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Biennial report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075929/00005
 Material Information
Title: Biennial report
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Board of Conservation
Florida Geological Survey
Publisher: The Board
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Creation Date: 1946
Publication Date: 1936-1968
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Natural resources -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Conservation of natural resources -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Saltwater fishing -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Economic conditions -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida State Board of Conservation.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1936/38-1967/68.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vols. for 1936/38-1959/60 called 3rd-14th.
Numbering Peculiarities: 6th (1943/44) bound with the 6th Biennial report of the Florida Geological survey.
Numbering Peculiarities: Biennium ending Dec.31.
General Note: 13th (1957/58) has a subtitle "Salt water fishing."
General Note: Vols. for 1961/62-1963/64 include biennial reports of the individual divisions of the Board of Conservation.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001589422
oclc - 01410803
notis - AHL3395
System ID: UF00075929:00005
 Related Items
Preceded by: Biennial report to State Board of Conservation
Succeeded by: Biennial report - Florida Department of Natural Resources

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Front Matter
        Page 4
    Main
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
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        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
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        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
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Full Text












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SEVENTH BIENNIAL

REPORT

BIENNIUM ENDING
DECEMBER 31, 1946












FLORIDA STATE BOARD
OF CONSERVATION


DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION
J. T. HURST, Supervisor
TALLAHASSEEi FLORIDA

















LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL


Tallahassee, Florida
March 1, 1947
To His Excellency,
Millard F. Caldwell, Governor of the State of Florida,
Chairman, State Board of Conservation,
Tallahassee, Florida

Sir:
I have the honor to submit herewith the Biennial Report for
the State Board of Conservation for the years 1945 and 1946.
The activities of the State Board of Conservation are wide in
scope, and this department is charged with the supervision of
the entire salt water resources of the state.
Florida produces a greater variety of food and game fish
than any other state and the fishing industry is among the
state's most important resources.
The biennial report of the Florida Geological Survey, which
operates under the supervision of the State Board of Conserva-
tion is made under separate cover by Mr. Herman Gunter,
Director.
Respectfully submitted,
J. T. HURST, Supervisor.














FISHING INDUSTRY


Since the very first settlements were made, the Atlantic and
Gulf waters bordering Florida have furnished food. Shrimp,
oysters, crabs and shorefish, abundant in the warm Southern
bays and sounds, insured the early colonists against starva-
tion. Little by little the fisheries developed and today occupy
an important part in the state's economic life.
Commercial fishing is one of the oldest industries on eartn.
Its magnitude and value as a source of food supply are not
generally known, even to the citizens of Florida. It is reliably
estimated that more than 75,000 persons in the state are solely
dependent on fishing for their daily bread. The business has
an annual cash turnover running more than ten millions of
dollars. Moreover, many different businesses are dependent
on fishing to keep their establishments running.
The current annual gross value of the state's fisheries is in
excess of $30,000,000.
The Conservation Department has licensed more than 700
wholesale dealers whose establishments buy and sell seafoods,
and more than 2,940 retail dealers.
The commercial fishing industry has approximately 8,OUO
licensed boats operating in Florida waters.
More than 300 shrimp boats or trawlers have bought licenses
to operate in Florida waters. Shrimp canning plants, crab meat
producers, oyster shucking and canning plants, clam canneries,
and shark processing plants are dotted everywhere along the
coast.
Florida markets approximately 40,000,000 pounds of mullet
annually.,
The mullet, is Florida's money fish and tops the list of our food
fishes. It is high in food value and health-giving minerals. Its
iodine content is 900 times greater than that of the best grade
beef, and ranks higher than salmon and many other food fishes.

5


I










FLORIDA SHRIMPERS marketed almost 13,000,000 pounds
of shrimp in 1946. Shrimp are found in abundance on both
coasts of Florida.
Economically, shrimp are the most important seafoods item
produced in Florida. The principal production and canning
centers are at Pensacola, Apalachicola, Fernandina, and New
Smyrna. About half of the catch is canned. The remainder is
shipped frozen, or consumed locally.
Shrimp are prolific breeders and develop from the egg to
adult size in 12 months or less time.


CRABS also are an important and delicious food item. The
well-known blue crab or common crab, is found in all Florida
coastal waters.


STONE CRABS are found in the rocky bays of the west coast
in comparatively deep water, but they are nothing like as
abundant as the blue crabs. The demand for stone crabs is
greater than can be supplied by Florida fishermen.


OYSTERS are perhaps better known than any other seafood
and the flavor of the Florida oyster amply justifies its popularity.
As a food for universal enjoyment, oysters are unsurpassed.
They are very rich in minerals, rank high in vitamin content,
are deliciously good, easily digested, and their low cost enables
their general use.
Florida oysters grow to maturity from the spat in less time
than in other states.

