• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 Report of the division directo...
 Fiscal
 Library
 Technical assistance
 Office of systematic botany
 Bureau of apiary inspection
 Bureau of citrus budwood regis...
 Bureau of entomology
 The Florida state collection of...
 Bureau of methods development
 Bureau of methods development
 Bureau of methods development
 Bureau of pest eradication and...
 Bureau of plant inspection
 Bureau of plant pathology














Title: Division of Plant Industry biennial report
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075925/00013
 Material Information
Title: Division of Plant Industry biennial report
Alternate Title: Biennial report
Abbreviated Title: Div. Plant Ind. bienn. rep.
Physical Description: v. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Division of Plant Industry
Publisher: Florida Dept. of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Publication Date: 1982-1984
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Plant inspection -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Plant diseases -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Dept. of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 26th (1964/66)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year ends June 30.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: 39th (July 1, 1990-June 30, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075925
Volume ID: VID00013
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01242950
alephbibnum - 001511744
lccn - sn 86001883
lccn - sn 86001883
issn - 0888-9554
 Related Items
Preceded by: Biennial report

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
    Front Matter
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Table of Contents
        Page iv
        Page v
    Report of the division director
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Fiscal
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Library
        Page 12
    Technical assistance
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Office of systematic botany
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Bureau of apiary inspection
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Bureau of citrus budwood registration
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Bureau of entomology
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    The Florida state collection of arthropods and its research associates program
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
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        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
    Bureau of methods development
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
    Bureau of methods development
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
    Bureau of methods development
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
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        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
    Bureau of pest eradication and control
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
    Bureau of plant inspection
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
    Bureau of plant pathology
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 190
Full Text





Division of Plant Industry















































and Consumer Services



oyle conner, commissioner
.. ............. ... .......... ..... ........... ... .......::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
== == === = = = ==..................................................Si~ ii iiii !" i"" ii ii~ii" :i .:::i:::iiiii i: i~ii~ i: i:"" "' i: "
. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . ..i-i"i"i"i"i"i" "i"i"i"i" " " " -i i i i . ..ii ; 11 1 1 : : 1: : :
........................... ..at m n ....ic lt r
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Division of Plant Industry



Thirty-Fifth Biennial Report
July 1, 1982--June 30, 1984




w oOnn




Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services
Doyle Conner, Commissioner


Division of Plant Industry
S. A. Alfieri, Jr., Director
Post Office Box 1269
Gainesville, Florida 32602














FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF
AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER
SERVICES
DIVISION OF PLANT INDUSTRY




PLANT INDUSTRY TECHNICAL COUNCIL


Roy Vandegrift Jr., Chairman (Fruit
& Vegetable) . . . . . . .
Joseph Welker, Vice Chairman (Horticulture).
Lawrence Cutts (Apiary) . . .
John W. Hornbuckle (Citrus) . . . .
Richard Mims (Citrus). . . . . .
Edward F. Mitchell (Tropical Fruits) . .
Leonard Coward (Commercial Flower) . . .
Lewis E. Wadsworth, Jr. (Forestry) . . .
Jim Vosters (Foliage) . . . .
Joann Smith (Citizen-at-Large) . . . .
Mike Swanson (Turf-grass) . . . . .


ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
S. A. Alfieri, Jr., Director . . . .
R. D. Gaskalla, Assistant Director . . .
C. Youtsey, Chief of Budwood Registration.
R. E. Brown, Chief of Methods Development .
A. E. Graham, Chief of Plant Inspection. .
H. A. Denmark, Chief of Entomology . . .
L. Putnal, Chief of Apiary Inspection . .
C. Poucher, Chief of Pest Eradication
& Control . . . . . . . .
C. L. Schoulties, Chief of Plant Pathology .
Chief of Nematology .....


. . Canal Point
S. .Jacksonville
. . .. Chipley
S.Belleair Beach
. . .. Waverly
. . . Miami
. . Punta Gorda
. . .. Bunnell
. . . Miami
. . .Micanopy
S.St. Petersburg



. . Gainesville
. . Gainesville
. .Winter Haven
. . Gainesville
. . Gainesville
. . Gainesville
. . Gainesville

. .Winter Haven
. . Gainesville
. . Gainesville













TABLE OF CONTENTS


REPORT OF THE DIVISION DIRECTOR ......
Fiscal . . . . .
Library .. . . . . ... .........
Technical Assistance ......
Office of Systematic Botany .. . . .....
BUREAU OF APIARY INSPECTION ......
BUREAU OF CITRUS BUDWOOD REGISTRATION ...
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY .. . .... .. ......
The Florida State Collection of Arthropods and
Its Research Associates Program .. . ....
BUREAU OF METHODS DEVELOPMENT . . . ......
BUREAU OF NEMATOLOGY .. . . ..........
BUREAU OF PEST ERADICATION AND CONTROL .. .....
BUREAU OF PLANT INSPECTION .. . . ........
BUREAU OF PLANT PATHOLOGY ......


.s document was promulgated at a cost of $5,195.00 or a cost of
49 per copy, to inform the general public, Legislature, and other
:erested parties on the programs and investigative efforts of the
visionn of Plant Industry. PI86G-5.




























Gainesville, Florida



Honorable Doyle Conner, Commissioner
Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services
The Capitol
Tallahassee, Florida 32301

Dear Commissioner:

I am pleased to present herewith the 1982-84 Biennial
Report for the Division of Plant Industry.


Respectfully,



S. A. Alfieri, Jr., director
Division of Plant Industry










REPORT OF THE DIVISION DIRECTOR

S. A. Alfieri, Jr.


Created to safeguard Florida's agricultural interests,
the Division of Plant Industry (DPI) is responsible for de-
tecting, intercepting, identifying, and controlling plant
pests which could pose serious threats to agricultural and
horticultural interests within the state. To fulfill this
responsibility, the DPI administers biometric surveys and
other regulatory programs including inspections and certifi-
cations of nurseries and stock dealers, special certifica-
tions, and control and eradication programs.
During the 1982-84 biennium, retirement of several key
personnel brought about important changes in the Division's
leadership.
Dr. Salvatore A. Alfieri, Jr. became acting director when
Division Director Halwin L. Jones retired in January 1983. In
October, Dr. Alfieri was named director of the division. Dr.
Alfieri served as assistant director from 1971 to 1983 and as
a plant pathologist specializing in fungal pathogens from 1966
to 1971. Prior to joining the division, he was superintendent
and research pathologist for the Agricultural Research Service
of the U. S. Department of Agriculture in Colorado. A native
of Newark, N. J., Dr. Alfieri earned his Ph.D. in plant
pathology from Cornell University and completed his under-
graduate studies cum laude in botany and chemistry at the
University of Miami.
Richard D. Gaskalla was named DPI's assistant director in
November 1983. He has been with the division since graduating
in 1975 from Florida State University with a degree in biolog-
ical science. An expert on plant import and export regula-
tions, Mr. Gaskalla served as an agricultural products special-
ist for five years during which he helped coordinate the
citrus blackfly survey program. For three years prior to
becoming assistant director, he was an agricultural products
specialist supervisor.
Ralph L. King, Jr. retired as chief of the Plant In-
spection Bureau in May 1984. The new bureau chief, A. Earl
Graham, has been with DPI for 29 years, serving as assistant
chief of the Plant Inspection Bureau since 1979. A graduate
in agricultural economics from the University of Florida, he
was a regional supervisor for 11 years after many years exper-
ience in nursery and agricultural inspection.
Richard A. Clark, who supervised the inspection offices
in the North Florida region, was appointed the new assistant
chief of the Plant Inspection Bureau. After graduating with a
degree in biology from the University of Miami, Mr. Clark
started with the division in 1973 as an inspector.
When Carter P. Seymour, Chief Plant Pathologist, retired
in September 1982, Dr. Calvin L. Schoulties was appointed to







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


that position. Dr. Schoulties joined the department in 1975
and has served as a Plant Pathologist III. Dr. Schoulties was
awarded his doctorate in 1971 by the University of Kentucky.
Region III administrator Curtis F. Dowling, Jr. retired
in May 1984. R. E. Burns, an inspector with an M.S. in horti-
culture from the University of Hawaii, assumed responsibility
for the South Florida region. Region III includes Miami, one
of the areas with the greatest potential for plant pest intro-
ductions in Florida and the nation.
Responsibility for the Apiary Inspection Bureau was
transferred from James C. Herndon, who retired during June
1984, to Leroy Purnal, a field inspector supervisor with 25
years experience in apiary inspection with DPI.
Florida's growing population has reduced the area of land
available for agricultural production, including areas con-
taining plants used for honey production. Seeking new apiary
locations, increasing numbers of beekeepers are moving
colonies to other states and returning to Florida for the
spring citrus bloom. Consequently, BUREAU OF APIARY
INSPECTION personnel must be constantly alert for bee diseases
introduced into Florida via migrating beekeepers. Recognizing
the potential problem, a 1983 amendment to existing bee laws
required bees introduced into Florida to be disease-free; the
amendment also provided for one additional inspector's
position to serve Bay, Escambia, Holmes, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa,
Walton, and Washington counties.
During the biennium, 309,005 bee colonies were brought
into the state by migratory beekeepers; overall, inspectors
examined 674,751 colonies in 1,245 apairies and 2,433 colonies
infested with American foulbrood (Bacillus larvae), a bacter-
ial pathogen highly contagious to honeybee.
The introduction of agricultural pests and diseases not
indigenous to the state is a continuing and escalating
problem. As the flow of travelers and commerce into Florida
has increased, the threat of importing such potentially damag-
ing pests and diseases has risen.
A Mediterranean fruit fly was trapped in Miami Springs on
31 May 1983; no subsequent flies were trapped at that loca-
tion. However, on 19 June 1984, four Medflies were detected
in traps in the "Little Havana" area of Miami. Subsequent
catches totaled 13 adults and one larvae. Eradication pro-
cedures were being carried out in accordance with established
emergency program procedures. Intensified trapping was to
continue through October 1984, and if no additional flies are
trapped, eradication will be declared November 2, 1984.
Infestations and diseases were not the only source of
concern during the biennium. After sustaining major freezes
in 1981 and 1982, Florida was struck on Christmas Day, 1983,
with the most severe freeze since 1962. Because the state had
been experiencing a mild winter prior to this artic air in-
vasion, many citrus trees and ornamental plants were killed or
severely damaged.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Although more than 10.6 million registered budeyes were
used for propagation this biennium, the BUREAU OF BUDWOOD
REGISTRATION reported this is a reduction of more than two
million buds from the previous biennium--a loss attributed to
the 1983 freeze.
There were 33 new participants in the Budwood program and
approximately 100 active participants accounted for more than
90% of the total citrus nursery tree production in Florida.
Nurserymen planted 38 new scion groves, representing 13,826
new trees that will be used for registered budwood sources.
Registered citrus tree production was recorded at more than
8.5 million trees, an increase of approximately two million
trees over the previous biennium.
More than 370 new trees from promising new budlines or
rootstocks were set in the citrus budwood foundation grove;
citrus tristeza virus continued to be a problem in the founda-
tion grove as well as in growers' registered scion groves.
The BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY received 33,258 specimens from
Agricultural Products specialists for identification--an
increase of nearly 9,000 from the previous biennium. From
these samples, 331,423 specimens were identified and 3,670
were pinned for reference. In addition, the bureau received
2,508 trap samples from various sources. There were 601 new
host records, 364 new county records, 18 new state records,
and 12 new U.S. records recorded. The county, state, and U.S.
records indicate the first time a specific insect was found in
a particular geographic area.
The R. B. Selander collection of blister beetles (Meloi-
dae), the largest and finest collection of the Meloidae in the
world, was added to the Florida State Collection of Arthropods
(FSCA).
In July 1983, the BUREAU OF PEST ERADICATION AND CONTROL,
in conjunction with the Department of Health and Rehabilita-
tive Services, began sampling water wells; testing was concen-
trated in areas near spreading decline buffers around citrus
groves as well as in pushed and treated areas where ethylene
dibromide (EDB) had been applied in a cooperative program with
the USDA/APHIS which was designed to control burrowing nema-
todes.
Subsequently, EDB was found in water collected from wells
in Orange, Lake, Polk, Highlands, and Marion counties. With
this discovery, the Commissioner of Agriculture and Consumer
Services immediately suspended use of EDB and, in October
1983, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) banned the use
of EDB as a soil fumigant.
The Burrowing Nematode Program underwent drastic changes
due to the ban on EDB as a soil fumigant. The use of Telone
II for buffer treatment was also suspended during this bi-
ennium. Since the use of these substances was no longer
allowed, the growers were left with no approved chemical
treatment to control the spread of burrowing nematode. There
did not appear to be any short-range solution.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


The December 1983 freeze resulted in a moratorium on all
fruit shipments, and in January 1984, concern over the effects
of EDB in fumigated fruit brought about a voluntary extension
of the moratorium on shipments to other citrus-producing
states by Florida shippers. A test semi-load of citrus,
fumigated with methyl bromide (MB) for delivery to California,
showed no MB residue at the end of seven days, and California
Department of Food and Agriculture officials began accepting
MB-treated shipments in lieu of citrus fumigated with EDB.
Anticipating the eventual loss of chemicals as fumigants,
a new protocol was negotiated between California and Florida
which would allow citrus fruit to be shipped to California
from areas declared to be free of the Caribbean fruit fly.
Under this protocol, shipments of fruit were sent to Cali-
fornia from Caribfly-free areas in Indian River County, begin-
ning in the 1982-83 harvesting season. The Division continued
to collect data to further support the fly-free concept,
because it demonstrated promise as a satisfactory way to ship
fruit without the use of fumigant treatments.
In view of increasing concern over the use of chemicals
in pest control and eradication, emphasis has shifted to the
development of alternative control methods. BUREAU OF METHODS
DEVELOPMENT personnel have been exploring biological control
for several pests, including the sugarcane delphacid
(Perkinsiella saccharicida). Releases of a delphacid preda-
tor, Tytthus mundulus, have thus far been inconclusive in
their results.
However, populations of the red wax scale (Ceroplastes
rubens), discovered in 1983 and found to be widespread through-
out Dade, Lee, Brevard, and Palm Beach counties, appeared to
have been controlled by the parasite Microterys flavus, a
native wasp of the family Aphelinidae. Other parasites and
predators of such pests as the citrus whitefly and the citrus
blackfly were being studied in the Biological Control Labora-
tory.
The Bureau of Methods Development has assumed responsi-
bility for hazardous waste management for the division.
During this biennium, the BUREAU OF PLANT PATHOLOGY
processed 16,073 specimens, establishing 64 new Florida patho-
gen records. A test for the lettuce mosaic virus was de-
veloped by a scientist at the University of Florida using
ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), and the bureau
began seed testing by this method in 1984.
The Winter Haven pathology laboratory tested 5,070 citrus
trees for tristeza virus using the ELISA test and 1,070 trees
were found positive. Of the 3,086 trees tested for exocortis
virus using a host bioassay system, 32 were positive for the
virus. Sixty-two trees with budwood destined for Texas were
tested by the same method; 18 were found to be positive.
The Bureau of Plant Pathology released 'Ray Ruby' grape-
fruit and 'Venezuela Red Navel' to the Bureau of Citrus Bud-
wood Registration in Winter Haven for further evaluation and
eventual release to the citrus industry.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


During 1983, the bureau conducted extensive surveys in
the Tampa Bay area for geranium rust (Puccinia pelargonii-
zonalis); it was found in only two Tampa Bay locations in
1984. In addition, surveys were conducted for Fusarium Wilt,
Race 3, on 90% of the tomato production area in Collier and
Lee counties. Bureau personnel also participated in three
surveys for citrus canker; two surveys were conducted in
Mexico and one in Dade County lime groves.
The bureau has also been investigating bacterial leaf
blight of fern, citrus blight, galls on edible figs, canker
fungi on sycamores in Gainesville, the failure of Eucalyptus
grandis coppice regeneration in South Florida, and a chlorosis
/decline syndrome affecting black olives in Hollywood,
Florida.
'Clementine Monreale' (mandarin-type citrus) was intro-
duced from California and was being indexed for viruses in the
quarantine facility.
BUREAU OF PLANT INSPECTION personnel conducted 2,340
inspections of high-risk nurseries, 6,618 inspections of
medium-risk nurseries, and 8,010 inspections of low-risk
nurseries during the 1982-84 biennium. The number of nur-
series under inspection decreased from 7,915 reported June 30,
1982 to 7,848 reported June 30, 1984.
Citrus nursery acreage increased by 76.22 acres and
citrus nursery trees increased by 10,234,379 trees.
Burrowing nematode (BN), cause of spreading decline in
citrus, was not detected in any citrus nursery during this
two-year period.
An average of 8,761 Jackson fruit fly traps were in-
spected on a three-week basis and an average of 126 McPhail
traps on a weekly basis.
Citrus tree survey personnel, searching for serious plant
pests, surveyed 218,402 acres in 35 citrus-producing counties;
there was an average of 4,036 survey points per inspector. In
addition to the 31,758 points surveyed for plant pests by the
citrus tree personnel, 7,963 points were surveyed by district
agricultural products specialists.
A total of 7,285,775 square feet of turfgrass was dis-
tributed under blue tag certification during 1982-84. The
program had eight turf growers registered.
Brown garden snails (Helix aspersa) and phytophagous
slugs were intercepted on several occasions on certified
commercial shipments of plants and plant material and on
non-certified homeowner and air-freight shipments.
During the biennium, the BUREAU OF NEMATOLOGY diagnosed a
total of 27,867 samples for nematodes and other invertebrates.
A survey for soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines)
was prompted by its discovery in June 1983 at the University
of Florida main campus agronomy farm in Gainesville. A total
of 2,649 samples were taken from 95 different fields in nine
counties. In addition to Alachua County, record new infesta-
tions were found in Bradford and Putnam counties.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


"European Economic Community Certification" was added to
the bureau's regulatory programs and a new survey, the "Citrus
seedling nursery ectoparasitic nematology survey", was initi-
ated. Investigative programs included the soybean cyst nema-
tode race determination, root-knot nematode on dogwood, coffee
lesion nematode, host testing, and a microscope lens evalua-
tion.
The bureau also incorporated new or modified laboratory
procedures to improve efficiency and quality control. Im-
provements included the construction of a waste soil and water
disposal system to prevent contamination of any uninfested
areas, laboratory remodeling and a training program for tech-
nologists. Improved procedures reduced turn-around time
between sample collection and receipt of results from 37 to 11
days.
As the 1982-84 biennium drew to a close, indicators
suggested the possibility that emergency situations would
occur more frequently among the state's agricultural re-
sources. The steady influx of people into Florida has greatly
increased the likelihood of importing destructive agricultural
pests and diseases. At the same time, concern for safe-
guarding the environment and the population has brought about
a reluctance to use chemicals indiscriminately. The division
will continue to diligently pursue early plant pest detection,
investigate biological controls, and judiciously apply exist-
ing technology in response to the changing needs of Florida's
agricultural and urban communities.








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


FISCAL OFFICE

Charles E. Taylor, Fiscal Officer
Tables 1 through V reflect the application or intended
applications of several categories of appropriated funds or
requested appropriation of funds for Fiscal Years 1982-83
through 1986-87. Tables identify program components of the
Division, based on Florida's Planning and Budgeting System.

Table 1. FY 1982-83 Actual expenditures
General Total
Bureau/Activity Revenue Trust Expenditures


Administrative Services, General


Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library
Total Administrative
Services, General


864,364 64,032

864,364 64,032


Plant Industry Products and Protection Inspections


Bureau of Plant Inspection 2,213,550
Citrus Tree Survey 162,276
Total Plant Industry
Products and Protection
Inspections 2,375,826
Plant and Animal Pest and Disease Control


Bureau of Entomology
Bio-control Laboratory
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bureau of Pest Eradication
and Control
Spreading Decline Program
Lethal Yellow Program
Special Categories
Apiary Indemnities
Citrus Blackfly
Methods Development
*Imported Fire Ant
Total Plant and Animal
Pest and Disease
Control
DIVISION TOTAL


494,379
36,454
450,462
254,038
270,249

307,629


185,277
182,169
-0-

30,365
127,676
184,460
-0-


2,523,158
5,763,348


18,4

15,8
32,5
8,5


8,0
401,3


-0-
-0-
7,701
592,498


1,085,070
*1,398,142


928,396

928,396


243,167 2,456,717
5,873 168,149


249,040 2,624,866


69 512,848
0- 36,454
07 466,269
56 286,594
87 278,836

27 307,656

41 193,318
84 583,553
0- -0-


30,365
127,676
192,161
592,498


3,608,228
7,161,490


*Per direction of the Legislature $75,000 for transfer to
IFAS, University of Florida for scientific research for bio-
control of Imported Fire Ant. Includes $592,498 Imported Fire
Ant Trust Fund.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Table 2. FY 1983-84 Actual expenditures

General Total
Bureau/Activity Revenue Trust Expenditures
Administrative Services,
General
Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library
Personnel 856,056 35,470 891,526
Total Administrative
Services, General 856,056 35,470 891,526
Plant Industry Products and
Protection Inspections
Bureau of Plant Inspection 2,396,168 293,028 2,689,196
Citrus Tree Survey 161,883 6,664 168,547
Total Plant Industry
Products and Protection
Inspections 2,558,051 299,692 2,857,743
Plant and Animal Pest
and Disease Control
Bureau of Entomology 555,462 20,320 575,782
Bio-control Laboratory 37,407 -0- 37,407
Bureau of Plant Pathology 461,791 18,089 479,880
Bureau of Nematology 229,681 34,768 264,449
Bureau of Apiary Inspection 310,277 21,759 332,036
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration 300,056 10,569 310,625
Bureau of Pest Eradication
and Control 161,855 6,027 167,882
Lethal Yellowing Program -0- -0- -0-
Spreading Decline Program 34,753 280,847 315,600
Fruitfly Protocol 99,897 65,829 165,726
Special Categories
Apiary Indemnities 32,195 -0- 32,195
Citrus Blackfly 146,464 -0- 146,464
Emergency Medfly 150,000 -0- 150,000
Methods Development 238,668 8,966 247,634
*Imported Fire Ant -0- 463,195 463,195
Total Plant and Animal
Pest and Disease
Control 2,758,506 930,369 3,688,875
DIVISION TOTAL 6,172,613 1,265,531 7,438,144

*Per direction of the Legislature $75,000 for transfer to
IFAS, University of Florida for scientific research for bio-
control of Imported Fire Ant. Includes $463,195 Imported Fire
Ant Trust Fund.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Table 3. FY 1984-85 Allocations and estimated expenditures

General Total
Bureau/Activity Revenue Trust Expenditures
Administrative Services,
General


Director-Fiscal-Technical
Personnel
Total Administrative
Services, General
Plant Industry Products and
Protection Inspections


1,199,113 -0-

1.199.113 -0-


Bureau of Plant Inspection 2,161,855
Citrus Tree Survey 177,729
Total Plant Industry
Products and Protection
Inspections 2,339,584
Plant and Animal Pest
and Disease Control


1,199,113

1,199,113


679,311 2,841,166
-0- 177,729


679,311 3,018,895


Bureau of Entomology
Bio-control Laboratory
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bureau of Pest Eradication
and Control
Spreading Decline Program
Fruitfly Protocol
Methods Development
*Imported Fire Ant
Special Categories
Apiary Indemnities
Citrus Blackfly
Emergency Medfly
Emergency Citrus Canker
Citrus Canker Indemnities
Total Plant and Animal
Pest and Disease
Control
DIVISION TOTAL 1


575,326
46,268
493,480
304,260
307,273

325,272

195,371
205,139
330,273
239,751
-0-


975
-0-
-0-
479
28,300

8,500

-0-
62,454
-0-
6,976
1,039,309


36,000 -0-
150,000 -0-
150,000 -0-
3,000,000 1,068,000
3,400,000 -0-


*Per direction of the Legislature $75,000 for transfer to
IFAS, University of Florida for scientific research for bio-
control of Imported Fire Ant. Includes $1,039,309 Imported
Fire Ant Trust Fund.


576,301
46,268
493,480
304,739
335,573

333,772

195,371
267,593
330,273
246,727
1,039,309

36,000
150,000
150,000
4,068,000
3,400,000


11,973,406
16,191,414


9,758,413
3,297,110


2,214,993
2,894,304








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Table 4. 1985-86 Requested allotments

General Total
Revenue Trust Expenditures


Administrative Service,
General
Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library-
Personnel
Total Administrative
Services, General
Plant Industry Products and
Protection Inspections
Bureau of Plant Inspection
Citrus Tree Survey
Total Plant Industry
Products and Protection
Inspections
Plant and Animal Pest
and Disease Control


Bureau of Entomology
Bio-control Laboratory
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bureau of Pest Eradication
and Control
Spreading Decline Program
Fruitfly Protocol
Methods Development
Imported Fire Ant
Special Categories
Apiary Indemnities
Citrus Blackfly
Emergency Medfly
Emergency Citrus Canker
Citrus Canker Indemnities
New Program-Sterile
Fly Lab
Total Plant and Animal
Pest and Disease
Control 1]
DIVISION TOTAL 15


*Includes $1,056,720 Imported


1,296,111 -0-

1,296,111 -0-


3,036,824
211,861


3,248,685


720,669
49,039
533,376
383,544
387,840

387,597

222,539
298,573
333,460
340,949
-0-

36,000
150,000
300,000
6,183,624
861,000
37,543


1,296,111

1,296,111


79,530 3,116,354
-0- 211,861


79_530 3,328,215


-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-

-0-

-0-
57,454
-0-
-0-
1,056,720

-0-
-0-
-0-
-0-
350,000
-0-


1,225,753 1,464,174
i,770,549 *1,543,704


Fire Ant Trust Fund.


720,669
49,039
533,376
383,544
387,840

387,597

222,539
356,027
333,460
340,949
1,056,720

36,000
150,000
-0-
6,183,624
1,211,000
37,543



12,689,927
15,803,253







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Table 5. FY 1986-87 Requested allotments

General Total
Bureau/Activity Revenue Trust Expenditures
Administrative Services,
General


Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library-
Personnel
Total Administrative
Services, General
Plant Industry Products and
Protection Inspections
Bureau of Plant Inspection
Citrus Tree Survey
Total Plant Industry
Products and Protection
Inspections
Plant and Animal Pest
and Disease Control


1,223,860

1,223,860



2,284,431
184,177


-0- 1,223,860

-0- 1,223,860



613,530 2,897,961
-0- 184,177


2,468,608 613,530 3,082,138


Bureau of Entomology
Bio-control Laboratory
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspectic
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bureau of Pest Eradicatioi
and Control
Spreading Decline Program
Fruitfly Protocol
Methods Development
Imported Fire Ant
Special Categories
Apiary Indemnities
Citrus Blackfly
Emergency Medfly
Emergency Citrus Canker
New Program-Sterile
Fly Lab
Total Plant and Animal
Pest and Disease
Control
DIVISION TOTAL


692,210
52,096
536,501
356,346
344,990


367,102

246,476
238,389
340,503
316,628
-0-

36,000
150,000
-0-
5,510,527
429,867


57


1,111,


9,617,635 1,168,
13,310,103 *1,782


-0- 692,210
-0- 52,096
-0- 536,501
-0- 356,346
-0- 344,990

-0- 367,102

-0- 246,476
,454 295,843
-0- 340,503
-0- 316,628
,254 1,111,254

-0- 36,000
-0- 150,000
-0- -0-
-0- 5,510,527
-0- 429,867



,708 10,786,343
238 15,092,341


*Includes $1,111,254 Imported Fire Ant Trust Fund.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


LIBRARY


June B. Jacobson, Librarian


The Division Library provides support for the technical
bureaus by maintaining an orderly collection of books and
journals specializing in entomology, nematology, and plant
pathology. During the biennium the Library acquired 533 new
books for a total of 11,653. Bound journal volumes added to
the collection were 365.
The Library operates with a staff of two. The Librarian
catalogs the materials acquired through orders placed by the
bureaus. A classification system based on the Library of
Congress system is used, but subject headings are changed when
necessary to add specificity. The Librarian is responsible
for library planning, budgeting, and coordinating services
between DPI and the University Libraries and interlibrary
borrowing with out-of-state institutions.
The Librarian works closely with the Library Technical
Assistant who performs numerous tasks which includes secre-
tarial work, bookkeeping, binding preparation, and Kardex
maintenance. Alice Sanders has occupied this position through-
out the biennium.
Interlibrary loans continue to enhance our collection as
we obtained 457 items for our personnel and Research Associ-
ates. Exchange agreements with 186 institutions with similar
goals are also maintained.
In 1983 Mrs. Sanders completed work on a list of serials
in the DPI col-lection. It is a helpful list for anyone
initiating work with our journals. It includes call numbers
and holdings information.
Catalog cards continue to be exchanged with Hume Library
and Library West. Now that their catalog is online (Florida
Online Computerized User Service) it will be necessary to
merge our records with theirs to benefit from interlibrary
cooperation. Plans to join our records to FOCUS will be our
new project for the mid 1980's.
Donors of special books added to the Library during 1982-
84 include: Dr. Sal Alfieri, Dr. Ross Arnett, Dr. George Bick,
Dr. Franklin Blanton, Dr. Lincoln Brower, Dr. Robert Esser,
Dr. Avas Hamon, Dr. John Heppner, Mrs. Ann King, Dr. John
McRitchie, Mr. Steven Passoa, Dr. James Reinert, Mr. Carter
Seymour, Dr. Richard Wilkerson, Dr. Robert Wilkinson, and Dr.
Robert Woodruff.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

Phyllis P. Habeck, Information Specialist


During the biennium, the Technical Assistance Office
(TAO) staff worked together to inform the public about
Division of Plant Industry (DPI) programs and activities.
Information was disseminated through news releases to and
interviews with newspapers, magazines, radio and television;
feature articles and monthly columns in various agricultural
magazines and regional newspapers; a quarterly news bulletin;
leaflets and brochures; audio-visual presentations and ex-
hibits. Staff members assisted the technical bureaus in the
preparation and printing of technical and scientific publi-
cations. TAO personnel responded to requests from the public
for DPI publications.
When Mediterranean fruit flies were discovered in Miami
in June 1984, the information specialists went to the scene to
provide the news media and the public with the latest infor-
mation concerning the regulatory and control aspects of the
eradication program. A daily chronology was written, and pic-
tures were taken of major events. The artist created maps,
posters and other artwork needed for the program.
The TAO staff was comprised of two information special-
ists, a secretary specialist, a clerk typist II, a technical
illustrator (OPS), a technical photographer and a photo-
grapher's assistant (OPS). In July 1982 Phyllis P. Habeck was
appointed information specialist III and chief of the TAO. M.
Linda Perry joined the staff at the same time as an infor-
mation specialist II and writer.


