• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 Report of the division directo...
 Summary of citrus projects and...
 Fiscal
 Library
 Technical assistance
 Training coordinator
 Bureau of apiary inspection
 Bureau of citrus budwood regis...
 Bureau of entomology
 Bureau of methods development
 Bureau of nematology
 Bureau of plant inspection
 Citrus tree survey
 Agricultural products entering...
 Plants and plant propagation material...
 Bureau of plant pathology














Title: Division of Plant Industry biennial report
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075925/00011
 Material Information
Title: Division of Plant Industry biennial report
Alternate Title: Biennial report
Abbreviated Title: Div. Plant Ind. bienn. rep.
Physical Description: v. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Division of Plant Industry
Publisher: Florida Dept. of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Publication Date: 1978-1980
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Plant inspection -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Plant diseases -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Dept. of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 26th (1964/66)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year ends June 30.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: 39th (July 1, 1990-June 30, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075925
Volume ID: VID00011
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01242950
alephbibnum - 001511744
lccn - sn 86001883
lccn - sn 86001883
issn - 0888-9554
 Related Items
Preceded by: Biennial report

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
    Front Matter
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Table of Contents
        Page iv
        Page v
    Report of the division director
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Summary of citrus projects and studies
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Fiscal
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Library
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Technical assistance
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Training coordinator
        Page 18
    Bureau of apiary inspection
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Bureau of citrus budwood registration
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Bureau of entomology
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
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    Bureau of methods development
        Page 120
        Page 121
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        Page 124
        Page 125
    Bureau of nematology
        Page 126
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    Bureau of plant inspection
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    Citrus tree survey
        Page 187
    Agricultural products entering Florida
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
    Plants and plant propagation material imported into Florida from foreign countries
        Page 194
    Bureau of plant pathology
        Page 195
        Page 196
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Full Text




















DIVISION OF PLANT INDUSTRY
3rd Biennial Report
July 1, 1978 June 30, 1980
LORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER SERVICES
nnula f(nnnar ('nmmiatinner







Division of Plant Industry

Thirty-Third

Biennial Report

July 1, 1978-June 30, 1980


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
AND CONSUMER SERVICES
Doyle Conner, Commissioner

DIVISION OF PLANT INDUSTRY
Halwin L. Jones, Director

Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Division of Plant Industry
Post Office Box 1269
Gainesville, Florida 32602








FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF
AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER
SERVICES

DIVISION OF PLANT INDUSTRY


Plant Industry Technical Council

Vernon Conner, Chairman (Citrus) ................ Mount Dora
Roy Vandegrift, Jr., Vice Chairman (Vegetable) ...... Canal Point
Lawrence Cutts (Apiary) ............................ Chipley
Colin English, Sr. (Citizen-at-Large) ............... Tallahassee
John W. Hornbuckle (Citrus) ..................... Dade City
John Morroni (Commercial Flower) ................ Fort Myers
Lewis E. Wadsworth, Jr. (Forestry) ................... Bunnell
Joseph Welker (Ornamental Horticulture) .......... Jacksonville
Stanley F. Cruse (Turfgrass) ........................ Palmetto
Halwin L. Jones, Secretary ....................... Gainesville



Administrative Staff

Halwin L. Jones, Director ...................... Gainesville
S. A. Alfieri, Jr., Assistant Director ................ Gainesville
C. O. Youtsey, Chief of Budwood Registration ..... Winter Haven
R. E. Brown, Chief of Methods Development ......... Gainesville
Ralph King, Chief of Plant Inspection .............. Gainesville
H. A. Denmark, Chief of Entomology ............... Gainesville
J. C. Herndon, Chief of Apiary Inspection ........... Gainesville
C. Poucher, Chief of Pest Eradication and Control .. Winter Haven
C. P. Seymour, Chief of Plant Pathology ............ Gainesville
D. E. Stokes, Chief of Nematology ................. Gainesville








TABLE OF CONTENTS

REPORT OF THE DIVISION DIRECTOR .................... 1
Summary of Citrus Projects and Studies .................. 4
Fiscal .............................................. 7
Library .......... ............................... 14
Technical Assistance .................................. 16
Training Coordinator .................................. 18
BUREAU OF APIARY INSPECTION ........................ 19
BUREAU OF CITRUS BUDWOOD REGISTRATION .......... 24
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY .............................. 31
BUREAU OF METHODS DEVELOPMENT ................... 120
BUREAU OF NEMATOLOGY ............................. 126
BUREAU OF PEST ERADICATION AND CONTROL .......... 163
M meetings ................................... .. ..... 163
Citrus Blackfly ................. ................... 164
Spreading Decline .. ....... ..................... 167
Lethal Yellowing .... ........ .. ........... ........ 175
Sugarcane Rootstalk Borer Weevil . .... ......... ... 176
BUREAU OF PLANT INSPECTION ......................... 179
Citrus Tree Survey .................................... 187
Turfgrass Certification Program ......................... 187
Agricultural Products Entering Florida ................... 188
Citrus Nursery Site Selection ............................ 189
Plants and Plant Propagation Material Imported
into Florida from Foreign Countries ..................... 194
BUREAU OF PLANT PATHOLOGY ......................... 195


This public document was promulgated at a cost of $6,518.50
or $6.51 per copy, to inform the general public, Legislature,
and other interested parties on the programs and investigative
efforts of the Division of Plant Industry. PI81G-5











Gainesville, Florida


Honorable Doyle Conner
Commissioner
Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services
The Capitol
Tallahassee, Florida 32301



Dear Commissioner:

I am pleased to present herewith the 1978-80 Biennial
Report for the Division of Plant Industry.

Respectfully,


/


HALWIN L. JONES, DIRECTOR
Division of Plant Industry






REPORT OF THE DIVISION DIRECTOR
July 1, 1978-June 30, 1980
Restructuring of the Division of Plant Industry, predicated on the early
detection of serious plant pests through systematic and biometric survey
as its primary objective, took precedence during the biennium. Changes
were designed and implemented to substantially increase the effectiveness
of the detection and control effort in protecting Florida agriculture.
Prompt detection of plant diseases and pests in both high- and low-risk
areas affords a greater opportunity for control and elimination, thereby
reducing or negating the economic impact.
Preliminary and associated efforts at early plant pest detection prior to
restructuring were high-hazard survey activities, nursery environs surveys,
special surveys, and biometric surveys on an "as-needed" basis.
An integral part of the restructuring program involved the "one-man,
one-district" concept wherein one well-trained agricultural specialist carried
out or assumed all the regulatory activities necessary in the district, as op-
posed to having more than one person performing different functions in the
same district, e.g., insect detection, nursery inspections, regulatory inspec-
tions, with some personnel having little or no biological training.
Restructuring of the Division was established on three main factors: 1)
having agricultural specialists with good academic biological training
(minimum of a bachelor's degree and. two years experience in some
biological endeavor); 2) having an effective supervisory ratio of 1 to 6 (by
the end of the biennium the average was 1 to 8, in contrast with 1 to 16 and
as high as 1 to 28 formerly); and 3) continuous training for all personnel in
all aspects of the most effective and highest standards of regulatory plant
protection.
Work districts were realigned geographically, commensurate with a full
workload, so that responsibility for all regulatory activities was assumed
by one agricultural specialist, and field personnel were trained in newly ac-
quired duties such as insect detection (trapping) and expanded surveys at
high-hazard sites (ports, airports, terminals, dooryards of the urban and
traveling public). With restructuring, our agricultural products specialists
were able to spend approximately 30 percent of their time on survey for new
plant pests in contrast to 4 percent prior to the implementation of this
revolutionary concept.
Nurseries were categorized according to plant pest risk and inspected
with the frequency corresponding to pest risk. Energy conservation (travel)
and cost savings were realized by establishing "one-man, one-district" work
areas, thus eliminating extra travel, and by providing all field personnel
with state vehicles.
The impact and results of restructuring proved satisfying but not
without a few relatively minor problems of adjustment to the re-ordered
priorities of early pest detection.
The Division's technical bureaus experienced a decided impact upon
their specimen workloads but not without substantial contributory and
satisfactory results.






2 Division of Plant Industry

During the biennium the Citrus Blackfly (Aleurocanthus woglumi) Pro-
gram was directed toward containment instead of eradication and was
based upon the following criteria: 1) the highly successful performance of
two parasitic wasps, Prospaltella opulenta and Amitus hesperidum, which
have literally decimated the blackfly populations by 98 percent, with conse-
quent absence of any economic injury to the citrus industry; 2) increased
homeowners resistance to the use of chemical sprays; and 3) inadequate
results obtained with chemical treatments. Further, the containment pro-
gram included the establishment and maintenance of a parasite-rearing
facility and the maintenance of eradicating equipment should it have
become necessary to return to an eradication program. The citrus blackfly
came under biological control, supplemented by urban biometric surveys
and the use of Garza (sticky) traps.
Witchweed was found in Florida during October 1978. In order to ascer-
tain its host range under Florida conditions and its potential for economic
damage to our crops, an experimental host range study was conducted.
Hairy indigo, Indigofera hirsuta, has thus far been the only established
host in Florida. Witchweed has not been found outside of Lake, Orange,
Osceola, and Polk counties.
With the placement of USDA inspectors in Puerto Rico, sugarcane
rootstalk borer weevil interceptions in Florida were drastically reduced.
The State of Florida was granted "exemption" under the emergency pro-
cedures enacted by the EPA for the use of the restricted pesticide Hepta-
chlor 5G at the rate of 4 oz per cu yd by nurserymen in their potting soil
(in the infested counties).
Sugarcane rust, Puccinia melanocephala, was discovered in Florida dur-
ing 1979 within USDA test plots at Canal Point. Commercial fields were
surveyed with negative results. Surveys continued in commercial plantings
to note any varieties which exhibited high levels of rust susceptibility, as
well as resistance.
A quarantine was initiated against Hendry, Palm Beach, Glades, and
Martin counties where sugarcane smut, Ustilago scitaminea, was
discovered. It was recommended that growers switch to resistant varieties
of sugarcane, and tests to determine resistant varieties were conducted.
Citrus grower interest and participation in the Spreading Decline (bur-
rowing nematode) Program continued to be active. The voluntary program
involved maintaining buffers and pushing and treating. The Division con-
tinued to require nursery site approval and extensive sampling of young
trees prior to movement.
A cooperative program between the Division and Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences was directed toward the distribution of Prospaltella
lahorensis, a parasite of citrus whitefly, an important pest of citrus and
many ornamentals. Spread of the parasite has been rapid and successful,
more than was anticipated.
Shipment of plant material from California, Arizona, Texas, and Oregon
were monitored for presence of European brown garden snail. Interceptions






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


of the pest were periodically made, and all shipments of infested plants
were either destroyed or removed from the state.
Division personnel continued to be alert to detect any spread of lethal
yellowing to new areas of Florida. The state made available, at cost, oxy-
tetracycline to local government agencies for use in injection programs in
their areas. Use of resistant varieties of coconut palms in new plantings was
strongly recommended.
There was no official state-conducted imported fire ant (Solenopsis in-
victa) control program during the biennium. American Cyanamid made the
product AMDRO (AC 217 300) available as a toxicant bait against the IFA
under EPA experimental use permit. AMDRO was tested in Florida and
was determined to be effective in decreasing the number of fire ant mounds
in the treated area.
The use of chlordane for regulatory purposes expired as of December 31,
1979. Dow FA-5 (chlorpyrifos) was approved by the EPA to replace chlor-
dane as a treatment for potting bench soils and potting media.
Small, initial field tests with EL-468 (Eli Lilly) conducted by the USDA
indicated that this material could have some promise as a bait toxicant
against the IFA.
The Division was charged with responsibility for enforcing the Florida
Preservation of Native Flora law enacted in 1978. Steps were taken to im-
plement the necessary processes for incorporating and enforcing the provi-
sions of this measure.
A total of 3,511,029 (4/5 bushel) boxes of citrus and 385,411 (4/5 bushel)
boxes of gift fruit was fumigated during the biennium. An additional
13,921,112 (4/5 bushel) boxes of citrus were fumigated by the Division of
Fruit and Vegetables under the authority of the Division of Plant Indus-
try during the same period. Of special importance is the fact that the
ethylene dibromide (EDB) fumigant is under review by the EPA, and how
long it may be available for fumigation purposes is a question of consid-
erable concern.
Funds were appropriated by the Florida Legislature for several impor-
tant construction projects. Included will be an addition to the Division
Headquarters, the Doyle Conner Building. The Bureau of Entomology will
have an expansion effectively doubling its arthropod collection area, three
new offices, and an enlarged specimen preparation area; Soil and Water
Conservation, five offices; offices for the Training Coordinator, Methods
Development Bureau, and the Maintenance Supervisor; training area ac-
commodating 200 persons; and office space for the Division Botanist and
staff, plus herbarium storage area; also a new quarantine greenhouse and
laboratory. A heating system for the protection of plantings against freeze
injury in the Florida Citrus Arboretum was begun during the biennium.
Construction of the addition to the Division Headquarters was planned for
the 1980-81 fiscal year.
Mr. Jesse K. Condo retired November 30, 1979, as chief of the Bureau of
Plant Inspection. Mr. Ralph L. King, formerly assistant bureau chief, was
appointed as Mr. Condo's replacement.






Division of Plant Industry


SUMMARY OF CITRUS PROJECTS AND STUDIES


The Division of Plant Industry is involved in the following citrus
studies and cooperative projects.
Entomology
Citrus whitefly parasites identifications are made by Dr. Lionel Stange
in connection with the citrus whitefly project conducted by Dr. Reese Sailer
of IFAS.
Scales, aphids, and mites of citrus submitted by DPI citrus survey per-
sonnel are identified by Dr. Avas Hamon and Harold Denmark.
Fruit fly collection at DPI is being steadily developed and expanded by
Dr. Howard Weems, now considered one of the finest research Tephritidae
collections in North America. Plans are being made to publish a taxonomic
bulletin on the Tephritidae. Efforts are being made to identify a micro-
lepidopteran whose larvae produce extensive serpentine mines in the rind of
grapefruit.
Citrus weevils, Diaprepres abbreviatus and Pachneus are under tax-
onomic studies by Dr. Robert Woodruff. Weevil collections were made as a
result of six trips to the West Indies, along with parasites which are under
study at the USDA Apopka Lab for rearing and possible release.
Circulars on economically important citrus insects (arthropods) are writ-
ten and published by DPI entomologists.
Nematology
Pratylenchus coffeae, the coffee nematode, is under cooperative study
for effective field control methods with our Bureau of Pest Eradication and
Control; John B. MacGowan and Dr. D. T. (Dave) Kaplan, USDA, on host
range among ornamentals and weeds; Dr. P. S. Lehman with Drs. L. W.
(Pete) Timmer and D. T. Kaplan on efficacy studies of Temik; and Dr. R. P.
(Bob) Esser on nematode survey of citrus groves and environs with citrus
survey personnel and seasonal population studies, including Pratylenchus
coffeae.
Citrus nematodes are being studied as vectors of psorosis, especially
Xiphinema americanum, by Drs. P. S. Lehman and D. E. Stokes. There are
no reports of a citrus virus being vectored by a nematode.
Plant Pathology
Citrus virus indexing for exocortis, psorosis and tristeza is conducted by
Harry C. Burnett, using sensitive clones of citron (Citrus medical L.) for ex-
ocortis in 4000 tests over last 2 years; visual leaf symptoms for psorosis
with 900 leaf specimens examined over last 2 years; and the use of key lime
[Citrus aurantifolia (Christm.) Swingle] for tristeza in 240 tests and more
recently with the use of ELISA in 1400 samples tested in 4 months.
Young tree decline is being studied by Harry C. Burnett in cooperation






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


with Dr. Stan Nemac (USDA) as to the relationship of various types of
nitrogen fertilizers and the fungus Fusarium solani.
Milkweed vine (Morrenia odorata Lindl.) and its biocontrol by
Phytophthora palmivora Butl. has been studied intensively over the past 7
years by Dr. W. H. Ridings, Dr. M. E. (Beth) Kannwischer, Dr. Calvin L.
Schoulties, Harry C. Burnett, and Nabih E. El-Gholl, and hopefully will
result in full commercial registration of this mycoherbicidal pathogen by
Abbott Laboratories for its use by citrus growers in Florida in the spring of
1981.
Seedling root rot in citrus nurseries is under study by Dr. W. H.
Ridings, Dr. N. C. Schenck, Dr. C. L. Schoulties, R. R. Snell, W. M. Keen
and N. E. El-Gholl with the objective of ascertaining the effects of methyl
bromide fumigation and its interaction with the root-rotting pathogen
Phytophthora parasitica Dast. and VA (vesicular arbuscular) mycorrhizal
fungi. It has been noted to date that mycorrhizal-inoculated trees have
shown a higher survival rate.
Citrus canker is under continuing study in Argentina through a USDA
grant to IFAS with Drs. R. E. Stall and John W. Miller with the expressed
purpose of determining how to eradicate citrus canker. Carter P. Seymour
observed the regulatory plant protection aspects of the eradication pro-
gram. Dr. Devon Zagory, plant pathologist from California, will be heading
up citrus canker research for the next 2 years.
Plant Disease Quarantine facility under the supervision of Dr. J. J.
McRitchie at the Doyle Conner Building, Gainesville, receives only ap-
proved plant introductions for observation, indexing, and clearance, par-
ticularly citrus introductions for any serious pest or disease, which can
threaten our citrus industry. Whenever possible, introductions are made
disease-free through tissue culture (shoot-tip grafting) under strict quaran-
tine conditions.
Citrus Budwood Registration
Tristeza studies are being conducted in cooperation with various
research personnel, as denoted in the following: 1) on studies into CTV in-
cidence and distribution in Florida growing areas with Drs. R. L. Lee, IFAS
Virologist, the tree (grapefruit) with Dr. R. L. Lee; 3) on refinement and ap-
plication of ELISA indexing for CTV detection in registered budwood foun-
dation grove trees with Drs. S. M. Garnsey and R. L. Lee; 4) on studies of
CTV pre-immunization (cross-protection) with mild strains on sour orange
rootstock with Dr. S. M. Garnsey; 5) on long term observation of CTV
tolerance of sour orange rootstock types with Dr. A. P. Pieringer, IFAS
plant breeder and pathologist.
Exocortis study involves supplying mild strain selections for inocula-
tion in dwarfing trials with Drs. S. M. Garnsey and M. Cohen, IFAS plant
pathologist.
Disease studies include cooperative projects on 1) root rotting problems
in nursery stock with Dr. G. Grimm, USDA plant pathologist, 2)





Division of Plant Industry


milkweed/Phytophthora control studies with H. C. Burnett and Dr. W. H.
Ridings, 3) seed storage studies and treatments with C. R. Barmore, Plant
Pathologist, Lake Alfred, 4) virus elimination through shoot-tip grafting
with C. P. Seymour.
Horticultural cooperative projects include 1) navel yield trial and a
lemon seedling selection study with Dr. A. P. Pieringer, 2) rootstock
assessments and observations (YTD, etc.) with D. J. Hutchison, Geneticist,
USDA, Orlando, and W. Castle, Horticulturist, IFAS, Lake Alfred, 3) new
variety indexing and distributions with J. Hearn, Geneticist, USDA, Or-
lando, H. Ford, Horticulturist, IFAS, Lake Alfred, and D. Hutchison, 4)
supplying seed, seedlings, trees and budwood for various experimental
studies to USDA and IFAS.
Pest Eradication and Control
Citrus blackfly studies are directed toward mass rearing of citrus black-
fly and its parasites in Ft. Lauderdale as they now pertain to the present
biological control program. These studies include: 1) seasonal changes in
the life cycles of CBF, Amitus and Prospaltella; 2) viability of CBF from
egg to pupae and egg to adult; 3) viability of parasitized CBF from egg to
pupae and from egg to adult; 4) fecundity of CBF, Amitus and Prospaltella
and factors affecting same; 5) host preferences of CBF in culture; 6) in-
oculative techniques for CBF, Amitus and Prospaltella; 7) phototacticity of
CBF, Amitus and Prospaltella; 8) collection, storage and shipping tech-
niques for Amitus and Prospaltella; 9) comparative parasitization efficiency
of Amitus and Prospaltella; 10) food needs of parasites; and 11) feeding
needs of CBF adults.
Methods Development
Fumigation of limes and lemon-limes with ethylene dibromide and
methyl bromide to meet Japanese requirements on Caribbean fruit fly
resulted in no phytotoxic effects at 8 oz/1000 cu. ft. and 3 lbs/1000 cu. ft. for
EDB and MB, respectively, as demonstrated by Ralph E. Brown.





THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


FISCAL OFFICE

C. E. Taylor, Fiscal Officer

Summaries of the application of budgeted and/or requested funds iden-
tified by the Division's activities are contained in Tables 1 through 4 for the
fiscal years 1979-80 through 1982-83, respectively. Each table lists the pro-
gram components, based on Florida's Planning and Budgeting System,
which are subject to approval and adjustment, as applicable, by the Com-
missioner of Agriculture and the State Legislature.


TABLE 1
FY 1979-80 Actual Expenditures

General Total
Bureau/Activity Revenue Trust Expenditures


Administrative Services, General
Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library
Total Administrative Services,
General

Plant Industry Products and
Protection Inspections
Bureau of Plant Inspection
Citrus Tree Survey
Total Plant Industry Products
and Protection Inspections

Plant and Animal Pest
and Disease Control
Bureau of Entomology
Bio-Control Laboratory
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bureau of Pest Eradication
and Control


632,865 49,568 682,433

632,865 49,568 682,433


1,859,345
149,325


57,021 1,916,366
1,178 150,503


2,008,670 58,199


412,979
25,268
374,446
219,802
191,684

261,163


2,066,869


412,979
25,268
374,446
18,683 238,485
191,684


261,163


74,450 75,234 149,684






Division ofPlant Industry


Spreading Decline Program
Lethal Yellowing Program
Special Categories
Apiary Indemnities
Citrus Blackfly
Bureau of Methods Development
Total Plant and Animal Pest
and Disease Control
DIVISION TOTAL


104,065 453,029 557,094
63 35,964 36,027


27,459
426,531
136,079


27,459
389,978 816,509
136,079


2,253,989 972,888
4,895,524 1,080,655


3,226,877

5,976,179






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


TABLE 2

FY 1980-81 Allocations and Estimated Expenditures


General Total
Bureau/Activity Revenue Trust Expenditures


Administrative Services, General
Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library
Total Administrative Services,
General

Plant Industry Products and
Protection Inspections
Bureau of Plant Inspection
Citrus Tree Survey
Total Plant Industry Products
and Protection Inspections

Plant and Animal Pest
and Disease Control
Bureau of Entomology
Bio-Control Laboratory
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bureau of Pest Eradication
and Control
Spreading Decline Program
Lethal Yellowing Program
Special Categories
Apiary Indemnities
Citrus Blackfly
Bureau of Methods Development
Total Plant and Animal Pest
and Disease Control

DIVISION TOTAL


763,599 56,773 820,372


763,599 56,773


1,780,340
157,293


250,886 2,031,226
157,293


1,937,633 250,886 2,188,519


458,993
39,227
402,315
241,594
228,310


273,758 273,758


126,767
97,288
14,325

36,000
583,660
160,565


47,152
512,857
150,000


36,000
536,508 1,120,168
160,565


2,662,802 1,246,517

5,364,034 1,554,176


3,909,319

6,918,210


820,372


458,993
39,227
402,315
241,594
228,310



173,919
610,145
164,325






Division of Plant Industry


TABLE 3

FY 1981-82 Requested Allotments


General Total
Bureau/Activity Revenue Trust Expenditures


Administrative Services, General
Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library
Total Administrative Services,
General

Plant Industry Products and
Protection Inspections
Bureau of Plant Inspection
Citrus Tree Survey
Total Plant Industry Products
and Protection Inspections


Plant and Animal Pest
and Disease Control
Bureau of Entomology
Bio-Control Laboratory
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bureau of Pest Eradication
and Control
Spreading Decline Program
Lethal Yellowing Program
Special Categories
Apiary Indemnities
Citrus Blackfly
Bureau of Methods Development
Methods Development
*Imported Fire Ant
Total Plant and Animal Pest
and Disease Control


DIVISION TOTAL


933,343 59,806 993,149

933,343 59,806 993,149


1,947,261
144,426


331,040 2,278,301
144,426


2,091,687 331,040


606,370
53,133
447,823
328,291
293,175

309,071

301,252
129,738
14,325

36,000
390,000


2,422,727


606,370
53,133
447,823
328,291
293,175

309,071


301,252
564,793 694,531
150,000 164,325

36,000
12,267 402,267


177,692
791,663

3,878,533 727,060

6,903,563 1,117,906


177,692
791,663

4,605,593

8,021,469






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT 11

*EPA registration for Mirex was cancelled in 1978. No other effective tool
for broad-spectrum use against the imported fire ant being available,
further support for the IFA Program was withheld. Recently a new con-
trol product, Amdro, was approved for use over grasslands, forests and
urban areas. Plans for a cooperative program to begin Fiscal Year 1981
and to be supported by the USDA, DPI and program participants, will
be recommended to the Legislature for consideration.






Division of Plant Industry


TABLE 4

FY 1982-83 Requested Allotments


General
Bureau/Activity Revenue


Total
Trust Expenditures


Administrative Services, General
Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library
Total Administrative Services,
General

Plant Industry Products and
Protection Inspections
Bureau of Plant Inspection
Citrus Tree Survey
Total Plant Industry Products
and Protection Inspections

Plant and Animal Pest
and Disease Control
Bureau of Entomology
Bio-Control Laboratory
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bureau of Pest Eradication
and Control
Spreading Decline Program
Lethal Yellowing Program
Special Categories
Apiary Indemnities
Citrus Blackfly
Bureau of Methods Development
Methods Development
*Imported Fire Ant
Total Plant and Animal Pest
and Disease Control


DIVISION TOTAL


911,366 59,817 971,183


911,366 59,817


2,091,747
146,709


971,183


276,780 2,368,527
146,709


2,238,456 276,780


593,856
59,353
442,932
279,748
263,328

305,270

310,920
136,383
14,325

36,000
350,000

172,905
806,573


2,515,236


593,856
59,353
442,932
279,748
263,328

305,270


310,920
593,721 730,104
150,000 164,325


3,771,593 743,721

6,921,415 1,080,318


36,000
350,000

172,905
806,573

4,515,314

8,001,733






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT 13


*EPA registration for Mirex was cancelled in 1978. No other effective tool
for broad-spectrum use against the imported fire ant being available, fur-
ther support for the IFA Program was withheld. Recently a new control
product, Amdro, was approved for use over grasslands, forests and urban
areas. Plans for a cooperative program to begin Fiscal Year 1981 and to
be supported by the USDA, DPI and program participants, will be rec-
ommended to the Legislature for consideration.






Division of Plant Industry


LIBRARY

June B. Jacobson, Librarian

The Division Library has continued its expansion of both journal and
book volumes over the 1978-80 biennium. Our fine collection of materials
dealing mainly with entomology, nematology and plant pathology sur-
passed the 10,000 mark and as of June 30, 1980, our collection numbered
10,167. This includes 287 bourid serials and 385 book volumes added during
the two-year period.
Catalog cards reflecting our library's holdings continue to be exchanged
with the University of Florida in the area of entomology. Entomological
catalog cards are also sent to the Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory
in Vero Beach. Duplication of cards had been difficult until 1979 when
reliance on photocopying was replaced with an electronic typewriter which
permits rapid reproduction of card sets while remaining at one's desk.
Progress was made during the biennium in cataloging the back-log of
volumes that had never been permanently cataloged. Approximately one
hundred and sixty-nine volumes remain. These items are accessible by
author's name on blue cards filed in the main catalog. Four hundred and
fifty-three books and journals were cataloged in the two-year period. An ad-
ditional card catalog cabinet and kardex unit were purchased to handle
these additional cards. The library has been successful in cataloging new
books as they are received to make important new materials easily
retrievable by author, title, and subject.
During the biennium the Division's binding needs were handled by
Dobbs Brothers of St. Augustine. The book-binding agreement known as
ICOP-78-01 has been renewed, and it permits the library to send materials
to any of the participating binderies, eliminating the need to solicit bids
every year. The standardized binding procedure continues to be used
because of its economy.
Several changes in library personnel occurred during the 1978-80 bien-
nium. Ms. Pam Maruniak was hired as secretary in September 1978. Ms.
Lisa Burton continued her work as a part-time employee until she com-
pleted her degree in June 1980. Ms. Olga Newman has replaced Lisa and is
a very capable assistant. Ms. Maruniak transferred to the Bureau of Plant
Pathology in August 1979, and Ms. Barbara Tryon assumed that position
in October 1979.
Inter-library loans continued to be an important adjunct to our collec-
tion. Three hundred and twenty-four items were borrowed for the Division
from major collections such as the National Agricultural Library, the
Library of the Agricultural University, Wageningen, the Netherlands, and
the Bibliotheca Central in Brasilia, Brasil. The library filled 200 requests
from other institutions needing research materials owned by the Division.
A donation during this period was given to the Division by F. S. Blanton






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT 15

and has been incorporated into our collection. We have also been fortunate
to receive the excellent materials of the late H. H. Ross. Other gifts were
received from Dr. Frank Young, the Archbold Biological Station, Mrs. John
Creighton, Dr. E. P. DuCharme, Dr. Robert Esser, Dr. Howard Weems, Dr.
Thomas Walker, Dr. James Lloyd, and Dr. E. Barnard.
The decade of the 80s holds exciting new technological advances that
will need to be evaluated with respect to our special library. Refinement of
our collection and services will be our emphasis for the next biennium.






