• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 Main
 Report of the division directo...
 Fiscal
 Library
 Technical assistance
 Bureau of apiary inspection
 Bureau of citrus budwood regis...
 Bureau of entomology
 Bureau of methods development
 Bureau of nematology
 Bureau of plant inspection
 Grove Inspection
 Through roadguard stations
 Plants and plant propagating materials...
 Lettuce mosaic program
 Bureau of plant pathology
 Bureau of special programs
 Meetings
 Citrus blackfly
 Fruit fly detection
 Spreading decline
 Lethal yellowing
 Sugarcane rootstalk borer...














Title: Division of Plant Industry biennial report
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075925/00010
 Material Information
Title: Division of Plant Industry biennial report
Alternate Title: Biennial report
Abbreviated Title: Div. Plant Ind. bienn. rep.
Physical Description: v. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Division of Plant Industry
Publisher: Florida Dept. of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Publication Date: 1976-1978
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Plant inspection -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Plant diseases -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Dept. of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 26th (1964/66)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year ends June 30.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: 39th (July 1, 1990-June 30, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075925
Volume ID: VID00010
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01242950
alephbibnum - 001511744
lccn - sn 86001883
lccn - sn 86001883
issn - 0888-9554
 Related Items
Preceded by: Biennial report

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page I
    Front Matter
        Page II
        Page III
    Table of Contents
        Page IV
    Main
        Page V
        Page 1
    Report of the division director
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Fiscal
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Library
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Technical assistance
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Bureau of apiary inspection
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Bureau of citrus budwood registration
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Bureau of entomology
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
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        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
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        Page 57
        Page 58
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        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
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        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
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        Page 72
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        Page 76
        Page 77
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        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
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        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
    Bureau of methods development
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
    Bureau of nematology
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
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        Page 123
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        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
    Bureau of plant inspection
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
    Grove Inspection
        Page 144
    Through roadguard stations
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
    Plants and plant propagating materials imported into Florida from foreign countries
        Page 150
    Lettuce mosaic program
        Page 151
    Bureau of plant pathology
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
    Bureau of special programs
        Page 171
    Meetings
        Page 172
    Citrus blackfly
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
    Fruit fly detection
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
    Spreading decline
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
    Lethal yellowing
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
    Sugarcane rootstalk borer weevil
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
Full Text
l uly I, 1976-
June 30,1978


lf.A. Univ f Fi rid C oau


9 MINMI 7q





Thirty Second
Biennial Report








Division of Plant Industry

Thirty-Second

Biennial Report

July 1, 1976-June 30, 1978


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
AND CONSUMER SERVICES
Doyle Conner, Commissioner


DIVISION OF PLANT INDUSTRY
Halwin L. Jones, Director


Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Division of Plant Industry
Post Office Box 1269
Gainesville, Florida 32602










FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF
AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER
SERVICES


DIVISION OF PLANT INDUSTRY



Plant Industry Technical Council

Vernon Conner, Chairman (Citrus). ..................... Mount Dora
Roy Vandegrift, Jr., Vice Chairman (Vegetable) ............ Canal Point
Lawrence Cutts (Apiary) ............................... Chipley
Colin English, Sr. (Citizen-at-Large) ................... .. Tallahassee
John W. Hornbuckle (Citrus) .......................... Dade City
John Morroni (Commercial Flower) ....................... Fort Myers
Lewis E. Wadsworth, Jr. (Forestry) ......................... Bunnell
Joseph Welker (Ornamental Horticulture) ................ Jacksonville
Stanley F. Cruse (Turfgrass) ........................... . Palmetto
Halwin L. Jones, Secretary ............................. Gainesville



Administrative Staff

Halwin L. Jones, Director .............................. Gainesville
S. A. Alfieri, Jr., Assistant Director ................... .. Gainesville
C. O. Youtsey, Chief of Budwood Registration ........... Winter Haven
R. E. Brown, Chief of Methods Development ............... Gainesville
J. K. Condo, Chief of Plant Inspection .................... Gainesville
H. A. Denmark, Chief of Entomology ..................... Gainesville
J. C. Herndon, Chief of Apiary Inspection ................. Gainesville
C. Poucher, Chief of Pest Eradication and Control ........ Winter Haven
C. P. Seymour, Chief of Plant Pathology ................... Gainesville
D. E. Stokes, Chief of Nematology ................... ... Gainesville







TABLE OF CONTENTS

REPORT OF THE DIVISION DIRECTOR ..................... 2
Fiscal ........ ....... .... ................... ... ..... 5
Library ......................................... . 15
Technical Assistance . ........ ......... ............ 17
BUREAU OF APIARY INSPECTION ......................... 19
BUREAU OF CITRUS BUDWOOD REGISTRATION ........... 24
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY ............................... 29
BUREAU OF METHODS DEVELOPMENT .................... 105
BUREAU OF NEMATOLOGY ............................... 109
BUREAU OF PLANT INSPECTION .......................... 137
G rove Inspection ...................................... 144
Turfgrass Certification Program .......................... 144
Plant Products Entering Peninsular Florida
Through Road Guard Stations ........................ 145
Citrus Nursery Site Selection ......................... 145
Plants and Plant Propagating Materials Imported
into Florida from Foreign Countries ................... .. 150
Soybean Crop Survey ................................ 150
Lettuce M osaic Program ................................ 151
BUREAU OF PLANT PATHOLOGY .......................... 152
BUREAU OF SPECIAL PROGRAMS ......................... 171
Personnel Training ................................... 171
Meetings ............... ........... .. .. ....... 172
Awards ................................... ... 172
Citrus Blackfly ................ ..................... 173
Fruit Fly Detection ................ .................. 188
Spreading Decline ................ ................... 191
Lethal Yellowing ................ ................... 198
Sugarcane Rootstalk Borer Weevil ........................ 202










This public document was promulgated at a cost of $5,379.30, or
$5.38 per copy, to inform the general public, Legislature, and other in-
terested parties on the programs and investigative efforts of the Divi-
sion of Plant Industry. PI79G-7













Gainesville, Florida


Honorable Doyle Conner
Commissioner
Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services
The Capitol
Tallahassee, Florida 32301


Dear Commissioner:

I am pleased to present herewith the 1976-78 Biennial
Report for the Division of Plant Industry,

Respectfully,





HALWIN L. JONES, Director
Division of Plant Industry








PLANT INDUSTRY TECHNICAL COUNCIL

Vernon Conner, Chairman Citrus
P. O. Box 183
Mount Dora 32757
(904) 383-2952
Roy Vandegrift, Jr., Vice-Chairman Vegetable
Star Route, Box 13-E
Canal Point 33438
(305) 924-5551
Colin English, Sr. Citizen-at-Large
Exchange Building, Room 105
201 South Monroe Street
Tallahassee 32301
Ofc: (904) 222-3664, Home: (904) 877-4230
John W. Hornbuckle Citrus
Lykes-Pasco Packing Company
P. O. Box 822
Dade City 33525
Ofc: (904) 567-5211, Home (904) 567-3019
John Morroni Commercial Flower
Morroni Flower Farms
P. O. Box 2159
Ft. Myers 33902
(813) 481-2314


Lawrence Cutts
P. O. Box 336
Chipley 32428
(904) 638-1637


Apiary


Lewis E. Wadsworth, Jr. Forestry
Box 98
Bunnell 32010
Ofc: (904) 437-3322, Home (904) 437-3189


Joseph Welker
2818 Grand Avenue
Jacksonville 32210
(904) 388-2492
Stanley F. Cruse
Route 1, Box 420-X
Palmetto 33561
(813) 722-4032


Ornamental Horticulture



Turfgrass







REPORT OF THE DIVISION DIRECTOR

The citrus blackfly eradication effort took precedence during the bien-
nium, becoming the Division of Plant Industry's most important eradica-
tion effort since the Mediterranean fruit fly and the giant African snail. The
Bureau of Plant Pathology's quarantine greenhouse, designed to permit in-
troduction of new and highly desirable citrus varieties, also became fully
operational. These were major highlights for the Division during the
1976-78 biennium.
The State of Florida appropriated approximately $2.5 million to conduct
the first year of the citrus blackfly operation, and the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture (USDA) appropriated federal funds to match the state
budget. It was projected that the eradication of this pest would take five
years at a cost of approximately $25 million.
After two full years of operation, the Citrus Blackfly Program is on
schedule. The main control program in Palm Beach County has been com-
pleted, and spraying is now being conducted six miles inside Broward
County.
In the spring of 1976, parasites from Mexico were introduced into Florida
which reduced the population of the citrus blackfly and increased the
chance of eradication. Research personnel estimated that the parasites
have reduced the citrus blackfly population by 97 percent; however, it is
well known that parasites alone cannot normally eradicate a pest.
Four greenhouse laboratories are being built in the Ft. Lauderdale area
for the production of the citrus blackfly and its parasites. Once maximum
production of parasites is reached, it should further increase the success of
eradication. It is planned for parasites to be released in back of the spray
crew.
Since the main infestation was delimited, only three spot infestations
have been detected beyond the original delimited area-one in Okeechobee
City where one tree was found infested, and two spots in St. Lucie County.
Surveys made behind the spray area in Palm Beach County revealed 13
small infestations. Most of these have been single trees.
A very encouraging aspect of our program is the capability of survey per-
sonnel to detect these very early and lightly infested properties.
As the biennium ended, there were approximately 600 state and federal
personnel assigned full time to the Citrus Blackfly Program.
Two citrus clones indexed at the Division's quarantine greenhouse
facilities at the Doyle Conner Building are scheduled to be released in late
1978. A red navel introduction from Venezuela and a grapefruit variety
'Ray Ruby' from Texas were indexed and found to have viruses and possi-
ble genetic variegation in the case of the navel. These two clones are in the
process of being shoot-tip grafted and treated by thermotherapy in an ef-
fort to free them of viruses. Other introductions have been approved and in-
dexing will begin as space becomes available.
In support of the citrus introduction program, a tissue culture laboratory
has been equipped and personnel trained to operate this facility. The facili-
ty will be used for shoot-tip grafting and other tissue culture procedures to







Thirty-second Biennial Report


produce virus-free plants. A thermotherapy growth chamber was installed
and in use near the end of the biennium.
Development of the six-acre Florida Citrus Arboretum in Winter Haven
has become a reality; a new forest pathologist, working cooperatively with
the Division of Forestry, was assigned to the Bureau of Plant Pathology at
the Doyle Conner Building, and Methods Development became a bureau
separate from Administration. These are some other incidents of major im-
portance which occurred during the biennium.
More than 267 varieties of citrus and rare citrus relatives have been
planted in the arboretum, which will feature a worldwide collection. Many
selections will have unique foliage and fruit characteristics, as well as possi-
ble resistance to certain diseases, and they may serve as a gene source in
breeding or developing new varieties of rootstocks. Approximately 340 ac-
quisitions have been made since 1976. Dedication of this valuable resource
and educational facility is scheduled sometime in 1979.
Early in 1977, citrus researchers made new techniques available for
tristeza indexing that shortened the period of testing from six months to 24
hours. This is a serological test using tristeza antiserum in a diffusion-plate
precipitin reaction. The necessary equipment has been obtained by the
Bureau of Plant Pathology to incorporate the technique as a standard test.
This promises to replace the need for thousands of index plants and large
areas of greenhouse space that can now be devoted to additional exocortis
indexing.
The forest pathologist assigned to the Bureau of Plant Pathology will be
working on state and private forest nursery disease problems and keeping
apprised of industry problems.
Because of the seriousness of the citrus canker disease, and the problems
it could present in Florida if it were introduced here, the Division's Chief of
the Bureau of Plant Pathology, Carter P. Seymour, traveled to Argentina
last spring, where the disease is rampant, to study the disease. Seymour
made the trip with two pathologists from the University of Florida's In-
stitute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
The Argentina Department of Agriculture and the University of Florida
are establishing a cooperative program to study control of citrus canker. In-
formation forthcoming from the agencies working in this cooperative study
could be invaluable in protecting Florida's citrus industry should canker be
introduced here.
Ralph E. Brown, previously the Methods Development coordinator, was
promoted to bureau chief when the new bureau was established.
Along with the responsibilities of investigation of new and improved
methods for conducting the various activities of the Division and supervi-
sion of fixed capital outlay projects being conducted by the DPI, at the
beginning of the fiscal year 1976-77, the Methods Development Bureau was
given the added responsibility of handling the Imported Fire Ant Program
and the fumigation operations.
With the suspension of the Mirex label for use against the imported fire







Division of Plant Industry


ant, a degradable form of Mirex, Ferriamicide, was developed and has re-
quired extensive testing to meet the labeling requirements of the En-
vironmental Protection Agency (EPA). The Methods Development Bureau
cooperated with the Mississippi Department of Agriculture and Commerce
and the USDA (SEA and APHIS divisions) in tests to provide needed data.
Efficacy tests on Ferriamicide, as well as monitoring studies of soil, leaves,
and various animal life, were conducted.
The biological control laboratory at the Doyle Conner Building continues
to serve as a clearinghouse for most of the southeastern United States in
the introduction of exotic species. To date, the University of Florida (In-
stitute of Food and Agricultural Sciences), U. S. Department of Agriculture
(SEA) and Division of Plant Industry have requested permission to
evaluate approximately 12 parasites and predators under rigid security for
their effectiveness against pest insects.
The Arthropod Introduction Committee, which was established to
regulate the movement of arthropods into and within the State of Florida,
during this biennium handled 93 requests, involving 96 species, for the in-
troduction or movement of arthropods into or within the state from various
organizations.
Funds were requested, but not received, from the legislature for doubling
the space of the Entomology wing. Space is badly needed for personnel to
perform more effectively, and for the museum, where the Florida State Col-
lection of Arthropods is housed, to grow.






Thirty-second Biennial Report


FISCAL OFFICE
C. E. Taylor, Accountant

Summaries of the application of budgeted and/or requested funds identi-
fied by the Division's activities are contained in Tables 1 through 5 for the
fiscal years 1976-77 through 1980-81, respectively. Each table lists the pro-
gram components, based on Florida's Planning and Budgeting System,
which are subject to approval and adjustment, as applicable, by the Com-
missioner of Agriculture and the State Legislature.

Table 1
FY 1976 77 Actual Expenditures
General Total
BureaulActivity General Total
Revenue Trust Expenditures


Administrative Direction
& Support
Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library
Total Administrative
Direction & Support

Consumer Protection-Maintenance
of Business Standards
Bureau of Plant Inspection
Citrus Tree Survey
Total Consumer Protection-
Maintenance of Business
Standards


512,414 41,520 553,934

512,414 41,520 553,934



1,097,144 150,935 1,248,079
117,894 393 118,287



1,215,038 151,328 1,366,366


Property Protection
& Preservation


Bureau of Entomology
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bio-Control Laboratory
Bureau of Special Programs
Lethal Yellowing


345,083
293,502
164,799
143,562

202,512
32,670


345,083
293,502
164,799
143,562

202,512
32,670


80,017 99,165 179,182







Division of Plant Industry


Bureau/Activity


Special Programs -
Administration
Spreading Decline
Fruit Fly Survey & Control
Weevil Eradication
Special Categories
Apiary Indemnities
Imported Fire Ant
Citrus Blackfly
Bureau of Methods
Development*
Methods Development
Fire Ant Control

Total Property Protection &
Preservation

DIVISION TOTAL


General
Revenue


124,782
276,320
171,347
21,232

18,768
276,199
2,002,535


*
110,641


Total
Trust Expenditures


189
202,869
2,051
692


124,971
479,189
173,398
21,924


18,768
276,199
2,002,535


*
87,600 198,241


4,263,969 392,566


4,656,535


5,991,421 585,414 6,576,835


*Effective September 1, 1977, Methods Development was recognized by
the Department of Administration as a Bureau which conforms to its iden-
tity in the Florida Statutes. Previously, Methods Development was an of-
fice funded in the Division of Plant Industry Administrative Direction and
Support Budget.







Thirty-second Biennial Report

Table 2
FY 1977 78 Actual Expenditures


Bureau/Activity


General
Revenue


Total
Trust Expenditures


Administrative Direction
& Support
Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library
Total Administrative
Direction & Support


493,209 45,388 538,597

493,209 45,388 538,597


Consumer Protection-Maintenance
of Business Standards


Bureau of Plant Inspection
Citrus Tree Survey
Total Consumer Protection-
Maintenance of Business
Standards


Property Protection
& Preservation
Bureau of Entomology
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bio-Control Laboratory
Bureau of Special Programs
Lethal Yellowing
Special Programs -
Administration
Spreading Decline
Fruit Fly Survey & Control
Weevil Eradication
Special Categories
Apiary Indemnities
Imported Fire Ant
Citrus Blackfly


1,179,061
116,579


210,034 1,389,095
607 117,186


1,295,640 210,641 1,506,281


357,058
324,961
181,185
182,170

196,386
19,618


774
20,283
8,837


357,832
345,244
190,022
182,170


3,341 199,727
19,618


59,407 16,027


121,392
16,911
202,645
23,681

23,675
2,372.94
2,372.948


471,260


75,434

121,392
488,171
202,645
23,681

23,675
*






Division of Plant Industry


General Total
Bureau/Activity Revenue Trust Expenditures


Bureau of Methods
Development
Methods Development
Fire Ant Control
Total Property Protection &
Preservation

DIVISION TOTAL


50,340
15,786


65,221


50,340
81,007


4,148,163 585,743 4,733,906

5,937,012 841,772 6,778,784


*Although the lump sum Imported Fire Ant Program did not receive an
allocation for use during FY 1977-78, $132,662 (General Revenue) was cer-
tified forward from FY 1976-77 allocation and expended during FY
1977-78.







Thirty-second Biennial Report


Table 3
FY 1978 79 Allocations & Estimated Expenditures

Bureau/Activity General Total
Revenue Trust Expenditures


Administrative Direction
& Support
Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library
Total Administrative
Direction & Support


Consumer Protection-Maintenance
of Business Standards
Bureau of Plant Inspection
Citrus Tree Survey
Total Consumer Protection-
Maintenance of Business
Standards


Property Protection
& Preservation
Bureau of Entomology
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bio-Control Laboratory
Bureau of Special Programs
Lethal Yellowing
Special Programs -
Administration
Spreading Decline
Fruit Fly Survey & Control
Weevil Eradication
Special Categories
Apiary Indemnities
Imported Fire Ant
Citrus Blackfly


636,033 45,055 681,088

636,033 45,055 681,088


1,157,188
113,925


392,970 1,550,158
113,925


1,271,113 392,970 1,644,083


394,204
358,206
212,368
168,285

211,891
35,450


394,204
358,206
212,368
168,285

211,891
35,450


13,162 150,000 163,162


179,970
38,415
217,706
48,068

24,000
,
2,518,754


179,970
608,577 646,992
217,706
48,068

24,000
*
450,000 2,968,754






Division of Plant Industry


General Total
Bureau/Activity Rene Trt e re
Revenue Trust Expenditures


Bureau of Methods
Development
Methods Development
Fire Ant Control
Total Property Protection
& Preservation

DIVISION TOTAL


47,644
35,804


24,752 72,396
35,804


4,503,927 1,233,329 5,737,256

6,411,073 1,671,354 8,082,427


*The Imported Fire Ant lump sum special category program did not
receive an allocation for FY 1978-79; however, $225,931 was certified for-
ward from original funds.






Thirty-second Biennial Report


Table 4
FY 1979 80 Requested Allotments

General Total
ctvy Revenue Trust Expenditures


Administrative Direction
& Support
Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library
Total Administrative
Direction & Support


Consumer Protection-Maintenance
of Business Standards
Bureau of Plant Inspection
Citrus Tree Survey
Total Consumer Protection-
Maintenance of Business
Standards


695,176

695,176


695,176

695,176


1,636,215
117,464



1,753,679


1,636,215
117,464


1,753,679


Property Protection
& Preservation


Bureau of Entomology
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bio-Control Laboratory
Bureau of Special Programs
Lethal Yellowing
Special Programs -
Administration
Spreading Decline
Fruit Fly Survey & Control
Weevil Eradication
Special Categories
Apiary Indemnities
Imported Fire Ant
Citrus Blackfly


473,467
399,870
251,296
243,947

226,407
45,643


473,467
399,870
251,296
243,947

226,407
45,643


13,840 150,000 163,840


231,172

243,517
48,434

24,000
156,700
2,518,754


231,172
726,901 726,901
243,517
48,434

24,000
156,700
1,400,000 3,918,754






Division of Plant Industry


General Total
Bureau/Activity Revenue Trust Expenditures


Bureau of Methods
Development
Methods Development
Fire Ant Control
Total Property Protection
& Preservation

DIVISION TOTAL


151,616
41,027


151,616
41,027


5,069,690 2,276,901 7,346,591

7,518,545 2,276,901 9,795,446






Thirty-second Biennial Report


Table 5
FY 1980 81 Requested Allotments

Btivity General Total
BureauActivity Expenditures
Revenue Trust Expenditures


Administrative Direction
& Support
Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library
Total Administrative
Direction & Support


Consumer Protection-Maintenance
of Business Standards
Bureau of Plant Inspection
Citrus Tree Survey
Total Consumer Protection-
Maintenance of Business
Standards


700,298


700,298


700,298


700,298


1,612,202
144,251



1,756,453


1,612,202
144,251


1,756,453


Property Protection
& Preservation


Bureau of Entomology
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bio-Control Laboratory
Bureau of Special Programs
Lethal Yellowing
Special Programs -
Administration
Spreading Decline
Fruit Fly Survey & Control
Weevil Eradication
Special Categories
Apiary Indemnities
Imported Fire Ant
Citrus Blackfly


470,779
404,803
237,419
242,761

233,482
48,279


470,779
404,803
237,419
242,761

233,482
48,279


14,499 150,000 164,499


219,567

252,175
56,455

24,000
182,200
2,518,754


219,567
674,513 674,513
252,175
56,455

24,000
182,200
1,400,000 3,918,754






Division of Plant Industry


Bury General Total
Bureau/Activity Revenue Trust Expenditures


Bureau of Methods
Development
Methods Development
Fire Ant Control
Total Property Protection
& Preservation

DIVISION TOTAL


143,366
41,117


143,366
41,117


5,089,656 2,224,513 7,314,169

7,546,407 2,224,513 9,770,920







Thirty-second Biennial Report


LIBRARY
June B. Jacobson, Librarian

The growing collection of the Division Library consists of 9,497 volumes
as of June 30, 1978. The number of serials has increased to 421 making the
collection important for its current information and also for its fine anti-
quariat materials of international scope.
Several noteworthy improvements occurred in the first half of the bien-
nium, under the direction of Mrs. Ann Owens. Storage space behind the
library staff offices was converted into an efficient and attractive book
room enlisting the skills of Ken Sims and experienced judgement of Jay
Adamson. A new shelving unit was purchased to store the growing number
of serial volumes owned by the library. During this period an appropriation
of $7,500 was allotted to fill in missing volumes of important serials.
Catalog cards continued to be exchanged between Hume Library and the
Division of Plant Industry as has been previously done. Catalog cards are
also being sent to Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory in Vero Beach.
Mrs. Owens terminated her employment with the Division of Plant In-
dustry on October 27, 1977, and Mrs. June Jacobson began work on Oc-
tober 21, having a week overlap to facilitate a smooth transition. Ms. Linda
Lundquist served as secretary from October 6, 1976, through the end of the
biennial period. Ms. Lisa Burton assisted in a part-time capacity during the
last month of the 2-year period.
A number of items were received as gifts during this period including
those from Hume Agricultural Library, Eric Grissell, Lewis Maxwell,
Frank W. Mead, Frank Young, G. B. Fairchild, R. S. Dennis, Major Reinert,
Florida International University, A. N. Tissot, Ernest Collins, Robert
Esser, Edgar Clark, the South Pacific Commission, the U. S. Department of
Interior, Wageningen the Netherlands, and the books of the late William H.
Pierce.
During the biennium 437 books were purchased, and 491 volumes were
bound by Dobbs Brothers of St. Augustine and the National Library
Bindery of Atlanta, Georgia. The standardized binding method continues
to be used since it is the most economical technique, enabling the library to
stretch its expense dollars.
Four hundred twenty books and serials were cataloged in the two-year
period. As of June 30, 1978, there were approximately 230 volumes shelved
in the book room that remained uncataloged, with other uncatloged
volumes checked out to the Bureaus. Uncataloged items are accessible by
author's name on temporary cards filed in the main catalog. The possibility
of adding a part-time cataloger to help classify these materials was dis-
cussed at the last library committee meeting. This seems to be an excellent
possibility for the future.
Inter-library loan activity increased substantially in this biennium with
413 items borrowed for the Division of Plant Industry personnel; 257 of






16 Division of Plant Industry

them were secured from the University of Florida libraries. We filled 205 re-
quests for other institutions from our holdings, including requests from
Syria, Canada, Australia, and England.
Continued inter-library cooperation between the Division of Plant In-
dustry and the University of Florida will keep our institution in the
forefront of its field.







Thirty-second Biennial Report


TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
Ernest M. Collins, Information Specialist

During the Biennium, primary emphasis was focused on keeping the
public informed of the progress of the citrus blackfly program in south
Florida through newspaper, radio and television releases. Many efforts also
revolved around creating informational slide talks and programs on
restructuring of the Division of Plant Industry-a plan, still awaiting final
approval, which has been designed for early detection of serious plant
pests.
Personnel in this office are responsible for several publications, as well
as coordinating the printing of publications written by other employees of
the DPI; writing press releases and feature articles to inform the public on
Division programs; a quarterly magazine; a monthly 'house organ'
magazine; field and studio photography for the technical staff; audio visual
materials and training aids; and exhibits which are displayed at various
trade fairs and shows throughout the state. Illustrations for the various
technical publications are also prepared by our staff.
Major Publications
The Plant Industry News, which is published quarterly, provides infor-
mation on programs of the Division of Plant Industry, and serves as an of-
ficial publication for rules and regulations concerning the movement of
plants and plant pests in Florida. The magazine serves as a primary infor-
mational source for nurserymen, growers and other persons in the
agricultural industry and has a controlled circulation of about 13,000.
The Reporter, a monthly 'house organ' newspaper, reviews and updates
Department and Division policies, as well as professional and job-related
activities of employees. It is distributed to all active and retired personnel
of the Division.
Photographs of Division activities and programs, taken in the field and in
the studio, were provided for publication in the Plant Industry News,
Reporter, Tri-ology, technical circulars, leaflets and major publications, and
for distribution to statewide news media. Photography was provided for all
Division publications and assistance was rendered to the Division's
technical bureaus. The photo lab handles approximately 200 black and
white work orders each year, with nearly the same number of requests for
color photography and slides.
Art Work and Exhibits
Approximately 200 work orders are handled yearly by the staff il-
lustrator, ranging from maps, charts, graphs, signs, posters, graphic and
artistic illustrations, and other visual aids. Layouts were provided for most
Division publications, including the technical circulars, Tri-ology, Plant In-
dustry News, and the Reporter.
The staff illustrator completed seven exhibits during the biennium de-







18 Division of Plant Industry

picting various Division programs and activities, which were displayed at
trade shows and flower shows, county fairs, and Legislative Appreciation
Day at Tallahassee. Two portable exhibits were completed--one on plant in-
spection services and one on activities of the Division of Plant Industry;
two citrus blackfly displays were built; and other exhibits were completed
on plant inspection services, orchid diseases, and the citrus budwood
registration program.