Publications and Printing

The TAO published seven issues of the quarterly Plant
Industry News to inform persons associated with the plant and
agricultural industries about pest control programs and regu-
lations governing the movement of plants and plant products.
It had a controlled circulation of approximately 12,000.
The technical bureaus compiled twenty-four issues of the
TRI-OLOGY Technical Report, a monthly summary of the most
important insects, plant pathogens, nematodes and plants found
in the state, and seventy-two monthly circulars dealing with
current plant pests. The TAO furnished photographs and illu-
strations, did the camera-ready layouts and coordinated the
printing of these publications. These were widely distributed
around the state, country and several foreign countries.
Major publications released by the DPI included Florida's
Certified Nursery Directory, 1982, 1983, 1984, and the 34th
Biennial Report, 1980-82.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Twelve issues of the Reporter, an in-house newsletter
covering Department and Division policies and job related
activities of employees, were distributed to active and re-
tired personnel.
A weekly in-house communicator was started in March 1983
to keep bureau chiefs and office heads informed of the activi-
ties of the various offices.


Art and Photography

The photography section completed 590 job requests from
DPI personnel. These included field and studio photographs
for all regular DPI publications, including the Plant Industry
News, the Reporter, the monthly technical circulars, news
releases and feature articles. Photographs of laboratory
specimens were taken for use in technical and scientific
publications. Slides and photographs were prepared for use in
employee training programs and manuals. Identification photo-
graphs were taken of all new employees. Several slide pre-
sentations about division programs and activities were put
together by the staff to be used at governmental and scien-
tific meetings and at public gatherings. Large photographs
were printed for use in DPI exhibits.
The photography section was also responsible for main-
taining, repairing, operating and supervising the use of all
audio-visual equipment for the DPI.
More than 400 job requests from DPI personnel for maps,
charts, graphs, signs, cover designs and other visual aids and
graphics were completed by the staff artist. There were
numerous requests for detailed, scientifically accurate illu-
strations of plants and plant pests. The artist was respon-
sible for the layout of all regular division publications.
Assistance was provided in the design and layout of major
publications, brochures, training manuals, business forms and
other printed matter produced by the DPI. The artist designed
and coordinated the construction of five exhibits for display
at agricultural fairs and expositions in an attempt to keep
the public informed about DPI regulatory programs.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


OFFICE OF SYSTEMATIC BOTANY


K. R. Langdon, Botanist


The Office of Systematic Botany is a service support unit
primarily aiding and assisting the other bureaus of the
Division of Plant Industry by providing plant identifications
and related services. Also, to a lesser extent, services are
provided for other local, state, and federal governmental
agencies and personnel and to individuals upon request.
The Office of Systematic Botany includes the Division of
Plant Industry Herbarium. Dr. K. R. Langdon, Botanist, serves
as head of the office and as curator of the herbarium. Mr. C.
R. Artaud, Biologist, assists him.
The Division of Plant Industry Herbarium now houses
approximately 5,700 sheets of pressed, dried, mounted, identi-
fied plant specimens, including 272 sheets added this bi-
ennium. The seed collection contains 1,336 vials of seed
specimens with 66 added this biennium. The herbarium also
houses approximately 600 packets of bryophytes (mosses and
liverworts). There were 5,494 plant specimens submitted for
identification during the biennium, 217 more than last bi-
ennium.
Other work handled by the Office of Systematic Botany
includes many hours spent reviewing host lists and checking
plant names to verify or correct plant names for spelling,
validity, synonomy, describers, etc.; reviewing manuscripts as
a member of the Publications Committee; and reviewing and
making recommendations on applications to the Aquatic Plant
Council and the Plant Pathogen Introduction Committee. Trans-
lations of scientific literature from Spanish, Portuguese, and
Latin to English were provided by the Botanist and Biologist
for various division personnel.


Meetings Attended

August 8-12, 1982. Joint meeting of American Society of Plant
Taxonomists and American Institute of Biological
Sciences. State College, PA. (K. R. Langdon)
August 7-12, 1983. Joint meeting of American Society of Plant
Taxonomists and American Institute of Biological
Sciences. Grand Forks, ND. (K. R. Langdon)


Staff Publications

Langdon, K. R. 1983. Rhododendron chapmanii, an endangered
species on both state and federal lists. Fla. Dept.
Agric. and Consumer Services, Div. Plant Ind. Bot. Circ.
18. 2 pp.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report 16


1983. Sassafrass, a medicinal plant and flavoring
ingredient. Fla. Dept. Agric. and Consumer Services,
Div. Plant Ind. Bot. Circ. 19. 2 pp.
S1983. Simpsons zephyr lily, Zephyranthes simpsonii,
an endangered species. Fla. Dept. Agric. and Consumer
Services, Div. Plant Ind. Bot. Circ. 20. 2 pp.
and E. L. Barnard (senior author). 1983. Lignotubers
of Eucalyptus. Fla. Dept. Agric. and Consumer Services,
Div. Plant Ind. Plant Path. Circ. 253. 2 pp.
S 1984. Pygmy fringe-tree, Chionanthus pygmaeus, en-
dangered by loss of habitat. Fla. Dept. Agric. and
Consumer Services, Div. Plant Ind. Bot. Circ. 21. 2
pp.








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


BUREAU OF APIARY INSPECTION


Chief Apiarist

James C. Heradon
Leroy Putnal

Apiary Inspector Supervisor


Administers the activities of
the Bureau.



Assists in administering the
activities of the Bureau, de-
tection and eradication of
diseased hives infested with
American foulbrood.


Leroy Putn l2
James Hall


Agricultural Inspectors



Warren R. Johnson
William I. Langston
Thomas B. Dowda, III
James R. Hall
Open

Richard L. Dunaway
Robert T. Metz, Jr.
Richard D. Hughes
M. Cecil Morgan
John L. Bastianelli
Lee A. Del Signore


Detection and eradication of
diseased hives found infested
with American foulbrood.


District
District
District
District
District

District
District
District
District
District
District


I
II
III
IV

V
VI
VIII
IX
X
XI


Hosford
Tallahassee
High Springs
Umatilla
New Smyrna
Beach
Haines City
Tampa
Alva
Ft. Pierce
Loxahatchee
Miami


Summary of Bureau of Apiary Inspection Activities


The beekeeping industry is a vital segment of Florida
agriculture. Florida is ranked among the top three states in
the nation in the value of honey produced. Florida's honeybee
population, estimated at 375,000 colonies, produces from 25 to
30 million pounds of honey each year at a wholesale value of
10 to 12 million dollars.
In addition to the value of honey produced, the total
value of pollination services of bees is estimated to be 45.8
million dollars. Florida's honeybee colonies fertilize and


Retired.
promoted.
Promoted.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


cross-pollinate watermelons, cucumbers, squash, cantaloupes,
and the Orlando Tangelo variety of citrus. To enable reseed-
ing, some varieties of clover used in cattle pastures must be
visited by bees each year.
Florida's ideal climatic conditions make possible the
production and shipment of thousands of queen and package bees
to northern states to replace winter losses and to South
America and England.
As a protection to the honey bee industry, the State
Legislature passed the Florida Bee Disease Law in 1919. The
original and continuing purpose of the law is the detection
and destruction of honeybee colonies infected with a disease
known as American foulbrood, Bacillus larvae. This disease,
while completely harmless to humans, is highly contagious to
honeybee colonies. Introduction into the hive is in the form
of spores located in honey, on combs, and in used beekeeping
equipment which has been exposed to a previously established
source of infection. The spore form is very resistant to
adverse conditions so that when equipment, honey, and pollen
become contaminated, they remain so for long periods of time.
One of the problems facing Florida beekeepers is the
reduction of plants necessary for honey production. Increased
population growth, building projects, and new highways consume
vast areas of land once containing plants important for honey
production, forcing the beekeeper to find new apiary loca-
tions. Because of this problem, more and more beekeepers move
their honeybee colonies to other states in search of a honey
crop, returning each fall in order to be ready for the spring
citrus bloom. During the 1982-84 biennium, 309,005 colonies
were brought into Florida by migratory beekeepers. Apiary
inspectors are constantly on the alert for bee diseases which
could be brought into Florida in this manner.


Honey Certification Program

During the biennium, apiary inspectors collected 128
composite honey samples from 475 barrels of tupelo honey. The
Department's Food Laboratory in Tallahassee analyzed and
certified the honey samples for flavor, color, soluble solids,
moisture, and pollen count.
Eighty composite samples from 318 barrels were certified
as tupelo honey. Forty-eight composite samples from 157
barrels failed to certify as tupelo honey. The moisture
content for certified tupelo honey averaged 18.47%. The
moisture content for the samples that failed to certify as
tupelo honey averaged 17.53%.








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Topics for 1982-84 Biennial Report

Legislation

The 1983 Legislature, in regular session in Tallahassee,
passed an amendment to our existing bee laws. The amendment
states that any out- of-state bees coming into Florida must
be disease-free and must meet standards of inspection adequate
to insure the health and safety of Florida honeybees according
to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Ser-
vices. The 1984 Legislature authorized and funded a new
apiary position for the Bureau of Apiary Inspection. The new
position will consist of the following counties: Bay, Escam-
bia, Holmes, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa, Walton and Washington.
This one new position will make a total of 12 inspectors for
the bureau.

Varroa Mite Test Exercise

In March 1984, The Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry and the United
States Department of Agriculture (USDA) engaged in a training
exercise for the eradication of the varroa mite. This exer-
cise took place in the Tampa area. The purpose of this exer-
cise was to test the contingency plans that have been de-
veloped for dealing with pest of honeybees. At the present
time this mite does not exist in the United States.
Six Division of Plant Industry employees and two USDA
personnel participated in this test exercise.


Resume of Bureau of Apiary Inspection Activities

During the biennium, apiary inspectors examined 674,751
colonies in 1,245 apiaries and found 2,433 colonies infected
with American foulbrood. The Bureau of Apiary Inspection
issued 701 permits for 338,732 colonies of out-of-state bees
to move into Florida, and 265 special moving permits for
moving point-to-point within the state. Florida beekeepers
were issued 1,924 moving permits and 109 certificates of
inspection.
The sum of $62,520 was paid during the biennium to
Florida beekeepers in compensation for bees and equipment
destroyed because of American foulbrood.








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Apiaries inspected
Colonies inspected
Colonies infected with AFB
AFB colonies destroyed
Florida permits issued
Certificates issued for exit
Point-to-Point permits issued
Certificates issued for sale
Special entry permits issued


1982-83
6,420
334,586
1,315
1,315
1,051
310
109
49
347


1983-84
6,030
340,165
1,118
1,118
873
300
116
60
244


Biennium
12,450
674,751
2,433
2,433
1,924
610
225
109
591


Road Guard Report

Monthly reports from the Road Guard Stations during the
biennium indicated 276,884 colonies and 319,871 supers moved
into Florida from other states. Road guard reports also
showed 345,585 colonies and 342,575 supers left Florida for
destinations across the nation.
Personnel of the Bureau of Apiary Inspection examined and
certified 165,915 colonies for queen and package bee pro-
ducers. A total of 362,041 colonies were inspected and certi-
fied for shipment to the following states:


Arkansas
California
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kentucky
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Minnesota
Missouri
Nebraska
New Hampshire
New Jersey


206
300
37,336
2,918
7,096
1,400
50
14,034
1,737
5,872
14,964
1
500
56
10,709


New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Pennsylvania
South Carolina
South Dakot a
Tennessee
Texas
Vermont
Virginia
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming


32,820
4,838
101,626
7,528
14,465
215
57,090
341
146
4
827
8
44,354
600








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Yearly Summary Bureau of Apiary Inspection


Year Ending
June 30, 1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984


Apiaries
Inspected
3,451
3,371
3,414
3,711
3,671
3,347
2,646
2,371
2,265
2,464
3,266
3,710
3,082
2,872
2,836
3,259
5,102
5,885
6,168
5,813
4,932
5,123
5,056
4,991
5,693
5,497
5,230
5,680
5,833
6,337
6,519
5,912
5,788
5,273
4,713
5,353
4,802
5,050
4,750
4,277
5,872
5,878
5,589
5,529
6,423
6,420
6,030


Colonies
Inspected
64,668
70,655
76,851
81,950
83,354
80,823
73,649
69,262
71,161
87,674
98,147
105,678
105,296
95,405
88,206
92,267
135,168
157,388
176,616
162,885
159,692
153,677
149,227
152,288
173,538
169,411
166,641
179,861
189,802
197,833
218,493
192,651
185,752
176,608
176,153
193,382
191,102
204,929
212,945
217,403
260,152
283,346
303,567
325,038
320,729
334,586
340,165


American Foulbrood
Apiaries Colonies
Infected Infected
38 173
56 416
61 234
80 371
106 698
100 524
106 456
105 379
138 959
104 683
100 391
130 406
175 369
237 772
232 578
449 1,366
683 2,158
524 1,421
460 1,180
490 1,121
457 1,623
454 1,329
438 1,422
319 1,271
341 1,053
416 1,546
481 1,614
500 1,709
485 1,340
561 1,768
504 1,712
509 1,707
443 1,317
431 2,092
433 1,683
420 1,702
293 1,148
365 1,229
302 1,271
360 1,068
163 1,989
329 1,406
338 1,532
260 903
441 1,613
333 1,315
296 1,118








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


BUREAU OF CITRUS BUDWOOD REGISTRATION


Charles 0. Youtsey, Chief

The Bureau of Citrus Budwood Registration is responsible
for the selecting and testing of horticulturally true-to-type
citrus trees. Tested material is registered as free of cer-
tain virus or virus-like diseases and released to growers and
nurserymen for propagation. Participation in the budwood
program is voluntary on the part of the nurseryman, but those
who produce registered trees must do so under supervised
guidelines to assure that identity of propagations and
integrity of testing are maintained throughout the production
period.
There were 33 new participants entering the program this
biennium. The number of active participants fluctuates near
100 and accounts for over 90% of the total citrus nursery tree
production in Florida. Nurserymen planted 38 new scion groves
that represent 13,826 new trees that will be used for regis-
tered budwood sources. Over 10.6 million registered budeyes
were used for propagations in registered nurseries this bien-
nium. This was reduced from the previous period by over 2
million buds in the second half of the biennium due to the
December 1983 freeze. Registered citrus tree production was
recorded at over 8.5 million trees, an increase of over 2
million trees over the previous biennium.
Of the total rootstocks used for registered propagations,
sour orange and Carrizo citrange make up 72% in 1982-83, and
71% in 1983-84. Swingle citrumelo amounted to 15% of the
total in 1983-84 and continues to increase as seed become
available. The number of Hamlin and Valencia orange propaga-
tions are down from all time highs in 1982-83, while Duncan
and Marsh grapefruit propagations continue their downward
trend of previous years due to poor market conditions for this
fruit. Ruby Red is the only grapefruit variety that enjoys a
good market reception, but the drop of 200,000 propagations is
a reflection of the problems in the total grapefruit market
picture. Sunburst and Robinson tangerines are the only varie-
ties that showed an increase in nursery stock production
during this biennium posting gains of 182% and 12%, respect-
ively. A tabulation of the number of registered propagation
of scion types and rootstocks for the past five years is
available from the Bureau of Citrus Budwood Registration.
The Bureau continues to provide a hot water treatment
service for nurserymen who desire to have citrus seed treated
as a preventive measure to control the root-rotting fungus,
Phytophthora parasitica Dast. A total of 7,971 quarts of seed
were treated this biennium which generated $4,034 in revenue
for the Bureau.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Florida Citrus Arboretum

An arboretum containing 74 citrus species and close
citrus relatives is maintained on the grounds of the
Division's Winter Haven headquarters. The planting provides a
means of preservation and affords many educational benefits.
Dr. Carlos H. Blazquez from the Citrus Research and Education
Center, Lake Alfred, used the Florida Citrus Arboretum to
investigate infrared photographic techniques which may enable
identification of citrus varieties. Such capabilities would
greatly aid in citrus survey. Dr. Gloria Moore, from the
University of Florida, collected foliage specimens for leaf
component analysis. Mr. Robert A. Baker from the USDA Citrus
and Suptropical Products Laboratory, Winter Haven, collected a
series of fruit samples for extraction of enzymes for study to
better understand the chemistry of fruit ripening and their
effects on juice quality during processing and storage. Among
the various educational programs was the filming of a 30minute
television program known as "Gills Garden" from WFLA, Channel
8, Tampa. There were over 600 visitors, including 32 from
foreign countries, using the arboretum this biennium.


Citrus Budwood Foundation Grove

In addition to the arboretum, the Bureau maintains a
citrus budwood foundation grove near Dundee, Florida, for the
purpose of preserving and comparing horticulturally selected
and virus tested budlines that provide sources of budwood for
distribution to Florida growers and nurserymen. There were
2,345,840 buds distributed from the foundation grove to nur-
serymen during this biennium. This is a reduction of 650,000
budeyes from the previous reporting period and was primarily
due to the December 1983 freeze.
After sustaining major freezes in January 1981 and 1982,
Florida was hit on December 25, 1983, with the most severe
freeze since 1962, and judged by many to be equal to the great
freeze of 1894-95. Low temperatures in the teens were re-
corded in the northern parts of the citrus belt for periods up
to 12 hours. A strong wind, 8 to 15 miles per hour, blew
steadily for 2 nights. Citrus trees had experienced a rather
mild winter prior to this artic air invasion and were unusual-
ly vulnerable to freezing.
Temperatures recorded in the citrus budwood foundation
grove were below 32 F for approximately 8 hours on Christmas
eve and reached 22 F on the morning of December 26. Tempera-
tures remained below 28 F for approximately 10.5 hours and
were accompanied by winds of 8 to 15 miles per hour.
Young trees in the grove were damaged severely with split
bark and dead wood in 34" diameter limbs and trunks. Nursery
test trees and experimental nursery trees were severely








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


damaged despite the burning of heaters for cold protection.
Table 1 shows the percent defoliation in the 9-year old foun-
dation grove trees on a wide range of rootstocks. In addition
to the traditional cold hardy rootstocks, such as sour orange
and Cleopatra mandarin, the group of citrumelo rootstocks
Swingle, F80-3, F-80-8, and F-80-9 show great promise for
planting in colder locations.
There were 525 trees removed from the foundation grove
this biennium. Included in this number were a large group of
lemon trees no longer in demand as budwood sources and 130
Duncan grapefruit trees that also have lost popular demand due
to poor fruit returns. Included in these removals were a
number of horticulturally inferior trees and some in decline
from citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and/or blight.
Over 370 new trees from promising new budlines or root-
stocks were set in the foundation grove during this period,
many from shoot-tip grafting of old diseased budlines, and a
number of popular varieties preinoculated with CTV mild
strains.
Citrus tristeza virus continues to be a problem for the
foundation grove and in growers registered scion groves. Of
224 originally CTV-free trees set in the foundation grove in
1979, only 37 remain uninfected. Strong local strains have
shown up in nursery propagations from many of the budwood
distributions made during this report period. Budwood dis-
tribution from these trees has been discontinued, and tests
have been initiated on 1,374 individual trees to confirm the
presence of strong CTV strains. Only those trees with strong
growth on sour orange seedlings will continue to be used as
budwood sources for propagations of registered nursery trees.
In addition to CTV, the citrus tree decline known as
blight has spread rapidly among certian varieties and root-
stocks in the foundation grove. The cause of this decline is
presently unknown. Presence of visual symptoms and the mea-
surement of water conductivity in the trunks are accepted
diagnostic methods. A new tool was invented by L. H. Hebb and
W. F. Connell for using a hypodermic syringe to measure water
uptake in trees suspected of having blight. This tool im-
proves reliability and saves manhours.
A study was made in the fall of 1983 to determine rate of
loss from blight in two sweet orange variety blocks at the
foundation grove. Rough lemon, Volkamer lemon, and Rangpur
lime were the three rootstocks most affected by the disease in
both blocks regardless of scion variety. Jaffa, Parson Brown,
Pineapple, (including Queen Pineapple), and Valencia orange
were the scion varieties most affected. It is of interest
that there were no symptoms in trees on Swingle citrumelo
rootstock growing within 25 feet of these severely affected
rows.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Citrus Virus Testing

Testing for exocortis viroid in participants scion groves
and in the DPI foundation grove trees accounted for 4,198
tests completed this biennium. Of these, there were 2,742
exocortis tests completed by the Plant Pathology laboratory in
Winter Haven. Only 3.5% of these tests showed exocortis
infection. The lab also processed 4,278 CTV tests using the
ELISA procedure. Test selections were principally from founda-
tion grove trees and from CTV mild strain inoculations.
There were 92 tests begun for psorosis, 36 of which were
completed; 133 tests were completed for xyloporosis, and 92
plants were processed through the Gainesville lab for shoot-
tip grafting to eliminate virus diseases from desirable old-
line selections.
Tests for mild strain CTV were begun in 1984 on 1,374
selections from scion groves and trees from the foundation
grove. This is a labor-intensive test that iay take up to 12
months to complete. The purpose is to identify budwood
sources that have strong strains of CTV so that they can be
eliminated as sources of budwood for propagation. Sour orange
seedlings are propagated with selected budwood, and growth is
measured against standards of growth in trees having no CTV
infection. Results should be available in the summer of 1985
on a large portion of these tests.


Educational and Training Programs

During the biennum, personnel from the Bureau of Citrus
Budwood Registration participated in numerous educational
activities for students from high schools and colleges,
Division of Plant Industry personnel, citrus nurserymen and
budders, horticulturists, and master gardeners.
Lectures and/or slide talks on citrus virus diseases and
techniques of virus indexing were given to students from the
University of Florida Fruit Crops Department and Florida
Southern College citrus classes on 7 occasions. (C. 0. Yout-
sey, L. H. Hebb)
Lectures and field training in citrus budwood registra-
tion procedures, virus disease recognition, citrus variety
identification, and horticultural evaluation were given to 27
new Plant Industry Products Specialists, three college stu-
dents from Taiwan, and three employees from a commerical
citrus grower, in a total of four training sessions. (C. 0.
Youtsey, L. H. Hebb)
Numerous guided tours of the Florida Citrus Arboretum
were conducted for students from several Central Florida high
schools. The students inspected fruit and leaves of various
varieties to practice identifying specimens at the annual State
FFA Identification Contest at the Citrus Showcase. In addi-







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


tion, a two-day seminar was held for members of the Florida
Rare Fruit Council International, Inc. (C. 0. Youtsey, L. H.
Hebb, M. C. Kesinger, P. R. O'Brien, S. B. Garrett)
Members of the Florida Citrus Nurserymen's Association
(FCNA) and large numbers of commercial citrus growers from
citrus growing counties toured the budwood foundation grove
for specific interests. Over a 100 growers from Lake, Orange,
and Polk counties observed rootstock tolerance to freeze
damage. Forty members of the FCNA were shown fruit and tree
characteristics of Sunburst tangerine and the reduced growth
of sweet oranges grown on sour orange rootstock due to CTV
infection in the propagation material. Numerous growers were
also interested in navel orange yields and growth habits on
various rootstock.


Conferences and Meetings

October 31-November 3, 1982. Florida State Horticultural
Society meeting, Miami Beach. (L. H. Hebb)
May 1-19, 1983. Ninth Conference of International Organiza-
tion of Citrus Virologists, Argentina and Brazil, South
America. (L. H. Hebb)
November 13, 1983. Florida State Horticultural Society Meet-
ing, Daytona Beach. (C. 0. Youtsey, L. H. Hebb)


Publications and Talks

October 31-November 3, 1982. L. H. Hebb presented a paper
entitled "Tristeza Decline in Four Grapefruit Cultivars
at the Budwood Foundation Grove, Dundee, Florida", by C.
0. Youtsey and L. H. Hebb at the Florida State Horticul-
tural Society Meeting, Miami Beach.
November 13, 1983. C. 0. Youtsey coauthored a paper presented
at the Florida State Horticultural Society Meeting,
Daytona Beach, "Negative Results in Citrus Blight Trans-
mission Tests", by H. K. Wutscher, C. O. Youtsey, P. F.
Smith and M. Cohen.










Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


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Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY


H. A. Denmark, Chief of Entomology

Summary

The Bureau of Entomology provides arthropod identifica-
tion services, conducts limited investigations of certain
economic problems, assists in instructing Agricultural Prod-
ucts Specialists, continues to build a general arthropod
reference and research collection, conducts taxonomic investi-
gations, supervises the security of the Biological Control
Laboratory, and collects the taxonomic and biological control
literature to support these areas of responsibility.
During the biennium there were 33,258 lots received from
the Agricultural Products Specialists (a lot may represent 1
to many specimens). From these lots there were 331,423 speci-
mens identified, 18,465 report forms added to the host and
species files, 90,903 specimens discarded, 3,670 specimens
pinned, 409 specimens placed in envelopes, 9,810 slide mounts
prepared, and 29,419 specimens in vials of alcohol added to
the Florida State Collection of Arthropods (FSCA). The number
of specimens received and identified by the Entomology Bureau
that did not require typed report forms was 147,603. From
these specimens there were 98,913 discarded, 45,673 pinned,
1,398 slides made, and 1,619 preserved in vials. There were
41,820 specimens identified by collaborating specialists
outside of the Entomology Bureau. Of this number there were
29,302 discarded, 12,622 pinned, 100 slides prepared, and
2,123 preserved in alcohol. There were 2,508 trap samples
containing thousands of unprocessed specimens received from
various sources. Research Associates donated 212,918 pinned
and labeled specimens, 9,288 vials of alcohol-preserved speci-
mens, 4,180 slide-mounted specimens, and 58,247 placed in
envelopes. A large number of these specimens were identified.
There were 601 new host records, 364 new county records,
18 new state records, and 12 new U.S. records recorded during
the biennium. There were 4,658 types added to the collection.
The FSCA now contains over 5.2 million curated specimens, over
240,488 slide-mounted specimens, and over 22,508 pints and
quarts of unsorted alcohol-preserved specimens.
The R. B. Selander collection of blister beetles (Meloi-
dae) has been added to the FSCA. This is the largest and
finest collection (ca. 360 drawers) of the Meloidae. Because
of equine deaths from eating blister beetle-contaminated hay,
the collection has added significance.
The Lepidoptera collection of H. L. King, Sarasota,
Florida, was purchased jointly with the Department of Zoology,
University of Florida. This is an important and beautifully
curated collection and is a definite asset to the FSCA.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


A Mediterranean fruit fly was trapped in Miami Springs on
31 May 1983. However, no subsequent flies were trapped at
that location. On 19 June 1984, a Medfly was trapped in the
"Little Havana" area of Miami. Subsequent catches totaled 13
adults and 1 larva. Eradication procedures are in progress.
Dr. John Lattin, University of Oregon, reviewed the
Bureau of Entomology and FSCA in July 1982 as part of a study
conducted by the USDA to determine resources in various col-
lections in the United States.
Mr. Robert Swanson, Entomologist with the Bureau and
located at the University of Florida's Agricultural Research
Center (IFAS) in Homestead, Florida, died 23 August 1982.
Dr. John Heppner joined the entomology staff in January
1983 to identify and curate immature insects, particularly
Diptera (fruit flies), Coleoptera, and Lepidoptera.
Mrs. Helen Harben retired in April 1984 after 21 years
service.
The Arthropod Introduction Committee has processed 57
requests involving 86 species of insects during this biennium.
Anyone wishing to introduce insects or related arthropods into
Florida should write to: Harold A. Denmark, Chairman, Arthro-
pod Introduction Committee, Division of Plant Industry, P. 0.
Box 1269, Gainesville, Florida 32602.