Division of Plant Industry


TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE


Frank King, Information Specialist

During the biennium, strong emphasis was placed upon keeping the
public informed about the progress achieved in biological control of citrus
blackfly in South Florida through newspaper, radio and television releases.
Supportive articles were written about the successful results of the recently
implemented restructuring program. Efforts were also made in supplying
slide talks to various groups throughout the state concerning the plant pro-
tection activities of the Division of Plant Industry.
Personnel in the Technical Assistance Office are responsible for produc-
ing several publications as well as coordinating the printing of publications
written by other DPI personnel; writing press releases and feature articles
to inform the public and the plant industries it serves about DPI programs;
producing a quarterly news magazine; producing a monthly (subsequently
changed to bi-monthly) "house organ"; conducting field and studio
photography for the technical staff; supplying audio visual materials and
training aids; coordinating and building exhibits which are displayed at
various agricultural trade shows and fairs throughout the state; creating il-
lustrations and layout for the various technical publications, and coor-
dinating layout and printing of most standard business and technical forms
used throughout the Division.

Major Publications
The Plant Industry News, published quarterly, provides information
about Division programs and related plant protection efforts, and serves as
an official publication for clarifying rules and regulations concerning the
movement of plants and plant materials and the possible movement of
plant pests in Florida. The magazine serves as a primary information
source for nurserymen, growers and other persons in the agricultural in-
dustry-with a controlled circulation of approximately 13,000.
The Reporter, presently a bi-monthly "house organ" reviews and updates
Department and Division policies, as well as professional job-related ac-
tivities of employees. It is distributed to all current and retired personnel of
the Division.
Photographs of the Division activities and programs, taken in the field
and in the studio, were provided for publication in the Plant Industry News,
the Reporter, technical circulars, leaflets and major publications, and for
distribution to state-wide news media. Photography was provided for all
Division publications and assistance was rendered to the Division's
technical bureaus. The photography laboratory personnel processed ap-
proximately 600 work orders during the biennium, approximately an equal
amount of black and white and color work.






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


Art Work and Exhibits
Approximately 250 work orders are handled yearly by the staff il-
lustrator in spite of the fact that the position has experienced three change-
overs in the past year. The work ranges from creating maps, charts, signs,
posters, graphic and artistic illustrations to other visual aids. Layouts were
provided for most Division publications including the technical circulars,
Plant Industry News, and the Reporter.
The staff illustrator completed an exhibit during the biennium concern-
ing turfgrass certification; another exhibit concerning models of plant pests
has been partially refurbished, and a third, more extensive exhibit,
highlighting bureau activities within the Division is nearing completion.
These and other exhibits have been systematically displayed at trade
and flower shows and county fairs throughout the state, and at Legislative
Appreciation Day in Tallahassee.
Special Features
Special news features, originating from the Technical Assistance Office,
are being supplied to various state media outlets on a continuous basis. A
regular feature entitled "Threatened and Endangered Plants of Florida", ap-
pearing for the first time in January 1980 has been requested for publica-
tion by 13 state daily and weekly newspapers, the more prominent being
the Orlando Sentinel Star and the Gainesville Sun. Each feature article is
accompanied by either appropriate photographs or artwork.






Division of Plant Industry


TRAINING COORDINATOR
JULY 1, 1978-JUNE 30, 1980
The restructuring of the Division of Plant Industry brought about the
establishment of a Training Coordinator position within the Office of Ad-
ministration.
In March 1979, Ernest Collins was employed as the Division's first
Training Coordinator. His responsibilities included the development and
coordination of primary instruction for newly employed Agricultural Prod-
ucts Specialists (field personnel) in plant pest regulatory functions. At pres-
ent this entails six weeks of highly intensified instruction in the fields of en-
tomology, plant pathology, nematology, plant pest survey techniques, and
regulatory laws and duties. Each class spends two weeks at Division head-
quarters in Gainesville for technical training in entomology, plant
pathology, and nematology. In addition, area nurseries are visited for plant
identification and pest survey requirements in the North Florida region.
Three weeks are devoted to the citrus responsibilities of the Division along
with the nursery and foliage industries of Central Florida. The final week of
primary training is accomplished in Miami where the flora such as palms,
flowering trees, subtropical fruit, and South Florida nursery plants are
taught. In each area, classroom instruction is reinforced by field observa-
tions and participation. We expect the need for primary training to con-
tinue as the Division has experienced a 19.5 percent turnover rate during
this biennium. Thirty-two field employees have received primary training
since the Training Coordinator position was established.
The continued training of personnel falls within the purview of the
Training Coordinator. To date, instruction by outside technicians on office
equipment such as typewriters and copiers has been provided. Field person-
nel workshops are conducted by the Bureau of Plant Inspection. The Train-
ing Coordinator attends these workshops in an advisory capacity as well as
to present material on pest problems and related information.
Supervisory personnel attended a three-day Management Training
Seminar conducted by the Management Center, College of Business Ad-
ministration, University of Florida, in June 1980. Fifty-four supervisors at-
tended the three-day session at Division headquarters in Gainesville. Sub-
ject matter included motivation, leadership, group processes, communica-
tions, and time management.
As part of the continuing education needs of field personnel, the Train-
ing Coordinator has procured publications for distribution through the
Division library system. This will be an ongoing project to update person-
nel on new methods of pest detection and regulatory responsibilities.





THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


BUREAU OF APIARY INSPECTION

James C. Herndon, Chief

Summary of Activities
Florida's honeybee industry ranks first in honey production in the
United States, with Florida's honeybee population, estimated at 375,000
colonies, producing from 25 to 30 million pounds of honey each year at a
wholesale value of 10 to 12 million dollars.
Additionally, the total value of pollination services of bees is estimated
at 45.8 million dollars. Florida's honeybee colonies fertilize and cross-
pollinate watermelons, cucumbers, squash, cantaloupes, and the Orlando
tangelo variety of citrus.
Florida's ideal climatic conditions make possible the production of
thousands of queen and package bees, many of which are shipped to north-
ern states and abroad.
As a protection to the honeybee industry, the State Legislature passed
the Florida Bee Disease Law in 1919. The original and continuing objective
of the law is the detection and destruction of honeybee colonies infected
with a disease known as American foulbrood, Bacillus larvae. This disease,
while completely harmless to humans, is highly contagious and lethal to
honeybee colonies.

New Legislation
The 1980 Florida Legislature enacted important changes in the
Honeybee Law, Chapter 586, which will provide further protection of our
important apiary industry.
The maximum amount of compensation paid when diseased bee colonies
are destroyed has been increased to $30 per colony. This action should en-
courage beekeepers with suspected cases of American foulbrood to be
prompt in seeking apiary inspection, thus minimizing the incidence of this
serious disease.
Heretofore violations of the provisions of Chapter 586 were treated as
misdemeanors of the second degree. In the future, however, violations will
be misdemeanors of the first degree, thus conforming to the penalty provi-
sions of Chapter 581, the Plant Protection Law, which the Division of Plant
Industry also administers.
The new law also empowers the department, after notice and hearing, to
impose a fine of up to but not exceeding $5,000 for the violation of any of
the provisions of Chapter 586. Prior to this legislation the enforcement
tools available to us-injunctive relief and the seeking of criminal
penalties-were not adequate to effectively protect the economically impor-
tant honeybee industry of Florida.
As a final protection and deterrent to violations of the law, the bill pro-






Division of Plant Industry


vides for the suspension or revocation of permits when administrative fines
are not paid within 15 days.

Honey Certification Program
During the biennium, apiary inspectors sampled 845 drums of tupelo
honey and delivered 228 composite samples to the Department's Food
Laboratory in Tallahassee for analysis and certification. These samples
were examined for flavor, color, soluble solids, moisture, and pollen count.
One hundred seventy-nine composite samples from 670 barrels were cer-
tified as tupelo honey. Forty-nine samples from 175 barrels failed to earn
certification as tupelo honey. Moisture content of the samples averaged
17.45%.

Varroa jacobsoni Investigation
In late December 1979 it was learned that a graduate student at the
University of Maryland had observed two mites floating in a vial of alcohol
containing a drone bee. Dr. E. Baker of the Insect Identification and
Beneficial Insect Introduction Institute, USDA, identified this mite as Var-
roa jacobsoni-the first report of Varroa sp. occurring in North America.
All Maryland beekeepers having bees located in Florida (approximately
850 colonies) were immediately contacted and plans were made to sample
these bees for evidence of the mite. In January 1980, 25% of the Maryland
honeybee colonies were sampled. Approximately 500 adult bees were
shaken from each colony into diesel fuel to dislodge any possible mites that
might be present and specimens were sent to the entomology laboratory of
Dr. Harvey L. Cromroy for identification. All results proved to be negative.

Road Guard Report
One of the problems facing Florida beekeepers is the reduction of plants
necessary for honey production. With the increased population growth,
building projects and new highways consume vast areas of land containing
plants important for honey production, forcing the beekeeper to find new
apiary locations. Because of this problem, more and more beekeepers move
their honeybee colonies to other states in search of a honey crop, returning
each fall in order to be ready for the spring citrus bloom. During the
1978-1980 biennium, 270,065 colonies were brought into Florida by
migratory beekeepers-approximately 16.5% more than were brought in
during the previous biennium. Road Guard reports also showed 362,210
supers moved into Florida, while 334,368 colonies and 356,078 supers left
Florida for destinations across the nation.
Personnel of the Bureau of Apiary Inspection examined and certified
81,104 colonies for queen and package bee producers. A total of 326,561 col-
onies was inspected and certified for shipment to the following states:






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


Arkansas 101
Colorado 2
Connecticut 100
Georgia 53,543
Illinois 2,385
Indiana 225
Iowa 103
Kentucky 244
Maine 10,151
Maryland 2,115
Massachusetts 5,098
Michigan 800
Minnesota 22,082
Mississippi 466
Missouri 580
Montana 448
Nebraska 1,230
New Jersey 7,221
New York 23,155
North Carolina 3,119
North Dakota 68,154
Ohio 13,007
Oklahoma 140
Pennsylvania 13,392
South Carolina 237
South Dakota 28,554
Tennessee 1,211
Texas 154
Virginia 2,039
Washington 120
West Virginia 222



Rbsume of Bureau of Apiary Inspection Activities
In 1979 the Florida Legislature authorized and funded one additional
apiary inspector position which has provided for a record number of col-
onies being inspected in the past biennium-109,294 more colonies than
during any other biennium. Apiary inspectors examined 586,849 colonies in
11,484 apiaries and found 2,917 colonies infected with American foulbrood.
The Apiary Inspection office issued 1,132 permits for 270,065 colonies
of out-of-state bees to move into Florida and 264 special moving permits for
moving point-to-point within the state. Florida beekeepers were issued
2,647 moving permits and 123 certificates of inspection. The sum of
$45,481 was paid during the biennium to Florida beekeepers in compensa-
tion for bees and equipment destroyed because of American foulbrood.






Division of Plant Industry


Florida's disease rate of one-half of one percent remains one of the lowest in
the nation.


1978-79 1979-80 Biennium
Apiaries inspected 5,878 5,616 11,494
Colonies inspected 283,346 303,503 586,849
Colonies infected with AFB 1,406 1,511 2,917
AFB colonies destroyed 1,406 1,511 2,917
Florida permits issued 1,255 1,392 2,647
Certificates issued for exit 294 314 608
Point-to-Point permits issued 129 135 264
Certificates issued for sales 70 53 123
Special Entry permits issued 632 500 1,132


Yearly Summary, Bureau of Apiary Inspection


Apiaries Colonies
Infected Infected
Apiaries Colonies American American
Year Ending Inspected Inspected Foulbrood Foulbrood
June 30, 1938 3,451 64,668 38 173
1939 3,371 70,655 56 416
1940 3,414 76,851 61 234
1941 3,711 81,950 80 371
1942 3,671 83,354 106 698
1943 3,347 80,823 100 524
1944 2,646 73,649 106 456
1945 2,371 69,262 105 379
1946 2,265 71,161 138 959
1947 2,464 87,674 104 683
1948 3,266 98,147 100 391
1949 3,710 105,678 130 406
1950 3,082 105,296 175 369
1951 2,872 95,405 237 772
1952 2,836 88,206 232 578
1953 3,259 92,267 449 1,366
1954 5,102 135,168 683 2,158
1955 5,885 157,388 524 1,421
1956 6,168 176,616 460 1,180
1957 5,813 162,885 490 1,121
1958 4,932 159,692 457 1,623
1959 5,123 153,677 454 1,329
1960 5,056 149,227 438 1,422






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980


4,991
5,693
5,497
5,230
5,680
5,833
6,337
6,519
5,912
5,788
5,273
4,713
5,353
4,802
5,050
4,750
4,377
5,872
5,878
5,589


152,288
173,538
169,411
166,641
179,861
189,802
197,833
218,493
192,651
185,752
176,608
176,153
193,382
191,102
204,929
212,945
217,403
260,152
283,346
303,567


1,271
1,053
1,546
1,614
1,709
1,340
1,768
1,712
1,707
1,317
2,092
1,683
1,702
1,148
1,229
1,271
1,068
1,989
1,406
1,532






Division of Plant Industry


BUREAU OF CITRUS
BUDWOOD REGISTRATION

C. O. Youtsey, Chief of Budwood Registration

Information compiled in the budwood bureau during this report period
continued to show the strong demand for citrus nursery trees that began in
late 1977. A strong fruit market the last 2 seasons has enabled growers to
replace trees lost in the damaging freeze of 1977, and to continue replace-
ment schedules for trees lost from blight. Good market conditions have also
led to considerable new grove planting in Hendry, Collier, and Palm Beach
counties.
The number of registered nursery propagations remained about the
same for the 2 reporting years, totaling 4,145,034 for the biennium. This is
a 34% increase over the previous period.
Table 1 provides information on trends established in nursery propaga-
tions by variety and rootstock for the 3 years 1977-78 through 1979-80. Car-
rizo citrange, Cleopatra mandarin, Milam lemon, and sour orange comprise
approximately 80% of the rootstocks in use during this period. The large in-
crease in the use of Swingle rootstock is the result of increased availability
of seed. This relatively unproven rootstock shows the greatest promise as a
substitute for sour orange with grapefruit scions. Hamlin, Valencia, and
pink and white seedless grapefruit are the leading scion varieties.
Budwood supplied to the industry from the budwood foundation grove
amounted to nearly 1,070,000 buds for this biennium which exceeded the
estimated demand for material by 65%.
With the strong activity in the industry, many new citrus nurseries are
being established to meet the demand for new trees. Many inquiries have
been received regarding participation in the Citrus Budwood Registration
Program. A total of 24 new participants entered the program. Fifteen new
scion groves and validated budwood source plantings involving 1,669 trees
were established under supervision of division personnel.
Fruit production from the 5-year-old foundation grove has increased
sharply in this biennium. Sale of fruit, budwood, and inspection fees
charged, returned $149,361 for the biennium. This is a $100,500 increase
over the previous 2 years and is largely due to the increased fruit produc-
tion and exceptionally good market prices in 1978-79. An increase of
$12,000 in sales of budwood in 1979-80 was also a major factor in these
returns.
In March 1979, approximately 6 acres of additional foundation grove
were set with trees propagated from material that has been cleared of one or
more virus diseases by the shoot-tip-grafting (STG) technique. There are 9
Valencia and 11 navel selections included in this planting propagated on 8
rootstocks. These stocks will serve as a long-term index and provide an op-
portunity to gather valuable horticultural data. One group of trees in this





THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


planting has already been replaced because of failure to eliminate psorosis
virus.
Other foundation grove changes include the removal of a very low qual-
ity pineapple selection, replaced with a STG selection of Homosassa
orange. A selection of Lee tangerine was removed and replaced with trees of
the recently released Sunburst citrus hybrid, a new mandarin variety from
the USDA breeding program distributed through this bureau's citrus
validation program in April 1979.
Two shoot-tip-grafted selections of Bearss lemon were used to replace
exocortis infected budlines in the Lake Fannie grove. One of these was
selected for its reduced thorniness.
One STG selection of Thompson pink grapefruit with true-to-type fruit
was added to the screenhouse, as were an old-line Tahiti lime, a Eureka
lemon, and propagations from the 1977 California introduction of Parsons
Special mandarin, and Etrog citron "S-1". The latter 2 trees are reported to
shorten the time required to index for xyloporosis virus and increased sen-
sitivity to exocortis viroid. Tests are under way comparing the Parson
Special mandarin with the standard Orlando tangelo indicator for
xyloporosis. The Etrog S-1 selection is being used in all standard exocortis
indexing for this viroid.
A selection of rough lemon that has better foot-rot tolerance was ob-
tained from the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) and
established in the foundation grove. Two additional experimental rootstock
selections have been established from USDA sources.
The Florida Citrus Arborteum gained 84 additional trees this period
bringing to 222 trees now located in permanently numbered positions. A
large number of citrus and citrus relatives have been used in landscaping,
parkway beautification, and perimeter plantings. Total new acquisitions
number 61.
Additional improvements in the arboretum include wrought iron win-
dow bars for the arbor, shutters for the windows, and several decorative
urns for specimen plants.
A central heating system is presently being installed and should be com-
plete for the winter season. Major equipment for this system was donated
by the Florida Citrus Research Foundation. Installation is being completed
by bureau personnel.
Hot water treatment of citrus seed for control of Phytophthora
parasitica Dast., has become an important nursery practice in Florida. A
record number of 11,166 quarts were handled by the bureau in the 1979-80
season. The total for the 2-year period amounted to 19,154 quarts. Carrizo
citrange, sour orange, and Cleopatra mandarin varieties represent 84% of
the seed used for rootstock purposes.
A cooperative effort between this office and the Bureau of Plant
Pathology for the elimination of viruses through STG in certain outstand-
ing citrus budlines has resulted in 198 plants being returned for indexing
through the bureau's facility. Through the efforts of the registration pro-






Division of Plant Industry


gram there are exocortis-free sources of Dream navel, Thompson
grapefruit, Bearss lemon, Tahiti lime, and Homosassa and Temple orange
now available for industry use.
Testing in participants' registered bud source trees for mechanically
spread exocortis viroid continues to occupy the largest part of the virus
testing workload. There were a total of 3,097 exocortis tests started this
period and 2,643 completed using Etrog citron indicator plants. This large
volume of testing is made possible by cooperative arrangements with the
Winter Haven Pathology Laboratory. The rate of accidental infection in ex-
ocortis registered budlines fell from the 5.5% reported in the last biennium
to 2.4% for this period. Increased consciousness of sanitary precautions
and removal of infected trees have helped to reduce this rate. The impor-
tance of this testing is illustrated by rootstock trends as seen in Table 1.
Currently there are nearly 44% of the rootstocks used for nursery produc-
tion that are susceptible to the deleterious effects of exocortis.
Long term field plot testing for psorosis and xyloporosis was begun on
224 trees. These included 71 STG selections being re-indexed to detect
viruses that may not have been eliminated with this technique. There were
24 xyloporosis tests on foundation nucellar selections that were completed
this period and 14 parent tree tests completed. Indexing on 10 new line
seedling selections from the IFAS station at Homestead was completed
and propagation material returned for field trials.
There were 1,812 foundation grove trees tested for tristeza this period of
which 33% were infected. This compares with 11.5% in the last period.
Three grapefruit trees on sour orange rootstock were removed this period
due to tristeza decline. Of the 49 remaining 5-year-old trees on this
rootstock, 11 are infected and 4 are showing early decline symptoms.
More than 2,100 tests were completed using the enzyme-linked im-
munosorbent assay (ELISA), or sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) technique.
The plant pathology laboratory in Winter Haven has obtained the neces-
sary equipment for making these determinations. This laboratory proce-
dure has been shown to be very reliable when compared to the standard
Key lime test. Results are obtained within 12-24 hours. This will eliminate
the necessity for growing thousands of greenhouse plants over a period of
a year or more and make considerable more space available for exocortis
indexing of scion groves.
In a cooperative USDA-IFAS-DPI study conducted in the latter half of
the biennium in 7 scion groves in the ridge area, 260 trees were sampled to
detect tristeza infection in bud source trees supplying propagation material
for budding on sour orange rootstock. Budwood bureau records indicate
that these trees supplied 435,500 buds. Of these buds, 89% of the sweet
oranges were infected as were 57% of the grapefruit. The lack of reported
major losses in commercial plantings of sweet oranges on sour orange
rootstock has led observers to believe that most Florida plantings are
benefiting from a type of natural immunization provided by the mild
tristeza strains that are present in most citrus growing sections. There are






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


exceptions to this observation, however, and past reports have described
some areas on the East and West Coast, and in Central Florida where
severe losses have occurred. State-wide losses have not been as great as the
overall losses on rough lemon stocks due to "blight"; thus growers continue
the heavy use of sour orange as a rootstock despite the risk of loss from
tristeza decline.
On the second day of March 1980, a fast moving cold front swept
through Florida dropping temperatures to the lowest ever recorded by the
weather bureau for this date. Temperatures at the foundation grove in
Dundee reached 25 F and remained at this level for more than 4 hours.
Nursery stock and young trees in the foundation grove and arboretum
were protected with heaters and sustained only minor twig damage. Bloom
was damaged on foundation grapefruit trees and observations indicated a
light crop for 1980-81. An estimated 850 boxes of Valencia oranges dropped
due to freezing, but yield records were obtained, and fruit was salvaged
from the important foundation selections.
As a result of division restructuring, budwood bureau personnel as-
sumed the responsibilities for witnessing bud cutting, setting of scion
groves, and other routine activity connected with citrus tree registration in
Polk and Highlands counties.
In 1979-80, mileage increased by 16,107 miles over the previous year as
a result of these new activities. It is interesting to note that while mileage
increased only 42.4%, the cost of travel increased 94.7% A further measure
of increased activity can be seen by comparing the number of buds wit-
nessed by bureau personnel. In 1978-79 there were 334,082 witnessed buds
compared to 1,679,261 registered budeyes witnessed in 1979-80.
Training in virus diseases, variety identification, horticultural evalua-
tion, and budwood procedures was given to 54 new employees in a total of 8
training classes lasting 2 days each.
Twenty-four visitors from 12 foreign countries visited the bureau to
learn of various phases of bureau activity.
The following publications, trips and talks were made by bureau person-
nel during this report period:
September 12, 1978. A paper was presented at the Citrus Growers' In-
stitute in Winter Haven by C. 0. Youtsey, "Shoot-Tip-Grafting- A Method
for Virus-Free Propagation of Citrus". The paper was also published in the
CITRUS INDUSTRY magazine November 1978.
November 9, 1978. A paper was presented at the Proc. Fla. State Hort.
Soc. 91., "Comparison of Yield and Internal Quality of 25 Navel Orange
Selections", co-authored by A. P. Pieringer, G. D. Bridges and C. O.
Youtsey.
February 27, 1979. Charles Youtsey gave a talk for the Ridge Runners,
"Foundation Grove".
March 13, 1979. "Dooryard Citrus" was the topic given by Leon Hebb
for the Bartow Garden Club.
April 16, 1979. A tour was conducted by C. O. Youtsey of the budwood
(Continued on Page 30)













TABLE 1. Scion and rootstock types' used for registered nursery trees during 7/77 thru 6/80.


Total by Scion Type


Scion

Early oranges




Mid-season




Late oranges




Red & pink
grapefruit


Duncan




Marsh




Limes &
Lemons


Total

616,170
838,142
891.888

149,244
190,365
199,416

469,358
837,776
641,399

186,862
108,498
144,005

14,613
8,020
22,756

86,693
39,022
75,903

3,452
124
7,079


Rough
Milam P. Trif Lemon


% of
Total

37.4
40.3
43.2

9.0
9.2
9.7

28.5
40.3
31.3

11.3
5.2
7.0

.9
.4
1.1

5.3
1.9
3.7

.2
.005
.3


Carrizo

224,181
307,285
284,597

79,748
82,946
71,644

269,721
396,274
411,513

41,235
23,401
27,122

6,267
5,226
5,264

23,051
9,436
26,802

16
0
478


Cleo

106,529
126,665
182,102

24,988
26,584
22,176

23,955
30,513
26,852

15,552
4,081
5,808

2,173
3
1,801

2,254
588
2,491

32
0
0


Total by Rootstock

SSweet Sour
Lime Orange


404
0
0

545
0
0

2,268
305
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0


147,927
274,833
265,268

10,686
32,279
15,560

64,764
133,131
54,309

84,887
62,411
57,535

54
21
607

33,417
14,314
23,429

0
86
2,727


30,261
34,643
48,506

17,949
30,589
18,483

46,308
153,224
66,694

7,933
6,905
19,586

2,191
199
10,460

12,432
7,326
12,643

154
0
80


7/77-6/78
7/78-6/79
7/79-6/80

7/77-6/78
7/78-6/79
7/79-6/80

7/77-6/78
7/78-6/79
7/79-6/80

7/77-6/78
7/78-6/79
7/79-6/80

7/77-6/78
7/78-6/79
7/79-6/80

7/77-6/78
7/78-6/79
7/79-6/80

7/77-6/78
7/78-6/79
7/79-6/80


46,280
4,018
30,388

0
0
4,099

2,792
0
0

4,131
0
11,443

0
0
3,509

2,058
0
1,976

0
0
3,309


182
3,608
2

1,806
2,003
0

11,208
30,791
0

0
0
5

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
4
0


Swingle

27,439
43,763
80,035

8,504
14,732
63,925

33,166
44,776
81,008

23,365
7,162
22,506

1,458
1,025
1,115

12,437
5,668
8,562

1,460
0
237


Misc.

32,969
43,327
990

4,998
1,232
3,529

15,176
48,762
1,023

9,759
4,538
0 n

2,470
1,546
0

1,044
1,690
0

1,790
34
248





Tangerine
& Mandarin
hybrids

Total by
rootstock


% each
rootstock


7/77-6/78
7/78-6/79
7/79-6/80

7/77-6/78
7/78-6/79
7/79-6/80

7/77-6/78
7/78-7/79
7/79-6/80


122,785
57,541
83,100

1,649,177
2,079,488
2,065,546


661,278
834,136
844,340

40.1
40.1
40.9


*Reflects increased use of Volkamer lemon and Citrus macrophylla
' Does not include validated nursery stock


216,676
203,083
274,280

13.1
9.8
13.3


7.4 17,059 41,193
2.8 9,568 14,649
4.0 16,920 33,050


7,795
9,943
23,045

125,023
242,829
199,497


27,305
3,207
6,193

82,566
7,225
60,917

5.0
.3
2.9


3,890
0
3

17,086
36,406
10


1.0
1.8
.0005


12,951
10,692
2,832

354,686
527,767
422,267

21.5
25.4
20.4


6,438
4,195
1,054

114,267
121,321
258,442


6,154
5,287
3

74,360
106,416*
5,793


3,217
305
0

.2
.01
.0






Division of Plant Industry


foundation facilities for the Hillsborough county agent and a large group of
interested growers.
May 3, 1979. "Lime Growers Production Course" was given at Dade
County Agricultural Center, Homestead, by C. O. Youtsey.
July 11, 1979. Talks were presented by C. O. Youtsey for the Produc-
tion Manager's Meeting, Vero Beach, "Growth Response of Star Ruby
Grapefruit Under Florida Ridge Conditions", and "Australian Citrus In-
dustry".
July 12, 1979. A talk was given by C. O. Youtsey for the Florida Citrus
Nurserymen's Association, Winter Haven, "Australian Citrus Industry".
July 25, 1979. C. O. Youtsey and L. H. Hebb attended a training
seminar on virus identification conducted by USDA research station per-
sonnel at Orlando.
September 11, 1979. A paper was presented at the Citrus Growers' In-
stitute in Winter Haven by William S. Castle, "Trends in Florida Citrus
Rootstocks", authored by W. S. Castle and C. O. Youtsey. The paper was
also published in the CITRUS INDUSTRY magazine July 1980.
October 11, 1979. A talk was presented by C. O. Youtsey for the
Florida Citrus Nurserymen's Association, "Citrus Budwood Foundation
Grove", and a walking tour of the budwood foundation facilities was con-
ducted.
October 14 through 21, 1979. Leon H. Hebb attended the "Technical
Problems of Citrus Nursery Propagations" course at the University of
California, Riverside, California.
December 5, 1979. A talk was presented by C. O. Youtsey for the Rare
Fruit Council at the Community Center, Bonita Springs, titled "Florida
Budwood Registration Program".
January 29, 1980. C. 0. Youtsey gave a talk for the Indian River Citrus
Seminar, Vero Beach, "Twenty-Seven Years of Citrus Budwood Registra-
tion in Florida". The article was also published in the DPI News Bulletin,
Vol. 21, No. 3, January 1980.
February 21, 1980. A course lecture was given by C. O. Youtsey for the
University of Florida Fruit Crops Department, Gainesville.
March 11, 1980. L. H. Hebb gave a talk on "Citrus Fruit Identification"
for the Bartow Garden Club.
March 13, 1980. A tour was conducted by C. O. Youtsey of the founda-
tion grove facilities for Florida Southern College citrus class.
March 1980. C. 0. Youtsey revised "Citrus Nursery Practices", IFAS
Circular 430, authored by D. P. H. Tucker and C. O. Youtsey.
May 29, 1980. A talk by C. O. Youtsey was presented at the Florida
Citrus Nurserymen's meeting, "New or Additional Selections Showing
Promise for Scion Grove Planting".
June 18, 1980. C. 0. Youtsey revised notes and a list of budwood selec-
tions for the Polk County Extension Service, for their publication "Citrus
Notes" production handbook.






