• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 Report of the division directo...
 Fiscal
 Library
 Technical assistance
 Office of training coordinator
 Office of systematic botany
 Bureau of apiary inspection
 Bureau of citrus budwood regis...
 Bureau of entomology
 Biological control laboratory
 Florida state collection of...
 Bureau of methods development
 Bureau of nematology
 Bureau of pest eradication and...
 Citrus blackfly
 Spreading decline
 Lethal yellowing
 Mediterranean fruit fly
 Bureau of plant inspection
 Citrus tree survey
 Turfgrass certification progra...
 Non-citrus nematode certificat...
 Postentry quarantione 1980-82
 Bureau of plant pathology














Title: Division of Plant Industry biennial report
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075925/00012
 Material Information
Title: Division of Plant Industry biennial report
Alternate Title: Biennial report
Abbreviated Title: Div. Plant Ind. bienn. rep.
Physical Description: v. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Division of Plant Industry
Publisher: Florida Dept. of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Publication Date: 1980-1982
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Plant inspection -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Plant diseases -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Dept. of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 26th (1964/66)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year ends June 30.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: 39th (July 1, 1990-June 30, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075925
Volume ID: VID00012
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01242950
alephbibnum - 001511744
lccn - sn 86001883
lccn - sn 86001883
issn - 0888-9554
 Related Items
Preceded by: Biennial report

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
    Front Matter
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Table of Contents
        Page iv
        Page v
    Report of the division director
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Fiscal
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Library
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Technical assistance
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Office of training coordinator
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Office of systematic botany
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Bureau of apiary inspection
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Bureau of citrus budwood registration
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Bureau of entomology
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Biological control laboratory
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
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        Page 53
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        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    Florida state collection of arthropods
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
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        Page 81
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        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
    Bureau of methods development
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
    Bureau of nematology
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
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        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
    Bureau of pest eradication and control
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
    Citrus blackfly
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
    Spreading decline
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
    Lethal yellowing
        Page 204
        Page 205
    Mediterranean fruit fly
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
    Bureau of plant inspection
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
    Citrus tree survey
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
    Turfgrass certification program
        Page 226
    Non-citrus nematode certification
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
    Postentry quarantione 1980-82
        Page 232
    Bureau of plant pathology
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
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Full Text

































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Division of Plant Industry

Thirty-Fourth

Biennial Report

July 1, 1980-June 30, 1982


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
AND CONSUMER SERVICES
Doyle Conner, Commissioner

DIVISION OF PLANT INDUSTRY
Halwin L. Jones, Director

Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Division of Plant Industry
Post Office Box 1269
Gainesville, Florida 32602







FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF
AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER
SERVICES


DIVISION OF PLANT INDUSTRY


Plant Industry Technical Council

Roy Vandegrift, Jr., Chairman (Vegetable) .......... Canal Point
Joseph Welker, Vice Chairman (Ornamental
Horticulture) .............................. Jacksonville
Stanley F. Cruse (Turfgrass) ........................ Palmetto
Lawrence Cutts (Apiary) ............................ Chipley
Joann Smith (Citizen-at-Large) ..................... Micanopy
John W. Hornbuckle (Citrus) ................... Belleair Beach
John Morroni (Commercial Flower) ................ Fort Myers
Lewis E. Wadsworth, Jr. (Forestry) ................... Bunnell
Richard M ims (Citrus) ............................. W averly
Jim Vosters (Foliage) .............................. Miami
Edward F. Mitchell (Tropical Fruit) .................... Miami
Halwin L. Jones, Secretary ....................... Gainesville


Administrative Staff

Halwin L. Jones, Director ........................ Gainesville
S. A. Alfieri, Jr., Assistant Director ................ Gainesville
R. E. Brown, Chief of Methods Development ......... Gainesville
H. A. Denmark, Chief of Entomology ............... Gainesville
J. C. Herndon, Chief of Apiary Inspection ........... Gainesville
R. L. King, Chief of Plant Inspection ............... Gainesville
C. Poucher, Chief of Pest Eradication
and Control .............................. W inter Haven
C. P. Seymour, Chief of Plant Pathology ............ Gainesville
D. E. Stokes, Chief of Nematology ................. Gainesville
C. O. Youtsey, Chief of Budwood Registration ..... Winter Haven







TABLE OF CONTENTS


REPORT OF THE DIVISION DIRECTOR ............... 1
F iscal ................. ................. ....... 5
Library ........................................ 11
Technical Assistance ............................. 13
Office of Training Coordinator ....................... 15
Office of Systematic Botany ......................... 17
BUREAU OF APIARY INSPECTION ................... 19
BUREAU OF CITRUS BUDWOOD REGISTRATION ..... 24
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY ........................ 37
Biological Control Laboratory ................... .. 43
Florida State Collection of Arthropods ................ 69
BUREAU OF METHODS DEVELOPMENT ............. 145
BUREAU OF NEMATOLOGY ......................... 151
BUREAU OF PEST ERADICATION AND CONTROL ..... 189
Citrus Blackfly .................................... 192
Spreading Decline ................................. 196
Lethal Yellowing .............................. 204
M editerranean Fruit Fly ............................ 206
BUREAU OF PLANT INSPECTION .................... 215
Citrus Tree Survey................... ............ 223
Turfgrass Certification Program ................... .. 226
Non-citrus Nematode Certification .................... 227
Postentry Quarantione 1980-82 ................... . 232
BUREAU OF PLANT PATHOLOGY .................... 233


This public document was promulgated at a cost of $9,922.15,
or a cost of $9.92 cents per copy, to inform the general public,
Legislature, and other interested parties on the programs and
investigative efforts of the Division of Plant Industry.
PI83G-3




















Gainesville, Florida


Honorable Doyle Conner, Commissioner
Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services
The Capitol
Tallahassee, Florida 32301

Dear Commissioner:

I am pleased to present herewith the 1980-82 Biennial Report
for the Division of Plant Industry.

Respectfully,






HALWIN L. JONES, Director
Division of Plant Industi







REPORT OF THE DIVISION DIRECTOR

Halwin L. Jones

Restructuring of the Division of Plant Industry, a program
predicated upon early detection of serious plant pests through
systematic and biometric surveys as its primary objective, proceeded
according to plan during the biennium. Positive results of restructur-
ing indicated that the effectiveness of Florida's state-wide pest detec-
tion and control effort has been substantially enhanced.
As a result of restructuring, the Division's technical bureaus ex-
perienced a significant increase in the total number of specimens pro-
cessed over the past two bienniums, and the efforts of the Division's
entire plant protection team in covering "new ground" have been
rewarded with satisfactory results.
Many new host records and new county and state collecting records
resulted from newly instituted approaches to pest detection. Inspec-
tions are no longer confined to nurseries and groves, but have been ex-
panded to include: surveys of nursery environs for plant pests and
diseases; urban survey; special pest detection surveys; and more fre-
quent inspections of high-risk areas-such as ports, air terminals, and
nurseries which regularly import plants or plant materials. Expanded
coverage in pest detection work improves the ability to achieve the
overall goal of early detection of serious plant pests before they become
established in agricultural areas, as well as providing a wealth of
biological information concerning ranges and host preferences of
organisms effecting plants.
The early-detection objective was well served by some 12,000 fruit
fly traps strategically placed throughout our state. For the first time
since 1963, Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata, was detected in
Florida. Three Medflies were trapped in East Tampa on August 4,
1981. Another fly was trapped August 9, and a last, single Medfly was
trapped August 14, both finds occurring within 2 miles of the original
discovery.
The Medfly-infested area was uncomfortably near citrus-, winter
vegetable- and strawberry-producing areas of Florida. However, due to
early detection and rapid implementation of effective eradication
measures, eradication was officially announced within 101 days of the
discovery of the voracious pest, and serious economic crop losses were
prevented.
During the biennium, Division personnel remained alert to the threat
of Medfly introductions from California, where the pest was reported
from the Santa Clara area in June 1980. A separate infestation in the
Los Angeles area had been eradicated, but the Santa Clara infestation
was not effectively contained and began spreading into the
agriculturally rich San Joaquin Valley area. During California's long
and costly eradication program, Division inspection personnel met







Division of Plant Industry


incoming California produce shipments at their destination points to
inspect for possible presence of Medfly.
The Division's Chief of Pest Eradication and Control, Charles
Poucher, was dispatched to California on several occasions in an ad-
visory role and to review the Medfly problem there. It is noteworthy
that Florida's 101-day eradication campaign cost only $1 million
($500,000 federal and $500,000 state funds) compared with an
estimated $96 million, 2-year California Medfly campaign. Florida's
apparent success in preventing the establishment of Medfly can be
attributed to early detection as a result of an extensive fruit fly trap-
ping network that was already in place, and to effective, quick
response to the emergency. Control measures included ground and
aerial application of malathion bait spray in infested areas. Impor-
tant in implementing effective control measures was adequate survey
to delimit the extent of the infestation.
During the biennium, brown garden snail, Helix aspersa, was in-
tercepted on numerous occasions in certified and noncertified plant
and plant material shipments. During the reporting period, 5,262
shipments of plants and plant material from Arizona, California,
Oregon, Puerto Rico, Texas and Washington State were inspected by
Division personnel.
The number of nurseries under inspection decreased during the
biennium from 8,235 reported June 30, 1980, to 7,915 reported June
30, 1982. Citrus nursery acreage increased by 3,314 acres and the
number of citrus nursery trees increased by 4,226,562 during the
biennium.
Bureau of Plant Inspection personnel inspected and serviced an
average of 7,345 Jackson fruit fly traps on a 3-week basis and an
average of 91 McPhail traps on a weekly basis.
During the biennium, Florida experienced two of the most
devastating winter freezes since records have been kept. During the
month of January in 1981 and 1982, temperatures in the citrus belt
plummeted into the low teens for extended periods causing estimated
losses to the round orange crops of 17 and 22 percent in 1981 and
1982, respectively.
As the result of back-to-back severe freezes, an already strong
citrus nursery stock market was impacted with additional demands
for tens of thousands of grove replacement trees. Budwood Program
participants produced 6,622,000 registered nursery trees, represent-
ing a 60 percent increase in registered nursery stock production over
the previous reporting period.
Division personnel supervised the cutting of over 8.4 million buds
from registered scion grove trees this biennium. This represents an
increase of 8.5 percent.
Heavy demands were made on the foundation grove budwood trees






THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


to supply industry with propagative material during the time re-
quired for cold-damaged trees to recover.
During the biennium, 27 new selections were added to the Florida
Citrus Arboretum planting.
The Bureau of Entomology's specimen workload continued to in-
crease, along with the recording of many new arthropod hosts and
new county and state collecting records. During the biennium, 24,316
lots were received from field personnel for identification (each lot
representing from one to many specimens). Several important collec-
tions were added to the Florida State Collection of Arthropods during
the reporting period, with other important additions to the collection
planned.
Bureau of Nematology personnel rated a total of 27 different
plants, including ornamentals of economic importance, for host
suitability to Pratylenchus coffeae. Other plant-parasitic nematodes
were also tested for host preference. Surveys were conducted for
nematodes associated with citrus, grapes and corn. Other activities
by nematology personnel included pinewood nematode survey and ur-
ban survey.
The specimen workload for the nematology bureau increased about
25 percent during the biennium. Many new host records were re-
corded, particularly from the grape and pinewood nematode surveys.
The Bureau of Plant Pathology processed 14,514 specimens during
the reporting period, with 212 new Florida pathogen records
established. Many investigations into plant pathological problems
were conducted, along with a wide array of projects aimed at improv-
ing plant disease problems in industry.
Studies of Phytophthora palmivora, a root pathogen of milkweed
vine, Morrenia odorata, reached a conclusion after extensive in-
vestigations by pathology bureau personnel, IFAS researchers, and
most recently by Abbott Laboratories of North Chicago. A label for
this pathogen to be used as a fungal bioherbicide in Florida citrus
groves was granted by the Environmental Protection Agency. The
new product, called Devine, reportedly was selling and performing
well.
Cooperative studies of citrus canker in Argentina were continued
during the biennium. Training sessions for inspection personnel on
new citrus canker detection techniques were held on several occasions
during the reporting period.
With the continued good control effected by the release of citrus
blackfly parasitic wasps, the urban biometric survey associated with
this effort was gradually reduced and finally phased out toward the
end of the biennium. Citrus blackfly parasite colonies and the person-
nel to manage them were transferred to Division headquarters in
Gainesville, where the parasites will remain available for release when
needed.
The spreading decline program continued at the same intensity






Division of Plant Industry


level as previously, with some increase in the number of linear feet
of buffer maintenance.
To aid in treating diseased palms attacked by lethal yellowing,
the Division assisted county and municipal governments by pur-
chasing the antibiotic oxytetracycline in volume and distributing it,
at state cost, to municipalities involved in an injection program.
This participation continued until August 1981, when the chemical
became locally available at competitive prices. Additional research
to develop resistant palms, such as the Maypan, for replacing
diseased palms was recommended.
Prospaltella lahorensis, a tiny parasitic wasp distributed
throughout the state on infested gardenia plants, has shown good
control of citrus whitefly, Dialeurodes citri, in many parts of
Florida.
Fumigation of fruit at the Gainesville fumigation chambers
dropped in volume during the biennium, due to drastic reductions in
shipping due to severe freezes in the citrus belt. In addition, the
California Office of Safety and Health adopted standards of 130 ppb
ethylene dibromide (EDB) in the ambient air at the work site. Nine
hundred semi-truckloads of citrus (946,316 4/5-bushel boxes and
70,308 gift boxes) were fumigated at the Gainesville chambers. The
Fruit and Vegetable Division fumigated 10,011 semi-truckloads of
fruit (13,320,594 4/5-bushel boxes).
A cooperative Federal/State Imported Fire Ant Control Program
was launched during the biennium, with Amdro Fire Ant Bait
distributed to interested parties at state cost.
Division headquarters in Gainesville, the Doyle Conner Building,
were expanded during the biennium to include: additional office
space for the Training Coordinator, Methods Development, and the
Maintenance Supervisor; a training area accommodating 200 per-
sons; office space for the Division Botanist and staff, plus her-
barium storage area; a new quarantine greenhouse and laboratory;
and offices for Soil and Water Conservation. The Bureau of En-
tomology was expanded by 6,000 square feet, doubling the space for
the Florida State Collection of Arthropods. The Bureau of Plant
Pathology's facilities were expanded to include: a room for sterile
transfer of plant pathogenic organisms; additional laboratory space
for controlled environment incubators; office and laboratory space
for Forest Pathology; a conference/reference room; and storage
space. The expansion of division headquarters eased crowded condi-
tions and improved the diagnostic and investigative capabilities of
the bureaus affected.
In conclusion, the biennium saw the improvement of Florida's
overall plant protection effort, effected by the positive results of the
ongoing Restructuring Program and improvement and expansion of
facilities.







TIIIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


FISCAL OFFICE

Charles E. Taylor, Fiscal Officer

Tables I through V reflect the application or intended applica-
tions of the several categories of appropriated or requested ap-
propriation of funds for the Fiscal Years 1980-81 through 1984-85.
Tables identify the program components of the Division, based on
Florida's Planning and Budgeting System.

Table 1. FY 1980-81 Actual Expenditures

General Total
Bureau/Activity Revenue Trust Expenditures


Administrative Services,
General
Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library
Total Administrative
Services, General


Plant Industry Products and
Protection Inspections
Bureau of Plant Inspection
Citrus Tree Survey
Total Plant Industry
Products and Protection
Inspections


Plant and Animal Pest
and Disease Control
Bureau of Entomology
Bio-control Laboratory
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bureau of Pest Eradication
and Control
Spreading Decline Program
Lethal Yellowing Program


807,553 12,977 820,530

807,553 12,977 820,530


1,898,772 235,131 2,133,903
131,084 3,951 135,035


2,029,856 239,082 2,268,938


471,031
2,444
401,642
247,623
203,967


12,519 483,550
2,444
10,854 412,496
628 248,251
5,630 209,597


288,482 6,665 295,147


180,251 27,718
122,993 468,521
13,265


207,969
591,514
13,265







Division of Plant Industry


Special Categories
Apiary Indemnities
Citrus Blackfly
Bureau of Methods
Development
Methods Development
Imported Fire Ant
Total Plant and Animal
Pest and Disease
Control

DIVISION TOTAL


20,230
316,097


144,848
0


103,823


0
0


20,230
419,920


144,848
0


2,399,608 649,623 3,049,231

5,237,017 901,682 6,138,699







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Table 2. FY 1981-82 Actual Expenditures

General Total
Bureau/Activity Revenue Trust Expenditures


Administrative Services,
General
Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library
Personnel
Total Administrative
Services, General
Plant Industry Products and
Protection Inspections
Bureau of Plant Inspection
Citrus Tree Survey
Total Plant Industry
Products and Protection
Inspections
Plant and Animal Pest
and Disease Control
Bureau of Entomology
Bio-control Laboratory
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bureau of Pest Eradication
and Control
Spreading Decline Program
Lethal Yellowing Program
Special Categories
Apiary Indemnities
Citrus Blackfly
Bureau of Methods
Development
Methods Development
*Imported Fire Ant
Total Plant and Animal
Pest and Disease
Control

DIVISION TOTAL


881,245 1,634 882,879

881,245 1,634 882,879



1,899,707 355,276 2,254,983
162,889 334 163,223


2,062,596 355,610 2,418,206


505,534
25,289
462,615
269,398
265,922

293,006

200,100
119,915
0

33,108
637,518


505,534
25,289
462,615
270,196
265,922


0 293,006


350
464,650
7,277

0
26,994


200,450
584,565
7,277

33,108
664,512


133,493 317 133,810
0 579,009 579,009


2,945,898 1,079,395

5,889,739 1,436,639


4,025,293

7,326,378


*Per direction of the Legislature $75,000 for transfer to IFAS, University of Florida
for scientific research for bio-control of Imported Fire Ant.







Division of Plant Industry


Table 3. FY 1982-83 Allocations and Estimated Expend-
itures
General Total
Bureau/Activity Revenue Trust Expenditures


Administrative Services,
General
Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library
Personnel
Total Administrative
Services, General
Plant Industry Products and
Protection Inspections
Bureau of Plant Inspection
Citrus Tree Survey
Total Plant Industry
Products and Protection
Inspections
Plant and Animal Pest
and Disease Control
Bureau of Entomology
Bio-control Laboratory
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bureau of Pest Eradication
and Control
Spreading Decline Program
Lethal Yellowing Program
Special Categories
Apiary Indemnities
Citrus Blackfly
Bureau of Methods
Development
Methods Development
*Imported Fire Ant
Total Plant and Animal
Pest and Disease
Control
DIVISION TOTAL


1,066,416

1,066,416


0 1,066,416

0 1,066,416


2,044,428 413,628 2,458,056
165,922 0 165,922


2,210,350 413,628 2,623,978


552,334
53,000
487,719
306,882
282,060

342,887

193,728
127,240
0

36,000
350,000


70,745
0
0
0
0


623,079
53,000
487,719
306,882
282,060


0 342,887


0
521,710
150,000

0
0


228,162 0
0 1,001,790


2,960,012 1,744,245
6,236,778 2,157,873


193,728
648,950
150,000

36,000
350,000


228,162
1,001,790


4,704,257
8,394,651


*Per direction of the Legislature $75,000 for transfer to IFAS, University of
Florida, for scientific research for bio-control of Imported Fire Ant.







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Table 4. FY 1983-84 Requested Allotments
General Total
Bureau/Activity Revenue Trust Expenditures


Administrative Services,
General
Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library-
Personnel
Total Administrative
Services, General

Plant Industry Products and
Protection Inspections
Bureau of Plant Inspection
Citrus Tree Survey
Total Plant Industry
Products and Protection
Inspections

Plant and Animal Pest
and Disease Control
Bureau of Entomology
Bio-control Laboratory
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bureau of Pest Eradication
and Control
Spreading Decline Program
Lethal Yellowing Program
Special Categories
Apiary Indemnities
Citrus Blackfly
Bureau of Methods
Development
Methods Development
Imported Fire Ant
Total Plant and Animal
Pest and Disease
Control


DIVISION TOTAL


1,268,668

1,268,668


2,431,243
195,258


0 1,268,668

0 1,268,668


418,277
0


2,849,520
195,258


2,626,501 418,277 3,044,778


655,339
58,562
521,042
363,916
331,375

351,942

207,767
261,110
0

36,000
150,000


244,546


655,339
58,562
521,042
363,916
331,375


0 351,942


0
425,074
0

0
0


0 1,024,6&


3,181,599 1,449,71

7,076,768 1,867,9!


207,767
686,184
0

36,000
150,000


0 244,546
40 1,024,640


14 4,631,313

91 8,944,759






Division of Plant Industry


Table 5. FY 1984-85 Requested Allotments
General Total
Bureau/Activity Revenue Trust Expenditures


Administrative Services,
General
Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library-
Personnel
Total Administrative
Services, General

Plant Industry Products and
Protection Inspections
Bureau of Plant Inspection
Citrus Tree Survey
Total Plant Industry
Products and Protection
Inspections

Plant and Animal Pest
and Disease Control
Bureau of Entomology
Bio-control Laboratory
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bureau of Pest Eradication
and Control
Spreading Decline Program
Lethal Yellowing Program
Special Categories
Apiary Indemnities
Citrus Blackfly
Bureau of Methods
Development
Methods Development
Imported Fire Ant
Total Plant and Animal
Pest and Disease
Control


DIVISION TOTAL


1,236,066

1,236,066


0 1,236,066

0 1,236,066


2,407,437 418,277 2,825,714
175,872 0 175,872


2,583,309 418,277 3,001,586


647,239
65,771
517,435
335,799
331,111

356,441

205,706
275,280
0

36,000
150,000


647,239
65,771
517,435
335,799
331,111


0 356,441


0
425,074
0


205,706
700,354
0

36,000
150,000


242,544 0 242,544
0 990,503 990,503


3,163,326 1,415,577

6,982,701 1,833,854


4,578,903

8,816,555







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


LIBRARY

June B. Jacobson, Librarian

The Division Library has enjoyed a period of continuing growth
over the 1980-82 biennium. Nine hundred and fifty-three volumes
were added to our shelves; 582 book volumes with the remainder be-
ing bound serial volumes. The total number of volumes in the
Library is 11,120 as of June 30, 1982.
Although the Library book budget is the primary manner for ac-
quiring new publications, we have been fortunate to receive ex-
cellent donations from scientists retiring from life-long pursuits of
their specialized interests. The number of volumes added as dona-
tions was 112 of the 582 volumes, or nearly 20%. We are grateful to
be the recipients of these select volumes.
Library personnel has been much more stable than during the
previous biennium. A change in classification from Secretary to
Library Assistant enabled the Division to employ a person with
previous experience in Library work. Upon Barbara Tryon's ter-
mination in August 1980, the position was elevated to Library
Technical Assistant I. During this interim period Olga Newman
worked on a part-time basis, assisted by Karen Zripo Adamson. In
November 1980, Alice Richardson was selected for the position
after nearly a year of work at Hume Library where Alice worked
with the serial collection. Olga graduated in May 1981 and was
replaced by Charlene Shaw who terminated in June 1982 after
nearly a year's employment as a part-time employee.
During the 1980-82 biennium interlibrary loans increased by 30%
from 324 items borrowed to 466. A large part of the activity
originated from the Research Associates of the Florida State Collec-
tion of Arthropods.
Catalog cards reflecting our Library's holding continue to be ex-
changed with the University of Florida in the area of entomology.
We received cards from Hume Library for their newly purchased
books in entomology, plant disease, and nematology. Graduate
students in entomology are permitted to check out materials in ac-
cordance with library procedures.
Donations to our Library during the past two years were of
significant value. Dr. Frank Young of Bloomington, Indiana was a
major contributor as was Dr. Ernest DuCharme, Mrs. E. Waering,
Mr. & Mrs. C. Griffin, Mr. Henry Swanson, Dr. Howard Weems, Dr.
Robert Esser, and Dr. Ellis Matheny. A large and important collec-
tion of Lepidoptera books and journals was given to the Division
Library at the very close of the biennium by Dr. Walfried Reinthal.
It will certainly be an added resource to any investigators working
with moths and butterflies.







12 Division of Plant Industry

Progress has been made during the biennium in cataloging the
back-log of volumes that had never been permanently cataloged.
Approximately 80 volumes still remain in the technical bureaus;
although many of those have been in continuous use since their pur-
chase. The number of uncataloged volumes in the Library has been
reduced from 169 to 47.
We look forward to a period of further growth as more retiring
scientists have informally announced donating their private
libraries to the Division of Plant Industry Library.







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

Phyllis P. Habeck, Information Specialist

The primary responsibility of the Technical Assistance Office dur-
ing the biennium continued to be the dissemination of information
to the public, particularly those persons associated with the plant
and agricultural industries, about plant regulatory programs and
Division of Plant Industry activities. This was accomplished
through feature articles and news releases to newspapers, radio and
television; a quarterly news bulletin; a bi-monthly in-house news-
letter; audio-visual materials and educational aids; assisting the
bureaus in the publication of technical and scientific circulars,
bulletins and other information; exhibits; and public relations.
The discovery in August 1981 of the Mediterranean fruit fly in the
Tampa area kept the two information specialists and the
photographer especially busy supplying updated information to the
news media and the public on the progress of the eradication
program.
In April 1982, Phyllis P. Habeck was appointed information
specialist and Acting Chief of the TAO after the resignation of the
former Chief, Frank King.


DPI Publications

The Plant Industry News is published quarterly to inform
nurserymen, growers, stock dealers, citrus growers and other per-
sons who work in the plant and agricultural industries about pest
control programs and regulations governing the movement of
plants and plant products. It has a controlled circulation of approx-
imately 13,000.
The Reporter, a bi-monthly in-house newsletter reviews Depart-
ment and Division policies and reports on job-related activities of
employees. It is distributed to all active and retired personnel.
The TRI-OLOGY Technical Report, a monthly summary of the
most important insects, plant pathogens and nematodes found in
the state, is compiled by the technical bureaus. Monthly circulars
dealing with current plant pests are also provided by each technical
bureau. The TAO provides photographs, illustrations, does the
layouts and coordinates the printing of both publications. These are
widely distributed around the state, the country and several foreign
countries.
Major publications released by the DPI during the biennium in-
cluded Florida's Certified Nursery Directory, 1980 and 1981; Occa-
sional Papers of the Florida State Collection of Arthropods, Volume
2, Predaceous Water Beetles of the Genus Desmopachria: The







Division of Plant Industry


Convexa-Grana Group (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae); a reprinting of the
leaflet, Major Fruit Flies of the World; and 33rd Biennial Report,
1978-1980.
Regular feature articles written by the Division writer are being
furnished to several newspapers and magazines around the state.
These include various articles for the Florida Nurseryman, the of-
ficial publication of the Florida Nurseryman and Growers Associa-
tion which also uses the DPI feature entitled "Threatened and En-
dangered Plants of Florida". "Native Plants in Landscaping" is
another feature article published weekly in the Gainesville Sun, a
daily newspaper.