IDENTIFICATIONS:


Identifications of the various arthro-


pod groups are made by 9 staff entomologists. The entomol-
ogists and the groups for which they are responsible are as
follows:

H. A. Denmark: Aphids, mites, thrips, and ticks.

G. B. Edwards: All non-insect arthropods except
Acarina. Routine screening of fruit
flies (Tephritidae:Anastrepha).

A. B. Hamon: Homoptera: Coccoidea and Aleyrodidae.

J. B. Heppner: Immature insects, phytophagous lepi-
doptera larvae and adults, particularly
fruit flies.

F. W. Mead: Adult Lepidoptera: Diptera, suborder
Nematocera; Homoptera: Psyllidae, plus
suborder Auchenorhyncha, which includes
leafhoppers, planthoppers, spictlebugs,
treehoppers, and cicadas.

J. C. E. Nickerson: Formicidae.

L. A. Stange: Hymenoptera (except Formididae); gall-
forming insects, and Neuroptera.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


H. V. Weems, Jr.: Adult higher Diptera (suborder Brachy-
cera) and miscellaneous smaller arthro-
pod groups.

R. E. Woodruff: Coleoptera and Orthoptera.

Dr. L. A. Hetrick, Professor Emeritus, University of Florida,
IFAS, Department of Entomology and Nematology, continues to do
routine identifications of termites.


Biological Control Laboratory

Lionel A. Stange, Taxonomic Entomologist

The Florida Biological Control Laboratory (FBCL) is a
cooperative facility of the Division of Plant Industry, the U.
S. Department of Agriculture (USDA-ARS), and the University of
Florida (IFAS). The facility also contains a USDA Animal and
Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) approved quarantine
unit. This unit was routinely reinspected and approved in
January 1983 by APHIS, and Christine Bennett (University of
Florida, IFAS) was designated as Quarantine Officer at that
time. During the biennium, the cooperating agencies imported
39 shipments into quarantine consisting of 14 insect species,
and exported 46 shipments of 19 species.

Importations

The foreign source and the agency responsible for each
project is given in parentheses.
Parasites and predators were introduced for study and/or
eventual release against whitefly (Hawaii, IFAS), Caribbean
fruitfly (Colombia, IFAS), Colorado potato beetle, (Missouri,
IFAS), stable fly and house fly (Spain, France, West Germany,
USDA), sugarcane delphacid (Hawaii, DPI), mole crickets
(Puerto Rico, IFAS), pickleworm (Colombia, IFAS), Mexican bean
beetle (Japan, IFAS), and cane root borer (Puerto Rico, USDA).
An aquatic weevil was introduced for host specificity tests
against hydrilla (India, USDA).

Exportations and Releases

Five shipments of alligatorweed flea beetle, Agasicles
hygrophila, from lab culture were made to the agriculture
departments of North and South Carolina for release against
alligatorweed (USDA); 1 shipment of Mexican bean beetle,
Epilachna verivestis, was sent to the University of Michigan
for lab culture (IFAS); 4 shipments of the encyrtid parasite,
Arrhenophagus chionaspidis, were sent to the USDA Beltsville,
Maryland, lab for eventual release against the scale, Pseud-
aulacaspis prunincola, in the Washington, D.C. area (IFAS); 1







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


field release of Encarsia haitiensis was made in Hollywood
against the whitefly, Aleurodicus dispersus; 3 field releases
of the predator Nephaspis amnicola were made in south Florida
for establishment against the whitefly, Aleurodicus dispersus
(IFAS); 7 field releases of the mirid predator, Tytthus mundu-
lus, were made in south Florida in a biocontrol project on
sugarcane delphacid, Perkinsiella saccharicida (DPI); an
ichneumonid, Bathyplectes anurus, was released at a University
of Florida alfalfa field against alfalfa weevil, Hypera
postica (IFAS); Spalangia cameroni, Trichopria stomoxydis, and
Pachycrepoideus vindemiae (all parasites) were released from
quarantine to the USDA Man & Animals Lab for study on house
fly and stable fly (USDA); 2 releases of the parsitic wasp,
Larra bicolor, were made against mole crickets, Scapteriscus
vicinus and S. acletus, in Hillsborough County (IFAS); eulo-
phid parasites, Edovum puttleri, were released at the UF honey
plant against Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decem-
lineata (IFAS); 2 shipments of braconids, Cardiochiles sp.,
and the chalcid, Sphilochacis diaphaniae, were released to the
IFAS AREC Homestead lab for culture in a pickleworm, Diaphania
nitidalis, project (IFAS); 3 shipments of the braconid para-
site, Doryctobracon, were released to IFAS AREC, Homestead,
for lab culture and eventual release against Anastrepha
suspense (IFAS); 1 shipment of alligatorweed thrips, Amyno-
thrips andersoni, from the USDA lab colony was sent to the
North Carolina Department of Agriculture for lab culture
(USDA); an egg parasite, Tetrastichus haitiensis, was released
to the USDA in Orlando for study on cane root borer, Diaprepes
abbreviatus (USDA); 1 shipment of fall webworm, Hyphantria
cunea, was sent to Japan for lab culture (IFAS).


Entomology Library

R. E. Woodruff, Taxonomic Entomologist

The entomology portion of the Division of Plant Industry
Library has developed by gifts and purchases, with continued
emphasis on taxonomic literature. As a part of an agreement
with the University of Florida's Hume Library and the Depart-
ment of Entomology and Nematology, IFAS, all holdings are
cross-catalogued, and purchases are coordinated to avoid
duplication and maximize the use of minimal budgets. Details
of accessions and holdings are reported elsewhere. The Re-
search Associates program of the Florida State Collection of
Arthropods has provided the basis for donations of life-time
collections of specimens and the associated taxonomic litera-
ture. Many rare and valuable publications were received as a
part of this program during the biennium.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Hypogeococcus festerianus (Lizer y Trelles)
(Homoptera:Coccoidea:Pseudococcidae)

Avas B. Hamon, Taxonomic Entomologist

Hypogeococcus festerianus (NEW NORTH AMERICAN RECORD) was
collected by Louis J. Daigle at Hollywood, Florida, on 7-III-
1984 on stovepipe cactus, Cereus peruvianus. How or when the
mealybug arrived in Florida is not known. Previous records
are from the type locality in Argentina.
All infested plant material was destroyed and later
surveys will be conducted to determine if eradication proce-
dures were successful.
This mealybug causes considerable damage to Cereus spp.,
and it has been suggested as a biological control agent for
cacti.


Parabemisia myricae (Kuwana)

(Homoptera:Aleyrodidae:Aleyrodinae)

Avas B. Hamon

Bayberry whitefly, Parabemisia myricae, (NEW STATE
RECORD) was collected by Kenneth L. Hibbard at Walton, Florida
on 31-1-1984 on snowberry, Chiococca alba.
In the late 1970's this whitefly was a problem on citrus
in California. However, it is now under biological control,
and chemical controls are not needed (personal communication,
Ray Gill, California Department of Food and Agriculture).
The population density of bayberry whitefly in Florida
has been very low, parasites are already present, and it does
not pose a serious threat to citrus.


Rhizoecus gracilis McKenzie

(Homoptera:Coccoidea:Pseudococcidae)

Avas B. Hamon

A root mealybug, Rhizoecus gracilis, was collected on two
occasions (1983 and 1984) from Apopka, Florida. The 1983
interceptions originated from Arizona, and the 1984 inter-
ception originated from Texas. Both interceptions were on
cactus.
The economic importance of this root mealybug is unknown;
however, I would assume the damage potential would be as with
other root mealybugs (early wilt, inability to handle moisture
stress, etc.).








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


R. gracilis is reported from Arizona, California,
Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas,
Virginia, and Mexico. Reported hosts are: Cactaceae, Chena-
podiaceae, Compositae, Gramineae, Leguminoseae, and Loran-
thaceae.


Sugarcane Delphacid, Perkinsiella saccharicida Kirkaldy
(Homoptera:Delphacidae)

F. W. Mead, Taxonomic Entomologist

The first North American collection of the sugarcane
delphacid was made August 4, 1982 by U. S. Department of
Agriculture entomologist 0. Sosa, Jr., a few miles east of
Canal Point, Palm Beach County, Florida. Cooperative surveys
quickly revealed this planthopper to be widespread in southern
Florida. In large numbers, this delphacid can do economic
damage to sugarcane by its feeding and oviposition activities,
and it is a vector of the sugarcane Fiji virus which causes a
serious disease of sugarcane. This disease is not present in
the Americas. Within 5 months (1982), the sugarcane delphacid
was found in 10 south Florida counties; in 1983, it was found
in 14 more counties in central and northern Florida, plus 1
locality in the southeast corner of Georgia. These records
were made primarily by D. Harris and R. Nguyen of the Division
of Plant Industry. These workers were active in the intro-
duction of Tytthus mundulus (Breddin), a successful predator
of the sugarcane delphacid in the western Pacific and Hawaii.
It, and native predators and parsitoids, offer promise of
keeping the sugarcane delphacid populations at fairly low
levels. Another fortunate aspect is that by the time the
delphacid populations build up in autumn, sugarcane has
matured and is ready to have the leaves burned, which of
course, kills the delphacids that normally concentrate on the
leaves. This harvesting procedure is very important in re-
ducing the delphacid populations and keeping its economic
impact at a minimum.


Special Projects

H. A. DENMARK, Chief of Entomology

(1) Revision of the genus Galendromus. (Completed)
(2) Revision of the genus Phytoseiulus. (Completed)
(3) Revision of the genus Typhloctonus. (Completed)
(4) Revision of the genus Amblyseius.
(5) Center for insect systematics was created by Univer-
sity of Florida President Marston and Commissioner
Conner by signing a Memorandum of Understanding








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


between the University of Florida and the Florida
Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. I
represent the Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services as a rotating Chairman.
(6) Securing funds for the second addition to the Ento-
mology Bureau.
(7) Committee member to add an addition to the Biologi-
cal Control Laboratory.
(8) Compiling data with Dr. C. F. Smith for the aphids
of Florida.

G. B. EDWARDS, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Spiders of Florida citrus groves. (Completed)
(2) Spiders of coconut palms; studies of spiders' ef-
fectiveness against leafhoppers that transmit lethal
yellowing under study. (Completed)
(3) Card catalog of all Araneae (spiders) species in
FSCA. (Completed)
(4) Revision of genus Phidippus (Araneae:Salticidae).
(in progress)
(5) Spiders of Florida to be published in Arthropods of
Florida and Neighboring Land Areas. (in progress)
(6) Salticidae of Florida. To be published in Arthro-
pods of Florida and Neighboring Land Areas. (in
progress)

AVAS B. HAMON, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Soft Scale Insects of Florida. Complete.
(2) Whiteflies of Florida. Continuing project which
will take several years to complete.

J. B. HEPPNER, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Lepidoptera Pests of Florida: a list of all known
Florida Lepidoptera pests (255), with subsequent
completion of an illustrated handbook provided with
a diagnostic text and illustrations of adults and
larvae.
(2) Lepidoptera Pests of the World: a list of known
Lepidoptera pests from areas outside of Florida,
particularly pantropical species that can become
established in Florida; for future long-term de-
velopment into an illustrated manual.
(3) Fruit-fly larvae: a continuing project of circulars
to diagnose and illustrate economically important
fruit fly larvae of Florida and those which could
become established in Florida. One circular pub-
lished in 1983 (Ent. 260) on Caribbean and Mexican
fruit fly larvae.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report 36


(4) Lepidoptera of Florida: revision of Kimball's
"Lepidoptera of Florida" as a synoptic summary of
range, dates of adult flight, and host-plant infor-
mation for each species known to occur in Florida
(ca. 2,500). DPI host file information to be in-
corporated in the new work.
(5) Florida survey for immature insects and Lepidoptera:
continuing periodic surveys of the Florida fauna of
immatures and Lepidoptera; species cards maintained
for Lepidoptera species to record county distribu-
tions; to be developed into a Florida Insect Survey.
(6) Taxonomic assistance to USDA project (P.I.:D.A.
Carlson & C. 0. Calkins) on chemosystematics of
Anastrepha fruit fly larvae.
(7) Curation and inventory of the FSCA immatures col-
lection: consolidation of FSCA holdings completed;
inventory progressing on approximately 11,500 vials
of insects. And, curation of FSCA Lepidoptera
collection: consolidation of donation backlog begun
on estimated 300,000 Lepidoptera (mostly moths) to
be added to current 785 drawers of moths and butter-
flies (ca. 235,000 specimens); another 100,000
tropical moths also are to be curated (many species
of economic concern to Florida if ever established
here).
(8) Revision of the genus Ellabella (Lepidoptera:Copro-
morphidae). (Completed)
(9) Revision of American Thaumatographa (Lepidoptera:
Tortricidae). (Completed)
(10) Ecological notes on Brachodidae (Lepidoptera).
(Completed)
(11) A new plume moth pest from Hawaii and Mexico.
(Completed)
(12) Description of a new subfamily of Cossidae (Lepidop-
tera). (Completed)
(13) Revision of the genus Araeolepia (Lepidoptera:Plu-
tellidae). (In press)
(14) Revision of the genus Lotisma (Lepidoptera:Copromor-
phidae). (In press)
(15) Revision of West Indian Brenthia (Lepidoptera:Cho-
reutidae). (In press)
(16) Larval description of Copromorphoidea, Yponomeutri-
dea, and Sesiidea in North America. (In press)
(17) Revision of North American Glyphipterigidae. (In
press)
(18) Revision of the genus Episimus (Lepidoptera:Tortri-
cidae). (In preparation)
(19) New species of Tortricidae from Florida. (In prepa-
ration)
(20) Revision of various genera in Choreutidae, Glyphip-
terigidae, and Brachodidae. (In preparation)






Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


(21) Moths of Taiwan project (NSF grant INT-8119539,
$12,344): a long-term project on the moth fauna of
Taiwan, with annual survey trips (one in August-
September 1983); 30 authors involved in publication
series; many species potentially economic for Flori-
da agriculture.
(22) Atlas of Neotropical Lepidoptera: a long-term
project on the Lepidoptera of the Neotropics (many
species potentially dangerous for Florida agricul-
ture); 40 authors involved in publication series (in
part funded by Netherlands Foundation for Tropical
Research).
(23) Lepidoptera Taxonomic File: continued building of
FSCA holdings of identified color slides of Lepi-
doptera species: current holdings comprise ca. 2,500
species of the Florida fauna, 1,400 species from
Central Asia, Europe, and China, and 1,900 species
from New Zealand; further work planned to photograph
types at USNM (Washington) and British Museum (Lon-
don) so DPI identification capabilities can increase
in speed and accuracy.
(24) Immature Insect Taxonomic File: a comprehensive
system of notebooks on insect families, with larval
descriptions to species level; continued efforts to
include all Florida species and world pest or poten-
tial pest species. Also included in this file
system are original description notebooks and index
cards for species and genera.
(25) National Academy of Sciences scientific exchange
grant to Romania (May-June 1984): to study Chinese
moth types and make field surveys for Romanian
insects, particularly larvae, to augment FSCA col-
lection holdings and identification capabilities.
(26) Visited Dutch agricultural facilities at Wageningen,
Netherlands (April 1984), at Plant Protection Divi-
sion, to learn Dutch regulatory work on horticul-
tural exports to Florida.
(27) Exchange program between FSCA and Antipa Museum of
Natural History, Bucharest, set up to obtain Ro-
manian insect species to augment DPI identification
and investigation capabilities.
(28) Develop plans to incorporate the Center for Arthro-
pod Systematics, to allow further financial support
of insect taxonomy in Gainesville.

FRANK W. MEAD, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Taxonomic responsibility on a cooperative project
involving a survey of planthoppers and leafhoppers
in commercial rice field in the Belle Glade area.
Two year survey conducted by R. H. Cherry, Entomolo-
gist, and Dr. D. B. Jones, Agronomist, IFAS, Univer-








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


sity of Florida. Special attention given to identi-
fication of vector species and to the main species
components.
(2) Year-round daily operation of a blacklight trap at
the border between the University of Florida experi-
ment station fields; provides surveillance for
exotic pests that may have invaded the area.
(3) Taxonomic research on Neotropical Oliarus plant-
hoppers.
(4) Taxonomic assistance on the sugarcane delphacid in
Florida.
(5) Taxonomic studies on Parallaxis leafhoppers that
have invaded Florida from Central America on im-
ported foliage plant cuttings.
(6) Jumping plant lice (Psyllidae) in Florida.
(7) Series of circulars on predatory stink bugs in
Florida (with D. B. Richman).
(8) Taxonomic assistance on survey of homopterans in
southern Florida palm plantings (with J. H. Tsai).
(Completed)
(9) Rotating Editor of Tri-ology Technical Report.

L. A. STANGE, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Parasite and predator studies of economic species of
scale insects, citrus root weevils, and fruit flies.
(2) Studies and surveys on the significance to Florida
agriculture of slugs. Of special importance was the
discovery of the Mexican slug, Leidyula moreleti
(Crosse & Fischer) in Orange County in 1983. A
circular updating the veronicellid slugs of Florida
was produced.
(3) Identified specimens (parasitic Hymenoptera) re-
ceived in Quarantine Facility for various State and
Federal research projects.
(4) Economic snails and slugs of the world. Gathering a
synoptic collection of terrestrial mollusks of the
world of possible economic importance to Florida.
Of special importance during this biennium was the
addition of several species of European slugs and 6
species of Achatinidae (giant African snail family)
determined by A. Mead.
(5) Compiled lists of Hymenoptera, Neuroptera, and
mollusks of Puerto Rico of possible economic inter-
est to Florida agriculture.
(6) Studied value of predatory Neuroptera species in
controlling such pests as caterpillars, aphids, and
ants.
(7) Continued antlion larval studies (Neuroptera),
including antlions of South America, South Africa,
Mexico, Baja California, Arizona, and Florida;
worked on identification and keys of several spe-








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


cies; added 90 species to collection. Prepared a
description of the larva of Navasoleon boliviana
Banks.
(8) Continued studies of the genus Zethus (Eumenidae:Hy-
menoptera) of the Western Hemisphere.
(9) Worked on revision of Anthidiini genera (Megachili-
dae:Hymenoptera) of the Western Hemisphere.
(10) Continued studies and surveys of Hymenoptera of
Florida Keys.
(11) Studied citrus tower stinging wasp (Vespidae:Hy-
menoptera) problem.
(12) Field trips, in and out of state, made to conduct
special insect and mollusk surveys, collect material
for taxonomic studies in special interest groups,
and to build up reference collection.
(13) Neuroptera of Florida. Collecting and identifying
the families Coniopterygidae, Chrysopidae, Hemero-
biidae, Myrmeleontidae, etc. Distribution patterns,
biology, and variation being studied.
(14) Began working with Quarantine Facility (Florida
Biological Control Laboratory) to set up computer
data banks for specimens received through and/or
released from that facility.
(15) Continued acquisition of specialized library on
Hymenoptera, Neuroptera, and Gastropoda.
(16) Conduct exchanges of reference material to improve
the Florida State Collection of Arthropods. Ex-
changes have been made with V. Montserrat of Spain
(Neuroptera 1983), L. Masner of the Canadian Na-
tional Museum (Proctotrupoidea 1983), Gusenleitner
of Austria (Hymenoptera 1984), and Makarkin of the
USSR (Neuoptera 1984).
(17) Screening blacklight trap samples for Neuroptera and
certain Hymenoptera groups from diverse areas of the
world.
(18) Studies of gall-forming insects of Florida. A
reference collection of galls is being developed and
several galls from Europe and Mexico were added to
the collection.

H. V. WEEMS, JR., Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Compile a comprehensive report on private collec-
tions of arthropods which have been committed for
ultimate deposition in the Florida State Collection
of Arthropods by Research Associates and Student
Associates and on those already donated (but which
are currently in the possession of the donors) for
curating and continuing development and study.
(2) Complete an inventory of the primary and secondary
type specimens in the FSCA and in private collec-
tions of arthropods which are committed for ultimate








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report 40


deposition in the FSCA, and, when this had been
accomplished, prepare a manuscript for a bulletin
listing these types to be published by the Division
of Plant Industry.
(3) Prepare an illustrated bulletin on the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods and the Research Associate
Program which supports its continuing development
and generates publications on arthropods.
(4) Continue to coordinate the development of the arthro-
pod collections of the Florida State Collection of
Arthropods located at the University of Florida and
the Division of Plant Industry, FDACS, in Gaines-
ville, and Florida A & M University in Tallahassee.
Involved curators to meet approximately twice a year
to discuss mutual problems and procedures.
(5) Review and update the biographical information
records for all Research Associates and Student
Associates of the Florida State Collection of Arth-
ropods and try to obtain a personal photograph of
all associates.
(6) Develop plans for establishment of a non-profit,
tax-exempt corporation designed to support the total
program of the Florida State Collection of Arthro-
pods.
(7) Continue experimenting with designs for more effec-
tive insect flight traps and field testing of these
traps.
(8) Continue to coordinate operation of insect flight
traps by collaborators in several locations in
Florida, several other parts of the United States,
and in several other countries of the New World, and
the processing and identification of the collections
from these traps. The trapping program is a vital
part of a faunal survey of Florida and other areas,
provides a means of monitoring fluctuating insect
populations, and produces considerable reference and
study material for the Florida State Collection of
Arthropods.
(9) Conduct further exchanges of reference material to
make the Florida collection more complete. A spe-
cial continuing effort is being made to obtain
representatives of the principal arthropod pests
occurring in other parts of the world, notably
Tephritidae (fruit flies), which constitute a poten-
tial threat to Florida agriculture. This will mate-
rially aid staff specialists in making more rapid,
accurate, and complete identifications. It also
provides additional material for taxonomic research,
display, and teaching purposes.
(10) Make occasional field trips, both in-state and
out-of-state, to conduct special arthropod surveys,
to collect material for taxonomic study in special







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


interest groups, notable Syrphidae, and/or make
general collections for the Florida State Collection
of Arthropods.
(11) Visit other institutions in North, Central, and
South America which maintain substantial arthropod
collections in order to observe curatorial tech-
niques, arrange exchanges of specimens, and study
collections in specific areas of taxonomic interest
and responsibility.
(12) Develop a series of field trips to various parts of
Florida at different times of the year to search for
specific arthropods known to occur in those areas
but which are yet unrepresented in the official
state collection and to discover other species not
known to occur in Florida. Eventually this could
become a part of a formal, long-range survey of the
arthropods of Florida which might involve several
specialists trained to process the material collect-
ed in the course of such a survey. This, in turn,
could be coordinated with a proposed regional insect
detection laboratory and a proposed regional arthro-
pod identification and taxonomic research center
(for which the Florida State Collection of Arthro-
pods and the Division of Plant Industry library
would be basic resources).
(13) Continue a special effort to develop complete sets
of the entomological publications of some of the
most important and most prolific dipterists: efforts
are being made to develop extensive reprint files
for the various other groups of arthropods.
(14) Continue studies of the Diptera family, Syrphidae,
including preparation of a bulletin of the Syrphidae
of the southeastern United States.

R. E. WOODRUFF, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Scarabaeidae of Florida. Part II. May beetles (Phyl-
lophaga spp.). Although specimens and data have
been accumulated for more than 25 years, this proj-
ect was revitalized in April 1981, with a target
publication date of June 1985. It is a joint proj-
ect with technologist Brenda Beck. This economi-
cally important genus is taxonomically difficult and
requires dissection of the genitalia for positive
identification. Nearly 80,000 specimens have been
dissected, identified, and recorded. Only critical
or variable species were mounted. Type specimens
were studied at the U.S. National Museum and the
Illinois Natural History Survey. In addition, a
conference was held with Dr. Milton W. Sanderson
(Schona, Arizona), the world authority on the genus,
regarding several taxonomic problems.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report 42


(2) Fossil amber insects of the Dominican Republic.
This project began in 1975 and involved National
Science Foundation support in 1977-78. Prior to the
study, only a single fossil insect was described
from the entire West Indies. As a result of 9 trips
to the Dominican Republic, I have visited most of
the mines and now have over 3,000 fossils catalogued
(many of which are on loan to specialists for
study). Specimens of 21 Orders of insects are
represented, including over 30 families of beetles.
Several papers are in press or near completion, but
several years will be required to study this huge
collection. Most of the amber is sold commercially
as jewelry. Because of this, many new species of
insects and much scientific information is lost. In
an effort to salvage some of these data, and to
screen specimens being sold, I have set up a Regis-
try of Dominican Amber Fossils. Specimens are
submitted by commercial dealers; these are identi-
fied as far as possible, given a registry number,
recorded on a card file, significant fossils are
noted, some unusual ones purchased, lists of taxo-
nomic specialists are provided, and the specimens
and registry information returned to the dealer.
They have agreed to record and and return the names
and addresses of purchasers in order to trace the
specimen for study later. The registry now contains
6,000 entries. Currently there are 6 major dealers
submitting material for this study. During the
biennium 2 trips, made for other purposes, to the
Dominican Republic provided an opportunity to obtain
over 1,000 new fossils, including the first speci-
mens of both hard and soft ticks and a rare male
Strepsiptera. In addition, Mr. Jacob' Brodyinsky
donated 291 fossils (valued at $4,745) to the FSCA.
(3) Move into new facilities. All of the Coleoptera and
Orthoptera were transferred into new drawers in the
new wing; this involved 528 drawers of specimens.
The reprint files for these taxonomic units were
transferred from metal files to boxes and stored
above the appropriate taxonomic unit in the museum.
Considerable expansion and curatorial activities
have greatly improved the collections. Another
important accomplishment was completion of the
compactors for the alcohol and slide collections.
This was provided by a $54,000 grant from the
National Science Foundation.
(4) New Center for Arthropod Systematics. A formal
agreement, between the University of Florida and the
Florida Department of Agriculture, was signed to
form this center. Considerable effort was devoted
to negotiating this agreement, the possible movement







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report 43


of the Center for Parasitic Hymenoptera of Henry
Townes to Gainesville, and the possibility of estab-
lishing an entomological park to include all those
interested in entomology in Gainesville. A new
luncheon seminar for systematists was established to
stimulate the program. Dr. Ross H. Arnett, Jr.
moved to Gainesville in October, 1982 and has pro-
vided stimulus, leadership, and expertise for this
effort. He also has continued his taxonomic studies
of the beetle family Oedemeridae, working toward a
world monograph.
(5) Tall Timbers Insect Collections. Dr. E. V. Komarek
has provided technician assistance (Mary Arnett) to
transfer several thousand vials into more secure
containers and to sort certain groups for further
study. All of the thousands of specimens will be
deposited into the Florida State Collection of
Arthropods. This includes the large collections
made there by Dr. W. H. Whitcomb. New collections
are currently being made and sorted from Tall Tim-
bers Research Station. These will also be added to
FSCA. This involves habitat management for quail
production. Grasshoppers appear to be the primary
food of quail during parts of the year and identifi-
cations were provided for this study.
(6) Blister beetle (Meloidae) poisoning in horses.
During the past 2 years several extremely valuable
thoroughbred and quarter horses have been killed by
eating alfalfa hay, imported from western states,
contaminated with blister beetles accidentally baled
within. Meetings were held with horse owners,
regulatory officials, veterinarians, and entomolo-
gists to determine a possible solution. Education
of growers, shippers, and horse owners appears to be
a primary step. Research into the species present
in Florida, their potential toxicity, and the quan-
tities of toxin in each has been proposed in con-
junction with a joint grant proposal with the U.F.
College of Veterinary Science and the Florida
Thoroughbred Breeders Association. A lengthy ques-
tionaire was sent to all the states to obtain infor-
mation on the problem and potential solutions. In
conjunction with this, Dr. R. B. Selander, Uni-
versity of Illinois, has provided his world exper-
tise on the Meloidae. He has also agreed to donate
his collection (the finest in the world) to FSCA.
This presently consists of 360 drawers of adults and
several thousand larvae in alcohol. A portion of
the collection was brought back to Gainesville on
the return from attending the ASC meetings in Ur-
bana, Illinois.








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


(7) Assisting a University in the Dominican Republic.
In July and August, 1983, Dr. Woodruff and 2 other
scientists were invited to the Dominican Republic to
provide advice on establishment of an agricultural
research station near Puerto Plata (Universidad
Technologica Atlantica). Several thousand insect
specimens were also collected for the DPI reference
collections.
(8) Arthropod fauna of gopher tortoise burrows. This
long-range study culminated in publication of a 40
page manuscript on this interesting group of com-
mensals. Many rare and unusual species are in-
volved, and their study is critical because of the
threatened status of the tortoise.
(9) Citrus weevils of the West Indies. Although this
project was initiated in 1975, it has been inactive
for sometime. As a result of the removal of several
insecticides, increased emphasis is needed on bio-
logical control. Because of the increased economic
importance of Diaprepes (sugarcane root stalk borer
weevil) in Florida and the likelihood of other
introductions, the project has increased signi-
ficance. Pending grant requests from the USDA will
determine the extent and nature of the project.
Emphasis is anticipated on searches for parasites in
the West Indies and to complete taxonomic studies of
the weevils and their parasites.


Job Related Activities

H. A. DENMARK, Chief of Entomology

(1) Chairman, Arthropod Introduction Committee.
(2) Adjunct Professor (courtesy appointment), Department
of Entomology and Nematology, IFAS, University of
Florida.
(3) Courtesy Associate Professor, Area of Entomology and
Structural Pest Control, Florida A & M University,
Tallahassee.
(4) Chairman, Plant Pest Introduction and Evaluation
Committee in Entomology.
(5) Member, Supervisory Committee to review fruit fly
trapping.
(6) Member, Advisory Council, Department of Entomology
and Structural Pest Control, Florida A & M Univer-
sity, Tallahassee.
(7) Chairman of an Ad hoc Committee to revise the con-
stitution and by-laws for the Florida Entomological
Society.
(8) Member of a committee to discuss quarantine facili-
ties and what is needed in the Gainesville area.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


(9) Member of the Center for Arthropod Systematics
representing the FDA&CS.
(10) Seeking outside funds for a second addition to the
Entomology Bureau.
(11) Awards Committee for Annual Conference.
(12) Member of a pesticide recommendation committee for
the Division of Plant Industry.