Thirty-second Biennial Report


BUREAU OF APIARY INSPECTION
James C. Herndon, Chief of Apiary Inspection

The beekeeping industry is a vital segment of Florida agriculture. Florida
is ranked among the top three states in the nation in value of honey pro-
duced. Florida's honeybee population, estimated at 375,000 colonies, pro-
duces from 25 to 30 million pounds of honey each year at a wholesale value
of 10 to 12 million dollars.
In addition to the value of honey produced, the total value of pollination
services of bees is estimated at 45.8 million dollars. Florida's honeybee col-
onies fertilize and cross-pollinate watermelons, cucumbers, squash, can-
taloupes, and the Orlando Tangelo variety of citrus. To reseed themselves,
some varieties of clover used in cattle pastures must be visited by bees each
year.
Florida's ideal climatic conditions make possible the production and ship-
ment of thousands of queen and package bees to northern states to replace
winter losses, and to South America and England.
As a protection to the honeybee industry, the State Legislature passed
the Florida Bee Disease Law in 1919. The original and continuing objective
of the law is the detection and destruction of honeybee colonies infected
with a disease known as American foulbrood, Bacillus larvae. This disease,
while completely harmless to humans, is highly contagious to honeybee col-
onies. Introduction into the hive is in the form of spores located in honey,
on combs, and in used beekeeping equipment which has been exposed to a
previously established source of infection. The spore form is very resistant
so that when equipment, honey and pollen become contaminated, they re-
main so for long periods of time. Although American foulbrood continues to
be a threat to the Florida beekeeper, Florida's disease rate is 0.7 percent,
one of the lowest in the nation.
One of the problems facing Florida beekeepers is the reduction of plants
necessary for honey production. With the increased population growth,
building projects and new highways consume vast areas of land containing
plants important for honey production, forcing the beekeeper to find new
apiary locations. Because of this problem, more and more beekeepers move
their honeybee colonies to other states in search of a honey crop, returning
each fall in order to be ready for the spring citrus bloom. During the
1976-78 biennium, 232,568 colonies were brought into Florida by migratory
beekeepers, and apiary inspectors are constantly on the alert for bee
diseases brought into Florida by migratory beekeepers.

Resume of Bureau of Apiary Inspection Activities

1976-77 1977-78 Biennium
Apiaries inspected 4,377 5,872 10,249
Colonies inspected 217,403 260,152 477,555







Division of Plant Industry


1976-77 1977-78 Biennium
Colonies infected with AFB 1,068 1,989 3,057
AFB colonies destroyed 1,068 1,989 3,057
Florida Permits issued 1,230 1,389 2,619
Special Entry Permits issued 387 484 871
Certificates issued 184 238 422
Point-to-Point Permits issued 130 135 265

During the biennium, apiary inspectors examined 487,555 colonies in
10,249 apiaries and found 3,057 colonies infected with American foulbrood.
The Bureau of Apiary Inspection issued 871 permits for 247,320 colonies of
out-of-state bees to move into Florida, and 235 special moving permits for
moving point-to-point within the state. Florida beekeepers were issued
2,619 moving permits and 81 certificates of inspection.
The sum of $42,432 was paid during the biennium to Florida beekeepers
in compensation for bees and equipment destroyed because of American
foulbrood.

Road Guard Report
Monthly reports from the Road Guard Stations during the biennium in-
dicated 247,320 colonies and 248,224 supers moved into Florida from other
states. Road guard reports also showed 258,809 colonies and 253,813
supers left Florida for destinations across the nation.
Personnel of the Bureau of Apiary Inspection examined and certified
51,919 colonies for queen and package bee producers. Apiary reports in-
dicated 228,847 colonies were inspected and certified for shipment to the
following states:
170- Arkansas
1,400- California
11 Colorado
15,774- Georgia
2,648- Illinois
1,084- Indiana
1,800- Iowa
595- Kentucky
1,641- Maine
1,168- Maryland
870 Massachusetts
145- Michigan
18,648- Minnesota
612- Missouri
3,070 Nebraska
2,710- New Jersey
16,782- New York
2,962 North Carolina







Thirty-second Biennial Report


55,661 North Dakota
6,031- Ohio
2 Oregon
8,037 Pennsylvania
8 Rhode Island
1 South Carolina
28,911 South Dakota
1,725 Tennessee
5- Vermont
1,680- Virginia
109- Washington
261 West Virginia
54,316- Wisconsin
10- Canada

Honey Certification Program
During the biennium, apiary inspectors sampled 744 drums of tupelo
honey and delivered 201 composite samples to the Department's Food
Laboratory in Tallahassee for analysis and certification. These samples
were examined for flavor, color, soluble solids, moisture, and pollen count.
One hundred forty composite samples from 539 barrels were certified as
tupelo honey. Sixty-one samples from 205 barrels failed to certify as tupelo
honey. Moisture content of the samples averaged 16.8 percent.

Meetings
The following meetings were attended by the Chief of the Bureau of
Apiary Inspection during the 1976-78 biennium:
August 16-18, 1976 Beekeepers Institute, Cherry Lake, Florida.
September 24-25, 1976 Georgia State Beekeepers Convention, Tifton,
Georgia. Presented talk.
October 28-30, 1976 Florida State Beekeepers Convention, Clermont,
Florida. Gave Annual Apiary Report.
November 8, 1976 Central Beekeepers Association, Apopka, Florida.
Presented talk.
January 12-14, 1977 Apiary Inspectors of America, Kansas City,
Missouri. Gave Florida Report.
February 4-5, 1977 Georgia State Beekeepers Institute, Atlanta,
Georgia.
March 7, 1977 Attended Agricultural Committee hearing on House Bill
No. 188 relating to inspection fees on honeybees.
March 14, 1977 Central Florida Beekeepers Association, Apopka,
Florida. Presented talk.







2 Division of Plant Industry

May 12, 1977 Polk County Beekeepers Association, Bartow, Florida.
Presented talk.
June 18, 1977 Tupelo Beekeepers Association, Ochlockonee State Park,
Sopchoppy, Florida. Presented talk.
August 22-24, 1977 Beekeepers Institute, Lake Placid, Florida.
Presented talk.
November 9-11, 1977 Florida State Beekeepers Convention, Fort Myers,
Florida. Gave Annual Apiary Report.
November 14, 1977 Central Florida Beekeepers Association, Apopka,
Florida. Presented talk.
January 10-12, 1978 Apiary Inspectors of America, Beltsville, Maryland.
Gave Florida Report.
January 24-27, 1978 American Beekeepers Federation, Orlando,
Florida.
February 11, 1978 Tupelo Beekeepers Association, Tallahassee, Florida.
March 13, 1978 Central Florida Beekeepers Association, Apopka,
Florida.
June 17, 1978 Tupelo and Big Bend Associations Annual Fish Fry and
Meeting, Ochlockonee State Park, Sopchoppy, Florida.


Year Ending
June 30,1938
S1939
S1940
S1941
S1942
S1943
S1944
1945
." 1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
S1951


YEARLY SUMMARY
BUREAU OF APIARY INSPECTION

Apiaries
Infected
Apiaries Colonies American
Inspected Inspected Foulbrood
3,451 64,668 38
3,371 70,655 56
3,414 76,851 61
3,711 81,950 80
3,671 83,354 106
3,347 80,823 100
2,646 73,649 106
2,371 69,262 105
2,265 71,161 138
2,464 87,674 104
3,266 98,147 100
3,710 105,678 130
3,082 105,296 175
2,872 95,405 237


Colonies
Infected
American
Foulbrood
173
416
234
371
698
524
456
379
959
683
391
406
369
772






Thirty-second Biennial Report


Apiaries Colonies
Infected Infected
Apiaries Colonies American American
Year Ending Inspected Inspected Foulbrood Foulbrood
June 30, 1952 2,836 88,206 232 578
S1953 3,259 92,267 449 1,366
S1954 5,102 135,168 683 2,158
S1955 5,885 157,388 524 1,421
S1956 6,168 176,616 460 1,180
S1957 5,813 162,885 490 1,121
1958 4,932 159,692 457 1,623
S1959 5,123 153,677 454 1,329
S1960 5,056 149,227 438 1,422
S1961 4,991 152,288 319 1,271
S1962 5,693 173,538 341 1,053
S1963 5,497 169,411 416 1,546
S1964 5,230 166,641 481 1,614
S1965 5,680 179,861 500 1,709
S1966 5,833 189,802 485 1,340
S1967 6,337 197,833 561 1,768
S1968 6,519 218,493 504 1,712
S1969 5,912 192,651 509 1,707
S1970 5,788 185,752 443 1,317
S1971 5,273 176,608 431 2,092
S1972 4,713 176,153 433 1,683
1973 5,353 193,382 420 1,702
1974 4,802 191,102 293 1,148
1975 5,050 204,929 365 1,229
S1976 4,750 212,945 302 1,271
S 1977 4,377 217,403 360 1,068
1978 5,872 260,152 163 1,989






Division of Plant Industry


BUREAU OF CITRUS BUDWOOD
REGISTRATION
C. O. Youtsey, Chief of Budwood Registration
The 25th year of service to the citrus industry by the budwood registra-
tion program passed quietly into history on January 1, 1978. The respon-
sibilities for selecting horticulturally sound citrus trees for virus testing
and making these selections available for industry use have not diminished
in importance over the years.
What began as a one-man office in Winter Haven, with 3 acres of test
nursery in 1953, has kept pace with industry demands and now serves from
a modern office building and a staff of 12, keeping records on activities of
541 participants and caring for 1/2 acres of outdoor test nursery, 5200 sq.
ft. of greenhouse space, 6000 sq. ft. of screenhouse area, and 62 acres of
foundation grove. Virus-tested budwood is available for distribution from
382 separate budlines. More than 352,000 budeyes were distributed this
biennium.
Program activity continues strong with 13 new participants and 1266 ad-
ditional scion grove trees added this period. In a survey conducted in late
1976, of 40 citrus nurseries producing 95% of all citrus trees being grown in
Florida, only 4 failed to utilize registered scion blocks as the major source of
their budwood. Production in these nurseries amounted to only 8% of
Florida's citrus tree production.
Registered nursery tree production for the 25-year period amounts to
31,421,700 and is equal to 44% of all the citrus trees in Florida groves.
Table 1 compares registered nursery propagations by variety and rootstock
for the last two biennial periods. Volkamer lemon at 57,086 trees and C.
macrophylla at 34,827 accounted for the major increase of rootstocks in the
miscellaneous column.
Revenues returned to the general fund from bureau activities amounted
to $48,860 for the biennium. This amounts to 49% of budgeted funds, ex-
cluding salaries. Returns from fruit harvested in the young foundation
grove are expected to increase significantly in the next 2 years.
Development of the 6-acre Florida Citrus Arboretum in Winter Haven
has become a reality with the planting of more than 267 varieties of citrus
and rare citrus relatives having origins from the "out-back" of Australia
and New Zealand to mainland China. Approximately 340 acquisitions have
been made since 1976. Landscaping incorporates unique citrus species
wherever possible. Dedication of this valuable research and educational
facility is scheduled for February 1979.
Tristeza continues to cause serious losses to the Florida citrus industry
wherever trees on sour orange rootstock are grown. The virus is now readily
found in most plantings on the Central Ridge area and is causing increased
concern in the Indian River district where localized areas are declining
rapidly. Despite this trend, nursery propagation records indicate over 21%
of the total trees produced in 1977-78 were on sour orange rootstocks.






Thirty-second Biennial Report


Early in 1977, citrus researchers made new techniques available for
tristeza indexing that shortened the period of testing from 6 months to 24
hours. This is a serological test using tristeza antiserum in a diffusion-plate
precipitin reaction. The necessary equipment has been obtained by the
Plant Pathology Bureau to incorporate the technique as a standard test.
This promises to replace the need for thousands of index plants and large
areas of greenhouse space that can now be devoted to additional exocortis
indexing.
More than 1100 tristeza tests were performed this biennium, using both
Key lime indicator plants and the serological technique. The majority of
these determinations were from trees in the budwood foundation grove or
screenhouse at Dundee.
Exocortis viroid continues to occupy a large share of the bureau's atten-
tion. Testing of participants' bud source trees for this mechanically
transmitted disease accounted for 1863 tests during the biennium in a
cooperative effort with the Plant Pathology Bureau.
The importance of maintaining sanitary procedures while pruning or cut-
ting budwood in scion groves and nurseries can be clearly seen by compar-
ing rootstock trends. In 1960, exocortis-susceptible rootstocks made up on-
ly 2% of the total registered nursery tree production. By 1970, 26% of the
total were susceptible, and by 1978, 52% of the nursery tree production
reported to this bureau were propagated on exocortis-susceptible
rootstocks. Average exocortis spread in scion groves by contamination is
up from 5.1% in 1976 to 5.5% overall. This shift in rootstock popularity was
brought about primarily by the heavy losses in commercial groves on rough
lemon stocks due to "young tree decline" or "blight." This disease of
unknown origin continues to cause severe losses in nearly all citrus-growing
districts. Propagations on rough lemon rootstock fell from nearly 50% of
the total trees propagated in 1968 to 1% in 1978.
Indexing of plants derived from shoot-tip grafting was begun on 36 selec-
tions representing 16 varieties. This important work, that was begun in
1976, will enable these varieties to be used on a wide range of rootstocks
previously prohibited by virus disease problems.
Eight navel, 5 Valencia, and 1 selection each of Bearss lemon and Tahiti
lime from shoot-tip grafting have been propagated for addition to the foun-
dation grove planting in the spring of 1979. Selections will be observed for
typical horticultural characteristics before budwood is released to the in-
dustry for commercial use.
The bureau staff collected yield and maturity data from the young foun-
dation planting during this biennium. Comparisons between rootstocks and
within variety selections will become more significant as the trees mature.
Yields from 8-year-old nucellar navel selections continue to compare
favorably with old-line selections in the foundation grove and in
cooperative yield trials under commercial care. Four out of five nucellar
selections ranked consistently in the top 15% in an Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) comparison of 25 selections.
Investigation of a "dwarfing factor," observed during indexing tests in






Division of Plant Industry


three selections of Pineapple orange, were initiated in cooperation with the
IFAS research staff. Tree size control in citrus holds considerable promise
in reducing harvesting and production costs.
Cooperative work on various projects with staff members of IFAS and
USDA research agencies in the areas of tristeza, exocortis, young tree
decline/blight, yield trials, and indexing techniques continue to be mutually
beneficial.
First fruits from a group of seedling selections of "Rhode Red" Valencia
were examined in March 1978. The exceptionally dark orange interior color
characteristic of this cultivar was quite evident in all trees. One preliminary
selection was made for propagation, and two selections were noted as off-
type. Further studies are planned with these trees.
Hot-water treatment of citrus seed as a disease preventive measure con-
tinues to be well accepted by Florida citrus nurserymen. A total of 10,270
quarts of seed was treated this biennium and returned $2489 in fees. The
latest trend for rootstock use in Florida may be seen from records of the
1978 treatment certificates. Sour orange amounted to 35% of the seed
treated, with Carrizo citrange second at 34%. Cleo at 17% and Milam at 6%
were the remaining significant varieties. Rough lemon accounted for only
0.64% of the total, reflecting the severe disease losses to trees on this stock.

Personnel Changes
In July 1977, Joyce Cox joined the clerical staff, replacing Phillis Glaze,
who transferred to another division.
Sherry Kitto resigned in September 1977, to complete work on her MS
degree at the University of Florida. Scott Petersen filled this position from
December to April 1978.
Don Bridges retired as Chief of the Citrus Budwood Registration Bureau,
effective December 31, 1977, after more than 20 years of service to Florida
agriculture. He served for 18 years in the Citrus Budwood Registration Pro-
gram, 14 years as Chief of the Bureau, succeeding Gerald Norman.
In February 1978, Charles Youtsey was appointed Chief of the Bureau
and Leon Hebb was made Agricultural Specialist Supervisor. Cliff Gaddis
was appointed to fill Hebb's Agricultural Products Specialist II position in
June 1978. At the close of the biennium, one Agricultural Products
Specialist II position remained vacant.

Training
Training and technical information was presented by G. D. Bridges, C. O.
Youtsey, and Sherry Kitto for Division Training Class XXXIII, and field
instruction for a Florida Southern College citrus class, and a University of
Florida advanced citrus class. Charles Youtsey provided classroom instruc-
tion on citrus viruses and program procedures at Florida Southern College.
Sherry Kitto demonstrated shoot-tip grafting for 10 delegates to the Inter-
national Citriculture Congress who visited the Budwood Bureau head-
quarters. Miss Kitto provided instruction to Donna Hutchinson of the bud-






Thirty-second Biennial Report


wood staff and Gail Wisler of the Gainesville plant pathology staff. Mrs.
Hutchinson presented a demonstration of the technique for the Chinese
Citrus Studies Delegation of the People's Republic of China. Intermittent
visitors from Jamaica, Argentina, Israel, Virgin Islands, Spain, Venezuela,
Swaziland, Brazil, Australia, Mexico, Zaire, Guam, India, and Honduras
were taken on field trips and given slide talks during the biennium. Staff
members of university horticultural departments from South Carolina,
California, and Arizona visited the budwood office and were briefed on the
work of the budwood program.

Trips, Talks and Papers
Florida State Horticultural Society annual meetings for 1976 and 1977
were attended by G. D. Bridges, C. O. Youtsey and L. H. Hebb. Mr. Bridges
served as Citrus Section Vice President for 1977.
Florida Citrus Nurserymen Association quarterly meetings were attend-
ed by G. D. Bridges and C. O. Youtsey.
The Annual Business Conference of the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services for 1977 was attended by six budwood
staff members: Charles Youtsey, R. R. Nixon, Jr., Leon Hebb, Charles
Thornhill, Julia Wiggins, and Bernice Sluyter.
Messrs. Bridges, Youtsey, Hebb, and Miss Kitto attended the 1977
meeting of the International Society of Citriculture in Orlando, where a
paper titled "Cultural Practices in Florida Citrus Nurseries 1976," co-
authored by G. D. Bridges and C. O. Youtsey, was presented by Mr.
Bridges. A large pictorial exhibit, designed by the Technical Assistance
Bureau, described the technique of shoot-tip grafting currently being used
by the Budwood Bureau to develop and propagate virus-free budlines.
Charles Youtsey represented Commisioner Conner at an energy
workshop sponsored by the National Department of Energy and Walt
Disney Enterprises at Disney World in May 1978. National recommenda-
tions for conservation and efficient use of energy resources for agriculture
will be the result of the workshop.
IFAS Circular 430, "Citrus Nursery Practices" authored by D. P. H.
Tucker and Charles Youtsey was published during the biennium.
G. D. Bridges and C. O. Youtsey participated in the annual Citrus
Growers Institute, held in Kissimmee, 1976, and Sebring, 1977.
The reorganization meeting of the Hughes Memorial Foundation Board
of Directors in September 1977, named Charles Youtsey as Secretary-
Treasurer.
USDA seminar, Orlando, July 1977, was attended by G. D. Bridges, C. O.
Youtsey and Miss Kitto, and the Foundation Farm fall update meeting in
Leesburg was attended by G. D. Bridges and C. O. Youtsey. In March 1978,
the meeting on "blight" was attended by Leon Hebb.
Mr. Hebb made three trips to Miami to obtain propagative material for
arboretum specimens from the USDA-ARS (SEA) Subtropical Horticulture
Research and Plant Introduction Station.






TABLE 1. Scion and rootstock types used for registered nursery trees 7/74 thru 6/76 & 7/76 thru 6/78
Total by Scion Type Total by Rootstock
% of Rough Sweet Sour
Scion Total Total Carrizo Cleo Milam P.trif. lemon lime orange Swingle Misc.
Early oranges 7/74-6/76 669,055 26.0 257,654 90,340 35,823 26,387 5,069 1,907 224,824 26,996 55
7/76-6/78 1,096,365 35.6 472,364 176,890 49,816 54,123 3,762 404 249,750 47,476 41,780
Mid-season 7/74-6/76 292,089 11.2 107,352 45,406 30,184 2,114 5,809 4,365 87,276 9,300 283
7/76-6/78 260,812 8.5 135,490 38,352 37,676 2,044 3,552 545 28,062 8,945 6,146
Late oranges 7/74-6/76 825,499 31.9 554,709 30,778 74,299 200 35,233 4,545 76,628 23,277 25,830
7/76-6/78 938,369 30.4 561,107 39,951 117,963 2,807 28,335 6,477 109,597 43,359 28,773
Red & pink 7/74-6/76 378,191 14.6 87,965 12,758 12,267 3,104 1,124 30 235,264 25,624 55
grapefruit 7/76-6/78 368,012 11.9 96,680 16,804 14,419 8,587 24 4,124 168,386 39,355 19,633
Duncan 7/74-6/76 40,616 1.6 10,374 1,823 14,755 2,062 135 415 7,220 3,208 624
7/76-6/78 37,819 1.2 14,726 3,984 14,530 15 564 0 72 1,458 2,470
Marsh 7/74-6/76 130,631 5.0 31,983 2,384 11,445 0 0 45 79,181 5,538 55
7/76-6/78 143,022 4.6 43,341 4,299 20,680 2,073 612 0 53,685 17,288 1,044
Limes 7/74-6/76 17,027 .7 194 65 0 0 156 0 3,679 5,557 7,376
7/76-6/78 2,748 .1 16 32 154 15 72 0 32 637 1,790
Lemons 7/74-6/76 13,863 .5 23 63 0 0 54 3,333 0 3,094 7,296
7/76-6/78 1,555 .1 0 0 0 15 48 0 32 1,460 0
Tangerine
& Mandarin 7/74-6/76 220,005 8.5 46,623 33,718 25,522 17,934 986 19,689 51,130 19,322 5,081
hybrids 7/76-6/78 233,864 7.6 74,846 51,416 10,510 29,616 6,892 32,539 15,453 6,438 6,154


7/74-6/76 2,587,976
7/76-6/78 3,082,566
7/74-6/76
7/76-6/78


1,096,877 217,335 204,295 51,801 48,566 34,329 765,202 121,916 46,655
1,398,570 331,728 265,748 99,295 43,861 44,089 625,069 166,416 107,790*
42.4 8.4 7.9 2.0 1.9 1.3 29.6 4.7 1.8
45.4 10.7 8.6 3.2 1.4 1.4 20.3 5.4 3.6


*Reflects increased use of Volkamer lemon and Citrus macrophylla


Total by
rootstock
% each
rootstock






Thirty-second Biennial Report


BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
H. A. Denmark, Chief of Entomology

Summary
The Bureau of Entomology provides arthropod identification service,
conducts limited investigations of certain economic problems, assists in in-
structing Agricultural Products Specialists, continues to build a general ar-
thropod reference collection, conducts taxonomic investigations, super-
vises the security of the Biological Control Laboratory, and develops the
taxonomic and biological control literature to support these respon-
sibilities.
There were 280,162 specimens identified from 18,308 samples received
during the biennium. The number of specimens added to the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods during the biennium was: 196,700 pinned and
labeled specimens, 12,197 slide mounts, 15,874 papered specimens, and
13,038 vials, for a total of 237,809 processed specimens.
The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hubner), was found in
Jackson, Calhoun, Holmes, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa, Gadsden, Jefferson, and
Hamilton counties. Hamilton County is a new county record for this pest,
but to date it is not a threat to the sweet corn growing areas of peninsular
Florida.
The Cross State Barge Canal studies were made by Dr. Robert E.
Woodruff through grants from the Florida Game and Freshwater Fish
Commission, with funds provided to the Commission by the U. S. Army
Corps of Engineers. He also conducted studies of cypress insects through
the Center for Wetlands, University of Florida, under H. T. Odum.
Insects are being collected in the Osceola National Forest and the Suwan-
nee River between Columbia and Gilchrist counties. This study is in con-
junction with the National Fish and Wildlife Laboratory of the U. S.
Department of the Interior. The general objectives of this study are to ob-
tain information on the endangered species present, and assessment of
their populations, and the possible effects of stripmining for phosphates.
A predacious mite, Phytoseius woodburyi De Leon, was found associated
with an unknown eriophyid mite on oak in Dade County. This is the first
continental U. S. record for P. woodburyi.
A barn itch mite, Chorioptes bovis (Hering), was reported from calves at
Williston, Levy County. This is the first report of this barn itch mite from
Florida.
An armored scale, Chionaspis gleditsiae Sanders, was collected on
waterlocust, Gleditsia aquatica Marsh. at Sandy Point, Suwannee County.
This is a new state record for this scale.
A scale, Chionaspis triformis Tippins and Beshear, was found on leaves
and stems of river birch trees, Betula nigra Linnaeus, near Providence,
Union County. This is a new state record. It is also known in Georgia but is
of no economic importance.






Division of Plant Industry


An armored scale, Opuntiaspis carinata (Cockerell), was collected on pony
tail palm, Beaucarnea recurvata Lemaire, at Boynton Beach, Palm Beach
County. This is a new state record.
A soft scale, Parafairmairis new species, was infesting sedge plants,
Bulbostylis sp., in Stuart, Martin County. This is a new state record. The
new species is being described by Drs. J. O. Howell and H. H. Tippins, Tif-
ton, Georgia.
A leafhopper, Graphocephala hieroglyphica (Say), was caught on a sticky
board trap at Monticello, Jefferson County. This is a new state record. The
nearest previously reported state is Georgia. This species has a wide range
in the U. S.
A false powderpost beetle, Xylopsocus capucinus Fabricius, was in-
festing cassava, Manihot esculenta Crantz, at Homestead, Dade County.
This insect is known from Brazil and Madagascar, but according to our
records, it is new to Florida and is a new North American record as well. It
has been reported on guava, derris, mango, and tamarind.
A weevil belonging to the subfamily Baridinae (genus and species
unknown) had been found feeding on several tropical fleshy fruits in the
Dade County area in 1976. It has now been found in Broward and Palm
Beach counties.
The Arthropod Introduction Committee has processed 103 requests in-
volving 252 species (some of which are duplicates) during this biennium.
Anyone wishing to introduce insects or related arthropods should write to:
H. A. Denmark, Chairman, Arthropod Introduction Committee, Division of
Plant Industry, P. O. Box 1269, Gainesville, Florida 32602.