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY

H. A. Denmark, Chief of Entomology

Summary
The Bureau of Entomology provides arthropod identification service,
conducts limited investigations of certain economic problems, assists in in-
structing Agricultural Products Specialists, continues to build a general
arthropod reference collection, conducts taxonomic investigations, super-
vises the security of the Biological Control Laboratory, and develops the
taxonomic and biological control literature to support these respon-
sibilities.
There were 472,883 specimens identified from 21,542 samples received
during the biennium. The number of specimens added to the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods during the biennium was 168,181 pinned and
labeled specimens, 27,048 slide mounts, 2,381 papered specimens, and
96,533 vials, for a total of 284,143 processed specimens. In addition, there
were 397 pill boxes, 1,145 blacklight samples, 128 flight trap samples, and
28 pitfall samples added as unprocessed specimens. There were 38
holotypes and 4,857 paratypes added to the collection. There were 46 new
host records, 178 new county records, 5 new state records, 3 new U. S.
records, and 5 new species recorded during the biennium. There were 224
loans, involving 29,037 specimens, made from the FSCA.
No extensions of the range of the European corn borer, Ostrinia
nubilalis (Hubner) were found during the biennium. Surveys were made in 4
northcentral counties with negative results. This, the known Florida
distribution of this potential pest remains in the northern "panhandle" por-
tion of the state.
A dung beetle project of South America was conducted by Dr. Robert E.
Woodruff during the biennium for the USDA. He spent nearly 20 weeks in
South America and collected over 100,000 specimens. Eggs of 5 species
were shipped to the quarantine facility in College Station, Texas, where
they are being cultured. The adults will be lab-tested to see how effective
they are in burying dung beneath the soil surface. This reduces breeding
areas for flies and adds organic matter to the soil.
The National Science Foundation funded a fossil amber insect project of
the Dominican Republic for Dr. Woodruff. Over 2,000 specimens embedded
in amber have been catalogued and await study.
A Plant Pest Introduction and Evaluation Committee in Entomology
was formed by the Director, Halwin L. Jones, to deal with newly introduced
pests. The members serving during this biennium are Harold D. Bowman,
APHIS, USDA; Dean F. Davis, SEA, USDA; Reece I. Sailer, IFAS, and
Harold A. Denmark, DPI, Chairman.
The sugarcane aphid, Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner), was collected at






Division of Plant Industry


Belle Glade, Palm Beach County, on sugarcane. This is the first continental
United States record for this aphid.
A root mealybug, Rhizoecus hibisci Kawai & Takagi, was collected on
the roots of a bromeliad, Cryptanthus sp. in Orange County. Plants arrived
from Japan via Puerto Rico. This is the first record for the new world.
A mealybug, Dysmicoccus neobrevipes Brardsley, was collected on Fur-
craea sp. in Miami. This is a new continental U. S. record. It has an exten-
sive host list that includes pineapple and sugarcane. No more specimens
have been found after an intensive survey.
A scale, Pseudaonidia trilobitiformis (Green), was collected in Miami
Springs, Dade County, on mango. This is a polyphagous scale, and citrus is
also a host. This is a new continental U. S. record.
Brown garden snail, Helix aspersa Muller, has been intercepted
numerous times from California during the biennium. Three infestations
have been eradicated from Florida in the past. A thorough inspection of
nursery stock from California has prevented a fourth established infesta-
tion.
Gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), is being trapped at camp grounds in
Florida. Campers from the northeastern parts of the U. S., where gypsy
moth infestations are present, have their cars and trailers inspected before
leaving the infested areas. Occasionally egg masses or pupae are overlooked
and survive the trip to Florida. If larvae find a suitable host (usually oak),
they can go through at least one generation in Florida. It is not known
whether a second generation would develop. Adults are occasionally
trapped in Florida that emerged from introduced pupae attached to cars
and/or trailers.
A whitefly, Bemisia herbericola (Cockerell) was collected in Palm City,
Martin County, on wax myrtle, Myrica cerifera L. This is a new state
record.
A spider mite, Tetranychus mexicanus (McGregor), was collected in Ft.
Lauderdale, Broward County, on citrus. This is a new U. S. record. It has
been reported from Mexico and other South American countries. It has not
been reported to be economically important.
A land snail, Alcadia striata (Lamarck), was collected in Miami, Dade
County. It has been intercepted many times from Puerto Rico. This species
is considered economically important.
An armored scale, Opuntiaspis carinata (Cockerell), was collected at
Boynton Beach, Palm Beach County, on ponytail palm, Beaucarnea recur-
vata Lem. There are no established colonies of this scale in continental U. S.
The host range is extensive and includes lime from Mexico. The economic
importance is unknown.
A root mealybug, Rhizoecus mexicanus (Hambleton), was collected at
Seffner, Hillsborough County, on Mammillaria leucocentra Berg. It has
been intercepted previously on this host from Texas. It has been collected
on Christmas cactus, Zygocactus truncatus (Haworth) Schuman, and
causes the plant to wilt.






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


The Arthropod Introduction Committee has processed 57 requests in-
volving 110 species of insects, 1 species of tick, and 2 species of snails, dur-
ing this biennium. Anyone wishing to introduce insects or related arth-
ropods should write to: Harold A. Denmark, Chairman, Arthropod In-
troduction Committee, Division of Plant Industry, P. O. Box 1269,
Gainesville, Florida 32602.

Bureau Activities
The Biological Control Laboratory continues to serve as a clearinghouse
for most of the southeastern United States in the introduction of exotic
species. To date the University of Florida, Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences (IFAS), the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Science
and Education Administration, Agricultural Research (SEA, AR), and the
Division of Plant Industry (DPI) have requested permission to evaluate ap-
proximately 4 parasites and predators under rigid security for their effec-
tiveness against pest insects.
The Arthropod Introduction Committee was established to regulate the
movement of arthropods into and within the State of Florida. It is com-
posed of Dr. C. L. Campbell, Division of Animal Industry, Florida Depart-
ment of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS); Dr. John A. Mulren-
nan, Jr., Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services (HRS);
Dr. W. H. Whitcomb, University of Florida (IFAS); Dr. Donald E.
Weidhaas, U. S. Department of Agriculture (SEA, AR); Lt. Col. Brantley
Goodson, Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission; and Harold A.
Denmark, Chairman, FDACS, DPI. During this biennium 57 requests, in-
volving 110 species of insects, 1 species of tick, and 2 species of snails were
received for the introduction or movement of arthropods into or within the
state from various organizations.
Funds were requested and received to build an addition to the Bureau of
Entomology. This will more than double our museum room.
R. W. Swanson continues to develop methods to mass rear parasites for
fruit flies.
Mrs. Patricia M. Seslar began work as Laboratory Technologist II, July
1978, in a new position.
PUBLICATIONS: Twenty-four circulars and several papers were
published.
IDENTIFICATIONS: Identifications of the various arthropod groups
are made by 7 entomologists. The entomologists and the groups for which
they are responsible are as follows:
H. A. Denmark: Aphids, mites, thrips, and ticks.
A. B. Hamon: Scales, mealybugs, and Aleyrodidae.
F. W. Mead: Adult Lepidoptera; Diptera, suborder Nemato-
cera, Homoptera: Psyllidae, plus suborder
Auchenorhyncha, which includes leafhoppers,
planthoppers, spittlebugs, treehoppers, and
cicadas.






Division of Plant Industry


J. C. E. Nickerson: Formicidae.
L. A. Stange: Hymenoptera (except Formididae); gall-forming
insects, and Neuroptera.
H. V. Weems, Jr.: Adult higher Diptera (suborder Brachycera),
Arachnida (except Acarina), and miscellaneous
smaller arthropod groups.
R. E. Woodruff: Coleoptera and Orthoptera.
Dr. L. A. Hetrick, Professor Emeritus, University of Florida, IFAS,
Department of Entomology and Nematology, continues to do routine iden-
tifications of termites. Dr. Dale Habeck, University of Florida, IFAS,
Department of Entomology and Nematology, identifies the Arctiidae
adults and immatures, and all other immature insects. Drs. Minter J.
Westfall, Lewis Berner, and Fred C. Thompson, University of Florida,
Department of Zoology, identify the Odonata, Ephemeroptera, and
Mollusca, respectively.
Five insect cabinets were added during the biennium.
AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY: H. V. Weems, Jr. is the head curator
and is responsible for the overall development of the Florida State Collec-
tion of Arthropods. He also coordinates the Research Associate Program
and serves as editor of the irregularly published series, Arthropods of
Florida and Neighboring Land Areas.
F. W. Mead is the survey entomologist for the state. The Cooperative
Plant Pest Report (CPPR) has been a joint effort of the USDA and DPI for
the past 24 years. Weekly reports of insect activities are forwarded to
Washington, D. C., where all state reports are combined and published in
the CPPR. Monthly reports are combined with other reports of DPI
technical sections and are published as the TRI-OLOGY Technical Report.
R. E. Woodruff is in charge of the library development program for the
entomology portion of DPI. The DPI library is the primary repository for
the taxonomic and general zoogeographic literature, while the Hume
Library at the University of Florida is the primary repository for all subject
areas. Drs. Woodruff and Tom Walker coordinate the entomological library
purchases for the 2 organizations to eliminate costly and unnecessary
duplication.
A. B. Hamon, a specialist of scale insects, is also developing the collec-
tion of whiteflies and mealybugs of Florida. Adequate descriptions and
keys are lacking for many species of whiteflies.
L. A. Stange is developing and curating the Hymenoptera and the
Neuroptera. He has specialized in some groups of both orders world-wide.
Each entomologist is responsible for curating the respective groups of
assigned arthropods.

Cooperative Economic Insect Survey Program
F. W. Mead, Taxonomic Entomologist
The Division is the cooperative state agency under contract with the






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Plant Protection and
Quarantine Programs, New Pest Detection and Survey Staff, to prepare
weekly survey reports and annual summaries of economic insect conditions
in Florida. Highlights in the weekly reports and annual summaries from
Florida and other states are published by the USDA in the weekly
Cooperative Plant Pest Report (CPPR). DPI distributes its own TRI-
OLOGY Technical Report each month to summarize the most significant
insects, plant pathogens, and nematodes found in Florida. Most of this in-
formation results from the processing and determination of samples sent to
DPI during the preceding month. The author, as survey entomologist, is
responsible for assembling the entomology portion of TRI-OLOGY each
month and for being a rotating editor 4 times a year. Information is re-
ceived from many sources, but perhaps the most consistent general source
is from the DPI office in Gainesville, which acts as the state clearinghouse
as well as the focal point for technical services to DPI personnel around the
state. Much important information is obtained from the University of
Florida Agricultural Research and Education Centers, and extension scien-
tists, USDA personnel, and professional scouts. All of these reports help in
varying degrees to fulfill the objectives of the survey and detection pro-
gram. These objectives are:
1) To assist agricultural workers by supplying current information on
insect activity so that crops can be more adequately protected from
insect attacks.
2) To aid and assure more prompt detection of newly introduced insect
pests.
3) To determine losses caused by insects.
4) To maintain records on the occurrence of economic insects.
5) To aid manufacturers and suppliers of insecticides and control equip-
ment to determine areas of urgent need for supplies and equipment.
6) To develop a workable insect pest forecasting service.


Biological Control Laboratory

L. A. Stange, Taxonomic Entomologist
During the biennium 3 cooperating agencies (Division of Plant In-
dustry, University of Florida (IFAS), and United States Department of
Agriculture, SEA, AR) have been sharing the Biological Control
Laboratory (4,800 sq. ft.) which includes 3 separate laboratory-offices, a
maximum security holding room, 4 greenhouses, a temperature-humidity
controlled rearing room, and a room with environators.
USDA personnel at the laboratory worked principally with the
biological control of aquatic weeds. During the biennium the host specific-
ity tests of an aquatic, native, North American weevil, Litodactylus
leucogaster (Marsham), were completed, and the weevil was released at






Division of Plant Industry


Crystal River in August 1979 for the control of Eurasian watermilfoil.
Studies of a native aquatic weevil, Perenthis vestitus (Dietz) and an adven-
tive pyralid moth, Acentria nivea (Olivier), both on Eurasian watermilfoil,
have been completed.
Facilities have been upgraded with the addition of ten 266-gallon con-
crete vaults in which to grow submerged vegetation and several shallow
pools for ditchbank vegetation. Needed laboratory space was gained with
the addition of bench space in the quarantine facility after 12 obsolete en-
vironators were removed.
Continuing studies by IFAS personnel on Pediobius foveolatus
(Crawford) (wasp parasite of Mexican bean beetle) are providing more data
on reproductive biology, whereas Aphytis theae (Cameron), a tea scale
parasite, apparently cannot survive Florida winters and has been phased
out. A predaceous stink bug, Cantheconidia furcellata (Wolff), from
Thailand, has been released in Florida for control of many Florida pests
such as the tobacco budworm, imported cabbageworm, velvetbean cater-
pillar, cabbage looper, and Colorado potato beetle. Preliminary data in-
dicate that reproduction has occurred in the field.
The cooperative program on the citrus whitefly parasite, Prospaltella
lahorensis Howard, is documenting the dispersal of this parasite and
whitefly population changes in Florida with promising results for the
natural control of the whitefly.
During the biennium there were 57 requests to bring into Florida 110
species of insects, 1 species of tick, and 2 species of snails. Two requests
dealing with 26 species of insects (termites and mosquitoes) were denied.
Most of the imported material was destroyed after study, with approval for
field releases being limited to beneficial predators and parasites of insects
and aquatic weeds.
The facilities have been used for screening Litomastix prob. truncatella
(Dalman), a parasitic wasp from Argentina; Larra bicolor (Fabricius), a mole
cricket predator wasp from Puerto Rico; Eiphosoma vitticole Cresson from
Bolivia (against fall armyworm); and Campoletis grioti Blanchard, a
parasitic wasp from Uruguay (against fall armyworm).

Report on Biological Control Research
at Agricultural Research
and Education Center, Homestead

R. W. Swanson, Entomologist
During 1979, our objective, under the direction of Dr. R. M. Baranowski,
IFAS, was to increase the numbers of parasitoids that we had colonized in
the laboratory during 1978. We were able to produce large numbers of the 3
parasitoids that were imported from the I.N.R.A. Laboratory in Antilbe,
France, for the control of the Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspense
(Loew).





THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


The 3 parasitoids: Opius concolor Szepl. (larval parasitoid),
Trybliographa daci Weld (larval parasitoid), and Dirhinus giffardii Silv.
(pupal parasite) were released beginning in May 1979. During 1979, 31,917
of these parasitoids were released in Dade County.
By monitoring these release sites along with our previous release areas
of Daryctobracon cereum (Gahan) and Biosteres longicaudatus (Ash.) which
have both become established in Florida, we will be able to determine if
these 3 also become established.
Samples from release sites sometimes included large numbers of Opius
anastrephae Vier. which we first discovered in Florida during 1973.
Because of steady increase by this parasitoid in our samples each year, we
are attempting to colonize it.
In 1980 (to June 30) we continued to release 0. concolor, T. daci, and D.
griffardii plus small numbers of B. longicaudatus. The Rare Fruit Council
conducted parasitoid distribution.

Entomology Library

R. E. Woodruff, Taxonomic Entomologist
The entomology portion of the Division of Plant Industry Library con-
tinues to concentrate on literature dealing with taxonomy and identifica-
tion. It presently is one of the top 2 such resources in the southeastern
United States. Our holdings are cross-catalogued with the University of
Florida, and our purchases are coordinated to avoid duplication and effi-
ciently use the limited budget.
Details of accessions and holdings are reported elsewhere under the
librarian's report. Many valuable donations were received during the bien-
nium from research associates of the Florida State Collection of Arth-
ropods, or from their estates. The insect collections and the excellent
library facilities enable the taxonomic entomologists to provide prompt, ac-
curate, and efficient identifications for the regulatory arm of the Division of
Plant Industry, as well as citizens of Florida as a whole.


Rhizoecus mexicanus (Hambleton)
(Homoptera:Pseudococcidae)

Avas B. Hamon, Taxonomic Entomologist
Rhizoecus mexicanus (NEW STATE RECORD) was collected by Mr. C.
W. Hale at Seffner, Florida, on 5-VII-1978. The host was Mammillaria
beucocentra Bug. This root mealybug was previously intercepted by Mr. C.
K. Hickman in St. Petersburg on 7-III-1973. Subsequent to Hale's collec-
tion, Mr. C. B. Lieberman collected this mealybug at Middleburg, Florida,
on Zygocactus truncatus (Haworth). Schumann. The economic importance





Division of Plant Industry


is unknown; however, Lieberman noted that the Zygocactus truncatus were
severely wilted.
The occurrence of this and other species of Rhizoecus in Florida have
been reported on by Hambleton, 1979, (Florida Ent. 62(2):140-149).

Rhizoecus hibisci Kawai & Takagi
(Homoptera:Pseudococcidae)

Avas B. Hamon, Taxonomic Entomologist
Rhizoecus hibisci (NEW WESTERN HEMISPHERE RECORD), was
collected by Mr. F. L. Ware at Gotha, Florida, on 13-IX-1978. The host was
Cryptanthus sp. "It" (bromeliad) supposedly was imported within the last
10 years from Puerto Rico. Previously this root mealybug was known only
from Japan on variegated Carex sp., Crinum asiaticum L., Cuphea
hyssopifolia HBK, Dieffenbachia sp., Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L., Nerium
oleander L., Pelargonium sp., Phoenix canariensis, and Sabal sp.
This root-feeding mealybug is known to cause serious damage to
Cuphea, Hibiscus, Pelargonium, and Phoenix.


Cerococcus kalmiae Ferris
(Homoptera:Cerococcidae)
Avas B. Hamon, Taxonomic Entomologist
Cerococcus kalmiae (NEW STATE RECORD) was collected by Mr. E.
W. Campbell at Port St. Lucie, Florida, on 8-VII-1980. The host was Myrica
cerifera L. Additional hosts from the literature are Rhododendron sp.,
Camellia sp., Diospyros terona, Ilex crenata, Kalmia latifolia, Ribes
cynosbati, and Viburnum sp.
The United States distribution is PA, VA, OH, MD, TX, GA, MA, KS,
and NJ. This scale insect is not an economic problem in the U.S. at this
time, and at the present time, poses no threat to Florida agriculture.


Pseudaonidia trilobitiformis (Green)
(Homoptera:Diaspididae)
Avas B. Hamon, Taxonomic Entomologist
Pseudaonida trilobitiformis (NEW CONTINENTAL U.S. RECORD)
was collected by the USDA on Ixora hedge in Miami Springs, Florida.
This armored scale insect is a potential pest of Citrus and has been
found over a wide area in Dade County. However, to date no economic
damage has been reported. Apparently, some natural parasites are present,
but I have been unable to rear any from the collected material.






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


Some of the common hosts are Annona, Citrus, Ficus, Ixora, Mangifera,
Nerium, Persea, and Psidium. This scale insect occurs in Africa, Asia,
Australia, and South America.


Dysmicoccus neobrevipes Beardsley
(Homoptera:Pseudococcidae)
Avas B. Hamon, Taxonomic Entomologist
Dysmicoccus neobrevipes (NEW CONTINENTAL U.S. RECORD) was
collected by Mr. Paul Chobrda on 2-X-1978. The host was Furcraea sp.
This mealybug species is part of a "pineapple mealybug complex" in
Hawaii and is considered one of their major pineapple pests. This species
caused "green-spotting" of pineapple (a callous or gall formation on the
leaves in response to mealybug feeding). It is also involved with "mealybug
wilt" which is the principal cause of pineapple crop failure in Hawaii. In ad-
dition, it is also considered a minor sugarcane pest in Hawaii.
So far as I am aware, this mealybug was eradicated from the original col-
lection site with chemical insecticides.


Bemisia berbericola (Cockerell)
(Homoptera:Aleyrodidae:Aleyrodinae)
Avas B. Hamon, Taxonomic Entomologist
Bemisia berbericola (NEW STATE RECORD) was collected by Mr. E.
W. Campbell at Palm City, Florida, (Martin Co.) on 14-VI-1979, 8-II-1980
Bluefield, and 10-III-1980 Lakewood Park, (St. Lucie Co.). All 3 of these
specimens (1 from each location) were collected on Myrica cerifera L.
The economic importance is unknown; however, from the number of
specimens collected, it appears not to be economically important at this
time.
Other known hosts reported in the literature are Berberis sp., Colliguaja
sp., Morus sp., Ceanothus sp., and Photinia arbutifolia. Known distribution
is Chile, California, and New Mexico.


Kermes kosztarabi Baer
(Homoptera:Kermesidae)
Avas B. Hamon, Taxonomic Entomologist
Kermes kosztarabi was recently described by Baer (1980, J. Georgia
Ent. Soc. 15(1):20-25), and is reported from Florida. It occurs exclusively on
Quercus spp. and has caused "flagging" or dieback of newly formed leaves
in Auburn, Alabama.






Division of Plant Industry


This species is not separable from K. galliformis Riley in the adult stage,
and 1st instar nymphs must be used to separate these 2 species. Without a
doubt, this species has been in Florida for many years; however, because of
the difficulty with the systematics of this genus, it has been only in recent
times that accurate identifications might be possible (all of the information
has not been published yet).
Baer (1980) reports this scale insect from Levy, Marion, Manatee, St.
Lucie, and Franklin counties. The U.S. distribution is Alabama, Louisiana,
South Carolina, and Georgia.
I do not anticipate any changes in the economic importance of this
genus of scale insects in Florida.


Injury to roses by the coreid bug, Euthochtha galeator (Fabricius)
F. W. Mead, Taxonomic Entomologist
Euthochtha galeator (Fabricius) is a true bug in the family Coreidae,
order Hemiptera. It is a generally common and widely distributed species
in Florida; elsewhere it ranges over most of the eastern United States. In
Florida it has been cited as causing occasional injury to citrus and lychee
plants, similar to that caused by its close relatives, the leaffooted bugs,
Leptoglossus spp. There is a dearth of reports of this bug attacking and in-
juring ornamentals such as roses. The author has noticed it consistently ap-
pearing on his dooryard roses and injuring blooms and young foliage. An
adult (Fig. 1) puncturing the flower bud will produce several holes in the


Fig. 1. Adult Euthochtha galeator (Fabricius) puncturing a flower bud.






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


petals as minimum damage. Extended feeding can cause severe malforma-
tion of the inflorescence. Nymphs and adults feeding in the terminals will
cause young leaves to wilt and dry up (Fig. 2). The amount of injury to roses
by E. galeator may be more extensive than recognized, since its mottled
brownish hue provides protective coloration.


JO


Ac M


Fig. 2. Feeding injury to young leaves of rose by the coreid bug, Euthochtha
galeator (photo by F. W. Mead).


Special Projects


H. A. DENMARK, Chief of Entomology
(1) Phytoseiidae of the world.
(2) Leatherleaf fern project.
(3) Identified mites for Dr. Richard Weires. Seven species of
Phytoseiidae and Tetranychidae.
(4) Phytoseiidae of Mexico.
(5) Phytoseiidae of Nigeria (completed).
(6) Phytoseiidae of El Salvador (completed).
(7) Designed a security laboratory entrance adopted by the USDA


l~i B
L


pp-


A~~Lt






Division of Plant Industry


Attractants Laboratory, Gainesville, and Sandoz, Inc.,
Homestead. This is a portable unit that can be used in any office
with one entrance and limited personnel access.
(8) Revision of the genus Galendromus.
(9) Working with Dr. David Boethel on the Phytoseiidae of pecan in
Louisiana.
(10) Represented the Commissioner for 3 hearings of Quarantine 13.
The first meeting was in Long Beach, California, second meeting
in New Orleans, and the third meeting in Honolulu and Kona
Coast, Hawaii. Hawaii requested permission to ship "mature
green" avocados and mangoes to the mainland U. S. Request
was denied.
(11) Worked with Mr. James Herndon and Dr. Harvey Cromroy on a
survey for bee mites. The survey was negative.

A. B. HAMON, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Whiteflies of Florida-this is a continuing project of learning,
building collection, acquiring literature, getting photographs,
and compilation of data for a future bulletin.
(2) Soft scale insects of Florida- this is a continuing project leading
to a bulletin. The host list, photographs, and distribution have
been completed.
(3) A taxonomic description of the males of Rhizoecus spp.
(Homoptera: Pseudococcidae).

F. W. MEAD, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Year-round daily operation of a blacklight trap at the border be-
tween experiment station, University of Florida and the Doyle
Conner Building area.
Main purpose: Numerical counts of economic moths for the
cooperative weekly survey report and surveillance tool in the
midst of a highly diversified and active nursery and agricultural
area.
(2) Taxonomic and life history research on Oliarus spp.
(Homoptera: Cixiidae).
(3) Taxonomic assistance on IFAS survey (University of Florida)
for potential vectors of lethal yellowing disease of palms.
(4) Taxonomic assistance on saltmarsh insect projects by state
agency researchers.
(5) Series of short papers on life stages of predatory stink bugs in
Florida; junior author with D. B. Richman.
(6) European corn borer special surveys, primarily by examination
of blacklight trap samples.
(7) Alfalfa insects. Alfalfa fields at Gainesville were surveyed on a






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


limited basis to determine population trends of several economic
insect species.
(8) Preparation of an Annual Summary of Economic Insect Condi-
tions in Florida. Report not to exceed 10 pages as required by
USDA, APHIS.
(9) Member, DPI Survey & Detection Committee.
(10) Heteroptera on roses in home garden.

L. A. STANGE, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Taxonomic studies of the genus Zethus F.
(Hymenoptera:Eumenidae) of the Western Hemisphere. Cur-
rently studies of the Venezuelan and Bahamas fauna are being
made.
(2) Ant-lion biology. Rearing of larvae, especially Myrmeleon and
Brachynemurus from Florida, is in progress to obtain associated
adults and parasitoids. To date about 250 adults have been
reared, but no parasitoids have emerged. Also prey data
(especially ants) are being accumulated from the natural
habitats. Bruce Miller in California is working with me. To date,
several Brachynemurus species have been reared for the first
time.
(3) Anthiidine bees (Hymenoptera:Megachilidae) of the Neotropical
Region, continued taxonomic studies of the fauna of Argentina.
(4) Neuroptera (Planipennia) of Florida. Collecting and identifying
the families Coniopterygidae, Dilaridae, Sisyridae, Berothiidae,
Mantispidae, Hemerobiidae, Chrysopidae, Myrmeleontidae, and
Ascalaphidae. Distribution patterns, biology and variation are
being studied.
(5) Myrmeleontidae of the world (Neuroptera). Taxonomic studies
of diverse groups on a world basis to establish a better classifica-
tion of the family. Several new genera of Glenurini are being
described.
(6) Taxonomic studies of the Platymantispinae (Neuroptera:Man-
tispidae) of the Western Hemisphere. Continued investigation of
the genera and species of this group of insects which attack prin-
cipally Hymenoptera.
(7) Seasonal distribution of Neuroptera taken from the blacklight
traps operated at the Doyle Conner Building in Gainesville and
Beville Heights. Nearly daily examination of trap samples
made.
(8) Study of insect pollinators of palms.
(9) Economic snails of the world. Gathering a synoptic collection of
snails of the world of possible economic importance to Florida.
(10) Serve on graduate committee for Alan Wilkening.
(11) Conduct exchanges of reference materials to improve the





Division of Plant Industry


Florida State Collection. Exchanges have been made with the
Los Angeles County Museum (1979) and with Manfredo Fritz of
Argentina (1979-1980). This has greatly improved our collection
of Hymenoptera.
(12) Identify Myrmeleontidae for other individuals and institutions
to improve the reference collection of this Neuroptera family
from all parts of the world. During the biennium, ant-lions were
determined for the University of Nevada at Reno, the Smithson-
ian Institution, the University of Mississippi, the Bishop
Museum, the Museum at Manaus, Brazil, and the San Miguel
Museum in Argentina.
(13) Screening blacklight trap samples for Neuroptera and certain
Hymenoptera groups from diverse areas of the world.
(14) Make field trips, both in-state and out-of-state, to conduct
special insect and snail surveys, to collect material for tax-
onomic studies in special interest groups and to build up the
Florida State Collection of Arthropods.-
(15) Specialized library on Neuroptera and Hymenoptera. A special
effort to acquire the world literature on Neuroptera is being
made as well as all important taxonomic literature on
Hymenoptera.
(16) Taxonomic studies of the Hemerobiidae. This work is being con-
ducted with Enrique Gonzalez of Tucuman, Argentina.
(17) Studies of the natural enemies of mole-crickets. In December
1979 and January 1980, field work in Argentina and Bolivia was
conducted using special sound traps designed by Dr. Thomas
Walker of the University of Florida. A population of Larra
wasps was studied at Santa Cruz, Bolivia.