G. B. EDWARDS, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Chief editor of Peckhamia and membership secretary
of the Peckham Society, an organization dedicated to
research in the biology of jumping spiders.
(2) Reviewed 76 manuscrips and proposals for Bureau of
Entomology, DPI Publications Committee, Journal of
Arachnology, Florida Entomologist, National Science
Foundation, and other scientific institutions and
publications.

AVAS B. HAMON, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Quarantine Laboratory Equipment Coordinator.
(2) Assistant Professor, Adjunct, Department of Ento-
mology and Nematology, University of Florida
member of Graduate Research Faculty.
(3) Doyle Conner Building Blood Group Chairman.
(4) Associate Professor, Adjunct, Florida A & M Univer-
sity, Department of Entomology and Structural Pest
Control, Tallahassee, Florida.
(5) Planner-Moderator for the 1984 SYMPOSIUM: Biosyste-
matics of Homoptera:Sternorrhyncha, In Honor of G.
F. Ferris in San Antonio, Texas.

J. B. HEPPNER, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Associate Curator, FSCA (Immature insects and Lepi-
doptera).
(2) Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Ento-
mology and Nematology, University of Florida.
(3) Research Associate, Smithsonian Institution, Wash-
ington, D.C.
(4) Editor, Atlas of Neotropical Lepidoptera (W. Junk
Publishers).
(5) Editor, Lepidoptera of Taiwan (publ. by Taiwan
Museum, Taipei).
(6) Associate Editor (Taxonomy), Florida Entomologist
(since 1984).

F. W. MEAD, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Ento-
mology and Nematology, IFAS, University of Florida.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


(2) Courtesy Associate Professor, Department of Ento-
mology and Structural Pest Control, Florida A & M
University, Tallahassee, Florida.
(3) ARPE (American Registry of Professional Entomolo-
gists) member; serving on national committee to
approve or disapprove applicants wanting registry in
the field of Systematic Entomology.
(4) Chairman, Resolutions Committee, Florida Entomo-
logical Society, 1983.

L. A. STANGE, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Adjunct Associate Professor (courtesy appointment),
Department of Entomology and Nematology, TFAS,
University of Florida, Gainesville.
(2) Courtesy Associate Professor, Department of Entomo-
logy and Structural Pest Control, Florida A & M
University, Tallahassee, Florida.
(3) Research Associate, Los Angeles County Museum of
Natural History.
(4) Member of the Americas Committee, Florida Entomo-
logical Society.
(5) As a member of the DPI publications Review Commit-
tee, I reviewed 40 manuscripts.

H. V. WEEMS, JR., Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Head Curator, Florida State Collection of Arthro-
pods.
(2) Coordinator, Research Associate Program of the
Florida State Collection of Arthropods.
(3) Editor, Arthropods of Florida and Neighboring Land
Areas and Occasional Papers of the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods, irregularly appearing
bulletins published by the Division.
(4) Associate Editor, the Florida Entomologist, quar-
terly journal of the Florida Entomological Society,
since 1973.
(5) Adjunct Professor, Department of Entomology and
Nematology, IFAS, University of Florida, and member
of the Graduate Research Faculty.
(6) Courtesy Associate Professor, Area of Entomology and
Structural Pest Control, Florida A & M University,
Tallahassee.
(7) Florida Entomological Society: Member of following
committees: Brochure Committee, Publications Commit-
tee, Future Publications Subcommittee (Publications
Committee), Nominating Committee, Chairman of "Ad
Hoc" Search Committee for Editor of the Florida
Entomologist and preparation of detailed job de-
scription for Editor's position.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


R. E. WOODRUFF, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Adjunct Professor, Department of Entomology and
Nematology, University of Florida; served on 2 Ph.D.
Committees (Chm. of one), and 2 M.S. Committees
(Chm. of one).
(2) Adjunct Curator, Department of Natural Sciences,
Florida State Museum, Gainesville. Two trips to
Haiti were provided as a part of this appointment.
M. C. Thomas (grad. student) and Scott Yocom (tech-
nician) spent nearly 2 months there surveying na-
tional park areas and returning with several thou-
sand valuable specimens for the FSCA reference
collections.
(3) Courtesy Associate Professor, Department of Ento-
mology and Structural Pest Control, Florida A & M
University, Tallahassee.
(4) Committee Member, "Common Names of Insects", Entomo-
logical Society of America (1982).
(5) Committee Member, "Data and Word Processing Commit-
tee", Division of Plant Industry.
(6) Assistant Editor, "The Coleopterists Bulletin", The
Coleopterists Society (1980-1982).
(7) Committee Member, "Library Committee", Division of
Plant Industry.
(8) Editorial Board, "Colemanica" and "Ayyaria", Indian
Entomology Journals (1980-1982).
(9) Chairman, "Entomology Systematics Seminar", Gaines-
ville (1983).
(10) Alachua County Schools Volunteer Program; talk to
elementary classes on insects and geology.
(11) Identification of Scarabaeidae from light traps in
Texas for Texas Agricultural Experiment Station,
Dallas.
(12) Instructor, special problem on "Insect Illustration"
for U.F. student working on degree in scientific
illustration.
(13) Judge, Science Fair, Gainesville Mall (1983-1984).


Trips and Meetings

July 14, 1982: Dade City, Florida to evaluate a soft scale
insect problem on citrus with C. B. Williams. (A. B.
Hamon)
July 29, 1982: Jacksonville, Florida to attend Scientific
Products Exposition. (R. E. Woodruff)
August 10-13, 1982: Florida Entomolgical Society 65th Annual
Meeting, Sarasota, Florida. (H. A. Denmark, L. A. Stange,
and H. V. Weems, Jr.)
August 18-20, 1982: Winter Haven, Florida to evaluate a scale
insect problem on citrus with C. 0. Youtsey. (A. B.
Hamon)







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


September 5-11, 1982: VI International Congress of Acarology,
Edinburgh, Scotland, University of Edinburgh. (H. A.
Denmark)
September 6, 1982: Tallahassee, Florida to attend annual
conference on habitat management at Tall Timbers Research
Station. (R. E. Woodruff)
September 12-13, 1982: Visited British Museum. (H. A. Den-
mark)
September 16, 1982: Lakeland, Florida to attend a Caribbean
fruit fly research conference. (A. B. Hamon)
September 20-23, 1982: Okeechobee, Florida to survey for
sugarcane delphacid, a newly discovered pest. (R. E.
Woodruff)
September 21-24, 1982: Brownsville, Texas to attend 2-day
fruit fly larva identification workshop sponsored by USDA
for Mexican and American fruit fly specialists. (H. V.
Weems, Jr.)
October 18, 1982: Tallahassee, Florida to attend annual quail
day at Tall Timbers Research Station, regarding insect
food of quail. (R. E. Woodruff)
October 28-29, 1982: Knoxville, Tennessee to pick up library
donations of the late Dr. Walfried J. Reinthal, donated
by his daughter, Mrs. T. S. Irby. (H. V. Weems, Jr.)
November 13-14, 1982: 12th annual meeting of Florida De-
fenders of the Environment Inc., Silver Springs, Florida.
(H. V. Weems, Jr.)
November 28-December 3, 1982: Joint annual meeting of the
Entomological Society of America, Entomological Society
of Canada and Entomological Society of Ontario held in
Toronto, Canada. (H. V. Weems, Jr.)
December 1-21, 1982: Dominican Republic surveying for the
tick vector of African swine fever; citrus root weevils;
amber insect fossils. (R. E. Woodruff)
January 19-21, 1983: Workshop on the Taxonomy and Biology of
the Parasitic Hymenoptera, held at the University of
Florida. (H. V. Weems, Jr.)
January 21, 1983: Chairperson for plenary session for Para-
sitic Hymenoptera Short Course. (H. A. Denmark)
February 17-18, 1983: Annual Field Day and Work Shop: Turf
Problems at Florida A & M University, Tallahassee, Flori-
da. (H. A. Denmark and H. V. Weems, Jr.)
February 23-24, 1983: Sarasota, Florida to visit H. L. King.
University of Florida Agricultural Research and Education
Center, Belle Glade, Florida to pick up insect collection
from Dr. Ronald H. Cherry. (H. V. Weems, Jr.)
March 2, 1983: Attended IFAS meetings in Gainesville, "Flori-
da Agriculture in the 80's". (H. A. Denmark)
March 15, 1983: Meeting in Orlando with Florida Pest Control
and IFAS to discuss Formosan Termite in Florida. (H. A.
Denmark)
March 28, 1983: Met at University of Florida with Drs. D.
Shankland, Wayne King, George Cawthon on Center for
Arthropod Systematics. (H. A. Denmark)







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


April 12, 1983: Cocoa, Florida to evaluate scale insect and
whitefly problems with Frank A. Smith. (A. B. Hamon)
April 14-15, 1983: Eustis, Florida to survey for new species
of May beetle (Phyllophaga) on citrus. (R. E. Woodruff)
April 25-29, 1983: Florida Keys and Ft. Lauderdale to survey
for new species of June beetle (Cotinis) and attend
Regional Inspectors workshop. (R. E. Woodruff)
May 3, 1983: Meeting with Gary Moorehead, USDA, Staff Offi-
cer, Gordon Johnson, Wayne Dixon, S. A. Alfieri, Jr. and
Earl Graham on Gypsy Moth Program in Florida. (H. A.
Denmark)
June 5-10, 1983: Miami, Florida to provide identification
service to the Medfly program. (J. B. Heppner and H. V.
Weems, Jr.)
June 10, 1983: Collecting trip with Dr. Rowland M. Shelley,
to learn milliped collecting techniques; collected at
various locales. (G. B. Edwards)
June 12-18, 1983: Miami, Florida to provide identification
service to the Medfly program. (R. E. Woodruff)
July 19-August 8, 1983: Dominican Republic to advise new
university (Universidad Technologica Atlantica) in Puerta
Plata on establishing an experiment station. (R. E.
Woodruff and W. H. Whitcomb)
August 9-12, 1983: Florida Entomological Society 66th Annual
Meeting, Clearwater, Beach, Florida. (H. A. Denmark, F.
W. Mead, L. A. Stange and H. V. Weems, Jr.)
August 18-23, 1983: Osaka and Tokyo, Japan, to meet with
co-authors and set up project on moths of Taiwan; visit
museums and facilities, including fruit fly laboratories,
in Japan. (J. B. Heppner)
September 1, 1983: Orday Preserve (Putnam Co., Florida) in
conjunction with planned survey by the Florida State
Museum. (R. E. Woodruff)
September 6-9, 1983: Annual Department of Agriculture &
Consumer Services Business Conference, Orlando, Florida.
(H. A. Denmark, G. B. Edwards, F. W. Mead, L. A. Stange,
and H. V. Weems, Jr.)
September 27-October 5, 1983: Washington, D.C. to deliver
Coleopterists Bulletin back issues (trip paid by the
Coleopterists Society) and to study type specimens of May
beetles (Phyllophaga) at the U.S. National Museum. (R. E.
Woodruff)
September 30-October 2, 1983: Torreya State Park for annual
meeting of the Southern Lepidopterists. (J. B. Heppner
and H. V. Weems, Jr.)
October 18, 1983: Tallahassee, Florida to attend conference
on blister beetle poisoning in horses on imported alfalfa
hay. (R. E. Woodruff)
October 20, 1983: Tallahassee, Florida to attend annual
habitat management conference at Tall Timbers Research
Station. (R. E. Woodruff)







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


November 2-3, 1983: LaBelle, Florida for billbug survey in
Bahia grass pastures. (R. E. Woodruff)
November 4, 1983: North Florida annual regional meeting of
the Florida Defenders of the Environment, Inc., held at
Ironwood Country Club, Gainesville, Florida. (H. V.
Weems, Jr.)
November 7-8, 1983: Conference on AFSCME Master Contract,
Tallahassee, Florida. (F. W. Mead and H. V. Weems, Jr.)
November 28-December 3, 1983: Entomological Society of Amer-
ica meeting in Detroit, Michigan. (H. A. Denmark)
December 8, 1983: Senior Management Workshop in Tallahassee,
Florida. (H. A. Denmark)
December 7-9, 1983: Sarasota, Florida to pick up collection
of H. L. King and Dr. Calaway Dodson. (H. V. Weems, Jr.)
December 18-19, 1983: Managing Technologies (computer equip-
ment) Workshop in Tallahassee, Florida. (H. A. Denmark)
January 4, 1984: Pesticide Meeting, Division of Plant Indus-
try auditorium. (H. A. Denmark)
January 17, 1984: Trip to Tampa to inspect University of
South Florida security laboratory for introduction of
exotic snails and schistosomes. (H. A. Denmark)
January 18, 1984: Lake Alfred, Florida to organize grower
conference on citrus root weevils. (R. E. Woodruff)
January 23-26, 1984: New Orleans, Louisiana to attend and
present a paper at the Southeastern Branch of the Ento-
mological Society of America. (A. B. Hamon)
March 15-16, 1984: Deland, Florida and vicinity for insect
and slug survey in conjunction with an imported slug
discovery. (C. R. Roberts, L. A. Stange, and R. E. Wood-
ruff)
March 16-17, 1984: Perry, Florida to give invitational talk
to Big Bend Bee Keepers. (H. V. Weems, Jr.)
March 19-23, 1984: Frederich, Maryland, Fruit Fly Identifi-
cation Workshop sponsored by USDA, PPQ, APHIS. (H. V.
Weems, Jr.)
March 27, 1984: Florida A & M University Advisory Council
Meeting at Lake Alfred, Florida. (H. A. Denmark)
April 24-27, 1984: Wageningen, Holland, Congress of European
Lepidoptera Society, and visit the research facilities of
Dutch Plant Protection Bureau. (J. B. Heppner)
May 1, 1984: Ocala National Forest, Florida to survey for new
species of May beetle (Phyllophaga) found there. (R. E.
Woodruff and P. Landolt)
May 1, 1984: Traveled with Dr. S. A. Alfieri, Jr. to meet new
USDA/ARS Director, Dr. Ernie Corley and Asst. Director
Dr. Robert Burns in Lakeland (Citrus Mutual). (H. A.
Denmark)
May 11, 1984: Traveled to Sarasota with Mr. William Stone,
Florida Foundation to arrange for funds and the possible
moving of the Arthur Allyn Museum to Gainesville. (H. A.
Denmark)








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


May 16-17, 1984: Lake Alfred, Florida to present paper and
participate in a citrus root weevil grower conference.
(R. E. Woodruff)
May 16-June 15, 1984: Bucharest, Romania, to study collec-
tions of G. Antipa Museum of Natural History and survey
Romania for insect and larvae. (J. B. Heppner)
May 20-29, 1984: Urbana, Illinois to present invitational
paper and represent DPI at annual meeting of the Associa-
tion of Systematic Collections. In addition, insect
traps were set en route and picked up on return; several
thousand specimens were thus added to the FSCA reference
collection. Also, part of the extensive blister beetle
collection (Meloidae) of Dr. R. B. Selander was brought
back for incorporation into the collection. (R. E. Wood-
ruff)
May 21-22, 1984: Meeting of the Nominating Committee of the
Florida Entomological Society. (H. V. Weems, Jr.)
May 23-25, 1984: 1984 Biting Fly Workshop, Wedge Plantation,
University of South Carolina, McClellanville, South
Carolina. (H. V. Weems, Jr.)
May 23-25, 1984: Apopka, Florida to evaluate scale insect and
whitefly problems. (A. B. Hamon)
May 31, 1984: Gainesville, Florida: Awards Luncheon Civitan
Regional Blood Center: Accepted an award for contribu-
tions of employees in the Doyle Conner Building blood
group. (A. B. Hamon)
June 4-8, 1984: Ft. Lauderdale, Florida to evaluate scale
insect and whitefly problems. (A. B. Hamon)
June 4-7, 1984: Archbold Biological Station and Everglades
National Park with Dr. Peter Bridgewater, Australian
Biota Survey. (R. E. Woodruff)
June 16-19, 1984: Guest of Dr. Douglas A. Rossman, Director,
Museum of Natural History, Louisiana State University.
Spent one day identifying LSU Salticidae and two days
collecting in a variety of Louisiana habitats. (G. B.
Edwards)
June 19-24, 1984: New Orleans, Louisiana, FSCA representative
at the American Arachnological Society 4th International
Meeting. (G. B. Edwards)
June 21-29, 1984: Miami, Florida to provide identification of
specimens for Medfly Eradication Campaign. (H. A. Den-
mark)
June 27-30, 1984: Miami, Florida to identify adults and
larvae in the Medfly Eradication Campaign. (A. B. Hamon)


Special Surveys

July 9-31, 1982: Collect and study parasitic Hymenoptera and
predatory Neuroptera in coastal Peru. (L. A. Stange)
September 9-10, 1982: Investigate Brazilian black slug popu-
lations in the Apopka area. (L. A. Stange)







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


October 21-27, 1982: Survey for snails, slugs and Hymenoptera
in south Florida. (L. A. Stange)
January 12-February 12, 1983: Collect snails, slugs, and
other insects in South Africa and talked with Dr. Prins-
loo, an expert on scale insect parasites, and studied
problems common to Florida and South Africa. (L. A.
Stange)
March 29-April 6, 1983: Surveyed for scale parasites, snails
and insects in south Florida and the Florida Keys. (L. A.
Stange)
May 1-10, 1983: Immature Insect Survey in south Florida. (J.
B. Heppner)
May 26, 1983: Surveyed for Brazilian black slug populations
in Apopka area, where a slug (Leidyula moreleti) new to
Florida was discovered. (L. A. Stange)
June 17-July 10, 1983: Studied and collected economic in-
sects, parasitic Hymenoptera, and snails and slugs in
Mexico and Baja California. (L. A. Stange)
August 24-September 22, 1983: Taiwan field studies and insect
survey (NSF grant INT-8119539), particularly for Lepidop-
tera larvae and fruit flies which could become estab-
lished in Florida. (J. B. Heppner)
October 24-30, 1983: Surveyed slugs in northwest Florida and
Jacksonville. (L. A. Stange)
March 15-16, 1984: Slug survey in Pierson, Florida and en-
virons. (L. A. Stange)
April 18-21, 1984: Jacksonville and vicinity for snail and
slug survey. (L. A. Stange)
May 9-June 24, 1984: Romania field studies and museum re-
search (Natl. Academy of Sciences and Academia Romana
Scientific exchange), partly on annual leave, to augment
DPI insect identification capabilities, through additions
to the Florida State Collection of Arthropods. (J. B.
Heppner)
May 11-June 16, 1984: Egypt and Tunisia for collection,
surveys, and studies of economic Hymenoptera, Neuroptera,
Gastropoda. Conferred with Dr. Boucek of the British
Museum in London. (L. A. Stange)


Training Personnel

July 19-23, 1982: Lectures to Training Class #48 for field
personnel of the Division of Plant Industry, Gainesville,
Florida. (H. A. Denmark, W. N. Dixon, A. B. Hamon, F. W.
Mead, L. A. Stange, H. V. Weems, Jr., R. E. Woodruff)
August 18-20, 1982: Field training for Training Class #48 in
Winter Haven. (A. B. Hamon)
January 10-14, 1983: Lectures to Training Class #49 for field
personnel of the Division of Plant Industry, Gainesville,
Florida. (H. A. Denmark, W. N. Dixon, A. B. Hamon, F. W.
Mead, L. A. Stange, H. V. Weems, Jr., R. E. Woodruff)







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


February 9-11, 1983: Field training for Training Class #49 in
Winter Haven. (A. B. Hamon)
March 14-18, 1983: Lectures to Training Class #50 for field
personnel of the Division of Plant Industry, Gainesville,
Florida. (H. A. Denmark, W. N. Dixon, A. B. Hamon, F. W.
Mead, L. A. Stange, H. V. Weems, Jr., R. E. Woodruff)
April 12-15, 1983: Field training for Training Class #50 in
Winter Haven. (A. B. Hamon)
January 9-13, 1984: Lectures to Training Class #51 for field
personnel of the Division of Plant Industry, Gainesville,
Florida. (H. A. Denmark, W. N. Dixon, G. B. Edwards, A.
B. Hamon, F. W. Mead, L. A. Stange, H. V. Weems, Jr., R.
E. Woodruff)
February 8-10, 1984: Field training for Training Class #51 in
Winter Haven. (A. B. Hamon)


Talks

H. A. DENMARK, Chief of Entomology

January 28, 1983: Lake City Junior College Regulatory
entomology.
March 16, 1983: Ocala 6th grade Pest insects.
April 25, 1983: Lecture to Entomology Seminar on trip to
British Museum & VI International Congress of Acarology,
Edinburgh, Scotland.
September 20, 1983: Community School from Archer 3rd grade,
pest insects.
October 12, 1983: Lake Forest Elementary A study of insects
and their relationship to man.
October 18, 1983: Supervisor Training Session at Department
of Health and Rehabilitative Services, Waldo Road, Gaine-
sville.

G. B. EDWARDS, Taxonomic Entomologist

October 25-28, 1982: Guest lecturer in Dr. Jonathan Reis-
kind's University of Florida graduate zoology class on
Arachnida. First talk entitled; "Acoustic behavior in
the Araneae". Second talk entitled: "Resource parti-
tioning among species of the genus Phidippus".
June 23-28, 1983: FSCA representative at American Arachno-
logical Society Eastern Branch Meeting in Athens, Ohio.
Presented slide-illustrated travelog entitled "Tropical
Spiders" on collecting in Panama and Costa Rica.
August 22-29, 1983: Guest lecturer and field trip leader for
Dr. W. H. Whitcomb's University of Florida graduate
Tropical Entomology class.








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


AVAS B. HAMON, Taxonomic Entomologist

November 7, 1983: Overview of the Coccoidea, at n-ontime
seminar.
January 26, 1984: The taxonomy of the males of 3 species of
Rhizoecus (Homoptera:Pseudococcidae). Paper presented at
the annual meeting of the Southeastern Branch of the ESA,
New Orleans, LA.

J. B. HEPPNER, Taxonomic Entomologist

July 25, 1983: "Peru Natural History", to Systematics Semi-
nar, Center for Arthropod Systematics, DPI.
August 8, 1983: "Taiwan Natural History", to Systematics
Seminar, Center for Arthropod Systematics, DPI.
January 16, 1984: "Southern California Natural History", to
Systematics Seminar, Center for Arthropod Systematics,
DPI.

F. W. MEAD, Taxonomic Entomologist

November 1982: The sugarcane delphacid, Perkinsiella sacchar-
icida Kirkaldy, in Florida, a new North American record.
Seminar talk, Ohio State University, Dept. of Entomology,
Columbus, Ohio.
June 27, 1983: Travelogue on Galapogos Islands. Presented as
seminar to Systematic Entomology Luncheon.
August 11, 1983: The sugarcane delphacid, a new threat to
sugarcane: 0. Sosa, R. Nguyen, and F. W. Mead (presented
by Sosa). 66th Annual Meeting, Florida Entomological
Society, Clearwater Beach, Florida.
August 22, 1983: Regulatory and disease transmitting leaf-
hoppers. Seminar talk presented to Systematic Entomology
Luncheon.

L. A. STANGE, Taxonomic Entomologist

October 21-27, 1982: Update to Region III personnel on snails
and slugs of Florida.
October 26, 1982: "Antlion biology", Florida Medical Ento-
mology Laboratory, Vero Beach.
April 14-16, 1983: "Snails and slugs of Florida, native and
introduced", Region III Workshop, Ft. Lauderdale.
August 9-13, 1983: "Diversity of antlion life styles",
Florida Entomological Society Annual Meeting, Clearwater
Beach.
September 6-8, 1983: "Slug identification", Florida Depart-
ment of Agriculture & Consumer Services Business Con-
ference, Orlando.
September 22, 1983: Lectured on Neuroptera to Dale Habeck's
University of Florida class on immature insects.








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


June 4, 1984: Gave talk on Florida agriculture and research
to entomology class, Tanta University, Kafr el-Sheikh,
Egypt.

H. V. WEEMS, JR., Taxonomic Entomologist

August 12, 1982: Slide-illustrated talk titled "Update on
Florida State Collection of Arthropods", given at 65th
annual meeting of the Florida Entomological Society,
Sarasota, Florida.
December 2, 1982: "Collection donations and the internal
revenue service", invitational paper at Section A sympo-
sium: Growth of Entomological Collections. Progress,
Perils, and Paradox, ESA, ESC, & ESO meeting, Toronto,
Canada.
January 10, 1983: One-hour lecture and short tour of museum,
Dr. Jon Reiskind's Zoology class of 12 students, Univer-
sity of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
January 20, 1983: Gave remarks concerning Dr. Henry K. Townes,
world renown parasitic hymenopterist, Workshop on the
Taxonomy and Biology of the Parasitic Hymenoptera, Uni-
versity of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
January 27, 1983: One-hour illustrated program on "Butter-
flies", Gainesville Garden Club, Gainesville, Florida.
January 31, 1983: One-hour lecture and tour of museum, Prof.
Kyle Brown's landscaping and horticulture class of 15
students, Lake City Junior College.
August 9-12, 1983: Invocation and "Center for arthropod sys-
tematics", 66th Annual Meeting of the Florida Entomologi-
cal Society, Clearwater Beach, Florida.
September 27, 1983: One-hour lecture and tour of museum, Ms.
Carol Mesch's class of 20 students, Newberry Elementary
School, Newberry Florida.
September 30, 1983: Three 10-minute guided tours of FSCA
museum, Mrs. Kathy Dukes and 60 students, Archer Com-
munity School, Archer, Florida.
October 6, 1983: Twenty-minute talk and tour of museum, Mrs.
Bonnie Holbrook's class of 20 students, Southside
Christian School, Gainesville, Florida.
October 12, 1983: Twenty-minute talk and tour of museum, Ms.
Carol Mesch's class of 13 students, Lake Forest Elemen-
tary School, Gainesville, Florida.
March 16, 1984: 45-minute illustrated talk on the bee louse,
Big Bend Beekeepers, Perry, Florida.
April 6, 1984: One-hour talk and tour of museum. Dr. and Mrs.
M. A. Tidwell and a University of South Carolina class of
15 adults from the Greater and Lesser Antilles.
April 12, 1984: One-hour talk on the Florida State Collection
of Arthropods, University of Florida Department of Ento-
mology and Nematology Student Organization, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida.








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


April 27, 1984: Twenty-minute talk and tour of museum, Mrs.
Cristee D. Wagner and 4 cub scouts of Den 5, Pack 378,
Gainesville, Boy Scouts of America, Gainesville, Florida.

R. E. WOODRUFF, Taxonomic Entomologist

November 2, 1982: "Arthropods of gopher burrows". Third
Annual Gopher Tortoise Council meeting, Tallahassee,
Florida.
November 5, 1982: "Fossil insects in Dominican Republic
amber". Ocala Gem and Mineral Society, Ocala, Florida.
December 10, 1982: "Fossil insects in Dominican Republic
amber". Universidad Technologica Atlantica, Puerto
Plata, Dominican Republic.
April 26, 1983: "Foreign Coleoptera established in Florida".
DPI Regional Workshop, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
October 13, 1983: "Practical systematics at the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods". DPI, UF Systematics Class.
November 28, 1983: "Use of dung beetles to improve pasture
ecosystems". U.F. Class in Tropical Entomology.
December 1, 1983: "Phoretic mites on June beetles". Co-
authored by R. L. Crocker; at the Ent. Soc. Amer. meeting
at Detroit, Michigan.
May 16, 1984: "Taxonomy and distribution of weevils in the
citrus root weevil complex; including related species not
known to occur in Florida". Citrus Root Weevil Confer-
ence, Lake Alfred, Florida.
May 24, 1984: "Priority needs and directions in systematics
research; Insects and Arachnids", as part of a panel at
the annual meeting of The Association of Systematics
Collection, held at the University of Illinois, Urbana,
IL.