Photography
The photography section provided field and studio photographs
for all the regular DPI publications including the Plant Industry
News, the Reporter, the monthly technical circulars, news releases
and special features. In addition, 669 job orders were completed,
both black and white and color, for personnel in the different
bureaus during the biennium. Slide talks on Division programs and
activities, particularly the Medfly Campaign, were prepared not
only to be used as training aids within the Division, but were also
sent to groups and individuals outside of the Division for educa-
tional purposes. Large photographs, creative ideas and substantial
effort were contributed toward the production of Division exhibits.
A continuing responsibility is the management and operation of all
audio-visual equipment.


Art Work and Exhibits
More than 400 job orders from Division personnel for maps,
charts, graphs, posters, signs, cover designs and other visual aids
and graphics were completed by the staff artist during the bien-
nium. There were numerous requests for detailed, scientifically ac-
curate illustrations in black and white and occasionally in color of
plants, plant pathogens, insects and nematodes. The layout of all
regular Division publications continued to be the artist's respon-
sibility. Assistance in the design and layout of additional major
publications, leaflets, training manuals, business forms and other
printed matter produced by the DPI was also provided. The artist
was instrumental in the design and construction of three new ex-
hibits which were shown around the state at various agricultural
and trade fairs and other public functions in an attempt to keep the
public informed about Division programs and activities.







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


OFFICE OF TRAINING COORDINATOR

Ernest M. Collins, Jr., Training Coordinator

The primary training of new Agricultural Products Specialist
IIIs, consisting of six weeks of instruction, continued during this
biennium. Six classes TC-42 through TC-47, with a total enrollment
of 30 persons completed training in entomology, pathology,
nematology, nursery rules and regulations, and plant identification
subjects. Additional subjects on the general operation of the
various other offices of the Division are also presented to new
trainees. A new scheduling of the primary training was devised late
in this biennium whereby two weeks of training and one week back
at their work stations allowed time for field personnel to keep all
fruit fly trapping on schedule, avoiding added pressures on work
loads in other districts. Class instruction is under constant review
by the training coordinator and this has led to changes in schedul-
ing of subject presentation with emphasis being placed on practical
field application. Additionally, emphasis is being placed on the
possible introduction and identification of those economically
serious organisms that could invade Florida agriculture from
foreign countries and other states. Retention of field personnel con-
tinues to be a problem area. Of the 30 personnel receiving training,
almost half have left the Division for other employment.
The single most destructive bacterial disease known to citrus is
Xanthomonas campestris pv. citri, the cause of citrus canker. With
canker outbreaks occurring in South America and lack of pest
knowledge in some of our near neighboring island countries, there
was need to update our personnel on recognition and the proper
handling techniques of this dreaded organism. A citrus canker
survey and mailing kit was designed which included maps,
specimen slips, disinfestant, bagging material and tree markers
along with instructions for the safe sampling for this disease. With
the cooperation of the University of Florida's Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences, a 25-minute video presentation depicting the
various stages of canker development and the proper utilization of
the citrus canker kit was made to be used in conjunction with a slide
presentation of other citrus diseases that can be confused with
canker. In June 1981, three regional workshops covering all aspects
of the citrus canker problem were conducted for all field super-
visors, Agricultural Products Specialist IIIs, and members of the
United States Department of Agriculture, Plant Protection &
Quarantine, Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service. Since that
time each area or regional workshop has updated or revisited that
subject. Eight regional or area training days were conducted during
this biennium. A day of special vegetable transplant training







16 Division of Plant Industry

dealing with the certification requirements of other states was held
in February 1981, prior to transplant movement from Florida.
Additional duties of the Training Coordinator during this bien-
nium were assistance in the Tampa Mediterranean fruit fly eradica-
tion campaign (101 days) and the coordination of efforts in the selec-
tive computerization of the Division.







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


OFFICE OF SYSTEMATIC BOTANY

K. R. Langdon, Botanist

The Office of Systematic Botany is a service support unit pri-
marily aiding and assisting the other bureaus of the Division of
Plant Industry by providing plant identifications and related ser-
vices. Also to a lesser extent, services are provided for other local,
state, and federal governmental agencies and personnel and to in-
dividuals upon request.
As of September 1981, the Division of Plant Industry Herbarium
was moved from its location in the Bureau of Nematology to new,
expanded space in the addition to the Doyle Conner Building. For
administrative purposes it was transferred from Nematology to the
Bureau of Administration and was named the Office of Systematic
Botany to include the herbarium and associated work. Dr. K. R.
Langdon, Botanist, serves as head of the Office of Systematic
Botany and as curator of the herbarium. Mr. C. R. Artaud,
Biologist, assists him.
The Division of Plant Industry Herbarium has provided host and
other plant identification services for division personnel and others
since 1964. Since that time a collection of pressed, dried plant
specimens, mounted on herbarium sheets and carefully identified,
has been developed for reference, study, and comparison in identify-
ing submitted specimens. The collection now contains 5, 427 sheets
of vascular plants plus approximately 600 packets of bryophytes.
The herbarium also houses a seed collection presently containing
1,270 vials of identified seed.
During the 1980-82 biennium there were 5,277 plant specimens
submitted for identification, 671 more than the last biennium. There
were 670 specimens added to the herbarium.
Other work handled by the Office of Systematic Botany includes
many hours spent reviewing host lists and checking plant names to
verify or correct plant names for spelling, validity, synonomy,
describers, etc.; reviewing manuscripts as a member of the Publica-
tions Committee; and reviewing and making recommendations on
applications to the Aquatic Plant Council and the Plant Pathogen
Introduction Committee. Translations of scientific literature from
Spanish, Portuguese, and Latin to English were provided by the
Botanist and Biologist for various division personnel.


Meetings Attended
July 17-24, 1980. Second International Congress of Systematic and
Evolutionary Biology. Vancouver, B.C., Canada. (K. R.
Langdon)







18 Division of Plant Industry

August 17-21, 1981. American Soc. of Plant Taxonomists jointly
with American Institute of Biological Sciences. Bloomington,
Indiana. (K. R. Langdon)
November 4-6, 1981. Florida State Horticultural Society. Lake
Buena Vista, FL. (K. R. Langdon)


Staff Publications
Langdon, K. R. 1980. The bromeliad, Guzmania monostachya, an
endangered plant in Florida. Fla. Dept. Agric. and Consumer
Services, Div. Plant Ind., Nematol. Circ. 69 (Bot. 12). 2p.
1981. The seriously depleted cowhorn orchid, Cyrtopo-
dium punctatum, endangered in Florida. Fla. Dept. Agric. and
Consumer Services, Div. Plant Ind., Nematol. Circ. 74 (Bot. 13).
2p.
1981. Hand Fern, Ophioglossum palmatum, endangered
and becoming extremely rare in Florida. Fla. Dept. Agric. and
Consumer Services, Div. Plant Ind., Nematol. Circ. 79 (Bot. 14).
2p.
1982. The native Florida bromeliad or wild-pine, Tilland-
sia fasciculata. Fla. Dept. Agric. and Consumer Services, Div.
Plant Ind., Bot. Circ. 15. 2p.
1982. Florida law concerning threatened and endangered
plants. Fla. Dept. Agric. and Consumer Services, Div. Plant
Ind., Bot. Circ. 16. 2p.
1982. Florida law on endangered plants. The Palmetto
2(2):3, 10.
1982. Sea oats, Uniola paniculata, a valuable native sand-
binding grass of coastal dunes. Fla. Dept. Agric. and Consumer
Services, Div. Plant Ind., Bot. Circ. 17. 2p.







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


BUREAU OF APIARY INSPECTION

James C. Herndon, Chief

Summary
The beekeeping industry is a vital segment of Florida agriculture.
Florida is ranked among the top three states in the nation in value
of honey produced. Florida's honeybee population, estimated at
375,000 colonies, produces from 25 to 30 million pounds of honey
each year at a wholesale value of 10 to 12 million dollars.
In addition to the value of honey produced, the total value of
pollination services of bees is estimated at 45.8 million dollars.
Florida's honeybee colonies fertilize and cross-pollinate water-
melons, cucumbers, squash, cantaloupes, and the Orlando Tangelo
variety of citrus. To reseed themselves, some varieties of clover
used in cattle pastures must be visited by bees each year.
Florida's ideal climatic conditions make possible the production
and shipment of thousands of queen and package bees to northern
states to replace winter losses, and to South America and England.
As a protection to the honeybee industry, the State Legislature
passed the Florida Bee Disease Law in 1919. The original and
continuing purpose of the law is the detection and destruction of
honeybee colonies infected with a disease known as American
foulbrood, Bacillus larvae. This disease, while completely harmless
to humans, is highly contagious to honeybee colonies. Introduction
into the hive is in the form of spores located in honey, on combs, and
in used beekeeping equipment which has been exposed to a
previously established source of infection. The spore form is very
resistant so that when equipment, honey and pollen become con-
taminated, they remain viable for long periods of time.
One of the problems facing Florida beekeepers is the reduction of
plants necessary for honey production. With the increased popula-
tion growth, building projects and new highways consume vast
areas of land containing plants important for honey production,
forcing the beekeeper to find new apiary locations. Because of this
problem, more and more beekeepers move their honeybee colonies to
other states in search of a honey crop, returning each fall in order to
be ready for the spring citrus bloom. During the 1980-82 biennium,
236,584 colonies were brought into Florida by migratory
beekeepers, and apiary inspectors are constantly on the alert for bee
diseases brought into Florida by migratory beekeepers.







Division of Plant Industry


Honey Certification Program
During the biennium, apiary inspectors collected 173 composite
honey samples from 653 barrels of tupelo honey. Upon delivering
them to the Department's Food Laboratory in Tallahassee for
analysis and certification, the honey samples were examined for
flavor, color, soluble solids, moisture, and pollen count.
One hundred eleven composite samples from 424 barrels were cer-
tified as tupelo honey. Sixty-two composite samples from 229
barrels failed to certify as tupelo honey. The moisture content for
certified tupelo honey averaged 17.13%. The moisture content for
the samples that failed to certify as tupelo honey averaged 17.53%.


Acarine and Varroa Mite
In 1980, the acarine mite Acarapis was found in Mexico and the
Varroa mite Varroa jacobsoni was found on the Africanized bee
which is migrating through the Panama Canal Zone toward the
United States. It is projected that they will reach the United States
by 1990.
The Apiary Inspectors of America in conjunction with the United
States Bee Laboratory requested that each state make a sampling
for these mites. The number of samples for each state was based on
the number of colonies of bees in that state. Florida was assigned
700 samples. This sampling has been completed by the Florida
Bureau of Apiary Inspection.


New Legislation
The 1981 Legislature, in regular session in Tallahassee, author-
ized and funded a new position for the Bureau of Apiary Inspection
to be used as a working supervisor.
Inspector Leroy Putnal was promoted to this position.


Road Guard Report
Monthly reports from the Road Guard Stations during the bien-
nium indicated 236,584 colonies and 284,585 supers moved into
Florida from other states. Road guard reports also showed 331,503
colonies and 292,702 supers left Florida for destinations across the
nation.
Personnel of the Bureau of Apiary Inspection examined and cer-
tified 110,823 colonies for queen and package bee producers. A total
of 358,052 colonies were inspected and certified for shipment to the
following states:







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Arkansas 266
Georgia 23,634
Illinois 4,003
Indiana 681
Iowa 50
Kentucky 63
Maine 9,890
Maryland 4,152
Massachusetts 8,180
Michigan 5
Minnesota 31,603
Missouri 1,160
Montana 320
New Jersey 7,074
New York 35,798
North Carolina 3,861
North Dakota 95,301
Ohio 9,602
Pennsylvania 11,532
South Dakota 41,853
Tennessee 1,701
Texas 108
Utah 15
Vermont 400
Virginia 2,215
Washington 200
West Virginia 358
Wisconsin 64,027


Resume of Bureau of Apiary Inspection Activities
During the biennium, apiary inspectors examined 645,767 col-
onies in 11,952 apiaries and found 2,516 colonies infected with
American foulbrood. The Bureau of Apiary Inspection issued 837
permits for 288,144 colonies of out-of-state bees to move into
Florida and 213 special moving permits for moving point-to-point
within the state. Florida beekeepers were issued 2,107 moving per-
mits and 110 certificates of inspection.
The sum of $52,848 was paid during the biennium to Florida
beekeepers in compensation for bees and equipment destroyed
because of American foulbrood.







22 Division of Plant Industry

1980-81 1981-82 Biennium
Apiaries inspected 5,529 6,423 11,952
Colonies inspected 325,038 320,729 645,767
Colonies infected with AFB 903 1,613 2,516
AFB colonies destroyed 903 1,613 2,516
Florida permits issued 1,023 1,084 2,107
Certificates issued for exit 294 310 604
Point-to-Point permits issued 113 100 213
Certificates issued for sales 61 49 110
Special Entry permits issued 490 347 837


Yearly Summary, Bureau of Apiary Inspection

American Foulbrood
Apiaries Colonies Apiaries Colonies
Years Ending Inspected Inspected Infected Infected

June 30, 1938 3,451 64,668 38 173
1939 3,371 70,655 56 416
1940 3,414 76,851 61 234
1941 3,711 81,950 80 371
1942 3,671 83,354 106 698
1943 3,347 80,823 100 524
1944 2,646 73,649 106 456
1945 2,371 69,262 105 379
1946 2,265 71,161 138 959
1947 2,464 87,674 104 683
1948 3,266 98,147 100 391
1949 3,710 105,678 130 406
1950 3,082 105,296 175 369
1951 2,872 95,405 237 772
1952 2,836 88,206 232 578
1953 3,259 92,267 449 1,366
1954 5,102 135,168 683 2,158
1955 5,885 157,388 524 1,421
1956 6,168 176,616 460 1,180
1957 5,813 162,885 490 1,121
1958 4,932 159,692 457 1,623
1959 5,123 153,677 454 1,329
1960 5,056 149,227 438 1,422
1961 4,991 152,288 319 1,271
1962 5,693 173,538 341 1,053
1963 5,497 169,411 416 1,546
1964 5,230 166,641 481 1,614







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Yearly Summary, Bureau of Apiary Inspection (Cont.)

American Foulbrood
Apiaries Colonies Apiaries Colonies
Years Ending Inspected Inspected Infected Infected

June 30, 1965 5,680 179,861 500 1,709
1966 5,833 189,802 485 1,340
1967 6,337 197,833 561 1,768
1968 6,519 218,493 504 1,712
1969 5,912 192,651 509 1,707
1970 5,788 185,752 443 1,317
1971 5,273 176,608 431 2,092
1972 4,713 176,153 433 1,683
1973 5,353 193,382 420 1,702
1974 4,802 191,102 293 1,148
1975 5,050 204,929 365 1,229
1976 4,750 212,945 302 1,271
1977 4,277 217,403 360 1,068
1978 5,872 260,152 163 1,989
1979 5,878 283,346 329 1,406
1980 5,589 303,567 338 1,532
1981 5,529 325,038 260 903
1982 6,423 320,729 441 1,613






Division of Plant Industry


BUREAU OF CITRUS
BUDWOOD REGISTRATION

Charles Youtsey, Chief

The biennial period, 1 July 1980 through 30 June 1982, will long
be remembered by agricultural interests in Florida for two of the
most devastating winter freezes since records have been kept.
On 13-14 January 1981, and again on 12 January 1982,
temperatures in the citrus belt plunged into the low and mid-teens
for extended periods of time, causing estimated losses to the round
orange crops of 17 and 22% in 1981 and 1982, respectively.
Defoliation of both old and young trees in the central and
northern areas was extensive in the January 1981 freeze, with trees
and fruit in the south, south central, and east coast areas escaping
serious damage. The different nature of the January 1982 freeze was
reflected in the severe losses to both fruit and young trees up to 5
years of age in the south and east coast areas, with less severe
damage to the central and northern growing areas.
As a result of these back-to-back freezes, an already strong citrus
nursery stock market was impacted with an additional demand for
tens of thousands of trees for grove replacements.
This demand for citrus nursery stock in an already expanding seg-
ment of the nursery industry has resulted in a rapid increase of
small nurseries similar to the pattern of activity following the 1962
freeze.
This stimulus resulted in 46 new participants for the budwood
program during the biennium. In addition, many participants who
had been inactive for a number of years returned to production. Pro-
gram participants produced 6,622,000 registered nursery trees
which was a 60% increase in registered nursery stock production
over the previous period. Many of these nursery participants are
producing nursery stock in plastic bags or specialized containers
from raised benches under greenhouse conditions. This technique of
producing citrus nursery stock in greenhouses was pioneered by a
few innovative growers in 1975-76 and has developed dramatically
in the last 2 years.
Division personnel supervised the cutting of over 8.4 million buds
from registered scion grove trees this biennium. This represents a
58.5% increase over the previous biennium.
Table 1 shows the number of registered propagations and in-
dicates the number of trees for each scion type and rootstock for the
past 5 years. Carrizo citrange and sour orange continue to make up
72% of the rootstocks used for all varieties. Hamlin and Valencia







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


orange, and Marsh and Ruby Red grapefruit were the most prop-
agated scion varieties.
The specialty fruit varieties, Temple, Robinson, Minneola
tangelo, Murcott, Dancy tangerine, and Orlando tangelo show a
significant increase in numbers of trees propagated in the year
1981-1982. Sunburst is a specialty fruit variety released to growers
by the USDA research station in Orlando through the bureau's
validation program early in 1979 and has gained rapid acceptance
by the industry as indicated from recorded propagations.

Scion Groves

As a further result of the freezing winter weather, additional im-
petus was placed on growers to establish or enlarge their scion
grove plantings.
There were 19 new groves planted consisting of 7,313 trees. Of
these trees a significant number were registered rootstock seed
source trees from material obtained through the budwood founda-
tion grove and verified as true-to-type for the variety.
A major citrus seed dealer has propagated a large number of
registered seed source trees for a 5-acre planting devoted spe-
cifically to the harvest of seed. This planting will be a positive step
in improving the selection of rootstocks used in the Florida citrus
industry.
Treatment of citrus seed by this bureau to prevent infection by
Phytophthora parasitica Dast., the cause of footrot and rootrot in
citrus seed bed seedlings, has dropped off considerably in the latter
half of the biennium. In 1980-81 there were 10,800 quarts of seed
treated. In 1981-82 only 5,373 quarts were treated. The major
reason for this decline is due to the addition of 3 new treatment
facilities by private companies. It is expected that these companies
will take over the treatment of all seeds used by the industry in the
future, and the bureau facility can be phased out. This service
returned $3,893 in revenue from fees charged this period.
During this report period a cooperative project was undertaken
with IFAS researchers to gather data on the use of the fungicide
Arasan as a seed coating for the prevention of albinism in young
seedlings. Results confirmed the effectiveness of the material, and
an application was submitted to the Division of Inspection for an
amended 24C label to permit the use of Arasan as a seed treatment
by Florida growers.

Foundation Grove

As a result of the severe damage to participant's scion grove bud-
wood sources caused by the 2 January freezes, heavy demands were







Division of Plant Industry


made on the foundation grove budwood trees to supply the industry
with propagative material during the time required for damaged
trees to recover.
One of the major benefits gained when the budwood foundation
grove was relocated in 1973, was the significantly warmer location.
During both freeze periods temperatures in the colder locations of
the grove were recorded at 20-25 F for 4-6 hours. Adequate tree pro-
tection was provided through the use of grove heaters and wind
machines, and subsequently, the planting was able to provide
nearly 3 million budeyes to growers and nurserymen.
Injury to trees of grapefruit and Valencia scions as a result of the
January 1981 freeze was visually rated in February and March,
after damage was apparent. All trees sustained some leaf drop. The
most severe injury consisted of partial defoliation of the upper,
southern exposure of the trees on the vigorous lemon and lemon-
type rootstocks. The least damage was observed on the citrumelo
rootsocks. Damage was rated on a scale of 1-5, one indicating no
damage, and 5 complete defoliation of the top. Table 2 shows these
relationships.
Even though much of the late orange and grapefruit crop was
frozen, a high percentage was salvaged and marketed through the
Haines City Citrus Growers Association. Return from sale of fruit
and budwood from the foundation grove this period amounted to
over $200,000.
An additional 4 acres of trees from the original commercial Valen-
cia planting was cleared this period to provide space for an addi-
tional planting early in 1983. This planting of registered orange and
grapefruit varieties on sour orange rootstock will be a joint project
with USDA and IFAS researchers. These trees will be pre-
immunized using mild isolates of tristeza virus to provide valuable
information on the mechanism of cross protection and will also
serve as sources of propagation material as successful isolate com-
binations become available. Based on research data from other
citrus-growing areas, it is expected that these pre-immunized trees
will be less susceptible to tristeza decline and will resist re-
infections with naturally spread tristeza strains of a more severe
nature.
Despite the careful use of sanitary practices to prevent the
mechanical spread of exocortis, this viroid was detected in 2 founda-
tion grove Valencia trees adjacent to an exocortis infected old-line
that served to demonstrate to growers the virus effects on various
rootstocks. All of these trees were removed in order to prevent fur-
ther spread into desirable budlines.
Additional propagations were made of 3 Hamlin selections to be
added to the foundation grove. This will help relieve the shortfall in
Hamlin budwood for distribution and increase the number of selec-
tions available.







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Fifty lemon and 50 lime trees were removed from the foundation
grove this biennium, leaving only enough trees of these varieties to
supply budwood to meet anticipated needs. Expense of
maintenance and cost of fruit harvest could no longer be justified.
The additional space created will be replanted with several new
selections of grapefruit.
Three new citrange selections, one lemon, and a new, unreleased
hybrid of Swingle citrumelo were added to the rootstock planting to
provide seed and budwood sources.
Evaluation was completed on 2 groups of lemon seedlings and the
trees removed as undesirable sources of budwood.
During this period symptoms associated with the decline disorder
known as citrus blight were first noticed on a 5-year-old Hamlin
orange budded to rough lemon rootstock. Xylem samples taken
from the trunk and submitted for zinc analysis showed a rather high
zinc content compared to similar samples from healthy trees. This
procedure is commonly used as a diagnostic test for blight and ap-
pears to confirm visual symptoms. By the close of the report period
there were 2 trees of Hamilin, 1 tree of Jaffa, 9 trees of pineapple,
and 7 trees of Valencia suspected of having blight. Rootstocks of
rough lemon, Citrus volkameriana, Rangpur lime, Swingle
citrumelo, citrumelo F-80-3, and Milam served as rootstocks for
these trees.


Virus Indexing
Periodic re-indexing of growers scion grove budwood trees to
detect the mechanically spread exocortis viroid continues to have
highest priority for indexing. The industry use of the exocortis-
susceptible Carrizo citrange rootstock remains as it has since 1977,
at about 40 to 45% of the total rootstocks used. Presence of exocor-
tis viroid in budwood propagation material results in severe losses
in tree viability and fruit production on this rootstock.
There were 3,699 exocortis tests completed this period and 3,768
started. Approximately 62% of these tests were accomplished in
cooperation with the plant pathology laboratory in Winter Haven.
These tests indicate that accidental mechanical spread of this viroid
within scion grove plantings has dropped from 2.4% yearly to 0.9%.
Efforts to educate growers in the use of sanitary tree production
techniques appear to be having positive results.
Tristeza testing has been primarily confined to the citrus bud-
wood foundation grove planting; 3,574 tests were started and 3,900
were completed. Only 120 tests were made using Key lime indicator
plants. The remainder were accomplished using the enzyme-linked
immunosorbent assay (ELISA) laboratory technique.
Tests of 1,138 tristeza-free foundation grove trees set in 1975







Division of Plant Industry


were conducted to monitor the spread of tristeza virus by aphid vec-
tors within this planting. At the close of this biennium only 342
trees remain free of tristeza in this 7-year-old planting. This is an in-
fection rate of 70% in 7 years.
Long-term tests to detect psorosis and xyloporosis were begun on
122 candidate trees. Tests were completed for 108 trees for psorosis
and 99 trees for xyloporosis. Two hundred thirty-seven and 506
tests were incomplete for psorosis and xyloporosis, respectively, at
the end of the report period.
Included in these figures are tests on 102 shoot-tip grafted trees
received from the plant pathology laboratory in Gainesville. Re-
indexing of these plants is necessary to insure virus freedom. Use of
these excellent old-lines on Carrizo citrange rootstock will now be
economically possible through elimination of the destructive ex-
ocortis viroid that causes tree decline when infected propagation
material is used on this rootstock.
Tests have been conducted this period on a group of grapefruit
scion trees that have developed a scaly bark condition similar to
psorosis-A symptoms. Both budwood and bark-lesion inoculations
have been made in sweet orange and in grapefruit seedlings to in-
duce symptoms as described in the literature for psorosis-A. To
date, there have been no indications that this scaling bark condition
is caused by a virus. A similar condition has been reported from
Australia and has been attributed to heavy scale insect infestations
on the tree trunks. The trunks of the grapefruit trees under study
here were heavily infested with snow scale that now has been
brought under control. Further observations will be made to see if
the scaly bark condition clears up in connection with the scale
treatments.


Florid, Citrus Arboretum
There were 27 new selections added to the Florida Citrus Ar-
boretum planting this biennium. Testing of arboretum trees for
virus diseases continues as an ongoing part of maintenance in this
planting.
Installation of the automated heating system in the arboretum
planting that was begun last biennium was finished in time to fur-
nish protection from the January freezes of 1981 and 1982.
Minimum temperature recorded at the location was 24.5 F in 1981,
and 23 F for 1982. Relatively short durations below freezing in-
dicate this to be a comparatively warm location, and with the addi-
tion of the heating system protection was adequate for all but a few
very tropical citrus relatives. Most of these tender plants recovered
from freeze injury or were replaced with reserve plants held in the
greenhouse.







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


There were over 355 visitors to the arboretum this report period,
representing researchers, students, master gardeners, and others in-
terested in citrus species and their near relatives in the family
Rutaceae.
There were over 94 foreign visitors to the arboretum and other
bureau facilities during this period, representing 21 countries, in-
cluding a large contingent of Brazilian citrus growers touring the
Florida citrus industry.


Trips, Meetings, and Training Programs
Bureau personnel participated in the following activities during
the biennium:
Training in budwood procedures, virus disease recognition, vari-
ety identification, and horticultural evaluation was given to 29 new
employees in a total of 6 training classes lasting 2 days each, by C.
Youtsey and L. Hebb.
Instruction for classes from the University of Florida and Florida
Southern College was given on 3 occasions by C. Youtsey and L.
Hebb. July 15, 1980. A seminar on "Observations on Citrus, Citrus
Disease Problems and Citrus Research in Spain and Israel", USDA,
Orlando. (C. Youtsey)
September 10, 11, 1980. Florida Citrus Growers Institute meeting,
Winter Haven. (C. Youtsey, L. Hebb)
September 30-October 3, 1980. Florida Department of Agriculture
Annual Conference, Tampa. (Bureau personnel)
October 22, 23, 1980. Blight meeting, USDA Horticultural Re-
search Laboratory, Orlando. (C. Youtsey, L. Hebb)
January 20, 1981. Florida Research Council meeting regarding co-
operative and related projects associated with citrus, AREC,
Lake Alfred. (C. Youtsey)
April 20-24, 1981. A course on "Technical Problems of Citrus
Nursery Propagations" at the University of California, River-
side, California was attended by A. Conner.
April 11-28, 1981. Budwood Bureau personnel assisted the Bureau
of Pest Eradication and Control during the emergency Medfly
Eradication Program in Tampa. W. Connell and G. Johnson
helped to establish and monitor trapping surveys.
April 30, 1981. A walking tour of the budwood foundation grove in
Dundee was conducted in conjunction with the short course on
"Technical Problems of Citrus Nursery Propagations".
August 25-27, 1981. A training seminar was given by C. Youtsey
and L. Hebb for nurserymen, budders, and others interested in
propagating registered citrus nursery stock in Sebring,
Tavares, and Winter Haven.







