3,465
627

12,437


5,362
153
9,172


183
323


Charlotte
2,478
4,024
20,196

29,358
51,817


58,564
521


Citrus
810
573
2,471

175


Collier
40,138
15,523
25,174

753,211


669
209
14,165


11,805
260


91,529
1,342


5,441,971 1,714,003 66,417 4,066,543 945,120 5,296,746
NON-FOOD FISH
5,641 323
246,484
9,576 9,019
587
115,418 815 3,324
1,486 1,456 20,892 21,937 855
377,119 11,320 1,456 20,892 21,937 5,089
SHELLFISH, ETC.


188 1,027,6142


558,276
135


See3


6,168












COUNTY LANDINGS BY SPECIES, 1959
SHELLFISH, ETC.


(Continued)


Species
Crab: stone
Spiny lobster; crawfish ..
Oyster
Scallop
Shrimp (heads on) :
Campeche
Key West
Upper East Coast --
Upper West Coast --
TOTAL SHRIMP
Squid


Bay & Gulf Brevard
9,940


93,934
10,352


340,391


563,448


340,391 563,448
315


TOTAL SHELLFISH --------104,789 1,037,554
: GRAND TOTAL 6,264,270 3,326,325


FOOD FISH
Species Dade Dixie Duval Escambia Franklin Hillsborough
Amberjack --- 5,562 1,200 1,258


Barracuda
Bluefish
Bluerunner
Cobia
Catfish: fresh water ----
Catfish: sea
Croaker
Dolphin
Drum: black
Flounder ------ --
Grouper
Grunt


2,225
15,528
67,429
124


524
2,783


25,523
18,080


24,605


2,827
600
14,675


Broward

60,694


Citrus
3,000

16,000


Charlotte
1,839

57


15,805
40,400


56,205


Collier
88,768
405


336
309,465


309,801


60,694
128,557


560,433
4,704,073


19,000
986,057


95,341
5,706,977


9,606


4,044

1,055
22,832
11,100
1,338

16,835
45,764


42,495
3,061

1,757
44,358


2,084
67,398
358 531


6,196
473


1,192


10,027
276,305
46,834

26,909
18,977
1,011,098
1,108


5,741
955
537,497










COUNTY LANDINGS BY SPECIES, 1959 (Continued)
FOOD FISH


Dade


Dixie


Duval


Escambia


Hogfish
Jack: common -----
Jewfish
King mackerel
King whiting
Mullet: black
Mullet: silver
Muttonfish
Permit
Pigfish
Pompano
Redfish, channel bass _-------
Sandperch, mojarra ----
Os Seatrout: gray
Seatrout: spotted
Seatrout: white
Shad: common
Sheepshead
Snapper: mangrove --
Snapper: red
Spanish mackerel
Spot ----
Trigger fish
Tripletail
Warsaw grouper
White snapper; porgy --------
Yellowtail
Sea bass
Unclassified:
Miscellaneous
Bottom fish
TOTAL FOOD FISH _..._...


3,459
9,787
1,309
138,790

9,510
107,865
7,480
352

15,289

756

5,553


17,166
16,051
739,999
138


1,215
42,072

451
6,724
1,261,744


2,235



423,187

300
6,010
2,406
10,701


128,631
356



154
1,550


585
4,905
3,104
395,328
152,430
1,022
221


8,294
22,062
9,013
4,778
65,473

158,491
1,786

51,014
1,867
6,101
746

120
886
525
13,062


6,810

274
1,305
467,541
16,428

184
9,357
2,650


43,321


11,248
3,821
2,169,799
163,451
6,379
4,323

45,446
12,723


560


13,374
1,536,094



550
4,346
508

66,627

611
1,579
195,571
6,400
3,432

100


168 49 63 189
1,658 2,849 16,665
620,063 1,008,879 3,486,065 3,247,470


Species


Franklin Hillsborough


4,720
136
4,174
122
1,570,330
49,514

476

2,463
31,215
7,024

136,547
25,474

3,477
230
407,268
24,708
3,793


676


250
54,164
2,878,766












COUNTY LANDINGS BY SPECIES, 1959
NON-FOOD FISH


(Continued)


Species


Alewife; herring
Ballyhoo
Cigarfish; round scad ------------
Menhaden
Shark
Tenpounder; ladyfish -------
Trash fish
TOTAL NON-FOOD FISH _

Crab: blue, hard
Crab: blue, soft
0% Crab: stone
) Spiny lobster; crawfish --_-.-
Oyster
Scallops
Shrimp (heads on):
Campeche
Central America -----
Central West Coast -------
Tortugas
Upper East Coast ---
Upper West Coast -------
TOTAL SHRIMP
Squid
Turtle: green
Turtle: loggerhead
TOTAL SHELLFISH ......._---
GRAND TOTAL