Bureau Activities
The Biological Control Laboratory continues to serve as a clearing house
for most of the southeastern United States in the introduction of exotic
species. To date the University of Florida, Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences (IFAS), the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Science
and Education Administration, Agricultural Research (SEA,AR formerly
ARS), and the Division of Plant Industry (DPI) have requested permission
to evaluate approximately 12 parasites and predators under rigid security
for their effectiveness against pest insects.
The Arthropod Introduction Committee was established to regulate the
movement of arthropods into and within the State of Florida. It is com-
posed of Dr. C. L. Campbell, Division of Animal Industry, Florida Depart-
ment of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS); Dr. Andrew J.
Rogers, Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services (HRS);
Dr. Fowden G. Maxwell and Dr. W. H. Whitcomb, University of Florida
(IFAS); Dr. Donald E. Weidhaas, U. S. Department of Agriculture
(SEA,AR); Lt. Col. Brantley Goodson, Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission; and Harold A. Denmark, Chairman, FDACS, DPI. During
this biennium 93 requests, involving 96 species, were received for the in-







Thirty-second Biennial Report


production or movement of arthropods into or within the state from various
organizations.
Funds were requested, but not received, from the 1972-73, 1973-74,
1974-75, 1975-76, 1976-77, and 1977-78 legislature for doubling the space of
the entomology wing. Space is badly needed, and utility cabinets had to be
moved out of the hall to conform with the state fire code.
Mr. G. Wally Dekle retired October 31, 1976, and Dr. Avas B. Hamon, a
graduate of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University,
Blacksburg, Virginia, filled this vacancy October 1, 1976. Dr. E. Eric
Grissell resigned January 26, 1978, to take a position with the United
States National Museum in Washington, D. C.. Dr. Lionel A. Stange, a
graduate of the University of California, Davis, filled this vacancy
February 3, 1978.
R. W. Swanson is developing methods to mass-rear the papaya fruit fly,
Toxotrypana curvicauda Gerstaecker, with the ultimate aim of developing
sterile techniques for eradicating this pest from Florida. This fly is the
limiting factor in papaya production in Florida.
PUBLICATIONS: Twenty-four circulars and several papers were
published.
IDENTIFICATIONS: Identifications of the various arthropod groups
are made by 6 entomologists. The entomologists and the groups for which
they are responsible are as follows:


A. B. Hamon:
H. A. Denmark:
E. E. Grissell and
L. A. Stange:
F. W. Mead:







H. V. Weems, Jr.:



R. E. Woodruff:


Scales, mealybugs, and Aleyrodidae.
Aphids, mites, thrips, and ticks.
Hymenoptera, gall-forming insects,
and Neuroptera.
Adult Lepidoptera; Diptera, suborder
Nematocera, which includes midges
and mosquitoes; Hemiptera;
Homoptera: Psyllidae, plus suborder
Auchenorhyricha, which includes
leafhoppers, planthoppers, spit-
tlebugs, treehoppers, and cicadas.
Adult higher Diptera (suborder
Brachycera), Aleyrodidae, Arachnida
(except Acarina), and miscellaneous
smaller arthropod groups.
Adult Coleoptera and Orthoptera.


Dr. L.A. Hetrick, Professor Emeritus, University of Florida, IFAS,
Department of Entomology and Nematology, continues to do routine iden-
tification of termites. Dr. Dale Habeck, University of Florida, IFAS,
Department of Entomology and Nematology, identifies the Arctiidae
adults and immatures, and all other immature insects. Drs. Minter J.







Division of Plant Industry


Westfall, Lewis Berner, and Fred C. Thompson, University of Florida,
Department of Zoology, identify the Odonata, Ephemeroptera, and
Mollusca, respectively. Dr. Gary Buckingham, U. S. Department of
Agriculture, ARS, replaced Mr. Neal Spencer in the Biological Control
Laboratory, September 15, 1977.
Six insect cabinets were added during the biennium.
AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY: H. V. Weems, Jr. is the head curator
and is responsible for the overall development of the Florida State Collec-
tion of Arthropods. He also coordinates the Research Associate Program
and serves as editor of the irregularly published series, Arthropods of
Florida and Neighboring Land Areas.
F. W. Mead is the survey entomologist for the state. The Cooperative
Plant Pest Report (CPPR) has been a joint effort of the USDA and DPI for
the past 22 years. Weekly reports of insect activities are fowarded to
Washington, D. C., where all state reports are combined and published in
the CPPR. Monthly reports are combined with other reports of DPI
technical sections and are published as the TRI-OLOG Y Technical Report.
R. E. Woodruff is in charge of the library development program for the
entomology portion of DPI. The DPI library is the primary repository for
the taxonomic and general zoogeographic literature, while the Hume
Library at the University of Florida is the primary repository for all subject
areas. Drs. Woodruff and Tom Walker coordinate the entomological library
purchases for the 2 organizations to eliminate costly and unnecessary
duplication.
A. B. Hamon, a specialist of scale insects, is also developing the collection
of whiteflies and mealybugs of Florida. Adequate descriptions and keys are
lacking for many species of whiteflies.
L. A. Stange is developing and curating the Hymenoptera and the
Neuroptera. He has specialized in some groups of both orders world-wide.
Each entomologist is responsible for curating the respective groups of
assigned arthropods.
Mr. Ricardo Ungarte from Honduras visited the Bureau for instructions
on curating, identifying and regulatory laws.
Dr. A. N. Tissot delivered the aphid collection, the last remaining collec-
tion of IFAS (developed by Tissot since 1925). His reprint files have also
been transferred to DPI.

Cooperative Economic Insect Survey Program
F. W. Mead, Taxonomic Entomologist
The Division is the cooperative state agency under contract with the
USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Plant Protection and
Quarantine Programs, New Pest and Detection and Survey Staff, to
prepare weekly survey reports and annual summaries of economic insect
conditions in Florida. Highlights in the weekly reports and annual sum-
maries from Florida and other states are published by the USDA in the






Thirty-second Biennial Report


weekly Cooperative Plant Pest Report (CPPR). DPI distributes its own
TRI-OLOGY Technical Report each month to summarize the most signifi-
cant insects, plant pathogens, and nematodes found in Florida. Most of this
information results from the processing and determination of samples sent
to DPI during the preceding month. The author, as survey entomologist, is
responsible for assembling the entomology portion of TRI-OLOGY each
month and for being a rotating editor four times a year. Information is
received from many sources, but perhaps the most consistent general
source is from the DPI office in Gainesville, which acts as the state clear-
inghouse as well as the focal point for technical services to DPI personnel
around the state. Much important information is obtained from the Univer-
sity of Florida Agricultural Research and Education Centers, and Exten-
sion scientists, USDA personnel, and professional scouts. All of these
reports help in varying degrees to fulfill the objectives of the survey and
detection program. These objectives are:
1) To assist agricultural workers by supplying current information on in-
sect activity so that crops can be more adequately protected from in-
sect attacks.
2) To aid and assure more prompt detection of newly introduced insect
pests.
3) To determine losses caused by insects.
4) To maintain records on the occurrence of economic insects.
5) To aid manufacturers and suppliers of insecticides and control equip-
ment to determine areas of urgent need for supplies and equipment.
6) To develop a workable insect pest forecasting service.

Biological Control Laboratory
L. A. Stange, Taxonomic Entomologist
During the biennium three cooperating agencies (Division of Plant In-
dustry; University of Florida (IFAS); and U. S. Department of Agriculture)
have been sharing the Biological Control Laboratory facilities.
U.S.D.A. personnel at the laboratory worked principally with the
biological control of aquatic weeds. During the biennium the host specifi-
city tests of an argentine moth, Sameodes albiguttalis (Warren) (Pyralidae)
were completed, and the moth was first released in September 1977, for the
control of water hyacinth. Host specificity studies of Acentropus niveus
(Oliv.) (Pyralidae) and Litodactylus leucogaster Marsham (Curculionidae)
for possible use against Eurasian water milfoil are in progress.
IFAS personnel worked with parasites and predators, especially of
whiteflies, scale insects, and beetles. Prospaltella lahorensis Howard
(Aphelinidae) was first released June 22, 1977, for control of citrus whitefly,
Dialeurodes citri (Ashmead). Continued studies of the parasites Pediobius
foveolatus (Crawford) (first released in 1975 against the Mexican bean
beetle) and Aphytis theae (Cameron) (first released in 1976 against tea
scale) are being made.






Division of Plant Industry


Florida state law requires a permit for the introduction of any live
organism into the state. During the biennium 93 requests to import insects
(approx. 96 species), mites (1 species), isopods (1 species), and nematodes (3
species) were reviewed by the Arthropod Introduction Committee. Five re-
quests were denied. Most of the approved requests were for organisms
destined for destruction in controlled laboratory studies. However, about
29 species of parasites and predators were allowed to be imported as poten-
tial biological control agents to authorized laboratories.
Out-of-state exportations were Telenomus remus Nixon (N.J.; S.C.; Ga.),
Vogtia malloi Pastrana (Australia), Rodalia cardinalis (Mulsant) (Ecuador),
Pediobius foveolatus (Crawford) (Mexico), Aphytis theae (Cameron) (Calif.;
N.J.), Neochetina sp. (S.C.), Sameodes albiguttalis (Warren) (Miss.;
Panama), Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Ga.), and Agasicles
hydrophila Selman & Vogt (N. C.; S. C.).

Entomology Library Development
R. E. Woodruff, Taxonomic Entomologist
The cooperative agreement between DPI and the University of Florida
continues to permit maximum usefulness of resources by avoiding duplica-
tion and division of specialization. The entomology portion of the DPI
library continues as the repository for taxonomic and zoogeographic
literature, while the Hume Library of the University of Florida emphasizes
other aspects of entomology. Catalogue cards for all entomology holdings
are interchanged so that each catalog reflects the holdings in both institu-
tions.
During the biennium, librarian Mrs. Ann Owens resigned to move to New
Mexico, and she was succeeded by Mrs. June Jacobson.
Several donations of Library materials, during the biennium, have great-
ly enhanced our holdings. Especially noteworthy among these were the
following:
1) from Dr. G. B. Fairchild, Adjunct Professor, Dept. Entomology,
University of Florida: Vol. 1-24 of Systematic Zoology, previously
unrepresented in our holdings.
2) from Dr. A. N. Tissot, Professor Emeritus, Dept. Entomology, Univer-
sity of Florida: 425 reprints and 29 books on Aphididae, an extremely
valuable asset along with the aphid slide collection.
3) from F. N. Young, Dept. Zoology, Indiana University, Bloomington,
Indiana: several hundred entomological reprints.
4) from William Rosenberg, Hazelwood, North Carolina: two rare books
on Coleoptera.
The most noteworthy single acquisition of entomology literature in re-
cent years was Hume Library's purchase of the reprint library of the late
Howard E. Hinton. When Dr. Hinton visited with us, he indicated his
desire that we should have an opportunity to obtain his collection upon his
death. Through the long overdue exceptional funds provided for library
development at the University of Florida, this unique library was pur-







Thirty-second Biennial Report


chased. The collection consisted of approximately 32,000 items covering
the entire field of entomology, but especially rich in Professor Hinton's
specialities: physiology, insect eggs, evolution, behavior, insect
biochemistry, fossil insects, stored product beetles, taxonomy of Elmidae
(riffle beetles), scanning electron microscope work, and microstructure of
insect integument. It should be a resource of great value to the entire en-
tomological community.

Report On Biological Control Research
At Agricultural Research And Education Center,
Homestead
R. W. Swanson, Entomologist
The parasitoids, Doryctobracon cereum (Gahan) and Biosteres
longicaudatus (Ashmead) that were released to control the Caribfly,
Anastrepha suspense Loew, in the early 1970's have been monitored con-
tinuously since that time. These parasitoids, along with Opius anastrephae
Vier, which was first reared from the Caribfly in 1974, were collected a
number of times during this period.
Parasitoids Collected
Parasitoid Number collected
B. longicaudatus 1,503
D. cereum 254
0. anastrephae 120
These data indicate that B. longicaudatus has continued to be the dominate
parasite and 0. anastrephae, a probable natural introduction, continues to
increase in numbers. A decrease in the number of A. suspense catches may
indicate that the parasitoid releases are beginning to show results.
Opius trinidadensis Gahan and Opius oophilus Fullaway, two parasitoids
released during the previous biennium, failed to become established. It is
too early to determine if Opius concolor Szepl., released in June 1978, has
become established.
Parasitoids Imported: 1976-1978
Parasitoid Stage Attacked Importations Source Releases
0. trinidadensis larva 1 Trinidad 0
Opius bellus larva 1 Trinidad 0
Trybliographa daci mature larva 5 France 0
0. concolor larva 2 France 1
Dirhinus giffardii pupa 1 France 0
We were unable to colonize 0. trinidadensis and 0. bellus, but the other
three parasitoids have been colonized as follows:
Parasitoid Generation Number
T. daci 8 200
0 concolor 4 75
D. giffardii 3 1,600







Division of Plant Industry


These 3 parasitoids have successfully adapted to A. suspense after having
been reared on Medfly, Ceratitis capitata (Wied.) in France.
The papaya fruit fly, Toxotrypana curvicauda Gerst. has resisted our at-
tempts at colonization. This fly must be colonized before we are able to
move on the alternatives for chemical control, i.e., male sterilization,
trapping by use of pheromones, etc. The recent harsh winters have reduced
the fly populations, but it is now coming back in large numbers. We are
studying different types of larval media in the hope that we will be able to
colonize T. curvicauda, now that it is readily available.
A study was initiated on indigenous whiteflies and their natural enemies.
This was in association with the blackfly, Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby,
program. Possibly parasites of this pest could be reared on an apparently
endless supply of indigenous whiteflies. We determined that there were
several parasites and predators with only one being feasible for further
study. An attempt was made to rear this lady beetle predator, Delphastus
pusillus (Le Conte), on artificial medium, but we have no results to date. At
present, we are attempting to rear Prospaltella opulenta Silvestri and
Amitus hesperidum Silvestri on whiteflies indigenous to Florida.

Citrus Blackfly, Aleurocanthus woglumi, in Florida
Avas B. Hamon, Taxonomic Entomologist
The citrus blackfly, Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby, originated in Asia
and is one of the most serious insect pests of citrus in the Western
Hemisphere. It has been a constant threat to Florida citrus since it was
first discovered in Jamaica in 1913. Citrus is the favorite host, but it will
lay eggs on at least 75 hosts. Under laboratory conditions, it will complete
at least one life cycle on Ardisia escallonioides Schlechtendal & Champion,
Eugenia unifolia Linnaeus, Myrsine guianensis (Aublet) Kuntze, Persea
borbonia (Linnaeus) Sprenger, and Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi.
The insects feed on the undersides of leaves and cause serious damage by
the removal of sap, accompanied by the deposition of large quantities of
honeydew. The honeydew falls on the topsides of the leaves directly below
the feeding insects. A fungus with a black, sooty appearance grows in the
honeydew and interferes with the normal functions of the leaves by re-
ducing photosynthesis and respiration. Plants stop blooming and produc-
ing fruit as a result of this interference and may become so weakened that
dieback occurs.
Eggs are deposited in a spiral pattern on the undersides of leaves, and
each spiral will have approximately 40 eggs. The eggs are tiny, oval, and
dull white when laid but soon turn yellowish brown to dark brown and
average about 0.25 mm (one-hundredth of an inch) long. Larvae are dark
brown, spiny, and 0.25 to 0.89 mm long. The pupae are black, about 1 mm
long, and have several long spines on their backs. The adults are slightly
over 1 mm long and are covered with a powder which gives them a slate-
blue appearance. The wings are dark with pale spots.






Thirty-second Biennial Report


The known distribution in Florida is Broward, Dade, and Palm Beach
counties; however, small isolated infestations were found in Fort Pierce and
North Port St. Lucie, St. Lucie County. An all-out effort is being made to
eradicate citrus blackfly from Florida.

Chionaspis gleditsiae Sanders
(Homoptera: Diaspididae)
Avas B. Hamon, Taxonomic Entomologist
Chionaspis gleditsiae (NEW STATE RECORD) was collected by Mr. A.
E. Graham at Sandy Point, Suwannee County, Florida, on 12-V-1977. The
host was Gleditsia aquatica Marsh. (waterlocust).
In "Florida Armored Scale Insects" Dekle (1965) indicated that Merrill's
publication "Revision of the scale insects of Florida" contained a descrip-
tion of the armor, but that no records or slides were in the possession of
DPI; therefore, he deleted this species from the revised 1976 edition (Dekle,
1976).
Apparently this scale insect infests only Gleditsia spp. and is no threat to
any agricultural crop in Florida at this time.

Chionaspis triformis Tippins and Beshear
(Homoptera: Diaspididae)
Avas B. Hamon, Taxonomic Entomologist
Chionaspis triformis (NEW STATE RECORD) was collected by Mr. A.
E. Graham at RFD Providence, Union County, Florida, on 11-XI-1977. The
host was Betula nigra L. (river birch).
This armored scale insect is also known from Georgia and apparently is
no threat to any agricultural crop in Florida at this time.

Opuntiaspis carinata (Cockerell)
(Homoptera: Diaspididae)
Avas B. Hamon, Taxonomic Entomologist
Opuntiaspis carinata (NEW UNITED STATES RECORD) was collected
by J. E. Bennett at Boynton Beach, Palm Beach County, Florida, on
7-IV-1978. On 7-VI-78, H. G. Schmidt collected it in Polk County (NEW
COUNTY RECORD). In addition, it has been collected at several nurseries
in Palm Beach County. The host in all cases has been Beaucarnea recurvata
Lem. (pony tail palm). Apparently the plants were shipped to Florida 2 or 3
years ago from suppliers in Texas. It is suspected that the plants originated
in Mexico because of past quarantine interceptions by the USDA.
The economic importance is unknown, but because one very old record is
on "lime", precautions have been taken to learn the extent of infestations
and to apply controls. Other hosts known from interceptions are species of







Division of Plant Industry


Anthurium, Nolina, Oncidium, Pedilanthus, Philodendron, Theobroma,
Tillandsia, and Yucca.
Armor of female is about 2.5 mm long, straight, rather slender, gray to
brownish, and with a slight median ridge (carina). The male armor is similar
in color and shape but smaller.


Darkwinged Fungus Gnats, Bradysia spp.
(Diptera: Sciaridae) In Florida Greenhouses
F. W. Mead, Taxonomic Entomologist
Darkwinged fungus gnats, Bradysia spp., were an increasing problem in
greenhouses. Part of the problem involved large numbers of adult gnats
becoming a nuisance around the faces of workers. A more serious aspect
was increasing evidence that the larvae or maggots (fig. 1) were actually
destroying roots and other plant tissue of several kinds of ornamentals in
commercial production (fig. 2). In general these fungus gnats feed on decay-
ing organic matter and fungi, and do not normally attack healthy ornamen-
tals. It is believed that increased usage of organic growing media and over-
watering have contributed to a gnat buildup in some greenhouses. Good
cultural practices, such as eliminating old plants, rotting materials, spilled
potting soil, and avoidance of overwatering are very helpful in keeping gnat
populations at low levels. Dr. R. A. Hamlen, Ornamental Entomologist at
the University of Florida Agricultural Research Center, Apopka, conducted
chemical control tests throughout the biennium. Several materials were
showing promise as this was being written, and either had been given
clearance by EPA or were in the process of being cleared for use.
















Fig. 1. Larvae of darkwinged fungus Fig. 2. Mammillaria cactus plants in
gnat, Bradysia sp., infesting internal which the root and core areas have
tissues of Mammillaria cactus. Notice been destroyed by larvae of a dark-
dark heads and translucent bodies of winged fungus gnat, Bradysia sp.
larvae.






Thirty-second Biennial Report


Special Projects

H. A. DENMARK, Chief of Entomology

(1) Phytoseiidae of Jamaica (completed).
(2) Nomenclatural changes of some phytoseiid mites (completed).
(3) New phytoseiid mites from successional and climax plant com-
munities in New Jersey (completed).
(4) Revision of the family Phytoseiidae.
(5) Coordinating information on Diaprepes abbreviatus L.
(6) Arranged for indefinite loan of the U. S. National Museum's
phytoseiid collection transferred to Florida State Collection of
Arthropods.


E. E. GRISSELL, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Survey of egg parasites of Diaprepes abbreviatus and related
weevils.
(2) Taxonomy and world catalog of Torymidae.
(3) Study of the genus Rileya and world Rileyinae (Eurytomidae).
(4) Taxonomy of Tanaostigmatidae.
(5) Nesting biologies of Pluto new species and Prionyx thomae
(Sphecidae).
(6) Survey of salt marsh insects and preparation of guide to
Hymenoptera of eastern United States salt marshes (guide to be
published by National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration).
(7) Descriptions of new species of parasitic wasps in amber.
(8) Review of Neartic Podagrioninae.


A. B. HAMON, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Continuation of gathering material and information for a bulletin
on soft scale insects of Florida.
(2) Initial study of the Aleyrodidae (whiteflies) of Florida which will
lead to a bulletin on the Aleyrodidae of Florida.
(3) Currently studying Aleyrodidae (whiteflies) of citrus in Florida
with Drs. Reese I. Sailer and Nguyen Ru, IFAS, University of
Florida.
(4) A taxonomic description of the apterous male of Rhizoecus
palestineae (Hambleton) (Homoptera: Pseudococcidae).
(5) Identification of Aleyrodidae (whiteflies) for the USDA, because
they have no taxonomic entomologist currently assigned to this
family of important plant insects.






Division of Plant Industry


L. A. STANGE, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Taxonomic studies of the genus Zethus F. (Hymenoptera:
Eumenidae) of the Western Hemisphere. Currently a study of the
Venezuelan fauna is being made.
(2) Antlion biology. Rearing of larvae, especially Myrmeleon from
Florida, is in progress to obtain associated adults and parasitoids
(Chalcididae and Bombyliidae). To date about 60 adults have been
reared, but no parasitoids have emerged. Also prey data (espe-
cially ants) is being accumulated from the natural habitats.
(3) Anthiidine bees (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) of the Neotropical
Region. Continued taxonomic studies of the fauna of Argentina.
(4) Neuroptera (Planipennia) of Florida. Collecting and identifying of
the families Coniopterygidae, Dilaridae, Sisyridae, Berothidae,
Mantispidae, Hemerobiidae, Chrysopidae, Myrmeleontidae, and
Ascalaphidae. Distribution patterns, biology and variation are
being studied.
(5) Myrmeleontidae of the world (Neuroptera). Taxonomic studies of
diverse groups on a world basis to establish a better classification
of the family.
(6) Taxonomic studies of the Platymantispinae (Neuroptera: Man-
tispidae) of the Western Hemisphere. Continued investigation of
the genera and species of this group of insects which attack prin-
cipally Hymenoptera.
(7) Seasonal distribution of Neuroptera taken from the blacklight
trap operated at the Doyle Conner Building in Gainesville. Nearly
daily examination of trap samples is made.


F. W. MEAD, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Year-round daily operation of a blacklight trap at the border be-
tween experiment station, University of Florida, and the Doyle
Conner Building area.
Main purpose: Numerical counts of economic moths for the
cooperative weekly survey report and surveillance tool in the
midst of a highly diversified and active nursery and agricultural
area.
(2) Taxonomic and life history research on Oliarus spp. (Homoptera:
Cixiidae).
(3) Taxonomic assistance on IFAS survey (University of Florida) for
potential vectors of lethal yellowing disease of palms.
(4) Taxonomic assistance on saltmarsh insect project by Florida
State University.
(5) Taxonomic assistance on insect ecological studies at Tall Timbers
Research Station, Tallahassee, by University of Florida faculty






Thirty-second Biennial Report


and students.
(6) Series of short papers on life stages of predatory stink bugs in
Florida; junior author with D. B. Richman.
(7) Served as instructor in special problem course on leafhopper iden-
tification at University of Florida, Gainesville.
(8) European corn borer survey. This is a cooperative project in
which several persons have either operated blacklight traps or
pheromone traps. The supply of pheromone attractant was kindly
supplied by Dr. William B. Showers, USDA, at Iowa State
University, Ames. To date, no European corn borer moths have
been caught in these traps which were placed at several suitable
locations in central and northern Florida during spring 1978.
The European corn borer records based on larval and blacklight
trap captures, remained scattered in northern Florida and were
far removed from the commercial sweet corn areas of central and
southern Florida.
(9) Alfalfa insects. Alfalfa fields at Gainesville were surveyed on a
limited basis to determine population trends of several economic
insect species.


H. V. WEEMS, Jr., Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Prepare a bulletin on the family Syrphidae (Order Diptera) of the
southeastern United States. Dr. F. Christian Thompson, USDA
taxonomic entomologist at the (U. S.) National Museum of
Natural History, is the co-investigator.
(2) Continue a taxonomic and ecological study of the Syrphidae of
Cranberry Glades, a large disjunct bog in the Monongahela Na-
tional Forest of West Virginia.
(3) Continue a long range study begun in 1963 of the taxonomy and
ecology of the Syrphidae of Mexico, involving occasional trips in
some years during the several seasons of the year. Dr. F. Chris-
tian Thompson is the co-investigator.
(4) Continue a taxonomic and ecological study of the Syrphidae of
the southern escarpments of the Appalachian Plateau.
(5) Prepare a publication on the genus Salpingogaster, family Syr-
phidae, based on a study made jointly with Dr. Lloyd V. Knutson
of the USDA.
(6) Participate in a faunal survey of fire ecology and habitat manage-
ment study of the arthropods of the Tall Timbers Research Sta-
tion and the surrounding wooded areas of northern Leon County.
(7) Prepare an illustrated bulletin on arthropod groups, primarily
pertaining to their identification, habitat relationships, seasonal
and geographic distribution, and techniques for collecting them
with emphasis on Florida.






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(8) Prepare an illustrated bulletin on the Florida State Collection of
Arthropods and the Research Associates Program which sup-
ports its development and publishes on arthropods.
(9) Accumulate material for an eventual illustrated bulletin on fruit
flies and related groups.
(10) Identify Syrphidae for other individuals and institutions as a
part of the process of further building a research collection of Syr-
phidae and a more thorough knowledge of this family of flies,
especially those of the Nearctic and Neotropical Regions.
(11) Visit other institutions in North and Central America, which
maintain substantial arthropod collections in order to observe
curatorial techniques, arrange exchanges of specimens, and study
collections in specific areas of taxonomic interest and respon-
sibility.
(12) Make occasional field trips, both in-state and out-of-state, to con-
duct special insect surveys, to collect material for taxonomic
study in special interest groups (especially Syrphidae), andlor
make general collections for the Florida State Collection of Ar-
thropods.
(13) Conduct exchanges of reference material to make the Florida col-
lection more complete. A special continuing effort is being made
to obtain representatives of the principal arthropod pests oc-
curring in other parts of the world, which constitute a potential
threat to Florida agriculture. This will materially aid staff
specialists in making more rapid, accurate, and complete iden-
tifications. It also provides additional material for taxonomic
research, display, and teaching purposes.
(14) Examine, process, and identify samples taken from insect flight
traps, light traps, and several kinds of baited traps located in
various parts of Florida and from those operated by collaborators
in various foreign lands, notably the Bahamas, the West Indies,
Mexico, and Central America. Valuable material obtained from
these traps is processed and added to the Florida State Collection
of Arthropods, and some specimens of special interest are noted
in the TRI-OLOGY Technical Report. During 1976-1978, insect
flight traps were operated at several ecologically distinct sites in
Alachua County, Florida, and another was operated in Nova
Scotia during the summer-fall seasons by a Research Associate of
the FSCA, Dr. G. B. Fairchild. In 1978, two additional trapping
programs were established, one at the Archbold Biological Sta-
tion near Lake Placid, Florida, the other at Fuch's Hammock near
Homestead, Florida. The trapping program is a vital part of a
faunal survey of Florida and also provides a means of monitoring
fluctuating insect populations.
(15) Experiment with designs for more effective insect flight traps
and field testing of these traps.