Division of Plant Industry


November 4-7, 1981. Florida State Horticultural Society Meeting,
Lake Buena Vista. (C. Youtsey, L. Hebb, M. Kesinger, S. Moon)
April 15, 1982. Insects and Diseases Workshop, Broward County.
(C. Youtsey)
May 19, 26 and June 2, 9, 1982. Citrus Production School, AREC,
Lake Alfred. (L. Hebb, M. Kesinger)


Publications and Talks
November 4-7, 1980. C. Youtsey co-authored a paper presented at
the Florida State Horticultural Society Meeting, Miami Beach,
"A Survey for Citrus Tristeza Virus in Registered Budwood
Sources Commercially Propagated on Sour Orange Rootstock
in Florida", by S. M. Garnsey, R. F. Lee, C. O. Youtsey, R. H.
Brlansky, and H. C. Burnett. (S. Moon, M. Kesinger, A. Conner,
participants)
November 14, 1980. A talk and general discussion on budding and
identification of different citrus fruit was given by C. Thornhill
at the Eagle Lake Elementary School.
January 22, 1981. C. Youtsey gave a talk to the Florida Citrus
Nurserymen's Association regarding latest information and
yield data on Hamlin and Parson Brown oranges at the founda-
tion grove.
February 5, 1981. A lecture was given by C. Youtsey to University
of Florida Fruit Crops Department, Gainesville.
April 1, 1981. A talk was given by C. Youtsey on "Yield Observa-
tions in the Budwood Foundation Grove" for the Florida Citrus
Production Managers Association.
April 21, 1981. C. Youtsey gave a talk at the Southern Plant Board
annual meeting in Orlando describing the Florida Citrus Bud-
wood Registration Program.
April 27, 1981. A presentation was given by C. Youtsey on the
Florida Citrus Budwood Registration Program for the short
course, "Technical Problems of Citrus Nursery Propagations",
in Orlando.
June 30, 1981. A talk on "Registered Scion Performance", was
given by C. Youtsey to the "Ridge Runners", an organization of
productions managers.
July 1, 1981. C. Youtsey gave a talk on seed treatment to the
Florida Citrus Nurserymen's Association, Winter Haven.
September 16, 1981. A talk on "Yield Performance of Citrus Scion/
Rootstock Selections at the Division of Plant Industry Founda-
tion Grove", was given by C. Youtsey at the Florida Citrus
Growers Institute meeting, Bartow.






THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


October 8, 1981. A presentation was given by C. Youtsey on the
current status of budwood availability, data on scion propaga-
tions and nursery seedling populations, at the Florida Citrus
Nurserymen's Association meeting, Winter Haven.
October 13, 1981. A talk to a group of production managers from
the Ridge area was given by C. Youtsey on "Suggested
Registered Budlines for Commercial Use".
November 12, 1981. C. Youtsey gave a presentation on "5-Year
Cumulative Yield of 10 Early and Midseason Oranges on 12
Rootstocks", to the Florida Citrus Nurserymen's Association,
Dundee.
November 24, 1981. A talk by L. Hebb entitled "Citrus Root-
stocks" was given at the 1981 Fall Citrus Seminar, Tavares.
December 12, 1981. A talk on blight in the foundation grove was
given at a blight meeting in Ft. Pierce by C. Youtsey. (L. Hebb,
participant)
February 4, 1982. L. Hebb gave a lecture on virus diseases to
University of Florida Fruit Crops Department, Gainesville.
April 1, 1982. C. Youtsey and R. King led a discussion concerning
the Premium Quality Citrus Tree Program at the Florida Citrus
Nurserymen's Association meeting, Winter Haven.
May 26, 1982. A talk on finding the superior citrus variety was
given by C. Youtsey for the Citrus Production School, AREC,
Lake Alfred.
May 1982. C. Youtsey revised a list of budwood selections for the
Polk County Extension Service, for their publication "Citrus
Notes" production handbook.










Table 1. Scion and Rootstock Types Used for Registered Nursery Trees During 7/77 thru 6/82.

Total by Scion Type Total by Rootstock
% of Rough Sour
Scion Total Total Carrizo Cleo Milam P. Trif Lemon Orange Swingle Vk/Le Misc.


Early oranges






Mid-season






Late oranges






Red & pink
grapefruit





Duncan


7/77-6/78
7/78-6/79
7/79-6/80
7/80-6/81
7/81-6/82

7/77-6/78
7/78-6/79
7/79-6/80
7/80-6/81
7/81-6/82

7/77-6/78
7/78-6/79
7/79-6/80
7/80-6/81
7/81-6/82

7/77-6-78
7/78-6/79
7/79-6/80
7/80-6/81
7/81-6/82

7/77-6/78
7/78-6/79
7/79-6/80
7/80-6/81
7/81-6/82


616,172
838,142
891,888
1,204,561
1,481,091

149,224
190,365
199,416
169,611
158,544

469,358
837,776
641,399
947,492
1,043,577

186,862
108,498
144,005
280,299
523,205

14,613
8,020
22,756
24,620
21.777


224,181
307,285
284,597
495,522
649,297

79,748
82,946
71,644
47,572
39,282

269,721
396,274
411,513
667,265
615,700

41,235
23,401
27,122
48,362
65,657

6,267
5,226
5,264
11,041
9,094


106,529
126,665
182,102
111,989
141,769

24,988
26,584
22,176
10,580
35,223

23,955
30,513
26,852
21,872
18,520

15,552
4,081
5,808
2,919
5,748

2,173
3
1,801
1,448
1,851


30,261
34.643
48,506
15,760
47,413

17,949
30,589
18,483
11.596
24,776

46,308
153,224
66.694
32.945
109,767

7,933
6,905
19,586
9,241
6,995

2,191
199
10,460
4,426
5,152


46,280
4,018
30,388
5,855
13,797

0
0
4,099
4,916
0

2,792
0
0
1,620
0

4,131
0
11,443
100
5,946

0
0
3,509
291
0


182
3,608
2
0
0

1,806
2.003
0
0
0

11,208
30,791
0
3,842
179

0
0
5
4,981
0

0
0
0
0
0


147,927
274,833
265,268
431,787
541,577

10,686
32,279
15,560
38,746
18,295

64,764
133,131
54,309
147,202
189,175

84,887
62.411
57,535
105,949
253,538

54
21
607
5,064
3,885


27,439
43,763
80,035
112,942
79,081

8,504
14,732
63,925
36,476
34,686

33,166
44,776
81,008
61,948
75,987

23,365
7,162
22,506
92,128
163,069

1,458
1,025
1,115
2,350
0


12,822
21,730
0
6,567
3,429

3,405
0
2,454
5,349
1,986

11,719
39,267
30
9,922
30,072

987
3,204
0
10,184
12,665

1,500
Q
0
0
1.795


20,551
21,597
990
24,139
4,728

2,138
1,232 '
1,075
14,376
4,296

5,725
9,800
993
876
4,177

8,772
1,334
0
6.435
9.588






Marsh 7/77-6/78 86,693 5.3 23,051 2,254 12,432 2,058 0 33,417 12,437 1,010 34
7/78-6/79 39,022 1.9 9,436 588 7,326 0 0 14,314 5,668 0 1,690
7/79-6/80 75,903 3.6 26,802 2,491 12,643 1,976 0 23,429 8,562 0 0
7/80-6/81 140,459 4.8 31,438 3,572 6,910 3,208 1,168 73,966 14,162 6,035 0
7/81-6/82 192,813 5.3 45,092 5,294 13,842 4,523 0 102,437 18,201 2,340 1,084

Limes & 7/77-6/78 3,452 .2 16 32 154 0 0 0 1,460 890 900
Lemons 7/78-6/79 124 .005 0 0 0 0 4 86 0 0 34
7/79-6/80 7,079 .3 478 0 80 3,309 0 2,727 237 185 63
7/80-6/81 7,695 .3 173 0 2,760 0 0 1,269 0 91 3,402 -
7/81-6/82 5,664 .2 2 0 5,050 0 0 245 146 0 221

Temple 7/77-6/78 20,792 1.3 0 17,077 1,950 0 0 1,692 0 0 73
7/78-6/79 21,319 1.0 0 7,545 1,270 0 0 8,383 0 4,121 0 0
7/79-6/80 29,398 1.4 0 16,063 11,246 0 0 2,089 0 0 0
7/80-6/81 26,164 .9 103 6,065 960 0 0 6,074 0 12,962 0 -
7/81-6/82 42,905 1.2 70 9,155 12,719 0 0 14,316 385 5,810 450

Sunburst* 7/77-6/78 0 .0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
7/78-6/79 2,890 .1 1,697 137 103 0 547 333 31 0 42
7/79-6/80 9,747 .5 7,635 1,656 213 0 33 210 0 0 0
7/80-6/81 28,820 1.0 4,713 6,227 10,328 0 0 0 1,952 5,600 0 -
7/81-6/82 21,041 .6 15,844 3,461 1,634 0 0 19 83 0 0

Robinson 7/77-6/78 0 .0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
7/78-6/79 61 .003 0 0 11 0 0 20 0 0 30 l
7/79-6/80 8,375 .4 62 7,248 24 0 0 590 451 0 0
7/80-6/81 8,309 .3 6,491 921 0 0 0 897 0 0 0
7/81-6/82 13,978 .4 5,752 6,512 1,431 0 0 87 0 0 196
Minneloa 7/77-6/78 16,210 1.0 1,201 0 272 6,396 0 4,927 3,414 0 0
Tangelo 7/78-6/79 5,627 .3 653 548 21 1,099 0 2,197 0 1,084 25
7/79-6/80 17,535 .8 5,058 305 4,680 4,212 0 3,042 233 0 5
7/80-6/81 33,301 1.1 764 3,718 6,819 3,186 0 15,462 198 3,154 0
7/81-6/82 49,954 1.4 9,637 6,723 2,819 2,546 0 20,408 151 0 7,670 W

(continued)












Table 1. (Continued from page 33)

Total by Scion Type Total by Rootstock
% of Rough Sour
Scion Total Total Carrizo Cleo Milam P. Trif Lemon Orange Swingle Vk/Le Misc.

Murcotts 7/77-6/78 31,346 1.9 4,568 21,544 51 0 0 1,099 3,024 0 1,060
7/78-6/79 10,722 .5 1,750 4,692 26 0 0 29 4,195 0 30
7/79-6/80 29,254 1.4 12,121 9,604 6,945 0 0 153 431 0 0
7/80-6/81 20,200 .7 2,917 6,015 982 300 0 7,286 478 1,522 700 '
7/81-6/82 30,260 .8 10,841 11,862 2,997 0 0 146 0 2,742 1,672 "

Other 7/77-6/78 54,437 3.3 11,290 2,572 5,522 20,909 3,890 5,233 0 5,021 0
Tangerine & 7/78-6/79 19,812 1.0 7,165 1,864 8,615 2,108 0 61 3,764 0 27
Mandarin 7/79-6/80 28,322 1.3 8,487 1,295 10,754 6,193 3 1,468 119 0 3
Hybrids 7/80-6/81 22,257 .8 2,941 4,195 4,202 3,220 0 1,609 4,650 1,340 100
7/81-6/82 45,169 1.2 4,984 3,509 16,910 6,710 0 3,075 495 3,315 5,271

Total by 7/77-6/78 1,649,159 661,278 216,676 125,023 82,566 17,086 354,686 114,267 37,354 40,223
rootstock 7/78-6/79 2,082,378 835,833 203,220 242,932 7,225 36,953 528,100 121,352 69,406 37,357
7179-6/80 2,105,077 860,783 277,401 210,314 65,129 43 426,987 258,622 2,669 3,129
7/80-6/81 2,913,788 1,319,302 179,521 106,929 22,696 9,991 835,311 327,284 62,728 50,028
7/81-6/82 3,629,979 1,471,252 249,627 251,505 33,522 179 1,147,203 372,284 65,054 39,353

% each 7/77-6/78 40.1 13.1 7.6 5.0 1.0 21.5 6.9 2.3 2.4
rootstock 7/78-6/79 40.1 9.8 11.7 .3 1.8 25.4 5.8 3.3 1.8
7/79-6/80 40.9 13.2 10.0 3.1 .002 20.3 12.3 .1 .1
7/80-6/81 45.3 6.2 3.7 .8 .3 28.7 11.2 2.2 1.7
7/81-6/82 40.5 6.9 .9 .9 .005 31.6 10.3 1.8 1.1
*Validated







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Table 2. Visual Rating of Defoliation Caused by the January
1982 Freeze in One Planting of Valencia and
Grapefruit Trees at the Citrus Budwood Foundation
Grove, Dundee. 1 = No Damage; 5 = Complete
Defoliation.

Rootstocks Valencia Scion Grapefruit Scion

Citrumelo F-80-8 2.15
Cleopatra mandarin 2.18 2.66
Smooth Flat Seville 2.35 2.66
Rangpur X Troyer 2.38 3.05
Milam 2.50
Swingle citrumelo 2.55 2.58
Rangpur lime 2.97 3.08
Rough lemon 3.00 2.85
Carrizo citrange 3.07 3.13
Citrus volkameriana 3.08 2.93
Sweet lime 3.12 2.88
Citrumelo F-80-7 2.78
Citrumelo F-81-14 2.83
Sour orange 3.03







36 Division of Plant Industry







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
H. A. Denmark, Chief of Entomology
Summary

The Bureau of Entomology provides arthropod identification
service, conducts limited investigations of certain economic pro-
blems, assists in instructing Agricultural Products Specialists, con-
tinues to build a general arthropod reference and research collection,
conducts taxonomic investigations, supervises the security of the
Biological Control Laboratory, and develops the taxonomic and
biological control literature to support these areas of responsibility.
During the biennium there were 24,316 lots received from the
Agricultural Products Specialists (a lot may represent 1 to many
specimens). From these lots there were 158,492 specimens iden-
tified, 17,320 report forms added to the host and species files,
134,376 specimens discarded, 1,943 specimens pinned, 14 specimens
placed in envelopes, 10,581 slide mounts prepared, and 19,234 vials
of alcohol containing from 1 to several specimens were added to the
Florida State Collection of Arthropods (FSCA). The number of
specimens received and identified by the Entomology Bureau that
did not require typed report forms was 267,236. From these
specimens there were 226,296 discarded, 36,677 pinned, 49 placed in
envelopes, 1,112 slides made, and 3,102 preserved in 4-dram vials of
alcohol. There were 31,058 specimens identified by collaborating
specialists outside of the Entomology Bureau. Of this number there
were 23,412 discarded, 6,698 pinned, 26 slides prepared, and 923
preserved in 4-dram vials of alcohol. There were 899 trap samples
containing thousands of unprocessed specimens received from
various sources. Research Associates donated 120,854 pinned and
labeled specimens, 5,675 4-dram vials of alcohol-preserved
specimens, 51,106 slide-mounted specimens and 1,018 placed in
envelopes. A large number of these specimens were identified.
There were 1,211 lots of insects for a total of 61,830 specimens on
loan during the biennium.
There were 171 new host records, 160 new county records, 3 new
state records, and 5 new U. S. records, and 4 new species recorded
during the biennium. There were 34 holotypes, 9 allotypes, and
2,026 paratypes added to the collection. The FSCA now contains
over 2,300,000 pinned specimens, over 225,000 slide-mounted
specimens, and over 20,000 pints and quarts of unsorted alcohol-
preserved specimens. The Entomology Bureau now has 188
Research Associates who are identifying and donating several
thousand specimens each year.
The addition to the Entomology Bureau of over 6,000 square feet
was dedicated in October 1981. It provides 4,260 square feet of







Division of Plant Industry


space for 12,000 insect drawers (10,000 have been added), and 58
utility cabinets. There are 750 square feet of alcohol storage space
and 330 square feet of storage space for slide-mounted specimens.
The National Science Foundation awarded a grant (#40520800) in
February 1982 for 2 compactors for the alcohol-preserved and slide-
mounted collections. The addition provides office space for 2 en-
tomology offices, a secretarial office and a preparatory room for
specimens that need processing before identification can be made.
The Entomology Bureau is now housed in 12,435 square feet of floor
space.
Dr. Minter Westfall, an Odonata specialist, is temporarily housed
in the Entomology Bureau with one of the largest Odonata collec-
tions in the world. The collection of immature Odonata ranks
number 1 in the world and the collections of adult Odonata ranks
3rd in the world. Odonata (dragonflies and damsel flies) are useful
biological control agents and pollution indicators. They have dif-
ficulty breeding in polluted lakes and streams.
Gainesville is rapidly becoming a center for biological control
work and insect taxonomy. Dr. Henry Townes will be moving part
of his parasitic Hymenoptera collection to Gainesville in July 1982
to be housed by the Division of Plant Industry (DPI) which
represents the largest collection of Ichneumonidae, parasitic wasps,
in the world. The Division of Plant Industry will temporarily house
part of this collection and provide working space for Dr. V. K.
Gupta until permanent facilities are provided by the University of
Florida.
The Arthur Allyn Lepidoptera Collection, which includes
representatives of more than 60 percent of the described species of
the world, has been given to the University of Florida Foundation,
Inc. and will be moved to Gainesville in the future.
The predaceous mites in the family Phytoseiidae are being
studied worldwide by various entomologists in relation to in-
tegrated pest management (IPM) programs. Harold Denmark has
identified thousands of specimens and described numerous species
in relation to IPM programs in Florida, southeastern United States,
and various other parts of the world. He is also working with en-
tomologists in developing countries with their mite problems in
relation to the production of cassava.
Drs. H. V. Weems and G. B. Edwards spent 4 weeks in Costa Rica
and Panama in July and August, 1981. They were hosted by the
United Fruit Company. Dr. Weems spent 4 weeks in Equador in
1980 and 1 week in Dominican Republic in 1981. It gave them an op-
portunity to survey for insects in those 2 countries. Dr. Edwards, a
spider specialist, collected about 335 species of spiders. Spiders are
now being studied as biological control agents.
Dr. Robert Woodruff has studied nearly 14,000 specimens of







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Scarabaeidae in relation to preparing Part II, Scarabaeidae of
Florida.
Dr. Woodruff has developed a registry for the listing of fossil in-
sects from Dominican amber. Recently, a flea was found in this
amber source which brings the total orders of insects to 21 that
have been found in amber.
"Rare and Endangered Invertebrates of Florida" has just been
published. Drs. H. V. Weems, R. E. Woodruff, and G. B. Edwards
contributed to this publication.
Hay from the midwest containing blister beetles (Meloidae) was
shipped into Florida in the spring of 1981. Some valuable racehorses
in the Ocala area died due to the presence of large numbers of
beetles that were baled with the hay. This problem developed after
the cutting and baling of hay was modified. For years the hay was
cut 1 day and baled the following day. A method of cutting and bal-
ing in 1 operation was developed. This does not permit time for the
beetles to leave the hay before being baled with the hay. The large
number of beetles involved contain sufficient cantharidin to cause
sickness and even death to some horses.
Mediterranian fruit flies were identified from a trap located at
Tampa on 4 August 1981. A fly was trapped on 9 August and 1 on
14 August. This was the fourth established infestation and it was
successfully eradicated. The quarantine was lifted 12 November
1981.
The fruit fly larvae are very difficult to identify. There are many
species that are only known from the adult stage. We are now in-
vestigating electrophoretic and gas chromotography methods with
the United States Department of Agriculture, (USDA), Agriculture
Research Service (ARS). If successful, these methods would provide
a backup to identifications made on morphological characters.
Dr. Lionel Stange has donated to the FSCA a collection represent-
ing about 60 percent of the world genera of Ascalaphidae and 90 per-
cent of the new world genera of Hemerobiidae. These are both
predaceous insects used in biological control.
Dr. Frank W. Mead has coauthored the "Taxonomic Study of
the Planthopper Genus Oliarus in the United States
(Homoptera:Fulgoroidae:Cixiidae)" with Dr. James P. Kramer,
USDA, Washington. This publication is based on Dr. Mead's
doctoral dissertation study of the genus Oliarus. These are plant-
hoppers, some of which are vectors of plant diseases. The DPI and
USDA shared the expense of this publication. He is also working
with Dr. W. French, Head of the Pecan and Peach Laboratory at
Monticello, Florida, in identifying sharpshooters associated with a
disease in Brazil that is similar to phony peach.
Importations: There were 27 requests to introduce and test 108
different species of parasites and predators of pest insects. Two







40 Division of Plant Industry

insect species, Uroplata girardi Pic and Octotoma scabrapennis
Guerin, were introduced from Australia for study as possible
biocontrol agents of Lantana camera L. in citrus groves in Florida.
Three shipments of Larra bicolor Fabr. were imported from Puerto
Rico for field colonization against mole crickets. Parapoynx spp.,
moths collected in Panama, were introduced into quarantine as
possible control agents of hydrilla. One species of parasite,
Trichopria sp., was introduced from Mauritius via California for
study in the biocontrol of stable flies in the southern states.
Exportations and Releases: Larra bicolor Fabr. was released in
Gainesville, Ft. Lauderdale, and Tampa against mole crickets. Two
shipments of Hyphantria cunea (Drury) collected in Florida were
sent to Japan for study and breeding experiments at Nagoya
University. Weevils, Neochetina bruchi Warner, collected in
Gainesville were shipped to the U. S. Corps of Engineers,
Vicksburg, MS, for release against water hyacinth in Texas.
On-Going Projects: USDA/ARS laboratory studies are being
made on a beetle, Dyscinetus morator (Fabr.), which damages the
crown of water hyacinth. A cooperative study with DPI for the
isolation and identification of nematodes on aquatic plants was con-
ducted; Hirshmaniella gracilis (deMan), H. caudacrene Sher, and
Aphelenchoides fragariae (Ritzena Bos) Christie were found heavily
infesting hydrilla. The accidentally introduced moth, Parapoynx
diminutalis Snellen, is being studied on hydrilla in the field.
UF: The University of Florida is conducting studies of the
reproductive biology of the Mexican bean beetle parasite, Pediobius
foveolatus (Crawford). Population surveys for the parasite Encarsia
lahorensis (Howard) were made to determine efficacy of the
colonization program of citrus whitefly.
Studies were conducted on Trissolcus basalis (Wollaston)
reproductive biology, inbreeding depression, and maintenance of
culture. A culture of stink bugs is being maintained to provide eggs
for T. basalis. Field-collected larvae of the fall webworm were reared
to obtain pupae for shipment to Japan for experiments. A culture of
waxmoth was maintained to obtain larvae for the culture of
predaceous stink bugs for Thailand. Regular seasonal collections of
larvae of forest tent caterpillars were held to rear the natural
enemies and estimate the extent of natural mortality factors. The
Rhodes grass mealybug was reared to record the parasite; collec-
tions of tea scale-infested plants were made to check the status of in-
festations and natural enemies; alfalfa weevils were collected during
the winter and summer to determine the levels of infestations and
mortality due to natural enemies.
The late Dr. W. J. Reinthal, a Research Associate donated his
library and insect collection (mostly moths and butterflies) to the
FSCA.







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


A recent addition to the FSCA museum and the renovation of the
previously existing museum to make the rooms airtight now permit
periodic fumigation of each museum. All specimens added to the col-
lection are fumigated in a separate chamber before they are stored
in the museum. Methyl bromide is the fumigant, applied at the rate
of 2 lbs per 1000 cubic for 24 hours. The gas must be circulated con-
tinuously because it is heavier than air.
For years, the Florida State Collection of Arthropods has de-
pended upon the conventional methods of fire protection such as the
local fire department, and conventional wall fire extinguishers
located in each room. A Halon 1301 gas system has been installed in
each museum room to control fires. Smoke or heat activates the
system. Gas is released into the room 35 seconds after the alarm is
sounded. A safety device has been installed to deactivate the
system in case of a malfunction. Halon 1301 (bromotrifluromethan)
is an odorless, colorless, electrically-nonconductive gas approx-
imately 5-10 times heavier than air. It is safer than any of the
vaporizing liquid fire extinguishing agents. Underwriter
Laboratories classified Halon 1301 in the least toxic category. All
persons should evacuate a room filled with Halon 1301 because it
depletes the oxygen. The operation of the system should be
thoroughly understood by those persons working in the museum in
order to prevent the accidental activation of the system since it
costs approximately $3,000 to recharge the tanks to fumigate a
room about 4,000 square feet.


Bureau Activities

The Biological Control laboratory continues to serve as a clear-
inghouse for most of the southeastern United States in the introduc-
tion of exotic species. To date, the University of Florida, Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS), the U. S. Department of
Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (USDA/ARS), and the
Division of Plant Industry (DPI) have requested permission to
evaluate approximately 4 parasites and predators under rigid
security for their effectiveness against pest insects.
The Arthropod Introduction Committee was established to
regulate the movement of arthropods into and within the State of
Florida. It is composed of Dr. C. L. Campbell, Division of Animal
Industry, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer
Services (FDACS); Dr. John A. Mulrennan, Jr., Florida Department
of Health and Rehabilitative Services (HRS); Dr. R. F. Brooks,
Agriculture & Education Research Center, (AREC), IFAS; Dr. D. L.
Shankland and Dr. W. H. Whitcomb, University of Florida (IFAS);
Dr. Donald E. Weidhaas, U. S. Department of Agriculture (SEA,







Division of Plant Industry


AR); Lt. Col. Brantley Goodson, Florida Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission; and Harold A. Denmark, Chairman, FDACS,
DPI. The Arthropod Introduction Committee has processed 51 re-
quests involving 142 species of insects, and 2 species of snails, dur-
ing this biennium. Anyone wishing to introduce insects or related
arthropods should write to: Harold A. Denmark, Chairman,
Arthropod Introduction Committee, Division of Plant Industry,
P. O. Box 1269, Gainesville, Florida 32602.
R. W. Swanson continues to develop methods to mass-rear
parasites for fruit flies.
Mrs. Mary (Monroe) Denmark, Secretary to the Chief of En-
tomology, retired 1 May 1981 and was replaced by Mrs. Byrdie M.
Lanier. Mrs. Joan Ortagus, Secretary to Dr. A. B. Hamon, ter-
minated her employment with the Entomology Bureau 30
November 1980 and was replaced by Mrs. Pamela Exon 31
December 1980, who terminated her employment 31 December 1981
and was replaced by Mrs. Darlene Cannon 29 January 1982. Mr.
Scott Yocom, formerly with the Bureau of Plant Inspection, was
employed as a Technologist II 20 March 1981.
PUBLICATIONS: Twenty-four circulars and several papers were
published.
IDENTIFICATIONS: Identifications of the various arthropod
groups are made by 8 staff entomologists. The entomologists and
the groups for which they are responsible are as follows:


H. A. Denmark:
G. B. Edwards:


A. B. Hamon:
F. W. Mead:




J. C. E. Nickerson:
L. A. Stange:

H. V. Weems, Jr.:


R. E. Woodruff:


Aphids, mites, thrips, and ticks.
All non-insect arthropods except Acarina.
Routine screening of fruit flies
(Tephritidae: Anastrepha).
Scales, mealybugs, and whiteflies.
Adult Lepidoptera: Diptera, suborder
Nematocera, Homoptera: Psyllidae, plus
suborder Auchenorhyncha, which includes
leafhoppers, planthoppers, spittlebugs,
treehoppers, and cicadas.
Formicidae.
Hymenoptera (except Formididae); gall-
forming insects, and Neuroptera.
Adult higher Diptera (suborder
Brachycera) and miscellaneous smaller
arthropod groups.
Coleoptera and Orthoptera.