H. V. WEEMS, JR., Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Compile a comprehensive report on private collections of arth-
ropods which have been committed for ultimate deposition in
the Florida State Collection of Arthropods by Research
Associates and Student Associates and those already donated
but which are currently in the possession of the donors for
curating and continuing development and study.
(2) Complete an inventory of the type specimens in the FSCA and
in private collections of arthropods which are committed for
ultimate deposition in the FSCA, and, when this has been ac-
complished, prepare a manuscript for a bulletin listing these
types to be published by the Division of Plant Industry.
(3) In cooperation with Dr. Joseph L. Simon, University of South
Florida, prepare a manuscript for the invertebrates volume of
the series on the rare and endangered plants and animals of






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


Florida, with assistance from other members of the Special Com-
mittee on Rare and Endangered Plants and Animals.
(4) Continue to direct doctoral research of University of Florida
graduate student, Rohani Ibrahim of Malaysia, who is studying
the Tephritidae of Florida. This involves a series of collecting
trips to various parts of Florida and operation of insect flight
traps, and rearing of adults from various plant hosts. (Note:
Work completed and degree received June 1980.)
.(5) Coordinate the continuing development of the arthropod collec-
tions of the Florida State Collection of Arthropods located at the
University of Florida and the Division of Plant Industry,
FDACS, in Gainesville, and Florida A & M University, in
Tallahassee. This involves meetings of the involved curators ap-
proximately twice each year to discuss mutual problems and
procedures.
(6) Edit and guide through to publication the first volume in the
newly authorized irregularly appearing Division of Plant In-
dustry bulletin series titled Occasional Papers of the Florida
State Collection of Arthropods. Volume 1 will be titled A revi-
sion of the New World Species of the genus Neobisnius
Ganglbauer (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae), by Dr. J. Howard
Frank.
(7) Prepare an illustrated bulletin on the Florida State Collection of
Arthropods and the Research Associates Program which sup-
ports its development and publishes on arthropods.
(8) Develop plans for establishment of a non-profit, tax-exempt cor-
poration designed to support the total program of the Florida
State Collection of Arthropods.
(9) Direct work on the Fleming Key Project, a survey of the ter-
restrial and littoral arthropods of Fleming Key, Monroe County,
Florida, and their relationship to the Harry S. Truman Animal
Import Center (USDA), with special reference to those arth-
ropods which might serve as reservoirs for, or vectors of,
diseases of cattle, swine, and sheep but which diseases do not
presently occur in the continental United States.
(10) Continue insect flight trap projects at Archbold Biological Sta-
tion in Highlands County, Fuch's Hammock in Dade County,
and Fleming Key in Monroe County, Florida. These are being
operated continuously throughout the year and the trap collec-
tions processed in Gainesville.
(11) Examine, process, and identify samples taken by other collec-
tors from insect flight traps, blacklight traps, and several kind
of baited traps located in various parts of Florida and from those
operated by collaborators in foreign lands, notably the
Bahamas, the Greater and Lesser Antilles, Mexico, and Central
America. Valuable material obtained from these traps is being






Division of Plant Industry


processed and added to the Florida State Collection of Arth-
ropods, and some specimens of particular interest are noted in
the TRI-OLOGY Technical Report. During 1978-80, insect
flight traps were operated at several ecologically distinct sites in
Alachua County, Florida, another was operated at Whitehall
Forest near Athens, Georgia by FSCA Research Associate, Dr.
Robert H. Turnbow, Jr., and another was operated each summer
in Nova Scotia, Canada, by FSCA Research Associate, Dr. G. B.
Fairchild. These were in addition to a trap operated at Fuch's
Hammock by FSCA Research Associate, Mr. Terhune S. Dickel,
a trap at Fleming Key, and 2 traps at Archbold Biological Sta-
tion. The trapping program is a vital part of a faunal survey of
Florida and other areas and provides a means of monitoring fluc-
tuating insect populations.
(12) Continue experimenting with designs for more effective insect
flight traps and field testing of these traps.
(13) Continue studies of Diptera: Syrphidae being conducted in
cooperation with Dr. F. Christian Thompson, USDA en-
tomologist at the (United States) National Museum of Natural
History, involving continuing collection and processing of
specimens, exchanges, and preparation of manuscripts. This
also involves a comprehensive study of the Syrphidae of Mexico,
a project initiated by Dr. Weems with a grant from the
American Philosophical Society, and continuation of long-range
studies of Syrphidae of the southeastern United States.
(14) Continue a taxonomic and ecological study of the Syrphidae of
Cranberry Glades, a large disjunct boreal bog in the
Monongahela National Forest of West Virginia.
(15) Continue a taxonomic and ecological study of the Syrphidae of
the southern escarpments of the Appalachian Plateau, a project
initiated with a grant from the National Science Foundation
through Highlands Biological Station.
(16) Prepare a publication on the genus Salpingogaster, family Syr-
phidae, based upon a study made jointly with Dr. Lloyd V.
Knutson, USDA entomologist.
(17) Prepare an illustrated bulletin on arthropod groups, primarily
pertaining to their identification, habitat relationships, seasonal
and geographic distribution, and techniques for collecting them,
with emphasis on Florida.
(18) Identify Syrphidae for other individuals and institutions as a
part of the process of further building a research collection of
Syrphidae and a more thorough knowledge of this family of flies,
especially those of the Nearctic and Neotropical Regions.
(19) Visit other institutions in North, Central, and South America,
which maintain substantial arthropod collections in order to
observe curatorial techniques, arrange exchanges of specimens,






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


and study collections in specific areas of taxonomic interest and
responsibility.
(20) Make occasional field trips, both in-state and out-of-state, to
conduct special insect surveys, to collect material for taxonomic
study in special interest groups (especially Syrphidae), and/or
make general collections for the Florida State Collection of Arth-
ropods.
(21) Conduct exchanges of reference material to make the Florida
collection more complete. A special continuing effort is being
made to obtain representatives of the principal arthropod pests
occurring in other parts of the world, which constitute a poten-
tial threat to Florida agriculture. This will materially aid staff
specialists in making more rapid, accurate, and complete iden-
tifications. It also provides additional material for taxonomic
research, display, and teaching purposes.
(22) Develop a series of carefully planned field trips to various parts
of Florida at different times of the year to search for specific
arthropods known to occur in those areas but which are yet
unrepresented in the FSCA. Eventually this could become a
part of a formal, long-range survey of the arthropods of Florida
which might involve several specialists trained to process the
material collected in the course of such a survey. This, in turn,
could be coordinated with a proposed regional insect detection
laboratory and a proposed regional arthropod identification and
taxonomic research center (for which the Florida State Collec-
tion of Arthropods and the Division of Plant Industry library
would be basic resources).
(23) Continue a special effort to develop complete sets of the en-
tomological publications of some of the most important and
most prolific dipterists; efforts are being made to develop exten-
sive reprint files for the various other groups of arthropods.

R. E. WOODRUFF, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Dung beetles of South America. This project began in 1978 and
was funded by two separate contracts. The first one was directly
with USDA, SEA, Veterinary Toxicology and Entomology
Research Laboratory at College Station, Texas. The purpose
was to make two exploratory trips to Brazil and Argentina in
search of dung-burying scarab beetles which might be of poten-
tial value for a release program in the U.S. It was in effect from
August 16, 1978 to December 31, 1979. The second contract was
through the Department of Entomology, Texas A&M Univer-
sity. It began in December 1979 and terminated after two trips
to Argentina on April 1, 1980. The purpose was to rear beetles in
Argentina and ship eggs to the quarantine facility in Texas. Ap-






Division of Plant Industry


proximately 6 months of my time was spent on this project.
Results: Nearly 20 weeks of field work, using various bulk trap
sampling techniques (bait, blacklight, Malaise) produced over
100,000 specimens for the Florida State Collection of Arth-
ropods. A synoptic collection of dung beetles from the first trips
were provided to the USDA, VTER lab. Additional material
from the 1980 trips is still being processed. Eggs of five species
were obtained in March 1980 and shipped to the quarantine
facility in College Station, Texas, where they are being cultured.
Undescribed immature stages of several species were also ob-
tained. Side benefits of these projects included salary funds for
technician support for mounting and labelling, as well as
replacement specialists. As a result five taxonomists spent from
30 days to 60 days curating, organizing, and identifying specific
portions of the beetle collection. This has greatly improved the
reference collections to aid in making routine identifications. A
complete report on the first contract is available. The second one
is in preparation.
(2) Fossil amber insects of the Dominican Republic. Although Na-
tional Science Foundation support has terminated, several
aspects of the project continue. Specimens have been loaned to
various specialists, and several papers, describing new species,
are in press or preparation. Over 2,000 specimens have not been
catalogued and await study. Mr. Jake Brodzinsky of Amberica
loaned 340 specimens (value $7,830.00) for the study and these
have been recorded; 78 ants were sent to Dr. E. O. Wilson, Har-
vard University, to add to those already sent previously. Over
200 pounds of rough amber were purchased and await cutting
for future study. It is anticipated that grant support will be re-
quested to continue this study when other commitments are
completed.
(3) Supervision of library and serving on DPI library committee.
The librarian, June Jacobson, continues to send all entomology
books to me for confirmation of proper subject headings. In ad-
dition, I check all catalogues from antiquariaat dealers for our
needs. I have worked with Dr. T. J. Walker (U. F. representative)
to assure that our cooperative library development is continu-
ing. A list of all Latin American entomological journals was
prepared so holdings could be checked and for possible ex-
changes for the Florida Entomological Society. Donations from
private libraries have added to both the work load and the
assets: W. H. Pierce, F. S. Blanton, F. N. Young, H. H. Ross,
and others.
(4) Mole crickets in South America. Because of the South American
travel on the dung beetle project, a cooperative effort was made
with Dr. L. A. Stange and the University of Florida (Dr. T. J.






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


Walker and Dr. R. I. Sailer). The purpose was to obtain
specimens and distribution records of mole crickets in Argen-
tina and Uruguay as well as search for parasites
(Diptera:Tachinidae and Hymenoptera:Sphecidae). Special
sound traps, designed by Dr. Walker, were used effectively dur-
ing the field work from December 1979 to March 1980.
Specimens collected are currently under study by Dr. D. A.
Nickle (USNM) to determine if they are similar to Florida
species. A complete report of the project is available.
(5) Refiling old specimen reports. During the period over 4,000 slips
(from 1916-1956) were xeroxed, reduced, modified to include
family and order, and interfiled with files in the museum. This
completes all the reports on the order Coleoptera.

Job-Related Activities

H. A. DENMARK, Chief of Entomology
(1) Chairman, Arthropod Introduction Committee.
(2) Adjunct Professor (courtesy appointment), Department of En-
tomology and Nematology, IFAS, University of Florida.
(3) Courtesy Associate Professor, Area of Entomology and Struc-
tural Pest Control, Florida A & M University, Tallahassee.
(4) Member of Citrus Blackfly Technical Committee.
(5) Serving on Committee of Dr. Wall Chaudhri PL 480 Grant to
study the predatory leaf-inhabiting mites of Pakistan.
(6) Chairman, Plant Pest Introduction and Evaluation Committee
in Entomology.
(7) Supervisory Committee to review fruit fly trapping.
(8) Member, Advisory Council, Department of Entomology and
Structural Pest Control, Florida A & M University, Tallahassee.
(9) Member, Committee to organize a working group for the
biological control of pests in the southeastern U. S.
(10) Member, Review Committee for Dr. Harvey Cromroy, who is
proposing a project on weed-feeding mites of the southeastern
U. S. and Puerto Rico.
(11) Member, Search Committee for Candidates for Chairman of the
Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of
Florida.

A. B. HAMON, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Member, Editorial Committee, Division of Plant Industry.
(2) Associate Editor, Florida Entomologist.
(3) Adjunct Assistant Professor (courtesy appointment), Depart-
ment of Entomology and Nematology, IFAS, University of
Florida.






Division of Plant Industry


F. W. MEAD, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Adjunct Associate Professor (Courtesy appointment), Depart-
ment of Entomology and Nematology, IFAS, University of
Florida, Gainesville.
(2) Courtesy Associate Professor, Area of Entomology and Struc-
tural Pest Control, Florida A & M University, Tallahassee.
(3) Secretary, Florida Entomological Society, 1978-1980.
(4) Member, Insect Detection, Evaluation, and Prediction Commit-
tee, Southeastern Branch, Entomological Society of America,
1980.
(5) Member, Insect Detection, Evaluation, and Prediction Commit-
tee, National Society, Entomological Society of America,
1979-1980.
(6) Member, Exhibits Committee, The Lepidopterists' Society, 31st
Annual Meeting, Gainesville, Florida, 1980.
(7) Official Host, Charter Meeting, Southern Lepidopterists, Nov.
18, 1978, Gainesville.

L. A. STANGE, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Adjunct Assistant Professor (courtesy appointment), Depart-
ment of Entomology and Nematology, IFAS, University of
Florida.
(2) Courtesy associate professor, area of Entomology and Struc-
tural Pest Control, Florida A & M University, Tallahassee.
(3) Research associate, Los Angeles County Museum of Natural
History.

H. V. WEEMS, JR., Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Head Curator, Florida State Collection of Arthropods.
(2) Coordinator, Research Associate Program of the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods.
(3) Editor, Arthropods of Florida and Neighboring Land Areas,
irregularly appearing bulletin published by the Division.
(4) Associate Editor, The Florida Entomologist, quarterly journal
of the Florida Entomological Society.
(5) Adjunct Professor (courtesy appointment), Department of En-
tomology and Nematology, IFAS, University of Florida.
(6) Courtesy Associate Professor, Department of Entomology and
Structural Pest Control, Florida A & M University, Tallahassee.
(7) Chairman, Special Committee on Insects and Terrestrial In-
vertebrates, Florida Committee on Rare and Endangered Plants
and Animals.
(8) Florida Entomological Society: Chairman, Blue Ribbon Commit-
tee, 1978-79; Member, Nominating Committee, 1978-79; Chair-






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


man, Long Range Planning Committee, 1979-80; Chairman,
Constitution and By-Laws Committee, 1979-80; Member,
Florida Entomologists Directory Committee, 1979-80.
(9) Co-Chairman, Local Arrangements Committee, annual meeting
of the Lepidopterists' Society, Gainesville, Florida, 19-22 June
1980.
(10) Co-Chairman, faculty committee for Ms. Rohani Ibrahim's doc-
toral studies in entomology, University of Florida (Ph. D. degree
awarded Ms. Ibrahim June 1980).
(11) Principal Investigator, Fleming Key Project, Cooperative agree-
ment between the Florida Department of Agriculture and Con-
sumer Services and the United States Department of
Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service,
Veterinary Services, 1979-80.
(12) Member, three-man external review committee which reviewed
the facilities, staff, and program of the Section of Faunistics and
Insect Identification, Illinois Natural History Survey.
R. E. WOODRUFF, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Entomology and
Nematology, University of Florida.
(2) Adjunct Associate Curator, Department of Natural Science,
Florida State Museum.
(3) Courtesy Associate Professor, Area of Entomology and Struc-
tural Pest Control, Florida A & M University, Tallahassee.
(4) Board of Directors, North American Beetle Fauna Project,
Biological Research Institute of America.
(5) Member, Florida Committee on Rare and Endangered Plants
and Animals in Florida.
(6) President, The Coleopterist Society (International), 1978.
(7) Committee member, "Americas," Florida Entomological Society,
1979, 1980.
(8) Committee member, "Rules of Order," Florida Entomological
Society, 1979, 1980.
(9) Committee chairman, "Nominating Committee," Coleopterists
Society, 1979.
(10) Committee member, "Plant Pest Action Committee," Division of
Plant Industry, 1979.
(11) Committee member, "Common Names of Insects," En-
tomological Society of America, 1980.
(12) Committee member, "Data and Word Processing Committee,"
Division of Plant Industry.
Trips and Meetings
August 6-13, 1978: V International Congress of Acarology, East Lansing,
Michigan (H. A. Denmark).






Division of Plant Industry


August 21-23, 1978: Southern Forest Insect Work Conference, Blacksburg,
Virginia (A. B. Hamon).
September 5, 1978: Young Tree Decline Investigation, Orlando (H. A. Den-
mark and F. W. Mead).
September 5-8, 1978: Florida Entomological Society Annual Meeting, St.
Augustine (H. A. Denmark, F. W. Mead, L. A. Stange, and H. V.
Weems, Jr.). H. A. Denmark returned to Gainesville September 7 for
Senate Hearing Committee meeting for Bureau activities and returned
to St. Augustine for the Florida Entomological Society banquet.
October 12-15, 1978: Picked up donation to the FSCA from Mr. William
Rosenberg, Hazelwood, N. C. while on annual leave (H. V. Weems, Jr.).
November 7-10, 1978: Florida State Horticultural Society Annual Meeting,
Miami Beach (H. A. Denmark and H. V. Weems, Jr.)
November 18, 1978: Southern Lepidopterists' Charter Meeting, Gaines-
ville (F. W. Mead).
November 26-30, 1978: Entomological Society of America Annual Meet-
ing, Houston, Texas (H. A. Denmark, F. W. Mead, and R. E. Wood-
ruff).
December 11-12, 1978: Tropical and Subtropical Plant Germplasm Semi-
nar, Homestead (H. A. Denmark).
January 30-31, 1979: Citrus Blackfly and Witchweed Meetings, Winter
Haven (H. A. Denmark).
February 18-19, 1979: Citrus Blackfly and Witchweed Meetings, Lakeland
and Winter Haven (H. A. Denmark).
February 22-24, 1979: Tall Timbers Ecology and Management Conference
and Florida A & M University Field Day, Tallahassee and Thomas-
ville, Georgia (H. A. Denmark and H. V. Weems, Jr.).
February 28-March 1, 1979: Citrus Blackfly Meeting, Orlando (H. A. Den-
mark).
April 29-May 4, 1979: Annual Meeting of Association of Systematics Col-
lections, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts (H. V. Weems,
Jr.).
May 14-15, 1979: Florida Entomological Society "Blue Ribbon" Committee
Meeting and Executive Committee Meeting, Tallahassee (F. W. Mead
and H. V. Weems, Jr.).
June 25-July 8, 1979: Picked up personal library and insect collection,
studied Hymenoptera and Neuroptera collections at the Los Angeles
County Museum, and conferred with area specialists, Los Angeles,
California. Also studied Neuroptera with Dr. Faulkner at the San Diego
Museum of Natural History and Chrysopidae with P. Adams at the
California State University, Fullerton, California (L. A. Stange).
June 25-July 23, 1979: Annual Meeting of the Lepidopterists' Society, Fair-
banks, Alaska, tundra field trip to Brooks Range, collecting in Wash-
ington at Mt. Rainer National Park and the Olympic Peninsular
(H. V. Weems, Jr.).






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


June 27-29, 1979: Symposium "Discovery Processes and Scientific Produc-
tivity" Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacks-
burg, Virginia (A. B. Hamon).
July 31-August 5, 1979: U. S. National Museum, College Park, Maryland,
to work with Steve Nakahara on thrips identifications (H. A. Denmark).
August 6-10, 1979: International Congress of Plant Protection Meeting,
Washington, D. C. (H. A. Denmark).
September 4-7, 1979: Florida Entomological Society Annual Meeting, Tal-
lahassee (H. A. Denmark, A. B. Hamon, F. W. Mead, L. A. Stange,
and H. V. Weems, Jr.)
September 24-26, 1979: Quarantine 13 Meeting, Long Beach, California
(H. A. Denmark).
October 2-4, 1979: Quarantine 13 Meeting, New Orleans, Louisiana (H. A.
Denmark).
October 3-5, 1979: Picked up the science library of the late Dr. Herbert H.
Ross, Athens, Georgia (H. V. Weems, Jr.).
October 9, 1979: Checked security of Biological Control Laboratory,
Apopka (H. A. Denmark).
October 23-31, 1979: Quarantine 13 Hearing, inspected packinghouses
and field plantings, visited University of Hawaii, Kona, Oahum, and
Honolulu, Hawaii (H. A. Denmark).
October 25, 1979: Florida A & M University Advisory Council Meeting,
Gainesville (A. B. Hamon).
November 6-8, 1979: Florida State Horticultural Society Annual Meeting,
Lake Buena Vista (H. A. Denmark and H. V. Weems, Jr.).
November 25-30, 1979: Entomological Society of America Annual Meet-
ing, Denver, Colorado (H. A. Denmark, F. W. Mead, and R. E. Wood-
ruff).
December 11-12, 1979: Inventory and evaluate Coleoptera and Arachnida:
Scorpionida collections of the late Erik Kjellesvig-Waering, Marco
Island (H. V. Weems, Jr. and R. E. Woodruff).
December 14, 1979-January 25, 1980: To South America, principally Ar-
gentina and Bolivia, to obtain Neuroptera collection; study parasites
of mole crickets in cooperation with University of Florida; study para-
sites of Florida caterpillars in cooperation with USDA; study Wey-
rauch snail collection at Miguel Lillo Museum (L. A. Stange).
December 27-30, 1979: Annual joint meeting of the American Society of
Zoologists, Society of Systematic Zoology, and American Microscopi-
cal Society, Tampa (H. V. Weems, Jr.).
January 25-26, 1980: University of South Florida, Tampa, to work with
Dr. Joe Simon on endangered species invertebrate volume for Florida;
Lake Wales to meet with Mr. Arch R. Updike, Jr. on planning a non-
profit, tax-exempt corporation to support the program of the FSCA
(H. V. Weems, Jr.).
February 20-22, 1980: Florida A & M University Field Day, Tallahassee
(H. A. Denmark and H. V. Weems, Jr.).






54 Division of Plant Industry

February 25-26, 1980: Annual IFAS Pesticide Workshop, University of
Florida, Gainesville (F. W. Mead).
March 21, 1980: Florida A & M Advisory Council Meeting, Jacksonville
(H. A. Denmark).
March 23-25, 1980: Florida Academy of Sciences 44th Annual Meeting,
Tampa (H. V. Weems, Jr.).
April 17-19, 1980: Illinois Natural History Survey, to serve as a member
of a 3-man team which reviewed the facilities, staff, and program of the
Section of Faunistics and Insect Identification, Urbana, Illinois. Trip
made at expense of Illinois Natural History Survey (H. V. Weems, Jr.).
May 28-June 1, 1980: Association of Systematics Collections Annual Meet-
ing, Toronto, Canada (H. V. Weems, Jr.).
June 19-23, 1980: The Lepidopterists' Society Annual Meeting, Gaines-
ville (L. A. Stange and H. V. Weems, Jr.).

Special Surveys
June 25-July 15, 1978: Arthropod collecting trip to Antigua, Trinidad
(Simla Research Station), and Washington (Olympic Peninsula and
Mt. Rainier National Park) while on annual leave (H. V. Weems, Jr.).
July 1-8, 1978: Insect and snail study trip to southern Florida (Big Pine
Key, Clearwater, Winter Haven, Tavares, Sebring) (L. A. Stange).
August 16-18, 1978: Trip to Key West to visit site of Harry S. Truman
Animal Import Center (H. V. Weems, Jr.).
August 26-September 16, 1978: Avocado insect survey in cooperation with
USDA, Mexico: Sinaloa, Sonora and Baja Sur (R. E. Woodruff).
August 30-September 4, 1978: Insect and snail study trip to Torreya State
Park and Blackwater River Forest. Dune ecology study at St. Andrews
State Park (L. A. Stange).
September 25-28, 1978: Collecting trip to Torreya State Park and meeting
in Tallahassee of Endangered Species Advisory Committee (H. V.
Weems, Jr.).
September 29, 1978: Insect and snail study trip to Ocala National Forest
(L. A. Stange).
October 20-28, 1978: Insect and snail survey, coastal sand dune insect ecol-
ogy studies at Blackwater River Forest (L. A. Stange).
October 31-November 4, 1978: Insect and snail survey at Blackwater River
Forest (L. A. Stange and H. V. Weems, Jr.).
November 30-December 23, 1978: Cooperative dung beetle project with
USDA, Argentina and Brazil (R. E. Woodruff).
January 13-February 18, 1978: Cooperative dung beetle project with
USDA, Argentina and Brazil (R. E. Woodruff).
January 15, 1979: Review of Citrus Blackfly Eradication Program, Lake-
land (A. B. Hamon).
January 16, 1979: Field inspections for scale insects with H. C. Levan,
Cocoa (A. B. Hamon).






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


March 16-21, 1979: Insect and snail survey of Florida Panhandle, especially
Blackwater River Forest and sand dunes (L. A. Stange).
March 22-May 10, 1979: Investigate thrips on leatherleaf fern, Crescent
City (One trip each week) (H. A. Denmark).
April 9-11, 1979: Insect trapping and special field survey with DPI person-
nel, Clearwater (F. W. Mead).
April 23-24, 1979: Insect trapping and special survey with P. Pullara, Clear-
water and Dunedin (F. W. Mead).
May 3-10, 1979: Survey for new Cotinis (Scarabaeidae) and talk to Florida
avocado growers, Florida Keys (R. E. Woodruff).
May 10, 1979: Insect and snail collection trip, Old Town (L. A. Stange).
May 8-13, 1979: Fleming Key, Archbold Biological Station, and Fuch's
Hammock (near Homestead) and University of Florida Agricultural
Research and Education Center, Homestead (H. V. Weems, Jr.).
May 23, 1979: Insect and snail collection trip, Old Town (L. A. Stange).
July 13, 1979: Inspect witchweed plots, Bartow (F. W. Mead).
August 8-13, 1979: Insect and snail survey, Pensacola (L. A. Stange).
August 15, 1979: Inspect insect rearing facility at USDA Lab working on
sugarcane rootstalk borer weevil, Apopka, and Florida Entomological
Society "Blue Ribbon" Committee meeting, Orlando (H. V. Weems, Jr.).
September 20-22, 1979: Report on South American dung beetle project,
College Station, Texas (R. E. Woodruff).
October 15-19, 1979: Survey for new Cotinis (Scarabaeidae), Florida Keys
(R. E. Woodruff).
October 23-26, 1979: Collected snails and insects at Archbold Biological
Station; discussed milk snail situation with Region II personnel, St.
Petersburg-Clearwater area (L. A. Stange).
October 30-November 4, 1979: DPI workshops in Sebring, Archbold Bio-
logical Station, West Palm Beach and Kendall; Fuch's Hammock, Key
West and Fleming Key (where we are conducting a 1-year arthropod
survey), and visited with Dr. Herbert S. Zim, Plantation Key, to discuss
plans for a non-profit, tax-exempt private corporation which will sup-
port the program of the Florida State Collection of Arthropods (H. V.
Weems, Jr.).
December 4-7, 1979: Scarab parasite survey on Islamorada, survey and
collect in Keys (L. A. Stange).
December 26, 1979-March 30, 1980: Dung beetle project with USDA, Ar-
gentina (R. E. Woodruff).
March 4-12, 1980: Insect and snail survey and collection at Torreya State
Park, Blackwater River Forest, St. Andrews State Park, Seahorse Key,
and Archbold Biological Station (L. A. Stange).
April 1-6, 1980: Collect and survey at Archbold Biological Station, visit
Citrus Blackfly Lab in Ft. Lauderdale, confer with area personnel in
Homestead (L. A. Stange).
May 27-June 3, 1980: Survey for new Cotonis (Scarabaeidae), Florida Keys
(R. E. Woodruff).






Division of Plant Industry


May 28, 1980: Review of trapping program, Winter Haven (H. A. Den-
mark).
June 7-9, 1980: Collect and survey snails and insects, Crestview (L. A.
Stange).
June 10-13, 1980: Collect and survey snails and insects, Panama City (L. A.
Stange).
June 23-July 19, 1980: Ecuador field trip, following the annual meeting
of the Lepidopterists' Society in Gainesville (H. V. Weems, Jr.).



Training Personnel

August 1-3, 1978: Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Serv-
ices Annual Business Conference, Orlando (H. A. Denmark, A. B.
Hamon, F. W. Mead, L. A. Stange, H. V. Weems, Jr.).
August 25-September 7, 1978: Study whiteflies and scale insects in USNM
collection, Beltsville, Maryland (A. B. Hamon).
October 24-25, 1978: Contract Administrative Training meeting, Tallahas-
see (H. A. Denmark, A. B. Hamon, R. E. Woodruff).
January 5-11, 1979: Trip to southern Florida to discuss insect and snail
problems with region personnel (L. A. Stange).
July 25-27, 1979: Field training for Training Class No. 37, Winter Haven
(A. B. Hamon).
August 28-31, 1979: Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer
Services Annual Business Conference, Tallahassee (H. A. Denmark,
A. B. Hamon, F. W. Mead, R. E. Woodruff, H. V. Weems, Jr.).
October 21-22, 1979: Gold Coast Area Foliage and Woody Ornamental
Short Course, Ft. Lauderdale (H. A. Denmark and A. B. Hamon).
November 7-8, 1979: Contract Administrative Training meeting, Tallahas-
see (A. B. Hamon and L. A. Stange).
December 12-14, 1979: Field training of Training Class No. 39, Winter
Haven (A. B. Hamon).
January 17, 1980: Field trip concerning scale insect problems with C. Webb
and H. Collins, Macclenny and Yulee (A. B. Hamon).
February 6-7, 1980: Contract Administrative Training meeting, Orlando
(H. A. Denmark, F. W. Mead, H. V. Weems, Jr.).
February 6-8, 1980: Field training of Training Class No. 40, Winter Haven
(A. B. Hamon).
April 2-4, 1980: Region II Workshop, Winter Haven (H. A. Denmark, A. B.
Hamon).
June 4-6, 1980: Management Training, Gainesville (H. A. Denmark, A. B.
Hamon, L. A. Stange, H. V. Weems, Jr., and R. E. Woodruff).
June 24-27, 1980: Field collection trip with E. Collins, E. W. Campbell and
Frank Smith, Ft. Pierce and Cocoa (A. B. Hamon).