Thirty-second Biennial Report


(16) Develop a series of carefully planned field trips to various parts of
Florida at different times of the year to search for specific ar-
thropods known to occur in those areas but which are yet
unrepresented in the FSCA. Eventually this can become a part of
a formal, long-range survey of the arthropods of Florida which
might involve several specialists trained to carry out the field
work and technicians specially trained to process the material col-
lected in the course of such a survey. This, in turn, could be coor-
dinated with a proposed regional insect detection laboratory and
a proposed regional arthropod identification and taxonomic
research center (for which the Florida State Collection of Ar-
thropods and the DPI library would be basic resources).
(17) Prepare the arthropods portion of the manuscript concerning the
rare and endangered plants and animals of Florida, with
assistance from the members of the Special Committee on Rare
and Endangered Plants and Animals.
(18) Continue a special effort to develop complete sets of the en-
tomological publications of some of the most important and most
prolific dipterists; efforts are being made to develop the reprint
files for the various other groups of arthropods.
(19) Compilate a comprehensive report on private collections of ar-
thropods which have been committed for ultimate deposition in
the Florida State Collection of Arthropods by Research
Associates and Student Associates and those already donated
but which are currently in the possession of the donors for
curating and continued development and study.
(20) Continue to direct doctoral research of University of Florida
graduate student, Rohani Ibrahim of Malaysia, who is studying
the Tephritidae of Florida. This involves a series of collecting
trips to various parts of Florida and operation of insect flight
traps. During the past biennium Rohani completed several weeks
of work at several museums in the northeastern U. S., spending
most of the time studying at the (US)NMNH under Dr. R. H.
Foote and Mr. G. C. Steyskal.


R. E. WOODRUFF, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) The scarab beetles of Florida (Coleoptera:Scarabaeidae). Since
Part I (covering subfamilies Scarabaeinae, Geotrupinae, Apho-
diinae, Acanthocerinae, Ochodaeinae, and Hybosorinae) was
published in 1973, several thousand specimens and data have
been accumulated for an addendum. Part II on the 50 species of
Phyllophaga is in preparation and is expected to be completed in
the next biennium. Specimens and data have also been ac-
cumulating on the 84 species of Rutelinae, Dynastinae, Ceto-






Division of Plant Industry


niinae, and the remainder of the Melolonthinae which will form
the basis of Part III.
(2) Citrus weevils of the West Indies and their parasites. This joint
project with Dr. E. E. Grissell was initiated in the last biennium
in order to obtain taxonomic and biological data to form a firm
foundation for future biological control efforts against the West
Indian sugarcane rootstalk borer weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus
(L.). Previous trips had provided specimens from Jamaica and the
Dominican Republic. From June 9 to July 8, 1977, a survey was
conducted primarily in the Lesser Antilles, but included collec-
tions from 10 islands (Trinidad, Grenada, St. Vincent, St. Lucia,
Dominica, Guadeloupe, St. Kitts, Montserrat, Puerto Rico, and
the Dominican Republic). Diaprepes species were taken on all
islands except St. Kitts. Dr. Grissell reports on the parasites
elsewhere. The several thousand weevils now on hand are un-
doubtedly the largest series ever available for study. This is a
highly variable group of weevils with many color forms apparent-
ly found only on certain islands. Although several names are
already available for some of these forms, their status remains
questionable until the entire assemblage can be studied (in-
cluding male genitalia) along with the relevant type specimens. In
Puerto Rico it is possible to determine the part of the island from
which certain color forms originate, thus aiding in any regulatory
detection program.
(3) Arthropods of the Osceola National Forest. From July 1976 to
July 1977, a survey was conducted of the Osceola National Forest
and the Suwannee River likely to be affected by proposed
phosphate mining there. During the year bulk sampling tech-
niques were used to obtain over 1 million specimens. Mr. J. R.
Wiley was employed as a technician to collect and process these
samples which were subsequently sent to specialists for study. A
total of 16,111 Scarabaeidae of 103 species were identified during
the study. A lengthy report and list of all species identified were
prepared for the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service of the Depart-
ment of Interior which sponsored the project to obtain data to
form an environmental impact statement regarding endangered
species.
(4) Insects associated with cypress. This is a project partly spon-
sored by the Center for Wetlands, Univ. of Florida, under Dr. H.
T. Odum. All records of cypress insects from DPI files and a
literature search, by computer and by hand, provide the basis for
a chapter of this title for a book on cypress being produced by the
Center for Wetlands.
(5) Fossil amber insects of the Dominican Republic. As a result of
preliminary work done during a citrus weevil survey, several in-
teresting fossils led to a request for grant funds from the Na-






Thirty-second Biennial Report


tional Science Foundation. A one-year study was supported by
$16,000, beginning July 1977. Two trips have now produced
several thousand amber insect fossils, representing 19 orders and
at least 27 families of beetles. Over 100 lbs of rough amber was
secured and is being cut and polished by technician James Wiley.
By having this control we are able to obtain fragile, minute
specimens that might otherwise have been damaged or overlook-
ed. Only one species of insect (and this the only fossil insect
known from the West Indies) has formally been described from
these deposits. Thus, the several hundred species obtained are all
new to science.
NOTE: The following projects involved some collection of specimens and
data during the biennium, but they are still incomplete. Reports on these
studies will be published in scientific journals as they are completed.
(6) Arthropods associated with packrats, Neotoma floridana small
Sherman, on Key Largo, Florida.
(7) Food habits of the burrowing owl in Florida (with C. T. Collins).
(8) Taxonomic studies of the myrmecophilous and termitophilous
Aphodiinae (Coleoptera:Scarabaedae) of North and South
America.
(9) Screening blacklight trap samples for foreign pests.
(10) Revision of the Mexican species of Aphodius (Coleoptera:
Scarabaeidae) (with R. D. Gordon).
(11) Survey of the Scarabaeidae of Tall Timbers Research Station,
with special emphasis on their ecology in relation to fire and
habitat management.
(12) Special survey for a European dung beetle, Onthophagus taurus
Schreber (with G. T. Fincher).
(13) Arthropods associated with the gopher tortoise, Gopherus
polyphemus (Daudin).


Job-Related Activities

H. A. DENMARK, Chief of Entomology

(1) Chairman, Arthropod Introduction Committee.
(2) Adjunct Professor (courtesy appointment), Department of En-
tomology and Nematology, IFAS, University of Florida.
(3) Member of Citrus Blackfly Technical Committee.
(4) Served on Public Relations Committee for the Meeting of the
Southeastern Entomological Society of America, Gainesville,
January 1978.
(5) Serving on Committee of Dr. Wali Chaudhri PL 480 Grant to
study the predatory leaf-inhabiting mites of Pakistan.
(6) Worked up a list of insects and mites on woody ornamentals for






Division of Plant Industry


Dr. Charles Meister's work with EPA to ascertain problems of
control.
(7) Chairman, Auditing Committee, Florida Entomological Society,
September 1977.
(8) Courtesy Associate Professor, Area of Entomology and Struc-
tural Pest Control, Florida A & M University, Tallahassee.
E. E. GRISSELL, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Adjunct Assistant Professor (courtesy appointment), Depart-
ment of Entomology and Nematology, IFAS, University of
Florida. On Ph.D. Committee of one graduate student.
(2) Member, Editorial Committee, Division of Plant Industry.
(3) Associate Editor, The Florida Entomologist.
A. B. HAMON, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Member, Editorial Committee, Division of Plant Industry.
(2) Associate Editor, The Florida Entomologist.
(3) Courtesy Associate Professor, Area of Entomology and Struc-
tural Pest Control, Florida A & M University, Tallahassee.
F. W. MEAD, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Adjunct Associate Professor (courtesy appointment), Depart-
ment of Entomology and Nematology, IFAS, University of
Florida.
(2) Courtesy Associate Professor, Area of Entomology and Struc-
tural Pest Control, Florida A & M University, Tallahassee.
(3) Secretary, Florida Entomological Society, 1976-78.
(4) Member, Membership Committee, Florida Entomological
Society, 1977.
(5) Member, Local Arrangements Committee, Southeastern Branch,
Entomological Society of America, 1977-78.
(6) Member-at-Large, Executive Committee, Southeastern Branch,
Entomological Society of America, 1978.
(7) Served as an invited representative from Florida, 1976-78, on
"Workshop of the Committee of Insect Detection, Evaluation,
and Prediction" of the Southeastern Branch, Entomological
Society of America.
H. V. WEEMS, JR., Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Head Curator, Florida State Collection of Arthropods.
(2) Coordinator, Research Associate Program of the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods.
(3) Editor, Arthropods of Florida and Neighboring Land Areas, ir-
regularly appearing bulletin published by the Division.
(4) Associate Editor, The Florida Entomologist, quarterly journal of
the Florida Entomological Society.






Thirty-second Biennial Report


(5) Adjunct Professor (courtesy appointment), Department of En-
tomology and Nematology, IFAS, University of Florida.
(6) Chairman, Special Committee on Insects and Terrestrial In-
vertebrates, Florida Committee on Rare and Endangered Plants
and Animals.
(7) President, Florida Entomological Society, 1975-1976; member of
Executive Committee, Florida Entomological Society, 1976-1977.
(8) Courtesy Associate Professor, Area of Entomology and Struc-
tural Pest Control, Florida A & M University, Tallahassee.

L. A. STANGE, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Research Associate, Los Angeles County Museum of Natural
History.

R. E. WOODRUFF, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Adjunct Associate Professor (courtesy appointment), Depart-
ment of Entomology and Nematology, IFAS, University of
Florida.
(2) Adjunct Associate Curator, Department of Natural Science,
Florida State Museum.
(3) Courtesy Associate Professor, Area of Entomology and Struc-
tural Pest Control, Florida A & M University, Tallahassee.
(4) President elect (1977) and President (1978), Coleopterists Society.
(5) Board of Directors, North American Beetle Fauna Project,
Biological Research Institute of America.
(6) Prepared display of original insect drawings for the International
Congress of Entomology (August 1976), Washington, D. C.; in-
cluding the Congress symbol, designed by Woodruff and used in
all Congress notices, letterhead, and publications.
(7) Editorial Board of Insect World Digest (1976).
(8) Contributing author and family coordinator (Scarabaeidae),
Checklist of North American Beetles, to be published by the
Biological Research Institute of America.
(9) Member, Florida Committee on Rare and Endangered Plants and
Animals in Florida.
(10) Member of following organizations: a) Council of Biological
Editors; b) Association for Tropical Biology; c) The Coleopterists
Society; d) The Entomological Society of America; e) The Florida
Entomological Society; f) Society of Systematic Zoology;
g) Sigma Xi; h) Gamma Sigma Delta; i) Sociedad Mexicana de En-
tomologia.

Trips and Meetings
July 3-5, 1976: Arthropod collecting trip to southern Florida while on an-
nual leave (H. V. Weems, Jr.).






Division of Plant Industry


July 7, 1976: Citrus Blackfly Hearing, Orlando (H.A. Denmark).
July 13-15, 1976: Visit Allyn Museum, obtain synoptic collection of exotic
orchid-pollinating bees from Marie Selby Botanical Garden, and
negotiate with Mr. H. L. King regarding Lepidoptera collection (H. V.
Weems, Jr. and E. E. Grissell).
July 26-August 28, 1976: Study national collection of Scarabaeidae and
attend the International Congress of Entomology (R. E. Woodruff).
July 28, 1976: Citrus Blackfly Technical Committee Meeting, Orlando
(H. A. Denmark).
August 16-29, 1976: XV International Congress of Entomology and
work at U. S. National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D. C.
Collecting at Cranberry Glades, West Virginia on return trip (H. V.
Weems, Jr.).
August 16-27, 1976: XV International Congress of Entomology and work
at U. S. National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D. C. (E. E.
Grissell and F. W. Mead).
August 30-September 1, 1976: Assisted in setting up greenhouse for
citrus blackfly research, Ft. Lauderdale (H. A. Denmark).
August 31, 1976: International Symposium for Biological Control of
Weeds, Gainesville (F. W. Mead).
September 8-10, 1976: Annual Meeting of the Florida Entomological
Society, Winter Haven (H. A. Denmark, F. W. Mead, H. V. Weems, Jr.,
and R. E. Woodruff).
September 14-15, 1976: Citrus Blackfly Meeting, Ft. Lauderdale (H. A.
Denmark).
October 6, 1976: Citrus Production Managers Meeting, Lake Alfred (H. A.
Denmark).
October 7, 1976: Citrus Blackfly Technical Committee Meeting, Orlando
(H. A. Denmark).
October 7-8, 1976: Osceola National Forest, endangered species survey
(R. E. Woodruff).
October 16-22, 1976: Various Florida salt marsh locations to survey para-
sitic Hymenoptera (E. E. Grissell).
October 20-25, 1976: Trip to western North Carolina and eastern
Tennessee to visit Research Associates of the FSCA, (Mr. William
Rosenberg in Hazelwood, N. C. and Col. Lester L. Lampert, Jr., in
Asheville, N. C.), and made inventory of Rosenberg's collection of ex-
otic Coleoptera excluding his European beetles (H. V. Weems, Jr.).
October 27-29, 1976: Osceola National Forest, endangered species survey
(R. E. Woodruff).
November 2-5, 1976: Florida State Horticultural Society Annual Meeting,
Miami Beach (H. A. Denmark).
November 8-9, 1976: Technical Advisory Committee Meeting of the
Florida Committee on Rare and Endangered Plants and Animals,
Maitland (H. V. Weems, Jr.).







Thirty-second Biennial Report


November 23-December 4, 1976: Entomological Society of America Annual
Meeting, Honolulu, Hawaii (H. A. Denmark, F. W. Mead, and H. V.
Weems, Jr.).
December 13-22, 1976: California Department of Agriculture, California
Academy of Sciences, and California Insect Survey, to sort and locate
specimens for projects underway (E. E. Grissell).
December 15-17, 1976: Citrus Blackfly Meeting, Orlando (H. A. Denmark).
December 22, 1976: Ocala National Forest endangered species survey for
Cross Florida Barge Canal routes (R. E. Woodruff).
December 29, 1976: Osceola National Forest endangered species survey
(R. E. Woodruff).
January 5, 1977: Florida annual review of sugarcane rootstalk borer,
Diaprepes abbreviatus (Linnaeus), program, Orlando (H. A. Denmark,
E. E. Grissell, and R. E. Woodruff).
January 11-12, 1978: Trip to Tallahassee to attend a meeting of the
Florida Endangered and Threatened Species Advisory Council; visited
Florida A & M University to confer with Dr. W. L. Peters and several
members of his staff; visited Commissioner Conner's office to confer
with Assistant Commissioner Harold Hoffman and Ms. Lee Rumbley,
Executive Assistant to Commissioner Conner (FDACS representative
on the new Florida Endangered and Threatened Species Advisory
Council); visited Tall Timbers Research Station; visited one of our
Research Associates, Mr. Carl E. Stegmaier, Jr.; conferred with Mr.
Jorge Rey at Florida State University (H. V. Weems, Jr.).
January 12-13, 1977: Citrus Blackfly Meeting, Ft. Lauderdale to form a
closer working relationship and get EPA approval for changes in
spraying with Orthene (H. A. Denmark).
January 24-27, 1977: Entomological Society of America, Southeastern
Branch, 51st Annual Meeting, including preliminary workshop on In-
sect Surveys and Losses, Charleston, South Carolina (F. W. Mead).
February 29-March 3, 1977: Review Citrus Blackfly Program and Technical
Committee Meeting (H. A. Denmark).
March 4-10, 1977: Trip to Red Oak, Oklahoma to obtain the beetle collec-
tion of Karl Stephan (R. E. Woodruff).
March 14-18, 1977: Various Florida localities to survey for insects, in-
cluding citrus blackfly parasites (E. E. Grissell).
March 15, 1977: Symposium on Pilot Test for Management of Sugarcane
Borer Populations Through Programmed Releases of Cuban Fly, Lix-
ophaga diatraea (Townsend), Gainesville (F. W. Mead).
April 23-26, 1977: Trip to Sebring and Sarasota to pick up part of King col-
lection of Lepidoptera (H. V. Weems, Jr.).
April 23-May 22, 1977: U. S. National Museum, Washington, D. C., under
USDA cooperative agreement to identify parasitic Hymenoptera (E. E.
Grissell).
April 25-26, 1977: Osceola National Forest endangered species survey
(R. E. Woodruff).






Division of Plant Industry


April 27-May 4, 1977: Trip to Clemson University; Highlands Biological
Station; Hazelwood, North Carolina, to pick up part of Rosenberg col-
lection of Coleoptera (H. V. Weems, Jr.).
May 5-6, 1977: International Citrus Congress, Orlando (A. B. Hamon and
F. W. Mead).
May 5-7, 1977: Check testing of chemicals in trailer trucks and airplanes
by USDA, Miami (H. A. Denmark).
May 12-14, 1977: Association of Systematic Collections Annual Meeting,
Chicago (H. A. Denmark).
June 9-July 8, 1977: West Indies (Trinidad, Grenada, St. Vincent, St.
Lucia, Guadeloupe, Dominica, St. Kitts, Montserrat, Puerto Rico, and
Dominican Republic) surveying citrus weevils of the West Indies and
their parasites (E. E. Grissell and R. E. Woodruff).
June 12-July 3, 1977: Field trip to western North Carolina and eastern
West Virginia while on annual leave (H. V. Weems, Jr.).
June 15-16, 1977: Citrus Backfly Technical Committee Meeting, Orlando
(H. A. Denmark).
July 11-15, 1977: Survey for mottled-winged blackfly and review
chemical recommendations with IFAS, and discuss host-plant relation-
ship, Ft. Lauderdale (H. A. Denmark).
August 1-5, 1977: 4th International Symposium of Odonatology, Univer-
sity of Florida, Gainesville (H. V. Weems, Jr.).
August 2-5, 1977: State Personnel Seminar, St. Petersburg (H. A. Den-
mark).
August 8-25, 1977: Dominican Republic to study fossil amber insects on
National Science Foundation Grant (R. E. Woodruff).
August 22-25, 1977: Pest Management Seminar on leafminers on tomatoes,
celery, and soybeans, Clearwater (H. A. Denmark).
August 30-September 2, 1977: Florida Entomological Society 60th An-
nual Meeting, Cape Coral (H. A. Denmark, E. E. Grissell, A. B. Hamon,
F. W. Mead, and H. V. Weems, Jr.).
September 6-9, 1977: Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer
Services Annual Business Conference, Tallahassee (H. A. Denmark, E.
E. Grissell, A. B. Hamon, F. W. Mead, H. V. Weems, Jr., and R. E.
Woodruff).
September 28, 1977: Investigation of insect problems at Disney World (A.
B. Hamon and R. E. Woodruff).
October 14-17, 1977: Field trip to western North Carolina while on annual
leave; picked up remainder of William Rosenberg collection of exotic
Coleoptera, three books and a box of miscellaneous insect pinning trays
which Mr. Rosenberg donated to the Florida State Collection of Ar-
thropods (H. V. Weems, Jr.).
October 24, 1977: Insect survey with nursery inspectors, Miami and Key
West (R. E. Woodruff).
November 1-3, 1977: Florida State Horticultural Society Annual Meeting,
Lake Buena Vista (H. A. Denmark and H. V. Weems, Jr.).






Thirty-second Biennial Report


November 8, 1977: Surveying Diaprepes infestation, Ft. Lauderdale
(R. E. Woodruff).
November 14-15, 1977: Public hearing on Diaprepes, Orlando (H. A. Den-
mark and R. E. Woodruff).
November 22, 1977: Blind Mosquito Meeting, Tavares (H. A. Denmark).
November 27-December 2, 1977: Entomological Society of America Annual
Meeting, Washington, D. C. (H. A. Denmark, H. V. Weems, Jr., and R.
E. Woodruff).
December 12-16, 1977: Citrus Blackfly Parasite Meeting in Brownsville,
Texas, and observe facilities of U. S. Department of Agriculture in
Monterrey, Mexico (H. A. Denmark).
December 12-16, 1977: Survey for new scarab beetle found in Islamorada
(R. E. Woodruff).
January 23-26, 1978: Entomological Society of America, Southeastern
Branch, 52nd Annual Meeting, Gainesville (H. A. Denmark, A. B.
Hamon, and F. W. Mead).
March 6-8, 1978: Seventh Annual Tall Timbers Conference on Eco-
logical Animal Control by Habitat Management: The Fire Ant Prob-
lem, Tallahassee (H. A. Denmark, F. W. Mead, L. A. Stange, H. V.
Weems, Jr., and R. E. Woodruff).
March 15-16, 1978: Collective Bargaining Meeting, Orlando (H. A. Den-
mark).
March 21, 1978: Citrus Blackfly Technical Committee Meeting, Gainesville
(H. A. Denmark).
April 5, 1978: Investigate thrips problems on leatherleaf fern at Ocala,
Barberville and Pierce (H. A. Denmark).
April 8-9, 1978: Collecting trip to northwestern Florida (Torreya State
Park) (L. A. Stange and H. V. Weems, Jr.).
April 12, 1978: Investigate scarab larvae feeding on sugarcane at Winter
Haven, Clewiston, and Canal Point ( H. A. Denmark).
April 20, 1978: Study of fossil amber insects on National Science Founda-
tion Grant, Dominican Republic (R. E. Woodruff).
April 30-May 3, 1978: Trip to southern Florida. Operated an insect flight
trap at Highlands Hammock State Park for 3 days; set up a 2nd insect
flight trap at Archbold Biological Station in addition to 1 already being
operated for us there and made arrangements for their continuing
operation; set up an insect flight trap at Homestead and arranged to
have it operated (L. A. Stange and H. V. Weems, Jr.).
May 24-25, 1978: Citrus Blackfly Meeting, Ft. Lauderdale (H. A. Denmark).
June 12-13, 1978: Collective Bargaining Meeting, Orlando (H. A. Denmark).
June 21-23, 1978: American Arachnological Society Meeting, Gainesville
(H. V. Weems, Jr.).
June 25-July 15, 1978: Annual leave arthropod collecting trip with wife to
Antigua and Trinidad, W. I., and Washington (Olympic Peninsula and
Mt. Ranier National Park) (H. V. Weems, Jr.).







Division of Plant Industry


Talks

H. A. DENMARK, Chief of Entomology

September 17, 1976: "Introduction to Insects," and tour of Insect
Museum, 7th and 10th grade biology classes from Lake City Academy.
September 21, 1976: "Forest Insects," visiting class from Lake City
Community College.
October 6, 1976: "Citrus Blackfly," Production Managers, Agricultural
Research and Education Center, Lake Alfred.
October 9, 1976: "Introduction to Insects," visiting 3rd grade, Glen
Springs, Elementary School, Gainesville.
November 4, 1976: "Banded Greenhouse Thrips Damage to Foliage,"
Florida State Horticultural Society Annual Meeting, Miami Beach.
April 7, 1977: "Overview of Duties and Responsibilities of Bureau of Ento-
mology," Jim Lloyd's class, Department of Entomology and
Nematology, University of Florida. Bob Woodruff and Howard Weems
conducted a tour.
June 23, 1977: "The Function of the Biological Control Laboratory," visit-
ing class from Department of Entomology and Nematology, Univer-
sity of Florida.
November 15, 1977: "Surveying for Weevils in West Indies," Citrus
Blackfly Public Hearing, Orlando.
February 2, 1978: "Introduction to Regulatory Entomology," visiting
class, Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of
Florida.
February 13, 1978: "Quarantine Facilities and Procedures for Introducing
Exotic Species into Florida," Dr. Carol Musgrave's class, Department
of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida.
February 22, 1978: "Common Insects in the Gainesville Area" and tour of
Insect Museum, Grand Ridge Elementary School class of Mrs. Glen
Alexandra, Gainesville.
March 1, 1978: "Diagnostic Facilities of the Division of Plant Industry,"
National Pest Management Workshop, Gainesville.
March 10, 1978: "Insects and Their Importance," 2nd grade, Montessori
Elementary School, Gainesville.
March 15, 1978: "Division of Plant Industry Facilities and Insect
Collection," Drs. Will Enns and Robert Beer, and 6 students from
University of Kansas. Conducted tour of facilities.
April 11, 1978: "Common Pest Insects," Boy Scout Troop, Gainesville.


A. B. HAMON, Taxonomic Entomologist

April 1977: "Scale Insects of Ornamental Plants," Lecture for Dr. S. L.
Poe's class, University of Florida.






Thirty-second Biennial Report


E. E. GRISSELL, Taxonomic Entomologist

September 9, 1976: "Identification of Biological Control Agents," Florida
Entomological Society Annual Meeting, Winter Haven.
October 8, 1976: "Identification of Biological Control Agents," Biological
Control Class, University of Florida, Gainesville.


L. A. STANGE, Taxonomic Entomologist
January 19, 1978: "Biology of the Ant Lions," Entomology Seminar,
Division of Plant Industry, Gainesville.


H. V. WEEMS, JR., Taxonomic Entomologist
August 21, 1976: Invitational paper on "The Florida state endangered in-
sect program," Symposium: Endangered insects of the world. XV In-
ternational Congress of Entomology, Washington, D. C.
September 7, 1976: Presidential address, Florida Entomological Society,
"The Florida endangered arthropod program."
September 20-21, 1976: Talk given to forestry students from Lake City
Junior College.
November 8, 1976: Seminar at the Department of Entomology and Nema-
tology, University of Florida, talking on the Florida State Collection of
Arthropods and the Division of Plant Industry library.
November 12, 1976: Series of talks on insects (with visual aids) to first
grade class, 2 kindergarten classes, and 2 second grade classes at
Archer Elementary School.
January 13, 1977: Talk given to Dr. Jon Reiskind's class in Principles of
Systematic Zoology, University of Florida, on the FSCA, Research
Associate Program, DPI library, and arthropod identification service
of the DPI.
February 23, 1977: Mr. Andy Andreason, vocational agriculture teacher
from high school in Grand Ridge, Florida, and 4 of his students were
given a 2-hour program in the museum.
March 29, 1977: Talk on threatened and endangered species of butterflies
in Florida, given at annual public meeting of the Florida Committee on
Rare and Endangered Plants and Animals at the new Florida Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commission laboratory, Gainesville.
April 7, 1977: Talk given to taxonomy class of Dr. James E. Lloyd, Univer-
versity of Florida, on Florida State Collection of Arthropods and the
DPI library.
August 1, 1977: Invitational address on "The Florida State Collection of
Arthropods and the Research Associate Program" at the 4th Interna-
tional Symposium of Odonatology, held at the University of Florida.
August 18, 1977: Lecture to Dr. T. J. Walker's taxonomy class of 8 stu-






Division of Plant Industry


dents, University of Florida, on the subject of the Florida State Collec-
tion of Arthropods, the Research Associate Program, and the ar-
thropod identification service, the DPI library, and miscellaneous en-
tomological publications sponsored or published by the Division of
Plant Industry.
October 26, 1977: Lecture to Dr. W. H. Whitcomb's class in Tropical Ento-
mology, discussing the work of the Bureau of Entomology of the DPI,
the Florida State Collection of Arthropods, the Research Associate
Program, and the DPI library.
November 30, 1977: Invitational paper presented at the Entomological
Society of America Symposium: Progress in the Implementation of the
Endangered Species Act and the Convention of International Trade in
Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora. Title of paper: Progress
Report on the Florida State Endangered Insect Program.
May 10, 1978: Talk given to Dr. Charles V. Covell, Jr.'s class of ento-
mology students from the University of Louisville (KY).