Dr. L. A. Hetrick, Professor Emeritus, University of Florida,
IFAS, Department of Entomology and Nematology, continues to
do routine identifications of termites. Dr. Dale Habeck, University
of Florida, IFAS, Department of Entomology and Nematology,
identifies the Arctiidae adults and immatures, and all other







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


immature insects. Drs. Minter J. Westfall, Lewis Berner, and Fred
C. Thompson, University of Florida, Department of Zoology, iden-
tify the Odonata, Ephemeroptera, and Mollusca, respectively.
Office space has been provided for Dr. Wayne Dixon, Forest En-
tomologist, who works out of Gainesville. He cooperates with the
Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida
on forest insect problems. He is observing the gypsy moth Lyman-
tria dispar L. that is being introduced into Florida as egg masses at-
tached to cars and trailers from the northeastern U. S. to see if they
can become established in the state.
The Cooperative Plant Pest Report was phased out by USDA ef-
fective September 1980. The Division of Plant Industry continues
to publish monthly in the TRI-OLOG Y Technical Report, and F. W.
Mead reports on activities in Entomology.


Biological Control Laboratory
Lionel A. Stange, Taxonomic Entomologist

During the biennium the 3 cooperating agencies (Division of Plant
Industry, United States Department of Agriculture, ARS, and the
University of Florida, IFAS) imported into quarantine 8 species of
insects for study against insect and weed pests. A total of 9 species,
both native and introduced, were sent to other facilities for study or
culture, or were released as control agents. These are summarized as
follows:
Importations
Two leaf-mining beetles, Uroplata girardi Pic. and Octotoma
scabrapennis Guerin, were introduced from Australia for study as
possible biocontrol agents of Lantana camera L. in Florida citrus
groves; 6 shipments of the wasp Larra bicolor Fabr. were imported
from Puerto Rico for field colonization against mole crickets
throughout Florida; a moth, Parapoynx diminutalis Snellen, col-
lected in Panama, and aquatic weevils, Bagous spp., collected in In-
dia, were hand-carried to this unit for identification and possible
study against hydrilla; 1 species of parasitic wasp, Trichopria
stomoxydis Huggert, was imported from Mauritius via California
for study in the biocontrol of stable flies in the southern states;
citrus root weevils, Diaprepes abbreviatus L., were sent to quaran-
tine from Puerto Rico for pheromone collection and study; Ardalus
n.sp., a parasitic wasp from Colombia, was imported for coloniza-
tion against bean leafroller, Urbanus proteus (L.), in Florida.
Exportations and Releases
Larra bicolor Fabr., a predator wasp, has been released in Braden-
ton, Ft. Lauderdale, Gainesville, and Tampa against mole crickets,







Division of Plant Industry


Scapteriscus spp.; 2 shipments of Hyphantria cunea (Drury) (fall
webworm) collected in Florida were sent to Nagoya University,
Japan, for physiological study and breeding experiments; weevils,
Neochetina bruchi Warner, collected in Gainesville were shipped to
the U. S. Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS, for release against
water hyacinth in Texas; lab-cultured Mexican bean beetles,
Epilachna varivestis Mulsant, were shipped to the University of
Michigan for use in mass-rearing its parasitic wasp, Pediobius
foveolatus (Crawford); predatory stinkbugs, Podisus maculiventris
Snellen and Eocanthecona furcellata (Wolff), from lab cultures were
sent to the USDA Stoneville Quarantine Facility for use in screen-
ing exotic egg parasites; the parasitic wasp, Trichopria stomoxydis
Huggert, was hand-carried to the USDA Insects Affecting Man and
Animal Research Laboratory, Gainesville, for lab culture and
probable release against stable flies; alligatorweed flea beetles,
Agasicles hygrophila Selman & Vogt, were shipped to Columbia,
SC, for release against alligatorweed in that area; Arrhenophagus
sp., parasitic wasps collected in Gainesville, were shipped to the
USDA, ARS Beltsville Lab for study and probable release against
white peach scale.
Projects University of Florida
Releases of Larra bicolor Fabr. have been made in 4 locations in
Florida against mole crickets; population surveys of citrus whitefly
and its introduced parasite, Encarsia lahorensis (Howard), were con-
tinued to determine the extent of control in Florida; experimental
studies on the reproductive biology and inbreeding depression were
continued on Trissolcus basalis (Wollaston), a parasite of the
stinkbug Nezara viridula (L.); lab cultures of N. viridula (L.), T.
basalis (Wollaston), Galleria mellonella (L.) (wax moth), and Eocan-
thecona furcellata (Wolff) are maintained; Morganella longispina
(Morgan), a pest of citrus and ornamentals, has been cultured for the
expected arrival of its natural enemies from Hawaii; an attempt was
made to establish a lab colony of Ardalus n. sp. from specimens
received from Colombia, SA although a first generation was
reared successfully, the second could not complete development due
to the disease-caused death of parasitized host larvae; Pediobius
foveolatus (Crawford), parasite of Mexican bean beetle, has been
released in only one location south of Brooker, Alachua Co., and
releases will continue until the end of the current growing season.
The objective of the release is to examine the parasite's impact on
the Mexican bean beetle at this particular location; reproductive
biology studies of this parasite continue.
Projects USDA
A colony of Agasicles hygrophila Selman & Vogt is maintained
for use against alligatorweed in Florida and other southern states;






THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Parapoynx diminutalis Snellen, an accidentally introduced moth on
hydrilla, is being studied; surveys and collections of Neochetina
spp., weevils released for control of water hyacinth, continue; a
cooperative study with DPI for the isolation and identification of
nematodes on aquatic plants was conducted; approximately 40
species of aquatic plants are maintained in pools, vaults, and
greenhouses by USDA personnel for use as food or host plants and
for culturing insects.


Entomology Library

R. E. Woodruff, Taxonomic Entomologist

As in the past, the entomology portion of the Division of Plant In-
dustry Library has developed by gifts and purchases, with con-
tinued emphasis on taxonomic literature. As a part of a cooperative
agreement, with the University of Florida's Hume Library and the
Department of Entomology and Nematology, IFAS, all holdings
are cross-catalogued, and purchases are coordinated to avoid
duplication and maximize the use of minimal budgets.
Details of accessions and holdings are reported elsewhere under
the librarian's report and under donations. The Research Associates
program of the Florida State Collection of Arthropods has provided
the basis for donations of life-time collections of specimens and the
associated taxonomic literature. Many rare and valuable publica-
tions were received as a part of this program during the biennium.


Morganella longispina (Morgan)
(Homoptera:Coccoidea:Diaspididae)

Avas B. Hamon, Taxonomic Entomologist

Plumose scale, Morganella longispina, was collected by Gordon T.
Muraoka, USDA-APHIS (Miami 024094 NPD-CONTINENTAL
RECORD) at Dodge Island, the port area of Miami, Florida, on
24-X-1980. The host was oleander, Nerium sp. Additional surveys
by the Division of Plant Industry located several infestations in the
Miami area.
This armored scale insect has been reported as a minor pest of
Citrus in Brazil and China. It occurs over most of the Caribbean
Islands and South America.
More information on plumose scale can be found in Dekle 1964,
Ent. Circ. No. 23 and Hamon 1981, Ent. Circ. No. 226.






Division of Plant Industry


Philephedra sp.
(Homoptera:Coccoidea:Coccidae)
Avas B. Hamon, Taxonomic Entomologist

This undescribed species of soft scale insect was collected by Ms.
J. S. Hunt at Miami, Florida, on 5-VII-1981. The host was gumbo
limbo Bursera simaruba (L.) Sarg. Additional hosts in Florida have
been papaya (Carica papaya L.) and Brazilian pepper (Schinus
terebinthifolius Raddi). The known distribution is Colombia,
Guatemala, Mexico, and Texas (Cameron County, Hildago Co., and
Wallacy Co.) on various hosts including Codiaeum and Citrus (per-
sonal communication, S. Nakahara).
Precautions have been taken to eliminate this scale insect from
Florida.


Aleurolobus solitarius Quaintance & Baker
(Homoptera:Aleyrodidae:Aleyrodinae)
Avas B. Hamon, Taxonomic Entomologist

Aleurolobus solitarius (NEW STATE RECORD) was collected by
Ms. O. K. Miller at Camp Blanding Military Reservation, Florida,
on 23-VI-1981. The host was redbud, Cercis canadensis L.
The United States distribution is Missouri, Texas, Virginia, and
now Florida. Other members of this whitefly genus are from the
Orient or Asia.
This species is not known to be economically important, and no
further regulatory action is contemplated. It was first reported in
TRI-OLOGY 20(7):3.


Chionaspis kosztarabi Takagi
(Homoptera:Coccoidea:Diaspididae)

Avas B. Hamon, Taxonomic Entomologist

Chionaspis kosztarabi (NEW STATE RECORD) was collected by
Mr. A. E. Graham at RFD #3, Lake City, Florida, on 8-VI-1980. The
host was Fraxinus sp. and was originally reported in 1981 (TRI-
OLOG Y, 20(1):3). This scale insect is not economically important in
Florida. The known distribution is Georgia, Maryland, Mississippi,
North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Virginia.






THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Rhizoecus arabicus Hambleton
(Homoptera:Coccoidea:Pseudococcidae)
Avas B. Hamon, Taxonomic Entomologist

Rhizoecus arabicus (NEW NORTH AMERICAN RECORD) was
collected by Mr. D. L. Culbert at Sarasota, Florida, on 22-II-1982.
The host was the gesneriad Gasteranthus atratus (Hanst.) Wiehler,
and now several related plants are known hosts in Florida (TRI-
OLOGY, 21(3):5).
This root mealybug has the potential for causing economic
damage, and precautions have been taken to eliminate it from
Florida. For additional information see Hamon 1982, Entomology
Circular No. 238.


Arthropods Other Than Insects (Except Acarina)
Dr. G. B. Edwards, Taxonomic Entomologist

The single largest collection of non-insect arthropods received
during the past biennium was the remainder of the late Dr. Nell B.
Causey's milliped (Diplopoda) collection, willed to the FSCA. This
portion of the collection consisted of over 18,200 specimens and
added over 700 species to the reference collection, including type
material and numerous undescribed forms. Another significant
myriapod collection was purchased from Mr. Alexander K. Johnson,
consisting of about 1000 Chilopoda and 1300 Diplopoda. Dr.
Rowland M. Shelley deposited several milliped paratypes with the
FSCA and provided several rare reprints on millipeds.
The purchase of the scorpion (Scorpionida) collection of the late
Mr. Erik N. Kjellesvig-Waering was one of the highlights of
Arachnida acquisitions by the FSCA. This collection is worldwide in
scope and contains 212 described species, nearly 20% of the world's
described scorpion fauna. Another important collection was
donated by Dr. William B. Muchmore, consisting of a portion of Dr.
Muchmore's extensive pseudoscorpion (Pseudoscorpionida) collec-
tion, considered the second largest in North America. Over 2000
alcohol-preserved specimens and 220 slides representing 29 species
were added to the FSCA. Dr. Muchmore also contributed over 1200
specimens of spiders (Araneae) from the U. S. Virgin Islands,
adding 3 families and 54 species to the FSCA. Other significant col-
lections of spiders donated to the FSCA included those by Dr. W. H.
Whitcomb (over 500 specimens from Zaire, 48 specimens identified
to 29 species from Japan), Mrs. Luis Malaret (about 1000
specimens, 675 from Kansas, the rest from Mexico), Dr. Dale H.
Habeck (over 400 specimens from Africa, Australia, Europe, the






Division of Plant Industry


Caribbean area, and the South Pacific), Dr. Howard V. Weems, Jr.
(over 350 specimens from Costa Rica, Ecuador, Panama, and
Trinidad), Dr. Sidney L. Poe (over 300 specimens from the U. S.),
and Dr. David B. Richman (over 150 specimens identified to 29
species from Puerto Rico). Others donating smaller but nevertheless
valuable collections included Mr. James C. Cokendolpher, Dr. Bruce
Cutler, Mr. Byrd K. Dozier, Mr. L. Richard Franz, Dr. George F.
Knowlton, Mr. R. Bruce Miller, and Dr. Martin H. Muma. Dr.
Muma and Mr. Cokendolpher also contributed numbers of
Opiliones, Scorpionida, and Solpugida. Dr. Muma collected and
donated nearly 4500 specimens of harvestmen (Opiliones) identified
by Mr. Cokendolpher.


Special Projects

H. A. DENMARK, Chief of Entomology

(1) Phytoseiidae of Iran. (Completed)
(2) Phytoseiidae of Colombia. (Completed)
(3) Revision of the genus Galendromus. (in press)
(4) Revision of the genus Phytoseiulus. (in press)
(5) Phytoseiidae of Mexico.
(6) Working with Dr. David Boethel on the Phytoseiidae of
pecan in Louisiana.
(7) National Science Foundation grant No. DEB-8202362,
Florida Department of Agriculture ID 405208000, for 2
compactors 1 for alcohol-preserved specimens and 1 for
slide-mounted specimens ($70,745).
(8) Prepared letters for Commissioner Conner in support of a
whitefly thrips specialist position for ARS, USDA at
Beltsville, MD.
(9) Helped secure funds for the Entomology addition by ask-
ing the entomology community of the state to write letters
of support to their local congressman.
(10) Worked with Dr. Joe Ball of the Big Ben Laboratory, Mon-
ticello by identifying mites associated with pecan.
(11) Reviewed the California medfly program with Charles
Poucher in San Jose, California.
(12) Helped solve a mite problem on Maranta spp. in
greenhouses at Apopka.
(13) Helped train inspectors to recognize insects and mites
associated with transplants, such as tomatoes, eggplants,
tobacco, etc.
(14) Made series of lectures on biological control security
building and programs and the use of the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods in relation to such programs as







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


eradication programs, cross-Florida barge canal, and the
Harry Truman Animal Introduction Center, Fleming Key,
Monroe County.
(15) Visited the California Department of Agriculture in
Sacramento to learn the technique for extracting
spermatheca of female fruit flies to determine if they have
mated.
(16) Served on M. A. S. K. Ranasinghe's doctoral committee,
rewrote and redrew the illustrations from his doctoral
research and co-authored "Description of the immature
stages of Gnophothrips fusca (Morgan) and a new method
for distinguishing the adults from Leptathrips pini (Wat-
son)".

G. B. EDWARDS, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Spiders of Florida: Updating and revising the family-level
manuscript intended as an introduction to spiders occur-
ring in Florida. To be published in Arthropods of Florida
and Neighboring Land Areas.
(2) Salticidae of Florida: Detailed treatment of one of the
families of spiders treated in more general fashion in
Spiders of Florida. To be published in Arthropods of
Florida and Neighboring Land Areas.
(3) Revision of jumping spiders of the genus Phidippus
(Araneae: Salticidae).
(4) Review of North American Salticidae placed in European
genera.
(5) Cooperative project with Dr. D. A. Rossman (Louisiana
State University) on the Salticidae of Georgia (completed).
(6) Taxonomic assistance on IFAS (University of Florida)
survey of spider predators of potential vectors of lethal
yellowing disease of palms (completed).
(7) Taxonomic assistance on IFAS survey of spiders in citrus
groves (completed).
(8) Taxonomic assistance on IFAS survey of spiders in soy-
bean fields.
(9) Taxonomic assistance on IFAS survey of spiders in grape
vineyards.
(10) Taxonomic assistance on spiders of aquatic vegetation, a
survey by the Lee County Water Hyacinth Control
District (completed).
(11) Taxonomic assistance on surveys of saltmarsh arthropods
by the Florida Department of Natural Resources (com-
pleted) and IFAS.
(12) Taxonomic assistance on IFAS project studying spiders
overwintering on Amaranthus (completed).







Division of Plant Industry


(13) Taxonomic assistance and loan of specimens to Mr. George
R. Campbell, field representative of the Fund for Animals,
Inc., in regard to several suspected cases of loxoscelism
(brown recluse spider bite) on Sanibel Island (completed).
(14) Taxonomic assistance to Department of Zoology, Univer-
sity of Florida on projects involving spiders captured by
mud-dauber wasps.
(15) Identifications of Salticidae for institutions to improve the
FSCA reference collection for this diverse group of
predators. During the biennium, jumping spiders were
determined for the University of Costa Rica, the American
Museum of Natural History, the California Academy of
Science, the Museum of Comparative Zoology (Harvard),
the University of California at Berkeley, the University of
Kansas, Kansas State University, Louisiana State Univer-
sity, University of Nebraska, Texas A & M University,
and Texas Tech University.
(16) Identifications of diverse spider families were made for the
University of Florida, the Mississippi State Museum, and
the University of Rochester (New York). Significant addi-
tions to the reference collection of spiders were made.
(17) Set up exchanges with other institutions to improve the
reference collection. A series of exchanges was begun with
each of the following institutions: Museu de Ciencias
Naturais (Porto Alegre, Brasil), California Academy of
Sciences, and San Jose State University.
(18) Put together card file for all type material of non-insect
Arthropoda deposited in the FSCA (completed).
(19) Put together card file for all species of non-insect
Arthropoda represented in the FSCA (completed for
Araneae).
(20) Worked with photographer Steven Brown on article for
Life Magazine dealing with beneficial arthropods in
agroecosystems.
(21) Worked with photographer-producer Neal Goodwin on
movie for the Public Broadcasting System (Boston af-
filiate) dealing with mimicry in animals.
(22) Was interviewed by Information Services of the Univer-
sity of Florida and appeared on local television in connec-
tion with discovery of a "singing spider".

AVAS B. HAMON, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Whiteflies of Florida this is a continuing project of
learning, building collection, acquiring literature, getting
photographs, and compilation of data for a future bulletin.
(2) Soft Scale Insects of Florida this is a continuing project







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


leading to a bulletin. The host list, photographs, descrip-
tions, appendix, and distribution have been completed.
F. W. MEAD, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Year-round daily operation of a blacklight trap at the
border between experiment station, University of Florida
and the Doyle Conner Building area.
Main Purpose: Numerical counts of economic moths for
a surveillance tool in the midst of a highly diversified and
active nursery and agricultural area.
(2) Taxonomic and life history research on Oliarus spp.
(Homoptera: Cixiidae).
(3) Taxonomic assistance of IFAS survey (University of
Florida) for potential vectors of lethal yellowing disease of
palms.
(4) Taxonomic assistance on saltmarsh insect projects by
state agency researchers.
(5) Series of short papers on life stages of predatory stink
bugs in Florida; junior author with D. B. Richman.
(6) European corn borer special surveys, primarily by ex-
amination of blacklight trap samples.
(7) Preparation of an Annual Summary of Economic Insect
Condition in Florida. Report not to exceed 10 pages as re-
quired by USDA, APHIS.
(8) Member, DPI Survey & Detection Committee.
(9) Heteroptera on roses in homegarden.

L. A. STANGE, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Continued identification and field studies of Neuroptera of
Florida.
(2) Continued ant-lion (Neuroptera) larvae studies; rearing
ant-lion larvae and their parasites; worked on identifica-
tion and keys of several species; added 12 species to collec-
tion.
(3) Identified, sorted and curated Neuroptera for new FSCA
(Ascalaphidae, Coniopterygidae, Hemerobiidae, and
Myrmeleontidae).
(4) Worked on West Hemisphere book of keys and synopsis of
Myrmeleontidae.
(5) Platymantispinae biosystematics. Continued investiga-
tion of genera and species of this group of insects which at-
tack Hymenoptera (with Ellis MacLeod, University of
Illinois).
(6) Curated Eumenidae (Hymenoptera) for FSCA.
(7) Studied South American Epanthidium (Mega-
chilidae:Hymenoptera). Began paper for publication in







Division of Plant Industry


Bohart special edition of Pan-Pacific Entomol.
(8) Continued taxonomic studies of Zethus (Eumeni-
dae: Hymenoptera); worked on revision of Zethus of
Venezuela and the Bahamas.
(9) Curated Gastropoda for FSCA.
(10) Continued acquisition of specialized library on Neuroptera
and Hymenoptera.
(11) Field trips, in and out-of-state, were made to conduct
special insect and snail surveys, collect material for tax-
onomic studies in special interest groups, and to build up
the FSCA.
(12) Prepared a special course on Hymenoptera identification
for Steve Dwinell, a University of Florida graduate stu-
dent.
(13) Oversaw a 5-credit course on parasitic Hymenoptera for
two University of Florida students.
(14) Participated in the identification of Mediterranean fruit fly
suspects in Tampa; of the specimens I examined, two were
determined to be Medflies.

H. V. WEEMS, JR., Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Compile a comprehensive report on private collections of
arthropods which have been committed for ultimate
deposition in the Florida State Collection of Arthropods by
Research Associates and Student Associates and those
already donated but which are currently in the possession
of the donors for curating and continuing development and
study.
(2) Complete an inventory of the primary and secondary type
specimens in the FSCA and in private collections of ar-
thropods which are committed for ultimate deposition in
the FSCA, and, when this had been accomplished, prepare
a manuscript for a bulletin listing these types to be
published by the Division of Plant Industry.
(3) Prepare an illustrated bulletin on the Florida State Collec-
tion of Arthropods and the Research Associate Program
which supports its continuing development and generates
publications on arthropods.
(4) Continue to coordinate the development of the arthropod
collections of the Florida State Collection of Arthropods
located at the University of Florida and the Division of
Plant Industry, FDACS, in Gainesville, and Florida
A & M University in Tallahassee. This involves meetings
of the involved curators approximately twice each year to
discuss mutual problems and procedures.
(5) Review and update the biographical information records







THIITY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


for all Research Associates and Student Associates of the
Florida State Collection of Arthropods and try to obtain a
personal photograph of all associates.
(6) Develop plans for establishment of a non-profit, tax-
exempt corporation designed to support the total program
of the Florida State Collection of Arthropods.
(7) Develop a formal contract with the University of Florida
similar to that signed with Florida A & M University in
1977 regarding cooperative development of the Florida
State Collection of Arthropods. A close working relation-
ship with the University of Florida has been maintained
for many years, but no formal agreement has ever been ex-
ecuted.
(8) Prepare an illustrated bulletin on arthropod groups,
primarily pertaining to their identification, habitat rela-
tionships, seasonal and geographic distribution, and
techniques for collecting and preserving them, with em-
phasis on Florida.
(9) Continue experimenting with designs for more effective in-
sect flight traps and field testing of these traps.
(10) Continue to coordinate operation of insect flight traps by
collaborators in several locations in Florida, several other
parts of the United States, and in several other countries
of the New World, and the processing and identification of
the collections from these traps. The trapping program is a
vital part of a faunal survey of Florida and other areas,
provides a means of monitoring fluctuating insect popula-
tions, and produces considerable reference and study
material for the Florida State Collection of Arthropods.
(11) Conduct exchanges of reference material to make the
Florida collection more complete. A special continuing ef-
fort is being made to obtain representatives of the
principal arthropod pests occurring in other parts of the
world, those which constitute a potential threat to Florida
agriculture. This will materially aid staff specialists in
making more rapid, accurate, and complete identifications.
It also provides additional material for taxonomic
research, display, and teaching purposes.
(12) Make occasional field trips, both in-state and out-of-state,
to conduct special arthropod surveys, to collect material
for taxonomic study in special interest groups, notably
Syrphidae, and/or make general collections for the Florida
State Collection of Arthropods.
(13) Visit other institutions in North, Central, and South
America which maintain substantial arthropod collections
in order to observe curatorial techniques, arrange







Division of Plant Industry


exchanges of specimens, and study collections in specific
areas of taxonomic interest and responsibility.
(14) Develop a series of carefully planned field trips to various
parts of Florida at different times of the year to search for
specific arthropods known to occur in those areas but
which are yet unrepresented in the official state collection
and to discover other species not known to occur in
Florida. Eventually this could become a part of a formal,
long-range survey of the arthropods of Florida which
might involve several specialists trained to process the
material collected in the course of such a survey. This, in
turn, could be coordinated with a proposed regional insect
detection laboratory and a proposed regional arthropod
identification and taxonomic research center (for which the
Florida State Collection of Arthropods and the Division of
Plant Industry library would be basic resources).
(15) Continue a special effort to develop complete sets of the en-
tomological publications of some of the most important
and most prolific dipterists; efforts are being made to
develop extensive reprint files for the various other groups
of arthropods. Dr. G. B. Edwards has been assigned the
task for further development of the literature files on
arachnids, millipeds, centipedes, and crustaceans.
(16) Continue development of a comprehensive reference collec-
tion of immatures of various groups of insects, primarily
the Diptera, with special emphasis on larvae of fruit flies
and related groups. A special effort is being made to obtain
accurately identified larvae of both foreign and domestic
species of fruit flies of economic importance.
(17) Continue studies of the Diptera family, Syrphidae, in-
cluding preparation of a bulletin on the Syrphidae of the
southeastern United States.
R. E. WOODRUFF, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Scarabaeidae of Florida. Part II. May beetles (Phyllophaga
spp.). Although specimens and data have been ac-
cumulated for more than 20 years, this project was
revitalized in April 1981, with a target completion date of
June 1983. It is a joint project with technologist Brenda
Beck. This economically important genus is taxonomically
difficult and requires dissection of the genitalia for
positive identification. During the biennium 30,241
specimens were dissected, identified and recorded. Only
critical or variable species were mounted. The data have
been recorded on magcards, transferred to discs, and pro-
grammed to be reproduced for vial labels and also for
camera-ready copy for eventual publication.







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


(2) Fossil amber insects of the Dominican Republic. This pro-
ject began in 1975 and involved National Science Founda-
tion support in 1977-78. Prior to the study, only a single
fossil insect was described from the entire West Indies. As
a result of 7 trips to the Dominican Republic, I have
visited most of the mines and now have over 2,000 fossils
catalogued (many of which are on loan to specialists for
study). Specimens of 21 Orders of insects are represented,
including over 30 families of beetles. Several papers are in
press or near completion, but several years will be required
to study this huge collection. Most of the amber is sold
commercially as jewelry. Because of this, many new
species of insects and much scientific information is lost.
In an effort to salvage some of these data, and to screen
specimens being sold, I have set up a Registry of
Dominican Amber Fossils. Specimens are submitted by
commercial dealers; these are identified as far as possible,
given a registry number, recorded on a card file, significant
fossils are noted, some unusual ones purchased, lists of
taxonomic specialists are provided, and the specimens and
registry information returned to the dealer. They have
agreed to record and return the names and addresses of
purchasers in order to trace the specimen for study later.
The registry now contains over 4000 entries. Currently
there are 5 major dealers submitting material for this
study.
(3) Endangered Scarabaeidae of Florida. For several years I
have served on the Florida Endangered Species Commit-
tee. Five volumes had previously been published on the
plants and vertebrates. As a part of Volume 6 on the in-
vertebrates, I prepared a report on 52 species of
Scarabaeidae which was published in June 1982.