Florida has one of the largest clam beds in the United States.
For many years clam production has been confined to the Ten
Thousand Islands section, on the southwest coast of Florida.
Large quantities for shipment all over the country are canned
in that area.

A very desirable table delicacy and one of the choicest sea-
foods are the Florida scallops. They are widely distributed along
the coast; found almost every place oysters will grow. These de-
liciously flavored and rich little shellfish are greatly desired.









FLORIDA LOBSTER, better known as the crayfish because it
does not have the heavy claws like its northern neighbor, is in
great demand as a delectable seafood. Production centers in
the Miami and Key West waters.


Florida waters produce the largest turtles in the world, the
loggerhead, the green turtle, and the trunk turtle being out-
standing examples. The trunk turtle reaches a weight of 1,000
pounds. These massive sea animals are found in the tropical
waters around Key West and northward up both coast lines.
They have for long been prized as food and in Key West great
pens are kept much like poultry. Sea turtles breed along the
entire gulf shore to Pensacola, coming ashore to lay their eggs
in the sand. Aside from being an important source of choice
seafood, the turtle is an attraction for visitors.


Shark fishing is a new and promising industry. The shark
is a great menace to our supply of food fish and until recently
it had been considered worthless, commercially.
These sharks now are being taken for their oil and skins, and
experiments are being conducted for utilizing the flesh for
fertilizers and feeds, after being properly processed. Those re-
sponsible for the new industry claim the business has great
promise of success and profit, both for the fishermen and the
plants which deal in the oil and the by-products.
Encouragement is being given the industry because of its
utilizing a predatory and a non-food fish.
MENHADEN FISH are caught in large numbers on both the
east and west coasts of Florida. In 1946, over 123,000,000
pounds were taken. These little fellows are taken for the oil
they produce when processed, as well as for the meal. The
meal goes into fertilizers and feeds. The menhaden is a non-
food fish, but is worth many thousands of dollars as part of the
varied list of Florida's salt-water products. Menhaden plants
are located on both the Atlantic and Gulf coasts.

FLORIDA CONCH, OR PERRIWINKLE is a little shellfish
found in the shallow waters along the gulf coast. It is taken
by many as a delicious ingredient in soups. They also have a
commercial value in their shells, which are novelty articles in
this country and in Europe.










For over fifty years Florida waters have been producing vir-
tually all of the sponges harvested in the United States. The
coastal area from Saint Marks to Key West, on the west gulf
coast represents the great producing area. Three principal
species are marketed in large quantities.
The sponge industry in Florida represents production exceed-
ing 3 million dollars annually. Markets are at Tarpon Springs
and Key West, with the largest sponge market in the world
being located at Tarpon Springs..
Sponges are produced in two ways. Hookers, using small
boats, take sponges in territorial waters. In outside waters,
where there is no jurisdiction and no regulations, divers go
down in diving suits and pull the sponges from the bottom of
the sea by hand. These sponges then are dried and treated
for storing in warehouses, where the sales are held.







THE WORLD'S FINEST ae ?4




SAILFISH
INtiophorus An -cricrinus
The smartest, prettiest and most
popular of Gulf Stream gamefish.
'- -- Words cannot describe the thrill
that comes with his top, his leap-
ing acrobatics and the final
victory.


WAHOO
Acanlholybium solaMdri
Acclaimed the fastest fish that swims,
the Wahoo presents a real challenge to
any angler.



ALBACORE
',,, ,,n,, alleterata
A hard fighter that makes long, boring
runs, the Albacore is often mistaken for
tuna and bonito. Usually caught while
Ssailfishing, and never very large, the
Albacore nevertheless will give a good
account of himself.


SEA TROUT
C'ynoscion ,ebulosus
Usually caught in summer and fall near
-- inlets and in the surf. Large schools are
not infrequent when shrimp, mullet and
other food is plentiful.



POMPANO
Trrachinotu~s carrolinus
Prized for their excellent food value, the
"true" or common Pompano are caught
'. mostly in tidal and inland waters and in
.. ,the surf, running in large schools during
." the spring. Not to be confused with
Permit, Great or African Pompano, they
are taken on sand fleas, clams or shrimp,
and will strike viciously at small feather
and plug lures.


V


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MARLIN


Tu, tpe. of mor c.:.n.mon M.rlin are'
the Blue Marlin oandr rhe Whire Marhn
The whitee nmrlin ,: lhe mi r o common
and man, are caught -ih ,ear Blue
morlin core much larger and or, mc.-:
commorn n the EBhamoa

KINGFISH
Scomberonmrurus vaUralla
King Mackerel are abundant in Florida
waters. Highly valued as a food fish,
a slashing striker and hard fighter, the
king is a streamlined thunderbolt that
offers a tough battle.


