• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 Report of the division directo...
 Library
 Methods development
 Technical assistance
 Fiscal
 Bureau of apiary inspection
 Bureau of citrus budwood regis...
 Bureau of entomology
 Bureau of nematology
 Bureau of pest eradication and...
 Giant African snail
 Spreading decline
 Fruit fly detection
 Sugarcane rootstalk borer...
 Lethal yellowing
 Personnel training
 Bureau of plant pathology
 Bureau of plant inspection
 Grove inspection and citrus...
 Plant products entering peninsular...
 Citrus nursery site selection
 Premium quality citrus trees
 Lettuce mosaic














Title: Division of Plant Industry biennial report
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075925/00009
 Material Information
Title: Division of Plant Industry biennial report
Alternate Title: Biennial report
Abbreviated Title: Div. Plant Ind. bienn. rep.
Physical Description: v. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Division of Plant Industry
Publisher: Florida Dept. of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Publication Date: 1974-1976
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Plant inspection -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Plant diseases -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Dept. of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 26th (1964/66)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year ends June 30.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: 39th (July 1, 1990-June 30, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075925
Volume ID: VID00009
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01242950
alephbibnum - 001511744
lccn - sn 86001883
lccn - sn 86001883
issn - 0888-9554
 Related Items
Preceded by: Biennial report

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
    Front Matter
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Table of Contents
        Page iv
        Page vi
        Page 1
    Report of the division director
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Library
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Methods development
        Page 7
    Technical assistance
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Fiscal
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Bureau of apiary inspection
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Bureau of citrus budwood registration
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Bureau of entomology
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Bureau of nematology
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
    Bureau of pest eradication and control
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
    Giant African snail
        Page 119
    Spreading decline
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
    Fruit fly detection
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
    Sugarcane rootstalk borer weevil
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
    Lethal yellowing
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
    Personnel training
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
    Bureau of plant pathology
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
    Bureau of plant inspection
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
    Grove inspection and citrus survey
        Page 167
    Plant products entering peninsular Florida
        Page 168
    Citrus nursery site selection
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
    Premium quality citrus trees
        Page 174
        Page 175
    Lettuce mosaic
        Page 176
Full Text
Division of


Plant Industry




INIAL


REPORT


july
june


1974


30,


1976


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER SERVICES
Doyle Conner, Commissioner







Division of Plant Industry

Thirty-First

Biennial Report

July 1, 1974-June 30, 1976


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
AND CONSUMER SERVICES
Doyle Conner, Commissioner

DIVISION OF PLANT INDUSTRY
Halwin L. Jones, Director


Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Division of Plant Industry
Post Office Box 1269
Gainesville, Florida 32602







FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF
AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER
SERVICES


DIVISION OF PLANT INDUSTRY



Plant Industry Technical Council

Vernon Conner, Chairman (Citrus)....................................... Mount Dora
Roy Vandegrift, Jr., Vice Chairman (Vegetable)................ Canal Point
Lawrence Cutts (Apiary)........................ ................. ... Chipley
Colins English, Sr. (Citizen-at-Large)................. ....... Tallahassee
John W Hornbuckle (Citrus) ............................ ................... Dade City
T. Rankin Terry (Commercial Flower)................................... Fort Myers
Lewis E. Wadsworth, Jr. (Forestry) ............................................ Bunnell
Joseph Welker (Ornamental Horticulture)........................... Jacksonville
Halwin L. Jones, Secretary ...................... ..... .................. Gainesville



Administrative Staff

Halwin L. Jones, Director .............................. ...................... Gainesville
S. A. Alfieri, Jr., Assistant Director ....................................... Gainesville
G. D. Bridges, Chief of Budwood Registration................. Winter Haven
G. G. Norman, Chief of Methods Development...................... Gainesville
J. K. Condo, Chief of Plant Inspection.................................... Gainesville
H. A. Denmark, Chief of Entomology...................................... Gainesville
P. M. Packard, Chief of Apiary Inspection ............................. Gainesville
C. Poucher, Chief of Pest Eradication and Control............ Winter Haven
C. P. Seymour, Chief of Plant Pathology.................................. Gainesville
D. E. Stokes, Chief of Nematology ............................................ Gainesville






TABLE OF CONTENTS

REPORT OF THE DIVISION DIRECTOR ...................... 2
Library ............... ................. .............. 5
Methods Development ............... .. ...... ............ 7
Technical Assistance ................ ................... 8
Fiscal.................................... ................ 10
BUREAU OF APIARY INSPECTION ......................... 17
BUREAU OF BUDWOOD REGISTRATION ................... 29
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY ................................. 37
BUREAU OF NEMATOLOGY................................. 97
BUREAU OF PEST ERADICATION AND CONTROL ........... 110
Citrus Blackfly ............... .. ..................... 110
Giant African Snail ....................................... 119
Spreading Decline.............. .......................... 120
Fruit Fly Detection ....................................... 127
Sugarcane Rootstalk Borer Weevil ....................... 131
Lethal Yellowing ............... ........................ 139
Personnel Training ..................................... ..144
BUREAU OF PLANT PATHOLOGY .......................... 147
BUREAU OF PLANT INSPECTION ........................... 161
Grove Inspection and Citrus Survey ...................... 167
Turfgrass Certification .................................... 167
Plant Products Entering Peninsular Florida .............. 168
Citrus Nursery Site Selection ....... .................... 169
Plants Imported by Florida Growers ..................... 174
Premium Quality Citrus Trees ............................. 174
Postentry Quarantine ...................................... 175
Grades and Standards ..................................... 175
Im ported Fire Ant ..................................... . 176
Lettuce Mosaic ................ ..... ................. 176
Soybean Cyst Nematode ............... .................. 176


This public document was promulgated at a cost of $4,411.98 or $4.41
per copy, to inform the general public, Legislature, and other interested
parties on the programs and investigative efforts of the Division of Plant
Industry. PI 78G1















Gainesville, Florida

Honorable Doyle Conner, Commissioner
Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services
The Capitol
Tallahassee, Florida 32304


Dear Commissioner:

I am pleased to present herewith the 1974-1976 Biennial Report for the
Division of Plant Industry.

Respectfully,





HALWIN L. JONES, Director
Division of Plant Industry








PLANT INDUSTRY TECHNICAL COUNCIL

Vernon Conner, Chairman Citrus
P. O. Box 183
Mount Dora 32757
(904) 383-2952

Roy Vandegrift, Jr., Vice-Chairman Vegetable
Star Route, Box 13-E
Canal Point 33438
(305) 924-5551

Colin English, Sr. Citizen-at-Large
Exchange Building, Room 105
201 South Monroe Street
Tallahassee 32301
Ofc: (904) 222-3664, Home: (904) 877-4230

John W. Hornbuckle Citrus
Lykes-Pasco Packing Company
P. O. Box 822
Dade City 33525
Ofc: (904) 567-5211, Home: (904) 567-3019

T. Rankin Terry Commercial Flower
1335 Plumosa Drive
Fort Myers 33901
Ofc: (813) 481-0555, Home: (813) 334-1519


Felix H. Uzzell Apiary
Route 4, Box 168
Sebring 33870
(813) 385-7237

Lewis E. Wadsworth, Jr. Forestry
Box 98
Bunnell 32010
Ofc: (904) 437-3322, Home: (904) 437-3189


Joseph Welker
2818 Grand Avenue
Jacksonville 32210
(904) 388-2492


Ornamental Horticulture






REPORT OF THE DIVISION DIRECTOR

The eradication of the giant African snail and the discovery of the
citrus blackfly in South Florida, which prompted a major eradication
campaign, were perhaps the two most important events for the Division of
Plant Industry during the biennium.
Eradication of the snail was officially declared on April 13, 1975, and
federal and state quarantine controls were lifted. This task had never
before been achieved anywhere in the world where the snail had become
established.
The last live snail was found in July 1972. Pesticide applications
continued for a year after that date, and survey continued for an additional
year. For added insurance, an extended biometric survey was made of 48
square miles in Dade County and eight square miles in Broward County.
The eradication effort was accomplished with $700,000 in state and
federal funds and the expenditure of 67,183 man-hours of effort.
The citrus blackfly, which causes its greatest damage by feeding on the
leaves of trees, was found for the second time in Florida when it was
detected by a Division plant specialist in January 1976, on leaves of key
lime trees in an ornamental nursery at Wilton Manors, Ft. Lauderdale. The
first infestation of the blackfly in Florida was discovered in Key West in
1934 and was eradicated after several years of intensive efforts. The
blackfly has now spread to Palm Beach and Dade counties, and state and
federal personnel are attempting to contain this pest until a method to
eradicate it is developed.
The presence of the citrus blackfly on the mainland of Florida was
immediately recognized as a serious threat to the state's multimillion
dollar citrus industry. Agriculture Commissioner Doyle Conner declared
an agricultural emergency on February 12, 1976, and an emergency
transfer of funds from other DPI programs was made for blackfly
operations. Subsequently, the Florida Cabinet released $200,000 pending
legislative action to provide the additional funds needed for an eradication
program.
Headquarters for blackfly program operations were set up at a DPI
office located on the former site of the University of Florida's agricultural
experiment station at Plantation near Ft. Lauderdale. Immediately
following the discovery of the citrus blackfly, personnel drawn from
various bureaus of the Division were sent to Broward County to work on the
blackfly program. Over 3,000 man-hours were spent by DPI personnel on
citrus blackfly work during the first month of operations. By the end of
June, 100 state and 25 federal workers were assigned to the various phases
of the program, some of which were hired under Broward County's
Comprehensive Employment Training Act (CETA), a program supported
by federal funding.
Other incidents of major importance included the detection of the West
Indian sugarcane rootstalk borer weevil in Broward and Seminole counties
for the first time; the dedication of the Division's new budwood foundation
grove at Dundee; the development of a method for fumigation of citrus fruit
for the Caribbean fruit fly; and the opening of a quarantine greenhouse