Job-Related Activities

H. A. DENMARK, Chief of Entomology
(1) Chairman, Arthropod Introduction Committee.
(2) Adjunct Professor (courtesy appointment), Department of
Entomology and Nematology, IFAS, University of
Florida.
(3) Courtesy Associate Professor, Area of Entomology and
Structural Pest Control, Florida A & M University,
Tallahassee.
(4) Chairman, Plant Pest Introduction and Evaluation Com-
mittee in Entomology.







56 Division of Plant Industry

(5) Member, Supervisory Committee to review fruit fly
trapping.
(6) Member, Advisory Council, Department of Entomology
and Structural Pest Control, Florida A & M University,
Tallahassee.
(7) Chairman of an Ad hoc Committee to revise the constitu-
tion and by-laws for the Florida Entomological Society.
(8) Member of a committee to discuss quarantine facilities
and what is needed in the Gainesville area.
(9) Worked with Mr. Fred Petitt from EPCOT, Disney World
in arranging for predaceous mites as part of the exhibits
for biological control.
(10) Identified mites associated with apples in Michigan as
part of an integrated pest management program.
(11) Resolved dust mite problems in office of Irvin B. Green
and Associates, Inc., Winter Park and the Shands
Teaching Hospital, Gainesville. Employees in both areas
were allergic to this mite.
G. B. EDWARDS, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Editor, Peckhamia, a new journal dedicated to research on
the biology of jumping spiders.
AVAS B. HAMON, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Quarantine Laboratory Security Officer.
(2) Quarantine Laboratory Equipment Coordinator.
(3) Assistant Professor, Adjunct, Department of Entomology
and Nematology, University of Florida.
(4) Doyle Conner Building Blood Group Bureau represent-
ative.
(5) Associate Professor, Adjunct, Florida A & M University,
Department of Entomology and Structural Pest Control,
Tallahassee, FL.

F. W. MEAD, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Adjunct Associate Professor (Courtesy appointment),
Department of Entomology and Nematology, IFAS,
University of Florida, Gainesville.
(2) Courtesy Associate Professor, Department of Entomology
& Structural Pest Control, Florida \A & M University,
Tallahassee.
(3) Secretary, Florida Entomological Society, 1980-1982.
(4) Member, Insect Detection, Evaluation and Prediction
Committee, Southeastern Branch, Entomological Society
of America, 1980-1982.
(5) Member, Insect Detection, Evaluation, and Prediction







TIIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Committee, National Society, Entomological Society of
America, 1980-1981.
L. A. STANGE, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Adjunct Associate Professor (courtesy appointment),
Department of Entomology and Nematology, IFAS,
University of Florida.
(2) Courtesy Associate Professor, Department of Entomology
& Structural Pest Control, Florida A & M University,
Tallahassee.
(3) Research Associate, Los Angeles County Museum of
Natural History.
(4) Member of the Americas Committee of the Florida En-
tomological Society.
(5) As a member of the DPI Publications Review Committee I
reviewed 89 manuscripts.
H. V. WEEMS, JR., Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Head Curator, Florida State Collection of Arthropods.
(2) Coordinator, Research Associate Program of the Florida
State Collection of Arthropods.
(3) Editor, Arthropods of Florida and Neighboring Land
Areas and Occasional Papers of the Florida State Collec-
tion of Arthropods, irregularly appearing bulletins
published by the Division.
(4) Associate Editor, the Florida Entomologist, quarterly
journal of the Florida Entomological Society, since 1973.
(5) Adjunct Professor, Dept. of Entomology and Nematology,
IFAS, University of Florida, and member of the Doctoral
Research Faculty.
(6) Courtesy Associate Professor, Area of Entomology and
Structural Pest Control, Florida A & M University,
Tallahassee.
(7) Chairman, Special Committee on Insects and Terrestrial
Invertebrates, Florida Committee on Rare and En-
dangered Plants and Animals.
(8) Florida Entomological Society: Long Range Planning
Committee Chairman, 1980-1981; Member of following
committees: Brochure Committee, Publications Commit-
tee, and Future Publications Committee, and the Florida
Entomologists Directory Committee.
R. E. WOODRUFF, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Entomology
and Nematology, University of Florida.
(2) Adjunct Associate Curator, Department of Natural







Division of Plant Industry


Science, Florida State Museum.
(3) Courtesy Associate Professor, Department of Entomology
and Structural Pest Control, Florida A & M University,
Tallahassee.
(4) Member, Florida Committee on Rare and Endangered
Plants and Animals in Florida.
(5) Committee member, "Common Names of Insects," En-
tomological Society of America, 1980-82.
(6) Committee member, "Data and Word Processing Commit-
tee," Division of Plant Industry.
(7) Committee Chairman, "New Society Emblem," Florida
Entomological Society, 1980-82.
(8) Assistant editor, "The Coleopterists Bulletin," The Col-
eopterists Society, 1980-82.
(9) Committee member, Division of Plant Industry Library
Committee.
(10) Committee Chairman, "Coleopterists Society Field Trip,
1980".
(11) Editorial Board of "Colemania" and "Ayyaria", 2 Indian
entomological journals, 1980-82.
(12) Committee member, By-laws Committee, Florida En-
tomological Society, 1980-81.


Trips and Meetings

August 7-14, 1980: Fayetteville, Arkansas to pick up remainder of
the Diplopoda collection of the late Dr. Nell B. Causey. (H. V.
Weems, Jr.)
August 27-29, 1980: Florida Entomological Society Annual Meet-
ing, Daytona Beach. (H. A. Denmark, G. B. Edwards, Avas B.
Hamon, F. W. Mead, L. A. Stange, and H. V. Weems, Jr.)
September 15, 1980: Florida A & M University Advisory Council
Meeting, inspect mites, Orlando. (H. A. Denmark)
October 21-28, 1980: Investigate mite problem in Apopka. (H. A.
Denmark)
October 28, 1980: Conference on Diaprepes. (R. E. Woodruff)
November 4-8, 1980: Investigate Medfly problem in San Jose, Cali-
fornia. (H. A. Denmark)
November 12-13, 1980: Florida Citrus Mutual Meeting to report on
the California Medfly problem. (H. A. Denmark)
November 14, 1980: To obtain National Science Foundation grant
support, Washington, D. C. (H. A. Denmark)
November 30-December 4, 1980: Entomological Society of America
Annual Meeting, Atlanta, Georgia. (H. A. Denmark, Avas B.
Hamon, F. W. Mead, H. V. Weems, Jr.)
January 15, 1982: Workshop and retirement luncheon for George







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Lamb, Ed Prange, Eugene Campbell, Winter Haven. (Avas B.
Hamon)
January 26-27, 1981: Medfly hearing in Lakeland. (H. A. Denmark)
February 17-19, 1981: Florida A & M University Entomology &
Structural Pest Control Field Day, Tallahassee. (H. A. Denmark,
H. V. Weems, Jr.)
March 16-17, 1981: Pick up the Coleoptera and Scorpionida Collec-
tions of the late Erik N. Kjellesvig-Waering, Marco Island.
(H. V. Weems, Jr., R. E. Woodruff)
March 31, 1981: Pick up mites on Maranta, Apopka. (H. A.
Denmark)
May 1-2, 1981: Florida Academy of Sciences 45th Annual Meeting,
Orlando, and meeting of the Florida Committee on Rare and En-
dangered Plants and Animals. (H. V. Weems, Jr.)
May 19-24, 1982: Association of Systematics Collections Annual
Meeting, Lawrence, Kansas. (H. V. Weems, Jr.)
July 16-17, 1981: Inter-agency meeting on Medfly, Winter Haven.
(H. A. Denmark)
July 19-24, 1981: American Malacological Society Annual Meeting,
Ft. Lauderdale. (L. A. Stange)
July 24, 1981: Inspect compactors to be installed in museum, Lake-
land. (H. A. Denmark, R. E. Woodruff)
July 30, 1981: Fruit fly Committee Meeting, Winter Haven. (H. A.
Denmark)
August 4, 1981: Set up Medfly eradication office for the 4th Florida
infestation, Tampa. (H. A. Denmark)
August 11-14, 1981: Florida Entomological Society 64th Annual
Meeting, Daytona Beach. (H. A. Denmark, F. W. Mead, H. V.
Weems, Jr., R. E. Woodruff)
August 22-28, 1981: Mediterranean Fruit fly Eradication in Tampa.
(Avas B. Hamon)
August 28-September 5, 1981: Medfly laboratory in Tampa.
(H. V. Weems, Jr.)
August 31, 1981: Medfly program planning meeting, Winter Haven.
(H. A. Denmark)
October 16-20, 1981: Trip to North Carolina. Visited Mr. Lucien
Harris, III concerning donation of Lepidoptera to the FSCA
while on annual leave. (H. V. Weems, Jr.)
November 3-6, 1981: Florida State Horticultural Society Meeting
which included a 2-day conference on control and biology of
Liriomyza Leaf Miners, Lake Buena Vista. (H. A. Denmark,
H. V. Weems, Jr.)
November 29-December 3, 1981: Entomological Society of America
Annual Meeting in San Diego, California. (H. A. Denmark,
L. A. Stange, H. V. Weems, Jr.)
December 4-12, 1981: Los Angeles County Museum to gather syn-
optic Hymenoptera collection for Florida State Collection of







60 Division of Plant Industry

Arthropods. (L. A. Stange)
January 12, 1982: Work with Dr. B. Schroeder, USDA Labora-
tory on possibility of identifying fruit fly larvae electrophoreti-
cally, Apopka. (H. A. Denmark)
January 14, 1982: Trip to The Allyn Museum of Entomology, Sara-
sota. (H. V. Weems, Jr.)
January 25-28, 1982: Southeastern Branch meeting of the Ento-
mological Society of America, Mobile, Alabama. (F. W. Mead)
February 19, 1982: Investigate blister beetles in hay, Ocala.
(R. E. Woodruff)
February 25, 1982: Attended morning session of IFAS Pesticide
Conference, Gainesville. (F. W. Mead)
March 3, 1982: Contact unit insect tray vendors, Jacksonville.
(R. E. Woodruff)
April 23-24, 1982: Florida Academy of Sciences 46th Annual Meet-
ing, DeLand. Also held in conjunction with this meeting were
the annual meeting of the Florida Junior Academy of Sciences,
the Florida Committee on Rare and Endangered Plants and Ani-
mals, and the Florida Science Talent Search. (H. V. Weems, Jr.)
May 24-30, 1982: Pick up Lepidoptera collection and library of the
late Dr. Walfried J. Reinthal, Knoxville, Tennessee. (H. V.
Weems, Jr.)
June 16-22, 1982: Conference of syrphidologists, Colebrook, New
Hampshire. (H. V. Weems, Jr.)
June 17-22, 1982: American Arachnological Society Eastern Branch
Meeting, Hampden-Sydney, Virginia. Served as moderator for
the session of papers dealing with behavior. (G. B. Edwards)


Special Surveys
June 23-July 7, 1980: Scientific study tour to Ecuador and Galap-
agos Islands (vacation:non-supported trip) Blacklight trapped
upper Amazon Basin for 2 nights, and western slopes of Andes
for 2 nights in Ecuador. (F. W. Mead)
July 1-19, 1980: Ecuador field trip. (H. V. Weems, Jr.)
July 13-31, 1980: During 1980-81, regular collections for citrus
whitefly were made of backyard citrus, Japanese persimmon,
ligustrum, gardenia, and viburnum leaves to aid in monitor-
ing of a whitefly biocontrol project, for a cooperative whitefly
biocontrol project, especially for IFAS Entomologist R. I. Sailer
and students. (F. W. Mead)
August 15-22, 1980: Survey for Cotinis n. sp., Miami and Florida
Keys. (R. E. Woodruff)
October 13-19, 1980: Insect and snail survey in South Florida, also
checked Encarsia lahorensis release sites in the Keys. (L. A.
Stange)







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


November 17-22, 1980: Insect and snail survey in South Florida;
collected many new snails for collection, collected larvae of 3
species of Myrmeleontidae (Neuroptera), including a first record
of Psammoleon bistictus. (L. A. Stange)
December 4-6, 1980: Coleopterists Society field trip, Welaka.
(R. E. Woodruff)
March 28-29, 1981: Arthropod collecting trip, Interlachen. (G. B.
Edwards, H. V. Weems, Jr.)
May 8-10, 1981: Insect survey with visiting entomologist, Welaka.
(R. E. Woodruff)
May 28-June 4, 1981: Insect and snail survey in South Florida.
(L. A. Stange)
June 18-26, 1981: Northeast Mexico to survey and study arthropods
and snails of economic concern, particularly on citrus and truck
crop pests as well as their parasites. (L. A. Stange)
June 20-30, 1981: Dominican Republic field trip. (H. V. Weems, Jr.)
July 5-19, 1981: Scientific tour of Costa Rica. Blacklight trap
operated at several biological stations in Costa Rica. (vacation:
non-supported trip). (F. W. Mead)
July 11-August 9, 1981: Panama and Costa Rica field trip to ob-
serve pests associated with each type of produce on banana and
oil palm plantations of United Fruit Company (a division of
United Brands). In Panama City working with Smithsonian
Tropical Research Institute and collecting in the Canal Zone.
(B. K. Dozier, Research Associate of FSCA, G. B. Edwards,
H. V. Weems, Jr.)
October 8-14, 1981: Insect and snail survey in South Florida with
Dr. Charles C. Porter, Fordham University. (L. A. Stange)
November 22-28, 1981: Yucatan, Mexico to collect Neuroptera and
study Mexican specimens in their native habitats. (L. A. Stange)
November 29-December 10, 1981: Worked at San Diego Natural
History Museum and Los Angeles County Museum of Natural
History and visited 4 Research Associates of the FSCA living in
California, following the 29th Annual Meeting of the Entomolog-
ical Society of America. (H. V. Weems, Jr.)
December 16-18, 1981: Survey for sugarcane weevils, South Bay.
(R. E. Woodruff)
February 24, 1982: Inspect laboratory building of the Orange
County Pollution Control Laboratory, Orlando, for infestation of
a species of venomous brown spider, Loxosceles rufescens
Dufour. Evidence of an established population was found, and
appropriate control recommended. (G. B. Edwards)
April 3-5, 1982: Arthropod collecting trip to South Florida while on
annual leave. (H. V. Weems, Jr.)
May 14, 1982: Insect survey at Myakka River State Park, Miami
and Florida Keys. (R. E. Woodruff)







62 Division of Plant Industry

May 14-23, 1982: Survey for snails and insects in South Florida
with Dr. C. C. Porter. (L. A. Stange and R. E. Woodruff)
June 8, 1982: Grasshopper survey, Leesburg. (R. E. Woodruff)
June 13-July 11, 1982: Field trip to New England and Nova Scotia
while on annual leave. (H. V. Weems, Jr.)
June 14-18, 1982: Insect survey, Miami and Florida Keys. (R. E.
Woodruff)


Training Personnel

July 21-25, 1980: Lectures to Training Class #42 for field personnel
of the Division of Plant Industry, Gainesville. (H. A. Denmark,
A. B. Hamon, F. W. Mead, H. V. Weems, Jr., R. E. Woodruff)
August 20-22, 1980: Field training for Training Class #42 in Winter
Haven. (Avas B. Hamon)
September 30-October 3, 1980: Florida Department of Agriculture
& Consumer Services Annual Business Conference, Tampa.
(H. A. Denmark, Avas B. Hamon, F. W. Mead, H. V. Weems, Jr.,
R. E. Woodruff)
January 15, 1981: Workshop in Winter Haven. (H. A. Denmark,
Avas B. Hamon)
January 19-23, 1981: Lectures to Training Class #43 for field per-
sonnel of the Division of Plant Industry, Gainesville. (H. A.
Denmark, A. B. Hamon, F. W. Mead, H. V. Weems, Jr., R. E.
Woodruff)
February 5, 1981: Region I Workshop in Winter Haven. (L. A.
Stange, H. V. Weems, Jr.)
February 9-10, 1981: Vegetable transplant workshop in Winter
Haven. (H. A. Denmark)
February 18-20, 1981: Field training for Training Class #43 in
Winter Haven. (A. B. Hamon)
March 4-8, 1981: Lectures to Training Class #44 for field personnel
of the Division of Plant Industry, Gainesville. (H. A. Denmark,
A. B. Hamon, F. W. Mead, H. V. Weems, Jr., R. E. Woodruff)
March 4-6, 1981: Seminar University of Florida, Department of
Entomology and Nematology, Gainesville. (A. B. Hamon)
April 2-3, 1981: Field training for Training Class #44 in Winter
Haven. (A. B. Hamon)
April 28-30, 1981: Region III Workshop in Ft. Lauderdale. (H. A.
Denmark)
May 4-8, 1981: Lectures to Training Class #45 for field personnel of
Division of Plant Industry, Gainesville. (H. A. Denmark, A. B.
Hamon, F. W. Mead, H. V. Weems, Jr., R. E. Woodruff)
June 4-5, 1981: Field training for Training Class #45 in Winter
Haven. (A. B. Hamon)
November 1-3, 1981: Field work with Division of Plant Industry







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Inspector, Melbourne and Vero Beach. (R. E. Woodruff)
November 12-13, 1981: Florida Department of Agriculture and Con-
sumer Services Medfly Debriefing Workshop in Winter Haven.
(H. A. Denmark, A. B. Hamon, H. V. Weems, Jr.)
December 4-5, 1981: Training under California Department of Agri-
culture on how to determine whether Medflies are sterile, Sacra-
mento, California. (H. A. Denmark)
December 7-11, 1981: Lectures to Training Class #46 for field per-
sonnel of Division of Plant Industry, Gainesville. (H. A. Den-
mark, A. B. Hamon, F. W. Mead, H. V. Weems, Jr., R. E.
Woodruff)
January 21-22, 1982: Field training for Training Class #46 in Winter
Haven. (A. B. Hamon)
February 8-12, 1982: Lectures to Training Class #47 for field per-
sonnel of Division of Plant Industry, Gainesville. (H. A. Den-
mark, A. B. Hamon, F. W. Mead, H. V. Weems, Jr., R. E.
Woodruff)
February 16-19, 1982: Attend Fifth Annual Field Day and Work-
shop, Department of Entomology and Structural Pest Control,
Florida A & M University, Tallahassee. (H. A. Denmark)
March 4-5, 1982: Field training for Training Class #47 in Winter
Haven. (A. B. Hamon)
April 14-16, 1982: Region III Workshop in Ft. Lauderdale. (L. A.
Stange)


Talks

H. A. DENMARK, Chief of Entomology
February 11, 1981: Overview of Bureau of Entomology activities
for House Appropriations Committee.
February 24-26, 1981: Series of lectures for the Entomology Depart-
ment of the Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana
on Biological Control, and the use of Florida State Collection
of Arthropods (FSCA) in relation to programs, such as the Cross-
Florida Barge Canal, Harry Truman Introduction Center, Key
West, eradication programs, etc.
August 5-8, 1981: Several live TV shows in Tampa for Channel 8
and 10 on the Medfly Program in Florida.
August 17, 1981: TV show for Channel 10, Kim Edstrom show on
the Medfly Program in Florida.
August 25, 1981: TV show for Channel 10, Kim Edstrom show to
present an update on the Medfly and trapping program in
Florida.
September 1, 1981: University of Florida Kiwanis Club on the Med-
fly Program in Florida.







64 Division of Plant Industry

G. B. EDWARDS, Taxonomic Entomologist
August 27, 1980: "The Salticidae of Florida", slide-illustrated invi-
tational talk to the Florida Entomological Society 63rd Annual
Meeting, Daytona Beach.
January 29, 1982: "The Araneae", guest lecturer, Dr. Harvey Crom-
roy's graduate entomology class on Acarina and other non-insect
arthropods, University of Florida, Gainesville.
June 18, 1982: "Courtship-based lineages in the genus Phidippus,
with a new type of courtship for the Salticidae", American
Arachnological Society Eastern Branch Meeting, Hampden-
Sydney, Virginia.

AVAS B. HAMON, Taxonomic Entomologist
October 1-2, 1980: Scale Insects New to Florida. Workshop at
Annual Business Conference, Tampa.
October 26, 1981: Lecture to Tropical Entomology Class, Univer-
sity of Florida.
November 2, 1981: Lecture to Tropical Entomology Class, Uni-
versity of Florida.
November 9, 1981: Lecture to Tropical Entomology Class, Univer-
sity of Florida.
F. W. MEAD, Taxonomic Entomologist
August 29, 1980: "Injury to roses by the coreid, Euthochtha
galeator." Presented at 63rd Annual Meeting of the Florida En-
tomological Society.
October 2, 1980: "Plant Feeding Hemiptera." Presented at Division
Workshop, Annual Business Conference, Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services, Tampa.
October, 1980: "Ecuador Biological Expedition." Presented at
Division Workshop, Annual Business Conference, Florida
Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Tampa.
November 1, 1980: "Biological Tour of Ecuador." Presented at
Entomology Luncheon Seminar, Botany and Zoology Building,
Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.
October 27, 1981: "The 1981 Medfly Campaign in Florida."
Presented at a Seminar at Department of Entomology, Ohio
State University, Columbus, Ohio.
L. A. STANGE, Taxonomic Entomologist
September 30, 1980. "Bees and wasps around the home", Florida
Department of Agriculture Annual Business Conference,
Tampa.
February 5, 1981: "European brown garden snail, Helix aspersa,
identification and habits", Region I Workshop, Winter Haven.
Also discussed other phytophagous mollusks.







TIIIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


November 12, 1981: Talk on immature Neuroptera for Dr. Dale
Habeck's larvae identification class, University of Florida.
April 14-16, 1982: "Slugs and snails of Florida, native and intro-
duced", Region III Workshop, Ft. Lauderdale.
H. V. WEEMS, JR., Taxonomic Entomologist
January 15, 1981: One-hour talk to Dr. Jonathan Reiskind's class of
10 students. Principles of Systematic Zoology, at the University
of Florida. Talked about the Florida State Collection of Arthro-
pods, the FSCA Research Associate Program, our publications
and others we support financially, the DPI Library, and the
identification service of the DPI.
May 27, 1981: One-hour lecture on insects and tour of FSCA for
Mrs. (Sue) G. B. Edwards' class of 27 students (8 & 9-year olds)
from Lake Forest Elementary School, Gainesville.
February 23, 1982: One-hour lecture on services provided by the
Division of Plant Industry with emphasis on the responsibilities
of the Bureau of Entomology, followed by a tour of the museum
for 6 Future Farmers of America students and their teacher
(Mrs. Lorine Dougherty) from Newberry Junior and Senior High
School.
May 14, 1982: Forty-five-minute talk on arthropods followed by 30-
minute tour of museum for 37 gifted K-5 students from Metcalf
Elementary School (Mrs. Sue Edwards' class).
R. E. WOODRUFF, Taxonomic Entomologist
September 19, 1980: "Fossil insects in Dominican Republic
Amber", to Gainesville Gem and Mineral Society.
October 31, 1980: "Current Research", to University of Florida
Department of Entomology, Seminar Course EY 6932.
August 12, 1981: "Fossil Amber insects of the Dominican
Republic"; invitational paper, Florida Entomological Society.
December 1, 1981: "Population ecology of Phyllophaga spp. and
other scarabs in North Central Texas"; joint paper with R. L.
Crocker, Entomological Society of America, San Diego, CA.
March 9, 1982: "Blister beetles in hay as poison to horses"; Florida
Horse Breeders Association, Ocala.

Publications
Denmark, H. A. 1980. Broad mite, Polyphagotarsonemus latus
(Banks) (Acarina: Tarsonemidae) on pittosporum. Fla. Dept.
Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 213,
3 fig.
1981. An oriental thrips, Taeniothrips eucharii (Whetzel),
in Florida (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Con-
sumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 224, 1 fig.







Division of Plant Industry


and Keith L. Andrews. 1981. Plant Associated Phytosei-
idae of El Salvador, Central America (Acarina: Mesostigmata).
The Fla. Ent. 64(1), 12 fig.
and John G. Matthysse. 1981. Some Phytoseiids of
Nigeria (Acarina: Mesostigmata). The Fla. Ent. 64(2), 35 fig.
-, and J. C. E. Nickerson. 1981. A tarsonemid mite, Steneo-
tarsonemus furcatus De Leon, a serious pest on Maranta sp. and
Calathea sp. (Acarina: Tarsonemidae), Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
94:70-72, 6 fig.
and J. C. E. Nickerson. 1982. A tarsonemid mite, Steneo-
tarsonemus furcatus De Leon on Maranta spp. (Acarina: Tarsone-
midae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Ser., Div. Plant Ind., Ent.
Circ. No. 229, 6 fig.
G. J. Moraes, and J. M. Guerrero. 1982. Phytoseiid Mites
of Colombia, (Acarina: Phytoseiidae). Internat. J. of Acarol. 8:1,
16 fig.
and H. Daneshvar. 1982. Phytoseiids of Iran (Acarina:
Phytoseiidae). Internat. J. of Acarol. 8:1, 34 fig.
1982. An eriophyid mite Nothopoda rapaneae Keifer
(Acarina: Eriophyidae), Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div.
Plant Ind. Ent. Circ. No. 235, 8 fig.
Edwards, G. B. 1980. Experimental demonstration of the impor-
tance of wings to prey evaluation by a salticid spider. Peckhamia
2(1):6-9.
1980. Jumping spiders of the United States and Canada:
Changes in the key and list (4). Peckhamia 2(1):11-14, 4 fig.
1981. The regal jumping spider. Phidippus regius (Ara-
neae: Salticidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant
Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 223:1-3, 4 fig.
1981. Sound production by courting males of Phidippus
mystaceus (Araneae:Salticidae). Psyche 88(34):199-214, 5 fig.
and D. A. Rossman. 1981. A preliminary checklist of
Georgia Salticidae. Peckhamia 2(2):27-31.
.1982. Attus otiosus Hentz, 1846 (Araneae:Salticidae):
Proposed conservation under the plenary powers. Z.N. (S.) 2355.
Bul. Zool. Nom. 39(2):64-66.
__ and H. K. Wallace. 1982. Phylum Arthropoda, Class
Arachnida, Order Araneae, In, R. Franz, ed., Rare and En-
dangered Biota of Florida, Invertebrates, 6:120-129.
Hamon, A. B. 1980. Bamboo pit scale, Asterolecanium bambusae
(Boisduval) (Homoptera: Coccoidea: Asterolecaniidae). Fla. Dept.
Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 220:1-2.
1981. Plumose scale. Morganella longispina (Morgan)
(Homoptera: Coccoidea: Diaspididae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Con-
sumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 226:1-2.
__ B. J. Simpson, and R. L. Crocker (senior author). 1981.