DOLPHIN
Corypharna hipptiriN
A fighter known for speed and stamina,
the Dolphin is one of the most colorful
of gamefish. Often running in schools.
of several thousands, slashing the water
for acres around, the Dolphin are usually
found in the "tide rip" and strike sav-
agely. Once hooked they display every
kind of leaping acrobatics.


BARRACUDA
Sphrallenu barracuda
A vicious, slashing killer that will strike
anything, the Barracuda is the lone wolf
of the Gulf Stream, often taking fish
that are hooked, and generally an
angler's nuisance, yet giving plenty of
sport and a speedy, thrilling fight.


TUNA
'Thuinni i 8c'icnfldodoIil lis
A vicious striker and a long runner, the
Tuna comes small in local waters as
compared with the big fellows of the .. ..
Bahamas and Nova Scotia.





AMBERJACK
Seriola lalanldi

A tenacious fighter, sounding with long
surging runs after he is hooked, the .
Amberjack is a favorite with many
anglers. --









BLACK BASS I Lare Mouth
.1Mftcronid.. I -ii .lniiii j .
Champion of fresh water gamefish, the
Black Boss is abundant in the lakes
and canals. A heavy striker, an acrobat
and a sturdy fighter, he gives a real
thrill to the plug or fly fisherman.


BLUEFISH
w i, ,..1r11 / 1 11 wiltatrixr

A voracious feeder, a game fighter and
an excellent food fish, the Bluefish is
the "common angler's" favorite. Large
schools slashing through millions of silver
mullet along the shores from September
to May, afford an angler's paradise to
the surf and small boat fisherman.


SNOOK (Robalo)
Oxiylabrax undlccimali.
The "plugger's pet," thousands of
anglers, with light casting rods and
feather or plug lures, fish the inlets,
inland waterways and rivers all year
'round for the flashing, fighting Snook.


WEAKFISH
Cynoscion regali.n
Related to the Croaker family, the
Weakfish is less frequently found in
Icoal waters than northward. The tender
structure of his mouth and his fighting
efforts make him difficult to land.





SPECKLED TROUT
A game fighter the;e trcur ore plenti-
ful throughout the iaore






COBIA
hli Iill i i .....ll W'# 'III11,1I
,A large, s itt and %ccraroOu. gamester,
ihe Ccbt.lo Ire uert:- rhe atl-rs of the
Gulf Stream during the winter months,
and occos.onallk n;rand and inler voters


- -f







TARPON
Iarpwa uattntluas
The Silver King frequents inlets and in-
land waterways along the Florida coast,
but is found in greater numbers in the
Keys and on the west coast of the state.



BONITO
Sarda sarda
A savage fighter that never gives up
until dead, the Bonito is found all year
'round in these waters. Usually running
in schools, they will strike at almost any
lure.



CHANNEL BASS
Sciaenops ocellata
Feeding on crustacea, shrimp and small
mullet, the Channel Bass frequents
sandbars and channels. He will take
feather and small plug lures and give
a real account of himself as a fighter.





SNAPPER
The Red Reef Snapper is illustrated;
however, the waters of Florida abound
with a variety of snappers from the
Mangrove to the Dog Snapper.


~e"











RECAPITULATION OF 1945 FOOD FISH CENSUS BY SPECIES

Number of Number of
Species Reported Counties Pounds
Reported Reported
Am berjack .................. ..................... ......... ... 13 320,137
Ballyhoo .................--.. .....-...... .... 2 24,200
Barracuda .......................... .......- 6 58,321
Bluefish ...........--....--- --.. -- --....... 24 1,852,042
Blue Runner .-.................- ..---- --....... 17 1,955,217
Bottom Fish (Mixed) ........................... .......... 32 3,554,033
Bream ........--------...... .......... ... .......... ..... ..... 20 724,402
Butterfish ................................ ---- ... 10 65,798
Cabio .............. ........ .. 9 47,911
Catfish .......... ..... .. .... .................... --- 25 5,326,112
Cero ............ -----....... ............... .......... 2 39,900
Cigarfish .....---- ........... .....---- ---- ..... 3 45,528
Crappie ... -------.... ................... 12 867,009
Crevalle .........- ...........--- .. .. 11 585,107
Croaker .............. -- --.... 12 60,533
Dolphin .. ............... -- --- --...... 5 80,461
Drum .... ---.......--....--..- ---- 21. 21 609,874
Eels ..... ........ ..............- .... -- 3 51,794
Flounders ...-------.........------...- 27 290,499
Frogs ........---...--.... -----------.... 9 82,815
Gar .... ------..............-..---------... 5 1,045,224
Groupers .-............-... .-------... ------- 24 8,557,947
Grunts ........................----- ------- 13 196,193
Herring ....------- --------........... ........------ 3 498,971
Hogfish --........~...... ...... ........---...--- .... 6 84,370
Jacks ...-......~..... ............... 2 25,839
Jewfish ......................--........--- --- -- 20 475,859
Kingfish (King Mackere) .......---.......------------- 17 3,982,549
Ladyfish ............. .....................--------------------- 5 23,807
M ackerel ... ......... --------- -... ..- 26 10,244,124
Mullet .. ---...................... .. .-- .....- --------- ... 36 34,562,063
Silver Mullet .......--............. ----- -- -------- 2 28,238
Muttonfish .-.................-----. -- ------... 7 254,592
Permit ....................-- ------------... 8 66,457
Pigfish .. .....--. ------....-...... -------- 11 88,337
Pinfish (Sailor's Choice) .............. --- --.-- -- 5 36,213
Pompano ......- ---......... -------- ----- ----------- 26 780,683
Sea Bass (Redfish) ..... ----- ---------.....- 33 1,291,436
Sea Trout (Gray) ..............--- ------------------- 19 241,280
Sea Trout (Spotted) ................ .---------- 33 3,908,816
Shad ....------.................------- ----. ---------------- 8 816,054
Shad (Hickory) ........... ---------.. --------- .. 3 55,323
Sheepshead --....-..---- -.--------.---.------------------ 23 258,868
Skipjack ... ---------.. -----------------7 544,809
Snapper, Mangrove .............--.---.....--... 20 226,772
Snapper, Red ..........-....---------- ----------- 23 3,171,639