R. E. WOODRUFF, Taxonomic Entomologist

September 13, 1976: Review of Systematics, University of Florida, for
comprehensive departmental review.
September 21, 1976: Tour of the Bureau of Entomology, Lake City Junior
College, Forestry Class.
November 4-5, 1976: Lecture to University of Florida class in Plant Pests
(2 classes, 4 hrs.), of Dr. F. W. Zettler.
December 2, 1976: Lecture to Florida State University Entomology Class
(visiting) of Dr. W. Tschinkel.
January 5, 1977: Review of Diaprepes studies, at annual review, Orlando,
Fla.
February 9, 1977: Lecture on "Scientific Illustration" to University of
Florida Entomology Class of John Randall's.
March 2, 1977: Lecture on "A practicing taxonomist" to University of
Florida Zoology Class of Dr. John Reiskind.
April 7, 1977: Lecture on "Florida State Collection of Arthropods" to
University of Florida Entomology Class of Dr. James Lloyd.
May 12, 1977: Lecture on "Bureau of Entomology" to University of
Florida Ornamental Horticulture Class.
November 29, 1977: Presented joint paper (with G. T. Fincher) at En-
tomological Society of America Meeting in Washington, D. C.: "A
European dung beetle, Onthophagus taurus, new to the United
States."
January 19, 1978: Lecture on "Florida State Collection of Arthropods"
to University of Florida Entomology Class of Harry Davis.







Thirty-second Biennial Report


F. W. MEAD, Taxonomic Entomologist

November 4, 1976: "XV International Congress of Entomology." Ento-
mology Seminar, Ohio State University, Columbus.
September 2, 1977: "Some homopterous vectors of actual or potential im-
portance in Florida." Florida Entomological Society 60th Annual
Meeting, Cape Coral.
November 8, 1977: "Entomology in Florida." Entomology Seminar, Ohio
State University, Columbus.


Publications

Denmark, H. A. 1976. The banded greenhouse thrips, Hercinothrips
femoralis (0. M. Reuter) damage to ornamental plants. Proc. Fla. State
Hort. Soc. 89:330-331.
1976. The banded greenhouse thrips, Hercinothrips
femoralis (0. M. Reuter) in Florida (Thysantoptera: Thripidae). Fla.
Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services, Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 172:1-2,6
fig.
Sand H. H. Keifer. 1977. Aculops eugeniae Keifer (Acarina:
Eriophyidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services, Div. Plant Ind.,
Ent. Circ. 182:1-2, 8 fig.
1977. Nomenclatural changes of some phytoseiid mites
(Acarina: Phytoseiidae). Fla. Entomol. 60(3):171-172.
1978. A mite, Brevipalpus russulus (Boisduval) in Florida
(Acarina: Tenuipalpidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services, Div.
Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 188:1-2, 5 fig.
and Martin H. Muma. 1978. Phytoseiidae of Jamaica, an
annotated list (Acari: Mesostigmata). International J. Acarology
4(1):1-22..
and C. Barry Knisley (senior author). 1978. New phytoseiid
mites from successional and climax plant communities in New Jersey.
Fla. Entomol. 61(1):5-17.
Grissell, E. E. 1976. A revision of Western Nearctic species of Torymus
Dalman (Hymenoptera; Torymidae). Univ. Calif. Publ. Ent. 79:1-120, 6
plates.
D. P. Wojcik (senior author), W. F. Buren, and T. Carlysle.
1976. The fire ants (Solenopsis) of Florida (Hymenoptera:
Formicidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consuner Services, Div. Plant Ind.,
Ent. Circ. 173:1-4, 15 fig.
1977. The scoliid wasps of Florida. I. Introduction, biology,
and key to Nearctic genera (Hymenoptera: Scoliidae). Fla. Dept. Agric.
& Consumer Services, Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 179:1-2.
1978. Theodore D. A. Cockerell Letters from West Cliff,
Colorado 1887-1889. (Book Review) Bull. Ent. Soc. Amer. 24:121.






Division of Plant Industry


Hamon, Avas B. 1977. Gall-like scale insects (Kermes spp.) (Homoptera:
Coccoidea: Kermesidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services, Div.
Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 178:1-2, 4 fig.
1977. Oleander pit scale, Asterolecanium pustulans (Cockerell)
(Homoptera: Coccoidea: Asterolecaniidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Con-
sumer Services, Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 184:1-2, 4 fig.
1978. Acacia whitefly, Tetraleurodes acaciae (Quaintance)
(Homoptera: Aleyrodidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services,
Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 190:1-2, 4 fig.
Mead, F. W. 1976. The South African citrus psyllid, Trioza erytrea (Del
Guercio) (Homoptera: Psyllidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Ser-
vices, Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 168:1-4, 2 fig.
1977. A predatory stink bug, Euthyrhynchus floridanus
(Linnaeus) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer
Services, Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 174:1-2, 7 fig.
1977. The Asiatic citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama
(Homoptera: Psyllidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services, Div.
Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 180:1-4. 1 fig.
1978. Darkwinged fungus gnats, Bradysia spp., in Florida
greenhouses (Diptera: Sciaridae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv-
ices, Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 186:1-4, 7 fig.
Stange, L. A. 1978. Evania appendigaster (L.), a cockroach egg para-
sitoid (Hymenoptera: Evaniidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Ser-
vices, Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 191:1-2, 2 fig.
H. V. Weems, Jr. and W. H. Whitcomb (senior author). 1976. The taran-
tula (Family Theraphosidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services,
Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 169:1-2, 3 fig.
and Carrol N. Smith. 1977. Human lice (Anoplura: Pediculidae)
their detection and control. Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services,
Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 175:1-2, 3 fig.
1977. Obituary: Harold Frederick Loomis (1896-1976). Fla.
Ent. 60(1):26.
1977. The Florida endangered insect program. Fla. Ent.
60(1):57-63.
Sand W. H. Whitcomb. 1977. The green lynx spider, Peucetia
viridans (Hentz) (Araneae: Oxyopidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer
Services, Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 181:1-4, 3 fig.
and V. H. Waddill (senior author). 1978. The cassava shoot fly,
Neosilba perezi (Romero and Ruppel) (Diptera: Lonchaeidae). Fla. Dept.
Agric. & Consumer Services, Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 187:1-2, 3 fig.
Woodruff, R. E. 1976. Another click beetle of the genus Alaus in Florida
(Coleoptera: Elateridae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services, Div.
Plant. Ind., Ent. Circ. 170:1-2, 4 fig.
et al. 1976. Report of the Coleopterists Society color standards
committee. Ent. Soc. Amer. Bull. 22(1):76-79.
and R. I. Sailer. 1977. Establishment of the genus Azya in the







Thirty-second Biennial Report


United States (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Con-
sumer Services, Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 176:1-2, 6 fig.
1977. A weevil pest of rose-apple (Syzygium jambos), appar-
ently new to the United States (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Fla. Dept.
Agric. & Consumer Services, Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 183:1-2, 3 fig.
1978. Foreign chafers I. Melolontha melolontha (L.) (Col-
eoptera: Scarabaeidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Services, Div.
Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 189:1-2, 3 fig.


Florida State Collection of Arthropods
H. V. Weems, Jr., Taxonomic Entomologist
In one of the most important and far-reaching developments since the
establishment of the Florida State Collection of Arthropods (FSCA), on 29
August 1977, Florida A and M University joined the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services and the University of Florida as the
third state institution supporting the housing, utility, and continuing
development of the state arthropod collection. The agreement was signed
by Commissioner Doyle Conner on behalf of the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services, President B. L. Perry, Jr. on behalf of
Florida A and M University, and Vice-Chancellor A. C. McArthur of the
Florida Board of Regents acting for and on behalf of Florida A and M
University. Through this agreement the reference and research collections
at Florida A and M University became an integral part of the official state
collection. Emphasis at Florida A and M University, in Tallahassee, is on
aquatic insects, and the collections there complement the collections in
Gainesville where special emphasis is placed on arthropods related to con-
trol of agricultural and urban pests. FAMU collections, including currently
privately-owned collections, include one of the world's largest and finest
collections of. Ephemeroptera.
The Florida State Collection of Arthropods, largest and most complete in
the southeastern United States, is a "library" of insect specimens and other
arthropods properly preserved and labelled as a permanent source of infor-
mation on structures, geographical and seasonal variations, habitats,
ecology, and host-parasite and host-predator relationships. The collection
provides a ready reference for entomological research, for prompt and ac-
curate identification of pests and other arthropods, and also serves as an
indispensable resource for undergraduate and graduate teaching of ar-
thropod systematics. Numerous loans for study are made each year in
response to requests from taxonomic specialists from many parts of the
world, in addition to loans at our request sent to specialists to obtain
authoritative indentifications. Occasionally exchanges are made with other
museums and with independent specialists. The collection is a valuable
reference for the accurate identification of specimens needed by those in-
volved in the control of crop pests, ecological surveys, and environmental






Division of Plant Industry


impact studies, as well as those in research, industry, and government.
Thousands of specimens are sent in each year by Agricultural Products
Specialists of the Division of Plant Industry, county agents, farmers, pest
control operators, special survey agents, and homeowners to find out what
they are and, in some instances, what can be done to control or eliminate
them.
A primary objective of the museum is to accumulate and maintain a
documented record of all species of arthropods, excluding saline Crustacea,
occurring in Florida from many types of habitats. The collection is strong in
groups that include pests, parasites, and predators affecting crops, forests,
man, and domestic animals in Florida, and in those groups that are impor-
tant in ecology, pollution biology, and biological control research. A special
effort has been made to collect the minute insects on the assumption that
these are apt to be slighted in most collections. Since insects and most
other arthropods generally are small, large numbers can be stored conve-
niently, along with their basic collection data, in a comparatively small
space. Most are preserved on pins and stored in cabinets especially made
for this purpose. Some are slide-mounted. Some are preserved in plastic
envelopes. Some groups, including most soft-bodied specimens, must be
stored in vials or bottles containing alcohol. The collection is arranged
systematically, which permits staff entomologists or visiting researchers to
locate any species within seconds. Development of a good collection re-
quires many years and the efforts of many dedicated scientists and
students. Development of research series of the various species is vital to
an understanding of the range of variation within a species due to
geographical distribution, seasonal distribution, food, genetics, sex, and
other factors. It is the goal of those involved with the Florida State Collec-
tion of Arthropods to continue to develop and improve it to the extent that
eventually almost all forms of arthropods found in Florida and neighboring
areas are represented and are correctly preserved and classified.
The primary area of interest, with special interest on Florida, covers the
southeastern United States, the Bahama Islands, the Greater and Lesser
Antilles, and other land areas approximate to the Gulf of Mexico and the
Caribbean Sea. However, in some groups the scope of the collections may
cover much of the New World or the entire world, depending upon the
research interests of staff entomologists and Research Associates. In addi-
tion, a special effort is being made to develop a synoptic collection of the
major pest species of the world, including those which do not occur in
Florida in order to facilitate the ready recognition of these species should
they be found in Florida or surrounding areas. Also the Florida State Col-
lection is established as a repository for primary and secondary types (i.e.,
holotypes, allotypes, paratypes, topotypes, etc.).
During the biennium three important research collections of insects were
purchased for the FSCA. The University of Florida and the Florida Depart-
ment of Agriculture and Consumer Services shared equally the purchase
price for these unique collections. The State of Florida purchased from Mr.






Thirty-second Biennial Report


Karl Stephan of Red Oak, Oklahoma, an outstanding collection of 47,400
beetles representing 111 families and approximately 9,000 species. Mr.
Stephan, a German immigrant, spent much of his adult life actively collec-
ting beetles as an avocation. The specimens personally collected by him
represent a 30-year time period, and a great many very rare and unusual
species resulted. The collection is especially rich in beetles of very small
size. The microcoleoptera often are neglected by the general collector and
even the advanced professional taxonomist. By long experience, Mr.
Stephan learned the habits of many tiny species and was able to obtain a
better representation of these groups than most museums in North
America. His collection contained several undescribed species and the type
specimens of several species described for Mr. Stephan. Geographically it
represents most of the world, but is exceptionally rich in material from the
southwestern United States and Mexico. It adds such a large number of
species to the collection which will greatly facilitate the speed and accuracy
of identifications. All regulatory action must be based on prompt, accurate
identifications, and collections such as this enable taxonomists at the Divi-
sion of Plant Industry to provide the maximum in the way of an identifica-
tion service.
In addition to the Stephan collection, a collection of 6,362 pinned and
labelled exotic Coleoptera, many identified to species, was purchased from
Mr. William Rosenberg of Hazelwood, North Carolina. This collection in-
cludes large and showy species from many parts of the world. From Mr. H.
L. King of Sarasota, Florida, was purchased a collection of 6,070 pinned,
labelled, neatly spread, and authoritatively identified Lepidoptera collected
by the donor and associates over much of the United States, Canada, Mex-
ico, and several Central American countries over a period of more than 50
years. This included approximately 275 species of Nearctic and Neotropical
Lycaenidae, 161 species of Riodinidae, and 3,425 exotic Heterocera, in-
cluding an especially fine collection of ctenuchid moths.


Major Contributions to the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods
*Mr. Robert A. Belmont (4117 S. W. 20th Avenue, #70, Gainesville, Florida
32601)
796 pinned, labeled insects (161 Coleoptera, 191 Diptera, 11
Neuroptera, 250 Hymenoptera, 6 Lepidoptera, 80 Hemiptera, 81
Homoptera, 6 Orthoptera, 4 Mecoptera, 6 Odonata) collected in
Florida, Texas, and California by the donor; 66 slide-mounted, labeled,
authoritatively identified Thysanoptera representing 57 species and
subspecies from Germany (1); Netherlands (2); Mexico (1); Puerto Rico
(2); and the United States (60): Hawaii (3), Arizona, California, Nevada,
Missouri, Kansas, and Rhode Island. Most of the U. S. species are from
*Research Associate/Student Associate of the Florida State Collection of
Arthropods






Division of Plant Industry


California, Nevada, and Arizona; 8 ultraviolet light trap samples of in-
sects collected in Florida by the donor.

Dr. Fred D. Bennett (Commonwealth Institute of Biological Control, West
Indian Station, Gordon Street, Curepe, Trinidad, West Indies)
100 ultraviolet light trap samples of miscellaneous insects collected in
Trinidad by Dr. J. Roger Price and Dr. Bennett (received for FSCA via
Dr. R. M. Baranowski of Homestead, Florida).

Dr. George H. Bick (Biology Department, St. Mary's College, Notre Dame,
Indiana 46556)
3,062 envelope-stored, authoritatively identified, adult Odonata (24 ex-
otic, 3,038 domestic) representing 213 species, including 60 mated
pairs, collected in Canada: British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, and
Nova Scotia and the United States: California, Wyoming, Colorado,
North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Arizona, Oklahoma, Texas,
Nebraska, Kansas, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa, Illinois, In-
diana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, New Hampshire,
Maine, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida,
Tennessee, Kentucky, North Carolina, Virginia, and Maryland, mostly
by the donor; 358 vials of alcohol-preserved, reared, authoritatively
identified Odonata nymphs representing 111 species collected by the
donor in Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina,
Tennessee, Virginia, Ohio, Michigan, New York, Oklahoma, Texas, and
Wyoming. This is a collection of exceptional quality.

*Dr. Franklin S. Blanton (4015 S. W. 21st Street, Gainesville, Florida
32601)
4,500 slide-mounted, labeled, authoritatively identified Diptera: Cera-
topogonidae (2,268 exotic, 2,232 domestic) representing 7 species of
Culicoides from Mexico, Honduras, British Honduras, Costa Rica,
Panama, El Salvador, Bolivia, Brazil, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Cuba, the
Bahama Islands, and Florida; 1 species of Forcipomyia from Jamaica;
3 species of Alluaudomyia from Florida; 2,026 pillboxes of
miscellaneous insects collected in Panama or the Panama Canal Zone,
consisting of the following pillboxes of specimens: 4 Simuliidae, 1,148
Ceratopogonidae: Culicoides, 448 Culicidae, 43 Tipulidae, 1
Chloropidae: Hippelates, 1 Mycetophilidae, and 381 miscellaneous (in
order of prevalence) Lepidoptera, Culicidae, Hymenoptera, higher
Diptera, and Coleoptera; and arthropod library totaling 1,824 items
consisting of 1,495 reprints, 49 large bulletins and monographs, 78
pamphlets, 29 manuscripts, 21 special reports and classroom aids, and
156 sets of rough notes, mostly relating to taxonomy of Diptera and
Acarina and the diseases vectored by these arthropods; 1 slide box con-
taining 100 slidemounts of Homoptera: Aphididae, 80 identified







Thirty-second Biennial Report


representing 47 species and 20 unidentified, collected in New York and
Florida.

*Mr. Vernon A. Brou, Jr. (Route 1, Box 74, Edgard, Louisiana 70049)
8,679 pinned, labeled Lepidoptera (27 exotic, 8,650 domestic), (8,567
determined, 112 undetermined), (7,998 neatly spread, 681 unspread),
representing 213 species collected in France (1), Malaysia (26), and the
United States (8,679): Louisiana and Mississippi; approximately 5% of
this collection consists of rare or exceptional species; almost all
specimens were collected by the donor.

*Dr. Nell B. Causey (922 Park Avenue, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701)
2,500 vials and bottles of alcohol-preserved Diplopoda consisting of
7,221 specimens (1,919 exotic, 5,302 domestic), including 1,823
authoritatively identified millipeds and 30 secondary type specimens.
This is the second of several donations which Dr. Causey has planned
to make to the Florida State Collection of Arthropods over a period of
several years from a total collection which is one of the great diplopod
collections of the New World. It adds several hundred species to the
Florida State Collection of Arthropods.

*Dr. Rail Corths P. (Entom6logo y Professor de entomologia, Facultad de
Agronomia Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile)
96 pinned, labeled, authoritatively identified Chilean Tachinidae
representing 48 species (a male and a female of every species) including
10 paratypes representing 5 species and 2 specimens each of 24 species
which are the type species of the genera they represent.

*Mr. Lloyd R. Davis, Jr. (2510 N. E. 10th Terrace, Gainesville, Florida
32601)
14 pinned, labeled Arthropoda (10 Scorpionida, 1 Phalangida, 2
Chilopoda, 1 Crustacea) collected in Greece (1), Spain (5), and the
United States (8): Florida, Texas, and Michigan by the donor; 379 pinn-
ed, labeled Diptera, including 282 Syrphidae (2 identified, 377 uniden-
tified) collected in South Africa (2), Spain (4), Costa Rica (1), and the
United States (372): Maine, New Jersey, Illinois, Georgia, and Florida,
almost all taken by the donor; 102 pinned, labeled, unidentified Col-
eoptera, Cerambycidae collected in Maine, Georgia, Florida, Mississip-
pi and Illinois by the donor; 799 pinned, labeled specimens (5 Odonata,
3 Trichoptera, 1 Neuroptera, 1 Isoptera, 182 Diptera, 170
Hymenoptera, 379 Coleoptera, 11 Orthoptera, 14 Hemiptera, 33
Homoptera) collected by the donor in Illinois, Georgia, and Florida; 114
pinned, labeled Hymenoptera (1 from Spain; 113 from Florida, Georgia,
Mississippi, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, New Jersey and Maine); 15
ultraviolet light trap samples from Maine; 39 vials of miscellaneous in







Division of Plant Industry


sects, mostly Coleoptera (6 vials from Illinois, 1 from Oregon, 1 from
Utah, 3 from Maine, 28 from Florida).

Mr. R. Duncan Cuyler (RFD 1, Box 52, Durham, North Carolina 27705)
2,043 envelope-stored Odonata representing 117 species, mostly col-
lected in North Carolina by the donor.

*Mr. Terhune S. Dickel (Box 385, Homestead, Florida 33030)
4,000 pinned, spread, labeled, identified Lepidoptera, all butterflies and
skippers (Panama and Canal Zone, 2,000 specimens representing 433
species and subspecies; Canada: Manitoba, Alberta, New Brunswick,
Saskatchewan, British Columbia, and Yukon Territory, 104 specimens
representing 19 species; United States: Alaska (97 specimens represen-
ting 14 species), 1,800 specimens representing 309 species and
subspecies from Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, Washington,
California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Arkansas, Pennsylvania,
North Carolina, and Florida), all collected by the donor. Approximately
20% of the Panamanian specimens could be considered rare, approx-
imately 5% extremely rare, including several yet undescribed species;
approximately 10% of the North American specimens represent rarely
collected species, including such species as Papilio aristodemus pon-
ceanus Schaus, Eurema dina helios M. Bates, Chlorostrymon simaethis
(Drury), and Tmolus azia (Hewitson) from southern Florida. This is an
exceptionally neatly processed collection; 1 pinned, labeled, spread,
identified butterfly, Papilio androgeus Cramor, Lepidoptera:
Papilionidae, collected in Florida by the donor; this is a very rarely col-
lected species, known to occur in Florida less than 6 years, and this is
the first specimen for the FSCA; 253 pinned, spread, labeled, identified
Lepidoptera representing 69 species collected by the donor in Florida,
Pennsylvania, and Colorado. This is exceptionally neatly processed
material which includes several rarely collected species.

Dr. Calaway H. Dodson (Director, Marie Selby Botanical Gardens, 800 S.
Palm Avenue, Sarasota, Florida 33577)
264 pinned, labeled, identified, host-associated orchid-pollinating bees,
representing 6 genera and 55 species of Apidae, most rare to uncom-
mon, collected by the donor in Central and South America.

*Dr. N. M. Downie (505 Lingle Terrace, Lafayette, Indiana 47901)
4,555 Coleoptera, preserved in 1,667 envelopes representing 1,570
species collected by the donor in Canada: British Columbia (178
specimens) and the United States: Indiana, New York, Florida,
Mississippi, Texas, Washington, Idaho, and Montana (4,377
specimens).






Thirty-second Biennial Report


*Mr. Bryd K. Dozier (1987 Gotham Street, Chula Vista, California 92010)
579 pinned insects (531 labeled, 48 unlabeled) (205 domestic, 374 ex-
otic) consisting of 1 Hemiptera, 36 Homoptera, 8 Diptera, and 534 Col-
eoptera collected by the donor in the United States: Arizona (1), Califor-
nia (200), Florida (4); Haiti (143), Trinidad (1), Costa Rica (6), Nicaragua
(7), Guatemala (133), Mexico (58), and Bahama Islands: Andros Island
(26).

*Dr. Michael Dykstra (Dykstra Clinic, Inc., S. Highway 61, Canton,
Missouri 63435)
1,647 pinned, neatly spread, labeled, identified Lepidoptera represen-
ting 308 species collected in Missouri and Illinois by the donor.

*Dr. Thomas C. Emmel (Chairman and Professor, Department of Zoology,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
7,200 pinned, neatly spread, labeled, authoritatively identified but-
terflies (Lepidoptera) representing 804 species collected in Ecuador,
Costa Rica, Mexico, the Yucatan Peninsula, Trinidad, Tobago, Puerto
Rico, British Honduras, Guatemala, Kenya and Tanzania by the donor
and associates.

*Dr. G. B. Fairchild (16 N. W. 22nd Drive, Gainesville, Florida 32601)
3,755 pinned insects, of which 924 were labeled and 2,858 were unlabel-
ed, (877 Lepidoptera (9 spread, 1 reared from Carica papaya), 4
Plecoptera (1 spread), 20 Mecoptera, 2,461 Diptera, 36 Homoptera, 14
Trichoptera, 78 Hymenoptera, 177 Coleoptera, 24 Neuroptera, 20
Hemiptera, and 43 Orthoptera) collected in Florida (1,430), Virginia
and West Virginia (21), Canada: Nova Scotia (822), Vietnam (7),
Panama (19), India (1), Malaysia (1), Dominican Republic (613), and
Ecuador (797) by the donor; 152 envelopes containing 281 Lepidoptera
and 35 envelopes containing miscellaneous insects collected in Spain
(34), Ecuador (99) and the Dominican Republic (19) by the donor; 278 in-
sect flight trap samples collected in Spain (3), Panama (3), Dominican
Republic (9), Ecuador (8), Canada: Nova Scotia (19), and Florida (236); 4
netted samples collected in Florida (3) and Canada: Nova Scotia (1); 3
sweeping samples from Canada: Nova Scotia all collected by the donor;
1 pinned, spread, unlabeled Lepidoptera (a large spectacular, rare
species) from Panama; 2,792 pinned, labeled, authoritatively identified
Diptera representing 78 species of Tabanidae, 13 of which are new to
the FSCA, consisting of 398 exotics from Greece (2), Italy (6),
Yugoslavia (13), Spain (91), France (4), Switzerland (8), Germany (90),
Austria (55), Australia (53), and Canada: Nova Scotia (76), and 2,394
from the United States: Florida; 34 envelopes containing 77
Lepidoptera, all collected in Spain by the donor; 80 envelopes contain-
ing 185 Lepidoptera and 19 envelopes containing 1 to many






Division of Plant Industry


miscellaneous insects other than Lepidoptera... all collected in
Ecuador by the donor.

*Dr. Clifford D. Ferris (Bioengineering Program, College of Engineering,
University of Wyoming, P. O. Box 33510, University Station, Laramie,
Wyoming 82070)
3,001 pinned, labeled insects (20 Neuroptera, 188 Trichoptera, 231
Diptera, 400 Hymenoptera, 497 Coleoptera (including 4 determined
Cicindelidae representing 1 species), 1,387 Lepidoptera (143 spread,
1,244 unspread) (including 4 paratypes representing 2 species) 79 Or-
thoptera, 10 Plecoptera, 2 Ephemeroptera, 89 Hemiptera, 93
Homoptera, 2 spread Odonata, and 3 Acarina (ticks) collected by the
donor in Wyoming, Montana, Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Arizona, New
Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Florida; 8 vials of alcohol-
preserved arthropods from Wyoming (5 Trichoptera, 1 Neuroptera, 2
Solpugida).