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Three native, potential ornamentals (Agarito, Red Barberry, and
Texas Barberry) are attacked by a whitefly. Tetraleurodes
ursorum (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae). SNA Research Conference.
Twenty-sixth Annual Report. 105-106.
1981. Woolly whitefly, Aleurothrixus floccosus (Maskell)
(Homoptera: Aleyrodidae: Aleyrodinae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Con-
sumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 232:1-2.
1982. Rhizoecus arabicus Hambleton, a root mealybug in
Florida. (Homoptera: Coccoidea: Pseudococcidae). Fla. Dept.
Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 238:1-2,
illus.
Mead, F. W., and D. B. Richman (Senior author). 1980. Stages in the
life cycle of a predatory stink bug, Podius maculiventris (Say)
(Hemiptera: Pentatomidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv.,
Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 216:1-2, 7 fig.
J. C. Nickerson, and C. R. Thompson (Senior author).
1981. Nymphal habitat of Oliarus vicarius (Homoptera:Cixi-
idae), and possible association with Aphaenogaster and
Paratrechina (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Psyche 82(4):321-325, 1
fig.
1981. The coreid bug, Euthochtha galeator (Fabricius)
in Florida (Hemiptera: Coreidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer
Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 222:1-4, 10 fig.
.1981. Tabebuia leafhopper, Rabela tabebuiae (Dozier)
(Homoptera: Cicadellidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv.,
Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 228:1-3, 3 fig.
and D. H. Habeck (Senior author). 1982. Edwards wasp
moth, Lymire edwardsii (Grote) (Ctenuchidae: Lepidoptera). Fla.
Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No.
234:1-2, 4 fig.
and J. P. Kramer. 1982. Taxonomic study of the plant-
hopper genus Oliarus in the United States (Homoptera: Fulgoro-
idea: Cixiidae). Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc. 107:381-569, 542 fig.
Stange, L. A. 1979(1980). Tipos de distribution de la subfamilia
Discoeliinae con las descripciones de dos generous nuevos de
Argentina (Hymenoptera: Eumenidae). Acta Zoological Lilloana
35:759-741.
1980. The ant-lions of Florida. II. Genera based on larvae.
(Neuroptera: Myrmeleontidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer
Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 221:1-4, 14 fig.
and Jeffrey Lucas (Junior author). 1981. Key and descrip-
tions to the Myrmeleon larvae of Florida (Neuroptera: Myr-
meleontidae). Fla. Ent. 64(2):207-216.
__ and Ellis MacLeod (Junior author). 1981. The brown lace-
wings of Florida (Neuroptera: Hemerobiidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. &
Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 227:1-4.






68 Division of Plant Industry

1981. The dusty-wings of Florida. Part 1. Genera (Neu-
roptera: Coniopterygidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv.,
Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 233:1-2.
1981. Una nueva species de Veurise Navas de Bolivia con
notas sobre Nemopteridae en America del Sur (Insecta: Neurop-
tera). Physis (Buenos Aires), Secc. C 39(97):35-39.
and Jane E. Deisler (Junior author). 1982. The giant South
American snail, Megalobulimus oblongus (Muller) (Gastropoda:
Megalobulimidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div.
Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 239:1-4.
Weems, Jr., H. V., S. H. Kerr (Senior author), S. B. Hydorn, E. A.
Schoborg, and W. H. Whitcomb. 1980. Handbook of Florida en-
tomologists, Florida Entomological Society. 55 p.
Weems, Jr., H. V. 1980. Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann)
(Diptera: Tephritidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div.
Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 217:1-4, 10 fig.
1981. Bureau chat. Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv.,
Div. Plant Ind., Reporter 27(2):2-3, 1 photo.
.1981. Medfly facts. Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv.,
Div. Plant Ind., Plant Industry News 22(3):4, 1 fig.
1981. Foreword A revision of the New World species of
the genus Neobisnius Ganglbauer (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae:
Staphylininae) by J. Howard Frank. Occasional papers of the
Florida State Collection of Arthropods Vol. l:vi.
.1981. The Florida state endangered insect program. Atala
6(1-2):37-40, 1 fig.
1981. Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiede-
mann) (Diptera: Tephritidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv.,
Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 230:1-12, 6 fig.
1981. Major fruit flies of the world. Fla. Dept. Agric. &
Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., revision of Leaflet No. 3, 1967,
8 p.
1981. Foreword Predaceous water beetles of the genus
Desmopachria: The convexa-grana group (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae)
by Frank N. Young, Jr. Occasional papers of the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods Vol. 2:iii-iv.
and C. M. Tibbets. 1982. Endangered dusky-handed tail-
less whip scorpion, Paraphrynus raptator (Pocock), Family
Phrynidae, Rare and endangered biota of Florida: Invertebrates
6:130-131, 4 fig., 1 map.
Woodruff, R. E., and H. R. Burke (Senior author). 1980. The pepper
weevil (Anthonomus eugenii Cano) in Florida (Coleoptera: Cur-
culionidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind.,
Ent. Circ. No. 219:1-4, 8 fig.
Woodruff, R. E. 1981. Tanymecus lacaena Herbst, an occasional
weevil pest of Florida citrus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Fla.
Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No.
225:1-2, 2 fig.







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


1981. Citrus root weevils of the genus Pachnaeus in
Florida (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer
Serv., Div. of Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 231:1-4, 4 fig.
1982. Artipus floridanus Horn, another weevil pest of
citrus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer
Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 237:1-2, 3 fig.
1982. Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae. p. 84-102, 37 fig. In
Franz, R., ed. Rare and endangered biota of Florida, In-
vertebrates, 6, xx + 131p., Univ. of Florida Presses,
Gainesville, Florida.


Florida State Collection of Arthropods

H. V. Weems, Jr., Taxonomic Entomologist and Curator

Gainesville is rapidly becoming a major center for arthropod tax-
onomy and biological control research. During this biennium, The
Allyn Museum of Entomology, currently located in Sarasota, was
donated to the University of Florida. The Lepidoptera collection of
this museum includes one of the great butterfly collections of the
world and continues to grow at an accelerating rate. We envision
combining the Lepidoptera collections currently housed at the
Allyn Museum, the University of Florida Department of Zoology,
and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Serv-
ices, Division of Plant Industry headquarters to produce the largest
and finest butterfly collection in the New World and one which will
rank at least 5th in the entire world. The other major collections are
located in Europe. Dr. Dale Habeck is developing the collection of
immature Lepidoptera with the expressed goal of making it second
to none in the world, and this is a realistic goal.
During the past year the great collections of Dr. Henry K. Townes
have been committed to the University of Florida Foundation and a
contract entered into which is to produce a world center for
Hymenoptera research, with primary emphasis, at least initially, on
parasitic Hymenoptera. The Townes collection, which number close
to a million specimens, including the world's largest and most com-
plete collection of Ichneumonidae, is to be housed in a planned 8,000
square foot structure to be built just east of the Doyle Conner
Building, possibly as a part of a new University of Florida Depart-
ment of Entomology and Nematology building which is being
planned for construction in that area, between the Division of Plant
Industry facilities and the 2 large USDA laboratories, to form a sort
of entomological park complex. The Townes library will come with
his great collection, along with the American Entomological In-
stitute, the publishing company directed by Dr.Townes. During the







Division of Plant Industry


past year the American Entomological Institute published more
than twice as much in the field of taxonomic entomology as did the
Smithsonian Institution!
Still further, plans are underway for the development at the
University of Florida of a world center for Odonata research, and
already several major collections in North America and Europe
have been committed to the planned center, along with the world's
best Odonata library, currently located in The Netherlands. This
center will also be a part of the developing entomological park.
Toward the common purpose of making Gainesville a world center
for entomological research, the Division of Plant Industry is
making plans to build a larger entomological library and add a
second unit to the existing biological control laboratory.
Possibilities for the future are extremely exciting, and there is a
great spirit of cooperation which makes all things possible, even in
these tight budget times. Major acquisitions during the biennium
included the collections of the late Erik N. Kjellesvig-Waering, a
world-wide Scorpionida collection (see report by Dr. G. B. Edwards)
and a collection of 12,760 exotic Coleoptera, including 2,607
Cicindelidae representing 190 authoritatively identified species;
3,029 Scarabaeidae, including 136 very large specimens; 149
Lucanidae, mostly large; 447 Buprestidae, some quite large; approx-
imately 500 Curculionidae, and assorted groups including Ceram-
bycidae, Elateridae, Tenebrionidae, Passalidae, and Chrysomelidae.
Specimens are from many parts of the world, with numerous species
from Central and South America and the Antilles. Many of the large
beetles represent "showy" species which bring from $10 to $25 per
specimen on the commercial market. An estimated 75% of the
species were new to the FSCA. These collections were purchased for
the FSCA by the University of Florida and the Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer Services. The Kjellesvig-Waering
library was donated to the Division of Plant Industry by Erik's
widow, Virginia, now Mrs. William H. Smith.
Several other sizeable personal libraries consisting of books,
bulletins, and reprints on entomology and related subjects were
donated to the Division of Plant Industry during the biennium,
notably those of the late Dr. Herbert H. Ross (gift from his wife,
Jean), the late Dr. Walfried J. Reinthal (received via his daughter,
Mrs. Wilma Irby), Dr. Frank N. Young, Jr., Dr. Franklin S. Blan-
ton, and Dr. Henry F. Strohecker.
Dr. H. F. Strohecker's extensive collection of endomychid beetles,
largest in the world, was donated to the FSCA. While a complete in-
ventory of this collection has not been completed, it contains many
holotypes and a considerable number of paratypes. A sizeable part
of the world-class collection of aquatic Coleoptera of Dr. Frank N.
Young, Jr. was donated to the FSCA. Dr. Lionel A. Stange donated







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


part of his extensive collection of Neuroptera, which includes the
world's best collection of Coniopterygidae and Neotropical
Neuroptera and an outstanding world collection of Myrmeleontidae.
The Chilopoda and Diplopoda collection of Mr. Alexander K.
Johnson (see report by Dr. G. B. Edwards) was purchased by the
Division of Plant Industry. The general collection of the late
Richard P. Dow, who died 2 December 1979, was donated by his
wife, Mary, to the FSCA. Mr. S. R. Steinhauser donated the insect
collection of his late wife, Levona Mae. The Lepidoptera collection
of the late Dr. Walfried J. Reinthal, especially rich in species of but-
terflies from Europe and the New World, was donated to the FSCA,
along with his storage cabinets and files. An inventory of this large
collection is still in progress. Dr. F. S. Blanton donated a collection
of Diptera: Ceratopogonidae consisting of 48,772 slide mounts, in-
cluding 43 paratype slides, valued in excess of $200,000. A major
exchange of identified species of Hymenoptera, the second such ex-
change in recent years, was made with the Los Angeles County
Museum of Natural History.
"Functions of systematics collections are: (1) identification of new
material, (2) confirmation of earlier determinations, (3) depositing
voucher specimens resulting from different kinds of biological
research, and (4) supplying records of distribution, life cycle, host
preference, and others; in addition, the collections are basic tools for
(5) research, and (6) training in systematics. Pest management pro-
grams can utilize collections which are easily accessible,
systematically arranged, catalogued, and bearing supplementary
documentation. Since pest management programs are usually sup-
ported through public funds, collections should be available to
qualified research workers on request. Identifications are almost im-
possible in pest management, unless the collection has a large series
of duplicates. A large number of specimens is needed to help
systematists to determine the geographical range of a pest species
and/or its parasites and predators; to better understand variations,
such as geographical, host-induced or ecological; and to obtain some
indication on sex ratios; and on subspeciation.
"Accurate species determinations are aided by, and often require,
inclusion of all life stages of both sexes, samples of damage, pupa-
tion chambers or cocoons, feces and frass, webbing, or any other
evidence left behind. Often preservation results in shape or
color change; therefore, preparation of color photographs is
essential.
"Systematics collections are extensively used for insect survey
and detection, they provide general assistance to extension person-
nel, and are basic for professional training and research. For these
reasons, the cost of maintenance of these collections should be







Division of Plant Industry


equally divided among the research, education, and extension divi-
sions of an institution."t
Increased state support for university collections is needed. There
is much that the states could and should do for their collections.
Systematics in the 1970's is being revitalized by the introduction of
ecological thought. Because of the availability of electronic data
processing (EDP) it is reasonable to think that ecological and
ecosystematic generalities of great importance will continue to
come from the study of collections. Information obtained from
systematics collections and systematists should be directly ap-
plicable to managing insect population and forecasting pest out-
breaks.


Major Contributions to the
Florida State Collection of Arthropods

*Mr. H. David Baggett (14406 N. 22nd Street, #169, Lutz, Florida
33549)
244 pinned, labeled insects (2 exotic, 242 domestic; 235 iden-
tified Lepidoptera representing 2 exotic & 53 domestic species;
9 unidentified) consisting of 3 Neuroptera, 1 Hymenoptera, 5
Coleoptera, & 235 Lepidoptera collected in Canada: Ontario (2),
& the United States (242): Florida, Georgia, Mississippi,
Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Vermont, Maine, Ohio, In-
diana, Wisconsin, Missouri, Texas, Arizona, & Wyoming; 90
papered insects consisting of 2 unidentified Neuroptera & 88
identified Lepidoptera representing 17 species, all collected in
Florida by the donor; 25 vials of insects consisting of 2 vials of
unidentified adult Hymenoptera and 23 vials of Lepidoptera lar-
vae (20 vials of identified larvae representing 15 species & 3
vials of unidentified larvae all collected in Florida by the donor.
At least 12 of the identified species of Lepidoptera are rarely col-
lected and/or represent new host plant records; many of the
specimens were reared by the donor); 318 pinned, labeled insects
(38 exotic, 280 domestic; 43 unidentified, 275 identified) con-
sisting of 7 Coleoptera, 2 Homoptera, 22 Neuroptera: Man-
tispidae, 3 Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae (1 with host data), 8
Diptera, 1 Hemiptera: Phymatidae, & 275 neatly spread, iden-
tified Lepidoptera, including 1 paratype, representing 105


tKosztarab, Michael. 1975. Role of systematics collections in pest management.
Bulletin of the Entomological Society of America 21(2):95-98.
*Research Associate or Student Associate of the Florida State Collection of
Arthropods.







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


species, including 38 Noctuidae: Catocala from Japan represen-
ting 15 species) collected in Japan (38) & the United States:
Florida (including 227 Lepidoptera), Georgia, North Carolina,
Kentucky, Virginia, Louisiana, Missouri, Michigan, Penn-
sylvania, New York, & Maine; 112 pinned, labeled, neatly
spread, identified Lepidoptera representing 52 species collected
in Florida (100), Georgia (2), Virginia (2), Texas (5), & Arizona
(3), mostly taken by the donor; 1 new U. S. record and several
new Florida records or new Florida host records were
represented by this material.
*Dr. Franklin S. Blanton (4015 S. W. 21st Street, Gainesville,
Florida 32601)
361 slide mounts of identified Diptera: Ceratopogonidae
representing 8 species collected in Florida (277), Georgia (18), &
Alabama (66); 4 slide boxes. 48,775 slide mounts of insects (3
slides of unidentified domestic Anoplura, 48,772 Diptera:
Ceratopogonidae, the slides of Ceratopogonidae consisting of 43
paratype slides (36 paratype slides representing 9 species of
Culicoides collected in Panama (27 slides), Honduras (8 slides),
& the United States: Florida (1 slide) & 43 paratype slides
representing 5 species of Forcipomyia collected in El Salvador
(3 slides), British Honduras (1 slide), Costa Rica (1 slide), Hon-
duras (1 slide), & Jamaica (1 slide)), 2,788 slides of unidentified
domestic ceratopogonids, 5,508 slides of unidentified exotic
ceratopogonids, 25,828 slides of identified domestic ce-
ratopogonids, & 14,605 slides of identified exotic ceratopo-
gonids, the identified material representing 209 species of Ce-
ratopogonidae; the following represent unidentified exotic slide
mounts: Afghanistan (4), Bermuda (4), British Honduras (9),
Colombia (1), Costa Rica (24), Cuba (176), El Salvador (154),
Honduras (280), Jamaica (1), Mexico (217), Nicaragua (2), Pan-
ama (411), Puerto Rico (1), Southern Rhodesia (7), & Taiwan
(4,217), 15 countries, 5,508 slides; the following represent iden-
tified exotic slide mounts: Afghanistan (255 slides, 1 species),
Bahama Islands (170 slides, 3 species), Bolivia (67 slides, 1
species), Brasil (569 slides, 17 species), British Honduras (172
slides, 5 species), Colombia (144 slides, 18 species), Costa Rica
(2,537 slides, 45 species), Cuba (28 slides, 3 species), El Salvador
(1,377 slides, 26 species), Germany (1 slide, 1 species),
Guatemala (1 slide, 1 species), Honduras (2,989 slides, 45
species), Jamaica (1,906 slides, 11 species), Mexico (670 slides,
24 species), Nicaragua (11 slides, 5 species), Canada: Nova
Scotia (444 slides, 11 species), Panama (3,015 slides, 51 species),
Puerto Rico (6 slides, 1 species), Taiwan (219 slides, 2 species),
Trinidad (5 slides, 1 species), Vietnam (19 slides, 3 species), 21
countries, 14,605 slides, 275 species); the 28,617 slides of
domestic ceratopogonids were collected in Alabama, Arizona,







74 Division of Plant Industry

Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Montana, Nebraska,
Nevada, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio,
Oregon, Texas, Virginia, Wisconsin, & Wyoming. Also donated
with the collection were 30 cigar boxes, 3 wooden insect boxes, 1
plastic 25-slide box, 494 Gold Seal Cardboard microscope
23-slide boxes, & 562 permanent microscope 100-slide boxes
consisting of 424 Black Adams microslide boxes, 64 brown or
tan wooden microslide boxes, & 74 green or black long
microslide boxes; 8 4-drawer letter file cabinets.
*Mr. Vernon A. Brou (Route 1, Box 74, Edgard, Louisiana 70049)
3,087 pinned, labeled insects: 2,728 neatly spread, authori-
tatively identified Lepidoptera representing 147 species & 359
other unidentified insects consisting of 352 Coleoptera, 4 Hy-
menoptera, 2 Diptera, & 1 Hemiptera, all collected in Louisiana
by the donor; 6,307 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 6,066
neatly spread Lepidoptera (4 exotic unidentified, 6,062 iden-
tified from Louisiana including 2 male paratypes of a newly
described saturnid, Automeris louisiana (Ferguson & Brou)) &
241 assorted insects, including 20 Homoptera, 2 Neuroptera, 48
Coleoptera, & 73 Trichoptera, all except the 4 exotics collected
in Louisiana by the donor. This is an exceptionally neatly pro-
cessed collection.
*Dr. Gary R. Buckingham (3663 N. W. 40th Lane, Gainesville,
Florida 32605)
1 pint of miscellaneous alcohol-preserved insects collected at
light in Florida by the donor; 1,233 pinned, labeled insects (890
domestic, 343 exotic) consisting of 1 spread Odonata, 54 Or-
thoptera, 4 Dermaptera, 1 Embioptera, 44 Hemiptera, 41
Homoptera, 3 Mecoptera, 26 Lepidoptera (9 spread), 151 Dip-
tera, 117 Hymenoptera, & 791 Coleoptera collected by the donor
in Panama (13), Costa Rica (330), & the United States (890):
California, Colorado, Arizona, Indiana, & Michigan; 69 domestic
specimens have host data; 813 pinned insects (346 unlabeled,
467 labeled; 766 domestic, 47 exotic; 4 identified representing 1
species, 809 unidentified) consisting of 1 spread Odonata, 7 Or-
thoptera, 2 Plecoptera, 4 Dermaptera, 60 Hemiptera, 20
Homoptera, 2 Neuroptera, 458 Coleoptera, 1 Mecoptera, 9
Trichoptera, 95 Diptera, 123 Hymenoptera, & 32 Lepidoptera
(including 4 identified representing 1 species & 23 spread) col-
lected by the donor in Italy (26), Lebanon (18), Pakistan (1),
Panama (1), Costa Rica (1), & the United States: Arizona,
California, Indiana, Oklahoma, Michigan, & Utah.
*Mr. Paul M. Choate, Jr. (2114 N. W. 55 Blvd. #18, Gainesville,
Florida 32605)
22 pinned, labeled Coleoptera, including 4 identified specimens







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


representing 1 species collected in Florida by the donor; 272
pinned, labeled, identified Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae represent-
ing 7 species of Phanaeus collected in Arizona, Florida, & Texas
by the donor; 156 pinned, labeled, identified Coleoptera (154
domestic, 2 exotic) representing 40 species collected in Costa
Rica (2 specimens, 1 species) and the United States: Arizona,
Florida, Georgia, Nebraska, New Hampshire, & New Mexico,
mostly collected by the donor.

*Mr. James C. Cokendolpher (Department of Biological Sciences,
Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409)
62 vials or bottles of Arthropoda containing 270 specimens (258
domestic, 12 exotic) consisting of the following vials of speci-
mens: 1 Ephemeroptera (30 specimens), 2 Orthoptera (11 speci-
mens), 1 Plecoptera (2 specimens), 5 Hemiptera (11 domestic, 7
exotic specimens), 2 Homoptera (5 specimens), 5 Neuroptera (13
specimens), 13 Coleoptera (96 specimens), 1 Trichoptera (5 speci-
mens), 1 Lepidoptera (9 specimens), 2 Hymenoptera (5 speci-
mens), 4 Crustacea: Isoptera (22 specimens), 2 Diplopoda (5
specimens), 6 Chilopoda (10 specimens), 1 Arachnida: Che-
lonethid (5 specimens), & 16 Arachnida: Araneida (29 domestic,
5 exotic specimens) collected by the donor in Canada (2 vials)
and the United States (60 vials): Florida, Texas, New Mexico, &
Arizona; 38 vials of alcohol-preserved arthropods consisting of
the following vials of specimens: 1 Orthoptera (3 specimens), 2
Coleoptera (5 specimens), 2 Hymenoptera (3 specimens), 3
Chilopoda (3 specimens), & 30 Arachnida: Araneida (38
specimens) collected in Texas, Mississippi, Maryland, New
York, Pennsylvania, & Washington, DC; 15 papered samples of
ultraviolet light samples of insects (4,000 + specimens) collected
in Arizona by Dr. Mont A. Cazier & family; 29 papered samples
of Homoptera consisting of 82 specimens identified to 23
species (collection locality unknown); 28 papered ultraviolet
light trap samples collected in Arizona by Dr. Mont A. Cazier
and family (approximately 7,250 specimens); 25 vials (95
specimens) of arthropods consisting of 4 vials (4 specimens) of
Chilopoda, 1 vial (2 specimens) of Arachnida: Solpugida, 14 vials
(42 specimens) of Arachnida: Araneida, 1 vial (12 specimens) of
Coleoptera, 5 vials (35 specimens) of miscellaneous insects (in-
cluding 1 vial, 15 specimens from Canada), collected in Texas ex-
cept as noted, all collected by the donor; 138 vials or bottles of
arthropods containing 255 unidentified domestic specimens, 33
unidentified exotic specimens, & 34 identified domestic
specimens (1 to genus, 3 to species) consisting of the following
vials of specimens: 3 Crustacea: Isopoda (32 specimens), 1
Crustacea: other (1 specimen), 7 Diplopoda (36 specimens), 2
Chilopoda (2 specimens), 65 Arachnida: Araneida (84 domestic,







Division of Plant Industry


28 exotic), 1 Arachnida: Acarina (4 specimens identified to 1
genus), 12 Arachnida: Scorpionida (4 unidentified, 24 identified
representing 2 species), 1 Arachnida (6 identified representing 1
species), 2 Orthoptera (2 specimens), 3 Dermaptera (3 speci-
mens), 1 Embioptera (1 specimen), 8 Hemiptera (29 specimens),
3 Homoptera (3 specimens), 4 Neuroptera (7 specimens), 19 Cole-
optera (38 specimens), 1 Diptera (2 specimens), 1 Siphonaptera
(2 specimens), & 5 Hymenoptera (14 specimens) collected in
Panama (3 vials, 4 specimens), Papua, New Guinea (7 vials, 24
specimens), Canada: British Columbia (5 vials, 5 specimens),
and the United States: District of Columbia, Nebraska, Penn-
sylvania, & Texas.

*Mr. Gary A. Coovert (Dayton Museum of Natural History, 2629
Ridge Avenue, Dayton, Ohio 45414)
586 Pinned, labeled, unidentified insects consisting of 4
Hymenoptera & 582 Diptera, including 568 Syrphidae, collected
in Chile.

Dr. Robert L. Crocker (Texas Agricultural Experiment Station,
17360 Coit Road, Dallas, Texas 75252)
13 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects collected in Texas by
the donor; 2 vials & 43 jars of miscellaneous insects collected by
the donor in a blacklight trap in Texas; 3 jars & 7 vials of Cole-
optera: Scarabaeidae: Phyllophaga representing 2 identified
species collected in Texas by the donor; 15 quarts, 6 pints, & 2
half-pint jars of miscellaneous insects collected with blacklight
traps in Texas by the donor; 35 ultraviolet light trap samples of
insects collected in Texas by the donor.

*Mr. Lloyd R. Davis, Jr. (2510 N. E. 10 Terrace, Gainesville, Florida
32601)
20 vials (23 specimens) of insects, including 1 determined, con-
sisting of 1 Orthoptera, 1 Plecoptera, 1 Hemiptera, 15 Cole-
optera, 1 Trichoptera, & 1 Hymenoptera collected in Florida by
the donor; 1 pinned, labeled Coleoptera, 1 vial of miscel-
laneous insects, & 30 pints of miscellaneous insects collected in
an ultraviolet light trap in Florida by the donor; 52 vials of
alcohol-preserved insects consisting of 50 vials containing ap-
proximately 300 Coleoptera & 2 vials containing 6 Hymen-
optera, including 3 vials of larvae, collected on carrion in Florida
by the donor; 1,153 pinned, labeled insects (48 exotic, 1,465
domestic) consisting of 10 Orthoptera, 30 Dermaptera, 1
Hemiptera, 2 Homoptera, 21 Neuroptera, 14 Lepidoptera, 9
Diptera, & 1,103 Coleoptera collected in Greece (6), Spain (33),
Philippines (1), Trinidad (1), Panama (6), Brasil (1), & the United
States (1,465): Florida, Georgia, Maryland, New Jersey, New







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


York, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Maine, Illinois, Michigan,
Colorado, Idaho, California, New Mexico, & Texas; 2,434
pinned, labeled insects (2 identified representing 1 species, 2,432
unidentified; 165 exotic, 2,269 domestic) consisting of 2
Odonata, 11 Orthoptera, 3 Dermaptera, 17 Hemiptera, 20
Homoptera, 27 Neuroptera, 12 Mecoptera, 24 Lepidoptera, 72
Diptera, 373 Hymenoptera, & 1,873 Coleoptera collected in
Costa Rica (40), Panama (105 ), Mexico (10), Spain (5), Australia
(4), Japan (1), & the United States (2,269): Florida, Georgia,
Mississippi, Kentucky, West Virginia, New Jersey, Rhode
Island, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, Ohio, Michigan, Il-
linois, Colorado, Washington, California, Arizona, New Mexico,
& Texas; 611 pinned, labeled insects (31 exotic, 580 domestic)
consisting of 6 Orthoptera, 14 Hemiptera, 9 Homoptera, 2
Neuroptera, 31 Diptera, 86 Hymenoptera, & 453 Coleoptera col-
lected in Taiwan (1), Panama (30), & the United States (580):
Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Maine, Illinois, Colorado, Idaho,
Oregon, & California; 537 pinned, labeled insects consisting of
13 Hemiptera, 4 Homoptera, 16 Neuroptera, 1 Trichoptera, 1
Lepidoptera, 70 Hymenoptera, 176 Diptera, & 256 Coleoptera
collected by the donor in Florida, New Mexico, Illinois, Indiana,
Michigan, Minnesota, & Maine; 381 pinned, labeled insects (10
exotic, 371 domestic) consisting of 1 Arachnida: Araneida, 3
Odonata, 23 Orthoptera, 32 Hemiptera, 4 Homoptera, 7 Lep-
idoptera, 9 Diptera, 19 Hymenoptera, & 293 Coleoptera col-
lected by the donor in Ecuador (6 Coleoptera, 2 Hemiptera, 2
Homoptera) & the United States: Florida, North Carolina, Mis-
sissippi, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Colorado. 29 vials of
alcohol-preserved insects consisting of the following: 1 Hemip-
tera (1 specimen), 1 Homoptera (1 specimen), 1 Mecoptera (1
specimen), 3 Diptera (10) specimens), 4 Hymenoptera (30 speci-
mens), 21 Coleoptera (19 vials containing 64 adults, 2 vials con-
taining 2 larvae), & 1 Arachnida (1 specimen), all collected in
Florida by the donor; 2 pint samples of unidentified Hymenop-
tera & 2 blacklight trap samples of miscellaneous insects, all col-
lected in Florida by the donor; 1 4-dram vial, 9 half pint, & 4
quart jars of alcohol-preserved insects (4-dram vial & 8 pints col-
lected in blacklight trap) collected in Alabama by the donor.