Thirty-first Biennial Report


facility which permits the safe introduction of new citrus and other plant
varieties into the State of Florida.
Infestations of the sugarcane rootstalk borer weevil found in Broward
and Seminole counties during the biennium further complicated
regulatory and control efforts. However, little change has resulted in the
acreage of the regulated areas with these finds.
Survey procedures for the adult weevil have not been changed from
previous years, except less survey is being done inside regulated areas, and
more importance is being placed on searching outside the regulated areas
for the presence of adult weevils.
Due to restrictions on certain pesticides by the Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA) and the lack of sufficient research data on other
pesticides that could possibly be used to control the adult weevils,
adulticide foliage sprays and larvicide soil treatments were drastically
reduced.
Research on control measures for the weevil has been stepped up
during the biennium with the scope being broadened to include input by
four different agencies. The all-out program is being undertaken by two
U.S. Department of Agriculture agencies-Agricultural Research Service
and Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service-and the University of
Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and the Division of
Plant Industry.
On October 2, 1976, the Division of Plant Industry's new budwood
foundation grove at Dundee was officially launched into operation with a
combined dedication, open house, and tour of the new virus test complex
and foundation blocks. The grove layout facilitates harvesting, grove care,
and evaluation of the various budlines for horticultural characteristics.
The Division began fumigation operations for host fruit of the
Caribbean fruit fly being shipped to Japan in February 1975. Florida was
placed under quarantine for Caribbean fruit fly host shipments after
Japanese inspectors found caribfly larvae in two grapefruit shipments
from Florida.
The quarantine caused considerable concern with the citrus industry,
which has a market in Japan for 4,800,000 bushels of grapefruit.
The opening of the new quarantine greenhouse facility at the Doyle
Conner Building in Gainesville marked the first time that the state has
been able to introduce new varieties of plants independent of the U.S.
Department of Agriculture.
The value of such a facility is immeasurable. The unit provides a vitally
important channel for introducing only healthy varieties of plants into the
state and at the same time insures protection of the industry against the
introduction of destructive plant pests.
Within a few months after the facility became operational, all
available space was occupied. One use has involved the investigation of a
virus found on a Star Ruby grapefruit tree introduced into the state
without authorization.
Many requests to introduce additional plant material have been





4 Division of Plant Industry

received, and it is expected that the greenhouse and laboratory space will
have to eventually be doubled.
This biennium brings to a close a long period during which the state
and federal governments participated in sharing the cost of Florida's
burrowing nematode control program. The state will continue to be
involved in the program, but the entire expense will be paid by the grower.
Still realizing the seriousness of the burrowing nematode threat to
citrus production, growers began assuming part of the costs in 1966 at the
request of the state. Even as the percentage of costs to the grower
increased, few growers dropped out of the program.
On July 1, 1976, the state will begin charging growers 100 percent of
the cost of buffer maintenance.
Approximately 18 requests were made to move arthropods through
the Division's biological control laboratory during the biennium. Intended
uses include screening of potential biological control agents (parasites and
predators) of certain plant pests and behavioral studies, in hopes that they
will lead to safer and more effective methods of eliminating or controlling
various plant pests.
Requests have come from different branches of the U.S. Department of
Agriculture, University of Florida, and Division of Plant Industry.






Thirty-first Biennial Report


LIBRARY
Ann J. Owens, Librarian

Major changes in library organization and operation were ushered in
during the biennium 1974-76. Chief among those changes was the shift in
personnel: Mr. Andrew Kolesar, Librarian, resigned on March 6, 1975,
and Mrs. Deborah Dixon, Clerk-Typist, resigned on September 27, 1974.
Replacing Mr. Kolesar was Mrs. Suzanne Quist, hired as Assistant
Librarian on September 23, 1974, and promoted to Mr. Kolesar's position
on March 7, 1975. Mrs. Quist resigned her position as Librarian on June
30, 1975, and was replaced by Mrs. Ann Owens on July 11, 1975. Mrs.
Eileen Kenton was employed as Clerk-Typist on October 11, 1974,
replacing Mrs. Dixon.
The period 1974-76 saw the addition of 386 new books (both purchases
and gifts) bringing the total number of books in the Division Library to
8,583. As of June 30, 1976, the library was receiving 400 serial titles. This
number includes subscriptions, gifts, and exchanges.
A considerable number of items were received as gifts during 1974-
76. Those persons donating books were: Dr. and Mrs. William L. Peters,
Mrs. S. C. Lee. Mr. E. A. Munyer. Drs. Charles and Lois O'Brien, Dr.
H. F. Strohecker. Mr. Sergio Fragoso, Mr. Carl E. Killon. Sr.. Dr. Gerald L.
Green, and Dr. Frank Young. In addition, Hume Agricultural Library (a
University of Florida branch library) donated a large collection of
duplicates to our library. These books deal with botany, horticulture, and
entomology.
Perhaps the best indicator of the increased library activity resulting
from the full-time employment of three staff members (including two
professional librarians) was the progress in cataloging. There was a
steady climb throughout the biennium. A total of 878 books were
catalogued. As of June 30, 1976. there were 321 books remaining to be
catalogued.
A great help in the area of cataloging is the resumption of Library of
Congress card ordering. Also, Hume Library has graciously consented to
allow the Division Library to have access to their computer terminal
which is on-line with the Ohio College Library Center. Subscribing to the
Library of Congress proofsheet service for classes Q (Science) and SB
(Plant and Animal Industry) has also proved to be an aid in the area of
cataloging.
During the biennium 1974-76, 305 serial volumes were bound by
Dobbs Brothers Bindery and the National Library Binding Company.
The Division Library has begun to employ a new method of binding
known as "Standardized Binding" which has allowed us to save a
considerable amount of money since we are no longer having books and
serials custom-bound.
Activity in the area of interlibrary loans also increased. A total of 148
loans were handled for DPI personnel, and 84 were processed for other
institutions. As the unique and comprehensive nature of the DPI Library






6 Division of Plant Industry

collection becomes more and more well-known, it is easy to predict a
continued increase in our interlibrary services within Florida and
throughout the country as a whole.
A series of meetings with Hume Library personnel during 1975
focused on interlibrary cooperation with our closest associate institution.
Mutual goals and comparative approaches were much clarified. Increased
effort has been devoted to avoiding duplication of holdings as a result of
these meetings, and future emphasis is to be given to complete inventories
of the collections in areas of mutual concern.
Other major areas of attention during 1974-76 included the physical
reorganization and rearrangement of the general library layout; the
evaluation and distribution of a large quantity of stored holdings: the
design and construction of an Archives Center; and the compilation of a
comprehensive statement of Library Policy. Taken as a whole, the
biennium 1974-76 has proved to be a particularly successful one in terms
of library development and progress.






Thirty-first Biennial Report


METHODS DEVELOPMENT
Gerald G. Norman, Methods Derelopment Coordinator

Mr. Gerald Norman, who had been the coordinator of Methods
Development since this unit was established, retired in September 1975.
In November 1975. Ralph E. Brown was made Coordinator. The Methods
Development Unit is responsible for the following:
1. Investigation of new methods of conducting the work of the
Division of Plant Industry.
2. Supervision of Fixed Capital Outlay projects being conducted by
the Division of Plant Industry.
During this fiscal year, 1975-76, a great deal of time was spent on
developing a method for fumigating citrus fruit, mainly grapefruit for
shipment to Japan. Requirements were placed against Florida by Japan
due to the presence of Caribbean Fruit Fly in this state. This action
caused considerable concern within the citrus industry which had
developed a market in Japan for approximately 6.000,000 4/5 bushels of
grapefruit.
To meet the demand for the fumigation of approximately 6 million
boxes, or 6,000 truckloads of fruit, the following actions were taken:
1. The Division of Plant Industry developed a portable fan unit with a
6,000 cubic foot per minute capacity. This unit is rolled into the
semi-truck and provides needed circulation for handling ethylene
debromide gas.
2. The Division of Plant Industry, the Division of Fruit and
Vegetable Inspection, and the USDA developed a method of seal-
ing and testing semi-trailers to use as chambers.
3. A method of fumigation using the above innovations and a system
of certification was worked out with the cooperating agencies and
Japan.
In addition to investigations described above, investigations of
fumigation damage to citrus, mangoes, peppers and tomatoes were
carried out.
Several Fixed Capital Outlay projects were completed or were near
completion at the end of the fiscal year. There are as follows:
Fumigation Chamber Emission Stacks ........ 100% completed
Quarantine Greenhouse....................... 100% completed
Florida Citrus Arboretum ..................... 97% completed
Nematode Sterilizing Unit, Winter Haven ..... 100% completed
Warehouse, Winter Haven .................... 100% completed
Entomology Wing Extension (planning stage),
Gainesville ................... ............ 100% completed