Dade
338
5,413

154


686


6,591

215


Dixie


1,325


Duval


10,008


22,350


11,800 70,827
13,125 103,185
SHELLFISH, ETC.
(See3) 1,024,893


57,309
434,501


21,781


1,176,052

1,176,052


Escambia


6,499

770
150


Franklin Hillsborouoh


8,778


17,569,431


23,310 1,215
4,919,952
30,729 22,499,376

8,436 1,637,383


8,371
12,568





397,774
397,774
8,819


4,015


492,025
1,760,360


1,050,689
633,188 3,338,805


316,807
3,103
2,752


1,268,757
240

11,133,693
85,444
36,029
65,651
5145
1,382,673 29,681
1,382,673 11,351,012


2,282


38,194 2,908,662
3,952,762 30,038,181


322,662
14.552.489


Frakln Hllborug


- -


--~-












COUNTY LANDINGS BY SPECIES, 1959 (Continued)
FOOD FISH
Indian
Species River Lee Levy Manatee Martin Monroe
Amberjack 103 2,479
Barracuda 1,326
Bluefish 58,313 16,474 2,216 99,137 226,776 102,834
Bluerunner 1,000 1,645 1,305 27,090
Cobia 2,136 110 10,959
Catfish: freshwater --- 127
Catfish: sea 3,081 18,331 110
Croaker 2,011 46,716
Dolphin 5,000 2,293
Drum: black 2,210 15,281 19,606
Flounder 1,808 514 984 132
0% Grouper 5,628 388,528 4,826 4,849 4,361 275,831
W Grunt 977 81,978
Hogfish 1,638 1,224 10,028
Jack: common 8,903 68,343 4,000 48,411 29,217 16,486
Jewfish 4,987 241 828 31,317
King mackerel 20,239 47,141 1,661 3,588 12,729 668,525
King whiting 126 975 231 2,108 85,760 2,599
Mullet: black 293,808 7,528,026 617,271 3,549,525 168,629 17,736
Mullet: silver 2,174 9,800 104,078 13,007 262,394
Muttonfish 4,014 6,857 5,327 63,882
Permit 4,693 5,939 387 8,264
Pigfish 500 1,324
Pompano 5,294 60,646 4,220 16,722 22,459 123,436
Redfish; channel bass .---...-. 5,694 235,228 19,455 86,115 20,711 2,673
Sandperch; mojarra ___---_ 1,274 6,549 2,669 83,036
Seatrout: gray 213 9,379
Seatrout: spotted 109,729 805,875 68,453 197,879 30,462 190,310
Seatrout: white 8,242 7,521











COUNTY LANDINGS BY SPECIES, 1959
FOOD FISH


(Continued)


Species
Sheepshead
Snapper: mangrove _____-
Snapper: red
Snapper: vermilion ----
Spanish mackerel
Spot
Triple tail ________
Warsaw grouper
White snapper; porgy ....-.--
Yellowtail
Sea bass
Tile fish
O0 Unclassified:
th Bottom fish
Miscellaneous
TOTAL FOOD FISH ._------

Alewife; herring _______ -
Ballyhoo
Menhaden
Tenpounder; ladyfish ....-----
Trash fish
TOTAL NON-FOOD FISH


Clam
Conch
Crab: blue, hard __-


Indian
River


665
12,480

4,418
361,312


721

4,413


36,344


Lee
1,336
53,238
145,417

101,197
5,282


2,372
16,935


242,929
894


Levy
500

1,602

217
7,003


Manatee
5,145
1,961
1,641

69,866
38,158


Martin
29,727
3,413
5,935

138,158
22,486
819


2,625
1,049


13,247
272


73,552
663


50,528
4,159


Monroe
15
119,078
27,064
2,031
2,407,291
1,889

3,268
10,491
375,041

1,786

52,910
191


929,677 9,762,495 762,001 4,346,186 1,062,434 4,903,724
NON-FOOD FISH
329 3,459
117,230
425,559 18,829
547 4,967 178
12,162 36,976 46,276 3,350 23,754 1,075
437,721 37,523 46,605 11,776 42,761 118,318
SHELLFISH, ETC.


17,764
17,212


--._ 1,345,189 1,755,798 5,559,2963


77,280 47,995












COUNTY LANDINGS BY SPECIES, 1959
SHELLFISH, ETC.