*Dr. Hermann A. Flaschka (Chemistry Department, Georgia Institute of
Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332)
1,756 pinned, labeled insects (1,498 identified, 258 unidentified) (1,370
exotic, 386 domestic) consisting of 768 Coleoptera representing 76
species and 988 spread Lepidoptera representing 503 species mostly
collected by the donor in France, West Germany, East Germany,
Hungary, Austria, Italy, England, Greece, India, Solomon Islands, In-
donesia, Japan, Yugoslavia, Switzerland, Spain, Mozambique,
Southern Rhodesia, Brazil, Peru, Mexico, Canada, Turkey, Morocco,
Rumania, Finland, Czechoslovakia, and the United States: Florida,
Georgia, South Carolina, Illinois, Michigan, Arizona, California, Col-
orado, Wyoming, North Carolina, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Texas,
New York, Maine, Missouri, Arkansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and
Connecticut.

*Dr. B. A. Foote (Department of Biological Sciences, 265 McGilvrey Hall,
Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242)
247 pinned, labeled, identified Diptera: Ephydridae representing 104
species from Arizona, California, Oregon, Montana, Utah, Wyoming,
Idaho, Missouri, Ohio, New York, Delaware, Florida, Alaska (11
specimens), and Mexico (3 specimens); 38 species are new to the FSCA.

*Mr. Lawrence R. Franz (3820 S. W. 19th Street, Gainesville, Florida
32608)
204 vials of Crustacea (crayfish and amphipods) containing 1,015
specimens consisting of 50 vials containing 194 Procambarus from
Florida representing 13 species, several of which are blind species from
underwater caves and springs, 1 Cambarus from the West Indies, 2 Or






Thirty-second Biennial Report


conectus from West Virginia, 3 Crangonyx from Florida, 15 vials con-
taining 115 undetermined specimens from the West Indies, and 81
vials containing 527 undetermined specimens from Florida (51 vials),
Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, Delaware, Arkansas,
Oklahoma, and California, all collected by the donor. Many of these
represent rarely collected species.

*Dr. James T. Goodwin (AID/Texas A & M Contract, Bamako, Department
of State, Washington, DC 20521)
556 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 61 unspread Lepidoptera from
Enderbury, Hull, and Canton Atolls, Phoenix Island, Pacific; 388
Tabanidae from Italy; 107 insects (74 Diptera, 15 Hymenoptera, 1 Der-
maptera, 3 Orthoptera, 5 Homoptera, 9 Coleoptera) from Mexico.

*Mr. Harold N. Greenbaum (Department of Entomology and Nematology,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
2,047 pinned insects (1,844 labeled, 193 unlabeled) consisting of 330
spread Lepidoptera, 951 Diptera, 448 Hymenoptera (35 Hymenoptera
are reared, with host data), 192 Coleoptera, 20 Hemiptera, 1 Plecoptera,
29 Orthoptera, 63 Homoptera, 10 Neuroptera, 2 Mecoptera, and 1
Odonata collected in Florida, Missouri and Arkansas by the donor; 55
insect flight trap samples collected in Florida by the donor; male and
female pinned, labeled, identified specimens of Hymenoptera:
Xyelidae: Xyela dodgei Greenbaum collected by the donor and J.
Mangold; the female is the first for the FSCA; 598 pinned, unlabeled in-
sects collected in Georgia by the donor and Robert H. Turnbow, using
an insect flight trap.

*Dr. Dale H. Habeck (1103 N. W. 36th Avenue, Gainesville, Florida 32601)
1,290 pinned, labeled insects (1,152 exotic, 138 domestic) consisting of
508 Coleoptera, 184 Hemiptera, 269 Homoptera, 162 Diptera, 148
Hymenoptera, 4 Dermaptera, 1 Neuroptera, 1 (spread) Lepidoptera,
and 13 Orthoptera, collected by the donor in Austria (632), Yugoslavia
(99), Kenya (88), Tanzania (170), Brazil (25), Costa Rica (138), and the
United States (138): Missouri, Tennessee, and North Carolina; signifi-
cant habitat or ecological data is provided for 20 of the domestic
specimens and 152 of the exotic ones. The major part of the donation
consists of 592 vials containing 4,333 specimens of immature insects,
mainly larvae, consisting of the following vials of insects: 1 Isoptera, 1
Orthoptera, 2 Homoptera, 9 Hemiptera, 1 Neuroptera, 2 Megaloptera,
155 Coleoptera, 38 Diptera, 47 Hymenoptera, 336 Lepidoptera; nearly
77% of the specimens are domestic, and over 79% contain significant
ecological or habitat data; 32% of the specimens are identified to
species, 11.8% to genus, 50.8% to family, with 5.4% unidentified even
to family (Identification of larvae beyond genus, and sometimes family,
often is impossible even with domestic specimens.); the majority of the






Division of Plant Industry


larvae were boiled prior to preservation in alcohol and are, therefore, in
excellent condition. Lepidoptera larvae comprise 43.8% of the
specimens (336 vials, 1,896 specimens), Coleoptera second (155 vials,
1,232 specimens), Hymenoptera third (47 vials, 578 specimens), and
Diptera fourth (38 vials, 528 specimens). Many of these are new to the
FSCA larval collection.

*Mr. Fred C. Harmston (117 E. 2700 South, Salt Lake City, Utah 84115)
782 pinned, labeled, identified Diptera: Culicidae representing 21
species collected by the donor in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming; 330
slide-mounts of Arthropoda (35 exotic, 295 domestic), consisting of 151
slides of Culicidae larvae representing 54 species, 74 slides of Culicidae
genitalia representing 31 species, 50 slides of Siphonaptera (5 slides
undetermined) representing 28 species, 17 slides of Anoplura represen-
ting 5 species, 1 slide representing 1 species of Mallophaga, 1 slide
representing 1 species of unidentified Diptera: Streblidae, 7 slides of
Acarina representing 3 species of mites, and 29 slides of Acarina
representing 8 species of ticks, collected in Korea (20), Philippine
Islands (8), Assam (1), Panama (1), El Salvador (4), Brazil (1), and the
United States (295): Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, Montana, Washington,
Oregon, California, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, New Mexico, Texas,
Alabama, Georgia, and Hawaii (15), mostly by the donor; 5 nearly new
wooden slide boxes; 416 pillboxes (each containing several to many
specimens) of insects collected in Texas by the donor.

*Mr. J. Richard Heitzman (3112 Harris Avenue, Independence, Missouri
64052)
7,385 pinned, labeled, identified Lepidoptera (1,549 neatly spread, in-
cluding 4 with 1 wing cleared) representing 963 species and 4 pinned,
labeled, unidentified insects (1 Coleoptera, 1 Diptera, 2 Hymenoptera)
collected in Kansas, Missouri and Arkansas by the donor and members
of his family; 2,830 identified, envelope-stored Lepidoptera represen-
ting 155 species collected in Missouri and identified by the donor; 66
pinned, labeled insects (8 Diptera: Syrphidae; 57 Coleoptera; 1
Homoptera) collected in Missouri by the donor.

Dr. Leon W. Hepner (Department of Entomology, Drawer EM, Mississippi
State University, Mississippi State, Mississippi 39762)
129 pinned, labeled paratypes representing 95 species of Homoptera:
Cicadellidae: Erythroneura (95 males, 34 females), all new to the FSCA.

Dr. Harry Hoogstraal (Medical Zoology Department, U. S. Naval Medical
Research Unit No. 3, NAMRU-3, FPO (Fleet Post Office), New York,
New York 09527)
English translations of 118 publications in Russian, Chinese, and







Thirty-second Biennial Report


several European languages on ticks, tick-borne diseases and on other
arthropods of medical health importance; 5 arthropod-related publica-
tions for which Dr. Hoogstraal was author or coauthor and translations
from Russian, Czechoslovakian, Polish and German (mostly from Rus-
sian) of 136 publications on ticks, tick-borne diseases and related sub-
jects.

*Mr. C. P. Kimball (West Barnstable, Massachusetts 02668)
1,810 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 1 unidentified Homoptera
and 1,809 identified Lepidoptera (193 spread, 1,616 unspread) repre-
senting 880 species collected in Florida, Massachusetts, Arizona,
California, and New Jersey.

Dr. Louis C. Kuitert (2842 S. W. 1st Avenue, Gainesville, Florida 32601)
2,766 pinned Arthropoda (2,723 Insecta, 43 Arachnida and Chilopoda)
(1,880 labeled, 886 unlabeled) (2,229 domestic, 537 exotic), including
181 identified domestic specimens representing 82 species, including
24 Odonata, 115 Orthoptera, 2 Dermaptera, 416 Hemiptera, 165
Homoptera, 4 Neuroptera, 1,361 Coleoptera, 162 Lepidoptera, 295
Diptera, 179 Hymenoptera, and 43 arachnids and centipedes; 6 small,
unmounted samples of miscellaneous insects and 50 pinned, unlabeled
insects (3 Hymenoptera, 2 Diptera, 3 Homoptera, 2 Hemiptera, and 37
Coleoptera) collected in El Salvador by the donor.

Mrs. H. F. Loomis (5355 S. W. 92nd Street, Miami, Florida 33156)
278 alcohol-preserved millipeds, including 9 holotypes, 4 allotypes, 223
additional paratypes, representing 67 species and 16 families from
Mexico, Panama, Jamaica, and the United States. Virtually all species
are new to the Florida State Collection of Arthropods. Most of the
specimens were collected by the donor and her late husband; 69
publications on Arthropoda from the library of her late husband.

*Mr. Bryant Mather (213 Mt. Salus Drive, Clinton, Mississippi 39056)
691 pinned, labeled, spread, identified insects (60 exotic, 631 domestic)
consisting of 102 Neuroptera representing 35 species, 163 Trichoptera
representing 31 species, 323 Lepidoptera representing 92 species, 13
Plecoptera representing 5 species, 13 Ephemeroptera representing 3
species, 28 Odonata representing 11 species, 5 Psocoptera representing
1 species, 9 Mecoptera representing 3 species collected by the donor in
Switzerland, Hungary, Spain, England, Bermuda, Venezuela, Mexico,
Guam, Canada, Germany, France, Japan, Austria, Turkey and the
United States: Mississippi, Texas, New Mexico, California, Kansas,
New Hampshire, Wisconsin, Wyoming, Florida, Illinois, Oregon,
Virginia, North Carolina, Michigan, Colorado, North Dakota and
Hawaii; 15 vials of identified Plecoptera (from Virginia, West Virginia,







68 Division of Plant Industry

Georgia, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Colorado, and Utah) representing 15
species.

Dr. Frank W. Mead (2035 N. E. 6th Terrace, Gainesville, Florida 32601)
86 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects collected in Florida by the
donor.

*Dr. Martin H. Muma (Lake Roberts General Store, Rt. 11, Box 250, Silver
City, New Mexico 88061)
215 can trap samples of arthropods collected in New Mexico by the
donor; 39 slide-mounted Pseudoscorpionida (5 slides representing 1
identified species from Nebraska; 34 slides, unidentified from
Maryland); 20 vials of Pseudoscorpionida (1 from Nebraska, 19 from
Maryland, all unidentified)... all collected by the donor; 264 vials of
unidentified Arthropoda, including 20 vials of Phalangida and 28 vials
of Araneida, 133 vials of identified Araneida, and 56 vials of identified
Scorpionida collected by the donor in New Mexico and Arizona; 254
vials of alcohol-preserved arthropods mostly from New Mexico (except
most of the arachnids which are from Florida), consisting of 44
Hymenoptera, 12 Neuroptera, 19 Hemiptera and Homoptera, 24 Or-
thoptera, 68 Coleoptera, 2 Acarina, 14 Diptera, 7 Isoptera, 5
Thysanura, 2 Embioptera, 2 Isopoda, 2 Diplopoda, 1 Chilopoda, 12
Opilionida and 40 Araneida.

Mr. Thomas M. Neal (1700 S. W. 16th Court, Gainesville, Florida 32601)
421 pinned, labeled, identified insects (1 Odonata, 165 Diptera
representing 36 species, and 255 Hymenoptera representing 96 species)
collected in Florida by the donor.

*Dr. Gayle H. Nelson (Department of Anatomy, Kansas City College of
Osteopathy and Surgery, 2105 Independence Boulevard, Kansas City,
Missouri 64124)
566 pinned, labeled insects (11 determined, 555 undetermined) con-
sisting of 2 Dermaptera, 308 Diptera, 38 Homoptera, 45 Hemiptera, 77
Hymenoptera, 37 Orthoptera, and 59 Neuroptera collected in Bolivia
(4), Mexico (42), and the United States (520): Arizona, New Mexico,
California, Texas, Oklahoma, Colorado, Missouri, Kansas, Delaware,
and Florida. All except the 4 Bolivian specimens were collected by the
donor.

*Dr. John S. Nordin (1826 Road Drive, Warrington, Pennsylvania 18976)
386 pinned, spread, labeled, identified Lepidoptera representing 94
species collected by the donor and associates in Pennsylvania, New
Jersey, New York, Virginia, North Carolina, Missouri, Arkansas,
Texas, Minnesota, South Dakota, North Dakota, and California; 5
species are new to the FSCA.







Thirty-second Biennial Report


*Dr. Dennis R. Paulson (Burke Museum, University of Washington,
Seattle, Washington 98195)
1,645 pinned insects (146 labeled, 178 partially labeled, 1,321 unla-
beled) (751 exotic, 894 domestic), consisting of 6 Orthoptera, 225
Hymenoptera, 459 Diptera, 912 Coleoptera, 12 Hemiptera, 16
Homoptera, 13 Neuroptera, and 2 Lepidoptera, collected in Kenya
(226), South Vietnam (1), Japan (11), Morocco (13), Grenada (5), Chile
(2), Colombia (1), Panama (2), Costa Rica (189), Guatemala (23), Mexico
(86), Jamaica (27), Dominican Republic (17), Dominica (3), Puerto Rico
(1), Cayman Brae (1), South Bimini (1), Eleuthera (2), St. Lucia (1),
Grenadines: Prune Island (1), Bahamas: San Salvador (3), Cuba (27),
Canada: Alberta, British Columbia (8), and the United States: Florida,
Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona,
Nevada, California, Washington, Massachusetts, New York,
Maryland, North Carolina, and South Carolina (994). Almost all of the
specimens were collected by the donor.

Mr. William H. Pierce (deceased)
123 ultraviolet light trap samples collected in Florida by the donor;
1,934 pinned Diptera (662 exotic, 1,272 domestic) collected by the
donor in the South Pacific Islands of Tonga (645) and Fiji (17) and the
United States: Florida and Georgia (1,272); 29 insect flight trap
samples collected in Florida by the donor.

Mr. Dennis Drew Pinkovsky (2416 B. Center Avenue, Orlando, Florida
32806)
Complete collection of Florida Simuliidae on which his doctoral disser-
tation was based, consisting of 113 pinned, labeled, identified
Simuliidae representing 14 species collected by the donor; 562 unla-
beled vials of identified Florida Simuliidae representing 14 species col-
lected by the donor (each vial contains a code number matching a card
file which gives detailed data about the habitat in which each sample
was collected and rearing data from each sample).

Dr. James A. Reinert (Agricultural Research Center, S. W. 70th Avenue,
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33314)
713 samples of alcohol-preserved insects which were collected by the
donor over a period of 1 year by means of rotating-net traps located in
the immediate vicinity of coconut palms, in connection with Dr.
Reinert's study of lethal yellowing disease of coconut palms and other
kinds of palms in southern Florida. These samples, mostly half-pint
samples were collected in or near Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.

*Dr. John F. Reinert (Chief, Entomology Research Branch Headquarters,
U. S. Army Medical R & D Command (SGRD-DMP-E), Washington,
D. C. 20314)







Division of Plant Industry


1,107 pinned, labeled insects (737 Diptera, 157 Hymenoptera, 91 Col-
eoptera, 33 Hemiptera, 29 Homoptera (1 spread), 19 Neuroptera, 7
Odonata (5 spread), 1 Mecoptera, 31 spread Lepidoptera, 2 Orthoptera)
collected in Maryland, Oklahoma, and Texas by the donor; 5 ultraviolet
light trap samples collected in Maryland by the donor)

Mr. David B. Richman (Lea County Courthouse, Agricultural Extension
Office, Lovington, New Mexico 88260)
454 vials of alcohol-preserved Arthropods (373 determined, 81 undeter-
mined) (329 domestic, 125 exotic) consisting of 392 Scorpionida, 9
Pedipalpida, 27 Amblypygi, 1 Schizomida, 3 Ricinulei and 22
Pseudoscorpionida, collected in Paraguay, Mexico, Guatemala,
Panama Canal Zone, Haiti, South India, Chile, Argentina, Iran,
Australia, Tasmania, South Africa, Ceylon, Srilanka and the United
States: Florida, Arizona, Texas, Arkansas, California, Georgia, New
Mexico, and New Jersey. Several species are new to the FSCA.

*Mr. William Rosenberg (P. O. Box 366, Hazelwood, North Carolina 28738)
65 Cornell-type insect cabinet drawers, 85 Schmitt boxes, 50 medium-
sized insect storage boxes with wooden tops on hinges; 3 books (Das
Kaferbuch by Josef R. Winkler, 1964. 154 p., illus.; Colored illustra-
tions of the insects of Japan Coleoptera by Takehiko Nakane. 1960.
274 p., illus.; Beetles by Ewald Teitter. 1961. (English translation of
1960 printing in German) 205 p., illus.; 630 assorted Ward's unit pin-
ning trays to fit Cornell drawers.

Dr. Barbara Saffer (Indian River Community College, 3209 Virginia
Avenue, Ft. Pierce, Florida 33450)
1,429 pinned, labeled, identified Hymenoptera representing 102 species
all collected in Florida by the donor.

*Mr. Joe Schuh (4039 Shasta Way, Klamath Falls, Oregon 97601)
3,767 pinned, labeled (987 determined, 1,384 undetermined) insects
(2,411 domestic, 526 exotic) consisting of 8 Lepidoptera, 1 Dermaptera,
2 Homoptera, 2 Neuroptera, 1,111 Orthoptera, 1 Mallophaga, 183
Diptera, 580 Coleoptera, and 1,879 Hymenoptera collected in Brazil (4),
Congo (1), El Salvador (3), Canada: British Columbia (6), Peru (28), In-
dia (2), Philippines (1), Mexico (19), Australia (58), New Guinea (109),
Ecuador (1), S. Vietnam (30), Nigeria (268), and the United States:
Arizona, Oregon, California, Utah, Arkansas, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho,
Montana, Nevada, Iowa, Massachusetts, Alaska, Washington,
Wyoming, Kansas, Texas, Indiana, Michigan, New York, New Jersey,
Connecticut and Louisiana (2,316); 191 vials of alcohol-preserved ar-
thropods and nematodes consisting of Nematoda (3) and Arthropoda
(188): Crustacea (4); Diplopoda and Chilopoda (32); Arachnida (91):
Pseudoscorpionida (6), Scorpionida (19), Solpugida, Thelyphonidae, and







Thirty-second Biennial Report


Tarantulidae (17), Acarina (9 mites, 20 ticks), Araneida and Phalangida
(9); Insecta (71): Embioptera (1), Homoptera (2), Diptera (6), Isoptera
(4), Orthoptera (21), Siphonaptera (5), Anoplura and Mallophaga (12),
Psocoptera (4), Thysanura (6), Collembola (3), Mecoptera (3), Coleoptera
larvae (4); 1 copy of A Catalog of the Diptera of America north of Mex-
ico, August 1965, by Alan Stone et al., Agricultural Handbook No. 276,
USDA, Washington, DC 1969 p.; 5,540 pinned, labeled, unidentified
Hymenoptera: Apoidea collected by the donor in the western United
States, mainly in Oregon and California, and a short series from Con-
necticut; 183 envelope-stored Odonata representing 24 species col-
lected in Oregon by the donor.


*Mr. Charles E. Seiler (deceased)
1,151 pinned, unlabeled arthropods (48 identified, 1,062 unidentified)
(1,110 Hymenoptera, 26 Orthoptera, 5 Hemiptera, 2 Homoptera, 1 Col-
eoptera, 5 Diptera, and 2 Araneida); 2 Hymenoptera preserved in
envelopes; 54 vials of alcohol-preserved arthropods (7 vials containing
29 Lepidoptera larvae and pupae, 10 vials containing 10 adult
Hymenoptera, and 37 vials containing 37 Arachnida: Araneida). All
specimens were collected in the vicinity of Belle Glade, Florida by the
donor. Virtually all arthropods other than Hymenoptera were prey of
the Hymenoptera taken in intimate association with the individual
wasps which captured them. Some wasps were reared and are accom-
panied by host and life history records, some of which information is
believed to be new to science. (This collection was received through Mr.
William G. Genung, University of Florida, IFAS, Agric. Research and
Education Center, P. O. Drawer A, Belle Glade, Florida 33430, for
whom Charles Seiler served as a research assistant for some years.)


Dr. B. J. Smittle (1605 N. W. 71st Street, Gainesville, Florida 32601)
494 ultraviolet light trap samples collected in Florida by the donor.


Dr. Lionel A. Stange (Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer
Services, Division of Plant Industry, P. O. Box 1269, Gainesville,
Florida 32602)
1 pinned, labeled Mecoptera: Notiothaumidae: Notiothauma reedi
McLachlin, a "living fossil" from Chile and the sole surviving represen-
tative of the family Notiothaumidae which is new to the FSCA; 172
pinned, labeled, identified insects consisting of 32 Neuroptera
representing 14 species from Argentina, all new to the FSCA, with
representation of both sexes of most species; 140 specimens represen-
ting 105 species of Hymenoptera (including 1 paratype of each of 5
species) from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, Peru and
Venezuela, almost all of which are new to the FSCA.







Division of Plant Industry


*Mr. Karl H. Stephan (Route 1, Box 145, Red Oak, Oklahoma 74563)
24 baited can trap and ultraviolet light trap samples collected in
Oklahoma by the donor; 699 pinned, unlabeled arthropods (125
Diptera, 259 Hymenoptera, 83 Homoptera, 132 Hemiptera, 5 Odonata,
11 Neuroptera, 7 Coleoptera, 15 Orthoptera, 1 Psocoptera, 1
Lepidoptera, 5 Thysanoptera, 1 Ephemeroptera, 2 Thysanura, 5
Mecoptera, 10 Siphonaptera, 29 Acarina (28 mites, 1 tick), 8
Pseudoscorpionida) collected in Oklahoma by the donor.

*Dr. Karl J. Stone (813 N. W. 20 Street, Minot, North Dakota 58701)
3,431 vials of Araneida (2,970 undetermined, 461 determined), each vial
containing 1 or more spiders, the vials of identified spiders represent-
ing 116 species collected in Afghanistan (68), Canada (55), and the
United States: Alaska (679), Hawaii (1), North Dakota (2,519), Idaho
(10), Montana (8), Washington (27), Oregon (10), California (1), New
Mexico (5), Wisconsin (4), Michigan (9), Kentucky (8), Georgia (14), and
Florida (13); arachnid reprint library consisting of 1,660 bulletins and
reprints treating spiders and related arachnids. In addition to this
donation Dr. Stone sold to the University of Florida 85 volumes
representing those books and monographs in his personal library, some
of them scarce to rare, that were not previously represented in the com-
bined arachnid library holdings of the University of Florida and the
Division of Plant Industry, Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services. These combined holdings constitute one of the
outstanding arachnid libraries in the New World.

Dr. Horace S. Telford (S. W. 315 Skyline Drive, Pullman, Washington
99163)
132 pinned, labeled Syrphidae, including 57 identified specimens
representing 41 species (19 species new to the FSCA; first represen-
tative of a sex of 2 additional species) collected in Mexico (2), Puerto
Rico (81), Panama (6), Argentina (2), India (4), and the United States:
Alaska (3), Hawaii (2), Idaho, Washington, Oregon, and Arizona. (an ex-
change)

*Dr. Mac A. Tidwell (International Center for Medical Research, 1430
Tulane Avenue, New Orleans, Louisiana 70112)
9 vials of miscellaneous insects (1 sample from a light fixture, 5
samples from a light trap, 3 small samples from an insect flight trap)
collected in Colombia by the donor; 211 pinned, labeled insects (126
Diptera, 26 Hymenoptera, 25 Coleoptera, 13 Orthoptera, 10
Homoptera, 5 Hemiptera, 4 Lepidoptera, 2 Odonata (collected in Col-
ombia by the donor; 19 insect flight trap samples collected in Colombia
by the donor; 8,058 pinned insects (8,018 Diptera, 40 Coleoptera) from
North America, including Mexico (7,365 United States, 347 Canada,
346 Mexico), of which 7,587 are labeled, 471 unlabeled; 4,537 identified







Thirty-second Biennial Report


to species, 3,521 unidentified or identified only to genera. Included are
4,250 pinned Tabanidae (989 unidentified, 3,261 identified representing
176 species) and 1,359 pinned, labeled Culicidae (118 unidentified,
1,241 identified representing 36 species); 187 pill boxes and salve cans
containing several thousand assorted insects collected by the donor in
the United States, Canada, and Mexico; 66 labeled, slide-mounted mos-
quito larval skins, all Aedes canadensis; 764 vials containing
Tabanidae larvae, larval and pupal skins, and miscellaneous other in-
sects collected by the donor in North America, including Mexico.

Dr. A. N. Tissot (520 N. E. Blvd., Gainesville, Florida 32601)
A collection of Homoptera: Aphididae developed over much of the
donor's lifetime consisting of 3,600 slide mounts representing 400
species of aphids, mostly North American, including 500 paratype
slides, 12 cotype slides, and 10 secondary type slides; a personal library
of reprints, bulletins, and books dealing with Aphididae is acknow-
ledged elsewhere in this report (see Entomology Library Development);
1,306 pinned, identified insects (1,062 labeled, 244 unlabeled) con-
sisting of 205 Coleoptera representing 5 species from Florida and
Texas and 1,101 Hemiptera representing 114 species consisting of 83
specimens from Mexico, Panama, Ecuador, Bolivia, Peru, Paraguay,
Colombia, Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, and Australia and 1,018 specimens
from the United States: Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina,
Virginia, Tennessee, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania,
Massachusetts, Ohio, Illinois, Iowa, Arizona, California, Oregon, Col-
orado, and Utah, including 5 Hemiptera paratypes representing 5
species (1 United States, 1 Bolivia, 1 Paraguay, 2 Brazil); 26 wooden
slide boxes.

University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (expedited by Dr. F.
E. Wood)
The Department of Entomology of the University of Maryland has
donated to the Florida State Collection of Arthropods its entire collec-
tion of spiders. This alcohol-preserved, identified collection consists of
1,591 vials containing 5,489 North American spiders representing 451
species, 183 genera, and 27 families, mostly collected by Dr. Martin H.
Muma.