8 Division of Plant Industry

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
Personnel in the Technical Assistance Office are responsible for in-
formational releases on regulatory activities and programs; a quarterly
bulletin; a monthly 'house organ' pamphlet; coordinating general print-
ing; public relations; still and studio photography related to scientific
materials and organisms; audio visual materials and training aids; ex-
hibits; and other duties as assigned by the Division Director.
Early in 1976, with the discovery of the citrus blackfly in the state,
information specialists were kept very busy supplying news releases and
updated information on the progress of the program.
Publications released by the Division of Plant Industry during the
biennium included a revised edition of Florida Armored Scale Insects;
Florida's Certified Nursery List; a third edition of Grades and Standards
for Nursery Plants, Part II (palms and trees); and a reprinting of Il-
lustrated Key to Caterpillars on Corn.
Plant Industry News
The Division publishes a quarterly bulletin, Plant Industry News,
which serves as a primary informational source for persons who work in
the plant and agricultural industries. Formerly known as the News
Bulletin, the name was recently changed in favor of a more descriptive
title for the publication. This publication had a controlled circulation of
approximately 13,000 during the biennium, including nurserymen, stock
dealers, citrus growers, state and federal agricultural officials, domestic
and some libraries in a number of countries, newspapers, magazines, and
radio and television stations throughout Florida. This publication pro-
vides information on Division programs and serves as an official outlet for
rules and regulations concerning the movement of plants and status of
plant pests in Florida.
Reporter
This monthly 'house organ' pamphlet was distributed to all active and
retired personnel. Articles in the Reporter cover Department and Division
policy, as well as professional, and job-related activities of the employees.
Still Photography
Photographs of Division activities, taken in the field and in the studio,
were provided for publication in the Plant Industry News, Reporter,
Tri-ology, technical circulars, leaflets and major publications, and for
distribution to statewide news media.
Exhibits
The Division of Plant Industry continued its policy of participating in
various agricultural displays throughout the state during the biennium at
county fairs, trade shows, and plant fairs, in an attempt to keep the public
informed about its programs, and pest problems that confront industry.
During the biennium, a large citrus blackfly exhibit was established,
and the display has proved effective and helpful in educating the public
about this serious pest.






Thirty-first Biennial Report


FISCAL OFFICE
C. E. Taylor, Accountant

Summaries of the application of budgeted and/or requested funds
identified by the Division's activities are contained in Tables 1 through 4
for the fiscal years 1974-78, respectively. Each table lists the program
components, based on Florida's Planning and Budgeting System and are
subject to approval and adjustment, as applicable, by the Commissioner of
Agriculture and the State Legislature.

Table 1

1974-75 Allotments and Expenditures
(Actual)


General Total
Revenue Trust Expenditures
(Allotments) (Allotments) (Actual)


Administrative Direction
& Support

Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library-Methods
Development
Total Administrative
Direction & Support

Consumer Protection Maintenance
of Business Standards

Bureau of Plant Inspection
Citrus Tree Survey
& Fumigation

Total Consumer Protection
Maintenance of Business
Standards


456,997 78,780 492,566


456,997 78,780 492,566


1,021,640 131,852 1,199,498
116,150 39,526 108,024




1,137,790 171,378 1,307,522


Property Protection
& Preservation


Bureau of Entomology
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection


300,513
254,035
164,354
139,824


296,537
260,481
150,571
143,863


Bureau/Activity






Division of Plant Industry


Table 1-Continued


Bureau/Activity


Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bio-Control Laboratory
Bureau of Pest Eradication
& Control
Fire Ant Control
Spreading Decline
Fruit Fly Survey & Control
Lethal Yellowing
Weevil Eradication
Snail Eradication


General Total
Revenue Trust Expenditures
(Allotments)(Allotments) (Actual)


154,140

30,000
51,533

291,323
345,333
198,368
420,085
157,831
10,670


150,030

26,116
60,628


100,060 235,451
177,147 443,800
189,697
322,474
11,925 42,838
31,296 3,851


Special Categories


Apiary Indemnities


Total Property
Protection & Preservation


Total Division


2,542,009 320,428 2,340,379

4,136,796 570,586 4.140,467


24,000


14,042






Thirty-first Biennial Report


Table 2

1975-76 Allotments and Expenditures
(Actual)


Bureau/Activity


General Total
Revenue Trust Expenditure
(Allotments) (Allotments) (Actual)


Administrative Direction
& Support

Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library-Methods
Development


Total Administrative
Direction & Support


476.554 44,130 520,684


476,554 44,130 520,684


Consumer Protection-Maintenance
of Business Standards

Bureau of Plant Inspection
Tree Survey

Total Consumer Protection-
Maintenance of Business
Standards

Property Protection
& Preservation
Bureau of Entomology
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bio-Control Laboratory
Bureau of Pest Eradication
& Control
Fire Ant Control
Spreading Decline
Fruit Fly Survey & Control
Lethal Yellowing
Weevil Eradication
Snail Eradication


1,021,615 137,516 1,218,781
79,315 58,572 107,858

1,100,930 196,088 1,326,639


285,062
264,882
144,961
158,065
167,764

35,000
154,403

211,280
287,969
188,403
153,942
79,507
25.430


9,567
13,200
3,300


316,495
274,704
144,580
152,591
166,404


25,700
21,805 152,354

87,804
153,372 427,198
33,389 181,192
95,560
10,137 30,089
13,519






Division of Plant Industry


Table 2-Continued


General Total
Revenue Trust Expenditures
(Allotments)(Allotments) (Actual)


Special Categories
Apiary Indemnities
Lethal Yellowing Serum
**Citrus Blackfly
Fire Ant Trust Fund
Lethal Yellowing Revolving
Trust Fund

Total Property Protection
& Preservation

Total Division


24,000
300,000


22,909
67,215
361,054
100,000 91,022
100,000 0


2,480,668 444,770 2,610,390


4,058,152 684,988 4,457,713


**230,000 was diverted from Lethal Yellow Serum allocation. The re-
maining 131,054 was diverted from budget entities of the Division;
each of these actions approved by the Bureau of the Budget.


Bureau/Activity





Thirty-first Biennial Report


Table 3

1976-77 Allotments and Expenditures
(Estimated)


General
Revenue
(Allotments)


Bureau/Activity


Administration Direction
& Support

Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library-Methods
Development


Total Administrative Direction 537,543
& Support

Consumer Protection-Maintenance
of Business Standards


Bureau of Plant Inspection
Citrus Tree Survey
& Fumigation

Total Consumer Protection-
Maintenance of Business
Standards


Total
Trust Expenditure
(Allotments) (Actual)


537,543 38.911 576,454


38,911 576,454


1,087,880 191,406 1,279,286
83,703 39,786 123,489


1,171,583 231,192 1,402,775


Property Protection
& Preservation


Bureau of Entomology
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bio-Control Laboratory
Bureau of Pest Eradication
& Control
Imported Fire Ant
Spreading Decline
Fruit Fly Survey & Control
Lethal Yellowing
Weevil Eradication


351,350
300,097
159,106
159,285
200,813

38,396
111,775

136,346
279,587
172,394
86,767
48,227


351,350
300,097
2,610 161,716
159,285
200,813

38,396
6,562 118,337

136,346
209,818 489,405
8,342 180,736
86,767
13,864 62,091






Division of Plant Industry


Table 3-Continued


General
Revenue
(Allotments)


Bureau/Activity


Total
Trust Expenditures
(Allotments) (Actual)


Special Categories


Apiary Indemnities
Fire Ant Control (Lump Sum)
Fire Ant Revolving Trust
Lethal Yellowing Revolving
Trust
**Citrus Blackfly

Total Property Protection
& Preservation


Total Division


24,000
1,000,000



2,002,535


24,000
1,000,000
100,000 100,000
100,000 100,000


2,002,535


5,070,678 441,196 5,511,874


6,779,804 711,299 7,491,103


**100,000 of Citrus Blackfly allocation reassigned to Fixed Capital Outlay
for construction of laboratory.






Thirty-first Biennial Report


Table 4

1977-78 Allotments
(Requested)

General
Bureau/Activity Revenue Trust Total


Administrative Direction
& Support

Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library-Methods
Development

Total Administrative
Direction & Support

Consumer Protection-Maintenance
of Business Standards

Bureau of Plant Inspection
Citrus Tree Survey
& Fumigation

Total Consumer Protection-
Maintenance of Business
Standards


710,878 39,051 749,929


710,878 39,051


1,260,196
146,283


749.929


194,201 1,454,397
146,283


1,406,479 194,201 1,600,680


Property Protection
& Preservation


Bureau of Entomology
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bio-Control Laboratory
Bureau of Pest Eradication
& Control
Imported Fire Ant
Spreading Decline
Fruit Fly Survey & Control
Lethal Yellowing
Weevil Eradication


484,749
476,789
202,409
182,013
222,491

48,243
139,711

123,869
331,180
203,834
144,968
71,479


422,663


484,749
476,789
202,409
182,013
222,491

48,243
139,711

123,869
753,843
203,834
144,968
71,479














Special Categories
Apiary Indemnities
Fire Ant Control (Lump Sum)
Fire Ant Trust Fund
Lethal Yellowing Revolving
Trust
Citrus Blackfly (Lump Sum)