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


Talks


H. A. DENMARK, Chief of Entomology
December 11, 1978: "Insects associated with introduction of plant germ-
plasm and quarantine significance," Tropical and Subtropical Plant
Germplasm Seminar, Homestead.
January 10, 1979: "Regulatory entomology," Dr. Carol Musgrove's class,
University of Florida, Gainesville.
October 21, 1979: "Mites of woody ornamentals and foliage plants," Gold
Coast Foliage and Woody Ornamentals Short Course, Ft. Lauderdale.
November 7, 1979: "Mites of woody ornamentals," Florida State Horticul-
tural Society Annual Meeting, Lake Buena Vista.

A. B. HAMON, Taxonomic Entomologist
August 23, 1978: "Highlights of scale insects and whitefly problems of
Florida forest and park trees," Southern Forest Insect Work Confer-
ence, Blacksburg, Virginia.
November 8, 1978: Lecture for Tropical Entomology Class, University of
Florida, Gainesville (2 hours).
November 15, 1978: Lecture for Tropical Entomology Class, University
of Florida, Gainesville (2 hours).
October 23, 1979: "Scale insects," Gold Coast Foliage and Woody Orna-
mentals Short Course, Ft. Lauderdale.
October 25, 1979: Lecture to Ornamental Entomology Class, University
of Florida, Gainesville.

F. W. MEAD, Taxonomic Entomologist
January 10, 1979: Lecture to Principles of Insect Control Class, University
of Florida, Gainesville (1 hour).

L. A. STANGE, Taxonomic Entomologist
August 3, 1978: "Snails and Slugs," Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services Annual Business Conference, Orlando.
February 27, 1980: "Practical Taxonomy," Thomas Walker's Class, Univer-
sity of Florida, Gainesville.

H. V. WEEMS, JR., Taxonomic Entomologist
December 12, 1978: Talk given to Dr. Walter Tschinkel and 2 of his stu-
dents from Florida State University, a discussion of the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods, Research Associate Program, and Division
library.
January 18, 1979: Talk on the Florida State Collection of Arthropods and






Division of Plant Industry


Research Associate Program to Dr. Jonathan Reiskind's class of 8
students from the Department of Zoology, University of Florida.
January 19, 1979: Talk on the taxonomic research and arthropod identifi-
cation services of the Florida State Collection of Arthropods to Dr. &
Mrs. Harry G. Davis and 7 undergraduate students from Franklin
Pierce College, Rindge, New Hampshire.
August 1, 1979: Lecture to Dr. Louis Kuitert's class of 19 students: A radio-
isotopes shortcourse sponsored by the International Atomic Energy
Agency in Vienna, Austria. Topic of the lecture was the activities and
services by the Bureau of Entomology of the DPI, the Research As-
sociate program, and the Florida State Collection of Arthropods.
September 21, 1979: Talk given to Ms. Lauri M. Schiffbauer and 9 children
from the Gainesville YMCA, a discussion of arthropod identification
and the work of our entomological bureau, nature and purposes of the
Florida State Collection of Arthropods.
October 31, 1979: Illustrated talk on foreign fruit flies at Region III, Areas
1 & 2, DPI Workshop, at West Palm Beach, Florida.
November 1, 1979: Illustrated talk on foreign fruit flies to Region III,
Areas 3 & 4, DPI Workshop, Kendall, Florida.
January 22, 1980: Talk given to Ms. Lisa Wilson's class of 18 gifted chil-
dren ages 9-12 from the Williston public schools, a general discussion
of the work of our entomological bureau, nature and purposes of the
Florida State Collection of Arthropods.

R. E. WOODRUFF, Taxonomic Entomologist
October 12, 1978: "The Florida State Collection of Arthropods," Systematic
Entomology class, University of Florida, Gainesville.
November 9, 1978: "Fossil insects in the Dominican Republic amber,"
Newell Entomological Society, University of Florida, Gainesville.
April 10, 1979: "The Florida State Collection of Arthropods," Systematic
Entomology class, University of Florida, Gainesville.
May 4, 1979: "The Mexican avocado insect survey of 1978," to Florida Avo-
cado Growers Association, Homestead.
May 24, 1979: "The Florida State Collection of Arthropods," to Horticul-
ture class visiting from Lake City Community College.
July 10, 1979: "The Florida State Collection of Arthropods," Entomology
class, University of Florida, Gainesville.
September 21, 1979: "Exploratory work on South American dung-burying
beetles," Texas A & M and USDA Veterinary Toxicology Entomology
Research Laboratory, College Station, Texas.
October 3, 1979: "The Florida State Collection of Arthropods," Entomology
class, University of Florida, Gainesville.
April 18, 1980: "The Florida State Collection of Arthropods," Entomology
class, University of Florida, Gainesville.






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


Publications

Denmark, H. A. 1978. The brown citrus aphid, Toxoptera citricida (Kirk-
aldy) (Homoptera: Aphididae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services,
Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 194:1-2, 2 fig.
1978. Quarantine and Biological Control Laboratory. USDA
Tech. Bull. 1576:47-49, 2 figs.
1979. The grape phylloxera, Daktulosphaira vitifoliae (Fitch)
(Homoptera: Phylloxeridae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services,
Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 200:1-4, 6 fig.
Sand H. H. Keifer. 1979. A mite, Eriophyes aloinis (Keifer) (Aca-
rina: Eriophyidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services, Div. Plant
Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 206:1-2, 7 fig.
1979. Some eriophyid mites of shade trees and woody ornamen-
tals (Acarina: Eriophyidae). Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 92:232-234.
.1980. Giant bark aphid, Longistigma caryae (Harris) (Homoptera:
Aphididae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services, Div. Plant Ind.,
Ent. Circ. No. 212:1-2, 3 fig.
Hamon, A. B. 1978. Opuntiaspis carinata (Cockerell) (Homoptera: Coccoi-
dea: Diaspididae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services, Div. Plant
Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 196:1-2.
1979. Angraecum scale, Conchaspis angraeci Cockerell (Homop-
tera: Coccoidae: Conchaspididae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv-
ices, Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 202:1-2.
.1979. Latania scale, Hemiberlesia lataniae (Signoret) (Homoptera:
Coccoidae: Diaspididae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services, Div.
Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 208:1-2; illus.
and M. Kosztarab. 1979. Morphology and systematics of the first
instars of the genus Cerococcus (Homoptera: Coccoidae: Cerococcidae).
Va. Polytech Inst. and State Res. Div. Bull. 146:1-22; illus.
.1980. Opuntiaspis philoccus (Cockerell) (Homoptera: Coccoidae:
Diaspididae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services, Div. Plant Ind.,
Ent. Circ. No. 214:1-2; illus.
Mead, F. W., and D. B. Richman (senior author). 1978. Stages in the life
cycle of a predatory stink bug, Alcaeorrhynchus grandis (Dallas)
(Hemiptera: Pentatomidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services,
Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 192:1-2, 8 fig.
1979. Key to the genera of Cixiidae in Florida (Homoptera:
Fulgoroidea). Fla. Dept. of Agric. & Consumer Services, Div. Plant
Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 198:1-2, illus.
__ P. B. Martin, and C. Sheppard (senior author). 1979. A plant-
hopper (Homoptera: Cixiidae) associated with red imported fire ant
(Hymenoptera: Formicidae) mounds. J. Georgia Ent. Soc. 14(2):140-
144, 1 fig.
and R. A. Hamlen (senior author). 1979. Fungus gnat larval con-
trol in greenhouse plant production. J. Econ. Ent. 72(2):269-271.






Division of Plant Industry


__ and D. B. Richman (senior author). 1980. Stages in the life cycle
of a predatory stink bug, Stiretrus anchorage (Fabricius) (Hemiptera:
Pentatomidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services, Div. Plant
Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 210:1-2, 8 fig.
and F. W. Howard (senior author). 1980. A survey of Auchenor-
rhyncha (Insecta: Homoptera) associated with palms in southern Flor-
ida. Trop. Agric. (Trinidad) 57(2):145-153, 4 fig.
Stange, L. A. 1979. The slugs of Florida (Gastropoda: Pulmonata). Fla.
Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services, Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 197:
1-4, 10 fig.
1979. Los Zethus del desierto costal de Peru. Acta Zoologico Lil-
loana 33:71-78.
1979. The milk snail in Florida (Gastropoda: Helicidae). Fla. Dept.
Agric. & Consumer Services, Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 209:1-2, 2
fig.
and J. C. Ball. 1979. Report of Arrhenophagus chionaspidis on
Pseudaulacaspis pentagon in Florida. Florida Entomol. 62(4):414.
1980. The ant-lions of Florida. I. Genera (Neuroptera: Myrme-
leontidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services, Div. Plant Ind., Ent.
Circ. 215:1-4, 21 fig.
Weems, H. V., Jr., and G. B. Edwards. 1978. The golden silk spider,
Nephila clavipes (Linnaeus) (Araneae: Araneidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. &
Consumer Services, Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 193:1-4, 3 fig.
1980. Crab louse, Pthirus pubis (Anoplura: Pediculidae), its de-
tection and control. Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services, Div. Plant
Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 211:1-4, 4 fig.
1980. Obituary: John T. Creighton (1905-1979). Fla. Ent. 63(1):
196-198, 1 fig.
1980. Obituary: John T. Creighton (1905-1979). J. Econ. Ent.
73(2):350, 1 fig.
Woodruff, R. E. 1978. Foreign chafers I. Melolontha melolontha (L.) (Cole-
optera: Scarabaeidae). Florida Dept. Agr. & Consumer Services, Div.
Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 189:1-2, 3 fig.
__ E. J. Gerberg, and T. J. Spilman. 1978. A false powder-post beetle
new to the United States (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae). Florida Dept. Agr.
& Consumer Services, Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 195:1-2, 2 fig.
1978. The 1978 Coleopterists Society meeting. Coleopterists
Bull. 32(3):256.
__ J. B. Beavers (senior author), S. A. Lovestrand, and W. J. Schroe-
der. 1979. Bibliography of the sugarcane rootstalk borer weevil, Dia-
prepes abbreviatus. Bull. Ent. Soc. Amer. 25(1):25-29.
__ and G. T. Fincher. 1979. Dung beetles of Cumberland Island,
Georgia (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). Coleopterists Bull. 33(1):69-70.
__ W. J. Kloft (senior author), and E. S. Kloft. 1979. Formica in-
tegra (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) IV. Exchange of food and trichome
secretions between worker ants and the inquiline beetle, Cremasto-






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


cheilus castaneus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) Tidschrift voor Ent.
122(3):47-57; 20 fig.
__ and R. C. Bullock. 1979. Fuller's rose weevil, Pantomorus cer-
vinus (Boheman), in Florida (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Florida Dept.
Agr. & Consumer Services, Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 207:1-4, 3 fig.
1979. Florida citrus weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Florida
Dept. Agr. & Consumer Services, Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. No. 202:
1-4, 20 fig.
.1980. U.S. Ceratocanthus. Scarabaeus. 2:6-7.
W. G. Genung (senior author), and E. E. Grissell. 1980. Languria
erythrocephalus: host plants, immature stages, parasites and habits
(Coleoptera: Languriidae). Fla. Ent. 63(2):206-210, 6 fig.


Florida State Collection of Arthropods
H. V. Weems, Jr., Taxonomic Entomologist and Curator
The Florida State Collection of Arthropods (FSCA) is supported and
developed through the cooperative efforts of the University of Florida,
Florida A & M University, and the Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services. Parts of the collection are housed in offices of Univer-
sity of Florida professors in the Department of Entomology and
Nematology and the Department of Zoology, who are specialists on
Odonata, Orthoptera, Lepidoptera, and Coleoptera. Collections at Florida A
& M University, in Tallahassee, including one of the world's largest and
finest collections of Ephemeroptera (currently privately owned), consist
primarily of various groups of aquatic insects. These collections comple-
ment the collections in Gainesville where special emphasis is placed on arth-
ropods related to control of agricultural and urban pests. The major part of
the state collections is housed in the Doyle Conner Building, headquarters
of the Division of Plant Industry.
Funds have been provided by the Florida Legislature for a 1.3 million
dollar addition to the Doyle Conner Building. Construction is to begin in
the fall of 1980. The expansion of the physical plant will include a major
expansion of the arthropod museum which is expected to include 12,500 in-
sect cabinet drawers, storage facilities for 2 million slide mounts, con-
siderable expansion of the alcohol-preserved collections, offices for 2 addi-
tional entomologists and 2 additional entomology secretaries, additional
facilities for laboratory technicians and technologists, and much needed
work space for visiting entomologists.
At the beginning of the 1978-1980 biennium, the FSCA already had ac-
cumulated a strong arachnid collection consisting of approximately 31,000
vials, representing the combined efforts of staff personnel and the donation
of the private collections of Dr. H. K. Wallace and Dr. Martin H. Muma
(Florida Collection). The spider family Lycosidae accounted for about 1/4 of
this total. During the last 2 years, 4 substantial collections of arachnids






Division of Plant Industry


have been acquired by the FSCA. Dr. Karl J. Stone donated over 3,400 vials
representing many families, which included a number of identified species
from Alaska. Dr. David B. Richman and G. B. Edwards gave about 2,400
vials apiece: the spider family Salticidae was heavily represented in both of
these donations. Dr. Martin H. Muma's collection of Maryland spiders, con-
sisting of over 1,300 vials, was donated by the University of Maryland.
With the incorporation of these recent additions, FSCA holdings are
especially strong in the Lycosidae and Salticidae, with approximately 8,000
vials each. Total arachnid holdings of the FSCA now number over 40,000
vials, ranking the FSCA at least fifth in the U. S. Continuing support from
Research Associates and extensive use of arachnologists throughout the
country emphasize the increasing importance of this collection. Mr. Glavis
B. Edwards, DPI Laboratory Technologist, had been assigned the primary
curatorial responsibility for the FSCA arachnid collection.
The Florida State Collection of Arthropods provides a ready reference
for the prompt and accurate identification of insect pests and other arth-
ropods, for entomological research, and for educational purposes. It is an
essential tool in the investigation of all insects dangerous or injurious to
agricultural or horticultural plants and crops, livestock, nursery plants,
forests, stored foods, human habitation, and man himself.
The primary area of interest, with special emphasis on Florida, covers
the southeastern United States, the Bahama Islands, the Greater and
Lesser Antilles, and other land areas approximate to the Gulf of Mexico
and the Caribbean Sea. However, in some groups the scope of the collec-
tions may cover much of the New World or the entire world, depending
upon the research interests of staff entomologists and Student and
Research Associates. A special interest is maintained in the arthropod
fauna of the New World tropics and subtropics because of its affinity with
the agricultural problems of Florida. This special interest is extended also
to the temperate subtropical, and tropical areas of other parts of the world
where, arthropod pests occur which are not known to occur in Florida but
which might cause serious problems if accidentally introduced. A reference
collection of pest species, world-wide in scope, is being developed, along
with corresponding library and files.
The continuing development of the reference and research collections in-
volves an effort to obtain and preserve the immature stages of as many
species as possible, with corresponding photographic files for some groups.
As a part of the philosophy behind the development of the FSCA, an effort
is being made to obtain representatives first of as many families of arth-
ropods as possible on a world-wide basis. Following this, an attempt is
made to obtain representatives of as many genera as possible, and in some
groups the goal is completeness at the specific level. Such collections are
essential to a competent arthropod identification service and form the basis
for taxonomic studies. Development of research series of the various
species is vital to an understanding of the range of variation within a
species due to geographical distribution, seasonal distribution, food,






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


genetics, sex, and other factors. Development of a good collection requires
many years and the efforts of many dedicated scientists, field personnel,
and students. Staff members and associates of the FDACS Bureau of En-
tomology are committed to this task.
The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, during
the past biennium, continued to maintain on behalf of the Florida State Col-
lection of Arthropods membership in the Association of Systematics Collec-
tions. The Curator represented the FSCA at the 1979 annual meeting of the
Society held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and the 1980 annual meeting
held in Toronto, Canada.
A cooperative agreement during 1979-80 between the Florida Depart-
ment of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service,
Veterinary Services, was carried out with Dr. Howard V. Weems, Jr. the
principal investigator. Primary purpose of the project was to conduct a
survey of arthropods of veterinary importance in the vicinity of the Harry
S. Truman Animal Import Center (AIC) located on Fleming Key, a small
key adjacent to Key West, Florida. Studies were conducted to determine
what potential arthropod vectors of animal disease agents exist in the
vicinity of AIC and to determine if specific precautions not already incor-
porated into the design of the AIC might be necessary to eliminate the
potential of pathogen transmissions from animals held in quarantine. As a
secondary objective, a survey was made of all terrestrial, littoral, and
brackish water arthropods which occur on Fleming Key. In the course of
this study, ultraviolet and insect flight traps were operated continuously
for 1 year, and additional collections were made with aerial and sweep nets
and by careful search of leaf litter, trash, and top soil. More than 30,000 in-
sects were pinned and labeled by laboratory assistant, Mrs. Nell G. Backus,
and approximately 90 quarts of alcohol-preserved arthropods were sorted
to various groups by Mr. Cyrus J. Nicholson, FDACS Division of Animal
Industry entomologist. All specimens were deposited in the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods. During this period the principal investigator,
Mrs. Backus, and DPI laboratory technologist, Mrs. Helen Harben, proc-
essed for the FSCA an additional 45,000 insects collected in an insect flight
trap operated at Fuch's Hammock, near Homestead, Florida, by Research
Associate Terhune S. Dickel, 2 flight traps operated continuously for more
than 2 years at Archbold Biological Station, near Lake Placid, Florida, and
flight traps operated at several locations in Alachua, Marion, Levy, and
Columbia counties, in Florida, and in Nova Scotia, Canada, by Research
Associate Dr. G. B. Fairchild.
Special acknowledgment is due Mrs. Debra Weems Grant for processing
the Lepidoptera collected by Howard and Camilla Weems in Trinidad and
Mr. Terhune S. Dickel for processing Lepidoptera collected by Howard and
Camilla Weems in Alaska and the State of Washington. Mrs. Grant and Mr.
Dickel are Research Associates of the FSCA. Research Associate Charles
P. Kimball processed and identified a considerable number of Lepidoptera
collected in flight traps in several parts of Florida.






Division of Plant Industry


Major Contributions to the
Florida State Collection of Arthropods

*Mr. H. David Baggett (8442 Thor Street, Jacksonville, Florida 32216)
14 vials of alcohol-preserved, labeled insect larvae consisting of 1 vial
of Hymenoptera: Diprionidae representing 1 species of sawfly and 13
vials of Lepidoptera representing 12 species, all collected in Florida and
identified by the donor; collection data for each sample include host
plant data; 2 dry-preserved, identified Lepidoptera larvae, each with
numerous braconid wasp parasites reared from it; 1 large, pinned,
labeled Hymenoptera: Braconidae reared from the larva of a papilionid
butterfly; 40 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 1 Trichoptera, 6
Diptera, 1 Mecoptera, 1 Hymenoptera, 1 Neuroptera, 18 Coleoptera,
and 12 spread Lepidoptera (3 identified to species), plus 3 envelope-
stored Neuroptera, collected in Florida and Texas by the donor; 3 vials
containing 9 late-instar larvae and 12 pinned, labeled adults of an
unidentified weevil (which proved to be Scyphophorus acupunctatus
Gryll.) which he reported as causing heavy damage to several species of
yuccas and Agave along the northeastern Florida Coastal area from
Daytona Beach to above Fernandina Beach; 19 vials of alcohol-
preserved arthropods consisting of 1 spider (Latrodectus various
Walckenaer) & 18 vials of Lepidoptera immatures (1 eggs, 1 eggs & lar-
vae, 16 exceptionally well-preserved larvae) collected in Florida by the
donor; 12 vials of immature Lepidoptera were identified to species; 3
vials of identified immature Lepidoptera (2 larvae, 1 pupa) with host
data, collected in Florida by the donor; 4 vials of identified immature
Lepidoptera with host data, representing 4 species collected in Florida
by the donor; 3 vials of alcohol-preserved larvae, with host plant data,
representing 3 species, 1 reared from an egg, all collected in Florida by
the donor.

*Mr. Robert A. Belmont (902 S. E. 23 Street, Cape Coral, Florida 33904)
153 vials of labeled, alcohol-preserved insect larvae (103 samples iden-
tified to order and family, 50 samples unidentified), the family iden-
tified samples consisting of 1 Thysanura, 3 Ephemeroptera, 5 Odonata,
6 Orthoptera, 1 Embioptera, 1 Hemiptera, 3 Homoptera, 3 Neuroptera,
1 Trichoptera, 11 Hymenoptera, 22 Diptera, 25 Coleoptera, and 21
Lepidoptera (1 to many specimens per sample), all collected by the
donor in Alachua Co., Florida; 6 ultraviolet light trap samples of in-
sects collected in Florida by the donor; 1,287 parasitic Hymenoptera,
all reared from Lepidoptera: (965 unmounted, 203 pinned & unlabeled,
119 pinned & labeled; 155 identified to genus representing 17 genera &

*Research Associate or Student Associate of the Florida State Collection of Arthro-
pods.





THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


17 species, including 7 described species, 4 undescribed species, & 1
undescribed genus) collected in Florida by the donor. Almost all are
new to the FSCA.


*Dr. Franklin S. Blanton (4015 S. W. 21st St., Gainesville, Florida 32601)
973 slide-mounted Diptera consisting of 157 Ceratopogonidae:
Atrichopogon from Florida, 25 Ceratopogonidae: Forcipomyia from
Florida, 83 Simuliidae: Phlebotomus from El Salvador (44), Honduras
(36), and Panama (3), 198 miscellaneous Diptera (mostly Trypetidae)
(98 determined to 98 species) from Afghanistan (12), Mexico (1), United
States: Connecticut, Minnesota, Maine, Utah, California, New York,
Florida, Nevada, Montana (185), 410 Culicidae (410 determined to 80
species) from Korea (6), German (4), France (2), Panama (5), and the
United States (393): Arizona, Louisiana, Indiana, Mississippi, Florida,
and Texas, and 100 Aphididae (100 determined to 50 species) from
Florida and New York; 12 slide boxes; 25,422 slide-mounted, identified
Ceratopogonidae: Culicoides (15,220 determined to 10 species, in-
cluding 2 types) from Jamaica (1,750), Mexico (889), El Salvador
(3,317), Costa Rica (616), Honduras (2,056), Panama (10,663), Taiwan
(1,200), Bermuda (200), Brazil (200), Bahamas (17), and the United
States (5,514): Texas, Florida, Montana, Nevada, Ohio, Wyoming and
New York; 116 slide-mounted unidentified Ceratopogonidae from Pan-
ama (50), El Salvador (1), Costa Rica (2), and the United States (63):
Florida and New York; and 257 slide boxes; A library totaling 4,174
items consisting of 134 entomological books and monographs, 24 gen-
eral books, 64 manuscripts and theses, 57 annual reports, 288 volumes
(each consisting of 1 to several numbers of 17 arthropod journals (in-
cluding Annals of the Entomological Society of America, Bulletin of the
Entomological Society of America, The Florida Entomologist, En-
tomology Abstracts, Journal of Economic Entomology, Contributions
of the American Entomological Institute, Review of Applied En-
tomology Series A & B, Journal of Medical Entomology, Mosquito
News, American Scientist, Mosquito Systematics Newsletter, Turtox
News, Journal of Parasitology, Index of American Economic En-
tomology, Zoological Record, Insecta, and Quarterly Report of En-
tomological Research (U. S. D. A.), Insects of Military Importance),
2,273 arthropod reprints (Nematocerous Diptera (1,088), other Diptera
(404), Coleoptera (9), Hymenoptera (7), Orthoptera (7), Lepidoptera (5),
Hemiptera (4), Siphonaptera (4), Anoplura (6), Odonata (2), Acarina (70),
other Arachnida (4), & insect control (663), 11 miscellaneous large in-
dexes, 24 maps, 9 pamphlets, 440 photographs and drawings, 7 medical
entomology textbooks, 22 Nematocerous Diptera notebooks, 85
Nematocera notes, and 30 miscellaneous items; in addition, several
hundred uncounted items, e.g., personal correspondence, unused
laboratory worksheets, advertisements, etc.; 23 pint Mason jar light





Division of Plant Industry


trap samples of insects from Texas; 17,472 slide-mount, unidentified
Ceratopogonidae belonging to the genera Atrichopogon, Dasyhelea,
and Forcipomyia (14,154 exotic, 3,318 domestic) collected in Honduras
(6,697), Panama (1,849), El Salvador (4,614), Costa Rica (878), Mexico
(109), Belize (5), Colombia (2), and the United States (3,318): Florida
(3,317), Georgia (1), a large number of species are represented in this
collection, including many undescribed species; 175 slide boxes.


*Mr. Vernon A. Brou (Rt. 1, Box 74, Edgard, Louisiana 70049)
2,969 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 136 Coleoptera (1 deter-
mined) and 2,833 (2,689 spread, 144 unspread), identified Lepidoptera
representing 151 species, all collected in Louisiana by the donor; 8,158
pinned, insects (8,073 domestic, 85 exotic; 8,156 labeled, 2 unlabeled;
7,879 identified, 279 unidentified) consisting of 2 Odonata, 3 Or-
thoptera, 1 Psocoptera, 2 Homoptera, 3 Neuroptera, 149 Coleoptera, 5
Hymenoptera, 16 Diptera, & 7,907 Lepidoptera (7,718 identified
representing 21 exotic species & 265 domestic species, 189 uniden-
tified; 7,718 spread, 189 unspread) from Brazil (8), Ecuador (1), Peru (2),
Mexico (3), Spain (1), Austria (18), Bavaria (10), Central African
Republic (2), Kenya (5), Tanzania (8), Uganda (10), Sarawak (6),
Malaysia (2), Assam (2), Anderra (3), & the United States (8,073): Loui-
siana, Mississippi, Florida, Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, Ken-
tucky, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois, Michigan, & Iowa; the vast major-
ity of the specimens were collected in Louisiana by the donor and were
exceptionally neatly processed.

*Dr. Nell B. Causey (deceased) (Fayetteville, Arkansas)
4,786 vials and bottles of alcohol-preserved arthropods consisting of 1
Arachnida: Scorpionida (1 exotic specimen), 2 Arachnida: Araneida (2
domestic specimens), 3 Chilopoda (3 domestic specimens), 2 Insecta (10
exotic specimens), & 4,778 Diplopoda (2,543 unidentified domestic
specimens, 1,222 unidentified exotic specimens, 6,735 domestic
specimens identified to species, 1,428 domestic specimens identified to
genus, 2,639 exotic specimens identified to species, 1,392 exotic
specimens identified to genus, the total identified specimens represent-
ing 778 species, including approximately 700 species and 15 genera
new to the FSCA; alcohol-preserved Diplopoda including 160 holotypes
(10 exotic, 150 domestic species), 5 neotypes, 1,562 paratypes &
"types", including 13 allotypes representing 247 species, 422 topotypes
(224 domestic representing 33 species, 198 exotic representing 24
species) representing 57 species, 22 specimens representing 2
undescribed genera, 260 exotic specimens representing 28 undescribed
species, & 23 fossil Diplopoda consisting of 1 topotype, 7 specimens
representing 4 genera, and 15 undetermined specimens; all of the con-
tiguous 48 states of the United States are represented except Maine,





THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


Nevada, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, & South Dakota; the following
exotics are: Hawaii (29 specimens determined to 4 species, 30
specimens determined to 1 genus, 18 specimens undetermined), Canada
(20 specimens determined to 6 species, 24 specimens determined to 1
genus, 1 specimen undetermined), Puerto Rico (10 specimens deter-
mined to 1 species, 6 specimens undetermined), Haiti (15 specimens
determined to 1 species, 5 specimens undetermined), Cuba (65
specimens undetermined), Jamaica (5 specimens determined to 1
species), British West Indies (1 determined specimen, 60 undetermined
specimens), French West Indies (8 specimens determined to 1 species),
Mexico (2,424 specimens determined to 146 species, 1,214 specimens
determined to 45 genera, 522 undetermined specimens), Guatemala (23
specimens determined to 3 species, 5 specimens determined to 1 genus,
2 undetermined specimens), Honduras (7 specimens determined to 2
species, 1 specimen determined to genus, 72 undetermined specimens),
Costa Rica (23 specimens determined to 7 species, 106 specimens deter-
mined to 6 genera, 153 undetermined specimens), El Salvador (1
specimen determined to genus, 4 undetermined specimens), Trinidad
(10 specimens determined to 1 species), Colombia (4 specimens deter-
mined to 1 genus, 45 undetermined specimens), Ecuador (132 undeter-
mined specimens), Galapagos Islands (21 undetermined specimens),
Peru (3 specimens determined to 1 genus, 16 undetermined specimens),
Brasil (20 specimens determined to 1 species, 16 undetermined
specimens), Uruguay (2 undetermined specimens), Seychelles (10
undetermined specimens), Japan (62 specimens determined to 11
species), Borneo (6 undetermined specimens), Malaysia (60 undeter-
mined specimens), Thailand (5 undetermined specimens), New
Caledonia (4 specimens determined to 1 species), Russia (2 specimens
determined to 1 species), Gabon (1 undetermined specimen); 98 slide
mounts, including 4 holotypes, 16 paratypes, & 1 topotype, consisting
of 6 determined domestic Chilopoda slides, including 1 holotype,
representing 4 species, 71 Diplopoda slide mounts consisting of 59
determined slide mounts (52 domestic, 7 exotic) including 20 holotypes
& representing 35 species, 12 undetermined domestic slide mounts; 475
pinned domestic Diplopoda consisting of 172 determined specimens
representing 11 species, 303 undetermined specimens: the following
non-specimen material: 1 Diplopoda microfilm; 2 3x5 card files; 4 row
feet of miscellaneous notes, manuscripts, correspondence, etc.: 72 new
museum jars; 116 4-dram vial racks; 60 larger vial racks; 29 maps; 18
field notebooks.