*Mr. Terhune S. Dickel (19921 S. W. 304 Street, Box 395, Home-
stead, Florida 33030)
3,007 pinned, labeled, spread, authoritatively identified Lepi-
doptera, all collected by the donor, consisting of 2,000 speci-
mens from Colorado representing 311 species & 1,007 specimens
from Fuch's Hammock, near Homestead, Florida, & the Florida
Keys representing 204 species; all specimens are exceptionally
neatly processed; 3,000 pinned, labeled, neatly spread






78 Division of Plant Industry

Lepidoptera, including 1,972 specimens identified to species &
60 reared specimens with host data, collected by the donor in
western North Carolina (1,100), Colorado (50), southeastern
Arizona (300), & Florida (1,550, including the reared specimens).
This collection contains representatives of a number of species
new to the FSCA and is exceptionally well processed; 53 pinned,
neatly spread, labeled, identified Lepidoptera, including 3
reared specimens, representing 12 species collected by the donor
in southern Florida.

Mrs. Mary Dow (805 Live Oak Road, Vero Beach, Florida 32960)
Insect collection of her late husband, Dr. Richard Phelps Dow
(received via Dr. J. Howard Frank) consisting of 2,171 pinned
insects (1,761 specimens mounted on minutien pins; 1,987
labeled, 184 unlabeled; 1,295 identified representing 190
species, 876 unidentified consisting of 37 Orthoptera, 1 Dermap-
tera, 3 Hemiptera, 22 Homoptera, 2 Neuroptera, 4 Coleoptera, 7
Lepidoptera, 60 Hymenoptera, & 2,035 Diptera collected,
mostly by the donor in Puerto Rico (15 specimens in 6 species),
Iran (261 specimens in 17 species plus 4 unidentified
specimens), Mediterranean region, countries not indicated (209
unidentified specimens), and the United States (1,586): Arizona,
California, Colorado, Utah, Texas, Georgia, & Florida.

*Dr. Norville M. Downie (505 Lingle Terrace, Lafayette, Indiana
47901)
33 samples of miscellaneous insects collected by the donor in
ultraviolet light traps at Archbold Biological Station, Florida;
707 envelopes of identified Coleoptera (305 exotic specimens
representing 94 species, 1,608 domestic specimens representing
613 species) collected in Canada: British Columbia and the
United States: New York, Indiana, Missouri, Idaho, Montana,
California, Arizona, Texas, & Florida; 2,426 pinned, labeled,
identified Coleoptera (2,147 domestic, 279 exotic) representing
643 species collected by the donor in Canada: British Columbia
(70 species) & the United States: Arizona, Colorado, Florida,
Idaho, Indiana, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New York,
Texas, Utah, Washington, & Wyoming (573 species).

*Mr. Byrd K. Dozier (USDA, Box 43-L, San Ysidro, California
92073)
582 pinned, labeled insects (22 exotic, 560 domestic) consisting
of 3 Hymenoptera, 3 Diptera, 43 Homoptera (including 14 iden-
tified), & 533 Coleoptera (including 24 identified representing 4
species) collected by the donor in Mexico (15), Bahama Islands
(7), & the United States: California, Arizona; 39 vials of Arach-
nida: Araneida consisting of 12 vials containing 33 specimens






THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


from Panama & 27 vials containing 47 specimens from Costa
Rica, all collected by the donor.
*Dr. A. Michael Dykstra (Route B (Box 320), Canton, Missouri
63435)
2,154 neatly pinned, spread, labeled identified Lepidoptera rep-
resenting 490 species of Lepidoptera collected in Missouri by
the donor; several species are new to the FSCA.
*Dr. K. C. Emerson (560 Boulder Drive, Sanibel Island, Florida
33957)
46 slide mounts of Mallophaga bearing 63 identified specimens
(all with host data) representing 22 genera & 27 species & sub-
species, including 7 paratype slides (13 specimens), collected in
Zambia 2 slides (2 specimens), Zaire 1 slide (2 specimens),
S. W. Africa 4 slides (8 specimens), Thailand 6 slides (8
specimens), Chile 2 slides (4 specimens), Bolivia 2 slides (3
specimens), Trinidad 1 slide (2 specimens), Canada: British
Columbia 1 slide (1 specimen), & the United States: Florida -
27 slides (34 specimens), identified by the donor; 46 slide
mounts of Mallophaga (1 to several specimens per slide) repre-
senting 7 species, all collected in Florida, mounted, and iden-
tified by the donor; 46 slide mounts of Mallophaga (1 or more
specimens per slide) representing 11 species collected in Florida
(8) and Hawaii (3); 23 slide mounts (23 specimens) representing 8
species collected in Tasmania (5 slides, 5 specimens represent-
ing 2 species), Chile (11 slides, 11 specimens representing 5
species), & the United States: Florida (7 slides, 7 specimens)
representing 1 species; 23 slide mounts (40 specimens) of
authoritatively identified Mallophaga representing 10 species
collected in Chile (7 slides, 9 specimens), Tasmania (1 slide, 1
specimen), and the United States: Florida (15 slides, 28
specimens), all with host data; 5 alcohol-preserved blacklight
trap samples of insects collected by the donor on Sanibel Island,
Florida; 23 slide mounts of authoritatively identified
Mallophaga representing 10 genera & 10 species collected in
Chile (9 slides, 9 specimens), Tasmania (2 slides, 8 specimens),
Somalia (1 slide, 4 specimens), & the United States: Florida (11
slides, 23 specimens); 23 slide mounts representing 10 species of
Mallophaga (41 specimens), 3 species (7 slides) from Chile, 1
species (4 slides) from Tasmania, 1 species (2 slides) from
Paraguay, 1 species (2 slides) from Australia, 4 species (8 slides)
from Florida; 2 insect trap samples from Sanibel Island,
Florida, collected by the donor & 23 slide mounts of
authoritatively identified Mallophaga (53 specimens) represent-
ing 10 species collected in Tasmania (1 slide, 1 specimen),
Hawaii (1 slide, 4 specimens), & Florida (21 slides, 48
specimens); the Florida Mallophaga were collected by the







80 Division of Plant Industry

donor; 1 alcohol-preserved sample of insects collected in an
ultraviolet light trap at Sanibel Island, Florida; 1 ultraviolet
light trap sample collected in Florida by the donor and 23 slide
mounts of identified Mallophaga representing 14 species from
Brasil (2 slides, 2 specimens), Chile (10 slides, 12 specimens),
Mexico (2 slides, 2 specimens), N. Philippines: Palawan (1 slide,
2 specimens), Panama (1 slide, 2 specimens), Sand Island,
Hawaiian Islands (1 slide, 2 specimens), Netherlands New
Guinea: Morobe Dist. (2 slides, 24 specimens), & the United
States: Arizona (1 slide, 1 specimen), Florida (3 slides, 3 speci-
mens); all have host data. Ten species are new to the FSCA.

*Dr. Thomas C. Emmel (Chairman, Department of Zoology, 223
Bartram Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
3,895 pinned, spread, labeled, authoritatively identified exotic
Lepidoptera representing 892 species collected by the donor in
Ecuador, Mexico, Costa Rica, Guatemala, & the Dominican Re-
public, including many species new to the FSCA; 4,785 pinned,
spread, labeled, authoritatively identified exotic Lepidoptera
representing 866 species collected by the donor in Costa Rica,
Ecuador, Galapagos Islands, Dominican Republic, Bahama
Islands, Mexico, & Guatemala, including many species new to
the FSCA. All specimens are curated for immediate scientific
use in identification comparisons or for the study by lepidop-
terists & economic entomologists who may wish to study this
material in the FSCA.

*Dr. G. B. Fairchild (16 N. W. 22nd Drive, Gainesville, Florida
32603)
264 pinned insects (13 labeled, 251 unlabeled) consisting of 7
Orthoptera, 6 Hemiptera, 1 Homoptera, 2 Neuroptera, 62 Cole-
optera, 24 Lepidoptera, 60 Hymenoptera, & 103 Diptera col-
lected in Texas by the donor; 3 ultraviolet light trap samples of
insects collected by the donor in Canada: Nova Scotia. 289
pinned, unlabeled insects (247 identified representing 9 species
of Diptera; 42 unidentified; 80 exotic, 209 domestic) consisting
of 2 Neuroptera, 2 Mecoptera, 6 Coleoptera, 2 Hymenoptera, 5
Lepidoptera, 1 Homoptera, 271 Diptera collected in Canada:
Nova Scotia, & the United Stated: Texas; 1 papered sweep net
sample of insects collected by the donor in Canada: Nova Scotia;
5 papered insect flight trap samples of insects collected by the
donor in Canada: Nova Scotia (2 samples) & the United States:
Florida (3 samples). 11 pinned, labeled, authoritatively iden-
tified Lepidoptera: Aeberiidae (5 with wings spread) represent-
ing 5 species collected by the donor in Canada: Nova Scotia; 43
pinned insects consisting of 1 Lepidoptera & 42 Diptera (1
Tachinidae, 41 Tabanidae) & 2 insect flight trap samples of







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


insects collected in Florida by the donor; 88 pinned, labeled
Lepidoptera (84 spread, 4 unspread; 63 identified representing
31 species, 21 unidentified) collected by the donor in Canada:
Nova Scotia; 1 Arachnida: Acarina & 11 envelope-stored
Lepidoptera collected by the donor in the Canal Zone, Panama;
3 vials of miscellaneous insects collected by the donor in Texas;
600 pinned insects (175 labeled, 425 unlabeled) consisting of 1
Ephemeroptera, 1 Trichoptera, 10 Neuroptera, 20 Orthoptera,
81 Coleoptera, 54 Homoptera, 22 Hemiptera, 55 Hymenoptera,
137 Lepidoptera, & 218 Diptera collected in Brasil by the donor;
1,521 pinned, labeled, authoritiatively identified Diptera:
Tabanidae (486 domestic, 1,035 exotic) representing 60 species
collected in Australia (24), Asia Minor (3), Greece (3),
Yugoslavia (3), Italy (5), France (1), Spain (3), Austria (2), Ger-
many (28), Colombia (16), Honduras (1), Ecuador (29), Brasil
(406), Canada: Quebec & Nova Scotia (511), & the United States:
Florida (438), Georgia (2), & New Hampshire (46); several
species are new to the FSCA; 28 pinned, unlabeled insects con-
sisting of 4 Diptera, 5 Orthoptera, 3 Neuroptera, 4
Hymenoptera, & 12 Lepidoptera and 1 insect flight trap sample
of miscellaneous insects collected on Wassau Island, Georgia by
the donor; 10 netted envelope-preserved samples of
Lepidoptera, 2 sweep net samples, and residue from 5
ultraviolet light trap samples and 21 insect flight trap samples,
all collected in Brasil in 1981 by the donor; 89 pinned, labeled
Diptera, including 86 identified Tabanidae representing 11
species, collected by the donor in Panama; 132 pinned, labeled
insects (25 domestic, 107 exotic) consisting of 2 Orthoptera, 4
Hemiptera, 7 Coleoptera, 1 Lepidoptera, 1 Hymenoptera, & 117
Diptera (10 unidentified, 107 identified Tabanidae representing
18 species) collected in Panama by the donor; 766 insects, 644
pinned, 122 unpinned Diptera: Tabanidae representing 2
species; 487 domestic, 275 exotic, 223 labeled, 543 unlabeled;
607 unidentified, 159 identified) consisting of 1 Orthoptera, 2
Hemiptera, 4 Neuroptera, 17 Coleoptera, 1 Mecoptera, 7
Lepidoptera, 2 Hymenoptera, & 729 Diptera (570 unidentified,
159 identified Tabanidae representing 7 domestic & 20 exotic
species, 8 genera) collected in Colombia (112), Dominican
Republic (23), Panama (139), Brasil (5), and the United States:
Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Kentucky,
& North Carolina; 37 pinned, unlabeled insects consisting of 27
Diptera, 5 Lepidoptera, 1 Neuroptera, 1 Hymenoptera, 1
Homoptera, & 2 Coleoptera and 3 insect flight trap samples col-
lected in Florida by the donor. 266 pinned insects (33 labeled,
233 unlabeled) consisting of 3 Hymenoptera & 230 Diptera col-
lected by the donor in Panama (170) & Florida (63); 10 partially
sorted insect flight trap samples of insects from Florida & 57







Division of Plant Industry


vials of alcohol-preserved Diptera sorted into family and species
groups collected in Panama by the donor; 372 pinned, labeled,
identified Diptera: Tabanidae representing 53 species
(Haematopota, 51 species; Hippocentrum, 2 species), all new to
the FSCA, collected in Austria (7), Belgium Congo (6), British
East Africa (20), Bohemia (16), Canada: Manitoba (2), Nova
Scotia (47), Bulgaria (1), China (4), England (4), Ethiopia (39),
France (13), Germany (69), Greece (2), India (10), Italy (39),
Japan (5), Laos (1), Nigeria (3), North Sumatra (3), Nyasaland
(3), Palestine (4), Russia (4), Spain (31), Southern Rhodesia (17),
South Africa (4), Uganda (4), Viet Nam (4), Yugoslavia (4), & the
United States (5).

*Mr. Frank D. Fee (522 Fairway Road, State College, Pennsylvania
16801)
213 pinned, labeled Diptera (identified to family, representing
23 families) collected by the donor in Pennsylvania, Maryland,
New Jersey, Texas, & Arizona; 109 envelopes containing 167
identified Lepidoptera representing 44 species & subspecies col-
lected by the donor in Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland,
Maine, New Hampshire, Florida, Texas, Colorado, & Canada:
New Brunswick (1 envelope, 3 specimens); 328 envelopes con-
taining 573 identified Lepidoptera (566 domestic, 7 exotic) rep-
resenting 62 species (61 domestic, 1 exotic) collected by the
donor in Canada and the United States: Delaware, Maryland,
New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, & Texas.

*Dr. Clifford D. Ferris (P. O. Box 3351, University Station,
Laramie, Wyoming 82071)
897 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 8 Odonata, 9 Orthop-
tera, 48 Hemiptera, 21 Homoptera, 4 Neuroptera, 261 Coleop-
tera, 233 Diptera, & 313 Hymenoptera; 28 envelope-stored
nematocerous Diptera; 50 vials of alcohol-preserved arthropods
consisting of 4 Ephemeroptera (7 specimens), 1 Orthoptera (1
specimen), 1 Plecoptera (1 specimen), 1 Hemiptera (1 specimen),
8 Neuroptera (17 specimens), 27 Trichoptera (397 specimens), 1
Diptera (24 specimens), 5 Arachnida: Araneida (11 specimens), 1
Arachnida: Acarina (35 specimens), & 1 Arachnida: Cheloneth-
ida (6 specimens). All specimens were collected by the donor in
Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, & Wyoming; 362 pinned, la-
beled insects consisting of 355 unspread Lepidoptera, 3 Or-
thoptera, 1 Hymenoptera, 1 Hemiptera, 1 Homoptera, & 1 Dip-
tera, collected by the donor in New Mexico, Arizona, & Wyom-
ing; 6 envelopes containing 15 Diptera: Tipulidae; 1,567 pinned,
labeled insects consisting of 1,266 Lepidoptera, 230 Hymenop-
tera, 45 Diptera, 13 Coleoptera, & 13 Hemiptera collected in
Wyoming by the donor; 12 vials containing 19 alcohol-preserved







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


arthropods (2 Arachnida: Araneida & 17 Trichoptera) collected
in Wyoming by the donor.

*Mr. Irving L. Finkelstein (425 Springdale Drive N. E., Atlanta,
Georgia 30305)
303 pinned, neatly spread, labeled, identified Lepidoptera (280
butterflies representing 165 species, 23 moths representing 17
species) (80 exotic representing 60 species, 223 domestic repre-
senting 120 species) collected in Japan (6), Celebes (6), Malaysia
(1), India (1), Italy (6), Spain (5), France (8), West Germany (2),
Austria (10), Central Africa (2), Brasil (2), Ecuador (3), Mexico
(20), Canada (1), & the United States (223); Florida, Georgia,
South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee, New Jersey, New
York, Pennsylvania, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin, Utah,
Wyoming, Colorado, California, Arizona, Texas, & Oklahoma;
families represented are: Papilionidae (15 species), Pieridae (27
species), Nymphalidae (35 species), Heliconidae (4 species),
Danaidae (5 species), Lycaenidae (34 species), Satyridae (11 spe-
cies), Acraeidae (1 species), Nemeobidae (4 species), Hesperiidae
(30 species), & 6 moth families; some of these species are rarely
collected, & several are new to the FSCA; 334 pinned, labeled,
neatly spread Lepidoptera (152 domestic, 182 exotic; 7 unidenti-
fied, 327 identified representing 92 domestic & 95 exotic
species) collected in Mexico (52), Ecuador (16), Dominican Re-
public (50), Cuba (2), Brasil (1), Spain (4), Morocco (1), Italy (2),
Turkey (1), France (2), Hungary (18), Austria (9), Holland (1),
Malagasy (Madagascar) (1), Israel (1), Russia (3), Germany (2),
Central African Republic (1), India (1), Philippine Islands (1),
New Guinea (3), Taiwan (3), Japan (4), Canada (2), & the United
States (152): Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, New York, Illi-
nois, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Texas, Arizona, Nevada, Cali-
fornia, New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, North
Dakota, Alaska, & Hawaii. The Lepidoptera include, by family,
29 Papilionidae, 43 Pieridae, 105 Nymphalidae, 5 Heliconidae, 8
Danaidae, 2 Nemeobiidae, 51 Lycaenidae, 29 Satytidae, 31 Hes-
periidae, 5 Ithomiidae, 1 Acraeidae, 5 Saturnidae, 4 Sphingidae,
3 Noctuidae, & 8 Arctiidae. This donation contains numerous
uncommon to rare specimens and is exceptionally neatly pro-
cessed.

*Dr. Hermann A. Flaschka (2318 Hunting Valley Drive, Decatur,
Georgia 30033)
204 pinned, labeled, spread, identified Lepidoptera (172 exotic
representing 85 species, 32 domestic representing 27 species)
collected in Spain (13), Italy (5), Bulgaria (1), Hungaria (2), Al-
geria (1), Turkey (2), Rumania (6), Yugoslavia (4), Czechoslo-
vakia (4), Austria (66), East Germany (39), Switzerland (16),







84 Division of Plant Industry

France (8), Morocco (1), Finland (1), Canada (3): Ontario, and the
United States (32): Georgia, North Carolina, New York, Indi-
ana, Michigan, Texas, & Arizona. Several species are new to the
FSCA; 176 pinned, neatly spread Lepidoptera: Sphingidae (117
identified representing 73 species, 59 unidentified) collected in
India (22), Laos (2), Thailand (6), Malaysia (6), New Guinea (1),
Ceylon (1), Celebes (1), Japan (8), Virgin Islands (1), Brasil (24),
Colombia (7), Peru (23), Bolivia (1), Paraguay (1), Panama (24),
Costa Rica (1), Venezuela (1), Guatemala (5), & Mexico (41). This
is exceptionally beautiful material; 263 pinned, labeled insects
(100 domestic, 163 exotic; 219 authoritatively identified repre-
senting 84 species of Coleoptera & 64 species of Lepidoptera, 44
unidentified) consisting of 150 Coleoptera (108 identified repre-
senting 84 species, 42 unidentified; 53 exotic, 97 domestic) &
113 neatly spread Lepidoptera (111 identified representing 64
species, 2 unidentified; 108 exotic, 3 domestic) collected in
Austria (33), Hungary (1), Italy (8), Germany (1), Russia (8),
cryptic European data (17), Rep. Central Africa (43), Zambia (7),
Tanzania (1), Malaysia (4), India (5), Japan (25), Australia (1),
Madagascar (4), Mexico (2), Canada (1), & the United States
(100): Georgia, South Carolina, Pennsylvania, Maine, Michigan,
Massachusetts, Kansas, Idaho, Texas, New Mexico, & Arizona.
Many species are new to the FSCA; 301 pinned insects (298 la-
beled, 3 unlabeled; 292 exotic, 9 domestic; 185 identified repre-
senting 171 species, 117 unidentified) consisting of 2 Diptera
(parasites reared from Lepidoptera), 122 Coleoptera (including
19 identified representing 13 species), & 177 Lepidoptera (in-
cluding 165 identified representing 108 species) collected in Re-
public of Central Africa (7), Zambia (1), Southern Rhodesia (8),
Transvaal (1), Cameroon (1), Africa (no other locality) (16),
Madagascar (2), Germany (24), Austria (41), Yugoslavia (1),
Macedonia (1), Australia (26), Nepal (4), India (42), Pakistan
(14), Japan (3), Formosa (18), China (4), South Viet Nam (2),
Philippine Islands (2), Mexico (8), Brasil (31), Trinidad (1), Ja-
maica (1), Colombia (10), Panama (1), British Honduras (Belize)
(10), Costa Rica (1), Guyana (1), & the United States: Georgia (9);
specimens are neatly processed, some species represent rarely
collected species, and several species are new to the FSCA; 616
pinned, labeled insects (526 exotic, 90 domestic; 13 unidentified,
603 identified representing 238 species) consisting of 254 Col-
eoptera (13 unidentified, 241 identified representing 64 species;
53 exotic, 11 domestic) & 362 neatly spread, identified
Lepidoptera (297 exotic representing 160 species, 65 domestic
representing 14 species) collected in Austria (285), Gallia (4),
West Germany (28), East Germany (24), France (23), Switzer-
land (15), Spain (16), Great Britain (5), Italy (10), Rumania
(5), Yugoslavia (7), Hungary (6), Turkey (5), Finland (11),







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


Czechoslovakia (2), Sicily (1), Morocco (6), Algeria (2), Tunisia
(1), Atlas Mountains (1), Canary Islands (1), Afghanistan (3),
Madagascar (3) Africa (2), India (7), Formosa (1), Japan (3),
Colon (2), Chile (3), Argentina (1), Bolivia (2), Brasil (2), Mexico
(8), Costa Rica (2), & the United States (90); Florida, Georgia,
South Carolina, North Carolina, Louisiana, Virginia, New
Jersey, Illinois, Michigan, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, Utah,
Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, California, Oregon, Colorado, &
Wyoming; 490 pinned, labeled, identified insects (320 exotic,
170 domestic, representing 249 species) consisting of 430 Cole-
optera representing 209 species (155 exotic, 54 domestic) & 60
neatly spread Lepidoptera representing 40 species (10 exotic, 30
domestic) collected in Austria (112), Yugoslavia (17), Italy (14),
Turkey (2), Morocco (1), Greece (1), Hungary (16), Czechoslo-
vakia (5), France (49), Germany (35), Switzerland (2), Finland (8),
Russia (1), Rumania (2), Mexico (2), Canada (3), & the United
States (170): Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina,
Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, Virginia,
Connecticut, Maryland, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania,
Maine, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Cali-
fornia, Utah, Idaho, Montana, Colorado, & Wyoming; 239
pinned, labeled insects (15 unidentified, 224 identified repre-
senting 122 species; 119 domestic, 120 exotic) consisting of 119
Coleoptera (15 unidentified, 104 identified representing 53 spe-
cies, 23 exotic, 30 domestic) & 120 neatly spread, identified
Lepidoptera representing 69 species (39) exotic, 30 domestic)
collected in France (6), Germany (26), Austria (38), Italy (4),
Spain (1), Turkey (13), Yugoslavia (6), Australia (1), India (1),
Formosa (4), Japan (2), Philippine Islands (6), Brasil (1), Mexico
(2), & the United States (119): Florida, Georgia, Louisiana,
North Carolina, Connecticut, New York, New Hampshire,
Maine, Ohio, Michigan, Missouri, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona,
California, Colorado, & Wyoming. This donation contains many
uncommon to rare specimens and is exceptionally neatly proc-
essed; 671 pinned, labeled, identified Coleoptera: Curculionidae
representing 295 species collected in Albania (2 specimens, 1
species), Austria (611 specimens, 253 species), Bulgaria (1 speci-
men), Crete (4 specimens, 2 species), England (2 specimens, 1
species), Gallia (6 specimens, 2 species), Germany (7 specimens,
7 species), Italy (18 specimens, 14 species), Russia (1 specimen),
Spain (6 specimens, 4 species), Yugoslavia (13 specimens, 9
species).

*Dr. James T. Goodwin (Department of Entomology, Texas A & M
University, College Station, Texas 77843)
4,823 pinned, labeled, identified Diptera: Tabanidae represent-
ing 50 species, 49 of these new to the FSCA, collected in Italy







Division of Plant Industry


(1,887 specimens representing 10 species) & Mali (2,936 speci-
mens representing 40 species, including types of 4 species as
follows: 1) holotype, 2) holotype, 1 paratype, 3) holotype, allo-
type, 8 paratypes, 4) 58 paratypes; Mali specimens were col-
lected by the donor; 1,019 vials of arthropods consisting of 1
vial of unidentified Arachnida: Solpugida (1 specimen), 2 vials of
unidentified Odonata (15 specimens), 1 vial of unidentified Or-
thoptera: Gryllotalpidae (1 specimen), 3 vials of unidentified
Neuroptera (3 specimens), & 1,012 vials of Diptera consisting of
76 miscellaneous unidentified Diptera, 50 larvae, pupae, &
adults of 1 species of Muscidae, & 1,056 identified Tabanidae
immatures representing 16 species, 14 new to the FSCA, all col-
lected in Mali by the donor; 6 vials of insects consisting of 5
vials of Neuroptera: Corydalidae (5 specimens), 1 vial containing
2 Trichoptera, 1 Coleoptera, all collected in Mexico by the
donor.