Dr. Howard V. Weems, Jr. (11208 N. W. 12th Place, Gainesville, Florida
32601)
19,841 pinned, labeled insects consisting of 16,734 Diptera, 443
Lepidoptera, 1,521 Hymenoptera, 533 Coleoptera, 77 Neuroptera, 219
Mecoptera, 23 Plecoptera, 19 Trichoptera, 138 Hemiptera, 79
Homoptera, 9 Dermaptera, and 55 Orthoptera, collected by the donor
and other members of his family in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina,
North Carolina, and West Virginia. This collection is an exceptionally







Division of Plant Industry


neatly processed one, including a substantial number of species new to
the FSCA; 122 envelopes, each containing 1 to 10 Lepidoptera collected
in Colombia by the donor.

*Dr. Willard H. Whitcomb (Department of Entomology and Nematology,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
5 insect flight trap samples from the island of Guadeloupe; 49 gallons
of alcohol-preserved insects collected at Tall Timbers Research Station
over a period of several years, each large bottle completely filled with
small vials, each of them containing a few to many insects.

*Mr. Richard W. Wilkerson (Department of Entomology and Nematology,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
61 insect flight trap samples collected in Colombia by the donor; 60
whirl-pak samples collected with a CDC light trap; 187 envelopes, each
containing an insect flight trap sample; 12 plastic bags containing in-
sect flight trap samples; 126 envelopes containing Lepidoptera and
miscellaneous other insects. All collections were made in Colombia by
the donor; 369 pinned, labeled insects collected by the donor and
associates in Colombia, S. A.; Trinidad and St. Lucia, West Indies, con-
sisting of 302 Diptera, 2 Mecoptera, 10 Neuroptera, 20 Hymenoptera,
61 Coleoptera, 3 Orthoptera, 38 Hemiptera, and 22 Homoptera.

*Dr. Nixon Wilson (Department of Biology, University of Northern Iowa,
Cedar Falls, Iowa 50613)
389 vials (some containing more than 1 order) of Arthropoda (65 exotic,
324 domestic) collected in Mexico, Canada, Thailand, Japan and the
United States: Alaska, Oregon, South Dakota, Iowa, Indiana, Texas,
Arkansas, Louisiana, Virginia, Georgia, Kentucky, Maine, Michigan,
Minnesota, New Mexico, South Carolina, West Virginia, Hawaii, and
Florida, consisting of the following: 1 Thysanura, 14 Collembola, 2 Or-
thoptera, 12 Psocoptera, 21 Coleoptera, 8 Thysanoptera, 6 Hemiptera,
7 Homoptera, 2 Neuroptera, 14 Diptera, 13 Hymenoptera, 2 Crustacea:
Isopoda, 2 Chilopoda, 1 Amphipoda, 3 Diplopoda, 1 Arachnida:
Phalangida, 3 Arachnida: Pseudoscorpionida, 195 Arachnida: Acarina,
and 12 Arachnida: Araneida, many new to the Florida State Collection
of Arthropods; 167 vials of specimens include host or habitat data; 46
vials of Araneida: Acarina are authoritatively identified to species; 63
slide-mounts of Acarina (mites), 56 with host data, 4 are free living
mites, 13 determined, from Indonesia: Java; India (2); Thailand (7); and
the United States: Iowa, Indiana, Michigan, South Dakota, Oregon,
Georgia, Kentucky, Alaska, and Florida (53); 2 vials of undetermined
mites from Alaska with habitat data.

*Dr. Daniel P. Wojcik (5302 S. W. 70th Terrace, Gainesville, Florida 32601)
690 ultraviolet light trap samples (110 half pints, 73 pints, 146 half






Thirty-second Biennial Report


quarts, 261 quarts, 32 half gallons, 68 gallons) (this computes to
676.875 quarts) of insects collected from September 1970 through Oc-
tober 1973 with continuous operation by the donor of the light trap at
Payne's Prairie, south of Gainesville, Alachua County, Florida.

Dr. Robert E. Woodruff (Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer
Services, Division of Plant Industry, 1911 S. W. 34th Street,
P. O. Box 1269, Gainesville, Florida 32601)
171 pinned insects (156 labeled, 20 unlabeled) consisting of 48
Homoptera: Cicadidae (15 unidentified; 33 identified representing 10
species) from Japan (9) and the United States (39): Ohio, Maine, Ken-
tucky, North Carolina, Florida, Arizona, and Colorado, and 128 Diptera
(98 unidentified; 30 identified representing 12 species) from Ohio,
Maine, North Carolina, Indiana and Virginia; 29 vials of alcohol-
preserved arthropods (1 Crustacea; 2 Diplopoda; 11 Arachnida: 4
Phalangida, 1 Acarina, 6 Araneida; 15 Insecta: 1 Orthoptera, 1 Col-
eoptera, 2 Neuroptera, 5 Hymenoptera, 6 Diptera) collected in Florida
and Maryland by the donor and Mr. Paul M. Choate, Jr.; 9 vials and 2
small bottles of alcohol-preserved arthropods consisting of 2
Arachnida: Araneida collected in Arizona and the following from
Florida; 53 Trichoptera, 30 Isoptera, 38 Hemiptera, 1 Ephemeroptera,
and 74 Coleoptera (45 unidentified, 29 in 2 vials identified), all except
the arachnids collected in Florida; 291 pinned, labeled insects (147 Col-
eoptera, 24 Diptera, 5 Hymenoptera, 14 Hemiptera, 1 Homoptera) col-
lected in Florida by the donor.

*Dr. David G. Young (1324 S. W. 98th Street, Gainesville, Florida 32601)
94 slide-mounted, identified Diptera: Culicidae larvae representing 19
species collected in Jamaica (23 slides) and the United States (71
slides): Florida and Texas by the donor; 1 wooden slide box; 41 pinned,
unlabeled insects (1 Homoptera, 6 Hemiptera, 1 Hymenoptera, 13 Col-
eoptera, 20 Diptera) collected in Ecuador by the donor.

*Dr. Frank N. Young (Department of Zoology, Indiana University,
Bloomington, Indiana 47401)
2,645 pinned insects (2,042 of which are labeled, 532 of which are ex-
otic) consisting of 2,520 Coleoptera, 46 Hemiptera, 66 Hymenoptera, 1
Lepidoptera, 3 Diptera, 9 Orthoptera collected in Austria, Italy,
England, Colombia, Venezuela, Mexico, Bahama Islands, Antilles,
Brazil, Panama, Argentina, Costa Rica, Bolivia, Trinidad, Canada and
the United States: Florida, Kentucky, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana,
Tennessee, Massachusetts, Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, New Hampshire,
Michigan, Pennsylvania, Indiana, Oklahoma, Iowa, Texas, Arkansas,
Washington, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Vermont, Mississip-
pi, Arizona, California, Rhode Island and Maine. 35 ultraviolet light
trap samples of insects collected in Brazil (2), Florida (2), Alabama (1),






Division of Plant Industry


and Indiana (30). 3,413 vials (each vial containing 1 to many specimens)
of alcohol-preserved arthropods (of which 2,326 were exotic) consisting
of 3,250 Coleoptera, 3 Ephemeroptera, 3 Odonata, 11 Hemiptera, 1
Trichoptera, 1 Crustacea:Isopoda, 1 Crustacea:Decapoda, 1
Arachnida:Scorpionida, 1 Arachnida:Araneida and 150 miscellaneous
insects collected in Brazil, Peru, Colombia, Venezuela, Surinam, French
Guiana, Bolivia, Panama, Mexico, Bahama Islands, Iran, England,
British Honduras, and the United States: New York, New Hampshire,
Vermont, Michigan, Ohio, Virginia, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida,
Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Alabama, Arizona, Pennsylvania, North
Carolina, Kentucky and Indiana.


Other Contributions to the Collection

Mr. John A'Brook (Welsh Plant Industry Station, Aberystwyth, Dyfed SY
23 EB, United Kingdom)
Approximately 3,000 undetermined Auchenorrhynchus Homoptera,
mostly Cicadellidae and Fulgoroidea, alcohol-preserved in 48 vials.
These specimens were caught in suction traps at 2 locations in
Jamaica; they represent a good assortment of the fauna of that area.
Some of the species are known vectors of plant diseases; others have
been investigated as potential vectors of the lethal yellowing disease of
coconut palms.

Dr. Tom R. Ashley (Research Entomologist, USDA, ARS, SR,
P. O. Box 14565, Gainesville, Florida 32604)
21 pinned, unlabeled Tachinidae, Eucelatoria n. sp., lab reared on
Galleria sp. at Baton Rouge, Louisiana by W. C. Nettles, Jr.

*Mr. Thomas H. Atkinson (1303 McCarty Hall, Department of En-
tomology and Nematology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
32611)
70 pinned, labeled, identified Coleoptera representing 15 species and 11
genera of Scolytidae collected in Guatemala (6) and the United States:
Florida (60), Texas (6); several species are new to the FSCA and 1 is the
first record for Florida; 18 pinned, labeled, identified Coleoptera con-
sisting of 6 Curius dentatus Newman (Cerambycidae), a rare species for
which there were only 3 in the FSCA, and 12 Xylosandrus compactus
(Eichhorn) (Scolytidae) including the rare dimorphic males, collected in
Florida by the donor.

Mr. Wilson Baker (Tall Timbers Research Station, Tallahassee, Florida
32303)


*Research Associate/Student Associate






Thirty-second Biennial Report


2 pinned, labeled Florida Cuterebridae reared from their rodent host by
the donor.

*Dr. R. M. Baranowski (University of Florida, IFAS, Agricultural
Research and Education Center, 18905 S. W. 280th Street, Route 1,
Homestead, Florida 33030)
2 McPhail trap samples from Bolivia; 9 ultraviolet light trap samples (4
from the Bahama Islands, 2 from Bolivia, and 3 from the U. S.: Florida:
Grossman Hammock).

Ms. Suzanne W. T. Batra (Beneficial Insect Introduction Lab, Bldg. 417,
IIBIII, Agr. Res. Serv., U.S.D.A., Beltsville, Maryland 20705)
5 pinned, labeled Pithitus smaragdula (Fabricius) (Hymenoptera: Cera-
tinidae), a species of carpenter bee native to Punjab, India, released
March 1978 in Ft. Lauderdale for pollination of legumes, cucurbits, and
other plants.

Mr. Dwight R. Bennett (3121 McCarty Hall, Department of Entomology
and Nematology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
56 vials of alcohol-preserved arthropods (1 Chilopoda, 1 Diplopoda, 14
Hymenoptera, 17 Diptera, 10 Coleoptera, 4 Orthoptera, 9 Hemiptera)
containing a total of 82 specimens collected by the donor in Costa Rica.

*Mr. Dale R. Birkenmeyer (Metabolism and Radiation Research Lab,
USDA, ARS, P. O. Box 5674, State University Station, Fargo, North
Dakota 581b2)
28 alcohol-preserved pints (canned) of ultraviolet light trap samples of
insects collected in North Dakota by the donor.

Dr. Zdenek Boucek (Commonwealth Institute of Entomology, c/o British
Museum of Natural History, Cromwell Road, London SW7-5BD, Great
Britain)
22 pinned, labeled, identified Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea from Europe
representing 15 species, 14 of which are new to the FSCA.

*Dr. W. F. Buren (Department of Entomology and Nematology, 3103 Mc
Carty Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
3 vials of Hymenoptera: Formicidae representing 2 species from
Gainesville, Florida.

Dr. Jerry F. Butler (Department of Entomology, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida 32611)
40 insect flight trap samples and Tabanidae selected from 4 additional
insect flight trap samples collected in Florida by the donor.

*Mr. Charles W. Calmbacher (Department of Biology, Fordham University,
Bronx, New York 10458)






Division of Plant Industry


6 quart samples and 6 half pint samples of alcohol-preserved insects
collected in New York State with an insect flight trap; Ichneumonidae
and some other Hymenoptera have been removed from these samples.

Mr. Ted Center (710 N. W. 2nd Avenue, Gainesville, Florida 32601)
16 pinned, labeled, spread Lepidoptera: Pyralidae: Sameodes albigut-
talis Warren, lab reared in Gainesville, Florida, by the donor.

*Mr. Paul M. Choate, Jr. (332-5 University Village South, Gainesville,
Florida 32603)
25 Coleoptera preserved in alcohol (8 Trogidae from Vermont, 17
Scarabaeidae: Geotrupinae from New Hampshire; these represent
rarely collected species which are poorly represented in the FSCA); 1
pitfall trap sample of miscellaneous insects collected in Vermont by the
donor; 4 pint samples of miscellaneous Coleoptera collected by the
donor in the United States; 2 pinned, labeled, identified Coleoptera;
Carabidae, collected in New Hampshire by the donor, representing
Platypatrobus lacustris Darlington, a very rarely collected beetle
which occurs in beaver "houses"; 31 pinned, labeled, unidentified Col-
eoptera; Scarabaeidae (United States, 19; Nepal, 2; South Vietnam, 10);
81 pinned, labeled Coleoptera (69 Trox spp., 12 Dichelonyx spp.) col-
lected by the donor in New Hampshire, Vermont, Nebraska, Arizona,
and South Carolina.

Mr. E. W. Clark (received through Dr. George Allen, Department of Ento-
mology and Nematology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
32611)
24 pinned, labeled Coleoptera, Lagriidae, Lagria villosa Fabricius from
Brazil.

Mr. Howard Converse (Florida State Museum, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida 32611)
12 vials of alcohol-preserved arthropods from Venezuela, Colombia and
Guatemala; 2 alcohol-preserved Coleoptera, 1 Hemiptera from Colom-
bia and Venezuela.

Mr. G. Wallace Dekle (3700 N. W. 12th Street, Gainesville, Florida 32601)
5 dry-preserved samples of Homoptera: Coccoidea and Aleyrodidae; 93
vials of arthropods (1 Amphipoda, 1 Isopoda, 1 Acari, 3 Araneida, 6
Hemiptera, 4 Homoptera, 16 Coleoptera, 7 Orthoptera, 4 Dermaptera,
1 Neuroptera, 17 Diptera, 6 Trichoptera, 8 Lepidoptera (3 adults, 5 lar-
vae), 6 Hymenoptera, and 12 miscellaneous) collected by the donor in
Florida, Arkansas, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Wyoming, Washington,
Oregon, and California; 28 vials of alcohol-preserved arthropods con-
sisting of 1 Chilopoda, 1 Arachnida: Acarina, 3 Arachnida: Araneida, 2
Isopoda, 3 Homoptera, 1 Hemiptera, 1 Orthoptera, 2 Coleoptera, 1






Thirty-second Biennial Report


Neuroptera, 3 Diptera, 5 Lepidoptera, and 5 Hymenoptera collected in
California, Arizona and Texas by the donor.

Mr. H. A. Denmark (Florida Department of Agric. and Consumer Services,
Division of Plant Industry, 1911 S. W. 34th Street, P. O. Box 1269,
Gainesville, Florida 32602)
9 volumes and 7 issues of scientific journals.

Mr. N. M. Dennis (344 Oxford Drive, Savannah, Georgia 31405)
Entomological literature consisting of the following: Journal of
Economic Entomology, Bulletin of the Entomological Society of
America, Journal of the Georgia Entomological Society, and Pro-
ceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington.

Mr. Tim H. Dickins (Department of Entomology, Virginia Polytechnic In-
stitute, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061)
Representatives of 3 species of Blattidae new to the FSCA ...
Schultesia lampyridiformis L. M. Roth (28 adults), 4 Blaberus
giganteus, and 4 Madagascar hissing roaches, Gromphadorhina
portentosa (Schaum).

Mr. H. L. Dominguez (Kil 71/2, Autopista Duarte, Entrada Cocimar Casa
No. 7, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic)
47 alcohol-preserved Scarabaeidae collected in the Dominican Republic
by the donor.

*Mr. Herbert L. Dozier, Jr. (Rt. 3, Box 130-B, Central, South Carolina
29630)
Paratypes of 6 pinned, labeled Coleoptera representing 5 species (1
from Arizona; 5 from the Bahama Islands); 3 pinned, labeled Culicidae
from Maryland; 1 pinned, labeled Phasmidae from Maryland.

Mr. Lynn Dubose (Department of Entomology and Nematology, Univer-
sity of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
13 insect flight trap collections of insects and 1 netted sample collected
by the donor in Austin Cary Forest, near Gainesville, Florida; 9 of the
samples were taken in CO,-baited flight traps.

Mr. Glavis B. Edwards (409 N. E. 50th Terrace, Gainesville, Florida 32601)
7 paratypes of a jumping spider, Phidippus xeros Edwards, 4 females
and 3 males, from Florida.

Dr. T. Fincher (USDA, ARS, Animal Parasite Research Lab, Georgia
Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton, Georgia 31794)
1 pitfall trap sample and 16 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects (3
vial size) collected in Georgia by the donor; 5 jars and 10 vials of iden-






Division of Plant Industry


tified Coleoptera representing 12 species collected in Georgia; 1 vial of
miscellaneous Coleoptera (10 Georgia, 1 Texas).

Mr. E. Folch (Gulf and Western Americas Corp., Division Central Romana,
La Romana, Republica Dominicana)
9 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects from the Dominican
Republic: La Roma, and 3 hand collected samples of insects from the
Dominican Republic: La Romana Prov., Cacata.

Dr. G. W. Frankie (Department of Entomology, Texas A & M University,
College Station, Texas 77843)
400 parasitic Hymenoptera (10 from Mexico, 390 from Texas), all
reared with host plant and host insect (gall-formers on Quercus),
representing 21 species (12 identified species identified to species, 9
species identified to genus) in the families Peteromalidae,
Eurytomidae, Torymidae, and Eulophidae, most of which are new to
the FSCA.

Mr. G. A. P. Gibson (Canadian National Collection, Ottawa, Canada)
6 identified Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae, Macrophya representing 5
North American species of sawflies new to the FSCA.

Mr. Robert C. Godefroi (School of Forest Resources and Conservation,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
8 pinned, spread, labeled Lepidoptera collected in Florida by the donor.

*Mr. Gerd H. Heinrich (Dryden, Maine 04225)
A cigarboxful of dry-stored, unmounted insects consisting of 2 small
samples from Maine, 27 Hymenoptera, mostly Ichneumonidae, 106
Diptera, mostly Syrphidae; 24 small samples from Florida, 270
Hymenoptera, mostly Icheumonidae, 5 Diptera; 1 insect flight trap
sample collected in Maine by the donor.

*Mr. John B. Heppner (Department of Entomology and Nematology, Uni-
versity of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
4 ultraviolet light trap collections (1 from Maryland, 3 from Tennessee)
taken by the donor; 32 envelope-preserved Odonata collected in
Venezuela by the donor.

*Dr. Lawrence A. Hetrick (1614 N. W. 12th Road, Gainesville, Florida
32605)
34 pinned, labeled insects (5 Diptera, 1 Hymenoptera, 1 Homoptera, 1
Orthoptera, 1 Lepidoptera, 25 Coleoptera) collected in Florida by the
donor.






Thirty-second Biennial Report


Dr. C. Clayton Hoff (Emeritus Professor, Department of Biology, Univer-
sity of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131)
4 slide-mounted paratypes of Pseudoscorpionida (1 male, 1 female,
Parachelifer superbus Hoff; 1 male, 1 female, Garyops pumila Hoff).

*Dr. Richard L. Hoffman (Biology Department, Radford College, Radford,
Virginia 24141)
139 publications by the donor, mostly on Chilopoda and Diplopoda.

Mr. Jerome A. Hogsette, Jr. (Department of Entomology and Nematology,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
1 Mydidae, 1 Mantoidea maya Saussure and Zehntner; 111 pinned, lab-
reared Ophyra aenescens (Wiedemann) and 7 pinned, lab-reared Ophyra
leucostoma (Wiedemann) (Diptera:Muscidae); 100+ lab-reared pupae of
Phormia regina (Meigen) (Diptera:Calliphoridae).

Dr. Francis G. Howarth (Bernice P. Bishop Museum, P. O. Box 6037,
Honolulu, Hawaii 96818)
2 vials of alcohol-preserved Homoptera:Cixiidae (5 Oliarus polyphemus
Fennah, 7 lolania perkinsi Kirkaldy) from Hawaii, both species new to
the FSCA.

Dr. Sally Hughes-Schrader (Department of Zoology, Duke University,
Durham, North Carolina 27706)
4 pinned, labeled, spread, identified Mantispidae: Climaciella
semihyalina (Serville), from Arizona, new to the FSCA.

Mrs. Rohani Ibrahim (Department of Entomology and Nematology,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
slide-mounted holotype of a newly described species of mite, Lep-
totrombidium floridanum Ibrahim (family Trombiculidae), from Leon
County, Florida.

*Mr. H. L. King (2215 La Salle Street, Sarasota, Florida 33581)
55 envelopes (1 specimen per envelope) of insects (26 Coleoptera, 8 Or-
thoptera, 3 Diptera, 4 Hymenoptera, 3 Hemiptera, 3 Homoptera, 8
Neuroptera) and 3 vials of Hymenoptera collected in Costa Rica and
Panama by the donor.

Mr. Noel L. H. Krauss (2437 Parker Place, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822)
3 pill boxes of dried insects consisting of 8 Coccinellidae and 24
Tephritidae from Solomon Islands and 21 Tephritidae from the Austral
Islands, all collected by the donor.

*Col. Lester L. Lampert (17 Hillview Circle, Asheville, North Carolina
28805)






Division of Plant Industry


30 insects flight trap samples and 6 full gallons of insect flight trap col-
lections of insects collected in Florida (some from Archbold Biological
Station near Lake Placid, Florida) by the donor.

*Dr. James E. Lloyd (Department of Entomology and Nematology, IFAS,
3103 McCarty Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
24 entomological reprints, most of them on Collembola.

Dr. Glenn Longley (Aquatic Station, Southwest Texas State University,
San Marcos, Texas 78666)
2 paratypes of Haidoporus texanus Young and Longley (family
Dytiscidae), a blind, wingless water beetle from an underground
river... the first species of this genus known from North America.

Dr. Dial F. Martin (USDA, ARS, Ent., Bioenvironmental Insect Control
Research Lab, Delta Branch Expt. Sta., Stoneville, Mississippi 38776)
26 pinned, unlabeled, laboratory-reared, adult tachinid flies, commonly
called the Cuban fly, Lixophaga diatreae (Townsend), Trinidad strain,
each associated with its empty puparium. This is a parasite of the
sugarcane borer, Diatreae saccharalis (Fabricius).

Mr. Lewis S. Maxwell (6230 Travis Boulevard, Tampa, Florida 33610)
a copy of C. H. Curran's classic, out-of-print volume, Diptera of North
America (donated to DPI library).

Mrs. Ernestine Mercer (4139 N. W. 21st Terrace, Gainesville, Florida
32605)
22 ultraviolet light trap samples from Florida collected by the donor.

Mr. Robert T. Mitchell (4109 Tennyson Road, Hyattsville, Maryland
20783)
3 pinned, labeled Hymenoptera; 1 undetermined Stephanidae (Florida),
1 Mutillidae: Dasymutilla sp. (Florida), 1 Ichneumonidae: Acroricnus
stylatorjunceus (Cresson).

Dr. William C. Nettles, Jr. (Cotton Insects Physiology Laboratory, USDA,
ARS, 4115 Gourrier Avenue, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70808)
23 pinned, unlabeled, laboratory-reared, adult tachinid flies,
Eucelatoria new species, a parasite in its larval stage of the corn ear-
worm, Heliothis zea (Boddie). This series of flies was lab-reared on lar-
vae of the wax moth, Galleria sp. (not a normal host of this parasitic fly)
at Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Mr. David Nye (University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware)
1 adult Phasmidae: Aplopus mayeri Caudell.






Thirty-second Biennial Report


Drs. Charles W. and Lois B. O'Brien (Entomology, P. O. Box 111, Florida
A & M University, Tallahassee, Florida 32307)
24 pinned, labeled, identified Fulgoroidea representing 5 species col-
lected by Charles and Lois O'Brien in Hawaii: Maui, identified by Dr.
Lois O'Brien; all are new to the FSCA; 16 pinned, labeled, identified
Curculionidae, all paratypes, representing 4 species recently described
by Dr. Charles O'Brien, collected in Mexico (6) and the United States:
Texas (4), Florida (6); 16 ultraviolet light trap samples (15 United
States and 1 Mexico sample) collected by the donor.

*Dr. Jose M. Osorio R. (Edificio Dofia Amalia, ler. piso Apto. 1-2, Ave.
Vargas con carrera 18, Barquisimeto, Venezuela)
13 vials and small bottles of arthropods (1 Homoptera: Coccidae, 1
Amblypygi, 1 Phalangida, 2 Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae, 2 Hymenoptera,
and 6 miscellaneous insects) collected in Venezuela by the donor; 95
envelopes, each containing 1 or more Lepidoptera, collected in
Venezuela by the donor.

Mr. Richard S. Peigler (Department of Entomology, Texas A & M Univer-
sity, College Station, Texas 77843)
153 pinned, labeled insects (111 Diptera, 23 Hymenoptera, 7
Homoptera, 2 Hemiptera, 4 Coleoptera, 3 spread Lepidoptera, 1
Psocoptera, 2 Mecoptera) collected in Mexico (4), France and Germany
(53) and the United States (96): Texas, South Carolina and Wisconsin
by the donor and associates.

*Dr. Charles C. Porter (Department of Biology, Fordham University,
Bronx, New York 10458)
26 pinned, labeled, identified Hymenoptera (1, Mexico; 25, United
States: Texas) representing 10 species of Ichneumonidae (1 paratype of
a new species described by the donor), Vespidae, and Scoliidae, all col-
lected and identified by the donor; selected Hymenoptera from 25 in-
sect flight trap samples, 9 from Argentina and 16 from the United
States: Texas, all collected by the donor; 76 pinned, labeled Diptera (10
from Texas, 7 from Mexico, 7 from Chile, 33 from Peru, 19 from
Ecuador) collected by the donor.

Dr. Harry D. Pratt (879 Glen Arden Way N. E., Atlanta, Georgia 30306)
49 pinned, labeled, determined Diptera (16 Trichoceridae representing
4 species from Georgia, all new to the FSCA, 33 Syrphidae represent-
ing 10 species from Georgia and Vermont, all collected by the donor).

*Mr. Mike A. Rickard (4618 Holly, Bellaire, Texas 77401)
143 pinned, labeled, spread, identified Lepidoptera representing 15
species collected in Texas by the donor.






Division of Plant Industry


Dr. Lawrence H. Rolston (Department of Entomology, 402 Life Sciences
Building, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803)
4 Hemiptera: Pentatomidae, paratypes of Mormidea isla Rolston (1),
Mormidea lunura Rolston (1), and Mormidea rugosa Rolston (2).

*Dr. Reece I. Sailer (3847 S. W. 6th Place, Gainesville, Florida 32607)
3 vials of insects identified to species (1 Coleoptera from Maryland, 1
Hymenoptera from Virginia, 1 Lepidoptera larvae from Oklahoma); 2
pinned adults, 5 puparia in gelatin capsules, representing 2 species of
Tachinidae, Lespesia aletiae (Riley) and Euphorocera floridensis Town-
send, reared from larvae of the Mexican bean beetle, Epilachna
varivestis Mulsant.