Snook (Sergeant Fish) ...... ....... ................
Spot ......................... ..
Stingray ............. ... ...............
Sturgeon ...... ..... ............
Sunfish ......-........... ..... .......
Tripletail (Black Perch) .......................... .........
Turbot ........ ...-.. ............ ...
W ahoo ............. ....... .... .. ..
W hitting .......................... ..............
Y ellow tail .................. ................

TOTAL FOOD FISH............. ... ...................


441,424
113,595
4,186
7,272
15,350
39,359
2,010
290
848,102
438,893

90,018,637


RECAPITULATION OF 1945 FISH CENSUS
NON-FOOD FISH


Number of Number of
Species Reported Counties Pounds
Reported Reported
Menhaden .... ..... ....... ...... .. ....... 10 71,607,719
Sharks .................................. ................. 4 3,028,463
Trash Fish .................. ........ ............... 14 3,554,675

TOTAL NON-FOOD FISH............................ 78,190,857


SHELL FISH


Number of Number of
Species Reported Counties Gallons
Reported Reported
Oysters ...... ...................... ....... ......... .. 16 200,662
Clams ..................... .. ................ 7 16,841
Scallops ................ .............. ........ 8 12,246

TOTAL SHELL FISH................................ ....... 229,749

MISCELLANEOUS


Number of Number of
Species Reported Counties Pounds
Reported Reported
Blue Crabs ........... ...........- .............. 14 5,468,869
Conchs ............... ....... ...........- 2 4,400
Crayfish ............- ........- .......................... 8 793,693
Sea Turtles .............- .....-...- ..........- 13 91;027
Shrimp ........... ....... ....- ... .. ............ 16 10,745,010
Stone Crabs ........................ .---------.......-- 8 102,606
Terrapin .............................. .. --- 2 4,991

TOTAL ...............---- .................---- 17,210,596











RECAPITULATION OF 1945 FISH CENSUS
BY COUNTIES

Crabs
Counties Fd Fh Non-Food Shell Crayfish
Counties Food Fish Fish Fish Shrimp
Fish Fish Shrimp
& Etc.
Bay 4,353,072 ...... 4,860 502
Brevard 1,756,100 500 ...-... 666,139
Broward 1,173,700 ........ 67 147,250
Charlotte 5,058,063 ............. 35,000
Citrus 1,937,796 ........ 11,281 5,000
Clay 344,701 145,818
Collier 7,200,091- .
Dade 7,926,579 ........ 1,187 273,419
Dixie 1,319,414 10,000 ....... 1,000
Duval 823,264 770,000 5,725 4,058,297
Escambia 4,185,735 23,496 15,734 179,130
Franklin 1,839,675 12,000,300 126,764 2,221,435
Glades 753,810 ....... ........ 31,405
Gulf 208,400 ....... 6,000 20,000
Hendry 299,000 .... ....... 13,000
Hernando 37,708 ......
Hillsborough 2,041,942 ........ 27 3,342
Indian River 1,202,528 27,000 ........ 95,000
Lee 3,116,340 ........ 1,061 51,136
Levy 1,737,720 3,000 261 3,763
Manatee 4,222,640 2,800 700 172,845
Martin 1,953,668 2,361,491 ........
Monroe 2,745,604 ........ ..... 243,956
Nassau 433,352 59,346,852 140 2,978,259
Okaloosa 2,298,384 6,915 .. ..
Okeechobee 1,007,666 ........ ..... 15,793
Palm Beach 6,907,906 41,821 240 359,265
Pasco 336,148 .........................
Pinellas 7,495,009 7,033 23,622 662
Putnam 6,432,246 2,225,281 ........ 1,142,321
St. Johns 230,999 25,800 ....... 2,547,388
St. Lucie 2,536,242 5,000 .... 68,119
Santa Rosa 31,524 ................
Sarasota 3,032,401 ........ 2,130 500
Sem inole .131,550 .......................
Taylor 363,853 ...... 200 10,214
Volusia 1,627,772 1,187,750 28,300 1,859,331
Wakulla 807,232 ........ 1,450 7,125
W alton 108,804 ............ ......