*Dr. Dale H. Habeck (1103 N. W. 36 Avenue, Gainesville, Florida
32601)
511 pinned, labeled insects (508 exotic, 3 domestic) consisting of
1 Plecoptera, 1 Orthoptera, 1 Dermaptera, 42 Homoptera, 89
Hemiptera, 298 Coleoptera, 2 Neuroptera, 2 Diptera, 28 Hymen-
optera, & 57 spread Lepidoptera, collected in Austria (199), Tan-
zania (62), Costa Rica (247), & the United States: Florida (3) by
the donor; 156 vials or bottles of alcohol-preserved arthropods
(151 exotic, 5 domestic; 1 identified Araneida; 54 vials with
significant host or habitat data) consisting of the follow-
ing vials of specimens: 2 Crustacea: Isopoda (36 specimens),
3 Diplopoda (19 specimens), 1 Chilopoda (1 specimen),
5 Arachnida: Phalangida (10 specimens), 1 Arachnida: Am-
blypygi (1 specimen), 1 Arachnida: Scorpionida (1 specimen), 1
Arachnida: Acarina (2 specimens), 141 Arachnida: Araneida
(421 specimens, including 1 identified specimen representing a
species new to the FSCA) collected by the donor in Costa Rica (2
vials, 13 specimens), El Salvador (7 vials, 21 specimens), Argen-
tina (2 vials, 6 specimens), Kenya (6 vials, 10 specimens), Tan-
zania (14 vials, 28 specimens), Austria (7 vials, 14 specimens),
Switzerland (3 vials, 13 specimens), Italy (34 vials, 68
specimens), Yugoslavia (9 vials, 38 specimens), West Germany
(17 vials, 193 specimens), Luxembourg (14 vials, 42 specimens),
Australia (25 vials, 27 specimens), New Caledonia (3 vials, 4
specimens), Fiji (8 vials, 12 specimens), & the United States (5
vials, 6 specimens): Arizona, Wisconsin, & Georgia. Several
dozen species, although unidentified, are new to the FSCA.

Dr. Elmo Hardy (Department of Entomology, University of
Hawaii, 3050 Maile Way, Honolulu, Hawaii 96816)







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


204 pinned, labeled, identified Diptera: Drosophilidae, including
4 paratypes, representing 52 species in the genus Drosophila, all
from Hawaii and all new to the FSCA.

*Mr. Fred C. Harmston (117 East 2700 South, Salt Lake City, Utah
84115)
1,712 pinned, labeled, identified Diptera: Dolichopodidae (140
specimens pointed, 373 specimens minutien mounted; 1,337 do-
mestic, 375 exotic), including 12 paratypes of 3 domestic species
& 28 paratypes representing 10 species from Japan, consisting
of the 28 paratypes from Japan, 5 specimens from Latin
America (Argentina 1, Mexico 4), 342 specimens from Europe
(Great Britain 75, Germany 65, France 13, Netherlands 7,
Sweden 5, Poland 3, Belgium 1, Hungary 1, Italy 1, & cryptic
labels 171, 110 species represented from Europe), & 1,337 speci-
mens from the United States representing 52 species (Texas,
New Mexico, Arizona, California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho,
Montana, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, South Dakota, Nebraska,
Missouri, Ohio, Indiana, New York, West Virginia, & Florida);
16 dried miscellaneous sweep net samples; 38 vials of insects (10
Diptera samples identified representing 7 species, 28 samples
unidentified) consisting of the following vials of specimens: 1
Odonata, 5 Coleoptera, 32 Diptera, collected in Colorado &
Utah; 3,492 pinned, labeled insects, including 25 minutien
mounted (124 exotic, 3,368 domestic; 3,315 identified Diptera:
Dolichopodidae representing 63 species including 9 paratypes,
177 unidentified) consisting of 3,474 Diptera, 5 Hemiptera, 2
Homoptera, 1 Neuroptera, 5 Coleoptera, 4 Mecoptera, & 1
Hymenoptera.

Mr. Edwin I. Hazard (213 N. W. 20 Terrace, Gainesville, Florida
32603)
610 vials or bottles of alcohol-preserved specimens (1 bottle con-
taining 1 plant specimen, 1 bottle containing 30 leeches, 3 bot-
tles containing 99 molluscs, & 605 bottles or vials containing ar-
thropods), including 368 identified specimens & 120 exotic
specimens, the arthropods consisting of the following: 1 Arach-
nida: Acarina (2 specimens), 1 Arachnida: Araneida (1 specimen
from Panama), 1 Chilopoda (1 specimen), 1 Diplopoda (2
specimens), 4 Crustacea: Isopoda (11 specimens, including 3
identified representing 1 species), 23 Crustacea: Amphipoda
(228 specimens, including 16 identified), 54 Ephemeroptera (299
domestic, 11 from Brasil), 20 Odonata (50 domestic, 1 from
Brasil), 1 Orthoptera (5 specimens), 62 Plecoptera (558 domestic
specimens, 21 identified representing 4 species), 4 Hemiptera (5
specimens), 62 Neuroptera (161 specimens including 144 uniden-
tified consisting of 126 domestic, 2 from Honduras, 6 from







88 Division of Plant Industry

Mexico, & 10 from Panama & 17 identified representing 6 spe-
cies including 12 domestic, 1 from Honduras, 1 from Brasil & 3
from Mexico), 69 Coleoptera (271 specimens consisting of 233
unidentified & 38 identified representing 4 species), 4 Mecoptera
(6 specimens), 117 Trichoptera (643 specimens consisting of 628
unidentified & 15 identified representing 3 species), 30 Lepidop-
tera (97 specimens consisting of 67 unidentified including 10
from Brasil & 224 identified domestic representing 14 species),
127 Diptera (1,070 specimens consisting of 846 unidentified in-
cluding 50 from Brasil & 224 identified domestic representing
14 species), 6 Hymenoptera (1,512 specimens consisting of 2,012
unidentified including 500 from Brasil & 4 identified from
Canada representing 1 species), & 17 miscellaneous arthropod
samples containing 166 specimens; domestic specimens are
from New York, Massachusetts, Maine, Ohio, Maryland, North
Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Texas, & Arizona.
*Mr. J. Richard Heitzman (3112 Harris Ave., Independence, Mis-
souri 64052)
1,185 neatly pinned, labeled, identified Lepidoptera (1,174
spread, 11 unspread, 23 with a cleared wing, 4 with dissected
genitalia in vials) representing 250 species collected in Missouri
and Kansas by the donor; 1,605 pinned, labeled, identified Lepi-
doptera (1,070 spread) representing 206 species collected in Mis-
souri, Arkansas, & Kansas by the donor & other members of his
family; 4,076 pinned, spread, labeled, authoritatively identified
Lepidoptera (35 with cleared wings; 4 with dissected genitalia in
vials), representing 439 species, mostly collected by the donor in
Missouri, Arkansas, & Kansas, but including a few specimens
from Texas, Arizona, Colorado, Louisiana, Mississippi,
Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, Kentucky, Virginia, Maine,
Wisconsin, & Canada: Ontario (1); included is a research collec-
tion of Papilio polyxenes asterius Stoll; all specimens are excep-
tionally neatly processed; 206 pinned, labeled, spread, identified
Lepidoptera representing 8 species collected in Missouri by the
donor; 2,882 pinned, labeled insects (2,825 identified, 57 uniden-
tified) consisting of 1 Mecoptera, 2 Hymenoptera, 5 Diptera, 31
Coleoptera, 4 Homoptera, 14 Neuroptera: Mantispidae, & 2,825
authoritatively identified Lepidoptera (31 unspread, 2,794
spread; 22 with cleared wing on one side, 7 with genitalic
preparations) representing 440 species (including several hun-
dred Sesiidae) collected in Arkansas (1), Kansas (2), Oklahoma
(1), & Missouri (2,878) by the donor. This is an exceptionally
neatly prepared collection, including several species new to the
FSCA.
*Mr. Robert L. Heitzman (9300 East 16 Street, Independence,
Missouri 64052)







THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


1,008 pinned, spread, labeled, authoritatively identified Lepi-
doptera representing 32 species & 1 pinned, labeled, unidenti-
fied Coleoptera collected by the donor in Missouri, Arkansas, &
Kansas; specimens are exceptionally neatly processed; 834
pinned, labeled insects (23 unidentified Coleoptera, 813 identi-
fied Lepidoptera (503 spread, 308 unspread) representing 147
species collected by the donor in Missouri; 785 pinned, labeled
insects consisting of 1 Neuroptera, 22 Coleoptera, & 762
authoritatively identified Lepidoptera (264 spread, 498 un-
spread), the Lepidoptera representing 100 species, collected in
Missouri by the donor. This is an exceptionally neatly processed
collection.

*Dr. John B. Heppner (Department of Entomology, Smithsonian
Institution, Washington, DC, 20560)
128 pinned, neatly spread, labeled, identified Lepidoptera repre-
senting 21 species and subspecies in 2 families (Glyphipteri-
gidae, Choreutidae), including 68 paratypes representing 10
species, collected in Florida, Mississippi, Arkansas, Illinois,
Vermont, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, & California.

Mr. Alexander K. Johnson (1895 Tulare Avenue, Richmond, Cali-
fornia 94805)
A collection of Myriapoda was purchased by the Division of
Plant Industry, FDACS, for $250.00. This collection of excep-
tionally well-preserved millipeds and centipedes consisted of ap-
proximately 1,000 Chilopoda (about 100-150 Scolopendromor-
pha: Scolopendridae, mostly from the southwestern United
States, about 450 Lithobiomorpha, & about 450 Geophilomor-
pha) & approximately 1,300 Diplopoda (about 100 Julida: Pae-
romopodidae, about 600 Julida, including many Parajulidae,
about 20 Spirobolida: Atopetholidae from the southwestern
United States, several Colobognatha, Siphonophoridae from
Arizona, several Spirostreptida: Orthoporus sp. from the south-
western United States, about 200 Chordeumatida, about 20
Polydesmida: Euryuridae: Euryurus maculatus from the
southeastern United States, 100-150 Polydesmida: Nearc-
todesmidae from California, about 200 Polydesmida:
Xystodesmidae: Harpaphe from California, & a few
miscellaneous diplopods not in the above categories). Most of
the specimens were collected by Mr. Johnson in northern
California & in Idaho, with others from Arizona, Colorado, Mon-
tana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, & Washington.

*Mr. Charles P. Kimball (deceased 4 March 1982) (West Barnstable,
Massachusetts 02668)
64 pinned, labeled Lepidoptera (36 exotic, 28 domestic; 45






90 Division of Plant Industry

identified representing 15 exotic & 25 domestic species, 19 un-
identified exotic) collected in the Dominican Republic (36) & the
United States (28): Massachusetts; 377 pinned, labeled insects
(372 identified Lepidoptera, 5 other insects unidentified) con-
sisting of 1 Hymenoptera, 4 Diptera, & 372 Lepidoptera (348
from Florida representing 126 species, 24 from other states rep-
resenting 16 species) collected in Massachusetts, New Jersey,
New York, Illinois, Colorado, California, Texas, Louisiana, &
Florida; 27 pinned, labeled, identified Lepidoptera representing
6 species collected in New York, Massachusetts, West Virginia,
Missouri, California, & Florida; 6 pinned, labeled identified
Lepidoptera representing 6 species, 2 species new to the FSCA,
collected in Florida (4), Mississippi (1), & Texas (1).

Mr. Kenneth R. Knight (433 Brady Street N. W., Comstock Park,
Missouri 49321)
1,664 pinned, labeled, neatly spread Lepidoptera (747 exotic,
917 domestic; 1,574 authoritatively identified representing 143
domestic & 168 exotic species, 90 unidentified) collected in
Japan (90), Formosa (28), New Guinea (1), Korea (1), Malaysia
(8), New Zealand (5), Australia (5), Philippines (4), France (30),
West Germany (368), Hungary (5), Poland (10), Bulgaria (4),
British West Indies (2), Cuba (3), Puerto Rico (2), Mexico (67), El
Salvador (1), Nicaragua (2), Peru (2), Brasil (3), Canada (25), and
the United States (917): Florida, Georgia, Tennessee, North
Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, New Jersey, Missouri, Michigan,
Kansas, Arkansas, Texas, Arizona, California, Oregon, Col-
orado, & Wyoming. Note: Exact number of specimens per coun-
try is given for identified specimens; 81 unidentified exotics
were not recorded country by country.

Dr. George F. Knowlton (Professor Emeritus, Department of Biol-
ogy, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322)
273 vials of alcohol-preserved arthropods totaling approxi-
mately 2,948 specimens, including 58 vials of identified Hymen-
optera containing approximately 700 identified specimens rep-
resenting 26 species, 1 vial of Hymenoptera (1 unidentified
specimen), 2 vials of Diptera (6 specimens), 136 vials of Lepidop-
tera (773+ specimens), 8 vials of Coleoptera (91 specimens), 1
vial of Neuroptera (1 specimen), 7 vials of Homoptera (202+
specimens), 1 vial of Hemiptera (7 specimens), 14 vials of Pso-
coptera (262+ specimens), 3 vials of Isoptera (55 specimens), 1
vial of Orthoptera (1 specimen), 1 vial of identified Thysanura
(20 specimens representing 1 species), 5 vials of Collembola
(320+ specimens), 5 vials of Arachnida: Araneida (27 speci-
mens), 32 vials of Arachnida: Acarina (485+ specimens), plus
2 vials of Nemathelminthes (30 specimens); 15 pillboxes






THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


containing approximately 50 dried insects each. All except
Araneae were either from duff samples or had plant host. All
specimens were collected by the donor in Arizona, Idaho, Utah,
& Wyoming; 113 vials of arthropods consisting of the following
vials of specimens: 1 Acarina (10 specimens), 2 Araneida (85
specimens), 1 Collembola (100 specimens), 5 miscellaneous in-
sects (285 specimens), & 104 Hymenoptera: Formicidae (810
identified specimens representing 31 species) collected in Utah
by the donor.
*Col. Lester L. Lampert, Jr. (17 Hillview Circle, Ashville, North
Carolina 28805)
36 pints of alcohol-preserved insects collected in an ultraviolet
light trap in Florida by the donor; 1 small alcohol-preserved
sample of insects (including 20 Mantispidae & 4 Myrmeleonti-
dae) collected at Madera Canyon, Santa Rita Mountains, Ari-
zona, & a larger sample (including 50 Myrmeleontidae, 50 Man-
tispidae, 10 Megaloptera, & 3 Hemerobiidae) collected at South-
western Research Station, Arizona, both samples taken by the
donor. 33 samples of miscellaneous insects collected by the
donor in ultraviolet light traps at Archbold Biological Station,
Florida; 33 insect flight trap samples of insects collected by the
donor at Archbold Biological Station, Florida; 605 pinned, la-
beled Coleoptera (75 exotic, 530 domestic; 480 identified repre-
senting 113 species (64 exotic species, 49 domestic species), 125
unidentified) collected in Panama (61), Mexico (3), Nicaragua (1),
Brasil (2), Peru (6), Hungary (1), New Guinea (1), & the United
States (530): Florida, Alabama, South Carolina, North Carolina,
Louisiana, Kentucky, Arkansas, Tennessee, Pennsylvania, Kan-
sas, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, California, & Idaho; 6 insect
flight trap samples collected at Archbold Biological Station,
near Lake Placid, Florida; 5 blacklight trap samples (18 quarts)
collected in North Carolina by the donor; 5 insect flight trap
samples collected in Florida by the donor; 75 pints of
miscellaneous insects collected from 1 through 11 November
1981 in a blacklight trap in Florida by the donor; 1 half pint & 6
fully packed quarts of miscellaneous alcohol-preserved insects
collected in blacklight traps in Florida by the donor; 1 ultra-
violet light trap sample (selected Neuroptera, Diptera, and a few
other insects) collected in Alabama by the donor.
Dr. E. Morton Miller (730 Maybank Drive, Hendersonville, North
Carolina 28739)
352 vials or bottles (333 vials or bottles of specimens identified
representing 14 species, 19 vials or bottles unidentified) of Isop-
tera, each contains several to many specimens, all collected in
Florida by the donor; identified samples include host or habitat
data.







Division of Plant Industry


*Mr. R. Bruce Miller (P. O. Box 1092, Project City, California
96079)
960 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 33 Orthoptera, 50
Hemiptera, 16 Homoptera, 134 Neuroptera, 238 Coleoptera, 7
Diptera, 46 Hymenoptera, & 436 neatly spread Lepidoptera col-
lected by the donor in California & Arizona; 52 specimens are
mounted on minutien pins; several species are new to the FSCA;
483 pinned, labeled specimens consisting of 1 Hemiptera, 9
Neuroptera, 13 Diptera, 39 Hymenoptera, 124 Coleoptera, 247
Lepidoptera (174 unspread, 73 spread), & 50 miscellaneous in-
sects (unrecorded) collected in California by the donor; 409
pinned, labeled insects (119 identified Neuroptera representing
10 species, 290 unidentified) consisting of 180 Lepidoptera (47
spread, 133 unspread), 10 Hymenoptera, 15 Coleoptera, & 204
Neuroptera collected in California & Nevada by the donor; 400
pinned, labeled insects (113 exotic, 287 domestic) consisting of 4
Orthoptera, 2 Dermaptera, 11 Hemiptera, 1 Homoptera, 127
Neuroptera, 107 Coleoptera, 70 Lepidoptera, 39 Diptera, & 39
Hymenoptera collected in Mexico (113) & the United States
(287): California & Nevada by the donor; 542 pinned, labeled in-
sects (281 domestic, 261 exotic; 40 identified Neuroptera
representing 1 species, 502 unidentified) consisting of 3 Or-
thoptera, 13 Hemiptera, 1 Homoptera, 88 Neuroptera, 219 Col-
eoptera, 17 Lepidoptera, 22 Diptera, & 179 Hymenoptera col-
lected by the donor in Mexico & the United States: California.

*Dr. William B. Muchmore (Department of Biology, University of
Rochester, River Campus Station, Rochester, New York 14627)
267 vials of alcohol-preserved arthropods (7 identified, 1,231 un-
identified) consisting of the following vials of specimens: 1 Dip-
tera (1 specimen), 1 Chilopoda (1 specimen), 1 Arachnida: Pha-
langida (1 specimen), 3 Arachnida: Chelonethida (8 specimens), 4
Arachnida: Acarina (4 specimens), & 257 Arachnida: Araneida
(1,216 unidentified, 7 identified representing 2 species); the
Araneida include representatives of 3 families and 1 genus new
to the FSCA. All specimens were collected on St. John, U. S.
Virgin Islands. This collection, not yet identified to species, un-
doubtedly contains numerous species not previously repre-
sented in the FSCA; 225 vials containing 2,030 Pseudoscor-
pionida & 220 slide-mounted Pseudoscorpionida consisting of 5
specimens identified to higher categories, 274 specimens iden-
tified to 17 genera, & 2,047 specimens identified to 29 species in
21 genera, including 9 paratypes, nearly all specimens with
habitat data, collected in the United States: Arizona, Connecti-
cut, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, New York,
Ohio, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Virginia. Most of these species
are new to the FSCA.






THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


*Dr. Martin H. Muma (Lake Roberts General Store, Rt. 11, Box
250, Silver City, New Mexico 88061)
74 can trap residue samples (14 pint size, 60 half-pint size) col-
lected in New Mexico by the donor. 117 vials of alcohol-
preserved Arachnida (including 107 vials of identified speci-
mens representing 25 species & a total of 159 specimens)
consisting of the following vials of specimens: 12 identified Sol-
pugida representing 3 species, 3 unidentified Phalangida, 1 un-
identified Chelonethida, 4 unidentified Acarina, 18 identified
Scorpionida representing 3 species & 1 unidentified Scor-
pionida, & 77 identified Araneida representing 19 species & 1
unidentified Araneida, all collected in New Mexico by the donor;
10 pint bulk samples of miscellaneous alcohol-preserved insects
(7 can trap & 3 alpine meadow sweep net samples) collected in
New Mexico by the donor; 152 bottles containing 4,478 iden-
tified Arachnida: Phalangida representing 3 species collected by
Dr. Muma in pitfall traps in New Mexico and identified by Mr.
James C. Cokendolpher (also a Research Associate of the
FSCA).

*Dr. Gayle H. Nelson (College of Osteopathic Medicine of the
Pacific, 309 Pomona Mall East, Pomona, California 91766)
402 pinned, labeled insects (376 domestic, 26 exotic) consisting
of 25 Orthoptera, 61 Hemiptera, 31 Homoptera, 12 Neuroptera,
1 Mecoptera, 107 Diptera, & 165 Hymenoptera collected in
Mexico (26, including 6 Nycteribiidae) & the United States:
Montana, Utah, Kansas, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Cali-
fornia, Texas, & Florida; there are 2 prey records & 89 host
records.

*Dr. Jose M. Osorio (3160 S. W. 21 Street, Miami, Florida 33145)
80 small jars & 4 vials of miscellaneous insects collected in
Venezuela by the donor; 252 vials or bottles of alcohol-preserved
arthropods (1 to many per vial or bottle) consisting of the follow-
ing samples (containers): 3 Thysanura, 3 Collembola, 2 Odonata,
20 Orthoptera, 2 Isoptera, 9 Dermaptera, 4 Psocoptera, 22
Hemiptera, 20 Homoptera, 2 Neuroptera, 50 Coleoptera, 4
Trichoptera, 27 Diptera, 59 Hymenoptera, 2 Crustacea: Am-
phipoda, 1 Diplopoda, 2 Chilopoda, 5 Arachnida: Araneida, 11
Arachnida: Acarina (100+ representing 2 identified species), 3
Arachnida: Phalangida, & 1 Arachnida: Solpugida, all collected
in Venezuela by the donor; 18 envelope-preserved insects (1
Odonata, 17 Lepidoptera collected in Venezuela by the donor;
110 vials or bottles of alcohol-preserved arthropods collected in
Venezuela by the donor, consisting of the following vials or bot-
tles: 1 Arachnida: Phalangida (6 specimens), 3 Arachnida:
Araneida (4 specimens), 4 Arachnida: Acarina (10 specimens), 1







Division of Plant Industry


Thysanura (1 specimen), 2 Collembola (15 specimens), 1
Odonata (1 specimen), 3 Orthoptera (3 specimens), 1 Der-
maptera (1 specimen), 1 Psocoptera (2 specimens), 2 Thy-
sanoptera (40 specimens), 27 Hemiptera (191 specimens), 13
Homoptera (78 specimens), 1 Neuroptera (2 specimens), 25 Cole-
optera (173 specimens), 12 Diptera (69 specimens), & 13 Hy-
menoptera (78 specimens).

*Capt. Peter V. Perkins (Department of Entomology & Nema-
tology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
1 Arachnida: Araneida, 1 Arachnida: Acarina, and 1,847 pinned,
labeled insects (including 18 identified Coleoptera representing
1 species) consisting of: 1 Collembola, 1 Ephemeroptera, 33
Odonata (31 spread), 60 Orthoptera (5 spread), 108 Lepidoptera
(108 spread), 1 Isoptera, 5 Plecoptera, 11 Dermaptera, 1
Psocoptera, 217 Hemiptera, 120 Homoptera, 8 Neuroptera, 1
Strepsiptera, 5 Mecoptera, 17 Trichoptera, 784 Coleoptera, 159
Diptera, & 313 Hymenoptera collected in Maine, New Jersey, &
Georgia; 16 specimens included host data.

*Dr. William L. Peters (1803 Chuli Nene, Tallahassee, Florida
32301)
569 vials of alcohol-preserved insects consisting of 1,245
Ephemeroptera in 329 vials & 8,250 Trichoptera in 240 vials, &
53 slide mounts of Ephemeroptera, all collected in New Cale-
donia by the donor; included are 7 holotypes & 1,238 paratypes
of 7 new species of Ephemeroptera described by the donor; 398
vials containing 1,685 Ephemeroptera & 69 slide mounts of
Ephemeroptera, including 11 holotypes & 1,677 paratypes, rep-
resenting 12 newly described species collected in New Caledonia
& described by the donor.

*Mr. John T. Polhemus (3115 S. York, Englewood, Colorado
80110)
106 pinned, labeled, authoritatively identified Hemiptera (74 ex-
otic, 32 domestic) collected by the donor in Mexico (57, includ-
ing 50 paratypes representing 5 species & 7 additional
specimens representing 2 species), El Salvador (7 paratypes rep-
resenting 1 species), Brasil (10 specimens representing 1
species), & the United States (32 specimens representing 2 spe-
cies): 5 species are new to the FSCA; 40 pinned, labeled, iden-
tified aquatic Hemiptera representing 8 species, including 27
paratypes representing 5 species, collected by the donor in
Japan (4), South Africa (4), and Mexico (32); 7 vials containing
330 alcohol-preserved aquatic Hemiptera representing 7 species
collected by the donor in Ceylon (105), Brasil (50), & Mexico
(175).






THIRTY-FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT


*Dr. Charles C. Porter (Department of Biology, Fordham Univer-
sity, Bronx, New York 10458)
2,098 pinned insects (1,174 labeled, 924 unlabeled; 686 exotic,
1,412 domestic; 947 Hymenoptera determined to 66 species,
1,045 Hymenoptera determined to 60 genera, 106 insects un-
determined) consisting of 2,069 Hymenoptera, 20 Diptera, & 9
Coleoptera collected by the donor in Chile (182), Argentina (504),
& the United States (1,412): Texas. Several species are new to
the FSCA; 1,172 pinned insects (305 labeled, 867 unlabeled) con-
sisting of 6 undetermined Diptera and 1,166 Hymenoptera (671
determined to 41 genera, 495 determined to 35 species) collected
in Texas by the donor; 440 pinned, labeled, identified
Hymenoptera consisting of holotypes of Certonotus invictus
Porter (Chile) & Thyreodon rivinae Porter (Texas), males of
Monobia biangulata, Monobia quadridens, and Monobia texana
from Texas, & 435 Ichneumonidae including 5 specimens deter-
mined to tribe, 1 specimen det. to subfamily, & 429 specimens
det. to genus including 21 specimens det. to 3 described species
& 408 specimens sorted to 149 undescribed species, collected in
Bolivia by Dr. Lionel A. Stange & Dr. Porter; 1,269 pinned,
labeled insects (1,114 exotic, 155 domestic; 18 unidentified, 877
Hymenoptera identified to 58 genera, 373 Hymenoptera in-
cluding 3 paratypes representing 2 species & 1 Mecoptera iden-
tified to 31 species) consisting of 1,110 identified Hymenoptera
from Argentina & Bolivia, 140 identified Hymenoptera from
Texas & New Jersey, 1 identified Mecoptera from New Jersey, 1
unidentified Coleoptera from Mexico, 3 unidentified Diptera
from Argentina & Mexico, & 14 unidentified Neuroptera from
Texas. All specimens were collected by the donor & are neatly
processed; 2,092 pinned, labeled insects (1,228 domestic, 864
exotic) consisting of 3 unidentified Diptera, 1 Hemiptera iden-
tified to family, 5 Neuroptera identified to family, 6 Coleoptera
identified to family, & 2,077 Hymenoptera (1 identified to fam-
ily, 2 identified to subfamily, 1,122 identified to genus, 5 iden-
tified to subgenus, & 947 identified to species, including 277 ex-
otics identified to 50 species & 670 domestics from Texas
identified to 50 species) collected by the donor in Bolivia, Ar-
gentina, Peru, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, & the United States:
Texas. Several species are new to the FSCA.

*Dr. John F. Reinert (610 N. W. 40 Terrace, Gainesville, Florida
32607)
30 bottles of alcohol-preserved insect flight trap collections
from Maryland, Oklahoma, Texas, & Alabama collected by the
donor; 777 pinned, labeled insects: 230 unspread Lepidoptera, 3
unspread Odonata, 3 Hemiptera, 3 Homoptera, 72 Coleoptera, 2
Orthoptera, 19 Neuroptera, 72 Hymenoptera, & 373 Diptera




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