*Dr. Mont A. Cazier (Dept. of Zoology, Arizona State University, Tempe,
Arizona 85281)
93 papered samples consisting of 14,526 insects (12,156 from
blacklight, 93 from house light. 219 hand-collected without ecological
data, 2,058 hand-collected with plant associations) collected in Arizona






Division of Plant Industry


by the donor; 46 pinned, labeled Apioceridae representing 27 species &
subspecies, including 5 paratypes & 24 paratopotypes, including
representatives of 25 species & subspecies new to the FSCA, collected
in Mexico (12) & the United States (34): California, Utah, Idaho,
Arizona, & Texas. 28 species and subspecies are new to the FSCA.
*Mr. Terhune S. Dickel (Box 385, Homestead, Florida 33030)
466 pinned, labeled, spread identified Lepidoptera (7 exotic, 459
domestic) representing 97 species collected by the donor in Canada:
British Columbia (1), Panama Canal Zone (6), and the United States
(459): Florida, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Texas, Arizona, New
Mexico, Colorado, & Alaska (3). Included are representatives of several
rarely collected species; 2,699 pinned, spread, labeled, identified
Lepidoptera representing 566 species collected in Panama (50) & the
United States (2,649): Florida (2,469) & Colorado (180) by the donor, in-
cluding several rarely collected species and a number of species new to
the FSCA. This collection is exceptionally well processed.
*Dr. Norville M. Downie (505 Lingle Terrace, Lafayette, Indiana 47901)
672 envelopes of "papered" & envelope stored identified Coleoptera con-
sisting of 2,833 specimens representing 761 species and subspecies col-
lected by the donor in Canada: British Columbia (4 envelopes, 36
specimens) and the United States (668 envelopes, 2,797 specimens):
New York, Florida, Texas, Montana, Idaho, Washington; 2,185 iden-
tified Coleoptera (14 exotic representing 4 species, 2,171 domestic)
stored in paper envelopes, representing 753 species, collected by the
donor in Canada: British Columbia and the United States: Indiana, Il-
linois, New York, Missouri, Idaho, Texas, and Florida.
*Mr. Byrd K. Dozier (U. S. Department of Agriculture, Box 43-L, San Ysi-
dro, California 92073)
607 pinned, labeled insects (3 determined, 604 undetermined): 575 Cole-
optera, 10 Homoptera, 6 Neuroptera, 5 Hymenoptera, and 11 Diptera
collected in Mexico: Baja California (132), Bahama Islands: New Prov-
idence Is. (4), and the United States (471): California, Arizona; 538
pinned, labeled insects consisting of 1 Hymenoptera, 1 Hemiptera, 5
Homoptera, 4 Diptera, & 527 Coleoptera collected in Mexico (223),
Guatemala (3), Costa Rica (1), Panama Canal Zone (1), Ecuador (6), Co-
lombia (2), Puerto Rico (5), Haiti (20), Bahama Islands: South Bimini
(4), India (1), & the United States (272): California, Nevada, Arizona,
Alabama, & Florida. All but 1 specimen (from India) of this excep-
tionally neatly prepared collection were collected by the donor.

*Dr. A. Michael Dykstra (Dykstra Clinic, Inc., P.O. Box 287, Route B, Can-
ton, Missouri 63435)
820 neatly pinned, spread, labeled, identified Lepidoptera representing
234 species collected in Missouri by the donor; 351 neatly pinned,





THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


spread, labeled, identified Lepidoptera representing 206 species col-
lected in Missouri by the donor. (exceptionally neatly prepared
material)

Mr. Glavis B. Edwards (409 N. E. 50th Terrace, Gainesville, Florida 32601)
551 pinned insects (519 labeled) consisting of 161 Coleoptera, 77
Diptera, 23 Orthoptera, 148 Hemiptera and Homoptera, 128
Hymenoptera, 3 Odonata, 3 Lepidoptera, 2 Mecoptera, 2 Dermaptera,
& 3 Neuroptera collected in Arkansas, Florida, Maryland, Oklahoma,
Virginia, & West Virginia by the donor; 2,380 vials of Arachnida (ap-
proximately 6,500 specimens, including representatives of 257 species),
including 1,724 vials of authoritatively identified arachnids (93 vials
exotic, 2,287 domestic), consisting of 1 Solpugida, 3 Phalangida, 4
Chelonethida, 2 Scorpionida, 1 Acarina, and 2,376 Araneida collected in
the United States (2,294): Florida, Maryland, Arizona, California,
Alabama, South Carolina, Georgia, Virginia, Tennessee, Louisiana,
Mississippi, Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Missouri, Iowa, Wyo-
ming, Montana, Minnesota, Kansas, New York, New Jersey, and New
Hampshire; Mexico (54), Panama (3); Puerto Rico (2); Jamaica (4);
Guadeloupe (3); Brazil (3); Paraguay (1), Chile (1), Haiti (1), Bahamas (1),
Canada (9); and Germany (11); 147 vials of Araneida have predation
records, approximately 50% of these with specific host records; 376
vials (5 species) of reared specimens, including series of each instar, in-
clude approximately 70 vials containing reared hybrids; donated
Araneida: Salticidae (1,746 vials, including identified representatives
of 186 species) increased the FSCA from 19 genera, 41 species (of which
only 1 genus, 3 species are not represented in this donation) to 44
genera, 189 species, an increase of 25 genera, 148 species; 39 species are
known to be undescribed; probably some exotic undetermined
specimens also are new; 17 paratypes described by the donor are in-
cluded; almost all eastern United States species of Salticidae are in-
cluded, including 8 new species from Florida. All known described
Florida species of Salticidae are now represented in the FSCA; several
of these are as yet unreported new state or county records; 21 vials of
miscellaneous insects (dry preserved) collected in Florida by the donor.

*Dr. Thomas C. Emmel (Dept. of Zoology, 421 Bartram Hall, West, Univer-
sity of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
3,125 pinned, spread, labeled, identified Lepidoptera representing 653
species collected by the donor in Ecuador, Trinidad, Tobago, Costa
Rica, British Honduras, Guatemala, Mexico, and East Africa; 3,685
pinned, spread, labeled, authoritatively identified exotic Lepidoptera
representing 805 species collected by the donor in Guatemala (250),
Mexico (2,002), Costa Rica (815), & Ecuador (618), including many
species new to the FSCA. This collection is exceptionally well proc-
essed.





Division of Plant Industry


*Dr. G. B. Fairchild (16 N. W. 22nd Drive, Gainesville, Florida 32603)
29 vials of alcohol-preserved insects, 8 large and 12 small insect flight
trap samples of miscellaneous insects, and 1,217 pinned, unlabeled in-
sects (1,119 Diptera, 19 Lepidoptera, 48 Hymenoptera, 10 Coleoptera,
6 Mecoptera, 4 Neuroptera, & 11 Trichoptera) collected in Nova Scotia,
Canada, by the donor; 114 pinned insects (98 labeled, 16 unlabeled; 5
domestic, 109 exotic; 88 determined, 26 undetermined) consisting of 1
Hymenoptera: Vespidae, 3 Neuroptera: Hemerobiidae, and 110 Diptera
(4 seldom collected Coenomyidae representing 1 species, 2 seldom col-
lected Cuterebridae, 2 rarely collected Pantophthalmidae, 55 paratypes
of Tabanus nondescriptus Fairchild, 29 specimens representing 8
species of the rarely collected family Pelecorhynchidae, and 18 other
Diptera collected in Peru (1), Chile (13), Brasil (3), Panama (55),
Dominican Republic (16), Costa Rica (1), Australia (20), and the United
States (5): North Carolina, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Illinois; 239
pinned Hemiptera: Reduviidae (10 domestic, 229 exotic; 201 labeled, 38
unlabeled; 234 determined, 5 undetermined), the determined specimens
representing 27 species (24 exotic, 3 domestic) of Triatoma and closely
related genera and including 5 paratypes of a Peruvian species, col-
lected in India (1), Brasil (35), Bolivia (1), Panama (135), Peru (10), El
Salvador (21), Jamaica (1), Mexico (9), Guatemala (10), Colombia (4),
Venezuela (1), Nicaragua (1), and the United States (10): Arizona,
Texas, and California; 1 sweep net sample of miscellaneous insects
from a Florida salt marsh; 67 pinned, unlabeled insects consisting of 3
Lepidoptera, 1 Neuroptera, 2 Orthoptera, 2 Coleoptera, 1
Hymenoptera, and 58 Diptera including 53 Tabanidae collected in
Florida by the donor; 7 insect flight trap samples and 26 pinned
unlabeled insects (20 Diptera, 4 Coleoptera, 1 Hymenoptera & 1
Lepidoptera) collected in Florida by the donor; 287 pinned, labeled,
identified Tabanidae representing 64 species collected in Costa Rica (1),
Panama (17), and the United States (269): Florida, Georgia, and Colo-
rado; 1,098 pinned insects (206 labeled, 892 unlabeled; 1,092 uniden-
tified, 6 Trichoptera identified representing 3 species) consisting of 3
Hemiptera, 2 Orthoptera, 1 Mecoptera, 93 Coleoptera, 43 Neuroptera,
72 Trichoptera, 55 Hymenoptera, 491 Diptera, & 348 Lepidoptera (41
spread, 307 unspread); 30 envelopes of insect flight trap collected
Lepidoptera; 1 box of dry mixed flight trap collections; 50 vials of
miscellaneous insects collected in a flight trap. All specimens were col-
lected in Canada: Nova Scotia by the donor; the following vials of
alcohol-preserved arthropods: 562 identified Arachnida: Acarina (ticks)
representing 8 genera & 47 species, 683 unidentified ticks, 9 identified
Diptera, 17 unidentified Diptera, & 45 unidentified miscellaneous in-
sects collected in Panama (1,279), Guatemala (8), Costa Rica (6), El
Salvador (2), Honduras (12), Nicaragua (5), Peru (3), & the Galapagos
Islands (1); 114 papered samples of miscellaneous insects (71 from
India, 22 from Surinam, 21 from Panama), including approximately





THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


200 identified specimens representing 3 species, including Diptera:
Tabanidae, Muscidae, & Ceratopogonidae; Lepidoptera: Mallophaga;
Anoplura; Hemiptera; & Acarina; 40 vials of undetermined ticks from
Panama, all with host data (in quart jar); 492 pill boxes of
miscellaneous insects from Panama (332), Honduras (157), Mexico (2),
Costa Rica (1) containing picked-over Tabanidae in poor condition: 106
pill boxes of miscellaneous insects from Panama (89), Colombia (7),
Honduras (8), Guatemala (1), & Mexico (1), all containing Tabanidae in
good condition except 5 boxes from Colombia which consist of insect
flight trap samples (a few other Diptera, Hymenoptera, Coleoptera are
intermixed with the tabanid samples) & there are 4 Orthoptera & 1
Hemiptera unpinned & unlabeled, from Panama: 148 pill boxes
(Material in poor condition from Panama (147) and Mexico (1), almost
all Tabanidae except 1 box Culicidae, 1 Tipulidae (Mexico), 1 Or-
thoptera, & 2 boxes Coleoptera: 114 dry-preserved samples (71 from
India, 22 from Surinam, 21 from Panama), including approximately 200
specimens identified to 3 species & 2 subspecies (Tabanidae), con-
sisting of: 16 papered samples of Acarina (India), 8 papered samples of
Hemiptera (bedbugs from India), 20 papered samples of Anoplura
(India) consisting of 2 species and 2 subspecies of human body lice,
head lice, & crab lice, 1 papered sample of Mallophaga (India), 1
papered sample of Lepidoptera: Sphingidae (Panama), and the follow-
ing Diptera: 1 papered sample of Ceretopogonidae (India) consisting of
1 species, Siphonella fumicola, approximately 100 specimens, 21
papered samples of Muscidae (India), & 20 pill box samples (Panama),
22 papered samples (Surinam), & 4 papered samples (India) of
Tabanidae; 137 pinned, unlabeled insects consisting of 7 Neuroptera &
130 Diptera, mostly Tabanidae, collected in Florida by the donor; 6
pinned insects (3 Diptera, 2 Hymenoptera, 1 Lepidoptera), including a
very rarely collected Syrphidae: Callicera, collected in Florida by the
donor; 3 insect flight trap samples (Tabanidae removed) & 147 pinned,
unlabeled Diptera from these samples collected in Florida by the donor;
213 pill boxes and 3 vials of arthropods consisting of 3 vials of Diptera
and the following pillboxes (each containing 1 or more specimens): 198
Diptera: Tabanidae, 3 Coleoptera, 1 Lepidoptera, 1 Scorpionida, 1
Acarina, and 9 light trap samples, all collected in Panama by the donor;
13 insect flight trap samples of insects collected in Texas by the donor.

*Dr. Clifford D. Ferris (College of Engineering, University of Wyoming,
P. O. Box 33510, University Station, Laramie, Wyoming 82070)
49 vials of alcohol-preserved arthropods, mixed samples of Diptera,
Hymenoptera, Hemiptera, Trichoptera, Ephemeroptera, Neuroptera,
Orthoptera, Arachnida, & Chilopoda, 1 to many per vial, collected in
Wyoming by the donor; 1,543 pinned, labeled insects (804 unspread
Lepidoptera, 181 Coleoptera, 169 Diptera, & 389 Hymenoptera) col-
lected in Wyoming, New Mexico, & Arizona by the donor; 1,181 pinned,






Division of Plant Industry


labeled insects (120 Diptera, 77 Hemiptera, 26 Odonata, 43
Neuroptera, & 915 unspread Lepidoptera collected in Wyoming, New
Mexico, & Arizona by the donor; 738 pinned, labeled insects (350
unspread Lepidoptera, 171 Coleoptera, 48 Diptera, 39 Orthoptera, 12
Homoptera, 5 Hemiptera, 97 Hymenoptera, 3 Isoptera, 8 Neuroptera, 2
Plecoptera, 2 Trichoptera, & 1 Odonata) collected in Wyoming, New
Mexico, & Arizona by the donor; 47 vials of miscellaneous arthropods,
predominantly Trichoptera, collected in Wyoming, New Mexico &
Arizona by the donor; 173 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 38
Diptera, 12 Hymenoptera, 5 Coleoptera, 6 Orthoptera, 1 Neuroptera, &
111 unspread Lepidoptera and 9 vials of arthropods consisting of 7
vials of Trichoptera and 2 vials of Araneae, collected by the donor in
Wyoming, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico; 1,078 pinned, labeled,
unspread Lepidoptera collected by the donor in Wyoming, New Mex-
ico, and Arizona; 1,803 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 52
Neuroptera, 958 unspread Lepidoptera, 221 Diptera, 249 Coleoptera,
20 Orthoptera, 1 Isoptera, 1 Plecoptera, 199 Hymenoptera, 35
Hemiptera, 58 Homoptera, and 9 Odonata collected by the donor in
Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona; 61 vials of alcohol-
preserved arthropods consisting of the following (vials of specimens): 1
Orthoptera, 1 Hymenoptera, 3 Hemiptera, 2 Coleoptera, 2 Diptera, 2
Plecoptera, 8 Ephemeroptera, 26 Trichoptera, 7 miscellaneous (mixed
Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, Neuroptera), 3 Solpugida, 6 Araneida, 6
vials of Trichoptera collected in Wyoming by the donor; 152 pinned,
labeled insects consisting of 2 Diptera, 24 Hymenoptera:
Ichneumonidae, & 126 unspread Lepidoptera collected in Wyoming by
the donor; 638 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 5 Odonata (2
spread), 2 Hemiptera, 11 Homoptera, 2 Neuroptera, 28 Orthoptera, and
638 Lepidoptera collected in Wyoming and Florida by the donor.


*Dr. Hermann A. Flaschka (Chemistry Department, Georgia Institute of
Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332)
233 pinned, labeled, identified insects (171 exotic, 62 domestic) con-
sisting of 124 spread Lepidoptera from the Philippine Islands (114),
Bohemia (4), France (1), Hungary (1), Austria (2), and the United States
(2): Georgia and 109 Coleoptera from Hungary (1), Italy (47), France (1),
and the United States (60): Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Missouri,
Mississippi, Georgia, Florida, Michigan, Maine, and Pennsylvania; 365
pinned, labeled insects, all exotic, consisting of 104 identified Cole-
optera representing 42 species from Italy (42), Hungary (56), and Ger-
many (6) and 261 neatly spread Lepidoptera (235 identified represent-
ing 61 species, 26 unidentified) from Germany (3), Austria (4), Italy
(26), Australia (5), Japan (1), and the Philippine Islands (27); 186
pinned, labeled, insects (119 exotic, 67 domestic; 133 Odonata &
Lepidoptera identified representing 46 species, 53 unidentified) con-
sisting of 67 spread Odonata from Florida, Georgia, South Carolina,






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


Kentucky, Indiana, & Arizona, 2 Coleoptera from Germany, and 117
spread Lepidoptera from Austria (73), Germany (29), Romania (14), &
Italy (1), collected by the donor; 174 pinned, labeled, spread, identified,
Lepidoptera (134 exotic, 40 domestic) representing 76 species (50 ex-
otic, 26 domestic) collected, mostly by the donor, in Austria (63), West
Germany (3), East Germany (17), Czechoslavakia (7), Rumania (2),
Yugoslavia (1), Hungary (2), Italy (2), Switzerland (22), Spain (5), Great
Britain (2), Japan (2), and the United States (40): Georgia, South
Carolina, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey,
Wisconsin, Missouri, Colorado, Arizona, and California; 210 pinned,
labeled, identified insects (141 exotic, 69 domestic) consisting of 91
Coleoptera representing 27 species (18 exotic, 9 domestic) and 119
spread Lepidoptera representing 48 species (33 exotic, 15 domestic) col-
lected in Italy (128), Hungary (12), Russia (1), and the United States
(69): Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina, Illinois,
Michigan, Arkansas, Colorado, & New Mexico; 593 pinned, labeled in-
sects (51 exotic, 542 domestic; 584 determined, 9 undetermined) con-
sisting of 17 neatly spread exotic Lepidoptera representing 8 species &
576 Coleoptera, 567 determined representing 118 species, including 25
exotic representing 15 species, & 9 undetermined, collected in Hungary
(11), Rumania (1), Italy (18), Spain (6), Mexico (2), Canada (4), & the
United States (542 specimens representing 103 species): Michigan,
Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, Minnesota,
Nebraska, North Dakota, Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Idaho,
Washington, California, Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas,
Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, Kentucky,
Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Rhode Island,
Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, & Florida. In-
cluded are 491 Coleoptera: Cicindelidae representing 87 species, several
new to the FSCA; 1,030 pinned, labeled insects (783 exotic, 247
domestic; 954 identified, 76 unidentified) consisting of 637 Coleoptera
(182 domestic, 455 exotic) representing 190 species and 393 spread
Lepidoptera (65 domestic, 318 exotic) including 383 identified speci-
mens representing 167 species (32 domestic, 135 exotic) collected in
Canada: Ontario (3), Austria (343), Czechoslovakia (7), Germany (73),
Austria (119), Norway (4), France (15), Italy (49), Switzerland (1), Spain
(5), Greece (3), Crete (2), Great Britain (5), Finland (8), Hungaria (36),
Yugoslavia (6), Rumania (1), Turkey (2), Morocco (3), Africa (no locality
given), Afghanistan (2), India (20), Japan (8), New Guinea (1), Formosa
(6), South Viet Nam (2), Philippine Islands (10), Chile (1), Peru (32),
Colombia (14), Bolivia (7), Brasil (8), Guatemala (1), British Honduras
(2), Costa Rica (3), Mexico (25), Trinidad (6), San Salvador (1), Tobago
(1), South America (no locality given), & the United States (97): Florida,
Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee, Louisiana, Texas,
New Mexico, Arizona, California, Washington, Colorado, Utah, Wyo-
ming, Kansas, Missouri, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, & Maine.
Many species are new to the FSCA.






Division of Plant Industry


*Mr. Lawrence R. Franz (3820 S. W. 19th Street, Gainesville, Florida
32608)
204 vials of Crustacea (crayfish and amphipods) containing 1,015
specimens consisting of 50 vials containing 194 Procambarus from
Florida representing 13 species, several of which are blind species from
underwater caves and springs, 1 Camnbarus from the West Indies, 2 Or-
conectes from West Virginia, 3 Crangonyx from Florida, 15 vials con-
taining 115 undetermined specimens from the West Indies, & 81 vials
containing 527 undetermined specimens from Florida (51 vials),
Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, Delaware, Arkansas,
Oklahoma, & California, all collected by the donor. Many of these repre-
sent rarely collected species.

*Dr. D. Elmo Hardy (Department of Entomology, University of Hawaii,
2500 Dole Street, Room 23, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822)
938 pinned, labeled, identified Diptera, mostly from Hawaii, including
85 paratypes, representing 320 species and 42 families: Phoridae (7),
Pipunculidae (10), Syrphidae (12), Tipulidae (13), Psychodidae (2),
Chironomidae (10), Ceratopogonidae (5), Scatopsidae (1),
Mycetophilidae (2), Sciaridae (4), Cecidomyiidae (8), Stratiomyidae (4),
Scenopinidae (2), Empididae (2), Dolichopodidae (52), Lonchopteridae
(1), Muscidae (40), Calliphoridae (16), Tachinidae (8), Canaceidae (9),
Asteiidae (4), Chyromyidae (2), Tethinidae (3), Chamaemyiidae (2), An-
thomyzidae (2), Agromyzidae (9), Milichiidae (6), Chloropidae (8), Cryp-
tochaetidae (1), Hippoboscidae (1), Anthomyiidae (2), Sarcophagidae
(9), Tephritidae (12), Platystomatidae (1), Otitidae (3), Sciomyzidae (2),
Lauxaniidae (2), Lonchaeidae (1), Piophilidae (1), Sepsidae (4),
Sphaeroceridae (16), and Ephydridae (74). Many species new to the
FSCA. (An Exchange)

*Mr. J. Richard Heitzman (3112 Harris Avenue, Independence, Missouri
64052)
3,497 pinned, labeled arthropods consisting of 2,168 identified Lepi-
doptera (971 spread, 1,197 unspread) representing 377 species, 16
Odonata (spread), 85 Homoptera (1 spread), 67 Hemiptera, 2 Or-
thoptera (1 spread), 5 Neuroptera, 10 Trichoptera, 6 Mecoptera, 9
Plecoptera, 105 Hymenoptera, 789 Coleoptera, 234 Diptera, and 1
Acarina collected by the donor and his family in Missouri, Arkansas,
Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, and West Virginia: 5,005 pinned, labeled in-
sects consisting of 6 Diptera, 1 Hymenoptera, 8 Neuroptera, 105 Cole-
optera, & 4,884 identified Lepidoptera (4,465 spread, including 30 with
cleared wings for study of venation; 419 unspread) collected by the
donor and other members of his family in the United States: mostly
Missouri, Kansas & Arkansas, with a few from West Virginia,
Oklahoma, Michigan, & Texas. This is an exceptionally neatly
prepared collection, the identified Lepidoptera representing more than
700 species.






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


*Dr. John B. Heppner (Dept. of Entomology, Smithsonian Institution,
Washington, DC 20560)
8,725 pinned, labeled Coleoptera (6,670 undetermined, 2,055 deter-
mined; 484 exotic including 4 specimens from Hawaii; 738 with host or
habitat data; 8 reared; 12 with genitalia extracted) representing 56
families collected in Mexico (427), Brasil (8), Uganda (12), Philippine
Islands (6), Thailand (4), Spain (5), Czechoslavakia (2), Bohemia (2),
Canada: Quebec (14), and the United States (8,245): Florida, California,
Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Idaho,
Washington, Hawaii (4), Nebraska, Ohio, Mississippi, Alabama,
Georgia, Tennessee, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, West
Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Vermont,
and New Hampshire, mostly taken by the donor. This collection con-
tains a substantial number of species new to the FSCA.

*Mr. Charles P. Kimball (West Barnstable, Massachusetts 02668)
463 pinned, labeled, spread, identified and 18 papered, identified
Lepidoptera collected in Massachusetts and Florida: 633 pinned,
labeled, identified Lepidoptera (7 exotic, 626 domestic; 254 spread, 379
unspread) representing 241 species collected in Canada: British Colum-
bia (6), Virgin Islands (1), and the United States (626): Florida, Virginia,
New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Colorado, Idaho, Utah,
Washington, California, Nevada, and Arizona; 2,190 pinned, labeled in-
sects, 1 Diptera & 2,189 Lepidoptera (902 spread, 1,288 unspread; 14
exotic, 2,176 domestic, 2,178 Lepidoptera identified representing 873
species, including 14 paratypes of 1 species, 12 undetermined) from
British Honduras (2), Mexico (1), Dominican Republic (7), Canada (4):
Saskatchewan & British Columbia, & the United States (2,176):
Florida, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Vermont, Alabama,
Wisconsin, Georgia, Colorado, Utah, Idaho, Oregon, California,
Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, & Montana; 203 pinned,
labeled, insects consisting of 202 identified Lepidoptera (60 spread, 142
unspread representing 117 species all from Florida and 1 undetermined
Diptera from Massachusetts.

*Dr. Edward C. Knudson (804 Woodstock, Bellaire, Texas 77401)
363 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 255 neatly spread, identified
Lepidoptera representing 72 species and 70 Diptera, 18 Coleoptera, 15
Neuroptera, 2 Hymenoptera, 1 Odonata, 1 Orthoptera, and 1
Trichoptera collected in Florida and Texas by the donor; 2 ultraviolet
light trap samples of miscellaneous insects collected in Texas by the
donor; 221 pinned, labeled insects (3 exotic, 218 domestic) consisting of
2 Plecoptera, 1 Homoptera, 11 Neuroptera, 1 Trichoptera, 8 Coleoptera,
46 Diptera, 2 Hymenoptera, and 150 Lepidoptera collected by the
donor in Mexico (3) and the United States (218): Texas & Florida.






Division of Plant Industry


*Col. Lester L. Lampert (17 Hillview Circle, Asheville, North Carolina
28805)
1 quart of alcohol-preserved insects collected at blacklight and in
blacklight trap in Arizona by the donor; this is a selected sample which
includes numerous Diptera and Neuroptera; 41/2 full gallons of alcohol-
preserved ultraviolet light trap collections of insects taken by the
donor during a 2-week period at Archbold Biological Station, near Lake
Placid, Florida; 2 small bottles of alcohol-preserved insects taken by
the donor, 1 sample in Alabama and 1 in North Carolina; 1,600 pinned,
labeled Coleoptera (48 exotic, 1,552 domestic), of which 110 have
host/habitat data, collected in Brasil (6), Peru (4), Panama Canal Zone
(35), Mexico (1), Formosa (1), New Guinea (1), & the United States
(1,597): North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, Alabama, Louisiana,
Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, California, Utah, Idaho, Colo-
rado, Nebraska, & Tennessee, mostly by the donor; 61/2 full gallons of
alcohol-preserved insects, many thousands of specimens, collected by
the donor in ultraviolet light traps at Archbold Biological Station, near
Lake Placid, Florida, over a period of 1 month. 2 full gallons of alcohol-
preserved miscellaneous insects collected in ultraviolet light traps in
Florida by the donor; 154 pints of alcohol-preserved insects collected in
an ultraviolet light trap in Florida by the donor.

Mr. Walter G. Leicht (221 Hungry Hollow Road, Spring Valley, New York
10977)
Donation from the estate of the late Mr. William Rosenberg of
Hazelwood, North Carolina, consisting of 3,177 pinned insects (3,163
labeled, 15 unlabeled; 2,226 unidentified, 847 identified Coleoptera; 319
domestic, 2,832 exotic) consisting of 50 Hemiptera, 12 Homoptera, 15
Lepidoptera, & 2,969 Coleoptera collected in Jamaica (37), Cuba (4),
Puerto Rico (2), St. Croix (5), Panama (1), Chile (46), Brasil (30), Argen-
tina (8), Japan (2), Australia (189), New Guinea (1), Okinawa (1), India
(60), Peru (1), Tasmania (1), Palestine (1), Madagascar (2), Belgian
Congo (11), Algeria (1), Europe (270), Canada (1,297), and the United
States (319): North Carolina, Alabama, Arizona, Florida; approxi-
mately 500 envelopes of dried, exotic insects, mostly Coleoptera; 126
10-dram vials & 90 pint jars (including 6 unlabelled jars, probably
Europe) of unmounted, alcohol-preserved, Coleoptera from North
Carolina, Florida, Alabama, Arizona, Oklahoma, New Jersey, & ?
Europe; 64 assorted wooden & cardboard boxes for storing & shipping
insects: 2 handsomely finished insect cabinets 1 of which will hold 72
Schmidt boxes & the other of which will hold 48 oversized insect
storage boxes, plus 3 insect cabinets each of which will hold 72 Cornell
drawers.