TOTALS 90,018,637 78,190,857 229,749 17,210,596











RECAPITULATION OF 1946 FOOD FISH CENSUS
BY SPECIES

Number of Number of
Species Reported Counties Pounds
Reported Reported
Am berjack .................................. ...... ........... 15 184,640
B allyhoo .................................................... .... ........ 2 6,300
Barracuda .................... ..... .. ...................... 6 52,849
Bluefish ..... ........................... .......... .. ........... 28 1,707,461
Blue R unner ............................................................. 14 714,942
Bottom Fish (M ixed) ............................................ 30 2,360,270
Bream ............ ..... ................... ... .... ........ 16 1,333,091
Butterfish ................................ .............................. 10 152,178
C abio ............................... ........................ ......... 11 33,715
Catfish .................. ..... ...........-- ..... 24 4,298,452
C ero ............... ....... ..................... 3 14,412
Cigarfish .................. .. .................... 2 61,414
Crappie ......................... ...................... 9 358,297
C revalle ........................................................ ............ 10 233,947
Croaker ....-.....--.... ........ ........... 15 92,746
Dolphin ....... ...... ........ .............. ............ 5 47,659
D rum ........... .................................. 25 311,460
Eels --..----.............................. 1 53,093
Flounders ..... ................................................... 30 342,079
Frogs ..........--..---..... ---......... 19 342,102
Gar ... ....... .................... .......... 4 1,507,350
Groupers .................. ................. .................... 28 6,480,249
G runts ............ ........... ....................... 11 86,211
Herring ...........-.............................. ........... 3 636,353
Hogfish .................---------- ---....... 5 53,236
Jacks ................. .............. ....... .... .................... 6 134,123
Jewfish .... -----..........-........-..... ........... 22 251,243
Kingfish (King Mackerel) ...................... .......... 21 2,463,336
King W hitting (Kingfish) ........ ............ ..... .......... 10 721,227
Ladyfish ................................. ..... 4 308,980
Ling ........ ...... ..-.... ........... ...- 1 35
M ackerel ......... ....... .. ...... ............. 25 14,951,543
M ullet ............... ...... .............. 36 36,889,793
Muttonfish .......-..... ..........-....... 11 329,274
Permit ..-------........ .................... ...... 10 23,821
Pigfish .............................. ............. 13 160,410
Pinfish (Sailor's Choice) ................................... .. 6 54,128
Pompano ...........-.......----------- ....... 28 831,282
Porkfish .....- ............ .. ... .... .......... 4 15,575
Sea Bass (Redfish) .- --- --............ ...-........... 33 1,223,031
Sea Trout (Gray)............................... ....... .. 15 270,685
Sea Trout (Spotted) .................... ................ 33 4,161,758
Shad ...-............ ......... ..-....-..- 6 837,309
Shad (Hickory) .....-.. ................. ........ .. 3 47,020
Sheepshead ..........-------...........--...---. 25 475,402
Skipjack .......-.......- --........... -- -----.. 7 255,369
Snapper, Mangrove .....----......--.. --------- 20 258,425
Snapper, Red ...............-----.~.-..--. ------- 24 4,201,737
Snook (Sergeant Fish)................----.... ............. 19 465,486
Spot ..................... ....---.. .............--. 14 135,840
Sturgeon .. ............... ---.... .........--- 4 3,318











Sunfish ..... ................... .
Tripletail (Black Perch) ................... ........
Triggerfish .. ....... ..... ... ..........
Turbot ........................ ...........
W ahoo ............. .......... ......... ..........
Whiting -.-..-........... ....... ......--.......
Y ellow tail ........ ..............

TOTAL FOOD FISH ............................. ......