(Continued)


Species
Crab: stone
Spiny lobster; crawfish ---
Oyster
Scallop
Shrimp (heads on) :
Campeche
Central America --
Central West Coast ------.--
Tortugas
Upper East Coast --
Upper West Coast ----
TOTAL SHRIMP -- -
Squid
Turtles: green
Turtles: loggerhead ----
TOTAL SHELLFISH ----.--
GRAND TOTAL


Indian
River


7,942
1,144
14,869
58,449


Levy
49,123

1,637


Manatee
6,206


Martin


3,669,341
213,104
11.236
3,287,179
2,3795
7.966
7,191,205


Monroe
83,721
2,635,118



705,688
317,512

10,083,320


11,106,520


3,687


S1,345,189
2,712,587


1,838,232 5,613,743
18,829,455 6,422,349


83,486
4,441,448


648
651
100
47,995 2,755,2134
1,153,190 18,883,776


FOOD FISH
Palm Pasco &
Species Nassau Okaloosa Beach Hernando Pinellas Putnam
Amberiack 438 1.547 7933


Barracuda
Bluefish
Bluerunner
Cobia
Catfish: fresh water
Catfish: sea


58,143
15,401


5,690


I, i
1,019
457,928
3,643
569


4,637
22,277
616
1,288


2,666,676












COUNTY LANDINGS BY SPECIES, 1959 (Continued)
FOOD FISH
Palm Pasco &
Species Nassau Okaloosa Beach Hernando Pinellas Putnam
Croaker 4,122 451
Dolphin 1,131
Drum: black 387 1,677 247 538
Flounder 11,989 2,939 158 30,303 265
Grouper 186,471 10,673 7,361 1,538,758
Grunt 401 361 2,424 7,510
Jack: common 8,406 6,114 16,222
Jewfish 139 671 2,557
King mackerel 3,857 1,818,363 1,770 69,251
King whiting 18,902 643 264
Mullet: black 243,725 13,966 890,426 2,843,176 59,649
Mullet: silver 2,234 13,885 3,986 3,718
O Muttonfish 20,986
0 Permit 548 640
Pompano 12,174 32,084 644 2,760
Redfish: channel bass ------ 190 1,592 2,939 32,862 175
Sandperch; mojarra 180 3,898 1,100 784
Seatrout: gray 218
Seatrout: spotted 32,545 857 45,041 254,809
Seatrout: white 415 1,848
Shad: common 381,049
Sheepshead 2,527 3,761 540 10,760
Snapper: mangrove __ 4,560 7,282 178 610
Snapper: red 728,120 12,983 228 588,851
Snapper: vermilion -- 1,289
Spanish mackerel 91,984 881,771 2,538 124,959
Spot 1,355 190 3,031 1,246
Sturgeon 5,310
Triggerfish 5,988
Warsaw grouper 35,608 135











COUNTY LANDINGS BY SPECIES, 1959
FOOD FISH


Species
White snapper; porgy _------
Yellowtail
Sea bass: common
Unclassified:
Bottom fish
Miscellaneous
TOTAL FOOD FISH -------

Alewife; herring
Ballyhoo
0N Cigarfish; round scad ---_-.
s Menhaden
Tenpounder; ladyfish _-_---
Trash fish
TOTAL NON-FOOD FISH


Nassau


Okaloosa
2,811


98


Palm
Beach
2,094
15,493

24,287
545


(Continued)


Pasco &
Hernando
130


1,639
316


Pinellas


Putnam


23,210


60,989 1,443,726 3,348,482 968,089 5,593,241 3,111,532
NON-FOOD FISH
2,440 22,578 10,043
440
47,448
46,141,530 619
16,847 5,994
236,626 200 702 124,271 306,280
_46,378,156 67,354 200 702 153,283 316,323
SHELLFISH, ETC.


Clam
Crab: blue, hard
Crab: stone
Spiny lobster; crawfish -----
Oyster
Shrimp (Heads on)
Central West Coast --_-----
Tortugas
Upper East Coast ---
Upper West Coast -
TOTAL SHRIMP


146
1,485,565


905



1,375,811


1,948


38,316


21,019


1,375,811 21,019


843,687


685
27,389
1,974
32
1,795

94,433
1,596


96,029












COUNTY LANDINGS BY SPECIES, 1959
SHELLFISH, ETC.
Palm
Nassau Okaloosa Beach


(Continued)


Pasco &
Hernando


104


TOTAL SHELLFISH -.____-- 1,486,616 2,078 38,316 514 59,202 843,687
GRAND TOTAL 49,301,572 1,534,177 3,386,998 969,305 5,901,755 4,271,542

FOOD FISH
Species St. Johns St. Lucie Sarasota Taylor Volusia Wakulla


Amberjack
Bluefish
Bluerunner
Bonito
Cobia
Catfish: freshwater __--___
Catfish: sea
Croaker
Dolphin
Drum: black
Flounder
Grouper
Grunt
Hogfish
Jack: common
Jewfish