*Dr. William W. McGuire (13128 Caminito Mar Villa, Del Mar, California
92014)






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


821 pinned, spread, labeled, identified Lepidoptera representing 276
species and subspecies of Hesperiidae (124), Papilionidae (12), Pieridae
(23), Nymphalidae (47), Danaidae (3), Satyridae (11), Riodinidae (12),
and Lycaenidae (44), including first county records for Texas of 38
species, 19 very rarely collected species, 40 rarely collected species, 48
uncommonly collected species, and 13 reared specimens, all collected
by the donor in Mexico (3) and the United States (818): Texas (782),
Oklahoma (2), New Mexico (1), Arizona (3), California (2), Colorado (14),
Utah (2), Illinois (1), Michigan (3), Virginia (1), North Carolina (2),
Mississippi (3), and Arkansas (1). This is a donation of exceptional
value; 113 pinned, spread, labeled Lepidoptera, 104 determined
representing 76 species, 9 undetermined, collected in Mexico by the
donor; 168 pinned, labeled, Lepidoptera (2 spread, 166 unspread) col-
lected in Texas by the donor.

*Mr. Bryant Mather (213 Mt. Salus Drive, Clinton, Mississippi 39056)
114 pinned, labeled, identified insects collected by the donor (12
Odonata, all spread, representing 6 species collected in Mississippi,
Florida, Illinois, Nebraska, South Dakota, Wyoming, & California; 1
identified, spread Lepidoptera collected in Russia; 4 identified, spread
Plecoptera representing 3 species collected in Mississippi; 30 identified
Neuroptera, 26 of them spread, representing 15 species, 2 collected in
England, 28 in the United States: Mississippi, Texas, & Colorado; 67
identified Trichoptera, 8 of them spread, representing 17 species col-
lected in Mississippi, Arizona, New Mexico, Wyoming, & South
Dakota); 4 pinned, labeled, identified insects collected by the donor,
consisting of 2 spread Odonata representing 2 species, one collected in
Mississippi, the other in Canada; British Columbia, and 2 Diptera:
Tipulidae representing 1 species, 1 from England, the other from
Switzerland; 4 vials of identified Trichoptera containing 51 specimens
representing 10 species collected in Mississippi by the donor; 110
pinned, labeled, identified insects consisting of 37 Neuroptera
representing 15 species, 64 Trichoptera representing 10 species, and 9
Coleoptera: Cicindelidae representing 3 species, all collected in
Mississippi by the donor; 464 pinned, labeled, spread, identified
Lepidoptera (1 exotic, 463 domestic) representing 59 species, 5 of them
new to the FSCA, collected in Puerto Rico (1) & the United States (463):
Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, New
Hampshire, Colorado, Utah, California, & Texas.

Mr. Bruce Miller (P. O. Box 1092, Project City, California 96079)
875 pinned, labeled insects (871 undetermined; 3 Neuroptera & 1 Cole-
optera determined) consisting of 3 Hemiptera, 12 Homoptera, 4
Hymenoptera, 102 Neuroptera, 361 Coleoptera, & 393 Lepidoptera (338
spread, 55 unspread) collected in California and Arizona by the donor.






Division of Plant Industry


*Dr. William L. Peters (Chairman & Professor, Area of Entomology &
Structural Pest Control, School of Science & Technology, P. O. Box
111, Florida A & M University, Tallahassee, Florida 32307)
3,504 Ephemeroptera in 671 vials and 1,255 unmounted specimens,
plus 98 slide-mounted specimens, all authoritatively identified, in-
cluding 3,498 paratypes (including 5 allotypes) and holotypes (6) of 6
species collected in New Caledonia and described as new by the donor.
Ephemeroptera of New Caledonia were virtually unknown prior to the
expedition led by Dr. Peters; 823 vials containing 4,843
Ephemeroptera and 108 slide mounts of Ephemeroptera collected by
the donor in New Caledonia & Seychelles, including 8 holotypes and
4,597 paratypes of newly described species and 58 dissected specimens
with special preparation of mouthparts, etc. The specimens from
Seychelles are the first ever collected from these islands.

*Mr. John T. Polhemus (3115 South York, Englewood, Colorado 80110)
104 pinned, labeled, identified Hemiptera (11 domestic, 93 exotic), in-
cluding 70 paratypes representing 13 species collected in Mexico (81),
Costa Rica (8), Puerto Rico (4), and the United States (11): Nevada and
Arizona, mostly by the donor.

*Dr. Charles C. Porter, Department of Biology, Fordham University,
Bronx, New York 10458)
2,162 neatly pinned, labeled insects (325 domestic, 1,837 exotic) con-
sisting of 38 Diptera, 13 Homoptera, 8 Hemiptera, 1 Lepidoptera, 41
Coleoptera, 1 Orthoptera, 32 Neuroptera, and 2,028 Hymenoptera (568
identified to species representing 49 species & subspecies, 1,192 iden-
tified to genera, & 268 identified to families) from Mexico (69), Chile
(536), Bolivia (141), Argentina (603), Peru (488), and the United States
(325): Texas (324), Maryland (1); 12 insect flight samples of selected
Hymenoptera collected in Argentina; 2,201 pinned, labeled insects
(1,223 exotic, 978 domestic; 1,135 unidentified, 920 identified to genus,
146 representing 19 species identified to species) consisting of 4 iden-
tified Coleoptera: Cicindelidae representing 1 species, 2 Mexican
Neuroptera: Myrmeleontidae representing 2 species, 1 Mexican
Mecoptera: Bittacidae, 3 Diptera: 1 Tabanidae and 2 Asilidae, and
2,191 Hymenoptera representing 15 families collected in Peru (17),
Argentina (15), Bolivia (202), Chile (957), Mexico (2), and the United
States (978): Maryland (1), Texas (977), mostly collected by the donor;
455 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 1 undetermined Coleoptera &
454 Hymenoptera (162 specimens determined to 34 genera, 292
specimens determined to 53 species) collected in Texas by the donor;
661 pinned, labeled Hymenoptera (3 specimens determined to 3
species, 443 specimens determined to 40 genera, 215 specimens deter-
mined to 33 species) from Bolivia (1), Argentina (151) and the United
States (509): Texas, all collected and identified by the donor; 661






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


pinned, labeled Hymenoptera (3 specimens determined to 3 species,
443 specimens determined to 40 genera, 215 specimens determined to
33 species) from Bolivia (1), Argentina (151), and the United States
(509); Texas, all collected and identified by the donor; 785 pinned, la-
beled Hymenoptera (72 specimens representing 2 species determined
to family or subfamily, 322 specimens representing 31 species deter-
mined to genus, & 391 specimens representing 27 species identified to
species) collected in Texas by the donor.

Dr. David B. Richman (Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology,
Box 3BE, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico
88001)
90 pinned, labeled insects (10 spread Lepidoptera, 2 spread Odonata, 2
Orthoptera (1 spread), 5 Homoptera (1 spread), 17 Hemiptera, 4
Neuroptera, 3 Diptera, & 47 Coleoptera), including 29 Lepidoptera &
Coleoptera identified to species, collected in Florida by the donor and
associates; 2,430 vials of Arachnida, of which 2,360 are Araneae, 70 are
other orders (Scorpionida 50, Solpugida 10, Phalangida 5, Uropygida 3,
Amblypygida 2). Most are from the continental United States:
Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, New Jersey, New York, New
Mexico, Minnesota, & Oklahoma. Of the spiders, 1,680, including 9
paratypes of 3 species, are Salticidae; 680 are in other families. Two
families were added to the FSCA, as well as 3 genera and 6 species of
non-salticid spiders; 260 vials of salticids were from a life history study
of Lyssomanes viridis (Walckenaer); 20 genera and 40 species of
salticids were added to the FSCA, almost all exotic; 100 vials of exotic
Salticidae are from: Canada, Mexico, Panama, Chile, Peru, Paraguay,
Venezuela, India, South Africa, Jamaica, Malaysia, & Australia; of the
identified Salticidae, 100 vials contain 20 new species recognized as
undescribed; Salticidae, except some exotics, notably Australian
specimens, were identified to species; most other spiders, except some
common species, were not identified to species (maximum identified
25%); most non-spiders were identified. Scorpionida added 1 family, 3
genera, & 4 species to the FSCA. More than 10% of the vial collections
included host or habitat data; 26 vials of Araneida consisting of 10
specimens in 4 vials determined to 1 species, 77 specimens in 22 vials
determined to 8 genera, all collected in pitfall traps in New Mexico by
the donor.

*Mr. Thomas E. Rogers (Box 182, Anthony, Florida 32617)
3,570 pinned, labeled insects (1,254 exotic, 2,316 domestic) consisting
of 1,152 Diptera, 1,650 Coleoptera, 484 Hemiptera, 229 Homoptera, 49
Hymenoptera, 4 Orthoptera, & 2 Lepidoptera collected in Spain (3),
Brasil (336), Ecuador (71), Colombia (37), Trinidad (611), Bahama
Islands (6), Dominican Republic (2), Puerto Rico (67), Curacao, W. I.
(16), & St. Lucia, W. I. (105), mostly by the donor; 1,446 pinned insects






Division of Plant Industry


(1,043 labeled, 403 unlabeled; 600 exotic, 846 domestic) consisting of 7
Orthoptera, 91 Hemiptera, 54 Homoptera, 465 Coleoptera, 712
Diptera, 6 Hymenoptera, 106 Lepidoptera, 1 Trichoptera, 1
Neuroptera, 2 Plecoptera, & 1 Thysanura collected by the donor in
Trinidad (175), St. Lucie, W. I. (24), Puerto Rico (36), Bahama Islands
(1), Ecuador (216), Brasil (148), & the United States (846): Florida,
Georgia, Delaware, Maryland, New Hampshire, Maine, New Jersey,
Illinois, and Oklahoma; 599 pinned, labeled insects (119 exotic, 480
domestic) consisting of 13 Hymenoptera, 1 Orthoptera, 3 Neuroptera,
305 Coleoptera, 17 Homoptera, 102 Hemiptera, 138 Diptera, and 20
spread Lepidoptera collected in Trinidad (109), Puerto Rico (2), St.
Lucia, W. I. (8), and the United States (480): Delaware, Maryland, New
Jersey, Georgia, & Florida; 3,853 pinned insects (2,982 labeled, 871
unlabeled, 618 exotic, 3,237 domestic) consisting of 76 identified
specimens representing 41 species and 3,777 unidentified specimens
(1,307 Diptera, 158 Hymenoptera, 5 Odonata, 697 Orthoptera, 2
Plecoptera, 4 Psocoptera, 39 Dermaptera, 74 Hemiptera, 24
Homoptera, 10 Neuroptera, 2 Trichoptera, 1,271 Coleoptera, & 260
Lepidoptera (201 spread, 59 unspread)) collected, mostly by the donor,
in Trinidad (188), Puerto Rico (57), St. Lucia, W. I. (26), Dominica, W. I.
(1), Eleuthra, W. I. (1), Dominican Republic (9), Bahama Islands (8),
Ecuador (114), Brasil (193), & the United States (3,237): Florida,
Georgia, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, & Oklahoma; 1,256 insects
(664 papered; 592 pinned: 528 labeled, 64 unlabeled) (341 domestic, 915
exotic) consisting of 30 Odonata (spread), 125 Orthoptera, 9 Der-
maptera, 24 Hemiptera, 80 Homoptera, 22 Neuroptera, 1
Hymenoptera, 20 Diptera, 1 Trichoptera, 223 Coleoptera, & 701
Lepidoptera (41 spread, 660 papered) collected, mostly by the donor, in
Brasil (711), Colombia (16), Ecuador (56), Trinidad (41), St. Lucia (7),
Puerto Rico (9), Dominican Republic (2), Bahamas (8), Taiwan (7),
Thailand (1), Canada (48), and the United States (341): Florida, Georgia,
Delaware, New Jersey, Maine, Illinois, & Oklahoma: 422 pinned insects
(264 labeled, 104 unlabeled; 368 domestic, 54 exotic) consisting of 166
Diptera, 6 Hemiptera, 4 Homoptera, 4 Hymenoptera, 4 Odonata, 15 Or-
thoptera, 222 Coleoptera, & 1 spread, identified Lepidoptera collected
by the donor in Trinidad (31), Brasil (23), and the United States (368):
Florida, Georgia, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, & Oklahoma; 1,458
pinned insects (1,271 labeled, 187 unlabeled; 748 domestic, 710 exotic;
149 determined representing 59 species of Coleoptera & 7 species of
Diptera, 1,309 undetermined) consisting of 34 Orthoptera, 4 Der-
maptera, 2 Hemiptera, 27 Homoptera, 1 Neuroptera, 4 Mecoptera, 1
Hymenoptera, 23 spread Lepidoptera, 457 Coleoptera, & 905 Diptera
collected, mostly by the donor in Ecuador (42), Colombia (258), Brasil
(239), Trinidad (90), Puerto Rico (38), Dominican Republic (2), West In-
dies (18), Bahamas (2), Virgin Islands (2), Germany (1), and the United
States (748): Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania,






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


New Jersey, Maine, Illinois, Oklahoma, Texas, & Colorado; 783 pinned,
labeled, unidentified Diptera collected in Florida by the donor; 717
pinned insects (708 labeled, 9 unlabeled; 549 exotic, 168 domestic; 5
determined representing 3 species, 712 undetermined) consisting of 7
spread Lepidoptera, 5 Odonata, 95 Orthoptera, 4 Hemiptera, 2
Homoptera, 98 Coleoptera, 420 Diptera, 115 Hymenoptera; 713
papered insects (545 from Ecuador, 168 from the United States:
Florida & Oklahoma) consisting of 7 Neuroptera, 9 Orthoptera, 132
Odonata, & 565 Lepidoptera including 501 from Ecuador; 21 vials of in-
sects from Ecuador consisting of 10 Orthoptera, 8 Neuroptera, 1 Der-
maptera, 1 Trichoptera, & 1 Lepidoptera; 11 alcohol-preserved insect
flight trap samples from the United States: Georgia.

Mr. William Rosenberg (P. O. Box 366, Hazelwood, North Carolina 28738)
476 pinned, labeled arthropods (1 Uropygida, 2 Acarina, 13 Araneida, 1
Diplopoda, 1 Mecoptera, 1 Dermaptera, 1 Trichoptera, 1 Lepidoptera, 3
Plecoptera, 5 Neuroptera, 31 Orthoptera, 27 Coleoptera, 155
Homoptera, & Hemiptera, 57 Hymenoptera, 4 Odonata, & 173 Diptera)
collected in Java (1), Czechoslovakia (2), Yugoslavia (4), Hungary (1),
Italy (1), Germany (1), France (9), and the United States (457): Florida,
North Carolina, South Carolina, Alabama, Texas, New Mexico, &
Arizona, mostly by the donor; 1 quart of miscellaneous insects col-
lected in a blacklight trap in Florida by the donor; 3 old insect storage
boxes; 310 pinned, labeled, identified Coleoptera consisting of 270
specimens representing 18 species from Austria and 40 specimens
representing 4 species from Germany; 1 insect cabinet drawer.

Mrs. (Jean) Herbert H. Ross (120 Devereus Drive, Athens, Georgia)
Most of the research library of her late husband, Dr. Herbert H. Ross,
consisting of: 256 books, 16 duplicate books (of 10 titles), 32 theses or
large monographs, 36 journals in partial sets, a complete set (21
volumes) of the General Catalogue of the Homoptera (of the world), &
5,535 reprints and bulletins in the following categories: ecology (303),
geology (349), systematics & evolution (414), miscellaneous science
(300), vertebrates (553), botany (464), marine invertebrates (74), Pro-
tozoa (65), Crustacea (52), Acarina (75), Siphonaptera (18), Thysanura
(2), Collembola (14), Thysanoptera (10), Psocoptera (25), Isoptera (17),
Anoplura (16), Mecoptera (55), Odonata (1), Dermaptera (9), Mallophga
(4), Ephemeroptera (1), Plecoptera (3), Trichoptera (9), Neuroptera (1),
Lepidoptera (249), Orthoptera (257), Coleoptera (329), Diptera (675), &
miscellaneous insects (228). (Reprints-33 linear feet)

*Mr. Joe Schuh (4039 Shasta Way, Klamath Falls, Oregon 97601)
2,264 pinned, labeled insects (2,111 determined representing 110
species, 153 undetermined; 2,225 domestic, 39 exotic) consisting of
1,952 determined Coleoptera representing 93 species, 34 undetermined






82 Division of Plant Industry

Diptera, 18 determined Hemiptera representing 1 species, 75 deter-
mined Homoptera representing 7 species, 156 Hymenoptera including
66 determined specimens representing 9 species, and 29 Orthoptera in-
cluding 8 determined specimens representing 1 species, collected in El
Salvador (9), Mexico (2), Nigeria (20), South Viet Nam (6), Canada (2):
Alberta and British Columbia, and the United States (2,225): Oregon,
California, Washington, Idaho, Utah, Colorado, Nevada, Arizona, New
Mexico, Texas, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Michigan, Nebraska,
Kansas, Illinois, Indiana, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, South
Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Vermont, Florida,
and Hawaii (3). Several species are new to the FSCA.

Mr. Robert O. Schuster (Curator, Department of Entomology, University
of California, Davis, California 95616)
(Donation from department's collection) 835 pinned, labeled, identified
Hymenoptera Sphecidae representing 6 species of Philanthus collected
in Arizona, California, Nevada, Utah, Idaho, Virginia, & Maryland.

Dr. Clyde F. Smith (Department of Entomology, North Carolina State Uni-
versity, Raleigh, North Carolina 27650)
425 identified slide mounts of Homoptera: Aphididae (67 exotic, 358
domestic), including 45 paratypes, paracotype, 2 paracolonotypes, & 2
topotypes, representing 181 species, 130 of these new to the FSCA, col-
lected in France (7), Netherlands (17), Germany (6), Italy (1),
Switzerland (4), Turkey (3), Israel (1), Thailand (2), Venezuela (6),
Puerto Rico (13), Denmark (1), Canada (6), and the United States (358):
North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, Virginia, West Virginia,
Maryland, Connecticut, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maine,
New Hampshire, Washington, D. C., Ohio, Illinois, Wisconsin, Min-
nesota, Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, Idaho, Montana,
Oregon, California, & New Mexico.

Dr. B. J. Smittel (1605 N. W. 71st Street, Gainesville, Florida 32605)
36 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects collected in Florida by the
donor; 75 pint samples and 228 half-pint samples of miscellaneous in-
sects, preserved in alcohol, collected in an ultraviolet light trap in
Florida, all collected by the donor.

Dr. Roy R. Snelling (Entomology, Los Angeles County Museum of Natural
History, Exposition Park, 900 Exposition Blvd., Los Angeles, Califor-
nia 90007)
1,538 pinned, labeled, identified Hymenoptera (554 exotic, 984 con-
tinental United States excluding Alaska), including 23 paratypes,
representing 224 genera (44 new to the FSCA) and 863 species or
subspecies (580 new to the FSCA) collected in Japan (3), Taiwan (28),
Vietnam (4), South Korea (1), North Korea (1), India (8), Philippine






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


Islands (10), Okinawa (6), Guadalcanal, British Solomon Islands (9),
Australia (6), Madagascar (5), Tanzania (5), Kenya (12), Nigeria (2),
Congo (24), Southern Africa (24), New Guinea (4), Iran (2), Egypt (1),
Slovakia (2), Russia (1), Czechoslovakia (2), Italy (2), Martinique (1),
France (2), Holland (4), Austria (9), Germany (3), Bohemia (18), Argen-
tina (16), Paraguay (2), Uruguay (1), Bolivia (7), Ecuador (1), Guatemala
(2), Colombia (4), British Honduras (1), Brazil (9), Panama (4), Chile (6),
Peru (66), Venezuela (26), Honduras (2), El Salvador (3), Costa Rica (57),
Mexico (150), Trinidad (1), Jamaica (1), Puerto Rico (2), Virgin Islands
(2), Canada (9): British Columbia, Yukon Territory, Northwest Ter-
ritory, & Newfoundland, and the United States (986): Alaska (1),
Hawaii (1), California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Utah, Wyoming,
North Dakota, Minnesota, Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas,
Oklahoma, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey,
Massachusetts, Vermont, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South
Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, Florida, Mississippi, and Washington,
D. C. (AN EXCHANGE WITH THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY
MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY)

Dr. Lionel S. Stange (610 N. W. 54 Terrace, Gainesville, Florida 32607)
153 pinned, labeled, identified Hymenoptera, including 5 paratypes,
representing 101 species and 32 genera, all new to the FSCA, collected
in Argentina by the donor; 1 slide mounted, identified domestic
Thysanoptera; 5 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects collected by
the donor in Bolivia & Argentina; 41 ultraviolet light trap samples of
insects collected in Florida by the donor; 255 vials of alcohol-preserved
arthropods & molluscs consisting of the following specimens: 1
Thysanura, 2 Plecoptera, 2 Ephemeroptera, 8 Orthoptera, 1 Isoptera, 3
Dermaptera, 5 Embioptera, 6 Psocoptera, 10 Hemiptera, 10
Homoptera, 26 Neuroptera, 4 Coleoptera, 1 Strepsiptera, 1 Diptera, 3
Trichoptera, 29 Homoptera, 9 Crustacea: Isopoda, 10 Diplopoda, 4
Chilopoda, 54 Arachnida: Araneida, 2 Arachnida: Acarina, 1
Arachnida: Scorpionida, 9 Arachnida Phalangida, 54 Mullusca:
Pulmonata consisting of 1 unidentified domestic, Hemiptera: 1,178+
unidentified exotic arthropods & molluscs consisting of 1 Thysanura, 5
Ephemeroptera, 9 Orthoptera, 100+ Isoptera, 3 Plecoptera, 3 Der-
maptera, 7 Embioptera, 10 Psocoptera, 40 Hemiptera, 72 Homoptera,
30 Neuroptera, 110 Coleoptera, 1 Strepsiptera, 9 Trichoptera, 15
Diptera, 300 Hymenoptera, 36 Crustacea: Isopoda, 53 Diplopoda, 6
Chilopoda, 131 Arachnida: Araneida (many new species and new
genera for FSCA), 4 Arachnida: Acarina, 1 Arachnida: Scorpionida, 34
Arachnida: Phalangida, & 198 Mollusca: Pulmonata: 232 identified
arthropods & mollusca consisting of 11 Dermaptera & 3 Neuroptera
from the United States: Florida & the following from Argentina &
Bolivia: 1 Hemiptera representing a species new to FSCA. 27
Neuroptera representing 10 species, 4 species and 1 genus new to






Division of Plant Industry


FSCA, 1 Coleoptera representing a genus and species new to FSCA, 80
Hymenoptera representing 1 species, & 110 Mollusca: Pulmonata
representing 20 species & 5 genera all new to FSCA; 1,693 pinned in-
sects (1,429 unlabeled, 264 labeled; 669 domestic, 1,024 exotic; 193
identified representing 18 species, 14 species & 3 genera new to FSCA,
& 1,500 unidentified) consisting of 5 Orthoptera, 66 Hemiptera
representing 12 species, 5 new to FSCA, 122 Neuroptera, including 1
species new to FSCA, 290 Coleoptera, including 3 species new to
FSCA, 2 Trichoptera, 1 Diptera, 80 Lepidoptera (30 spread), & 1,134
Hymenoptera, including 18 identified species, including 14 species & 3
genera new to FSCA. Including in this collection are 1 paratype of
Lethocerus truxali Menke, 1 Cicindelidae identified by W. Horn, 2
Megacephale bucephala Horn (Argentine species and genus new to
FSCA), a new species of Masaridae: Trimeria & a genus, Ceramiopsis,
new to FSCA. All exotic arthropods were collected in Bolivia, Argen-
tina, & Chile by the donor.

*Mr. Mike C. Thomas (4327 N. W. 30 Terrace, Gainesville, Florida 32605)
321 pinned insects (158 labeled, 163 unlabeled) consisting of 15
Hymenoptera, 5 Neuroptera, 14 Diptera, 1 Dermaptera, 1 Trichoptera,
2 Psocoptera, 34 Homoptera, 30 Hemiptera, 3 Orthoptera, and 216
Coleoptera (including 209 determined specimens representing 52
species) collected in Florida, Arizona, California, Idaho, and Missouri,
mostly by the donor; 485 pinned Coleoptera (452 labeled, 33 unlabeled;
473 exotic, 12 domestic) collected in Africa (51), Trinidad (339 labeled,
33 unlabeled; 473 exotic, 12 domestic collected in Africa (51), Trinidad
(339), China (1), Guadeloupe (3), Jamaica (4), Bolivia (54), British Hon-
duras (1), Brasil (3), Mexico (8), Cuba (9), and the United States (12):
Florida.

*Dr. Mac A. Tidwell (1109 Dixie Avenue, Florence, Alabama 35630)
3 vials of miscellaneous insects with habitat data and 12 vials and
bottles containing thousands of miscellaneous insects from 9 Malaise
trap, sweep net, and at light collections, all taken in Colombia by the
donor and associates; 5,712 neatly pinned arthropods (1,764 unlabeled,
3,948 labeled, 2,441 identified, 3,271 unidentified; 3,271 exotic, 2,441
domestic) consisting of 1 Phalangida, 4 Araneida, 1 Isoptera, 1
Thysanura, 3 Plecoptera, 5 Trichoptera, 5 Dermaptera, 7 Neuroptera,
12 Odonata, 103 Lepidoptera, 75 Hemiptera, 164 Homoptera, 115 Or-
thoptera, 542 Hymenoptera, 844 Coleoptera, & 3,831 Diptera (in-
cluding 2,441 identified North American Tabanidae) collected by the
donor in Colombia & the United States: Louisiana, Mississippi,
Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, & Florida; 120 papered samples of
Lepidoptera determined at least to genus, 6 beating & sweeping net
samples of miscellaneous insects, 10 hand-collected samples of
miscellaneous insects, 66 light trap samples of insects, & 33 insect






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


flight trap samples of insects collected in Colombia by the donor; 5 in-
sect flight trap collections (4 dry stored, 1 alcohol preserved) collected
in Colombia by the donor.

Dr. Howard V. Weems, Jr. (11208 N. W. 12 Place, Gainesville, Florida
32601)
4,563 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 51 Lepidoptera (2 spread), 24
Mecoptera (20 spread), 1 Thysanura, 1 Collembola, 2 Psocoptera, 4
Trichoptera, 7 Neuroptera, 8 Orthoptera, 22 Hemiptera, 139
Homoptera, 362 Coleoptera, 349 Hymenoptera, and 3,593 Diptera col-
lected by the donor and other members of his family in Canada (267)
and the United States (4,296): Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina,
West Virginia, Texas, Michigan, and Hawaii (73); 6,250 pinned, labeled
insects consisting of 5,750 Diptera, 200 Hymenoptera, 200 Coleoptera,
80 Homoptera, and 20 Hemiptera collected by the donor and other
members of his family in Florida, North Carolina and West Virginia:
11,884 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 91 Neuroptera, 16 Der-
maptera, 26 Orthoptera, 1 Ephemeroptera, 34 Plecoptera, 110 spread
Lepidoptera, 675 Homoptera, 297 Hemiptera, 748 Coleoptera, 1,208
Hymenoptera, 6 Trichoptera, & 8,672 Diptera collected in Colorado,
Montana, Oregon, Washington, Alaska (449), North Carolina, &
Florida by the donor & his wife. This is an exceptionally neatly
prepared collection, containing numerous species new to the FSCA;
118 pinned, spread, labeled Lepidoptera (27 determined representing 1
species, 91 undetermined) collected in Washington by the donor & his
wife, Camilla.

*Dr. Richard C. Wilkerson (1603 N. E. 19th Lane, Gainesville, Florida
32601)
4,325 pinned, labeled insects (4,137 exotic, 188 domestic; 3,521 deter-
mined, 804 undetermined) consisting of 13 Lepidoptera (10 spread), 1
Plecoptera, 2 Mecoptera, 4 Neuroptera, 1 Ephemeroptera, 1 Isoptera, 9
Odonata, 31 Orthoptera, 90 Homoptera, 97 Hemiptera, 168
Hymenoptera, 174 Coleoptera, & 3,662 Diptera (including 3,521
Tabanidae representing 58 species from Colombia, 31 species new to
the FSCA, & including 28 holotypes & 115 paratypes of species
described by the donor) collected by the donor in Colombia (4,137) &
the United States (188): Florida, Alabama, North Carolina.