*Dr. Jack C. Schuster (Facultad de Biologica, Universidad del Valle de
Guatemala, Guatemala City, Guatemala, C. A.)
1 ultraviolet light trap sample from Guatemala.

Mr. Joe Sedlacek (106 Boscombe Road, Brookfield 4069, Queensland,
Australia)
10 half pint samples of alcohol-preserved insects collected in Australia
by the donor; 2 boxes containing several thousand unmounted insects,
mostly Diptera, collected in Australia by the donor (an exchange).

*Dr. Rowland M. Shelley (North Carolina State Museum of Natural
History, 101 Halifax Street, P. O. Box 27647, Raleigh, North Carolina
27611)
4 small vials of miscellaneous insects, mostly Coleoptera, collected by
R. M. Blaney in Quintano Roo, Mexico; representatives of 2 new
species of Diplopoda: 1 male paratype and 1 female paratype of
Croatania catawba Shelley, collected in North Carolina, and 1 male
paratype of Croatania saluda Shelley, collected in South Carolina. Dr.
Shelley designated C. catawba as the type species of the newly de-
scribed genus Croatania; 2 paratypes of Croatania simplex Shelley, a
species of milliped from North Carolina recently described as new by
Dr. Shelley.

*Mr. Mike C. Thomas (2867 N. E. 7th Street, Apt. D, Ocala, Florida 32670)
17 ultraviolet light trap and suction trap samples from Florida, 1 roach,
probably new to the United States, and 5 pinned, labeled, rare Florida
Coleoptera, all collected by the donor; 30 pinned, labeled aquatic Col-
eoptera collected in Florida by the donor; 5 pinned, labeled specimens
of a beetle, Monoedus guttatus Leconte, from Florida. This is the only
North American member of the family Monoedidae and is new to the
FSCA; 1 yeast trap sample collected in Indian River Co., Florida, by
the donor; 1 pinned, labeled paratype of Ablechrus thomasi Wittmer,
family Malachiidae, order Coleoptera.






Thirty-second Biennial Report


Mr. Haroldo Toro (Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Valparaiso, Chile)
6 Neofidelia profusa Moure & Michener (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae,
Fideliinae); this is a new species for the FSCA and the first represen-
tative of the subfamily Fideliinae.

Dr. Charles A. Triplehorn (Curator of Insects, Academic Faculty of
Entomology, 1735 Neil Avenue, Ohio State University, Columbus,
Ohio 43210)
14 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects (Panama, 4; Mexico, 1;
Brazil, 1; Honduras, 1; United States, 7) collected by the donor.

U. S. Insect Identification and Beneficial Insect Introduction Institute,
USDA, Agricultural Research Center, West, Beltsville, Maryland
20705
Another of a series of INKTO (Insects Not Known to Occur in the
United States) synoptic collections. This shipment consisted of 11
pinned, labeled insects (4 spread Lepidoptera representing 3 species, 4
Coleoptera representing 2 species, 2 Hymenoptera (sawflies) repre-
senting 1 species, and 1 Orthoptera) and 8 vials of alcohol-preserved in-
sects (1 vial of 4 larvae and 4 pupae of 1 species of Coleoptera (a weevil),
1 vial containing 1 Homoptera (a psyllid nymph), 2 vials of Diptera (1
cecidomyiid midge adult of 1 species and 4 adults of another species of
Cecidomyiidae), and 4 vials containing larvae and/or pupae of 4 species
of Lepidoptera). All species are new to the FSCA.

Dr. J. R. Vockeroth (Insect Systematics & Biology Control Unit,
Biosystematics Research Institute, Agriculture Canada, Research
Branch, K. W. Neatby Building, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A OC6)
3 Syrphidae: Eristalis pilosa Loew (2 males, 1 female), the only North
American species of the genus previously not represented in the FSCA.

Miss D. Dee Wilder (California Academy of Sciences, Golden Gate Park,
San Francisco, California 09113)
6 pinned, labeled, identified tachinid flies representing 5 species of
Ptilodexia new to the FSCA, including a paratype of Ptilodexia
pacifica Wilder.

Dr. C. Yoshimoto (Canadian National Collection, Ottawa, Canada)
8 identified Hymenoptera: Eulophidae, including 6 paratypes,
representing 4 Palearctic and Nearctic species, all new to the FSCA.

*Mr. Charles F. Zeiger (Chief, Aquatic Plant Control Section, Operations
Division, U. S. Army, Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville, Florida 32202)
171 pinned, labeled insects (40 Diptera, 13 Coleoptera, 12
Hymenoptera, 5 Homoptera, 3 Hemiptera, 98 spread Lepidoptera) col-
lected in Florida, Georgia, and Pennsylvania by the donor.






Division of Plant Industry


Research Associates
of the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods

Following a period of several years during which no additional appoint-
ments were made by Commissioner Conner to the Research Associate and
Student Associate staff of the Florida State Collection of Arthropods, a
substantial expansion of the program was accomplished during the past
biennium. Thirty-five Research Associates and 15 Student Associates were
appointed by the Commissioner during the biennium. Dr. Boyce A. Drum-
mond, III, and Dr. David G. Young were promoted to full Research
Associate status following completion of their graduate studies at the
University of Florida. Nine Research Associates were lost during the bien-
nium. Dr. William G. Eden retired from the chairmanship of the Depart-
ment of Entomology at the University of Florida and returned to his home
state, Alabama. Three other University of Florida professors retired during
the period. Dr. Louis C. Kuitert retired from the Department of En-
tomology and Nematology. Dr. Howard K. Wallace, former chairman of the
department, retired from the Zoology Department. Dr. D. O. Wolfenbarger
retired from the Florida Agricultural Research and Education Center at
Homestead. In addition, Dr. John E. Porter retired from the United States
Public Health Service but still resides in Miami. Mr. Harold F. Loomis, in-
ternationally known authority on the taxonomy of millipeds and former
director of the United States Plant Introduction Garden, in Miami, Florida,
died 5 July 1976. Mr. William H. Pierce, an entomologist with the Division
of Plant Industry (Fla.) at the time of his death, died 19 March 1978. Both
were major contributors to the Florida State Collection of Arthropods over
a period of many years. Two other long-time friends of the program were
lost during the biennium. Mr. Richard Archbold, owner, developer, and
head of the Archbold Biological Station, near Lake Placid, Florida, died on
1 August 1976. Work at the station continues with the support of the
Archbold family and under the direction of Dr. James N. Layne, a Research
Associate of the FSCA. Dr. Maurice W. Provost, Director of the Florida
Medical Entomology Laboratory, at Vero Beach, died at his home on 1
December 1977. He was a recognized authority on wetlands ecology and
mosquito biology.
The Research Associate Program for the continuing development of the
Florida State Collection of Arthropods was initiated during the spring of
1963. The basic purpose of the program is to encourage a cooperative effort
toward the further development of the state arthropod collection by per-
sons who have an active interest and expertise in one or more phases of
basic studies of arthropods taxonomy, ecology, zoogeography,
etc. and who are personally interested in making a significant contribu-
tion to the Florida state collection. The program is designed to stimulate
greater interest among those who are interested in the arthropod fauna of






Thirty-second Biennial Report


Florida and the primary area of influence, but broadly also in the arthropod
fanua of the New World, to offer some tangible support for this kind of
work through furnishing some of the equipment and supplies needed, and
to serve as a coordinating agency for activities of this sort while maintain-
ing the records, channeling out processed material to specialists for iden-
tification, and providing a well curated repository for specimens con-
tributed to the state collection. The program is kept flexible to fit the par-
ticular situation of each Research or Student Associate, and a concerted ef-
fort is made to make this association mutually beneficial. The program in-
cludes both professional and amateur entomologists, without regard to
their residence. During the past 15 years these associates have played a
vital role in the development of the Florida State Collection of Arthropods
into one of the finest reference and research collections in North America.
In addition numerous donations are made by the associates to the Division
of Plant Industry library. During the past binennium these included a large
private library of entomological literature donated by Dr. Franklin S. Blan-
ton, 1,828 items in all, many hundreds of arthropod bulletins and reprints
donated by Dr. G. B. "Sandy"Fairchild, Dr. Frank N. Young, and Dr. Karl
J. Stone, and major donations by collaborating arthropod authorities, Dr.
Harry Hoogstraal, Dr. Herbert W. Levi, and Dr. L. L. Pechuman. Further-
more, during the biennium several thousand arthropod specimen identifica-
tions were made by associates of the FSCA. Special acknowledgement is
due the following: Mr. Paul M. Choate, Jr. (Carabidae), Dr. G. B. Fairchild
(Tabanidae), Mr. Harold N. Greenbaum (Hymenoptera, especially Sym-
phyta), Dr. Dale H. Habeck (immature insects, especially Lepidoptera), Mr.
Fred C. Harmston (Dolichopodidae), Dr. L. A. Hetrick (Isoptera), Dr.
Richard L. Hoffman (Diplopoda), Dr. Charles P. Kimball (Lepidoptera), Dr.
Edward L. Mockford (Psocoptera), Dr. Martin H. Muma (Arachnida,
especially Araneida and Solpugida), Dr. Charles W. O'Brien
(Curculionidae), Dr. Lois B. O'Brien (Fulgoroidea), Dr. Jonathan Reiskind
(Araneida), Dr. David B. Richman (Araneida), Dr. Minter J. Westfall, Jr.
(Odonata), Mr. Joe Wilcox (Asilidae, Mydidae), and Dr. Frank N. Young
(aquatic Coleoptera). Although not a Research Associate of the FSCA, Dr.
Richard M. Bohart, who identified several thousand FSCA aculeate
Hymenoptera during the biennium, is due special recognition.



Research Associates of the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods
(Effective 30 June 1978)

1. Dr. John F. Anderson, Associate Professor, Department of Zoology,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Physiological
ecology of Arachnida)






Division of Plant Industry


2. Dr. Keith L. Andrews, Assistant Research Scientist, Department
of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida, c/o Univer-
sity of Florida/AID Contract, American Embassy, San Salvador,
El Salvador, C. A. (Tropical emtomology; pest management)

3. Dr. Ross H. Arnett, Jr., Professor of Biology, The Biological Research
Institute of America, Inc., c/o Siena College, Loudonville, New
York 12211. (Beetles of the United States; Oedemeridae of the
world; pollen feeding insects)

4. *Mr. Thomas H. Atkinson, Department of Entomology and Nema-
tology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Col-
eoptera: Scolytidae, Platypodidae)

5. Mr. H. David Baggett (Manager of Laboratories, University of
North Florida), 8442 Thor Street, Jacksonville, Florida 32216.
(Host plant relationships, range extensions, parasitism, life cycles
of Lepidoptera)

6. Dr. Richard M. Baranowski, Entomologist, University of Florida,
IFAS, Agricultural Research & Education Center, 18905 S. W.
280th St., Rt. 1, Homestead, Florida 33030. (Biology and tax-
onomy of Hemiptera, especially of Florida and the Antilles)

7. Dr. Joseph A. Beatty, Associate Professor, Department of Zoology,
Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois 62901.
(Systematics, ecology, and distribution of invertebrates, especially
non-insect arthropods, echinoderms, and turbellarians)

8. Mrs. Elisabeth C. Beck, Biologist, Bureau of Entomology, Division of
Health, Florida Department of Health & Rehabilitive Services,
P. O. Box 210, Jacksonville, Florida 32201. (Insects of medical im-
portance, especially adult Chironomidae, Ceratopogonidae, and
Culicidae of Florida)

9. Mr. William M. Beck, Jr., Area of Entomology & Structural Pest Con-
trol, School of Science & Technology, University P. O. Box 111,
Florida A. & M. University, Tallahassee, Florida 32307. (Aquatic
ecology, biology of the family Chironomidae; biology of water
pollution)

10. *Mr. Robert A. Belmont, Department of Entomology and Nema-
tology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.
(Lepidoptera, especially Geometridae: Semiothisini)

*Student Associate







Thirty-second Biennial Report


11. Dr. Allen H. Benton, Professor, Department of Biology, Fredonia
State College, Fredonia, New York 14063. (Ecology, distribution
and host relationships of Siphonaptera; life history of small mam-
mals; wildlife management; conservation education)

12. Dr. Lewis Berner, Professor, Department of Zoology, University
of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Ephemeroptera of North
America, especially of the southeastern United States; bottom
dwelling insects of large rivers of the southeast)

13. Mr. Dale R. Birkenmeyer, Entomologist, Metabolism & Radiation
Research Lab, USDA, ARS, P. O. Box 5674, State University Sta-
tion, Fargo, North Dakota 58102. (Biological and integrated con-
trol of arthropods of major economic importance; Coleoptera of
North Dakota and Minnesota)

14. Dr. Franklin S. Blanton (Emeritus Professor, University of Florida),
4015 S. W. 21st St., Gainesville, Florida 32601. (Insects of public
health importance, especially Ceratopogonidae of middle America;
taxonomy of Culicidae; taxonomy of Tephritidae and other
Diptera; ornamental insect control)

15. *Mr. Alan B. Bolten, Department of Zoology, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Pollination mechanisms)

16. Mr. Vernon A. Brou, Jr., Rt. 1, Box 74, Edgard, Louisiana 70049.
(Lepidoptera: Sphingidae of the world)

17. Dr. William F. Buren, Professor, Department of Entomology and
Nematology, IFAS, 3103 McCarty Hall, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Taxonomy, biology, and ecology of
Formicidae)

18. *Mr. Charles W. Calmbacher, Department of Biology, Fordham
University, Bronx, New York 10458. (Hymenoptera, especially
Sphecidae; Plecoptera)

19. Mr. Reuben Capelouto, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Ento-
mology, Area of Entomology & Structural Pest Control, School of
Science & Technology, University P. O. Box 111, Florida A. & M.
University, Tallahassee, Florida 32307. (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

20. Mr. Paul H. Carlson, South Carolina Department of Health and En-
vironmental Control, 2600 Bull Street, Columbia, South Carolina
29201. (Aquatic ecology; evolution and systematics of
Ephemeroptera, seasonal distribution, emergence, and behavior)






Division of Plant Industry


21. Dr. Nell B. Causey (Emeritus Professor, Louisiana State University),
922 Park Avenue, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701. (Systematics of
Diplopoda)

22. *Mr. Paul M. Choate, Jr., Department of Entomology and Nema-
tology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Tax-
onomy, ecology, bionomics of Coleoptera, especially Carabidae and
Cicindelidae of the New World)

23. Dr. Rail Cort6s P., Entoihologo y Professor de Entomologia,
Facultad de Agronomia, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
(Diptera: Tachinidae)

24. Dr. Charles V. Covell, Jr., Associate Professor of Biology, Depart-
ment of Biology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky
40208. (Taxonomy and biology of Geometridae, especially subfami-
ly Sterrhinae; Lepidoptera fauna of Kentucky, Virginia, North
Carolina, and Florida; Culicidae fauna and bionomics of Louisville,
Kentucky area; endangered and rare butterfly species, especially
of southern Florida)

25. *Mr. Lloyd R. Davis, Jr., Department of Entomology and Nema-
tology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.
(Silphidae: ecology, behavior, and systematics; Elmidae: distribu-
tion; Andrenidae: behavior and ecology)

26. Mr. Terhune S. Dickel, Box 385, Homestead, Florida 33030.
(Lepidoptera of North and Central America; butterfly conserva-
tion; butterfly migrations)

27. Dr. Thomas W. Donnelly, Associate Professor, Department of
Geology, Harpur College State University of New York, Bingham-
ton, New York 13901. (Systematics, life histories, and distribution
of Odonata of the world, especially of Latin America and the West
Indies)

28. Dr. N. M. Downie (Professor, Department of Psychology, Purdue Uni-
versity), 505 Lingle Terrace, Lafayette, Indiana 47901. (Taxonomy
of Coleoptera of North America, north of Mexico)

29. Mr. Byrd K. Dozier, 1987 Gotham Street, Chula Vista, California
92010. (Coleoptera of the New World; Buprestidae of the World)

30. Mr. Herbert L. Dozier, Jr., Rt. 3, Box 130-B, Central, South Carolina
29630. (Taxonomy of several families of Coleoptera, especially Coc-
cinellidae)






Thirty-second Biennial Report


31. Dr. Boyce A. Drummond, III, Visiting Assistant Professor of
Zoology and Coordinator, Comprehensive Biological Sciences,
Department of Zoology, 409 Bartram West, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Population ecology of tropical insects,
especially Lepidoptera and Odonata; life history strategies and
reproductive biology of insects; mimicry and protective coloration
of arthropods; taxonomy of Ithomiinae, Danainae, and
Nymphalinae-Heliconiini (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae))

32. Mr. Peter C. Drummond (Instructor, Santa Fe Community College),
Rt. 1, Box 321A, Micanopy, Florida 32667. (Systematics of ter-
restrial and littoral Isopoda, especially of Florida and the West In-
dies)

33. Dr. A. Michael Dykstra, Dykstra Clinic, Inc., S. Highway 61, Box
630, Route B, Canton, MO 63435. (Lepidoptera)

34. *Mr. Glavis B. Edwards, Jr., Department of Entomology and Nema-
tology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Tax-
onomy, phylogeny, zoogeography, ecology, and behavior of
spiders, especially Salticidae)

35. Mr. Peter Eliazar, 11332 Snowfall Court, Apt. B, Tampa, Florida
33612. (Lepidoptera)

36. Dr. Thomas C. Emmel, Chairman and Professor, Department of
Zoology, 419 Bartram Hall, West, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Population biology, life histories, tax-
onomy, evolution, genetics, ecology of Rhopalocera, especially
Nearctic and Neotropical groups)

37. Dr. G. B. Fairchild, Adjunct Professor, Department of Entomology
and Nematology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.
(Tabanidae of the world, especially of the Neotropics; Psychodidae:
Phlebotomus of the World)

38. Dr. Edward G. Farnworth, Research Associate, Institute of Ecology,
University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602. (Systematics,
ecology, behavior, and biogeography of Neotropical Lampyridae;
chemical communication and energetic of Formicidae)

39. Dr. Clifford D. Ferris, Professor and Director, Bioengineering Pro-
gram, College of Engineering, University of Wyoming, P. O. Box
33510, University Station, Laramie, Wyoming 82070. (Arctic and






Division of Plant Industry


arctic-alpine Rhopalocera; taxonomy, behavior and life history;
taxonomy and distribution of North American Hesperioidea)

40. Dr. Durland D. Fish, NIH Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Depart-
ment of Biology, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana
46556. (Ecology and biogeography of aquatic insects associated
with terrestrial plants, especially bromeliads and pitcherplants;
community ecology of aquatic invertebrates inhabiting tree-holes;
mosquito systematics, ecology, and biogeography)

41. Dr. Hermenegild (Hermann) A. Flaschka, Regent's Professor of
Chemistry, Chemistry Department, Georgia Institute of
Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332. (Lepidoptera, especially
Saturniidae, Arctiidae, and Rhopalocera; Coleoptera, especially
Cerambycidae and Cicindelidae)

42. Dr. R. Wills Flowers, Assistant Professor, Area of Entomology and
Structural Pest Control, School of Science and Technology,
University P. O. Box 111, Florida A. & M. University, Tallahassee,
Florida 32307. (Taxonomy of Ephemeroptera, especially Hepta-
geniidae; biology of Unionidae (Mollusca))

43. Dr. B. A. Foote, Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, 265
McGilvrey Hall, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242.
(Systematics of Diptera, especially Sciomyzidae, Chloropidae,
Otitidae, Tephritidae, and Micropezidae; ecology and life cycles of
acalyptrate Diptera)

44. Mr. Sergio A. Fragoso, GO 25 McCarty Hall, Department of En-
tomology and Nematology, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida 32611. (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae taxonomy and biology;
general insect morphology, ecology and ethology)

45. Dr. J. Howard Frank, Entomologist III, Division of Health,
Entomological Research Center, P. O. Box 520, Vero Beach,
Florida 32960. (Insect ecology, particularly predator-prey relation-
ships and population dynamics; biology, ecology, and taxonomy of
Coleoptera: Staphylinidae)

46. Mr. Lawrence R. Franz, Associate in Natural Sciences, Florida State
Museum, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.
(Crustacean biology; cave ecology; feeding and reproductive
biology of reptiles)

47. Mr. William G. Genung, Entomologist, University of Florida, IFAS,
Agricultural Research and Education Center, P. O. Drawer A,






Thirty-second Biennial Report


Belle Glade, Florida 33430. (Biology, ecology, and control of in-
sects of vegetable crops, field crops, and pastures)

48. Dr. Eugene J. Gerberg, Director, Insect Control and Research Inc.,
6601 Johnnycake Road, Baltimore, Maryland 21207. (Lyctidae and
Bostrychidae: Culicidae, particularly of the Tropics; arthropods of
the Cayman Islands, BWI; rearing techniques for various insects,
particularly mosquitoes)

49. Mr. Glen R. Gibbs, 19801 S. W. 110th Ct., Miami, Florida 33157.
(Lepidoptera, especially of southern Florida)

50. Mr. Richard Gilmore, 35 S. Devon Avenue, Winter Springs, Florida
32707. (Lepidoptera)

51. *Mr. Jayson Glick, Department of Zoology and Entomology, Auburn
University, Auburn, Alabama 36830.

52. Dr. James T. Goodwin, AID/Texas A. & M. Contract, Bamako, De-
partment of State, Washington, D. C. 20521. (Taxonomy, ecology,
and life history of Tabanidae; Odonata, Trichoptera, and
Megaloptera of North America)

53. Mrs. Debra Grant, 1627 Ponce de Leon N. E., Atlanta, Georgia 30306.
(Insects of North and Central America, especially Lepidoptera)

54. Mr. Harold N. Greenbaum, Department of Entomology and
Nematology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.
(Biosystematics, bionomics, and ecology of Symphyta and
ichneumonoid Hymenoptera and of some chalcidoid Hymenoptera)

55. Dr. E. Eric Grissell, Department of Entomology, Smithsonian In-
stitution, U. S. National Museum of Natural History, Washington,
D. C. 20560. (Biosystematics of Chalcidoidea, ethology of aculeate
Hymenoptera, and ecology of gall-forming insects and their
hymenopterous parasites)

56. Dr. Dale H. Habeck, Professor, Department of Entomology and
Nematology, IFAS, 201 Entomology and Nematology Res. Lab.,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Biology and tax-
onomy of Nitidulidae; immature Lepidoptera of North America;
biology and control of vegetable insects)

57. Dr. Gonzalo Halffter, Director, Museo de Historia Natural de la
Ciudad de M6xico, Nuevo Bosque de Chapultepec, Apartado






Division of Plant Industry


Postal 18-845, Mexico 18, D. F. (Taxonomy of Scarabaeidae;
zoogeography of America, ecology and behavior of Coleoptera)

58. Mr. Charles E. Hallas, 20530 Gulfstream Rd., Miami, Florida
33157. (Lepidoptera of southern Florida)

59. Mr. Fred C. Harmston, (U. S. Public Health, retired), 117 East 2700
South, Salt Lake City, Utah 84115. (Taxonomy of Dolichopodidae
and Culicidae of North and Central America; vector control
associated with water resource projects; Colorado tick fever,
tularemia)

60. Mr. Gerd H. Heinrich, Dryden, Maine 04225. (Ichneumoninae of the
world; birds of Africa, Europe, and Asia)

61. Mr. J. Richard Heitzman (Assistant Post Master, U. S. Postal
Service), 3112 Harris Avenue, Independence, Missouri 64052.
(Nearctic Lepidoptera, all Rhopalocera; Heterocera of Missouri;
life histories of Nearctic Lepidoptera; photography of insects; iden-
tification of Nearctic Lepidoptera)

62. *Mr. Roger L. Heitzman, Department of Entomology and Nema-
tology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.
(Lepidoptera of North America, especially Geometridae)

63. Mr. John B. Heppner, c/o Dr. W. Donald Duckworth, Department of
Entomology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. 20560.
(Lepidoptera, especially Microlepidoptera)

64. Dr. Lawrence A. Hetrick (Emeritus Professor, University of
Florida), 1614 N. W. 12th Rd., Gainesville, Florida 32605. (Forest
insects and wood products infesting insects, especially Isoptera)

65. Mr. Harry O. Hilton, P. O. Box 144, Shalimar, Florida 32579.
(Lepidoptera of the southeastern United States and Mexico; insect
photography)

66. Dr. Richard L. Hoffman, Professor, Biology Department, Radford
College, Radford, Virginia 24141. (Taxonomy and biogeography of
Arthropoda, especially Diplopoda; Carabidae and Heteropoda of
Virginia; biota of southern Appalachians)

67. Mr. Michael D. Hubbard, Entomologist, Area of Entomology and
Structural Pest Control, School of Science and Technology, P. O.
Box 111, Florida A. & M. University, Tallahassee, Florida 32307.







Thirty-second Biennial Report


(Biology and systematics of Ephemeroptera; insect sociobiology;
insular biogeography)

68. Mr. Ronald L. Huber, (Assistant Engineer), 2896 Simpson Street, St.
Paul, Minnesota 55113. (Cicindelidae of the world; Nearctic
Lepidoptera, especially Sphingidae, Hesperiidae)

69. Dr. Richard L. Jacques, Jr., Assistant Professor, Department of
Biological Sciences, Farleigh Dickenson University, Rutherford,
New Jersey 07070. (Coleoptera, especially Chrysomelidae;
Coleoptera and other insects of New Jersey)

70. Dr. Fred C. Johnson, II, Professor, Department of Zoology, Univer-
sity of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Biology of Odonata)

71. Mr. Roy O. Kendall, Mountain View Acres, Rt. 4, Box 104-EB,
San Antonio, Texas 78228. (Life histories, spatial and temporal
distribution of Rhopalocera of Texas and contiguous land areas; in-
terests include larval food plants, parasites, predators, diapause,
chromosomes, and migratory habit)

72. Mr. Charles P. Kimball, West Barnstable, Massachusetts 02668.
(Lepidoptera of North America, especially of Florida and
Massachusetts)

73. Mr. Harold L. King, 2215 La Salle Street, Sarasota, Florida 33581.
(Lepidoptera of North and Central America and the West Indies,
especially Lycaenidae)

74. *Mr. Kenneth W. Knopf, College of Dentistry, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Odonata systematics; electrophoresis
and its use in systematics)

75. Mr. Edward C. Knudson, 804 Woodstock, Bellaire, Texas 77401.
(Lepidoptera: Rhopalocera, especially of Texas)

76. Colonel Lester L. Lampert (U. S. Army, retired), 17 Hillview Circle,
Asheville, North Carolina 28805. (Coleoptera, especially of North
America)

77. Dr. James N. Layne, Director of Research, Archbold Biological
Station, Rt. 2, Box 180, Lake Placid, Florida 33852. (Ecology,
behavior, and physiology of mammals; general vertebrate biology;
hosts and geographic distribution of Florida Siphonaptera and
other parasitic arthropods)




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