Publications

Denmark, H. A. 1982. Brevipalpus californicus (Banks), a
pest of woody ornamentals (Acarina:Tenuipalpidae) Fla.
Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent.
Circ. No. 240, 2 fig.
1982. Revision of Galendromus Muma, 1961 (Acarina:
Phytoseiidae) Internat. J. of Acarol. 8:3, 132 fig.
1982. Trichosiphonaphis polygoni (Van Der Goot)
(Homoptera:Aphididae), The Fla. Ent. 65(3), 4 fig.
,and E. Schicha. 1983. Revision of the Genus Phyto-
seiulus Evans (Acarina: Phytoseiidae) Internat. J. of
Acarol. 9:1, 29 fig.
1983. Aceria cephalanthi (Cook) (Acarina:Eriophyi-
dae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant
Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 249, 10 fig.
1983. Eriophyes mangiferae (Sayed) A pest of mango
(Acarina:Eriophyidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer
Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 254, 2 fig.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


1984. Brevipalpus mites found on Florida citrus
(Acarina:Tenuipalpidae) Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer
Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 69 Rev. 3 fig.
Edwards, G. B. 1982. The arboreal Salticidae of Florida.
Peckhamia 2(3):33-36.
Edwards, G. B., F. Mansour (senior author), J. W. Ross, W. H.
Whitcomb, and D. B. Richman. 1982. Spiders of Florida
citrus groves. Florida Ent. 65(4):514-522.
Edwards, G. B. 1983. The southern house spider, Filistata
hibernalis Hentz (Araneae:Filistatidae). Fla. Dept.
Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ.
255:1-2.
Hamon, A. B. 1983. White peach scale, Pseudaulacaspis penta-
gona (Targ. -Tozz.) (Homoptera:Coccoidea:Diaspididae).
Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent.
Circ. No. 253:1-2, illus.
Hamon, A. B., and R. L. Crocker (senior author). 1983. Fac-
tors affecting the orientation of Dialeurodes citri
(Homoptera:Aleyrodidae) on persimmon leaves. Fla. Ento-
mol. 66(1):208-210.
Heppner, J. B. 1983. Ecological notes on Brachodidae in
eastern Europe. Nota Lepid. (Karlsruhe), 6:99-110.
.1983. Revision of American Thaumatographa, with a new
species from Cuba (Lepidoptera:Tortricidae:Chlidanoti-
nae). Pan.-Pac. Ent., 58:165-176.
1984. Larvae of fruit flies. I. Anastrepha ludens
(Mexican fruit fly) (Diptera:Tephritidae). Fla. Dept.
Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No.
260:1-4.
.1984. Pseudocossinae: a new subfamily of Cossidae
(Lepidoptera). Ent. News, 95:99-100.
S 1984. Revision of the Oriental and Nearctic genus
Ellabella (Lepidoptera: Copromorphidae). J. Res. Lepid.,
23:50-76.
and K. Yano. 1983. Description of Hamakua pamakani
plume moth from Hawaii (Lepidoptera:Pterophoridae). Proc.
Hawaiian Ent. Soc., 24:335-341.
Mead, F. W., and D. B. Richman (senior author). 1982. Stages
in the life cycle of a predatory stink bug, Euthyrhynchus
floridanus (L.). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div.
Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 242:1-2, 7 fig.
and J. H. Tsai (senior author). 1982. Rotary net
survey of homopterans in palm planting in south Florida.
J. Econ. Ent. 75(5):809-812.
S1983. Yaupon psyllid, Gyropsylla ilicis (Ashmead).
Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent.
Circ. No. 247:1-2, 4 fig.
SR. I. Sailer, and R. M. Baranowski (senior author).
1983. Euschistus acuminatus, a pentatomid new to the
United States (Hemiptera:Pentatomidae). Florida Ent.
66(3):287-291, 1 fig.








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Stange, L. A., and R. B. Miller. 1982. The antlions of Flori-
da. Glenurus gratus (Say). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer
Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 251:1-2.
1983. A synopsis of the genus Epanthidium Moure with
the description of a new species from northeastern Mexico
(Hymenoptera:Megachilidae). Pan-Pacific Entomol. 59(1-4):
281-297.
and Jane E. Deisler. 1984. The veronicellid slugs of
Florida (Gastropoda:Veronicellidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. &
Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 261:1-4.
Weems, Jr., H. V. 1982. Anastrepha striata Schiner (Dip-
tera:Tephritidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv.,
Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 245:1-4, 9 fig.
1983. Collection donations and the Internal Revenue
Service. ASC Newsletter II(3):32-33.
.1983. Beelouse, Braula coece Nitzsch (Diptera:Brauli-
dae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant
Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 252:1-2, 2 fig.
Woodruff, R. E. and R. L. Crocker (senior author), C. L.
Simpson, H. Painter, and T. W. Fuchs. 1982. White grub
of southern masked chafer, Cyclocephala immaculate, found
in Texas turfgrass. Texas Turfgrass Research, Consoli-
dated P. R. 4032-4055:39-40.
R. L. Crocker (senior author), M. J. Gaylor, and T. W.
Fuchs. 1982. Field records of pathogens and parasites
of scarabs in Texas. Texas Turfgrass Research, Consoli-
date P. R. 4032-4055:41-42.
R. L. Crocker (senior author), C. L. Simpson, and H.
Painter. 1982. Comparative biology and ecology of
Phyllophaga spp. and other scarabs in Texas. Texas Turf-
grass Research, Consolidated P. R. 4032-4055:51-53.
and W. N. Dixon (senior author). 1983. The black twig
borer, Xylosandrus compactus (Eichhoff) (Coleoptera:
Scolytidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div.
Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 250:1-2, 3 fig.
and M. C. Thomas (senior author). 1983. First records
of a stored products pest, Oryzaephilus acuminatus Hal-
stead, from the Western Hemis phere. Fla. Dept. Agric. &
Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind. Ent. Circ. No. 257:1-4, 6
fig.
1983. Arthropods of gopher burrows. Proc. Third Ann.
Mtg., Gopher Tortoise Council (1982):24-48, 1 fig.


The Florida State Collection of Arthropods and

Its Research Associates Program

H. V. Weems, Jr., Taxonomic Entomologist and Curator

The Florida State Collection of Arthropods (FSCA) and
associated library, reprint files, and data files are essen-








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


tial to an effective identification service and form the basis
for taxonomic, life history, ecological, and biological con-
trol research. Accurate identification of the insects or
other arthropods pertinent to a particular problem is vital to
virtually any research to be conducted concerning these
species and is essential for the control of pest species. A
continuing effort is being made to develop the Florida State
Collection into one of the finest reference and research
collections in the world, with special emphasis upon species
of economic concern and for all tropical species which could
become established in Florida. The collection continues to
grow at an accelerating rate. Additions during each of the
past 3 years have been evaluated at approximately a quarter of
a million dollars, and the current pinned collections alone
consist of approximately 4.6 million specimens; this revised
total is considerably more than reported in the last biennium
due to a recent inventory which also added all donations to
the total. This collection is being developed through the
coordinated efforts of three state institutions: Florida A &
M University, in Tallahassee, the University of Florida and
the Division of Plant Industry of the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services, in Gainesville. Principal
collections are located in the Doyle Conner Building, head-
quarters of the Division of Plant Industry. The FSCA is now
about the 5th largest insect collection in the U. S. and is a
valuable asset for arthropod research and identification for
Florida.
The Research Associate Program of the FSCA, unique in
several respects, provides support for the arthropod identi-
fication service of the Division of Plant Industry available
to all Florida citizens and contributes significantlyto the
rapid growth of the collection and library. Currently, 217
Research Associates and 16 Student Associates are active in
the program. During the biennium 2 Research Associates who
had made major contributions to the program over a period of
many years passed away: Dr. William F. Buren, University of
Florida entomology professor and authority on Hymenoptera:
Formicidae, and Mr. Joseph Wilcox of Anaheim, California, a
world authority on the dipterous families, Asilidae, Lepto-
gastridae, and Mydidae. One Research Associate, Dr. John B.
Heppner, formerly with the Smithsonian Institution, joined the
staff of the Division of Plant Industry, and 9 others were
dropped due either to retirement or inactivity in the program.
Seven Student Associates were added:

Ms. Jane E. Deisler, Department of General Biology, University
of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721. (Mollusca; systematics,
distribution, and ecology of tropical land snails)
Mr. John H. Epler, III, Department of Entomology and Struc-
tural Pest Control, Florida A & M University, Tallahas-
see, FL 32307. (Systematics of Diptera: Chironomidae,
Neuroptera: Ascalaphidae, Arachnida: Scorpionida and








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Solpugida, miscellaneous Diptera, and the arthropod fauna
of the Rocky Mountains and desert southwestern United
States)
Mr. Peter M. Grant, Department of Entomology and Structural
Pest Control Florida A & M University, Tallahassee, FL
32307. (Biology, ecology, and systematics of North Ameri-
can Ephemeroptera and stream ecology)
Mr. Scott W. Gross, 4400 S. W. 20th Avenue, #86, Gainesville,
FL 32607.
(Systematics and behavior of crickets and katydids)
Mr. Steven C. Passoa, Department of Entomology, 320 Murrill
Hall, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801.
(Taxonomy of immature insects, especially Lepidoptera
larvae, and the taxonomy of Central American insects,
especially pest species)
Mr. Edward G. Riley, Department of Entomology, 402 Life
Sciences Building, Louisiana State University, Baton
Rouge, LA 70803. ( Coleoptera, especially the systematics
of Chrysolelidae)
Mr. Tomas G. Zoebisch, Department of Entomology and Nema-
tology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.
(Taxonomy of Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae and ecology of
Diptera: Agromyzidae).

Fifty Research Associates were added:
Dr. Morton S. Adams, Department of Entomology, Comstock Hall
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853. (Lepidoptera:
especially Noctuidae)
Dr. Andrew F. Beck, Department of Biology, Stetson University,
DeLand, FL 32720.
(Lepidoptera)
Mr. Charles L. Bellamy,, Department of Entomology, University
of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, Union of South Africa. (Cole-
optera: Buprestidae of the world with emphasis on bio-
geography, ecology, and phylogeny of genera and sub-
families)
Mr. Donald N. Bieman, Florida Pest Control, 116 N. W. 16th
Avenue, Gainesville, FL 32603. (Sex selection and other
aspects of behavioral ecology: sex pheremones; Lepidop-
tera: especially Malacosoma and Spodoptera)
Dr. Donald C. Booth, Department of Entomology, Coastal Plain
Research Station, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA
31794. (Neotropical insects)
Mr. Mike Brattain, 3206 Longlois Drive, Lafayette, IN 47904.
(Coleoptera)
Mrs. Nancy Burris, 4601 Snook Drive, Tampa, FL 33617. (Lepi-
doptera: especially in Florida)
Ms. Angela L. Choate, Biologist, USDA Entomology Research Lab,
1600 S. W. 23rd Drive, Gainesville, FL 32604. (Biological
control of Diptera: Culicidae)
Mr. John M. Coffman, Route 1, Box 331, Timberville, VA 22853.
(Rearing immature insects, especially Lepidoptera, Hy-







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


menoptera, and Coleoptera; photography of immature in-
sects, range extensions, foodplants, and parasites of
insects)
Mr. Jerrell J. Daigle, Environmental Specialist, Water Quality
Analysis Section. Florida Department of Environmental
Regulation, 2600 Blair Stone Road, Tallahassee, FL 32301.
(Odonata)
Dr. Dick L. Deonier, Department of Zoology and Physiology,
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056.
(Diptera: especially Ephydridae)
Dr. Mark A. Deyrup, Entomology, Archbold Biological Station,
Box 2057, Lake Placid, FL 33852. (Dead wood insects;
arthropod ecology; microhabitats)
Dr. Calaway H. Dodson, Missouri Botanical Gardens, P. 0. Box
299, St. Louis, Mo 63166. (Orchid pollinating insects)
Dr. Joseph E. Eger, 4608 Estrella Street, Tampa, FL 33629.
(Biology and systematics of Hemiptera: Pentatomoidea)
Mr. Edward V. Gage, P. 0. Box 380622, San Antonio, TX 78280.
(Lepidoptera: especially of North America; Coleoptera:
especially Cicindelidae, Cerambycidae, Scarabaeidae)
Mr. Edmund F. Giesbert, 9780 Drake Lane, Beverly Hill, CA
90210. (Coleoptera, especially taxonomy of Cerambycidae,
with emphasis on Central American fauna)
Dr. Clarence J. Goodnight, Department of Biology, Western
Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49001.
(Arachnida: Opiliones)
Mrs. Marie Goodnight, Department Jf Biology, Western Michigan
University, Kalamazoo, MI 49001. (Arachnida: Opiliones)
Dr. Deborah S. Green, 2900 N. W. 14th Place, Gainesville, FL
32605. (Biological control; integrated pest management;
multi-image slide presentations)
Dr. Santosh Gupta, 2716 N. W. 37th Terrace, Gainesville, FL
32605. (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae)
Dr. Virendra K. Gupta, 2716 N. W. 37th Terrace, Gainesville,
FL 30605.
(Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae)
Dr. Lowell N. Harris, 3092 Nelson Drive, Lakewood, CO 80215.
(Lepidoptera)
Dr. Frank W. Hedges, 1195 Meadow Spring Court, Kissimmee, FL
32743. (Lepidoptera: especially of the southeastern U.
S.; also exotics)
Mr. Robert L. Heitzman, 9300 E. 16th Street, Independence, MO
64052. (Lepidoptera; especially of Missouri)
Mr. Franklin T. Hovore, IV 28065 Langside Avenue, Canyon
Country, CA 91351. (Taxonomy, bionomics, ethology, eco-
systems, relationships, and distribution of Coleoptera:
Cerambycidae and Scarabaeidae; Pleocoma; bionomics of
neotropical Cerambycidae (Mexico, Central America))
Dr. John A. Hyatt, 439 Forest Hills Drive, Kingsport, TN
37663. (Lepidoptera distribution, life history, & taxo-
nomy; chemotaxonomy of insects; chemistry of insect
natural products and pigments)







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Mrs. Patty Isaac, 303B Wellington Court, Tampa, FL 33604.
(Lepidoptera)
Mr. Sam Isaac, 303B Wellington Court, Tampa, FL 33604. (Lepi-
doptera)
Mr. Stanley G. Jewett, Jr., 2351 S. W. Bosky Dell Lane, West
Linn, OR 97068. (Lepidoptera and aquatic insects, espe-
cially systematics of Plecoptera)
Dr. James W. Johnson, (Biology and systematics of Aphidiidae
and Braconidae; use of parasitoids in biological control)
Dr. James B. Kring, 238 Gladiolus Street, P. 0. Box 713, Anna
Marie, FL 33501 (Systematics, behavior, and biology of
Homoptera: Aphididae; behavior and control of vectors of
plant diseases, particularly virus diseases spread by
aphids, leafhoppers, and whiteflies)
Mr. Marc R. Kutash, 4314 S. Anita Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33611.
(Distribution and classification of Florida Lepidoptera)
Dr. Peter J. Landolt, P. 0. Box 14565, Gainesville, FL 32604.
(Insect behavior; role of moth sex pheromone components
in reproductive isolation)
Dr. John D. Lattin, Department of Entomology, Oregon State
University, Corvallis, OR 97331. (Heteroptera, especially
Scutellerinae)
Mr. Christian H. Miller, P. 0. Box 386, Palmetto, FL 33561.
(Odonata)
Dr. William B. Peck, S. Warren Street, Route 1, Warrensburg,
MO 64093. (Araneid systematics, faunistics, and ecology)
Mr. Dennis P. Profant, 250 N. Kentucky #13, Deland, FL 32724.
(Lepidoptera especially of Florida)
Mrs. Patricia Rosier, P. 0. Box 1625, Ft. Myers, FL 33902.
(Lepidoptera, especially of the Neotropics)
Dr. R. Peter Rosier, P. 0. Box 1625, Ft. Myers, FL 33902.
(Lepidoptera, especially of the Neotropics)
Dr. Dale F. Schweitzer, The Nature Conservancy, Eastern Re-
gional Office, 294 Washington Street, Room 740, Boston,
MA 02108. (Lepidoptera, especially Noctuidae; Lepidoptera
of sand barrens; ecology, life history)
Dr. Richard B. Selander, 1714 Georgetown Drive, Champaign, IL
61821. (Coleoptera: Meloidae)
Dr. Christopher Starr, Department of Entomology, Visayas State
College of Agriculture, Baybay, Leyte 7127, Philippine
Islands. (Arachnida: especially of the Philippine
Islands)
Mr. Jay Stees, 5717 Harding Boulevard N. E., St. Petersburg,
FL 33703. (Lepidoptera, especially of Florida)
Mrs. Susan Stees, 5717 Harding Boulevard N. E., St. Peters-
burg, FL 33703. (Lepidoptera, especially of Florida)
Mr. Allan M. Stodghill, 2928 A. Woodrich Drive, Tallahassee,
FL 32301. (Lepidoptera: collection and lifecycle studies
of Catocalinae; drawing and describing Lepidoptera larvae
and their parasites)
Mr. John T. Vaughan, Route 2, Box 274D2, High Springs, FL
32643. (Insect and vertebrate ecology, biological con-







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


trol; integrated pest management; taxonomy of parasitic
Hymenoptera)
Dr. Kenneth W. Vick, Route 2, Box 630, Newberry, FL 32669.
(Insect growth) regulators, sex pheromones of stored
product insects; Coleoptera of Florida)
Mrs. Deborah J. Waters, Biologist, Department of Preventive
Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.
(Biology and Taxonomy of Coleoptera, especially Ceram-
bycidae; bionomics and host plant interactions of forest
insect; malaria research)
Mr. Alan J. Wilkening, USDA-SEA-AR, IAMAR Lab, 1600 S. W. 23rd
Dr., Gainesville, FL 32604. (Taxonomy of Diptera: Cera-
topogonidae; adult biology of Culicoides; taxonomy and
systematics of higher Lepidoptera, especially Morphidae,
Brassolidae)
Mr. Donald A. Wilson, RFD Lamprey Road, Kensington, East
Kingston, NH 03927. (Coleoptera, especially Cerambycidae
and Cicindelidae)


Major Contributions to the

Florida State Collection of Arthropods

*Dr. Ross H. Arnett, Jr. (2406 N. W. 47th Terrace, Gaines-
ville, Florida 32606)
426 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 1 Odonata, 4
Orthoptera, 5 Hemiptera, 2 Homoptera, 5 Mecoptera, 328
Coleoptera, 30 Diptera, & 51 Hymenoptera collected in
Florida, New Jersey, & New York by the donor; 52 vials
containing 624 alcohol-preserved arthropods consisting of
1 vial Chilopoda (1 specimen), 4 vials Arachnida: Araneae
(4 specimens), 2 vials Collembola (56 specimens), 1 vial
Odonata (1 specimen), 1 vial Orthoptera (1 specimen), 1
vial Psocoptera (1 specimen), 4 vials Hemiptera (7 speci-
mens), 1 vial Homoptera (16 specimens), 2 vials Neurop-
tera (4 specimens), 20 vials Coleoptera (349 specimens),
2 vials Mecoptera (3 specimens), 5 vials Trichoptera (36
specimens), 4 vials Diptera (100 specimens), & 5 vials
Hymenoptera (55 specimens); 7 pints of ultraviolet light
trap samples of miscellaneous insects collected in Ari-
zona, Florida, New York, & Oklahoma, mostly by the donor;
9 unidentified exotic insects (7 Odonata, 2 Lepidoptera)
preserved in 9 paper envelopes, 6 vials (20 specimens)
unidentified exotic insects: 1 vial Hemiptera (1 speci-
men), 1 vial Orthoptera (2 specimens), 1 vial Diptera (2
specimens), 1 vial Neuroptera (2 specimens), 1 vial
Lepidoptera (2 specimens), and 1 vial Coleoptera (11
specimens) from Grand Cayman Island, British West Indies.


*Research Associate or Student Associate, FSCA.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


*Mr. H. David Baggett (14406 N. 22nd Street, #169, Lutz,
Florida 33549)
79 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 3 Orthoptera, 1
Hemiptera, 1 Mecoptera, 15 Neuroptera, 18 Coleoptera, 20
Diptera, 5 Hymenoptera, & 20 Lepidoptera; 1,157 neatly
spread Lepidoptera identified to 412 species, 226 speci-
mens with host data, 1 reared (with pupal and larval
skins): 2 yucca skipper larval tubes; 5 species new to
the FSCA, 9 species new to Florida, and several species
of Lepidoptera are rare in collections; 1 pinned,
labeled, exotic Lepidoptera from Canada identified to 1
species; 16 vials (60 specimens) unidentified arthropods
consisting of 2 vials (2 specimens) Arachnida: Scor-
pionida, 3 vials (4 specimens) Arachnida: Araneae, 1 vial
(3 adults) Ephemeroptera, 1 vial (6 adults) Trichoptera,
1 vial (6 specimens) Hymenoptera (Chalcidoidea) & 6 vials
(3 adults, 3 puparia) Diptera parasitizing 1 species of
Lepidoptera (12 larvae included), 1 vial (20 specimens)
Hymenoptera, 1 vial (1 specimen) Diptera; 29 vials (66
larvae) Lepidoptera identified to 28 species, 66 with
host data; collected by the donor in Arizona, California,
Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Maine, Michigan, Missouri,
North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, &
Virginia.
*Dr. William N. Beck (1621 River Bluff Road, Jacksonville,
Florida 32211)
8,461 slide mounts of Diptera: Chironomidae immatures
consisting of 385 unidentified domestic, 8,069 identified
(5,971 identified to genus, 2,098 identified to 44
species), & 7 exotic identified to 2 species including
representatives of 47 genera, collected in Australia (6
specimens representing 1 species, Panama (1 specimen
identified), & the United States: California, Colorado,
Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Minnesota,
Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina,
Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennes-
see, Utah, Virginia, & Wyoming; 85 slide boxes.
*Dr. Lewis Berner (Department of Zoology, University of Flori-
da, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
995 entomological publications, including 984 on the
order Ephemeroptera, consisting of microfilms of 2 doc-
toral dissertations, photocopies of 3 articles, 969
bulletins & reprints, & 11 books; 133 books or book-sized
monographs, of which 89 are hard-bound and 34 are soft-
bound (52 volumes considered of above-average value
because of their scarcity; 1 complete set of the Arthro-
pods of Florida and neighboring land areas series, in-
cluding revision of vol. 3; 2 copies of Occasional papers
of the Florida State Collection of Arthropods; 5 pages of
historical-value letters. One large box of polyporus
strips.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


*Dr. George H. Bick (1928 S. W. 48th Avenue, Gainesville,
Florida 32608)
The following volumes of The American Midland Naturalist:
vol. 102, no. 2 (October 1979), vol. 103 no. 12 (January,
April 1980), vol. 104, no. 1-2 (July, October 1980), vol.
105, no. 1-2 (January, April 1981), vol. 106, no 1-2
(July, October 1981), vol. 107, no. 1-2 (January, April
1982), vol. 108, no. 1-2 (July, October 1982); 2,221
labeled Odonata preserved in 698 plastic envelopes iden-
tified to 178 species, including 33 specimens identified
to 18 species from Canada, 3 specimens identified to 2
species from Mexico, and 1 specimen identified to 1
species from Costa Rica, the remainder from the U. S.:
Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Flori-
da, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts,
Maryland, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Mon-
tana, Nebraska, North Carolina, North Dakota, New Hamp-
shire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon,
Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia,
Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin, & Wyoming. Several
species are new to the FSCA.
*Dr. Franklin S. Blanton (4015 S. W. 21st Street, Gainesville,
Florida 32601)
1,608 slide-mounted, unidentified Diptera: Ceratopogoni-
dae collected in Colombia (2), Belize (5), Mexico (109),
Costa Rica (878), & El Salvador (614); 1,518 slide mounts
of unidentified Diptera: Ceratopogonidae collected in
Florida (1,517) and Georgia (1); 175 high quality wooden
slide boxes.
*Mr. Richard W. Boscoe (150 Ridge Pike #201, Lafayette Hill,
Pennsylvania 19444)
624 pinned, neatly spread, labeled Lepidoptera (595
identified to 95 species, 29 unidentified); 30 vials
containing 151 larvae & pupae representing 25 species of
Lepidoptera, all with host data, several new to the FSCA,
collected by the donor in Colorado, Florida, New Jersey,
North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Utah, West Virginia, &
Wyoming.
Mrs. Carolee Boyles-Sprenkel (Route 3, Box 200 A, Quincy,
Florida 32351) 64 envelopes containing 64 identified
Lepidoptera representing 32 species collected in Cali-
fornia, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, Oregon Utah, &
Washington; 398 pinned, labeled Lepidoptera (86 exotic,
312 domestic; 313 identified representing 18 families &
35 species, 85 unidentified) collected in Bolivia (3),
Costa Rica (1), Honduras (1), Mexico (5), New Guinea
(71), Nicaragua (2), Panama (3), & the United States:
Florida, Georgia, Pennsylvania, & Utah; domestic speci-
mens were collected by the donor; 10 vials of miscella-
neous insects, 1 small box containing 16 miscellaneous
insects, & 6 envelopes containing 13 Lepidoptera col-
lected in Florida by the donor; 29 vials (123 specimens)







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


unidentified insects: 1 Thysanura (1 specimen), 1 Ephem-
eroptera (1 specimen), 1 Orthoptera (2 specimens), 1
Homoptera (1 specimen), 1 Neuroptera (1 specimen), 19
Coleoptera (101 specimens), 2 Diptera 5 specimens), 3
Hymenoptera (11 specimens); 1 vial (2 specimens) Diplo-
poda, 1 vial (1 specimen) Arachnida: Scorpionida; 16
ultraviolet trap samples (4 dry, 12 alcoholpreserved in 2
pint jars and 10 small jars); 26 glassine envelopes con-
taining 36 unidentified insects; 1 Ephemeroptera (1
specimen), 4 Neuroptera (4 specimens), 21 Lepidoptera (31
specimens) all collected in Florida by the donor.
Mr. L. Mike Brattain (3206 Langlois Drive, Lafayette, Indiana
47904)
60 pinned, labeled Coleoptera, including 58 identified to
33 species and 2 unidentified, 5 pigdung trap samples of
miscellaneous insects collected by the donor in Indiana,
New York, Pennsylvania, & Tennessee.
Mr. Jacob Brodzinsky (Calle Z, No. 5, Naco, Dominican Repub-
lic)
291 insect fossils in amber from the Dominican Republic.
*Mr. Vernon A. Brou ( Route 5, Box 74, Edgard, LA 70049)
104 pinned, labeled, unidentified insects consisting of 5
Hemiptera, 1 Neuroptera, 20 Coleoptera, 23 Trichoptera,
45 Diptera, & 1 Hymenoptera; 10,178 pinned, labeled,
neatly spread Lepidoptera identified to 321 domestic
species collected in Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi,
Texas, and Utah, and 4 exotic species (2 specimens from
Canada, 4 specimens from Japan).
*Dr. Gary R. and May Buckingham (3663 N. W. 49th Lane, Gaines-
ville, Florida 32605)
848 (321 domestic and 527 exotic) pinned, labeled, un-
identified insects, consisting of 11 exotic Orthoptera
(Italy 8, Costa Rica 1, India 2), 37 exotic Hemiptera
(Italy 30, Costa Rica 2, India 5), 8 exotic Homoptera
(Italy 6, India 2), 4 exotic Neuroptera (Italy 4), 292
domestic and 291 exotic Coleoptera (Italy 201, India 90),
1 domestic and 6 exotic Mecoptera (Italy 6), 4 domestic
and 101 exotic Lepidoptera (Italy 101), 24 domestic and
24 exotic Diptera (Italy 22, Costa Rica 2), and 39 exotic
Hymenoptera (Italy 31, India 8); 18 pinned, labeled,
domestic Coleoptera identified to 12 species; 2 domestic
and 550 exotic pinned, labeled Lepidoptera identified to
47 species; 67 Lepidoptera were reared; 657 total Lepi-
doptera spread, 651 exotic from Italy and Austria; 1
Berlese sample of miscellaneous aquatic insects and 28
pints of ultraviolet light trap samples of miscellaneous
insects collected in Florida by the donor.
*Dr. Mont A. Cazier (Department of Zoology, Arizona State
University, Tempe, Arizona 85281)
30 pinned, labeled Coleoptera identified to 3 species,
133 pinned, labeled Diptera (94 domestic specimens repre-
senting 17 species, 39 exotic specimens from Mexico







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


representing 4 species) identified to 16 species (in-
cluding 60 paratypes), all new to the FSCA or first
representative of a sex, domestic specimens collected in
Arizona and New Mexico by the donor.
*Mr. Paul M. Choate, Jr. (2114 N. W. 55th Boulevard, # 18,
Gainesville, Florida 32605)
1,294 pinned, labeled insects including 3 Dermaptera, 14
Hemiptera, 6 Homoptera, 47 Diptera, 26 Hymenoptera, .6
Orthoptera, and 1,192 Coleoptera; 5 pinned, unlabeled
Coleoptera; 5 pinned, labeled Hymenoptera identified to 1
species; 248 pinned, labeled Coleoptera identified to 68
species (including 1 holotype); pinned material consists
of 73 exotic specimens from Argentina (1), Australia (2),
Canada (4), Costa Rica (4), Nepal (16), Spain (14),
Taiwan (1), and Vietnam (31), and 1,474 domestic speci-
mens from Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, Florida, Georgia,
Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hamp-
shire, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, &
Vermont; 37 vials (approximately 874 specimens) arthro-
pods consisting of 16 vials (202 specimens) Arachnida:
Araneae, 1 vial (1 specimen) Arachnida: Scorpionida, 6
vials (21 specimens) Arachnida: Opiliones, 1 vial (1
specimen) Odonata, 1 vial (10 specimens) Orthoptera, 2
vials (approximately 250 specimens) Hemiptera, 2 vials
(11 specimens) Neuroptera, 3 vials (approximately 225
specimens) Coleoptera, 1 vial (approximately 50 speci-
mens) Diptera, 1 vial (approximately 100 specimens)
Hymenoptera, 3 vials (3 specimens) immature insects; bulk
samples include 1 quart Crustacea, 1 pint Neuroptera, 1
'-pint Coleoptera, and the following samples of miscel-
laneous arthropods: 1 vial (Berlese funnel), 1 vial
(sweep net), 4 quarts, 26 pints, 5 -pints, 5 vials
(ultraviolet light trap), 2 pints, 1 -pint, 2 vials
(pitfall traps), 16 pints (bait traps), 1 pint, 6 vials
(hand collected); alcohol-preserved specimens collected
in Florida, Georgia, New Hampshire, and Virginia by the
donor.
*Mr. James C. Cokendolpher (Department of Biological Sciences,
Box 4149, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409)
589 vials (1,604 specimens) of arthropods consisting of 4
vials (19 specimens) Crustacea: Isopoda, 1 vial (9 speci-
mens) Crustacea: other, 19 vials (65 specimens) Chilo-
poda, 34 vials (90 specimens) Diplopoda, 1 vial (1 speci-
men) Arachnida: Acari, 251 vials (517 specimens) Arach-
nida: Araneae, 2 vials (8 specimens) Arachnida: Ambly-
pygi, 1 vial (1 specimen) Arachnida: Uropygi, 2 vials (32
specimens) Arachnida: Schizomida, 2 vials (3 specimens)
Arachnida: Solpugida, 1 vial (2 specimens) Arachnida:
Ricinulei, 1 vial (2 specimens) Arachnida: Pseudoscor-
pionida, 13 vials (37 specimens) Arachnida: Scorpionida,
1 vial (1 specimen) Arachnida: Palpigradi (an order new
to the FSCA), 2 vials (4 specimens) Thysanura, 1 vial (2