Total Property Protection
& Preservation

Total Division


24,000
893,957



3,018,754

6,568,446


8,685,803


Division of Plant Industry

Table 4-Continued

General
Revenue Trust


24,000
893,957
200,000 200,000
150,000 150,000

3,018,754

772,663 7,341,109


1,005,915 9,691,718


Bureau/Activity


Total






Thirty-first Biennial Report


BUREAU OF APIARY INSPECTION
Philip M. Packard, Chief of Apiary Inspection

The beekeeping industry is a vital segment of Florida agriculture.
Florida is ranked among the top three stages in the nation in value of
honey produced. Florida's honeybee population, estimated at 300.000
colonies, produces from 25 to 30 million pounds of honey each year at a
wholesale value of 10 to 12 million dollars.
In addition to the value of honey produced, the total value of
pollination services of bees is estimated at 45.8 million dollars. Florida's
honeybee colonies fertilize and cross-pollinate watermelons, cucumbers,
squash, cantaloupes, and the Orlando Tangelo variety of citrus. To reseed
themselves, some varieties of clover used in cattle pastures must be visited
by bees each year.
Florida's ideal climatic conditions make possible the production and
shipment of thousands of queen and package bees to northern states to
replace winter losses, and to South America and England.
As a protection to the honeybee industry, the State Legislature passed
the Florida Bee Disease Law in 1919. The original and continuing
objective of the law is the detection and destruction of honeybee colonies
infected with a disease known as American foulbrood, Bacillus larrae.
This disease, while completely harmless to humans, is highly contagious
to honeybee colonies. Introduction into the hive is in the form of spores
located in honey, on combs, and in used beekeeping equipment which have
been exposed to a previously established source of infection. The spore
form is very resistant so that when equipment, stores, honey and pollen
become contaminated, they remain so for long periods of time. Although
American foulbrood continues to be a threat to the Florida beekeeper,
Florida's disease rate is 0.6 percent, one of the lowest in the nation.
One of the problems facing Florida beekeepers is the reduction of
wild honey-producing plants. With the increased population growth,
building projects and new highways consume vast areas of land
containing wild honey-producing plants, forcing the beekeeper to find
new apiary locations. Because of this problem, more and more beekeepers
move their honeybee colonies to other states in search of a honey crop,
returning each fall in order to be ready for the spring citrus bloom.
During 1975-76, 105,000 colonies were brought into Florida by migratory
beekeepers, and apiary inspectors are constantly on the alert for bee
diseases brought into Florida by migratory beekeepers.
Since its introduction and accidental release in Brazil in 1957, the
African bee, Apis mellifera adansonii, has spread over most of South
America interbreeding with native South American honeybees and
forming a genetic cross known as the Brazilian or Africanized bee. The
Africanized bees are good honey producers and thrive in tropical and
semi-tropical areas. This exceptionally aggressive and ferocious strain of
honeybees has been a serious problem to the beekeeping industry in South
America. However, as the Africanized bee continues to cross with the





18 Division of Plant Industry

European strain, the progeny of the former are markedly less aggressive.
As a result, in central and southern Brazil honeybees are rarely a problem
anymore and beekeepers are benefiting from the high productivity of the
Africanized bee.
The United States Department of Agriculture is keeping a close
watch on the northward progress of the Africanized bee. With the African
cross, known as the Brazilian honeybee, moving northward toward
Central America, the honey and bee industry of the United States is very
seriously threatened. Not only by the tenacious Brazilian bee, but also the
even more dangerous threat of the introduction of two mites, Acarapis
uoodi and Varroa jacobsoni, which are serious pests of honeybees and
which are not known to exist in the United States. Even with border
precautions taken by the United States Department of Agriculture, it
seems inevitable that these mites will eventually reach the United States.
Facing these kinds of possible introductions certainly establishes a need
for investigations for some type of control, chemical or otherwise, to
safeguard against the introduction of these mites into the United States.
The Asian mite, Varroa jacobsoni, was found in Paraguay in 1975.
The finding of this mite in a country located between two major honey-
producing countries, Argentina and Brazil, certainly poses a serious
problem to honey producers in South America. It is believed Varroa
jacobsoni arrived in Paraguay via a shipment of queens from Japan,
where it is known as a major pest. Laying eggs in the cells of honeybee
comb, this mite attacks the unborn bee in the larval stage and kills in the
pupal stage of the honeybee's life cycle. Not all bees are killed by this mite,
but those reaching the adult stage survive with various types of deformities.
Another mite, Acarapis woodi, which infests the trachea or breathing
tubes of the honeybee, was found in Brazil in 1971 and is now found not
only in Brazil but in several South American countries. Acarapis woodi
has been found throughout Europe and also in India.
The hazards of these mites along with the possibility of the
introduction of the Africanized bee into this country poses a triple threat
to the regulatory officials of the United States.
A United States Senate Bill which became Public Law 34-319
provides that the Secretary of Agriculture is authorized to carry out
operations or measures in this country as well as cooperate with the
governments of Canada, Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, El
Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, and Colombia in carrying out
necessary research, surveys, and control operations in those countries in
connection with the eradication, suppression and prevention of the spread
of diseases, harmful parasites, and undesirable species and subspecies of
honeybees.






Thirty-first Biennial Report


Resume of Bureau of Apiary Inspection Activities

1974-75 1975-76

Apiaries inspected 5,050 4.750
Colonies inspected 204,929 212.945
Counties inspected 58 56
Apiaries infected with AFB 365 302
Colonies infected with AFB 1.229 1,271
AFB colonies destroyed 1,229 1,271
Apiaries with new infections of AFB 266 225
Florida Permits issued 876 940
Special Entry Permits issued 286 421
Point-to-Point Permits issued 154 183
Certificates issued 182 182

During the biennium, apiary inspectors examined 417,874 colonies in
9,800 apiaries and found 2,500 colonies in 667 apiaries to be infected with
American foulbrood. The Apiary Bureau issued 707 permits for 200,165
colonies of out-of-state bees to move into Florida, and 337 special moving
permits for moving from point-to-point within the State. Florida
beekeepers were issued 1.816 moving permits and 364 certificates of
inspection.
During the 1975 session of the Legislature, HB 429 was passed
providing for the maximum payment of $20 per diseased colony destroyed
by apiary inspectors. The sum of $37,131 was paid during the biennium to
Florida beekeepers in compensation for bees and equipment destroyed
because of American foulbrood. The operating cost of the Bureau was
$279,169, or approximately $.67 per colony inspection.

Road Guard Report
Monthly reports from the Road Guard Stations during the biennium
indicated 185.763 colonies and 258.984 supers moved into Florida from
other states. Road guard reports also showed 219.714 colonies and 272,286
supers left Florida for destinations across the nation.
Personnel of the Bureau of Apiary Inspection examined and certified
32,041 colonies for queen and package bee producers. Apiary reports show
that 173,765 colonies were inspected and certified for shipment to the
following states: Arkansas 83; Georgia 12.011; Illinois 1,272;
Indiana 124: Iowa 300; Kansas 500: Kentucky 192; Maine 845;
Maryland 728; Massachusetts 1,583; Minnesota 22,272; Missouri -
240; Nebraska 200; New Jersey 2,095; New York 13,153; North
Carolina 3.577; North Dakota 38,322; Ohio 8,171; Oregon 24;
Pennsylvania 6,753; South Carolina 216; South Dakota 29,476;
Tennessee 469; Texas 2; Virginia 1,120; West Virginia 534; and
Wisconsin 29,503.





Division of Plant Industry


Honey Certification Program
During the biennium, apiary inspectors sampled 651 drums of Tupelo
honey and delivered 175 composite samples to the Department's Food
Laboratory in Tallahassee for analysis and certification. These samples
were examined for flavor, color, soluble solids, moisture and pollen
count. One hundred forty-two composite samples from 547 barrels were
certified as Tupelo honey. Thirty-three samples from 104 barrels failed to
certify as Tupelo honey. Moisture content of the samples averaged 17.5
percent.

Diseased Larval Examinations
The Chief of Apiary Inspection made 35 microscopic examinations of
decomposed honeybee larvae during the 1974-75 fiscal year. Forty-three
microscopic examinations were made during the 1975-76 fiscal year. The
smears were sent in by apiary inspectors and beekeepers to determine the
pathogen that caused the death of the larvae.