5,288




137

5,991
22,607
2,771


134
123


488
506,531
817
3,278
1,903

378
7,346
545

406
69,842


17,211
338


39,456
973


4,308


3,000
2,684


3,347
728
535,731


11,262
1,581


298
319
16,481
6,331


22,360
334


1,252
55,084


1,092
1,289
12,031
31,883
7,000
520
517


1,613

300
1,115
5,285


Species


Squid
Sponges:
Glove
Grass
Wool
Yellow


Pinellas


Putnam


36
1,544
23,8534
1,8944










COUNTY LANDINGS BY SPECIES, 1959 (Continued)
FOOD FISH
Species St. Johns St. Lucie Sarasota Taylor Volusia Wakulla
King mackerel 117 140,262 38,667 8,529
King whiting 166,412 11,596 18,732
Mullet: black 13,171 162,895 1,567,568 177,941 986,264 480,383
Mullet: silver 6,898 78,307 1,289 2,482
Muttonfish 192
Permit 2,270
Pigfish 1,000
Pompano 1,594 13,377 32,762 1,267 504
Redfish; channel bass -.-----_ 4,896 10,471 38,048 5,534 57,444 2,560
Sandperch; mojarra --- -- 275 3,822 376
Seatrout: gray 702 12,743 250
Seatrout: spotted 4,069 92,633 127,771 91,869 221,453 10,241
S Seatrout: white 1,250
%0 Sheepshead 463 7,682 9,433 229
Snapper: mangrove -_ -- 12,678 1,493
Snapper: red 39,405 184,421 155,529 673 176,543 1,025
Snapper: vermilion ----
Spanish mackerel 1,078 403,852 62,822 776 554
Spot 2,672 202,625 1,935 50,065 1,416
Sturgeon 137
Triggerfish 241 1,920
Tripletail 674
Warsaw grouper 533 6,675 772
White snapper; porgy .-------. 294 1,016 628
Yellowtail 16,490 66
Sea bass 1,208 6,835 18,391
Unclassified:
Bottomfish 731 84,910 42,022 15,407 72,457
Miscellaneous 286 705 217 219 260 158


TOTAL FOOD FISH


--.--_ 274,923 1,987,160 2,764,533


322,028 1,749,863 507,132













COUNTY LANDINGS BY SPECIES, 1959 (Continued)


Species
Alewife, herring
Menhaden
Trash fish
TOTAL NON FOOD FISH ..


Clam
Crab: blue, hard
Crab: stone
"-J Spiny lobster; crawfish ....-.
0 Oyster
Scallop
Shrimp (heads on) :
Upper East Coast -----.....
TOTAL SHRIMP
Squid
TOTAL SHELLFISH -----..
GRAND TOTAL


St. Johns


NON-FOOD FISH
St. Lucie Sarasota


9,340
8,574


Taylor


1,175
3,800


Volusia

10,071
1,501


Wakulla

8,792
5,353


385 17,914 4,975 615 11,572 14,145

SHELLFISH, ETC.
1,320 16,219
315,892 521,485 92 2 3,928,593
8,870 2,960 378
9,468 1,055
9,438 1,018 7,921 8,489
170

1,119,098 6,641 270,206


1,119,098
208
326,858
1,721,539


6,641


530,953
2,542,668


27,424
2,796,932


270,206
1,787
12,668
322,643 2,044,309


3,937,460
4,458,737


1. Species whose landings are 100 pounds or less have been combined under Miscellaneous, bottom fish or trash fish.
2. Volusia County blue crab production has been combined with that of Brevard County to avoid divulging a firm's individual statistics.
3. Citrus and Dixie Counties blue crab production were combined with that of Levy County. Reason same as 2.
4. Sponges landed in Monroe County are included in Pinellas County's production.
5. Upper East Coast shrimp reported on the West Coast were caught on upper East Coast grounds but were landed at West Coast
Ports.





37i3
K-,il

c-













EDITORIAL NOTES


ABOUT THE COVER.
Most bridges in Florida serve, along with their other
duties, as aids to fishing. This one at John's Pass. near
St. Petersburg, shows a typical week-end popularity.
Note the specially built ramp to keep anglers away from
traffic.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
The following credit lines are given for pictures
used in this publication. Page numbers follow the
source.
Ron Phillips 94, 29 and top 37
Ron Phillips and Robert F. Hutton 99
Florida State News Bureau ..-- Cover, 26 and 30,
Holley Studio, Palm Beach ----... .___....--.--- 39
Cape Coral D, velopmjnt, Ft. -M-'-.s _.bottom 37
Warren Milleri .- 33
Bay T.ow\ing & Dirdgin-g Co., M\bile, Alabama 20
Artcraft Studio, Panama City 21
Lt. Comdr. Harry ia inmgill (deceased),
St. Petersburg 1
John Williams, Miami Herald ... 4
Public Information Dept., FSU -





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