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


specimens) Collembola, 1 vial (1 specimen) Ephemeroptera,
3 vials (15 specimens) Psocoptera, 2 vials (23 specimens)
Thysanoptera, 47 vials (177 specimens) Hemiptera, 9 vials
(34 specimens) Homoptera, 142 vials (385 specimens)
Coleoptera, 1 vial (1 specimen) Trichoptera, 6 vials (7
specimens) Diptera, 40 vials (166 specimens) Hymenoptera,
3 vials (4 specimens) Orthoptera; 1 vial miscellaneous
arthropods (litter sample); 386 vials (1,219 specimens)
domestic from California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia,
Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, North
Carolina, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Utah, mostly
collected by the donor and 85 vials (280 specimens)
exotic: 1 vial (5 specimens) Papua, New Guinea, 8 vials
(33 specimens) Panama, 59 vials (176 specimens) Mexico, 2
vials (3 specimens) Canada, 1 vial (1 specimen) France, 1
vial (1 specimen) Japan, 1 vial (7 specimens) South
Africa, 5 vials (5 specimens) Gabon, 6 vials (44 speci-
mens) Bolivia, 1 vial (5 specimens) Puerto Rico; 70 vials
(149 specimens) domestic identified to 22 species, 3
vials (3 specimens) domestic identified to 3 genera, and
9 vials (17 specimens) exotic identified to 8 species
from Canada (2 vials, 3 Araneae to 2 species), Gabon (2
vials, 2 Araneae to 2 species), Panama (5 vials, 12
Araneae to 4 species); 22 species, 1 first representative
of an opposite sex, 5 genera, and 1 order new to the
FSCA.
Dr. Robert L. Crocker (Texas Agricultural Experiment Station,
Texas A & M University Research and Extension Center at
Dallas, 17360 Coit Road, Dallas, Texas 75252)
101 ultraviolet light trap samples of miscellaneous
insects and 4 vials of Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Phyllo-
phaga collected in an ultraviolet light trap in Texas by
the donor & associate.
*Lloyd R. Davis, Jr. (2510 N. E. 10th Terrace, Gainesville,
Florida 32601)
416 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 3 Orthoptera,
365 Coleoptera, 13 Diptera, 33 Hymenoptera, 1 Homoptera,
and 1 Lepidoptera; 55 pinned, 1 labeled, exotic insects
consisting of 2 Orthoptera, 1 Hemiptera, 81 Coleoptera,
and 1 Hymenoptera from Panama (77), Costa Rica (1), South
America (4), Belgium (1), Spain (1), and Mexico (1);
3,444 pinned, labeled Coleoptera identified to 1,128
species; 205 pinned, labeled, exotic Coleoptera identi-
fied to 64 species from Canada (200 specimens repre-
senting 60 species), India (1 specimen representing 1
species), Mexico (1 specimen representing 1 species), and
Brasil (3 specimens representing 2 species); 31 vials
(684 specimens) unidentified insects consisting of 1 vial
(2 specimens) Ephemeroptera, 2 vials (17 specimens)
Orthoptera, 1 vial (9 specimens) Isoptera, 5 vials (260
specimens from 5 hosts) Mallophaga, 1 vial (60 specimens
on 1 host) Anoplura, 4 vials (61 specimens; including 1







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


vial, 50 specimens on 1 host) Hemiptera, 1 vial (2 speci-
mens) Neuroptera, 9 vials (90 specimens) Coleoptera, 1
vial (1 specimen) Trichoptera, 2 vials (12 specimens;
including 1 vial, 2 specimens from 1 host) Diptera, 3
vials (165 specimens from 3 hosts) Siphonaptera, 1 vial
(5 specimens) Hymenoptera; 235 vials (2,522 specimens) of
non-insect arthropods consisting of 1 vial (2 specimens)
Crustacea, 1 vial (5 specimens) Diplopoda, 1 vial (15
specimens) Chilopoda, 2 vials (40 specimens) Pauropoda,
130 vials (836 specimens) Arachnida: Araneae, 71 vials
(1,554 specimens; including 3 vials, 24 specimens from 3
hosts) Arachnida: Acari, 5 vials (29 specimens) Pseudo-
scorpionida, 8 vials (28 specimens) Opiliones, 1 vial (8
specimens) Solpugida; 13 vials (204 specimens) Arachnida
identified to 9 species consisting of 9 vials (87 speci-
mens) Araneae identified to 5 species, 2 vials (16 speci-
mens) Scorpionida identified to 2 species, 2 vials (101
specimens) Acari identified to 2 species; 10 vials (ap-
proxi mately 2,700 specimens) assorted samples of miscel-
laneous insects, 5 vials (approximately 35 specimens)
miscellaneous insects collected at light, 2 jars of
ultraviolet light trap samples of miscellaneous insects;
241 vials and 615 jars of miscellaneous insects, mostly
Coleoptera, including 322 with host, habitat, or trap
data, exotic samples: 3 vials, 3 pints pitfall trap
samples, 1 -pint insect flight trap sample, and 4 -pint
miscellaneous samples from Panama, and 8 vials, 1 -pint
Coleoptera identified to 8 species, consisting of 33
vials, 33 -pint samples, and 42 pint samples of pitfall
traps, 74 vials, 29 -pint samples, and 12 pint samples
of various bait traps 19 vials, 10 -pint and 33 pint
ultraviolet light trap samples, 2 vials and 3 -pint
samples collected at lights, 103 vials, 160 -pint
samples, and 281 pint samples without trap or host data;
from Alabama, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia,
Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Maine, Michigan, Montana, New
Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Caro-
lina, Ohio, Oregon, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont,
Virginia, Washington, & West Virginia; 7 pints undeter-
mined Coleoptera: Bruchidae from Florida, 1 pint undeter-
mined parasites from Florida.
*Dr. Dick L. Deonier (Department of Zoology & Physiology,
Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056)
3,653 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 27 Hemiptera,
260 Homoptera, 48 Coleoptera, 5 Lepidoptera, 104 Hymenop-
tera, 3,204 Diptera, 14 Odonata, 5 Orthoptera, 1 Psocop-
tera; and 15 pinned, labeled Diptera identified to 15
species; many specimens on points; collected in Ohio by
the donor and associates.
Mr. John Dick (Escuela Agricola Panamericana, A. P. 93, Tegu-
cigalpa, Honduras) 417 pinned, labeled insects, 207 of
them minutien mounted, consisting of 2 Odonata, 9 Or-







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


thoptera, 7 Hemiptera, 34 Homoptera, 2 Neuroptera, 75
Coleoptera, 1 Hymenoptera, 243 Diptera, & 44 Lepidoptera
(23 spread); 37 envelopes consisting of 83 Lepidoptera
(123 specimens), 2 Coleoptera, 1 Hymenoptera, 2 Odonata,
and 2 Neuroptera; 16 insect flight trap samples collected
in Honduras by the donor.
*Mr. Terhune S. Dickel (Box 385, Homestead, Florida 33030)
600 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 2 Neuroptera
and 598 neatly spread Lepidoptera; 4,150 pinned, labeled,
neatly spread Lepidoptera identified to 1,002 species;
collected in Colorado, Florida, North Carolina, and
Pennsylvania by the donor.
Dr. Calaway H. Dodson (Director, Marie Selby Botanical Gar-
dens, 800 S. Palm Avenue, Sarasota, Florida 33577)
1,501 pinned, labeled, unidentified, exotic insects (253
Orthoptera, 5 Plecoptera, 2 Dermaptera, 149 Hemiptera, 64
Homoptera, 21 Neuroptera, 680 Coleoptera, 121 Lepidop-
tera, 79 Diptera, 127 Hymenoptera), 1 pinned, unlabeled,
unidentified, exotic Hymenoptera; 1,002 pinned, labeled,
exotic insects identified to 515 species (230 Hemiptera
identified to 63 species, 217 Homoptera identified to 59
species, 449 Lepidoptera identified to 343 species, 106
Hymenoptera identified to 50 species 15 species of
Hymenoptera: Euglossini new to the FSCA), 11 specimens
unidentified Lepidoptera preserved in glassine envelopes,
all Lepidoptera spread, all specimens from Ecuador ex-
cept: 5 unidentified and 47 identified (to 30 species)
Lepidoptera from Costa Rica; 106 Hymenoptera: Euglossini
identified to 50 species (in 5 genera) from the following
localities: 42 Panama, 44 Costa Rica, 2 Trinidad, 5
Ecuador, 3 Guyana, 2 Brasil, 3 Colombia, 1 Venezuela, 2
Honduras, 2 Suriname mostly collected by the donor;
8,123 pinned, labeled, exotic Hymenoptera: Euglossini
identified to 178 species representing all 5 genera of
the Euglossinae, 190 pinned, labeled, exotic Hymenoptera
identified to genus, 5 holotypes, 19 paratypes included,
58 euglossine nests included, collected by the donor in
all Central American and northern South American coun-
tries from Mexico to Brasil and Bolivia.
*Dr. Norville M. Downie (505 Lingle Terrace, Lafayette, In-
diana 47901)
3,619 pinned, labeled, identified Coleoptera (200 exotic,
3,419 domestic) representing 1,176 species collected by
the donor in Canada (200 specimens representing 60
species) & the United States: Arizona, California, Flori-
da, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Montana, New Mexico, New
York, Oregon, Texas, Utah, & Washington; 2 jars of mis-
cellaneous insects collected in blacklight trap in Ari-
zona by the donor; 3,934 neatly pinned, labeled insects
(254 exotic, 3,680 domestic) consisting of 2 unidentified
Diptera collected in Indiana and 3,678 Coleoptera identi-
fied to 1,128 species collected in Brasil (3 specimens







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


representing 1 species), Canada: British Columbia (251
specimens representing 56 species), & the United States
(3,698 specimens representing 1,071 species): Alabama,
Arizona, California, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Minnesota,
Montana, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, South Carolina,
Texas, Utah, & Washington, virtually all by the donor.
*Mr. Byrd K. Dozier (USDA, Box 43L, San Ysidro, California
92073)
2,883 neatly pinned, labeled insects 536 domestic, 2,347
exotic) consisting of 3 Orthoptera, 50 Hemiptera, 131
Homoptera, 19 Diptera, 30 Hymenoptera, and 2,650 Coleop-
tera, exotic specimens collected in Costa Rica (159),
Ecuador (1), Mexico (1,361), Panama (822), and Paraguay
(4); 23 vials (172 specimens) domestic Arachnida: Araneae
and 11 vials (70 specimens) exotic Arachnida:Araneae from
Mexico including 7 species and 2 genera new to the FSCA;
40 slide-mounts (35 domestic, 5 exotic) with host data
consisting of 1 slide (4 specimens) Collembola, 9 slides
(36 specimens) Siphonaptera, 1 slide (4 specimens) Homop-
tera: Aphididae, 29 slides (60 specimens, including 7
slides, 18 specimens identified to 5 species) Mallophaga
(2 slides, 2 specimens on host apparently from Nigeria, 3
slides, 3 specimens on hosts apparently from Peru, all
intercepted in Miami, Florida); domestic collected in
Arizona, California, Idaho, Nebraska, New Mexico, and
Texas by the donor.
*Dr. Sidney W. Dunkel (4117 S. W. 20th Avenue, #304, Gaines-
ville, Florida 32601)
1 vial (1 adult, 1 larva) Diptera: Stratiomyidae: Odon-
tomyia; 179 envelopes (189 domestic, 47 exotic specimens)
consisting of 1 envelope (2 specimens) Orthoptera, 2
envelopes (2 specimens) Hemiptera, 17 envelopes (24
specimens) Homoptera, 1 envelope (1 specimen) Neuroptera,
2 envelopes (3 specimens) Hymenoptera, 36 envelopes (46
specimens) Coleoptera, 118 envelopes (168 specimens)
Diptera, including 10 prey records, 8 pairs in copula,
and 6 host records, exotic from the Bahama Islands (1)
and Mexico (46); 98 specimens identified to 15 species
(88 specimens) and 7 genera (10 specimens); domestic
collected in Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Michi-
gan, Missouri, New Mexico, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South
Carolina, Texas, and Virginia by the donor.
*Dr. Gary A. Dunn (Cooperative Extension Service, Michigan
State University & U. S. Department of Agriculture Co-
operating, Department of Entomology, Natural Science
Building, Room 147, Michigan State University, East
Lansing, Michigan 48824)
359 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 1 Orthoptera, 7
Hemiptera, 1 Trichoptera, 1 Hymenoptera, and 349 Coleop-
tera; 60 pinned, labeled Coleoptera identified to 8
species; 67 vials (over 2,750 specimens) Coleoptera,
mostly Carabidae and 2 vials miscellaneous insects; 1







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


ultraviolet light trap sample; collected in Arizona,
California, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Michigan,
Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina,
Oklahoma, Vermont, and Wisconsin by the donor.
*Mr. Bryce Edmondson (Armuelles Division, Apartado 6-2637,
Estefeta El Dorado, Panama 1, Republic of Panama)
14 vials miscellaneous insects collected by the donor in
Panama (8 vials) & Dominican Republic (6 vials); 35
insect flight trap samples of miscellaneous insects & 52
ultraviolet light trap samples of miscellaneous insects
collected in Panama by the donor and associates Anayansi
Castillo, Felix Rodriquez, & Linda Stephens; 125 slide-
mounts (125 adult specimens) of authoritatively identi-
fied Mallophaga representing 3 species collected in
Florida (25 slides, 2 species) & Irangi, Congo (100
slides, 1 species); 1 slide box for 100 slides.
Dr. Glavis B. Edwards, Jr. (409 NE 50th Terrace, Gainesville,
Florida 32601)
1,439 vials, 7 -pint jars (3,299 specimens) consisting
of 731 vials (1,962 exotic specimens) including 136 vials
(413 specimens) Insecta, 10 vials (48 specimens) Crus-
tacea: Isopoda, 3 vials (5 specimens) Diplopoda, 2 vials
(2 specimens) Chilopoda, 7 vials (63 specimens) Arach-
nida: Acari, 8 vials (33 specimens) Arachnida: Pseudo-
scorpionida, 5 vials (7 specimens) Arachnida: Opiliones,
1 jar (12 specimens) Arachnida: Scorpionida identified to
1 species, 2 vials & 1 jar (3 specimens) Arachnida:
Amblypygi identified to 1 species, 551 vials & 5 jars (60
specimens unidentified, 276 specimens identified to 26
genera, 1,040 specimens identified to 120 species) Arach-
nida: Araneae (including 2 holotypes, 1 allotype, 5
paratypes, 1 topotype, 4 discernible new species, 74
species, 19 genera, and 1 family new to the FSCA, 41
other species only identified to genus new to the FSCA,
and 6 specimens of a species known previously only from
the holotype); exotic specimens collected by donor in the
Bahamas 1 vial (10 specimens) Isoptera, 1 vial (22
specimens) Hymenoptera, 10 vials (2 specimens unidenti-
fied, 3 specimens identified to 2 genera, 11 specimens
identified to 5 species) Araneae; Costa Rica 1 vial (2
specimens) Thysanura, 1 vial (1 specimen) Collembola, 1
vial (1 specimen) Orthoptera, 1 vial (1 specimen) Psocop-
tera, 2 vials (5 specimens) Thysanoptera, 4 vials (8
specimens) Hemiptera, 4 vials (8 specimens) Homoptera, 39
vials (57 specimens) Coleoptera, 1 vial (1 specimen)
Diptera, 25 vials (55 specimens) Hymenoptera, 2 vials (6
specimens) Isopoda, 3 vials (5 specimens) Diplopoda, 1
vial (1 specimen) Chilopoda, 2 vials (17 specimens)
Pseudoscorpionida, 1 vial (10 specimens) Acari, 171 vials
(22 specimens unidentified, 82 specimens identified to 18
genera, 297 specimens identified to 70 species) Araneae
(including 1 holotype), 1 jar (1 specimen) Amblypygi







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


identified to 1 species; Panama 3 vials (5 specimens)
Thysanura, 3 vials (80 specimens) Isoptera, 5 vials (8
specimens) Psocoptera, 1 vial (2 specimens) Thysanoptera,
3 vials (3 specimens) Hemiptera, 1 vial (3 specimens)
Homoptera, 19 vials (27 specimens) Coleoptera, 1 vial (2
specimens) Lepidoptera, 5 vials (8 specimens) Diptera, 14
vials (106 specimens) Hymenoptera, 8 vials (42 specimens)
Isopoda, 1 vial (1 specimen) Chilopoda, 6 vials (53
specimens) Acari, 6 vials (16 specimens) Pseudoscorpio-
nida, 5 vials (7 specimens) Opiliones, 246 vials & 5 jars
(38 specimens unidentified, 191 specimens identified to
18 genera, 731 specimens identified to 87 species)
Araneae (including 1 holotype, 1 allotype, 5 paratypes, 1
topotype); 708 vials (1,337 domestic specimens) including
80 vials (178 specimens) Insecta 3 vials (5 specimens)
Thysanura, 3 vials (12 specimens) Psocoptera, 1 vial (2
specimens) Hemiptera, 52 vials (90 specimens) Coleoptera,
1 vial (1 specimen) Lepidoptera, 4 vials (6 specimens)
Diptera, 14 vials (30 specimens) Hymenoptera, 1 vial (3
specimens) Isopoda, 6 vials (13 specimens) Diplopoda, 1
vial (6 specimens) Chilopoda, 677 vials (10 specimens un-
identified, 105 specimens identified to 33 genera, 1,128
specimens identified to 236 species) Araneae (including 2
paratypes, 8 topotypes, 2 natural hybrids (including 1
new to science), 12 species and representatives of op-
posite sex of 5 species new to the FSCA, including 2 new
state records), 9 vials (6 specimens unidentified, 28
specimens identified to 2 species) Acari, 7 vials (5
specimens unidentified, 14 specimens identified to 1
species) Pseudoscorpionida, 20 vials (11 specimens iden-
tified to 2 genera, 40 specimens identified to 9 species)
Opiliones; collected in Arizona, Arkansas, Florida,
Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Vir-
ginia, mostly by the donor.
*Mr. Peter J. Eliazar (Division of Lepidoptera Research,
Department of Zoology, 223 Bartram Hall, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
810 pinned, spread, labeled, identified, neotropical
Lepidoptera: Rhopalocera collected by the donor in
Ecuador (325 specimens, 80 species) and Peru (485 speci-
mens, 105 species). This collection is exceptionally
neatly processed and contains several species new to the
FSCA.
*Dr. K. C. Emerson (560 Boulder Drive, Sanibel Island, Florida
33957)
1 vial (1 specimen) Diptera: Hippoboscidae, 12 vials (744
specimens) Mallophaga identified to 8 species, 2 vials (6
specimens) Arachnida: Acari; 21 ultraviolet light trap
samples of miscellaneous insects collected on Sanibel
Island, Florida; 431 slides (527 specimens) Mallophaga
identified to 128 species consisting of 186 slides (227
exotic specimens): 5 slides (19 specimens) Hong Kong, 2







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


slides (3 specimens) Thailand, 15 slides (25 specimens)
New Guinea, 4 slides (4 specimens) Tasmania, 5 slides (6
specimens) Germany, 14 slides (20 specimens) Chile, 1
slide (2 specimens) Argentina, 35 slides (41 specimens)
Australia, 8 slides (8 specimens) Mexico, 1 slide (4
specimens) Nepal, 1 slide (4 specimens) Trinidad, 4
slides (4 specimens) Ghana, 2 slides (2 specimens) Af-
ghanistan, 2 slides (2 specimens) Kreta, 2 slides (2
specimens) Livland, 27 slides (27 specimens) Reunion
Island, 14 slides (14 specimens) Kenya, 4 slides (12
specimens) Guyana, 1 slide (2 specimens) Choiseul Island,
1 slide (2 specimens) Guadalcanal Island, and 245 slides
(300 specimens) United States: Alabama, California,
Florida, Georgia, Idaho, and Texas (includes 6 type
slides, 6 paratypes, 6 neoparatypes).
*Dr. Thomas C. Emmel (Department of Zoology, 421 Bartram Hall
West, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
13,714 pinned, labeled, neatly spread, exotic Lepidoptera
(mostly Rhopalocera) identified to 2,556 species col-
lected in Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador,
Galapagos Islands, Guatemala, Kenya, Mexico, Papua-New
Guinea, Peru, Tanzania, Tobago, and Trinidad, and the
United States: 22 paratypes of Cercyonis meadi alamosa
Emmel & Emmel from Colorado, and the holotype, allotype,
and 8 paratypes of Cercyonis pegala blanca Emmel &
Mattoon from Nevada; 7 unprocessed Diptera collected in
the Dominican Republic (1), Papua-New Guinea (2) and
Galapagos Islands (4); all collected by the donor; 30
entomological bulletins, journals, and separate publica-
tions; includes many species and subspecies new to the
FSCA; Galapagos Islands material is extremely rare and
represented in virtually no other museums worldwide.
Mr. Don R. Estes (Applied Biologist, Southern Division, Naval
Facilities Engineering Command, P. 0. Box 10068, Charle-
ston, SC 29411)
465 slide-mounts (46 exotic, 419 domestic) arthropods
(387 identified representing 231 species, 78 unidenti-
fied) consisting of 79 slides (65 identified to 33
species, 14 unidentified) Arachnida: Acarina, 1 slide
Collembola identified to 1 species, 133 slides (126
identified to 94 species, 7 unidentified) Thysanoptera,
12 slides (10 identified to 5 species, 2 unidentified)
Hemiptera, 173 slides (144 identified to 69 species, 29
unidentified) Homoptera, 16 slides (11 identified to 8
species, 5 unidentified) Lepidoptera, 35 slides (17
identified to 13 species, 18 unidentified) Diptera, 5
slides (4 identified to 2 species, 1 unidentified) Sipho-
naptera, & 11 slides (9 identified to 6 species, 2 un-
identified Hymenoptera) collected in Brasil (1), Germany
(3), Mexico (1), The N etherlands (10), Puerto Rico (17),
Scotland (1), & the United States: Alaska (1), Arizona,
California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia,







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Hawaii (13), Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts,
Michigan, Nevada, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio,
Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, Virginia,
Washington, Wisconsin, & Wyoming; 13 black Adams micro-
scope slide boxes (each holds 100 slides). 5,668 pinned,
labeled insects (8 exotic, 5,660 domestic; 842 identified
representing 230 species, 4,826 unidentified) consisting
of 8 Thysanura, 12 Ephemeroptera, 160 Orthoptera (18
identified representing 12 species), 41 Isoptera (28
identified representing 1 species), 16 Plecoptera, 34
Dermaptera (4 identified representing 2 species) 5 iden-
tified Embioptera representing 1 species, 2 Anoplura, 468
Hemiptera (22 identified representing 9 species), 151
Homoptera (40 identified representing 8 species), 99
Neuroptera, 3,008 Coleoptera (577 identified representing
134 species) 1 Mecoptera, 11 Trichoptera, 329 Lepidoptera
(209 spread, 120 unspread; 59 identified representing 28
species, 270 unidentified), 638 Diptera (46 identified
representing 21 species), 13 identified Siphonaptera
representing 1 species, & 666 Hymenoptera (30 identified
representing 13 species); 283 vials or bottles (1,420
specimens) alcohol-preserved arthropods consisting of 1
vial (3 domestic specimens) Crustacea: Isopoda, 1 vial (1
domestic specimen) Diplopoda, 2 vials (1 unidentified
specimen, 1 identified specimen) Chilopoda, 1 vials (3
specimens) Arachnida: Araneae, 1 vial (2 specimens)
Arachnida: Scorpionida, 1 vial (5 specimens) Arachnida:
Pseudoscorpionida, 1 vial (1 specimen) Arachnida: Sol-
pugida, 6 vials (7 specimens) Ephemeroptera, 12 vials (24
specimens) Odonata, 2 vials (28 specimens) Isoptera, 3
vials (3 specimens) Plecoptera, 3 vials (5 specimens)
Hemiptera, 1 vial (1 specimen) Neuroptera, 52 vials (174
specimens; 164 specimens identified to 46 species) Co-
leoptera, 10 vials (27 specimens) Trichoptera, 63 vials
(160 specimens identified to 63 species) Lepidoptera im-
matures, 56 vials (318 specimens identified to 52
species, 6 unidentified specimens) Diptera, & 69 vials
(655 specimens identified to 62 species) Hymenoptera; the
pinned and the alcohol-preserved specimens were collected
in Costa Rica (2 pinned & spread Lepidoptera, 1 pinned
Orthoptera), El Salvador (1 pinned Orthoptera), Mexico (3
unspread Lepidoptera), Tanzania (1 vial, 4 specimens of
Isoptera), & the United States: Arizona, California,
Colorado, Florida, Louisiana, Oregon, South Carolina,
Utah, & Washington. Almost all of these collections were
taken by the donor.
*Dr. G. B. Fairchild (16 N. W. 22nd Drive, Gainesville, Flori-
da 32603)
22,000 pinned insects (20,472 labeled, 1,528 unlabeled)
consisting of 558 spread Lepidoptera identified to 154
species, 18,072 Diptera (mostly Tabanidae) identified to
1,842 species including 40 holotypes, 3 allotypes, 567







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report 76


paratypes, 2 neotypes, 3 cotypes, 1 syntype, 1 genotype,
128 homotypes, 12 topotypes, 7 plesiotypes and the fol-
lowing unidentified insects: 2 Odonata, 16 Orthoptera, 8
Mecoptera, 36 Coleoptera, 27 Trichoptera (11 spread), 9
Hemiptera, 8 Neuroptera (2 spread), 37 Hymenoptera, 1,423
Diptera, 1,126 Lepidoptera (27 spread); 39 unmounted
Diptera; 11 vials Diptera, 1 vial (13 specimens) Neurop-
tera, 1 vial (17 specimens) Trichoptera, 2 vials (11
specimens) Lepidoptera larvae with hosts, 1 vial (18
specimens), Diptera identified to 1 species, 9 vials, 13
bulk (including 10 from Brasil) insect flight trap sam-
ples, 29 bulk ultraviolet light trap samples, 5 vials
miscellaneous insects; 45 envelopes (327 specimens)
Lepidoptera, 6 envelopes (55 specimens) Odonata, 1 en-
velope (10 specimens) Trichoptera, 2 envelopes (206
specimens) Diptera, 1 envelope (25 specimens) Hymenop-
tera, 3 envelopes (315 specimens) miscellaneous insects,
5 envelopes (14 specimens) Lepidoptera identified to 4
species; domestic from all states except Hawaii, exotic
pinned from: 106 Africa, 1 Afghanistan, 12 Albania, 7
Algeria, 328 Argentina, 532 Australia, 1 Angola, 53
Austria, 35 Bahamas, 3 Belgium, 7 Belgian Congo (Zaire),
2 Bermuda, 43 Bohemia, 218 Bolivia, 8 Borneo, 3 British
Cameroons, 76 British Guiana, 39 British Honduras
(Belize), 1 British Somaliland, 4 Bulgaria, 6 Burma, 7
British West Indies, 2,982 Brasil, 3,178 Canada, 12
Cameroon, 18 Ceylon, 270 Chile, 20 China, 933 Colombia,
204 Costa Rica, 16 Congo, 58 Cuba, 1 Cyprus, 11 Czecho-
slovakia, 1 Dominica, 77 Dominican Republic; 14 Dutch
Guiana (Suriname), 4 Dutch New Guinea, 4 England, 443
Ecuador, 7 El Salvador, 3 Egypt, 21 Ethiopia, 1 Garquhar
Island, 2 Finland, 6 Formosa (Taiwan), 151 France, 64
French Guiana, 7 Galapagos Islands, 259 Germany, 1 Guam,
104 Guatemala, 6 Guiana, 1 Guadalcanal, 55 Greece, 15
Guyana, 5 Haiti, 136 Honduras, 6 Hungary, 105 India, 4
Iran, 1 Iraq, 13 Israel, 1 Ireland, 108 Italy, 2 Ivory
Coast, 48 Jamaica, 27 Japan, 1 Kashmir, 13 Kenya, 2
Korea, 1 Laos, 3 Labrador, 12 Liberia, 2 Macedonia
(Greece), 7 Malaya, 47 Malaysia, 3 Mali, 9 Manchuria, 7
Madagascar, 3 Malawi, 1 Martinique, 7 Moravia, 7 Morocco,
443 Mexico, 4 Mozambique, 1 Mesopotamia, 21 New Cale-
donia, 15 New Guinea, 1 New Hebrides, 51 Nicaragua, 64
Nigeria, 2 Netherlands, 12 New Zealand, 34 Nyasaland,
2,680 Panama, 2 Papua, 11 Palestine, 153 Paraguay, 41
Philippines, 5 Poland, 599 Peru, 11 Puerto Rico, 38
Rhodesia, 4 Russia, 4 Sardinia, 5 Seychelles, 8 Solomon
Island, 189 Spain, 1 South Pacific, 5 Sudan, 23 Sumatra,
4 Sierra Leone, 263 Suriname, 3 Sweden, 42 Switzerland, 1
Syria, 46 Tanzania, 20 Tasmania, 1 Taiwan, 5 Thailand, 1
Tibet, 14 Tunisia, 3 Tobago, 191 Trinidad, 25 Turkey, 17
Uganda, 4 Upper Volta, 9 Uruguay, 1, U. S. Virgin
Islands, 15 Vietnam, 127 Venezuela, 31 Yugoslavia, 5