*Dr. Nixon Wilson (Department of Biology, University of Northern Iowa,
Cedar Falls, Iowa 50613)
27 slide mounted Arachnida: Acarina (5 unidentified, 22 identified
representing 2 species); 122 vials (62 exotic, 60 domestic; 38 identified
representing 5 species, 84 unidentified) consisting of 1 Diplopoda (1
specimen), 4 Chilopoda (9 specimens), 11 Arachnida: Araneida (64
specimens), 68 Arachnida: Acarina (706 specimens), 1 Arachnida:






Division of Plant Industry


Phalangida (1 specimen), 2 Collembola (4 specimens), 1 Ephemeroptera
(2 specimens), 3 Odonata (7 specimens), 5 Psocoptera (14 specimens), 2
Thysanoptera (3 specimens), 1 Hemiptera (1 specimen), 3 Coleoptera (3
specimens), 15 Siphonaptera (49 specimens representing 4 species, all
new to the FSCA) collected in Australia (1) and the United States (121):
Alaska (61), Wyoming, Iowa, New Mexico, Georgia, & Florida; 300
slides of Arachnida: Acarina with 315 specimens representing 123 dif-
ferent collections from Brasil (2), Nicaragua (1), West Germany (1), &
the United States (296): Connecticut, Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota,
Nebraska, North Carolina, Tennessee, & Wisconsin, all identified to
family and about one-third to genus in the following families (super-
families): Parasitidae, Parholaspididae, Perlohmanniidae,
Phthiracariodea, Phytoseiidae, Podocinidae, & Polyaspididae: 76 vials
containing 330 alcohol-preserved arthropods consisting of 1 vial of
Crustacea: Isopoda (2 specimens), 1 vial of Diplopoda (1 specimen), 1
vial of Chilopoda (1 specimen), 1 vial of Arachnida: Araneida (2
specimens), 43 vials of Arachnida: Acarina (94 unidentified domestic,
164 exotic), 4 vials of Collembola (3 domestic, 9 exotic specimens), 2
vials of Orthoptera (2 specimens), 5 vials of Psocoptera (16 specimens),
1 vial of Neuroptera (1 specimen), 7 vials of Coleoptera (9 domestic, 3
exotic specimens), 1 vial of Trichoptera (2 specimens), 1 vial of
Lepidoptera (1 specimen), 4 vials of Diptera (7 domestic, 5 exotic
specimens), & 4 vials of Hymenoptera (4 domestic, 2 exotic specimens)
from the United States: Iowa, New York, Texas, & Alaska (exotic, 37
vials): 123 vials (73 domestic, 50 exotic), 55 vials with host data, con-
sisting of 1 Diplopoda, 4 Chilopoda, 11 Arachnida: Araneida, 69
Arachnida: Acarina, 1 Arachnida: Phalangida, 3 Odonata, 1
Ephemeroptera, 1 Collembola, 5 Psocoptera, 1 Hemiptera, 3 Cole-
optera, & 3 Hymenoptera collected in Australia (1), & the United
States: Alaska (49), Iowa, Wyoming, Florida, Louisiana, & New Mex-
ico; 25 slide mounts of Arachnida: Acarina (20 identified to 2 species)
from Georgia; 2 vials of parasitic Diptera identified to 2 species & 1 vial
of Mallophaga identified to 1 genus, all with host data, all from Florida.

*Dr. Frank N. Young, Jr. (Dept. of Biology, Indiana University, Blooming-
ton, Indiana 47406)
16 half-pint ultraviolet light trap samples of insects collected in Florida
by the donor; 330 entomological reprints and 122 journal and/or
monograph issues, including 93 numbers of The Proceedings of the Na-
tional Academy of Science; 23 half-pint samples of insects collected in a
blacklight trap in Indiana (14), Georgia (1), & Florida (8); 2,702 pinned
insects (2,676 labeled, 26 unlabeled; 2,454 identified Coleoptera
representing 102 species, 248 undetermined insects; 378 exotic, 2,324
domestic) consisting of 1 Hemiptera, 1 Homoptera, 33 Trichoptera, 28
Hymenoptera, 136 Lepidoptera, & 2,489 Coleoptera collected in Brasil
(129), Venezuela (18), Panama (32), Colombia (14), Suriname (10), Mex-






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


ico (32), Canada (11), France (3), Okinawa (24), Hawaii (7), and the con-
tinental United States (2,324): Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana,
South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Kentucky, New York,
Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, Ohio, Indiana, Michigan,
Mississippi, Arkansas, New Mexico, & Arizona, mostly by the donor;
20 envelopes of miscellaneous unidentified insects, mostly
Lepidoptera, some without data, others from Florida, Indiana,
Missouri, & Arizona; Bibliography of Homoptera Auchenorhyncha,
vol. 1-2, bound; General Catalogue of the Homoptera, unbound, Fasci-
cle I, 3 supplements, bibliography, & species index; II (1 vol.); III (1
vol.): IV, parts 1-18, species index V (1 vol.): VI, parts 2-9, 10 (sec. 1-3),
15, 17; VII, parts 1-4, bibliography, species index; VII, part 1 (sec. 1-2),
2 bibliography, species index; 606 pinned, labeled insects (513 iden-
tified representing 27 species, 93 unidentified; 129 exotic, 577
domestic) consisting of 1 Orthoptera, 8 Hemiptera, 1 Homoptera, 2
identified Neuroptera representing 1 species, 3 Diptera, 29 identified
Mecoptera representing 1 species, 252 Hymenoptera (212 identified
representing 14 species, 24 with host data, 40 unidentified), 24
Lepidoptera (17 identified representing 1 species, 7 unidentified), & 286
Coleoptera (253 identified representing 8 species, 33 unidentified: 88
from Brasil of which 48 are paratypes of 1 species, 40 with host data, &
27 from Okinawa with host data & represent 2 species) from Puerto
Rico (12), Brasil (88), Okinawa (27), Canada (2): British Columbia, & the
United States (157): Indiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Georgia, &
Florida; 834 pinned, identified, aquatic Coleoptera (816 labeled, 18
unlabeled; 652 domestic, 182 exotic), including 21 paratypes represent-
ing 14 species, representing 87 species (49 domestic, 38 exotic) col-
lected in El Salvador posss. Falkland Isl.) (1), Dominican Republic (1),
Jamaica (4), Bahama Islands (3), Brasil (56), Honduras (8), Mexico (91),
Colombia (13), Canada: British Columbia (2), and the United States: In-
diana, Ohio, Michigan Illinois, Pennsylvania, New York, New Hamp-
shire, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, Maryland, West
Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, Florida,
Alabama, Louisiana, Arkansas, Missouri, Texas, New Mexico, Ken-
tucky, Mississippi, Arizona, California, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Colo-
rado, North Dakota, & South Dakota; 220 pinned, labeled, identified
aquatic Coleoptera consisting of 15 exotic specimens representing 6
species from Mexico (9), Italy (1), Japan (4), & Canada (1), & 205
specimens representing 17 species, including 14 paratypes represent-
ing 3 species, from the United States: Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota,
Ohio, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, New York.
Connecticut, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Virginia, North
Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, Texas,
Oklahoma, New Mexico, Arizona, California, Oregon, North Dakota, &
South Dakota; 36 specimens have host or ecological data; 426 pinned,
labeled, identified aquatic Coleoptera representing 37 species con-






Division of Plant Industry


sisting of 245 exotic specimens representing 30 species (including 12
paratypes representing 2 species from Colombia (6), Panama (3),
British Honduras (2), & Brasil (1)) from Canada (2): Ontario, Haiti (2),
Venezuela (20), Colombia (43), Surinam (3), Brasil (112), Panama (16),
Mexico (30), Costa Rica (1), Ecuador (1), Bolivia (1), Nicaragua (1), Peru
(1), British Honduras (2), Trinidad (3), Jamaica (2), & Cuba (2) & 181
specimens representing 7 species from the United States: Florida,
Georgia, Texas, Alabama, Louisiana, South Carolina, North Carolina,
Tennessee, Kentucky, Arkansas, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, New
York, New Jersey; 714 pinned insects (708 labeled, 6 unlabeled; 164 ex-
otic, 560 domestic; 584 identified aquatic Coleoptera representing 132
species, 130 unidentified Hemiptera, Homoptera, & Diptera) consisting
of 151 Coleoptera including 19 paratypes representing 3 species (Brasil
(8), Panama (10), Canada (1)), from Brasil (38), Panama (19), Mexico (18),
Costa Rica (1), Nicaragua (1), Bolivia (1), Surinam (3), Virgin Islands (2),
Dominican Republic (4), Puerto Rico (1), Jamaica (1), Bahama Islands
(1), Canada (3): British Columbia, Manitoba, & Alberta, Italy (11),
England (17), Germany (11), & France (1); 433 Coleoptera, including 6
paratypes representing 5 species, from the United States: Indiana,
Florida, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Con-
necticut, Vermont, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Virginia, North
Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Louisiana, Alabama, Michigan,
Wisconsin, Minnesota, Kansas, Arkansas, Iowa, North Dakota, South
Dakota, Montana, Colorado, Washington, California, Nevada, Arizona,
New Mexico, Texas; 12 Hemiptera, 71 Homoptera, & 4 Diptera, all
from the United States; 411 pinned, labeled, identified Coleoptera (145
exotic, 266 domestic) representing 57 species of aquatic beetles con-
sisting of 145 specimens representing 36 species, including 1 paratype
from Brasil, from Canada (49): British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, &
Manitoba, Alaska (1), Mexico (31), Bahama Islands (1), Trinidad (2),
Venezuela (1), Brasil (1), Costa Rica (5), France (2), Italy (3), Germany
(20), Austria (2), & England (18) & 266 specimens representing 21
species, including 5 paratypes of 1 species, from the United States:
Florida, Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky,
West Virginia, Delaware, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York, Con-
necticut, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Maine, Ohio, Indiana,
Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa, North Dakota, Colorado, Utah, Wyoming,
Idaho, Washington, South Dakota, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico,
Arizona, & California.

*Mr. Charles F. Zeiger (3751 Sommers Street, Jacksonville, Florida 32205)
186 pinned, spread, labeled Lepidoptera collected in Florida by the
donor; 249 pinned, labeled insects (5 exotic, 244 domestic; 85 identified
representing 14 species, 164 unidentified) consisting of 47 Coleoptera
and 202 spread Lepidoptera collected in Puerto Rico (1), Argentina (4)
& the United States (244): Florida, Mississippi, and North Carolina;






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


260 pinned, labeled spread, Lepidoptera (54 exotic, 206 domestic; 250
identified, 10 unidentified) collected in Mexico (6), Panama (10), For-
mosa (6), Southern Rhodesia (32), and the United States (206): Florida,
Virginia, Tennessee, Alabama, New York, New Hampshire, Illinois,
Nebraska, Colorado, Idaho, Wyoming, Washington, Oregon, Califor-
nia, and Texas; 347 pinned, labeled insects (44 exotic, 303 domestic;
145 identified, 202 unidentified) consisting of 1 Hymenoptera, 53 Cole-
optera (21 identified specimens representing 2 species from Florida; 12
specimens from Trinidad and 20 from Argentina representing 2
species), and 293 Lepidoptera (281 spread specimens from Florida
representing 35 species, 12 unspread specimens from Argentina
representing 2 species): 21 vials of insects from Florida consisting of 7
vials of identified Lepidoptera, 7 vials of unidentified Lepidoptera, and
7 vials of unidentified Hemiptera, Coleoptera, Orthoptera, etc.; 62
pinned, spread, labeled Lepidoptera (10 identified representing 2
species, 52 unidentified) collected in Florida and Tennessee by the
donor; 54 pinned, spread, labeled Lepidoptera (2 exotic, 52 domestic; 30
determined representing 10 species, 24 undetermined) collected in Co-
lombia (2) and the United States: Florida by the donor & family in-
cluded are 10 specimens representing 2 rarely collected species of Ly-
caenidae from southern Florida; 48 pinned, spread, labeled, identified
Lepidoptera representing 2 species of Catocala collected in Florida by
the donor; 173 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 1 Hymenoptera, 2
Homoptera, & 170 spread Lepidoptera (169 representing 43 species, 1
unidentified) collected in Florida by the donor.


Other Contributions to the Collection

*Dr. Ross H. Arnett, Jr. (1330 Dillon Heights Ave., Baltimore, Maryland
21228)
14 pinned, labeled, identified Coleoptera, including 2 paratypes,
representing 3 species collected in New York, Massachusetts, Min-
nesota, Alabama, & Florida.
Mr. W. Wilson Baker (Biologist, Tall Timbers Research Station, Route 1,
Box 160, Tallahassee, FL 32301)
6 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 2 Orthoptera & 4 Coleoptera, in-
cluding 1 beetle with egg-dung ball, collected in Georgia by the donor;
19 vials of alcohol-preserved insects containing 1 Orthoptera (from
Hawaii), 1 vial containing approximately 20 Hymenoptera: Formicidae
(from Florida), 17 vials of Coleoptera (2 vials from Georgia & 2 from
Florida containing 36 specimens, 1 vial from Tanzania containing 1

*Research Associate or Student Associate of the Florida State Collection of Arth-
ropods.






Division of Plant Industry


specimen, 3 vials from Kenya containing 7 specimens, & 9 vials from
Australia containing 28 specimens), & 5 vials of Arachnida: Aranaeida
from Australia containing 7 specimens; 11 pinned insects (10 labeled, 1
unlabeled) consisting of 2 reared Diptera: Cuterebridae with their
empty puparia, Coleoptera: 2 Scarabaeidae (1 with a fur-covered dung
ball), 2 Cerambycidae, 1 Lampyridae, 1 Curculionidae, 2 Orthoptera, &
1 Hymenoptera collected by the donor in Florida & Georgia; 109 vials
of Arthropoda consisting of the following vials: 4 Diplopoda, 5
Chilopoda, 1 Arachnida: Scorpionida, 33 Arachnida: Araneida, 2
Odonata, 3 Orthoptera, 2 Dermaptera, 7 Hemiptera, 16 Hymenoptera,
28 Coleoptera, and 8 misc. mixed samples of insects collected on St.
Vincent Island and St. George Island, Florida by the donor.

*Dr. Richard M. Baranowski (University of Florida, IFAS, Agric. Research
& Education Center, 18905 S. W. 280th St., Rt. 1, Homestead, Florida
33030)
599 pinned, labeled insects (117 identified representing 65 species, 482
unidentified) consisting of 8 Diptera, 1 Neuroptera, 26 Homoptera, 44
Orthoptera including 26 identified representing 17 species, including 2
paratypes of 1 species), and 520 Coleoptera (including 91 identified
representing 48 species, including 1 paratype) collected in Florida,
Arizona, Colorado, California, British Columbia, Maine,
Massachusetts, and New Jersey.

*Mr. William M. Beck (Area of Entomology & Structural Pest Control,
Division of Rural Development, School of Science and Technology,
University P. O. Box 111, Florida A & M University, Tallahassee,
Florida 32307) 1,375 slide-mounted, authoritatively identified Diptera:
Chironomidae larvae.

*Dr. Gary Buckingham (3663 N. W. 49th Lane, Gainesville, Florida 32605)
1 ultraviolet light trap sample of insects collected in New York state by
the donor; 6 pinned, unlabeled Neuroptera representing 2 species new
to the FSCA collected in Mexico by the donor; 3 vials of alcohol-
preserved arthropods consisting of 1 vial containing a muscid fly and
mites which feed on it, collected in Florida, and 2 vials containing
voucher specimens of Lepidoptera: Pyralidae: Acentropus niveus
Olivier, larvae, pupae, and adults reared from milfoil, Myriophyllum ex-
albescens Fernald.

*Mr. James C. Cokendolpher (Dept. of Biological Sciences, Texas Tech.
University, Box 4149, Lubbock, Texas 79401)
35 vials of assorted arthropods, 31 vials with habitat data (2 vials iden-
tified to species, 33 vials unidentified and unsorted) from Mexico (4)
and the United States (31): Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas, all col-
lected by the donor; 22 vials of Arthropoda (7 Coleoptera, 6 mixed In-






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


secta (sweep samples), 1 Hymenoptera, 1 Psocoptera, 3 Araneida, 2
Chilopoda, 2 Isopoda), all collected in Texas by the donor except for 1
vial of Hymenoptera from Okinawa; 21 vials have rudimentary habitat
data, e. g., under rock, sweeping grasses, etc.; 52 vials of arthropods (46
unidentified, 6 Opilones identified; 9 vials with habitat data; 2 exotic,
52 domestic) consisting of 4 Homoptera, 3 Coleoptera, 20 Araneida, 1
Solpugida, 1 Pseudoscorpionida, 1 Isopoda, 16 mixed Arthropoda, and
6 Phalangida holotypess of 2 species described as new by the donor, 3
paratypes representing 2 additional species, and 1 specimen of yet
another species, all 5 species new to the FSCA) collected in Chile (1),
Mexico (1), and the United States (50 vials): Florida, Texas, and
Washington. 79 vials of miscellaneous arthropods (approximately 50%
Araneae and 50% Insecta & Myriapoda, unsorted) collected in Mexico
(24 vials), Canada (1 vial), and the United States (54 vials); Texas,
Arizona, Oklahoma, Missouri, Indiana, Illinois, & Michigan; 18 vials of
alcohol-preserved arthropods (10 exotic, 8 domestic) consisting of 1 vial
of Arachnida: Solpugida from Kenya, 9 vials of Arachnida: Araneae, in-
cluding 2 from Kenya & 6 from United States: Arizona, Texas, &
California; 1 vial of Diplopoda from Texas; 3 vials of Coleoptera from
Ghana; & 4 vials of mixed samples, 2 from Ghana, 1 from Kenya.

Dr. F. T. Crawford (Dept. of Psychology, Florida State University, Talla-
hassee, Florida 32306)
8 pinned & 7 alcohol-preserved Orthoptera: Acrididae: Acheta
domesticus (Linnaeus), voucher specimens from a study made by the
donor on a colony of crickets from Bainbridge, Georgia.

*Mr. Lloyd R. Davis (2510 N. E. 10th Terrace, Gainesville, Florida 32601)
53 pint jars of alcohol-preserved insects (45 pitfall trap samples, 8
ultraviolet light trap samples) collected in Florida by the donor. 12
alcohol-preserved samples of undetermined miscellaneous Coleoptera
(7 half-pint samples, 5 snap-cap vial samples) collected in Florida by the
donor; 32 vials of alcohol-preserved insects sorted to orders consisting
of 5 vials of Hemiptera & Homoptera, 2 Diptera, 1 Hymenoptera, 1
Trichoptera, 1 Dermaptera, 1 Lepidoptera, 4 Orthoptera, & 17 Cole-
optera collected in an ultraviolet light trap in Florida.

*Mr. H. A. Denmark (10903 N. W. 12 Place, Gainesville, Florida 32601)
1 pinned, labeled Diptera: Cuterebridae collected in Florida by the
donor.

Mr. Donald G. Denning (2016 Donald Drive, Moraga, California 94556)
11 vials containing 116 authoritatively identified Ephemeroptera col-
lected by the donor in Mexico (39 specimens) and the United States:
California (77 specimens)






Division of Plant Industry


*Mr. Sidney W. Dunkle, (Dept. of Zoology, University of Florida, Gaines-
ville, Florida 32611)
1 vial of alcohol-preserved Strepsiptera: Stylopidae: Xenos pallidus
Brues, females with larvae & male pupal cases in Polistes annularis
(Linnaeus).

Dr. David Faulkner (Curator of Entomology, San Diego Natural History
Museum, Balboa Park, P. O. Box 1390, San Diego, California 92112)
153 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 2 Orthoptera, 4 Plecoptera, 41
Coleoptera, 56 Diptera, & 50 Hymenoptera, mostly collected by the
donor.

*Mr. Irving L. Finkelstein (425 Springdale Drive, N. E. Atlanta, Georgia
30305)
3 pinned, spread, labeled, identified Lepidoptera, 2 males and 1 female
of the rarely collected Diana fritillary, Speyeria diana (Cramer), col-
lected in Tennessee by the donor; 59 pinned, spread, labeled, identified
Lepidoptera representing 14 species collected by the donor in Georgia,
Tennessee, and Florida; 115 pinned, spread, labeled, identified
Lepidoptera representing 51 species (9 species of Papilionidae, 2
species of Pieridae, 1 species of Danaidae, 3 species of Heliconiidae, 8
species of Nymphalidae, 2 species of Satyridae, 8 species of Ly-
caenidae, 5 species of Sphingidae, 5 species of Saturniidae, & 8 species
of Hesperiidae; 26 moths, 89 butterflies) collected in Georgia, Florida,
South Carolina, New York, & Texas. Several species are new to the
FSCA.

Dr. Eric M. Fisher (10362 Tupelo Lane, Los Angeles, California 90024)
2 pinned, labeled paratypes (male & female) of Diptera: Asilidae:
Zabrops thologaster Fisher from Mexico: Baja California.

*Dr. Sergio A. Fragoso (Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Forum
de Ciencia e Cultura, Museu Nacional (Dept. Entomology) Quinta da
Boa Vista, Rio R. J. 20942, Brasil)
2 slide mounts of the chigoe flea, Tunga penetrans (Linnaeus)
(Siphonaptera: Sarcopsyllidae) from Brasil, the first representatives for
the FSCA.

*Dr. J. Howard Frank, (Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory, P. O. Box
520, Vero Beach, Florida 32960)
1 ultraviolet light trap sample of insects collected in Georgia by the
donor. 2 pinned & labeled Coleoptera, holotype and 1 paratype of
Staphylinidae: Deinopsis franki Klimaszewski, collected in Florida by
the donor.

Dr. Raymond J. Gagne (Research Entomologist, Systematic Entomology






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


Laboratory, USDA, % (U. S.) National Museum of Natural History,
NHB 168, Washington, DC 20560)
1 vial of unidentified parasitic Hymenoptera reared from a gall midge,
Cecidomyia resinicola (Osten Sacken), and the following
Cecidomyiidae: 5 slide mounts (1 paratype larvae slide of Cecidomyia
brevispatula Gagne, 1 paratype larvae slide of C. bisetosa Gagne, 1
paratype slide of a male C. bisetosa Gagne adult, 1 paratype larvae
slide of C. tortilis Gagne, & 1 larvae slide of C. piniinopis Osten
Sacken); 6 pinned, labeled paratype adults of C. bisetosa Gagne; 13
vials consisting of 1 vial of paratypes of C. brevispatula Gagne larvae,
2 vials of C. resinicoloides William larvae, 5 vials of adults and 3 larvae
of C. resinicola (Osten Sacken).

Mr. Raymond Gill (Systematic Entomologist, Bureau of Entomology, Cali-
fornia Dept. of Agriculture, 1220 N. St., Sacramento, California 95814)
22 slide mounted Homoptera: Aleyrodidae representing 22 species of
whiteflies new to the FSCA. (an exchange-received June 1979)

*Dr. James T. Goodwin (AID/Texas A & M Contract, Bamako, Dept. of
State, Washington, D. C. 20521)
17 pinned, labeled Diptera representing 7 species and 4 genera of
Tabanidae and 3 species of tsetse flies (Muscidae: Glossina) collected in
Mali, Africa by the donor; 2 tabanid genera, Aegophagamyia and
Neavella, are new to the FSCA.

*Mr. Harold N. Greenbaum (Department of Entomology & Nematology,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
64 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 60 spread Lepidoptera and 4
Diptera collected in Florida by the donor; 1 pinned, labeled Diptera:
Cuterebridae collected in Florida by the donor.

Mr. Donald W. Hall (Department of Entomology & Nematology, Univer-
sity of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
4 pinned, labeled Mecoptera collected in Indiana by the donor.

*Mr. Fred C. Harmston (117 East 2700 South, Salt Lake City, Utah 84115)
21 vials of arthropods from Utah and Colorado consisting of 10 vials of
identified Diptera: Culicidae larvae and 11 vials of unidentified arth-
ropods as follows: 4 Araneae, 2 Chilopoda, 3 Coleoptera, and 1
miscellaneous aquatic immature; 466 pinned, labeled insects (27 exotic,
440 domestic), consisting of 249 identified Diptera: Dolichopodidae
representing 37 species, 38 identified Diptera: Culicidae representing 2
species, 32 identified Diptera: Syrphidae representing 13 species, and
the following unidentified insects: 139 Diptera, 2 Hymenoptera, 1
Mecoptera, 2 Psocoptera, 1 Hemiptera, & 2 Coleoptera, collected in
Costa Rica (7), Canada: Quebec (19), & the United States (440): Alaska






Division of Plant Industry


(1), Arizona, Colorado, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota,
Oregon, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Washington
& Wyoming: 12 insect flight trap samples from Arizona, Nevada,
Oregon, and Utah.

*Mr. Roger L. Heitzman (University of Maryland, Department of Entomol-
ogy, College Park, Maryland)
56 vials containing 470 alcohol-preserved insects collected by the donor
in Missouri (21 vials) and Florida (35 vials) consisting of 27 vials of
Lepidoptera (25 determined to species, 2 to genus, representing 22
species), 8 vials of Odonata (6 determined to genus, 2 to family), 12
vials of Coleoptera (9 determined to genus, 3 to family), 3 vials of
Hemiptera (all determined to genus), 2 vials of Diptera (1 determined to
genus, 1 to family), 1 vial of Plecoptera (determined to genus), 1 vial of
Neuroptera (determined to genus), 1 vial of Ephemeroptera (deter-
mined to genus), and 1 vial of Trichoptera (determined to family).

*Dr. Lawrence A. Hetrick (1614 N. W. 12th Rd., Gainesville, Florida 32605)
11 pinned, labeled insects (2 Homoptera, 3 Coleoptera, 1 Hymenoptera,
and 5 Diptera: Syrphidae) collected in Florida by the donor; 31 pinned,
labeled insects (15 identified Coleoptera representing 3 species, 16
specimens identified) consisting of 2 Hymenoptera, 2 Diptera, 2 Or-
thoptera, & 25 Coleoptera collected in Florida by the donor; 31 pinned,
labeled insects consisting of 23 Coleoptera, 6 Hymenoptera, & 2
Diptera, 18 with host data, collected in Florida by the donor.

Dr. Harry Hoogstraal (C. O. NAMRU-3 FPO, New York 09527)
Copies of English translations of 74 arthropod publications published
in Russian, German, Chinese, & several other languages; reprints of 18
recent publications by Dr. Hoogstraal and his associates and English
translations of 108 publications mostly in Russian on diseases of and
arthropod vectors of diseases of man and domestic animals:

Mr. James H. House (Ochopee, Florida 33943)
12 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects collected in Florida by the
donor.

Dr. James O. Howell (Department of Entomology, University of Georgia,
College of Agriculture Experiment Station, Experiment, Georgia
30212)
3 paratype slides of a scale insect, Haliaspis nakaharai Howell collected
in Puerto Rico.

Dr. Clarence D. Johnson (Dept. of Biological Sciences, Northern Arizona
University, Flagstaff, Arizona 86001)
135 pinned, labeled identified Coleoptera: Bruchidae, including 56






THIRTY-THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT


paratypes representing 12 species, representing 34 species collected in
Mexico (68, including 38 paratypes representing 7 species), Panama (3),
and the United States (64): Arizona, California, Oregon, & Texas.

Mr. Ken W. Knopf (4100-13 S. W. 31st St., Gainesville, Florida 32608)
2 vials and 3 small plastic bags of alcohol-preserved insects collected in
a dung trap in Ecuador by the donor.

Dr. Michael V. Kosztarab (Dept. of Entomology, Virginia Polytechnic In-
stitute, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061)
12 slide-mounted, identified Homoptera: Diaspididae and Aleyrodidae
representing 4 species collected in Costa Rica.

Dr. Carmine A. Lanciani (Dept. of Zoology, University of Florida, Gaines-
ville, Florida 32611)
Holotype male and 3 paratype (1 male, 2 females) slide mounts & 4
vials of alcohol-preserved Acarina: Hydrachna virella Lanciani.

Mr. Arthur T. Leitheuser, III (Florida State Museum, University of Flor-
ida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
9 vials of aquatic insects consisting of 1 Neuroptera, 1 Coleoptera, 1
Diptera, 1 Lepidoptera, 2 Odonata, and 3 Hemiptera collected in Co-
lombia (8 vials) and the United States (1 vial): Alabama.

Mr. William F. Mauffray (105 Devereux Drive, Slidell, Louisiana 70458)
15 alcohol-preserved, identified Odonata: Anisoptera nymphs
representing 4 species, 226 alcohol-preserved Odonata; Zygoptera
adults (201 identified representing 28 species, 25 unidentified), & 968
envelope-stored, authoritatively identified, adult Odonata, including 1
holotype, 1 allotype, & 1 paratype, representing 106 species, 42 genera,
collected in Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, Georgia, Florida,
South Carolina, & Virginia by the donor.

Mr. Harry G. Nelson (Department of Biology, Roosevelt University, Chi-
cago, Illinois)
15 pinned, labeled, identified Coleoptera: Dryopidae representing 9
species of North American Dryopidae new to the FSCA.

*Drs. Charles W. & Lois B. O'Brien (3009 Brookmont Drive, Tallahassee,
Florida 32312)
4 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects collected in Florida and
Mississippi: 34 pinned, labeled Lampyridae collected in New Guinea by
the donor; 62 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects (54 domestic, 8
exotic) collected by the donors in Bolivia (7), Panama Canal Zone (1),
and United States (54).




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