Inspection

Apiaries Inspected Colonies Inspected

Inspectors 1974-75 1975-76 1974-75 1975-76 Biennium

0. C. Albritton 638 690 35,107 43,174 78,281
J. R. Hall 628 598 20,027 23,421 43,448
J. C. Herndon 505 473 28,043 27,955 55,998
W. R. Johnson 481 464 24,033 23,236 47,269
B. E. Keen 34 1,869 1,869
W.M. Langston 276 519 10,622 20,358 30,980
P. M. Packard 233 232 10,699 11,943 22,642
L. Putnal 586 600 26,228 28,607 54,835
H. W. Russell 621 517 15,007 11,175 26,182
W. R. Sapp 588 281 17,919 7,495 25,414
J. B. Young 494 342 17,244 13,712 30,956
5,050 4,750 204,929 212,945 417,874

Compensation

Colonies Destroyed Compensation

Inspectors 1974-75 1975-76 1974-75 1975-76 Biennium

0. C. Albritton 78 16 $ 890.00 $ 300.00 $ 1,190.00
J. R. Hall 151 197 1,812.00 3,645.00 5,457.00
J. C. Herndon 219 86 2,628.00 1,339.00 3,967.00






Thirty-first Biennial Report

Compensation -Continuled


Colonies Destroyed


Compensation


Inspectors 1974-75 1975-76


W. R. Johnson
B. E. Keen
W.M. Langston
P. M. Packard
L. Putnal
H. W. Russell
W. R. Sapp
J. B. Young


1974-75 1975-76 Biennium


95 75 1,140.00 1,299.00 2,439.00


58

278
149
136
10
1,174


154
5
157
366
146
19
1,221


696.00

3.336.00
1,788.00
1,632.00
120.00
$14,042.00


3,046.00 3,742.00
92.00 92.00
3,299.00 6,635.00
7,064.00 8.852.00
2,630.00 4.262.00
375.00 495.00
$23.089.00 $37,131.00


Expenditures

1974-75 1975-76 Biennium


Capital Outlay
3 Dodge Pickups
4 Dodge Pickups
1 Typewriter
Salaries
Administrative & Field $

Expenses
Travel
Repairs & Maintenace
Motor Fuel & Lubricants
Maintenance & Heating
Supplies
Office Supplies
Educational, Medical & Agric.
Supplies; Other Contractual
Services
Telephone
Bldg. & Construction Supplies
Insurance


Other Current Charges &
Obligations


GRAND TOTAL


S9,834.00 $


13,178.20
625.50


$ 9,834.00
13.178.20
625.50


$108,554.00 $ 96,035.23 $204,589.23


14,026.00
1,628.00
6.503.00

856.00
18.00


491.00
129.00
64.00
1,317.00


443.00
$ 25,475.00
$143,863.00


$ 13,952.30
2,881.09
5,560.08


$ 27,978.30
4,509.09
12,063.08


208.50 1,064.50
129.00 147.00


534.53
249.85
119.60
949.00


884.00
$ 25,467.95
$135,306.88


1,025.53
378.85
183.60
2,266.00


1,327.00
$ 50,942.95
$279,169.88





22 Division of Plant Industry

Meetings

The following meetings were attended by the Chief of Apiary Inspection:

August 13-14, 1974 Beekeepers Institute, Cherry Lake, Florida. Pre-
sented a talk.

September 30, 1974 Georgia State Beekeepers Convention, Fargo,
Georgia. Presented a talk.

October 16, 1974 Greater Jacksonville Fair. Judged honey exhibits.

October 31 to November 2, 1974 Florida State Beekeepers Association
Convention, Perry, Florida. Presented apiary report.

December 9, 1974 Central Florida Beekeepers Association, Tavares,
Florida. Presented a talk.

January 9, 1975 Polk County Beekeepers Association, Bartow, Florida.
Gave a slide presentation.

January 27-29, 1975 Apiary Inspectors of America Convention, Las
Vegas, Nevada. Presented Florida inspection report and served on Board
of Directors.

February 24, 1975 Central Florida Fair, Orlando, Florida. Judged honey
exhibits.

June 21, 1975 Tupelo Beekeepers Association, McClay Gardens, Florida.
Presented a talk.

August 11-13, 1975 Beekeepers Institute, Camp Cloverleaf, Lake Placid,
Florida. Presented a talk.

October 15, 1975 Greater Jacksonville Fair. Judged honey exhibits.

October 28-31, 1975 Southern States Beekeepers Federation Convention
and America Bee Breeders Convention, Mobile, Alabama.

November 2-3, 1975 Georgia State Beekeepers Convention, Tifton,
Georgia. Presented a talk.

November 6-8, 1975 Florida State Beekeepers Association Convention,
Tampa, Florida. Presented apiary report.

January 12, 1976 Central Florida Beekeepers Association, Tavares,
Florida. Gave a slide presentation.






Thirty-first Biennial Report 23

January 13-17. 1976 Apiary Inspectors of America Convention, Baton
Rouge, Louisiana. Presented Florida inspection report, served on Board of
Directors, and received retirement certificate.

February 9, 1976 Central Florida Beekeepers Association, Apopka,
Florida.

February 23, 1976 Central Florida Fair. Orlando. Florida. Judged
community honey exhibits.

March 2, 1976 International Trade Commission hearing on honey import
problems, Orlando, Florida.





Division of Plant Industry


SUMMARY OF APIARY INSPECTION WORK
BY COUNTIES
July 1, 1974 to June 30, 1975


Apiaries Colonies
Infected: Infected: New
Apiaries Colonies American American Colonies Infec-
Inspected Inspected Foulbrood Foulbrood Destroyed tions


County
Alachua
Baker
Bay
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Calhoun
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
De Soto
Duval
Flagler
Franklin
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Gulf
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Leon
Liberty
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Nassau


163 3,509 2 3 3 2
54 3,303 6 32 32 6
1 41 -
20 522 3 3 3 3
153 6,298 23 105 105 9
36 738 1 1 1 1
48 1,604 11 33 33 6
5 55 -
3 19 -
32 1,195 10 49 49 10
52 2,553 -
400 7,047 61 148 148 57
58 3,200 -
128 2,092 26 91 91 23
5 405 -
68 4,536 2 2 2
14 818 -
3 87 -
35 1,184 2 7 7 1
86 2,960 9 33 33 4
29 552 -
59 3,778 1 27 27 1
150 4,964 2 2 2 2
29 1,692 1 2 2 1
167 8,808 -
375 13,769 5 44 44 5
5 286 1 1 1
67 3,165 -
5 115 1 8 8 1
22 1,093 -
59 2,464 6 12 12 6
377 13,962 32 84 84 27
44 2,114 -
50 2,737 -
116 4,726 13 26 26 6
2 44 -
7 414 -
25 384 1 2 2 1
1 6 1 1 1





Thirty-first Biennial Report


Apiaries Colonies
Infected: Infected: New
Apiaries Colonies American American Colonies Infec-
Inspected Inspected Foulbrood Foulbrood Destroyed tions


Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sarasota
Seminole
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Wakulla
Walton
Washington


TOTALS 5,050 204,929 365 1,229 1,229 266


County


19 426
378 16,010
13 776
131 3,050
113 4,699
90 4,084
473 27,091
39 1,272
8 166
118 5,944
21 442
46 2,629
98 4788
56 2,136
89 3,063
154 6,205
190 11.620
2 82
59 3.207





26 Division of Plant Industry

SUMMARY OF APIARY INSPECTION WORK
BY COUNTIES
July 1, 1975 to June 30, 1976
Apiaries Colonies
Infected: Infected: New
Apiaries Colonies American American Colonies Infec-
County Inspected Inspected Foulbrood Foulbrood Destroyed tions

Alachua 125 3,236 3 27 27 3
Baker 55 3,468 11 23 23 11
Bay 6 245 -
Bradford 9 304 -
Brevard 97 4,165 6 25 25 5
Broward 11 229 2 5 5 1
Calhoun 36 1,157 7 10 10 2
Collier 110 2,748 31 137 137 24
Columbia 45 1,560 -
Dade 342 5,513 35 170 170 34
DeSoto 88 5,030 1 8 8 1
Duval 38 720 -
Escambia 1 2 -
Flagler 3 180 -
Gadsden 14 812 -
Gilchrist 5 94 -
Glades 17 668 1 1 1 1
Gulf 60 3,293 7 28 28
Hamilton 51 1,621 -
Hardee 52 2,235 -
Hendry 200 7,968 8 16 16 5
Hernando 32 1,770 4 11 11 4
Highlands 156 9,167
Hillsborough 295 14,668 6 20 20 5
Holmes 2 33 -
Indian River 82 3,253 -
Jackson 21 711 3 15 15 3
Lafayette 31 1,332 2 3 3 2
Lake 317 13,444 11 43 43 6
Lee 83 3,824 3 8 8 3
Leon 31 1,581 1 4 4 1
Levy 24 236 -
Liberty 120 5,144 6 15 15 5
Madison 5 198 -
Manatee 1 36 -
Marion 96 2,985 9 58 58 9
Martin 37 694 -
Monroe 21 663 6 34 34 4
Okeechobee 33 550 -






Thirty-first Biennial Report


Apiaries Colonies
Infected: Infected: New
Apiaries Colonies American American Colonies Infec-
Inspected Inspected Foulbrood Foulbrood Destroyed tions


106
2
135
1

8


320 19,475
16 281
102 2,814
76 3,741
82 3,812
514 33,970
38 1,175
3 25
198 8,286
34 2,545
109 5,572
65 2,608
49 1,663
163 8,033
161 9,873
11 292
57 3,243


TOTALS 4,750 212,945 302 1,271 1,271 225


County


Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Seminole
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Wakulla
Walton
Washington






28 Division of Plant Industry

YEARLY SUMMARY OF APIARY INSPECTION WORK

Apiaries Colonies
Infected: Infected:
Apiaries Colonies American American
Year Ending Inspected Inspected Foulbrood Foulbrood