25,200
27,421
99,577
11,250
148
60,371
483,073

91,641,696


RECAPITULATION OF 1946 FISH CENSUS
NON-FOOD FISH

Number of Number of
Species Reported Counties Pounds
Reported Reported
Baits ....................................... 1 244,105
Menhaden ........ ................ 10 123,335,874
Sharks ..................... .................. ........... 2 1,124
Trash Fish ................................ ...... .......... 15 3,343,406

TOTAL NON-FOOD FISH.................................. 126,924,509

SHELL FISH

Number of Number of
Species Reported Counties Gallons
Reported Reported
Oysters ....................................... ........ 21 137,847
Clams ........... ........ ........... ....... 9 29,412
Scallops .................................. ..... ............ 6 24,498
W helks ................ ................ 1 9,496

TOTAL SHELL FISH... .......................- 201,253

MISCELLANEOUS


Number of
Species Reported Counties
Reported
Blue Crabs ................ ... .... ................... 14
Conchs ........ ...... ..................... .. 3
Crayfish ....................... ........... ....... 8
Sea Turtles ............................. ....... ....... 9
Shrim p .... .............. ... ....... ... -... 20
Squid ...... .................... ..._-......... 2
Stone Crabs ........................- ......-- .....- 12
Terrapin ....... ......... ................... 4
Fish Roe ............ ... ............... 1

TOTAL MISCELLANEOUS .......-.------.......----


Number of
Pounds
Reported
6,709,301
39,140
1,585,510
41,847
12,988,124
303
96,904
4,790
318

21,446,237












RECAPITULATION OF 1946 FISH CENSUS
BY COUNTIES


Counties


Bay
Brevard
Broward
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Dade
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Franklin
Glades
Gulf
Hendry
Hernando
Hillsborough
Indian River
Lee
Levy
Manatee
Martin
Monroe
Nassau
Okaloosa
Okeechobee
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
Taylor
Volusia
Wakulla
Walton

TOTALS


Food Fish Non-Food
Fish


3,452,462
2,846,739
557,600
4,587,150
222,411
13,090
8,671,829
5,209,744
1,202,527
1,692,928
4,197,237
3,550,405
193,843
152,000
280,000
26,399
1,811,062
1,100,316
2,960,742
1,313,227
4,220,652
592,047
1,987,047
682,967
2,283,870
208,125
5,334,003
264,479
12,806,267
5,808,497
660,001
1,972,968
28,046
2,829,266
385,503
931,809
2,193,203
2,314,460
96,770

91,641,696


251,105
4,000





800

32.840,000
32,592
15,009,078
20,000




46,026
100
158
6,000
194,325
380
76,284,598
79,826
5,000
40,000

1,156
1,658,869
68,461
28,000




354,035



126,924,509


Crabs
Shell Crayfish
Fish Shrimp
& Etc.
1,450 3,457
140 503,033
850 36,700
43 43,001
7,913 3,863

17,652 4,494
3,800 609,461
900
11,175 5,636,007
466 79,918
101,059 2,082,422
........ 5,644
6,000 50,000


-.... 51,312
700 85,000
8,134 218,972

1,150 155,301

.... 328,803
........ 3,005,919
........ 536
.... 9,809
....... 1,130,088
-.-- 48,600
32,125 70,963
--- 951,600
335 3,114,992
...... 86,484
976 6,163
4,448
22 1,080
405
114 3,128,915
1,170 13,700
226 ................

201,253 21,466,237











TARPON SPRINGS SPONGE EXCHANGE
TARPON SPRINGS, FLORIDA
1945
ANNUAL REPORT ON SPONGES SOLD THROUGH THE
TARPON SPRINGS SPONGE EXCHANGE, INC.


Rock Island Sheep Wool

Large & Ex. Med.............
Med. & Small................
Lg. & Ex. Med. Rags....
Med. & Sm. Rags............



Yellow and Grass
Y ellow ............... ..........
G rass ............... .......


GRAND TOTAL


Bunches
2,939
5,267
4,901
9,120

22,227


4,031
14,159

18.190


Value
$ 621,584.59
510,391.20
642,606.16
603,132.05

$2,377,314.00


$ 91,200.62
247,859.73

$ 339,060.35


Rock Island Wool.......... 22,227 $2,377,314.00
Yellow and Grass.......... 18,190 339,060.35

40,417 $2,716,374.35
Poundage is not included because the bunches vary in
not standard size.


Av. Per Bunch
$211.36
97.02
131.12
66.13


22.62
17.51


weight and are


Sponges Sold at Key West during 1945 amounted to............$115,170.16












TARPON SPRINGS SPONGE EXCHANGE
TARPON SPRINGS, FLORIDA
1946
ANNUAL REPORT ON SPONGES SOLD THROUGH THE
TARPON SPRINGS SPONGE EXCHANGE, INC.