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Zululand; all envelopes (except 10 Lepidoptera) from
Canada.
*Mr. Frank D. Fee (522 Fairway Road, State College, Pennsyl-
vania 16801)
875 neatly pinned, labeled insects (15 exotic, 860 do-
mestic; 100 identified, 775 unidentified) consisting of
365 Coleoptera, 397 Diptera, & 113 Hymenoptera (100
identified Apidae: Bombus & Psithyrus representing 11
species, 13 unidentified) collected in Canada: New Bruns-
wick (5), Venezuela (10), & the United States: Arizona,
California, Florida, Kansas, Maryland, Michigan, Massa-
chusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New York, Oklahoma,
Pennsylvania, Texas, & Virginia, mostly by the donor.
Mrs. Ladonia 0. Fields (4920 S. W. 69th Street, Gainesville,
Florida 32608)
78 pints of ultraviolet light trap samples of miscel-
laneous partially determined insects collected in Florida
by the donor.
*Dr. Irving L. Finkelstein (425 Springdale Drive N. E., At-
lanta, Georgia 30305)
1,183 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 1 Hemiptera,
10 Odonata, 136 unspread Lepidoptera, 1,036 spread Lepi-
doptera identified to 626 species; 1 pinned, unlabeled
Coleoptera; included among the Lepidoptera are several
rarely collected species and several species new to the
FSCA; domestic from Arizona, California, Colorado, Flori-
da Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisi-
ana, Maine, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, New
York, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, &
Wyoming; exotic from: 1 Anatolia, 1 Australia, 8 Austria,
3 Brasil, 6 Canada, 1 Central African Republic, 3 Cuba, 1
Dominican Republic, 191 Ecuador, 20 France, 6 Germany, 2
Hungary, 1 India, 9 Israel, 13 Italy, 39 Jamaica, 154
Japan, 2 Malaysia, 114 Mexico, 1 Morocco, 6 New Guinea, 2
Norway, 99 Peru, 8 Philippines, 2 Spain, 2 Switzerland, &
12 Taiwan.
*Dr. Hermann A. Flaschka (2318 Hunting Valley Drive, Decatur,
GA 30033)
1,758 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 872 unidenti-
fied Coleoptera, 611 Coleoptera identified to 163
species, 2 Hemiptera identified to 2 species, and 273
spread Lepidoptera identified to 63 species, 315 domestic
from Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecti-
cut, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana,
Maine, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska,
Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, Pen-
nsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Vermont,
Washington, and Wisconsin; 1,443 from: 3 Argentina, 800
Austria, 7 Brasil, 3 Chile, 7 Crete, 3 Finland, 1 For-
mosa, 3 France, 9 Gallia, 268 Germany, 2 Great Britain, 7
Hungary, 3 India, 7 Italy, 3 Mexico, 4 Pakistan, 18
Philippines, 4 Puerto Rico, 1 Russia, 4 St. Croix, 1







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Slovakia, 4 Spain, 2 Vietnam; The Coleopterists Bulletin
vol. 25-34 and the Bulletin of the Amateur Entomologists
Society vol. 25-37 (no. 273-321).
*Mr. J. Richard Heitzman (3112 Harris Avenue, Independence,
Missouri 64052)
9,338 pinned (8,149 labeled, 1,189 unlabeled) insects
consisting of 1 Plecoptera, 1 Mecoptera, 8 Trichoptera,
15 Neuroptera, 19 Homoptera, 138 Lepidoptera, 102 Coleop-
tera, and 491 Diptera unidentified, and 8,423 Lepidoptera
identified to 1,516 species, of which 5,215 are spread,
18 have cleared wings, 12 have dissected genitalia and
including 137 reared hybrid Papilio collected in Mis-
souri, Arkansas (2 specimens), and Canada: Saskatchewan
(1 specimen Lepidoptera) by the donor.
*Mr. Robert L. Heitzman (9300 16th Street, Independence,
Missouri)
5,248 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 3 Homoptera,
5 Neuroptera, 67 Coleoptera, 1 Trichoptera, 332 Diptera,
and 135 Hymenoptera unidentified, and 4,705 Lepidoptera
identified to 879 species, including 198 reared Papilio,
1,139 spread, and 3 with dissected genitalia, collected
in Missouri by the donor.
*Mr. Parker R. Henry (10960 S. W. 89 Terrace, Miami, Florida
33176 & Route 2, Box 478D, Heber Springs, Arkansas 72543)
776 pinned, labeled, spread, Lepidoptera, including 262
identified to 47 species, from: 58 Brasil, 9 Costa Rica,
6 Dominican Republic (plus 9 identified to 3 species), 17
Ecuador (plus 5 identified to 3 species), 1 France, 2
French Guiana, 39 Mexico (plus 3 identified to 2
species), 64 Papua, New Guinea, 31 Peru, 14 Trinidad, and
273 United States (plus 245 identified to 41 species):
Arkansas, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Il-
linois, and North Carolina collected by the donor.
Dr. John B. Heppner (3529 N. W. 42nd Terrace, Gainesville,
Florida 32601)
5 pinned, labeled Lepidoptera identified to 2 species (4
paratypes of Corticivora chica, 1 paratype of C. parva);
24 pinned, labeled Diptera from Venezuela, including 6
identified to 3 species; 216 pinned, labeled insects
consisting of 50 Hymenoptera, 44 Diptera, 118 Coleoptera,
3 Hemiptera, and 1 Homoptera; 36 vials (116 specimens)
consisting of 10 vials (13 specimens) Chilopoda, 13 vials
(46 specimens) Diplopoda, 8 vials (48 specimens) Crus-
tacea, and 5 vials (6 specimens) Arachnida: Araneae; 2
large shipping boxes of dried insects, 45 unmounted mis-
cellaneous large insects and 118 pinned, unlabeled in-
sects consisting of 1 Dermaptera, 6 Hemiptera, 14 Homop-
tera, 26 Orthoptera, 8 Neuroptera, 51 Coleoptera, and 2
Hymenoptera collected in Taiwan, domestic collected in
Arizona, California, Florida, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah,
and West Virginia by the donor; 32 entomological books or
large bulletins; Journal of Research on the Lepidoptera







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


vol. 6-8 (1967-1969, The Mid-Continent Lepidoptera Series
8-61 (1969-72).
*Dr. John A. Hyatt (439 Forest Halls Drive, Kingsport, Ten-
nessee 37663)
453 pinned, spread, labeled Lepidoptera (242 domestic,
211 exotic: 196 identified to 72 species, 103 of these
domestic identified to 30 species, 93 exotic identified
to 42 species, 139 domestic & 118 exotic for a total of
257 unidentified) collected in Australia (4 specimens, 4
species), Central African Republic (2 specimens, 2
species), China (2 specimens, 1 species), Denmark (3
specimens, 2 species), Ecuador (1 specimen identified, 73
unidentified), France (27 specimens, 9 species, 4 uni-
dentified), Germany (14 specimens, 5 species), Holland (2
specimens, 2 species), Mexico (1 specimen identified, 16
unidentified), Norway (17 specimens, 4 species), Peru (1
specimen identified, 22 unidentified), Portugal (4 speci-
mens, 2 species), Spain (1 specimen), Sweden (1 speci-
men), Taiwan (3 specimens, 1 species), Thailand (4 speci-
mens, 4 species), indecipherable localities (6 identified
specimens, 6 species, 2 unidentified), & the United
States: Florida, Kentucky, Montana, New Hampshire, South
Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia.
Dr. Clarence Dan Johnson (Box 5640, Biology Department,
Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona 86001)
30 pinned, labeled Coleoptera identified to 7 species
from Arizona, Georgia, North Carolina; 300 pinned,
labeled exotic, identified Coleoptera from Guatemala (10
specimens identified to 2 species), Honduras (20 speci-
mens identified to 3 species), Mexico (233 specimens
identified to 40 species), and Panama (37 specimens
identified to 7 species); 78 pinned, labeled, exotic,
identified Coleoptera representing paratypes of 15
species from Guatemala (5 specimens identified to 1
species), Mexico (58 specimens identified to 12 species),
Panama (15 specimens identified to 2 species).
*Dr. George F. Knowlton (Biology Department, UMC 53, Utah
State University, Logan, Utah 84322)
371 vials (7,986 specimens) alcohol-preserved arthropods
consisting of 1 vial (15 specimens) Crustacea: Isopoda, 9
vials (21 specimens) Diplopoda, 82 vials (781 specimens)
Arachnida: Araneae, 13 vials (155 specimens) Arachnida:
Acari, 15 vials (78 specimens) Arachnida: Opiliones, 1
vial (1 specimen) Arachnida: Solpugida, 21 vials (2,155
specimens) Collembola, 34 vials (202 specimens) Plecop-
tera, 9 vials (790 specimens) Thysanoptera, 1 vial (6
specimens) Isoptera, 3 vials (38 specimens) Hemiptera, 25
vials (768 specimens) Homoptera, 10 vials (145 specimens)
Coleoptera, 9 vials (73 specimens) Trichoptera, 8 vials
(166 larvae) Lepidoptera, 9 vials (337 specimens) Dip-
tera, 78 vials (1,073 specimens) Hymenoptera, 43 vials
(1,199 specimens) miscellaneous unsorted insects, 95 pill







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


boxes (approximately 11,750 specimens) dried insects
collected in Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming by the donor.
*Dr. Edward C. Knudson (804 Woodstock, Bellaire, Texas 77401)
473 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 1 Odonata, 1
Homoptera, 2 Coleoptera, 132 Neuroptera (including 15
specimens of 5 rare species), 3 Diptera, and 7 spread,
exotic Lepidoptera (from Mexico); 326 pinned, labeled,
spread Lepidoptera identified to 268 species (including
26 specimens identified to 26 species from Mexico) in-
cluding paratypes of 3 species, domestic collected in
Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas by the donor.
*Col. Lester L. Lampert, Jr. (17 Hillview Circle, Asheville,
North Carolina 28805)
461 pinned, labeled Coleoptera (310 identified repre-
senting 34 species, 151 unidentified) collected by the
donor in Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colo-
rado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, New Mexico,
North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee,
Texas, & Utah; alcohol-preserved arthropods selected from
4 ultraviolet light trap samples collected by the donor
in Arizona, as follows: 1 Arachnida: Araneae, 42 Hemip-
tera, 181 Neuroptera, 29 Coleoptera, 206 Diptera, and 54
Hymenoptera; 73 quarts of miscellaneous insects (56
ultraviolet light trap samples and 17 insect flight trap
samples) collected in Florida by the donor.
*Dr. Lubomir Masner (Biosystematics Research Institute, Ot-
tawa, Canada)
294 pinned, pointed, labeled Hymenoptera: Proctotrupoidea
(180 exotic, 114 domestic) identified to 156 species (130
new to the Florida State Collection of Arthropods) in 158
genera (69 new to FSCA) including 32 paratypes of 31
species from Africa (11), Antigua (1), Australia (1),
Austria (1), Bavaria (2), Brasil (10), Canada (106),
Chile (1), Colombia (1), Costa Rica (4), Cuba (1), Do-
minican Republic (1), Ecuador (7), England (1), Italy
(1), Jamaica (1), Japan (1), Mexico (3), Netherlands (1),
Panama (2), Paraguay (1), Philippines (1), Spain (1),
Tasmania (2), Trinidad (13), and the United States:
Alaska (5), Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida,
Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana,
Maryland, Missouri, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina,
Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.
*Mr. Bryant Mather (213 Mt. Salus Drive, Clinton, Mississippi
39056)
292 pinned, labeled Neuroptera identified to 53 species
(including 2 specimens identified to 1 species from
England, 4 specimens identified to 1 species from Panama,
1 specimen identified to 1 species from Canada, and 1
specimen identified to 1 species from Spain, 85 pinned,
spread, labeled Trichoptera identified to 13 species
(including 7 specimens from Canada), 1 vial (2 specimens)
Trichoptera identified to 1 species, domestic collected








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


in Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, and Oregon, mostly
by the donor.
*Mr. R. Bruce Miller (P. 0. Box 1092, Project City, California
96079)
126 pinned, labeled, identified Neuroptera: Myrmeleonti-
dae (7 species) collected by the donor in California &
Nevada; 418 pinned, labeled, unidentified, exotic insects
consisting of 1 Odonata, 4 Orthoptera, 20 Hemiptera, 15
Homoptera, 124 Coleoptera, 51 Diptera, 9 Lepidoptera, &
194 Hymenoptera collected by the donor in South Africa;
61 envelopes (413 specimens) of unidentified insects & 1
envelope (20 Neuroptera) of insects consisting of 1
Orthoptera (6 specimens), 3 Hemiptera (9 specimens), 2
Homoptera (17 specimens), 1 Neuroptera (20 specimens), 20
Coleoptera (78 specimens), 12 Lepidoptera (23 specimens),
8 Diptera (130 specimens) & 15 Hymenoptera (150 speci-
mens) collected by the donor in South Africa; 260 vials
or bottles (10,914 specimens) of unidentified snails and
arthropods consisting of 11 vials or bottles containing
49 unidentified Mollusca, 47 vials or bottles of mixed
arthropods other than insects which included 5 Crustacea:
Amphipoda, 5 Crustacea: Isopoda, 3 other Crustacea, 36
Diplopoda, 1 Chilopoda, 91 Arachnida: Araneae, 39 Arach-
nida: Acarina, 5 Arachnida: Scorpionida, 3 Arachnida:
Chelonethida, and 13 Arachnida: Solpugida, & 202 vials or
bottles (10,664 specimens consisting of 1 vial (3 speci-
mens) Collembola, 1 vial (2 specimens), Ephemeroptera, 1
vial (2 specimens) Odonata, 1 vial (1 specimen) Odonata,
7 vials (100 specimens) Orthoptera. 1 vial (29 specimens)
Isoptera, 1 vial (2 specimens) Plecoptera, 1 vial (3
specimens) Dermaptera, 9 vials (115 specimens) Hemiptera,
9 vials (78 specimens) Homoptera, 21 vials (167 speci-
mens) Neuroptera, 59 vials (3,350 specimens) Coleoptera,
3 vials (50 specimens) Trichoptera, 10 vials (3,500
specimens) Lepidoptera, 22 vials (264 specimens) Diptera,
& 56 vials (3,000 specimens) Hymenoptera collected in
South Africa by the donor; 1,170 pinned, labeled, un-
identified, exotic insects consisting of 2 Orthoptera, 17
Hemiptera, 29 Homoptera, 7 Neuroptera, 22 Coleoptera, 4
Lepidoptera, 201 Diptera, 788 Hymenoptera, and 97 pinned,
labeled Neuroptera identified to 1 genus collected in
Peru by the donor.
Mr. Wayne A. Miller (2209 Parkview, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008)
1 pinned, spread, labeled Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae:
Anartia chrysopelea Hubner 1825 from Florida, the first
representative of this species for the FSCA; 200 pinned,
spread, labeled, identified Lepidoptera; 13 Lepidoptera
identified to 4 species preserved dry in glassine en-
velopes collected in Michigan by the donor.
Mrs. (Esther) B. Elwood Montgomery (906 N. Chauncey Street,
West Lafayette, Indiana 47906)








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


1,273 pinned insects (1,267 labeled, 6 unlabeled; 16
exotic, 1,257 domestic; 8 identified representing 5
species, 1,265 unidentified) consisting of 71 Orthoptera,
1 Psocoptera, 202 Hemiptera, 124 Homoptera, 98 Coleop-
tera, 2 Mecoptera, 69 Lepidoptera (34 spread), 461 Dip-
tera, & 245 Hymenoptera collected in the Netherlands (16)
& the United States: Indiana, Ohio, & Virginia: 3 insect
cabinet drawers; 417 identified, papered Odonata in-
cluding 10 pairs, identified to 54 species, 151 papered
Odonata identified only to genus, 49 pinned, identified
Odonata, 222 papered, unidentified Odonata, 191 pinned,
unidentified Odonata with data from the United States; 54
papered, Odonata identified to 22 species from Europe and
Asia; 25 pinned, labeled, unidentified Odonata from
Argentina and Panama; 42 papered, unidentified Odonata
from Bolivia, Chile, Costa Rica, Hawaii, and Peru; 1,260
vials of reared Odonata from the United States (no iden-
tification labels in most vials, but with collection
numbers which refer to data and identifications in note-
books are included); 819 vials of unidentified United
States Odonata larvae; 8 vials of unidentified Odonata
larvae from Suriname; 8 vials of unidentified Odonata
larvae from Mexico; 120 vials of miscellaneous uniden-
tified insects from the United States; 14,000 punched
bibliography cards of the Odonata of the world; 17,250
blank punch cards; 3,750 genus and species punch card
index with bibliographic references on about half of
them. All of these are from the collection and files of
the late Dr. B. Elwood Montgomery and constitute a major
addition to the Florida State Collection of Arthropoda.
*Dr. William B. Muchmore (Department of Biology, University of
Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627)
36 vials (149 specimens) exotic Arachnida: Araneae from
U. S. Virgin Islands (except 1 vial, 1 specimens from U.
S.: New York); 1,076 vials (11,729 specimens) Arachnida:
Pseudoscorpionida consisting of 914 domestic and 101
exotic vials containing 6,905 domestic and 78 exotic
specimens identified to species, 3,821 domestic and 1,759
exotic specimens identified to genus, and 239 domestic
and 205 exotic specimens identified to family; 1,385
slides (2,053 specimens) Arachnida: Pseudoscorpionida
consisting of 1,196 domestic and 187 exotic slide mounts
containing 814 domestic and 49 exotic specimens iden-
tified to species, 1,009 domestic and 169 exotic speci-
mens identified to genus, and 11 domestic and 29 exotic
identified to family; Pseudoscorpionida identified to 177
species and 128 genera, including 3 holotypes, 112 para-
types (of 18 species), 41 topotypes (of 3 species), and
741 specimens from caves; Pseudoscorpionida from Austra-
lia (14 slides, 14 specimens; 1 vial, 11 specimens),
Belize (5 slides, 5 specimens; 1 vial, 1 specimen),
Brasil (3 slides, 3 specimens; 1 vial, 2 specimens),








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


British Virgin Islands (4 slides, 30 specimens; 25 vials,
99 specimens), Cameroun (1 vial, 18 specimens), Canada
(17 slides, 18 specimens; 13 vials, 50 specimens), Caro-
line Island (1 slide, 1 specimen), Chile (3 slides, 3
specimens), Colombia (6 slides, 6 specimens; 2 vials, 2
specimens), England (7 slides, 13 specimens; 4 vials, 46
specimens), France (1 vial, 3 specimens), Guatemala (2
slides, 2 specimens), Jamaica (12 slides, 12 specimens; 5
vials, 32 specimens), Mexico (45 slides, 79 specimens; 45
vials, 468 specimens), Panama (10 vials, 17 specimens; 12
vials, 80 specimens), Philippines (1 vial, 4 specimens),
Puerto Rico (12 slides, 21 specimens; 23 vials, 93 speci-
mens), Rhodesia (5 vials, 76 specimens), South Africa (10
slides, 10 specimens; 1 vial, 5 specimens), U. S. Virgin
Islands (1 slide, 1 specimen; 7 vials, 12 specimens), and
the United States; Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, Califor-
nia, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa,
Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachu-
setts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Ne-
vada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York,
North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Caro-
lina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washing-
ton, West Virginia, and Wyoming.
Dr. Marcio A. Naves (EMBRAPA, Director Executiva Ed. Venancio
2.000 S/916 70.600 Brasilia, Brasil)
73 pinned, labeled Hymenoptera identified to 10 species
(includes 3 holotypes, 34 paratypes of 4 species) col-
lected in Florida and Texas, mostly by the donor.
*Dr. Gayle H. Nelson (College of Osteopathic Medicine of the
Pacific, 309 Pomona Mall E., Pomona, California 91766)
332 neatly pinned, labeled insects (5 exotic, 327 do-
mestic) consisting of 7 Orthoptera, 3 Dermaptera, 6
Embioptera, 38 identified Hemiptera (3 identified to 1
genus, 35 identified to 2 species), 18 Homoptera, 15
Neuroptera, 28 identified Coleoptera, including 20 para-
types (3 species) representing 4 species, 1 Mecoptera, 2
spread Lepidoptera, 119 Diptera, & 57 Hymenoptera col-
lected by the donor in Mexico (5) & the United States:
Arizona, California, Missouri, Nevada, & Texas.
*Dr. Dennis R. Paulson (Burke Museum DB-10 University of
Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195)
191 envelopes (785 specimens) exotic Odonata identified
to 190 species, including 3 new species and 50 species
new to the FSCA, mostly collected by the donor in Austra-
lia (1), Canada (26), Costa Rica (657), Ecuador (3),
England (1), Germany (2), India (2), Indonesia (2), Japan
(15), Nepal (3), Papua-New Guinea (12), Paraguay (2),
Peru (8), Philippines (14), Rhodesia (1), Sarawak (23),
Sierra Leone (1), Singapore (8), Uganda (1), and U.S.S.R.
(2).
*Dr. William L. Peters (1803 Chuli Nene, Tallahassee, Florida
32301)








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


1,352 vials (5,240 specimens) exotic insects consisting
of 540 Odonata, 2,800 Coleoptera unidentified, 1,960
Ephemeroptera identified, including 14 holotypes, 5
allotypes, and 1,795 paratypes of 14 species; 78 slide
mounted Ephemeroptera; all collected in New Caledonia by
the donor.
*Mr. John R. Polhemus (3115 S. York Street., Englewood, Colo-
rado 80110)
17 vials and bottles (1,205 specimens) identified aquatic
Hemiptera (100 domestic & 1,105 exotic representing 1
domestic & all exotic species collected in Belize (100
specimens representing 1 species), Ceylon (190 specimens
representing 4 species), Mexico (715 specimens repre-
senting 5 species), Thailand (100 specimens representing
1 species), & the United States: Texas (100 specimens
representing 1 species).
*Dr. Charles C. Porter (Department of Biological Sciences,
Larkin Hall, Fordham University, Bronx, New York 10458)
7,517 pinned (5,264 labeled, 2,253 unlabeled) insects
consisting of 1 Odonata, 3 Hemiptera, 3 Homoptera, 1
Neuroptera, 2 Coleoptera, 3 Lepidoptera, 82 Diptera
unidentified, and 8,024 Hymenoptera, including 3,042
identified to 228 species, 4,050 identified to 398
genera, and 425 unidentified; collected in Argentina
(29), Bolivia (18), Chile (2), Ecuador (379), Mexico
(452), Peru (1,665), Perto Rico (202), and the United
States: Florida and Texas by the donor.
*Dr. John F. Reinert (610 N. W. 40 Terrace, Gainesville,
Florida 32607)
1,750 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 3 Orthoptera,
34 Odonata, 11 Hemiptera, 18 Homoptera, 21 Neuroptera,
186 Coleoptera, 241 Lepidoptera, 797 Diptera, and 439
Hymenoptera; 1 vial (1 specimen) Trichoptera, 1 vial (25
specimens) Homoptera; 4 ultraviolet light trap samples,
11 CDC light trap samples (1 sample from Kenya), 16
insect flight trap samples, 5 bound books, 31 unbound
bulletins, pictorial keys, and catalogs dealing with
*Dr. David B. Richman (Department of Entomology and Nemato-
logy, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
294 vials (1,436 specimens) arthropods including 248
vials (1,171 specimens) domestic: Arizona, Florida,
Georgia, Minnesota, New England, New Mexico, North Caro-
lina, and Tennessee, and 46 vials (265 specimens) exotic:
1 vial (1 specimen) France, 16 vials (69 specimens)
Israel, 1 vial (2 specimens) Panama, 28 vials (192 speci-
mens) Puerto Rico, consisting of Arachnida: 203 vials
(625 specimens) Araneae (including 83 specimens identi-
fied to 30 species, 10 specimens identified to 3 genera,
3 species and 1 genus new to the FSCA), 8 vials (23
specimens) Scorpionida (including 7 specimens identified
to 2 species), 1 vial (4 specimens) Acari, 1 vial (1
specimen) Opiliones, and Insecta: 2 vials (50 specimens)








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Isoptera, 2 vials (9 specimens) Hemiptera, 1 vial (1
specimen) Homoptera, 7 vials (35 specimens) Coleoptera,
10 vials (75 specimens) unsorted insects, and 59 vials
(620 specimens) Hymenoptera (including 1 specimen identi-
fied to 1 species and 41 specimens identified to 3
genera) mostly collected by the donor.
Mr. Edward G. Riley (Department of Entomology, 402 Life
Sciences Building, Louisiana State University, Baton
Rouge, Louisiana 70803)
1 envelope containing 43 identified Coleoptera repre-
senting 1 species collected in Louisiana by the donor;
772 pinned, labeled Coleoptera consisting of 149 uniden-
tified domestic, 74 unidentified exotic (64 Mexico, 12
Panama), 528 domestic identified to 29 species, 21 exotic
(Mexico) identified to 4 species, 114 specimens dis-
sected, domestic from Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, Cali-
fornia, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Missouri,
New Mexico, New York, Texas, and West Virginia.
*Dr. Richard H. Roberts (2241 N. W. 49th Terrace, Gainesville,
Florida 32605)
2,085 pinned (1,363 labeled, 1,722 unlabeled) insects
consisting of 1 Mecoptera, 1 Trichoptera, 1 Lepidoptera,
1 Coleoptera, and 2,081 Diptera (mostly Tabanidae),
including 512 identified to 167 species, 70 exotic from
Australia, Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Swit-
zerland, and Yugoslavia; domestic from California, Flori-
da, Georgia, Iowa, Maryland, Mississippi, New York, North
Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Texas, Wisconsin; 5
vials larval and adult Diptera; 32 Schmidt boxes; the
following literature: Annual Review of Entomology, 1956-
1984, vol. 1-29 (hardbound; Biological and morphological
studies of tick populations, 1975-77, 2 vol.; Biblio-
graphy of ticks and tickborne diseases, 1970-72, vol.
1-4; A revision of the Ixodidae, or ticks, of the United
States, 1908; A host-parasite catalogue of North American
Tachinidae (Diptera), 1978; Annotated-checklist of New
World insects associated with Prosopis (mesquite), 1977;
Bibliography of leishmania and leishmanial diseases,
1980, 2 vol. softboundd); California vector views (bound
together in 2 vol.), 1956-59, 1972-79; 3(1-11+index),
4(1-12+index), 5(1-12+index), 6(1), 19(7,12), 20(1-12),
16-20 (index), 21(1-12+index), 22(1-12+index), 23(1-12+
index), 24(1-12+ index), 25(1-12), 21-25 (index), 26(1-8)
publication suspended; Tropical medicine and hygiene
news, 1977-83: 26(2,4-6), 27(1-6), 28(1-6+supple.) 29
(1-6+supple.) 30(2-6), 31(1-6); 32(1-6) American J.
tropical medicine & hygiene, 1975-83: 24-32 @11-4 com-
plete: J. Florida Anti-Mosquito Association, 1980-83:
51(2), 52(1), 53(1,2), 54(1), 1980-81 yearbook, 1981-82
yearbook; Mosquito news (American Mosquito Control
Assoc.), 1958-83: vol. 18-43 @ #1-4 complete; Annals of
the Entomological Society of America, 1952-83: vol, 45-47