June 30, 1938 3,451 64,668 38 173
S" 1939 3,371 70,655 56 416
S 1940 3,414 76,851 61 234
S 1941 3,711 81,950 80 371
" 1942 3,671 83,354 106 698
S 1943 3,347 80,823 100 524
S 1944 2,646 73,649 106 456
" 1945 2,371 69,262 105 379
S 1946 2,265 71,161 138 959
S 1947 2,464 87,674 104 683
S 1948 3,266 98,147 100 391
S 1949 3,710 105,678 130 406
S 1950 3,082 105,296 175 369
" 1951 2,872 95,405 237 772
S 1952 2,836 88,206 232 578
S 1953 3,259 92,267 449 1,366
1954 5,102 135,168 683 2,158
S 1955 5,885 157,388 524 1,421
S 1956 6,168 176,616 460 1,180
S 1957 5,813 162,885 490 1,121
S 1958 4,932 159,692 457 1,623
S 1959 5,123 153,677 454 1,329
S 1960 5,056 149,227 438 1,422
" 1961 4,991 152,288 319 1,271
S 1962 5,693 173,538 341 1,053
S 1963 5,497 169,411 416 1,546
S 1964 5,230 166,641 481 1,614
S 1965 5,680 179,861 500 1,709
" 1966 5,833 189,802 485 1,340
S 1967 6,337 197,833 561 1,768
S 1968 6,519 218,493 504 1,712
" 1969 5,912 192,651 509 1,707
S 1970 5,788 185,752 443 1,317
S 1971 5,273 176,608 431 2,092
S 1972 4,713 176,153 433 1,683
S 1973 5,353 193,382 420 1,702
S 1974 4,802 191,102 293 1,148
S 1975 5,050 204,929 365 1,229
S 1976 4,750 212,945 302 1,271





Thirty-first Biennial Report


BUREAU OF CITRUS BUDWOOD
REGISTRATION

G. D. Bridges, Chief of Budwood Registration

An event unique in the bureau's history took place on 2 October 1974.
The special occasion was a combined dedication, open house, and
tour of the new virus test complex and foundation blocks at Dundee.
Commissioner Doyle Conner flew from Tallahassee to present the initial
address and to posthumously honor Bob T. Reynolds for his outstanding
contributions to Florida's citrus industry. Mrs. Reynolds, wife of Bob T.
Reynolds, and several family members were present to receive the award.
Other guests were members of the Florida Citrus Production Managers'
Association, the Florida Citrus Nurserymen's Association, state and
federal research personnel, extension workers, Division of Plant Industry
employees, and others. All present appeared to appreciate the activities,
especially the luncheon of barbecued beef and chicken prepared and
served by bureau personnel.
In March 1975, G. D. Bridges observed trees in a commercial citrus
nursery with characteristics identical to those of 'Star Ruby' grapefruit, a
Texas variety not legally released in Florida. Budwood used to produce
this nursery stock came from 3 trees in a grove at Vero Beach. This
incident brought about the rapid discovery of several other violations
involving Star Ruby, and led to a series of unsettled law suits, quarantine
violations, diseased trees, and strong industry feeling. As the biennium
closed, it was with the unhappy knowledge that diseased illegal plant
material had indeed been introduced and disseminated by propagation to
an undetermined number of trees. At this point the only good news
concerning Star Ruby is that its illegal entry has led to new and stronger
legislation to regulate the importation of plant material from outside
Florida.
The challenge of establishing the new Dundee facilities efficiently
and economically uncovered talents in the bureau that ranged from
glasshouse construction to welding. The willingness of bureau personnel
to tackle almost any job was beneficial in a number of ways, but care was
taken not to delay such basic objectives as re-establishing the foundation's
plantings. On 18 February 1975, less than 2 years after the initial clearing
was begun at the Dundee site, crews began removing trees from the
nursery and replanting them in grove form. To guard against errors in
tree identity, each tree was tagged in the nursery with the parent
registration number and the row and tree space where it should be set.
The 28 rootstocks employed were each identified by a special color code
painted on the stock. The system worked well-only 2 pairs of switched
trees were found after some 37 acres had been set.
Revenue from all sources for the biennium amounted to $42,946.60
with more than $36,500 coming from the sale of fruit. These fruit returns





Division of Plant Industry


seem especially rewarding since all production costs except irrigation
have already been deducted from the gross return. The total revenue is
equivalent to 53.5% of all bureau costs other than salaries. With a total of
almost 53 acres of newly set trees fruit returns are expected to decline
somewhat during '76-77 but should increase very substantially thereafter.
The losses statewide from tristeza and young tree decline continue to
increase along with grower interest in rootstocks to replace sour orange
and rough lemon. It is expected that the Division's budwood foundation
plantings will in the future produce valuable information concerning
rootstocks.
During '75-76 bureau functions were broadened to include develop-
ment, maintenance, and operation of the Florida Citrus Arboretum. Plant
Specialist Leon Hebb has been assigned primary supervisory respon-
sibility over arboretum-related activities.
Probably the most significant development is the bureau's new
capability for the production of virus-free plants by heat therapy and
shoot-tip grafting. Both techniques will be employed to provide the
industry with sources of horticulturally superior selections which can be
used successfully on a full range of rootstocks.
Budwood Foundation Grove
The task of creating a New Budwood Foundation Grove, gotten
underway during the '72-74 biennium by transferring 792 trees produced
at the old grove site to the Dundee location, gained momentum in 1975. On
18 February budwood personnel began transplanting 2,039 trees from
the nursery into 2 major grove plantings that are the nucleus of the
present foundation grove. Early and midseason oranges are contained in
one 10-acre block on 12 rootstocks; late oranges and grapefruit varieties
are planted in a separate 26-acre block. The grove layout facilitates
harvesting, grove care, and evaluation of the various budlines for
horticultural characteristics.
Tree trunks were painted with color-coded markings and in-
dividually labeled to reduce errors in planting, and to serve as a guide
for making observations. In mid-February 1976, the last 551 trees were
set in the various blocks to complete re-establishment of the primary
foundation planting. In all, 382 selected budlines are represented,
comprising all the major varieties of citrus grown in Florida. Additional
selections of superior budlines are being made and will be incorporated
into foundation plantings in the future.
Surplus trees remaining in the nursery were sold to interested
growers and nurserymen to establish sources of budwood for their
operations. The sale of 1,498 trees returned $2,976.
The first tree evaluations were recorded in the fall of 1975, and
included tree measurements and fruit yields.
Late in June 1976, clearing was begun on an additional 6 acres to
provide space needed for evaluation of virus-free propagations obtained
through the shoot-tip grafting technique. The cleared land had been






Thirty-first Biennial Report


producing Duncan grapefruit from which marginal returns were
expected due to market conditions for that variety.
Performance of the microjet irrigation system, installed in 1973 prior
to planting trees in 10 acres designated as Foundation Block E, has
continued to live up to the most optimistic expectations. Conservation of
water, more economical installation, and lower operating costs are only
some of the benefits; regular water application through timed watering
periods has resulted in exceptionally vigorous trees and lower costs
associated with newly set trees.
In the spring of 1975, 58 young nucellar trees resulting from 1973
closed pollination work by bureau personnel were set in Block E for
fruiting and growth evaluations. Included in this group are selected
seedling trees representing a deeply colored Valencia budline under
evaluation since 1969. The parent budline, which carries both xyloporosis
and exocortis, was released to the industry as 'Rhode Red Valencia' in an
IFAS/DPI report presented at the Florida State Horticultural Society in
November 1975.
In January 1975, a group of seedling trees from the original Bearss
lemon were re-evaluated; those selected were propagated in the Dundee
nursery. Sixteen trees were then chosen for planting in the foundation
grove for evaluation of yields and fruit quality. Virus testing continues on
several Bearss lemon selections made by the Coca Cola Company from
trees in the Indiantown area. These candidates exhibit a thornless
characteristic that could be an important cost factor in the harvesting of
this variety.
Trees representing the newly released Temple selection 'Sue-Linda'
were established in the foundation planting in the spring of 1976. This
variety was released by IFAS at the 1975 meeting of the Florida State
Horticultural Society. Sue-Linda Temple is characterized by averaging
fewer seeds (8) than the standard variety (20).
Hot water treatment of citrus seed as a disease preventive measure
continues to be well accepted by citrus nurserymen. A total of 8,054
quarts of seed were treated in the prescribed manner and returned
$1,182 during the biennium.
Ninety nine requests for budwood were honored with 35,553 total
budeyes distributed. As trees mature and additional budwood becomes
available, more such requests can be satisfied.
Citrus Arboretum
Following the retirement of Gerald Norman in 1975, responsibility
for development of the Florida Citrus Arboretum beyond the infant
planning stage was integrated into bureau responsibilities. Plant
Specialist Leon Hebb has been assigned such direct supervisory
responsibilities as overseeing contractors, collecting plant material, and
developing the arboretum plantings. The Florida Citrus Arboretum will
become a complete taxonomic collection of rare and foreign citrus,
including citrus relatives. It will serve research as a germ plasm bank for