Rock Island Sheep Wool

Large W ool......................
X Med. Med., Sm. Wool
Large Wool Rags..........
X Med. Med., Sm.
Wool Rags..-..............
Yellow and Grass
Yellow .............. .......
G rass ...............................
Grand Total
Rock Island Wool..........
Yellow & Grass.............-


Bunches*
1,508
3,173
2,623

11,228


3,975
11,523

18,532
15,498

34,030


NOTE: Sponges are sold by the pound
the bunches vary in weight.


Value
$ 616,590.70
505,401.82
584,239.77

884,458.23


112,862.86
242,277.97


Av. Per Bunch*
$408.83
159.28
222.74

78.78


28.39
21.03


2,590,692.52
355,140.83

$2,945,833.35
and there being no standard


Sponges Sold at Key West during 1946 amounted to...........$181,239.68




























RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS

January 1st, 1945 through December 31st, 1945













STATE CONSERVATION FUND
SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR YEAR
JANUARY 1, 1945 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 1945

Balance Credited to State Conservation
Fund in Comptroller's Office as of
Decem ber 31, 1944.................................................. $ 89,160.06 $
Balance Credited to State Conservation
Fund in Capital City Bank as of
December 31, 1944.......................... ....... ....... 130.00 89,290.06

RECEIPTS
Commercial Salt Water Fishing Industry-
Resident Wholesale Seafood Dealers Licenses $ 34,700.00 $
Resident Retail Seafood Dealers Licenses........ 28,820.00
Resident Commercial Fishing and Oyster
Boat Licenses .................................................. 17,448.20
Alien or Non-resident Commercial Fishing and
Oyster Boat Licenses.................................... 2350.00
Alien or Non-resident Commercial Fishermen
Licenses ................................... ...........- 1,115.00
Excess Net Commercial Licenses........................ 64.00
Sale of Shipping Permit Tags......................... 3,120.25 87,617.45

Shrimp Fishing Industry
Resident Shrimp Fishing Boat Licenses.......... 2,903.75
Alien or Non-resident Shrimp Fishing Boat
Licenses ............................................ ............ 2,000.00
Alien or Non-resident Shrimp Fishermen
Licenses ..........-- --.......... .. ............. 785.00 5,688.75

Menhaden Fishing Industry
Resident Menhaden Fishing Boat Licenses ... 445.75
Alien or Non-resident Menhaden Fishing
Boat Licenses ........ ............................ .......2- 275.00
Alien or Non-resident Menhaden Fishermen
Licenses ....-...........--.----- .......... 645.00
Purse Seine Licenses.................... ........ .... 350.00 1,715.75

Oyster Industry
Oyster Bottom Lease Rentals....................... 1,261.12
Two Cent Privilege Tax on Oysters Gathered 1,340.95
Three Cent Privilege Tax on Oysters Gathered 1,195.84
Five Cent Privilege Tax on Oysters Gathered 1,019.04 4,816.95

Sponge Industry
Resident Sponge Fishing Boat Licenses.......... 957.75 957.75

Pleasure Fishing
Resident Pleasure Fishing Boat Licenses....... 1,724.70
Alien or Non-resident Pleasure Fishing Boat
Licenses ------................ ------- -- --- 325.00 2,049.70











Oyster Shell Soles
Sale of Oyster Shell............ ........................... 2,484.56 2,484.56

Miscellaneous Collections
Sale of Confiscated Fish, Nets and Other
Equipment ....... ........................... ............... 386.24
Sale of Outboard M otor........................................ 135.00
Sale of Patrol Boat "Keys" ................................. 1,000.00
Court Cost Collected............. ................................ 60.50
Refunds on Insurance and Other Small Items 125.73 1,707.47

$107,038.38 $196,328.44
DISBURSEMENTS
Administrative and Office:
Salaries .................................. .............$ 12,738.39 $
Traveling Expenses ................................... 1,193.73
Printing and Stationery ................. .................. 1,725.65
Telegraph and Telephone............................... 138.95
Postage and Box Rent..................... .. ........... 916.73
Employees Bonds ........................ ................ 55.00
Employees Insurance ................................ 16.78
Office Rent ............. .... .............. ... 1,572.00

18,357.23
Field Division:
Salaries .............................. ................... 44,461.04
Traveling Expenses ..................... ................. 25,805.98
Printing and Stationery.................................... 2,295.92
Purchase, Maintenance and Operation
of Patrol Boats................ ............... 4,276.11
Telegraph and Telephone ................................... 642.52
Purchase Tags .................... ... ............ 927.62
Money Order Fees ....................... ...... 84.87
Employees Bonds ........................... ....... .......... 145.00
Employees Insurance....... ................... ... 1,036.09
Insurance on Boats ................................... ....... 616.00
Rent .......................... ... ....... .. 85.00
University of Miami- .................... ............ 321.96
Boat Tags .................................. 164.40
Portable House, Miami ..................... .. ........ 375.00
Refunds ........................... ...................... 131.00
M miscellaneous .............................-......... ....... 10.81
L. A. Baxter Check Payment Stopped
License Cancelled ............. ....... ....... ..... 53.00