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


@ # 1-4 complete, vol. 48-76 @ 1-6 complete; J. Economic
Entomology 1960-75: vol. 53-68 @#1-6 complete; Florida
Entomologist, 1977-83: vol. 60-66 @ #1-4 complete; Trans-
actions of the American Entomological Society, 1971-76:
vol. 97-101 @ # 1-4 complete, 102(1,2); Entomological
news, 1976-84: vol. 88-89 @ #1-10 (2 numbers per issue)
complete, 90-94 @ # 1-5 complete, 95(1); Environmental
entomology, 1972-75: vol. 1-4 @ # 1-6 complete; bot fly
life stages display (in riker mount); Bulletin of the
Entomological Society of America, vol. 1-29 (ca. #1-4)
complete, 1955-1983, except 1(1), 11(2), 21(2) are
missing.
Dr. R. Peter Rosier (3515 Acocado Drive, Ft. Myers, Florida
33902)
5,256 exotic (3,201 Peru, 2,054 Ecuador) Lepidoptera and
2 exotic Odonata (Ecuador) preserved dry in labeled
glassine envelopes, including numerous rarely obtained
species collected by the donor.
Dr. Lionel A. Stange (610 N. W. 54th Terrace, Gainesville,
Florida 32608)
5,034 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 1 Homoptera,
5 Orthoptera, 8 Coleoptera, 7 Lepidoptera, 32 Diptera,
and 767 Hymenoptera unidentified, 22 Neuroptera identi-
fied to 12 species, and 4,202 Hymenoptera identified to
346 species and 92 genera, including 3 holotypes, 72
paratypes, 3 paralectotypes, 2 homeotypes, 71 specimens
with genitalia extracted, 220 with host data, 6 nests; 33
ultraviolet light trap samples (2 from South Africa);
collected in Argentina (1,389), Australia (2), Bahamas
(7), Bolivia (171), Brasil (223), Chile (113), Colombia
(63), Costa Rica (15), Cuba (2), Dominican Republic (4),
Ecuador (35), El Salvador (2), Europe (1), French Guiana
(2), Germany (2), Guatemala (6), Guyana (1), Honduras
(2), Mallorca (9), Mexico (498), Panama (6), Paraguay
(236), Peru (339), Philippines (1), Trinidad (16), Uru-
guay (3), U.S.S.R. (2), Venezuela (177), and the United
States: California, Florida mostly by the donor. This
donation includes the world's largest collection of the
genus Zethus (Hymenoptera: Eumenidae) in both numbers of
specimens and species. Many rare species are in no other
collection (except for holotypes). Hymenoptera: Mega-
chilidae: Anthidiini are also well represented.
*Mr. Karl H. Stephan (Route 1, Box 145, Red Oak, Oklahoma
74563)
6,958 pinned, labeled arthropods consisting of 7 Orthop-
tera, 5 Plecoptera, 1 Thysanoptera, 30 Hemiptera, 13
Homoptera, 5 Neuroptera, 75 Diptera, 2 Siphonaptera,
5,732 Coleoptera, 152 Hymenoptera, 21 Arachnida: Acari
(associated with Hymenoptera: Formicidae), 1 Arachnida:
Pseudoscorpionida unidentified, 1,016 Coleoptera identi-
fied to 153 species, including 1 holotype and 142 para-
types, 89 exotic (3 Brasil, 84 Canada, 2 Mexico); 23








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


vials (50 specimens) consisting of 1 vial (1 specimen)
Hemiptera, 10 vials (17 specimens) Coleoptera, 4 vials
(10 specimens) Hymenoptera, 5 vials (5 specimens) larvae,
2 vials (2 specimens) Diplopoda, 1 vial (15 specimens)
Arachnida: Scorpionida, including 13 vials (4 Coleoptera,
7 Hymenoptera, 3 larvae, 2 Diplopoda, 15 Scorpionida)
from Borneo; domestic collected in Arizona, California,
Florida, Kentucky, North Carolina, Oklahoma by the donor.
2,130 previously donated Coleoptera: Colydiidae identi-
fied to 78 species; 5 pint bulk flight trap sample and
2 pint bulk berlese sample collected in Oklahoma.
*Dr. J. Bolling Sullivan, III (200 Craven Street, Beaufort,
North Carolina 28516)
4,728 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 5 Hemiptera,
1 Diptera, 1 Mecoptera, 6 Trichoptera, 174 spread Lepi-
doptera, 408 Coleoptera unidentified, and 4,075 spread
Lepidoptera identified to 386 species, including 259
exotic collected in Brasil (10), Colombia (134), Ecuador
(29), Mexico (2), Nicaragua (36), Panama (5), Peru (1),
and Venezuela (42), and domestic collected in Florida and
North Carolina by the donor;
*Mr. Mike C. Thomas (4327 N. W. 30th Terrace, Gainesville,
Florida 32605)
1,355 pinned (1,279 labeled, 76 unlabeled) insects con-
sisting of 3 Orthoptera, 5 Hemiptera, 6 Homoptera, 5
Lepidoptera, 18 Diptera, 8 Hymenoptera, 620 Coleoptera
unidentified, and 680 Coleoptera identified to 107
species, including 94 exotic collected in Africa (5),
Argentina (1), Bolivia (10), Canada (3), Dominican Repub-
lic (2), France (2), Grenada (6), Guadeloupe (1), Guam
(11), Haiti (18), Jamaica (9), Mexico (6), Panama (18),
and Trinidad (3), and domestic collected in Arizona,
California, Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Michigan,
Oregon, and Texas; 9 vials (9 specimens) invertebrates
consisting of 1 Mollusca, 1 Chilopoda, 1 Arachnida:
Pseudoscorpionida, 4 Arachnida: Araneae, 1 Diptera, and 1
Homoptera; 34 vials, 7 -pints Coleoptera, 1 vial pitfall
trap sample and 7 quarts ultraviolet light trap samples
of miscellaneous insects.
*Dr. Mac A. Tidwell (The International Center for Public
Health Research. University of South Carolina, P. 0. Box
699, McClellanville, South Carolina 29458)
1,844 (209 labeled, 1,635 unlabeled), exotic, unidenti-
fied insects (5 Orthoptera, 1 Dermaptera, 11 Hemiptera,
10 Homoptera, 98 Coleoptera, 8 Lepidoptera, 1,439 Dip-
tera, 272 Hymenoptera); 1,090 labeled, exotic Diptera
identified to 11 genera, 416 pinned, labeled, exotic
Diptera identified to 18 species; 134 vials arthropods
(100 domestic and 997 exotic specimens): 1 vial (2 speci-
mens) Thysanura, 1 vial (3 specimens) Orthoptera, 1 vial
(2 specimens) Isoptera, 1 vial (3 specimens) Dermaptera,
1 vial (2 specimens) Hemiptera, 5 vials (18 specimens)








Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Coleoptera, 8 vials (14 specimens) Lepidoptera, 8 vials
(44 specimens) Hymenoptera, 12 vials (789 specimens)
Diptera all exotic, 3 vials (10 specimens) Diptera do-
mestic; 2 vials (5 specimens Diplopoda, 1 vial (3 speci-
mens) Chilopoda, 3 vials (10 specimens) Arachnida: Opili-
ones, 7 vials (102 specimens) Arachnida: Araneae all
exotic, 50 vials (90 specimens) Arachnida: Araneae do-
mestic; 27 glassine envelopes (81 specimens) exotic Lepi-
doptera, 1 pillbox (15 specimens) exotic Thysanura; all
exotic from Colombia, domestic from Alabama, Louisiana,
and South Carolina; exotic samples miscellaneous insects:
3 sweep net samples, 3 insect flight trap samples, 52
ultraviolet light trap samples, 5 aquatic samples, 35
mixed samples (trap type not given) from Colombia and 2
mixed samples domestic collected by the donor.
Dr. Catherine R. Thompson (University of Florida, Agricultural
Research Center, 3205 College Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale,
Florida 33314)
1 pinned, labeled holotype & 95 paratypes of a new
species of Hymenoptera: Formicidae, Solenopsis (Diplo-
rhoptrum) nickersoni Thompson, described by the donor
from specimens collected in Florida by the donor.
*Dr. Robert H. Turnbow, Jr. (Route 4, Box 84, Lot 10, Enter-
prise, Alabama 36330)
1,749 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 6 Hemiptera,
236 Coleoptera unidentified, and 1,507 Coleoptera (14
dissected) identified to 374 species, including 152
exotic collected in Canada (4), Costa Rica (35), Mexico
(109), and Zaire (4), and domestic collected in Arizona,
California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Il-
linois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts,
Michigan, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexi-
co, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode
Island, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, and Washington
by the donor.
*Dr. Thomas J. Walker, Jr. (Department of Entomology and
Nematology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
32611)
6 pinned, labeled exotic Orthoptera identified to 6
species consisting of 5 holotypes (1 each from the Do-
minican Republic, Jamaica, Panama, Puerto Rico, and
Trinidad) and 1 neotype (from the Dominican Republic)
collected by the donor.
*Mr. James E. Wappes (904 50th Street, West Des Moines, Iowa
50265)
1,795 pinned, labeled Coleoptera consisting of 1,576
domestic identified to 277 species, and 219 exotic iden-
tified to 82 species, exotic from: Canada (1 specimen
identified to 1 species), Costa Rica (92 specimens iden-
tified to 30 species), Mexico (67 specimens identified to
29 species), Panama (59 specimens identified to 22
species), domestic from: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas,







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa,
Louisiana, Maine, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada,
New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Okla-
homa, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah.
Dr. Howard V. Weems, Jr. (11208 N. W. 12th Place, Gainesville,
Florida 32606)
15,975 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 81 Orthop-
tera, 27 Dermaptera, 532 Hemiptera, 591 Homoptera, 1,725
Coleoptera, 1,206 Lepidoptera (including 5 spread),
10,115 Diptera, 1,065 Hymenoptera, 231 Mecoptera, 29
Neuroptera 4,994 pinned insects have significant bio-
logical, host, habitat, or kind of trap data; 107 vials
(870 specimens) arthropods consisting of 3 vials (11
specimens) Crustacea: Isopoda, 9 vials (34 specimens)
Chilopoda, 3 vials (16 specimens) Diplopoda, 68 vials
(199 specimens) Arachnida: Araneae, 4 vials (4 specimens)
Arachnida: Scorpionida, 1 vial (2 specimens) Arachnida:
Amblypygi, 1 vial (1 specimen) Thysanura, 2 vials (2
specimens) Orthoptera, 1 vial (500) Homoptera, 1 vial (8
specimens) Hymenoptera, 1 vial (7 larvae) Diptera, 2
vials (2 larvae) Lepidoptera, 6 vials (23 larvae, 61
adults) Coleoptera; 357 envelopes (1,425 specimens)
insects consisting of 1 envelope (6 exotic specimens)
Lepidoptera (Canada), 346 envelopes (1,403 specimens)
Lepidoptera, 1 envelope (1 specimen) Coloeptera, 1 en-
velope (1 specimen) Diptera; 52 vials (677 specimens) and
5,392 pinned insects collected in Dominican Republic by
the donor and wife (Camilla) and family (Howard V. Weems,
III, Debra and Michael Grant, & Brenda Weems), domestic
collected in California, Florida, Georgia, Maine, New
Hampshire, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South
Carolina, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, & West Virginia.
*Dr. Minter J. Westfall, Jr. (Department of Zoology, 411
Bartram Hall West, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida 32611)
2,550 exotic authoritatively identified adult Odonata
representing 177 species, including 78 mated pairs, all
treated with acetone and stored in cellophone envelopes
with identification and collection data, collected in
Ecuador (1,518 specimens representing 106 species, in-
cluding 60 mated pairs), Switzerland (160 specimens
representing 12 species), & Venezuela (872 specimens
representing 59 species, including 18 mated pairs); 34
glassine envelopes containing 120 dried insects: 2 en-
velopes (5 specimens) Orthoptera, 2 envelopes (18 speci-
mens) Hemiptera, 4 envelopes (5 specimens) Homoptera, 16
envelopes (80 specimens) Coleoptera, 8 envelopes (10
specimens) Diptera, 2 envelopes (2 specimens) Hymenop-
tera, collected in Ecuador (except 2 envelopes, 2 speci-
mens of Coleoptera from Venezuela): 4 vials of miscel-
laneous alcohol-preserved insects collected in Costa
Rica: Puntarenas Province; all collected by the donor.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Dr. Richard C. Wilkerson (Department of Entomology and Nema-
tology, University of Florida 32611)
4,857 (4,785 exotic, 72 domestic) pinned, labeled insects
(37 from Bolivia, 1,872 from Colombia, 4 from Ecuador,
and 2,872 from Peru) 72 from the United States: Florida)
consisting of 4 Orthoptera, 8 Hemiptera, 33 Homoptera, 79
Coloeptera, 107 Diptera, 27 Hymenoptera unidentified, and
4,593 Diptera identified to 51 species, including 320
paratypes, and 5 holotypes and 1 allotype of 5 species;
23 insect flight trap samples from Ecuador (6) and Peru
(17); 2 pints (78 specimens) miscellaneous arthropods
from Peru; approximately 1,500 unpinned Diptera from
Peru; all collected by the donor.
*Dr. Nixon Wilson (Department of Biology, University of
Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa 50613)
3,573 slides (3,375 domestic, 177 exotic) (3,723 speci-
mens: 3,546 domestic, 177 exotic) Arachnida: Acari,
including 279 specimens identified to 39 species (in-
cluding 2 paratypes of 1 species) and 42 specimens iden-
tified to 13 genera; 190 vials (4,126 specimens: 4,037
domestic, 89 exotic) arthropods, including 2,725 speci-
mens identified to 15 species and 569 identified to 1
genus, consisting of 1 vial (1 specimen) Thysanura, 1
vial (1 specimen) Orthoptera, 8 vials (16 specimens) Col-
lembola, 2 vials (4 specimens) Odonata, 7 vials (31
specimens) Psocoptera, 1 vial (1 specimen) Thysanoptera,
8 vials (32 specimens, including 27 identified to 4
species) Mallophaga, 4 vials (6 specimens) Hemiptera, 1
vial (15 specimens) Homoptera, 3 vials (4 specimens)
Neuroptera, 4 vials (4 specimens) Coleoptera, 2 vials (2
larvae) Lepidoptera, 5 vials (6 specimens) Diptera, 20
vials (31 specimens, including 29 identified to 6
species) Siphonaptera, 3 vials (13 specimens) Hymenop-
tera, 3 vials (6 specimens) Crustacea: Amphipoda, 2 vials
(5 specimens) Crustacea: Isopoda, 6 vials (7 specimens)
Crustacea: other, 4 vials (5 specimens) Chilopoda, 4
vials (10 specimens) Diplopoda, 5 vials (7 specimens)
Arachnida: Araneae, 2 vials (2 specimens) Arachnida:
Opiliones, 65 vials (2,298 specimens, including 1,657
identified to 5 species) Arachnida: Acari; exotic from
Africa (2 slides), Antarctica (31 slides), Australia (2
slides, 2 vials), Belgian Congo (5 slides), Brasil (8
slides), Canada (18 vials), Colombia (2 vials), Cooke
Island (2 vials), Cuba (5 slides), Germany (7 slides),
India (1 vial), Liberia (6 slides), Mexico (54 slides, 1
vial), Nicaragua (15 slides), Okinawa (1 slide), Puerto
Rico (24 slides), South Africa (3 slides), Sudan (2
slides), Taiwan (9 slides), Taketoma Island (1 slide),
Trinidad (2 slides), Alaska (11 slides, 17 vials); do-
mestic from Arkansas, Arizona, Connecticut, Florida,
Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan,
Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New York,







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South
Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, and Wisconsin;
collected by the donor.
*Dr. Willis W. Wirth (806 Copley Lane, Silver Spring, Maryland
20904)
494 slide mounts (889 specimens) Diptera: Ceratopogonidae
representing 4 species of Dasyhelea & Culicoides col-
lected in Texas (296) & Wyoming (593); 5 slide boxes.
Dr. William B. Wright (18 Clinton Place, Woodcliff Lake, New
Jersey 07675)
9,548 Lepidoptera individually stored in glassine en-
velopes, consisting of 8,608 domestic and 970 exotic
specimens identified to 643 species, including 90 rare
and 9 very rare species; 91 pinned, labeled, spread Lep-
idoptera identified to 3 rarely collected species, in-
cluding 41 reared of 1 species (along with 5 pupae);
exotic from Alaska (17), Brasil (7), Canada (627), El
Salvador (8), Hawaii (25), Jamaica (3), Mexico (243),
Peru (9), Taiwan (2); domestic from Arizona, Arkansas,
California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa,
Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri,
Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New
York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsyl-
vania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont,
Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin, & Wyoming collected
mostly by the donor. This research collection of excep-
tional value consists at least 25% of uncommon to rarely
collected species. Within this group of Lepidoptera,
nearly all species and subspecies known to occur in North
America, including Mexico, are represented.
*Dr. Frank N. Young, Jr. (Department of Biology, Indiana
University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405)
11,737 pinned (10,920 labeled, 817 unlabeled) insects
consisting of 1 Odonata, 13 Orthoptera, 53 Hemiptera, 70
Homoptera, 6 Mecoptera, 1 Trichoptera, 485 Lepidoptera
(including 289 spread), 78 Diptera, 527 Hymenoptera, and
10,096 Coleoptera (684 dissected) (1,620 exotic) in-
cluding 6 Mecoptera identified to 2 species, 25 Lepidop-
tera identified to 5 species, 73 Diptera identified to 34
species, 198 Hymenoptera identified to 10 species, 13
Hymenoptera identified to 3 genera, and 8,171 Coleoptera
identified to 1,159 species (including 811 hybrids of a
generic cross, holotypes and allotypes of 2 species, 521
paratypes representing 51 species, and 7 topotypes of 2
species); 3 papered Lepidoptera; exotic Coleoptera from
Africa (1), Argentina (13), Austria (5), Bahamas (5),
Belize (1), Bolivia (6), Brasil (104), Canada (47), Chile
(23), Colombia (22), Costa Rica (12), Cuba (2), El Sal-
vador (8), England (50), Europe (42), Germany (20),
Guatemala (16), Honduras (1), India (41), Italy (3),
Mexico (186), Nicaragua (2), Panama (28), Paraguay (2),
Patagonia (2), Prussia (1), Puerto Rico (816), Scotland







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


(2), Sicily (7), South Africa (1), Suriname (79), Tan-
zania (15), Trinidad (3), Venezuela (45), and Zaire (9);
domestic specimens from all states except Delaware,
Maryland, Minnesota, Nebraska, and Wyoming; 335 ultra-
violet light trap samples (47 pints, 192 -pints, 96
vials); 142 vials, 68 -pint and smaller jars of assorted
invertebrates consisting of 1 vial (5 specimens) An-
nelida, 2 vials (2 specimens) Chilopoda, 1 vial (22
specimens) Crustacea: Amphipoda, 1 vial (1 specimen)
Diplopoda, 3 vials (16 specimens) Arachnida: Araneae
(including, 1 vial, 14 specimens from Mexico), 1 vial
(100+ specimens) Hymenoptera, 24 vials (250+ specimens)
mixed Anoplura and Arachnida: Acari, 1 vial (2 specimens)
Anoplura identified to 1 species, 1 vial (25 specimens)
Homoptera, 1 vial (4 specimens) Homoptera identified to 1
genus, 8 vials (78 specimens) Coleoptera (including 1
vial, 9 specimens for Brasil), 20 vials (299 specimens)
Coleoptera identified to 13 species (including 1 vial, 15
specimens identified to 1 species from Jamaica), 2 vials
(210 specimens) Coleoptera identified to 5 genera (in-
cluding 1 vial, 200 specimens identified to 4 genera from
Brasil), 35 vials, 52 jars aquatic samples of miscel-
laneous arthropods, 41 vials, 22 jars miscellaneous arth-
ropod collections, 3 jars (1 from Colombia) light trap
samples of miscellaneous insects, 1 jar sweep net sample
of miscellaneous insects; 5 slides (5 specimens) Arach-
nida: Acari; 897 miscellaneous entomological publica-
tions, 7 maps, 64 journal and bulletin issues including
American Zoologist vol. 23 (1-4) complete, Antenna vol. 6
(4), vol. 7 (1-3), Science vol. 220 (4599-4601), vol. 221
(4608, 4614-4618), vol. 222 (4619-4626), Discover vol. 3
(12), vol. 4 (1-5), Bioscience vol. 33(1-11), American
Scientist vol. 70 (3,6) vol. 71 (1-6), and 18 miscel-
laneous newsletters, magazines, bulletins, and catalogs:
Evolution vol. 36 (6), vol 37 (1-5), American Journal of
Tropical Medicine and Hygiene vol. 32 (2-6), Ecological
Entomology vol. 8 (1-4), Physiological Entomology vol. 8
(1-4), Systematic Entomology vol. 8 (1-4), Annals of the
Entomological Society of America, vol. 76 (1-6) Journal
of the Kansas Entomological Society vol. 56 (1-4),
Audubon vol. 85 (1,2,4,6), vol. 86 (1), The Great Lakes
Entomologist vol. 15 (4) vol., 16 (1-3), Entomological
News vol. 93 (5), vol. 94 (1-4), Psyche vol. 89 (3/4),
vol. 90 (1/2, 3), Smithsonian vol. 13 (3,8-12), vol. 14
(3,6-10), and 14 miscellaneous monographs, bulletins, and
newsletters.
*Mr. Charles F. Zeiger (3751 Sommers Street, Jacksonville,
Florida 32205)
732 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 1 Homoptera, 6
Coleoptera, and 725 spread Lepidoptera (including 109
identified to 64 species), all exotic (except 24 Lepidop-
tera from Florida identified to 13 species), exotic from







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


the Dominican Republic (89), Ecuador (261), Hungary (147
including 7 identified to 7 species), Japan (78 identi-
fied to 44 species) and Peru (126).


Other Contributions to the Collection

*Dr. W. Lee Adair (Department of Biochemistry, University of
South Florida, 12901 N. 30th Street, Tampa, Florida
33612)
65 pinned, labeled, spread Lepidoptera identified to 35
species, including 1 rarely collected Lepidoptera: Sphin-
gidae from Sanibel Island, collected in Florida by the
donor.
Dr. Carter T. Atkinson (Department of Preventive Medicine,
College of Veterinary Medicine, Box J136, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610)
8 slide mounts of identified Diptera: Ceratopogonidae,
voucher specimens representing 8 species of Culicoides.
*Dr. Thomas H. Atkinson, IV (Colegio de Postgraduados, Secre-
taria de Agricultura & Recursos Hildraulicos, Chapingo,
Mexico)
276 pinned, labeled, identified Coleoptera representing
84 species collected in Mexico.
*Dr. Richard M. Baranowski (University of Florida, IFAS,
Agriculture Research & Education Center, 18905 S. W.
280th Street, Route 1, Homestead, Florida 33030)
1 pint, 10 -pints, and 4 vials ultraviolet light trap
samples of miscellaneous insects from Mexico; 2 -pints,
17 vials ultraviolet light trap samples of miscellaneous
insects from Florida.
Dr. Richard S. Beal, Jr. (Box 4125, Northern Arizona Univer-
sity, Flagstaff, Arizona 86011)
39 pinned, labeled Coleoptera identified to 7 species,
including 1 paratype from Alabama, Arizona, California,
Florida, Missouri, Nevada, North Carolina, Ohio, and
Texas.
Mrs. Brenda Beck (P. 0. Box 493, Melrose, Florida 32666)
7 pints of ultraviolet light trap samples of miscel-
laneous insects collected by the donor in Florida.
Mr. Thomas L. Benfield (Jack Benny's Barbecue of Minneola,
P. 0. Box 236, Minneola, Florida 32755)
Very large yellowjacket wasp nest build around an old
stump, mounted in a clear plastic case with elevated
wooden base.
Mr. Robb Bennett (Department of Biology, Western Carolina
University, Cullowhee, North Carolina 28273)
10 vials (31 specimens) of Arachnida: Araneae collected
by the donor in Georgia and North Carolina representing a
species of Agelenidae, Cicurina bryantae, a rare spider
from the southern Appalachian area new to the FSCA.







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


Mr. Robert Bennett (39 W. Cork Street, Kalmazoo, Michigan
49001)
2 pinned, spread, labeled, identified Lepidoptera, Tmolus
azia (Hewitson) 1873, and Aphrissa (Phoebis) orbis (Poey)
1832, collected in southern Florida by the donor; both
represent firsts of their species for the FSCA.
*Dr. Allen H. Benton (Department of Biology, Fredonia State
College, Fredonia, New York 14063)
25 slide mounts (25 specimens) Siphonaptera identified to
11 species (both sexes represented for all but 1 species)
collected in Minnesota, New York, & West Virginia; host
data given for all specimens.
Mr. Julius Boos (314 N. E. 26th Drive, Wilton Manors, Ft.
Lauderdale, Florida 33334)
1 vial containing 3 Diptera: Tachinidae reared from
Lepidoptera.
Mr. and Mrs. (Nancy) Daniel L. Burris (4601 Snook Drive,
Tampa, Florida 33617) 313 pinned, unidentified Lepidop-
tera: 46 labeled 44 domestic (Florida, New York), 2
exotic (Mexico), 267 unlabeled, exotic (Germany) all
spread.
Mr. Broughton A. Caldwell (Environmental Protection Division,
Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Atlanta, Georgia
30334)
Holotype male & allotype of Diptera: Chironomidae: Hud-
sonimyia parrishi Caldwell & Soponis collected in Georgia
by the senior author & reared from larvae, with exuviae.
Mr. James A. Cohen (Department of Zoology, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
Voucher specimens consisting of 2 pinned, labeled, iden-
tified adults, male and female, of Lepidoptera: Arcti-
idae: Cycnia tenera Huber & 2 alcohol-preserved larvae,
all reared specimens with host data, collected in Florida
by the donor.
Mr. Allen Dean (Department of Entomology, Texas A & M Univer-
sity, College Station, Texas 77843)
34 alcohol-preserved Araneae: Salticidae in 30 vials
consisting of 1 male Bellota longimana Peckhams (genus &
species new to FSCA) & 33 Phidippus spp., all collected
in Texas by the donor.
*Ms. Jane E. Deisler (Department of General Biology, Univer-
sity of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85727)
4 bottles, 6 vials (24 specimens) Mollusca (Gastropoda:
Pulmonata) identified to 10 species and 3 genera, in-
cluding 2 species new to the FSCA, collected in Arizona
and Washington by the donor.
Mr. G. Wallace Dekle, Sr. (3600 N. W. 12th Street, Gaines-
ville, Florida 32601)
17 vials (34 specimens) of alcohol-preserved arthropods
consisting of 1 vial of Arachnida: Araneae (1 specimen),
1 vial of Trichoptera (1 specimen), 3 vials of Hemiptera
(8 specimens), 1 vial of Hymenoptera (3 specimens), 1







Division of Plant Industry/35th Biennial Report


vial of Coleoptera (1 specimen), & 10 vials of Diptera
(23 specimens) collected by the donor in Canada: Alberta
(1 vial), Yukon Territory (5 vials), & the United States:
Alaska (6 vials), Michigan (2 vials), & New York (2
vials).
Mr. Harold A. Denmark (10930 N. W. 12th Place, Gainesville,
Florida 32601)
1 volume of the Florida State Horticultural Society
Proceedings, 1 volume (4 numbers) of the Florida Entomol-
ogist, 1 volume (4 numbers) of the International Journal
of Acarology, 1 volume (4 numbers) of the Bulletin of the
Entomological Society of America, 1 volume (4 numbers) of
The Journal of Agriculture of the University of Puerto
Rico, & a 1980 University of Florida Alumni Directory.
*Dr. Mark Deyrup (Archbold Biological Station, Route 2, Box
180, Lake Placid, Florida 33852)
6 insect flight trap samples of miscellaneous alcohol-
preserved insects and 17 pinned, labeled, identified
Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae representing 1 rarely collected
species collected in southern Florida by the donor.
*Mr. Herbert L. Dozier, Jr. (Route 1, Box 295D, Pickens, South
Carolina 29671)
242 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 106 Diptera, 65
Hymenoptera, 5 Orthoptera, 1 Dermaptera, 41 Coleoptera, 8
Homoptera, 10 Hemiptera, 3 Neuroptera, 1 Odonata, 1
Isoptera, & 1 Lepidoptera collected by the donor in
Alabama, California, Florida, Maryland, Montana, New
Jersey, Oregon, South Carolina, & Texas.
*Mr. Peter C. Drummond (Route 1, Box 321A, Micanopy, Florida
32667)
8 ultraviolet light trap samples of miscellaneous insects
collected in Florida by the donor: 95 vials (292 speci-
mens) exotic unidentified Arachnida consisting of 39
vials (57 specimens) Scorpionida, 1 vial (2 specimens)
Schizomida, 54 vials (230 specimens) Opiliones, and 1
vial (3 specimens) Solpugida collected in the West Indies
by the donor (Scorpionida: Grenada, 2 vials, 2 specimens;
Jamaica, 23 vials, 33 specimens; Mexico, 1 vial, 1 speci-
men; Montserrat, 2 vials, 3 specimens; Puerto Rico, 9
vials, 15 specimens; Statia, 1 vial, 2 specimens; St.
Vincent, 1 vial, 1 specimen; Schizomida: Puerto Rico, 1
vial, 2 specimens: Opiliones: Bahamas, 1 vial, 1 speci-
men; Dominica, 2 vials, 29 specimens; Grenada, 1 vial, 2
specimens; Jamaica, 29 vials, 139 specimens; Montserrat,
6 vials, 33 specimens; Puerto Rico, 15 vials, 26 speci-
mens; Solpugida: Jamaica, 1 vial, 3 specimens.
*Dr. Joe E. Eger (4608 Estrella, Tampa, Florida 33609)
214 pinned, labeled insects (174 exotic, 40 domestic)
consisting of 150 Hemiptera, 59 Homoptera, 1 Orthoptera,
& 4 Coleoptera collected in Czechoslovakia (2), Guatemala
(6), India (109), Mexico (56) Russia (1), and the United
States: Texas (40).




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