Division of Plant Industry


breeding purposes, and will also become a public educational attraction.
During the 1974-76 period the Winter Haven site has been prepared
for planting, an irrigation system installed, and a security fence erected.
The parking lot and reception building with its attached greenhouse have
been completed and are to be occupied in the near future. Collection of
plant material is underway.
Indexing
An exciting new concept for establishing virus-free sources of citrus
is shoot-tip grafting, a technique developed at the University of California
at Riverside as an outgrowth of tissue culture research.
In March 1976, Plant Specialist Sherry Kitto traveled to California to
train under the direction of Dr. Toshio Murashige and C. N. Roistacher,
research scientists directly involved in developing the procedure. Upon
her return, facilities were improvised to implement this procedure, with
one room in the budwood wing of the Cowperthwaite building being set
aside for growing seedlings in test tubes and performing the microscopic
grafting procedure. In making the graft only 0.10-0.18 mm of plant tissue
is removed from an expanding citrus shoot tip and then placed in an
inverted "T" cut near the top of a decapitated 2-week-old seedling. This
micrograft is then grown for several weeks in a controlled environment.
After the shoot-tip has sprouted, the plant is transferred to a shaded
greenhouse for growing off. Standard virus indexing is performed using
tissue from shoot-tip grafted plants to confirm freedom from viruses.
Simultaneously, newly derived plants from shoot-tip grafts are being
grown in the field for horticultural observations.
The shoot-tip grafting process will enable the bureau to produce
virus-free budlines quickly and without the long period of juvenility
associated with nucellar seedlings from varieties that are now known to
be infected with exocortis and xyloporosis viruses. In addition the shoot-
tip grafting procedure provides the only means for eliminating
xyloporosis and exocortis from 'Temple' and 'Thompson' grapefruit,
neither of which normally produces nucellar seedlings. Altogether, the
shoot-tip grafting procedure will be useful in providing the industry with
budding material for at least 15 commercial varieties now totally
exocortis-infected, which can be used successfully on a wide range of
rootstocks. At the end of the biennium there were 25 successful shoot-tip
propagations growing well in the Dundee greenhouses.
Another aid in the production of virus-free budlines is the heat-
therapy technique developed through research. This technique enables
the bureau to eliminate tristeza and psorosis viruses from infected plants.
In the spring of 1975, a small greenhouse was programmed for 16-hour
days at 104 F, and 8-hour nights at 85 F. This schedule was maintained
for 22 weeks on a group of 40 selected budlines infected with tristeza.
Preliminary testing indicates that only one selection was not freed of
tristeza virus at the end of the treatment period. Propagations of heat-
treated plants are now being planted in the bureau's screenhouse and will





Thirty-first Biennial Report


be maintained tristeza-free, available for distribution to growers for use
in areas of low tristeza incidence, or where groves are predominantly on
sour orange rootstocks. Researchers are also interested in this material
for use in cross-protection experiments where virus-free plants are
deliberately infected with a specific mild virus isolate, hopefully to
protect the plant from more virulent virus strains that are vectored by
insects.
Greenhouse facilities obtained through the property exchange with
Circus World, finalized in mid-1974, have provided space for exocortis
testing in a temperature-controlled environment that minimizes the
masking of symptom expressions by tristeza virus. Such tests were
previously conducted on field-grown indicator plants.
Exocortis testing of scion trees remains high on the priority list. Five
hundred tests were completed and 638 were initiated during 1974-76 in our
field test blocks and greenhouse. With the completion of these tests more
than 11.5% of the 23,000 eligible scion trees will have been tested since 1968.
Additional trees have been planted in new scion groves since testing was
begun; and because retesting of existing trees in necessary to detect
accidental spread of exocortis, the workload of exocortis testing has
increased steadily.
Tests for tristeza virus primarily consisted of foundation grove trees
and special tests on trees being prepared for screenhouse planting. Tristeza
tests numbered 322 in the Dundee greenhouse and 572 in the Winter Haven
greenhouse.
Psorosis and xyloporosis indexing of new parent trees and additional
nucellar selections from the foundation grove totaled 124. Field indexing
for psorosis and xyloporosis is being moved from the Winter Haven test plot
to the nursery at Dundee. This will increase work efficiency and provide
additional space for foundation plantings of limes and lemons as future
needs arise.
There were 22 new parent trees entered in the program and 10
new scion groves planted, involving 1,183 trees. New validated source
plantings accounted for 94 trees in 3 locations. Budwood program
participants now number 535; co-operators in the validated source
program total 104, involving 5,838 trees. More than 2-1/2 million nursery
trees were produced within the program. Rootstock and variety planting
trends in commercial groves are illustrated in Table 1.
Cooperative Projects
With the discovery that illegally introduced 'Star Ruby' grapefruit
trees were being propagated in Florida nurseries, personnel from the
plant inspection bureau and budwood bureau carried out a series of
special inspections that resulted in the discovery of over 210 acres of
illegal plant material consisting of nearly 95,000 trees, either in grove
plantings or as budded nursery stock. These plantings were distributed
largely in the Indian River growing area, but included properties in
North Central Florida, the West Coast growing area, and South Central






34 Division of Plant Industry

Florida. An administrative hearing at Lakeland was called by Com-
missioner Conner in August 1975, to gather information on the scope
and seriousness of the problem. Division plant specialists continued to
inspect the illegal plantings since there was a possibility that some of the
smuggled plant material was infected with citrus ringspot virus-necrotic
strain (CRV-NS), a virus known to exist only in Texas. The cooperation
and technical assistance of United States Department of Agriculture
virologist, Dr. S. M. Garnsey, were obtained when field inspections of
illegal Star Ruby disclosed suspicious symptoms. At least one tree in a
planting at Titusville, originally budded in a Texas nursery, was found
to be carrying a transmissible virus disease with symptoms closely resem-
bling CRV-NS. This virus, described in 1973 by Dr. L. W. Timmer
at Texas A&I University has since caused decline in infected trees located
on the Experiment Station at Weslaco. The diseased tree near Titusville
has been voluntarily destroyed by the owner at the request of the division
director.
Six lemon and 6 lime selections, each on 10 rootstocks, were estab-
lished at the old Winter Haven test nursery site to provide informa-
tion useful to producers of these acid fruits. Five of the 6 lemon selections,
not yet released to industry, are being studied cooperatively with Dr.
A. P. Pieringer, IFAS, Lake Alfred, in an effort to establish lemon
clones more ideally suited to Florida conditions than selections currently
in commercial use. Dr. Pieringer is also cooperating with the bureau
in yield and quality studies of grapefruit, and midseason and navel
oranges.
Participation by the budwood staff on a research committee
investigating young tree decline resulted in a cooperative rootstock study
designed to demonstrate performance of 12 rootstocks under severe
disease exposure. Approximately 1500 trees representing one Valencia
budline were propagated in the Dundee nursery in the spring of 1976 to be
set in a cooperator's grove planting in the fall of 1976.
Observations continue to be made on a Milam stem-pitting experi-
ment initiated in June 1972, in cooperation with Dr. S. M. Garnsey,
USDA plant pathologist, Orlando. Major scion and rootstock varieties
have been topworked into Milam seed trees displaying severe trunk
pitting. This host range study now 4 years old has not yet shown definitive
results. The stem-pitting condition does not appear to be causing
noticeable decline in the seed source trees.
Personnel Changes
In December 1975, Plant Specialist Sherry Kitto was transferred to
the budwood bureau from the Fort Myers district where she was engaged
in plant inspection work. Sherry has assumed many of the duties formerly
assigned to Leon Hebb, including care and maintenance of greenhouse
index plants, and in addition, has become skilled in the very exacting
shoot-tip grafting technique developed recently for the production of
virus-free plants from infected sources.
On 5 March 1976, Phillis Glaze joined the staff as Clerk Typist II to





Thirty-first Biennial Report


fill the position made vacant by the resignation of Pam Black earlier in the
year.
Training
Training and technical information in Budwood Program work were
provided by G. D. Bridges and C. O. Youtsey for Division Training classes
XXX and XXXI, 2 University of Florida advanced citrus classes, and 2
Florida Southern College citrus classes. Special training classes relating
to Star Ruby grapefruit were conducted for regional inspectors, district
plant specialists, and county agents. Reports on the Star Ruby situation
were presented by Charles Youtsey on request at Production Managers'
Association meetings, Florida Citrus Nurserymen's Association meetings,
Florida Nurserymen and Grower Association meetings, and at seminars
held in Vero Beach and Cocoa. Ten visitors from 5 foreign countries-
Israel, South Africa, Japan, Philippines, and Iran-were taken on field
trips to test plots, foundation blocks, and indexing facilities as well as
other locations to observe virus diseases and rootstock trials.
A training program in defensive driving was attended by the entire
budwood staff. Safety meetings for field personnel, conducted in evening
classes at the county agent's office in Bartow, were attended by our staff
members.
Trips, Talks, and Papers
Messrs. Bridges and Youtsey attended and participated in annual
meetings of Indian River Citrus Seminar, Citrus Growers' Institute,
USDA Field Day, and the Florida State Horticultural Society, which for
the second time within 3 years selected them as the recipients of the
outstanding paper award presented in the citrus section. Title of the 1974
award paper was "Yield Variations Among Nucellar Seedling Clones at
the Florida State Budwood Foundation Grove." Mr. Bridges was a junior
author of a paper entitled "'Rhode Red Valencia,' an Orange Selection
with Improved Juice Color" presented at the 1975 meeting of the Florida
State Horticultural Society.
Conferences relating to young tree decline were held at the Citrus
Experiment Station, Lake Alfred; Florida Technological University,
Orlando; and the IFAS Research Center, Ft. Pierce, and were attended by
Mr. Bridges and Mr. Youtsey. The Ft. Pierce meeting included also a
tristeza workshop. Seven members of the Budwood Bureau staff attended
the 1974 Annual Business Conference of the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services.
Mr. Bridges attended meetings of the Budwood Technical Committee,
Citrus Mutual Directors, House of Representatives Citrus Subcommittee,
and the dedication of the quarantine greenhouse facility in Gainesville.
Mr. Youtsey conducted the California Lemon Club on a tour Saturday, 20
March 1976, in cooperation with the Polk County agricultural agent's
office.
Mr. Bridges served on the Florida State Horticultural Society's
Membership and Nominating Committee for 1974.