$ 81,432.32

Total .Disbursements ---.... ....................................... $ 99,789.55
Balance Credited to State Board of
Conservation Fund in Comptroller's Office
December 31, 1945............ .................... .. ...$ 96,538.89

$196,328.44




























RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS

January 1st, 1946 through December 31st, 1946














STATE CONSERVATION FUND
SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR YEAR
JANUARY I, 1946 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 1946


Balance credited to State Conservation
Fund in Comptroller's Office as of
December 31, 1945.................................. ........$.. 96,538.89 $ 96,538.89

RECEIPTS
Commercial Salt Water Fishing Industry
Resident Wholesale Seafood Dealers Licenses..$ 36,650.00
Resident Retail Seafood Dealers Licenses.... 33,600.00
Resident Commercial Fishing and Oyster Boat
Licenses --.-- ----..-..------......................... 15,013.40
Alien or Non-resident Commercial Fishing
and Oyster Boat Licenses............................ 2,825.00
Alien or Non-resident Commercial Fishermen
Licenses ................ ..................... ................ 1,345.00
Excess Net Commercial Licenses................... 34.00
Sale of Shipping Permit Tags....................... 3,310.50 92,777.90

Shrimp Fishing Industry
Resident Shrimp Fishing Boat Licenses........ 3,478.90
Alien or Non-resident Shrimp Fishing Boat
Licenses .............. .................. ......... 2,775.00
Alien or Non-resident Shrimp Fishermen
Licenses ...............--........--- --...-........- 985.00

7,238.90
Menhaden Fishing Industry
Resident Menhaden Fishing Boat Licenses.... 400.10
Alien or Non-resident Shrimp Fishing Boat
Licenses ........----- ............. .................... 250.00
Alien or Non-resident Menhaden Fishermen
Licenses ................................... 720.00
Purse Seine Licenses.................. ......... 400.00

1,770.10
Oyster Industry
Oyster Bottom Lease Rentals......-....--................ 1,646.25
Two Cent Privilege Tax on' Oysters Gathered 416.73
Three Cent Privilege Tax on Oysters Gathered 113.61
Five Cent Privilege Tax on Oysters Gathered 3,317.94

5,494.53
Sponge Industry
Resident Sponge Boat Licenses............................ 934.20
Alien or Non-resident Sponge Boat Licenses.... 25.00

959.20
Pleasure Fishing
Resident Pleasure Fishing Boat Licenses..... 2,939.50
Alien or Non-resident Fishing Boat Licenses.. 2,500.00

5,439.50











Oyster Shell Sales
Sale of Oyster Shell............................................. 795.87

795.87
Miscellaneous Items
Sale of Confiscated Nets, Fish and Other
Equipm ent ................. ............................. 1,128.50
Court Cost Collected.................................. 206.32
Sale of Postage Stamps.................. ............. 10.13
Sale of Outboard Motor............. ....... .......... 30.00
Sale of Credit Memo on Automobile................ 90.00
Sale of Outboard Motor............................. 10.00
Sale of Boat and Trailer.............................. 90.00
Refund on Gasoline......................................... 16.67
Refund on Insurance and other sihall items.... 170.03
Warrant Cancelled ........................ ......... 1.00 1,752.65

$116,228.65 $212,767.54

DISBURSEMENTS
Administrative and Office
Salaries .....-- .............................. ....$ 13,029.18 $
Traveling Expenses ................... .............. 1,748.80
Printing and Stationery...................... 803.50
Telegraph and Telephone................................... 379.92
Rent .... ............................................. 1,572.00
Employees Bonds ........................................ 50.00
Postage and Box Rent................................... 895.84
Employees Insurance .-................................... 16.78
Court Cost ............ -................ ........... 16.70 18,512.72

Field Division:
Salaries ..................... .................... 47,018.03
Traveling Expenses .................. ... ............ 32,321.28
Printing and Stationery ................................... 4,523.65
Purchase, Maintenance and Operation
of Patrol Boats.......................... ........ ... 5,824.64
Telegraph and Telephone.............-................... 260.59
P. O. Money Order Fees.............................. 50.28
Employees Bonds ..................................... 310.39
Employees Insurance ................................... 677.70
Insurance on Boats ....................... ............ 616.00
University of Miami, Research Work............... 798.23
Boat Tags ................................... 160.00
Other Tags ............................................. 756.00
M miscellaneous items ....................... .......... .. 60.76
R funds ...................................................... ............ 165.00 93,542.55

$112,055.27
Balance Credited to State Board of
Conservation Fund in Comptroller's Office
December 31, 1946...................... ........ ............................$100,712.27

$212,767.54