TABLE 1. Scion and rootstock types used for registered nursery trees-7/74 thru 6/76.

Total by Scion Type Total by Rootstock
% of Rough Sweet Sour
Scion Total Total Carrizo Cleo Milam P.trif. lemon lime orange Swingle Misc.


Early oranges 669,055 25.9 257,654

Mid-season 292,089 11.2 107,352

Late oranges 825,499 31.9 554,709

Red & pink
grapefruit 378,191 14.6 87,965

Duncan 40,616 1.6 10,374

Marsh 130,631 5.0 31,983

Limes 17,027 .7 194

Lemons 13,863 .5 23

Tangerine &
Mandarin hybrids 220,005 8.5 46,623


90,340

45,406

30,778


12,758

1,823

2,384

65

63


35,823

30,184

74,299


12,267

14,755

11,445

0

0


26,387

2,114

200


3,104

2,062

0

0

0


33,718 25,522 17,934


5,069

5,809

35,233


1,124

135

0

156

54


1,907 224,824

4,365 87,276

4,545 76,628


30 235,264

415 7,220

45 79,181

0 3,679

3,333 0


986 19,689 51,130


26,996

9,300

23,277


25,624

3,208

5,538

5,557

3,094


55

283

25,830


55

624

55

7,376 I

7,296


19,322 5,081


Total by
Rootstock 2,587,976 1,096,877 217,335 204,295 51,801 48,566 34,329 765,202 121,916 46,655

% Each


Rootstock


42.4 8.4 7.9 2.0 1.9 1.3 29.6


4.7 1.8






Thirty-first Biennial Report


BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
H. A. Denmark, Chief of Entomology

Summary
The Bureau of Entomology provides arthropod identification service,
conducts limited investigations of certain economic problems, assists in
instructing plant specialists, continues to build a general arthropod
reference collection, conducts taxonomic investigations, supervises the
security of the biological control laboratory, and develops the taxonomic
and biological control literature to support these responsibilities.
There were 182,636 specimens identified from 14,715 samples
received during the biennium. (An identification may consist of one or
many specimens representing a single species.) The number of specimens
added to the Florida State Collection of Arthropods (FSCA) during the
biennium was 191,020 pinned and labeled specimens, 11,183 slide mounts,
44,686 vials, and 17,887 papered specimens, for a total of 264,776
processed specimens.
A leaf beetle, Microtheca ochroloma Stal, was found wide spread in
1975 in backyard gardens and on commercially grown watercress in 1976.
The red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren, is now found in
every county in Florida, except Monroe.
The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hubner), was found in
Jackson, Calhoun, Holmes, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa, Gadsden, and Jefferson
counties during this biennium. To date it is not a threat to the sweet corn
growing areas of Florida.
Hundreds of identifications were made of leafhoppers as possible
vectors of lethal yellowing of coconut. The insect vector has not been
determined to date.
Many hundreds of specimens have been collected and processed in
relation to testing the effect of effluent pumped into cypress domes on the
insect populations associated with these areas.
Insects are being collected in the areas where the Florida Cross State
Barge Canal has been dug and the areas proposed for digging to evaluate
changes in insect populations before and after excavation. The cypress
dome and Cross State Barge Canal studies were made by Dr. Robert E.
Woodruff through grants from the Center for Wet Lands through the
University of Florida and from the Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission with funds provided to the Commission by the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers.
The sugarcane rootstalk borer, Diaprepes abbreviatus (L.), spread
into a nursery near the known infestation in Apopka and appeared in a
nursery in Broward County in 1974. Methods and materials were
developed for treating potting soil by the Division of Plant Industry,
Methods Development; USDA, APHIS; USDA, ARS; and the University
of Florida, Department of Entomology and Nematology, IFAS, to prevent
the movement of the larvae on nursery stock.
A palm mealybug, Palmicultor palmarum (Ehrhorn) was taken from






Division of Plant Industry


Manila palm in Volusia County. The plants had been shipped from Hilo,
Hawaii. This is a new continental U.S. record.
Thrips, Nesothrips brevicollis (Bagnall) and Scotothrips claripennis
(Moulton) were taken from coconut palm in Dade County. Both species are
new to the continental U.S. A thrips, Dichromothrips corbetti (Priesner)
was taken on orchid in Lee County. This is a new continental record. The
importance of the above insects is not fully known, but are considered of
economic importance.
The citrus blackfly, Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby (fig. 1) was found
for the second time on the continental U.S. when it was discovered on
citrus nursery plants in Broward County in February 1976. It has now
spread to Palm Beach and Dade Counties. State and federal personnel are
attempting to contain this pest until a method to eradicate it is developed.
A weevil belonging to the subfamily Bardidinae (genus and species
unknown) has been found feeding on several tropical fleshy fruits in the
Dade County area.
The Arthropod Introduction Committee has processed 59 requests
involving 129 species during this biennium. Anyone wishing to introduce
insects or related arthropods should write to: H. A. Denmark, Chairman,
Arthropod Introduction Committee, Division of Plant Industry, P. O. Box
1269, Gainesville, Florida 32602.


Fig. 1. Citrus blackfly on underside of citrus leaves.






Thirty-first Biennial Report


Bureau Activities
The Biological Control Laboratory continues to serve as a clearing
house for most of the southeastern United States in the introduction of
exotic species. To date the University of Florida (IFAS), U.S. Department
of Agriculture (ARS), and Division of Plant Industry have requested
permission to evaluate approximately 18 parasites and predators under
rigid security for their effectiveness against pest insects.
The Arthropod Introduction Committee was established to regulate
the movement of arthropods into and within the State of Florida. It is
composed of Dr. C. L. Campbell, Division of Animal Industry (FDACS);
Dr. John Mulrennan, Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative
Services; Dr. Fowden Maxwell and Dr. W. H. Whitcomb, University of
Florida (IFAS); Dr. Donald E. Weidhaas, USDA, ARS; Lt. Col. Brantley
Goodson, Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission; and Harold
A. Denmark, Chairman, FDACS, DPI. During this beinnium 59 requests,
involving 129 species, were received for the introduction or movement of
arthropods into or within the state from various organizations.
Funds were requested, but not received, from the 1972-73, 1973-74,
1974-75, and 1975-76 legislature for doubling the space of the entomology
wing. Space is badly needed, and utility cabinets have been moved into
the hall to make room for insect cabinets.
R. W. Swanson is developing methods to mass rear the papaya fruit
fly, Toxotrypana curvicauda Gerstaecker, with the ultimate aim of de-
veloping sterile techniques for eradicating this pest from Florida. This fly
is the limiting factor in papaya production in Florida.
PUBLICATIONS: The "Florida Armored Scale Insects" and "Illus-
trated Key to Caterpillars on Corn" were revised by G. W. Dekle. Twenty-
four circulars and several papers were published.
IDENTIFICATIONS: Identifications of the various arthropod
groups are made by 6 entomologists. The entomologists and the groups for
which they are responsible are as follows:


G. W. Dekle: Scales, mealybugs, and all immature
stages.
H. A. Denmark: Aphids, mites, thrips, and ticks.
E. E. Grissell: Hymenoptera and gall-forming in-
sects.
F. W. Mead: Adult Lepidoptera; Diptera, sub-
order Nematocera, which includes
midges and mosquitoes; Hemiptera;
Homoptera: Psyllidae, plus suborder
Auchenorhyncha, which includes
leafhoppers, plant hoppers, spittle-
bugs, treehoppers, and cicadas.






Division of Plant Industry


H. V. Weems, Jr.: Adult Higher Diptera (suborder Bra-
chycera), Aleyrodidae, Archnida (ex-
cept Acarina), and miscellaneous
smaller arthropod groups.
R. E. Woodruff: Adult Coleoptera and Orthoptera.


Dr. L. A. Hetrick, Professor Emeritus, University of Florida, IFAS,
Department of Entomology and Nematology, continues to do routine
identifications of termites. Dr. Dale Habeck, University of Florida, IFAS,
Department of Entomology and Nematology, identifies the Arctiidae
adults and immatures, and all other immature insects. Drs. Minter J.
Westfall, Lewis Berner, and Fred C. Thompson, University of Florida,
Department of Zoology, identify the Odonata, Ephemeroptera, and
Mollusca, respectively.
Four insect cabinets were purchased during the biennium.
AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY: H. V. Weems, Jr. is the head cura-
tor and is responsible for the overall development of the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods. He also coordinates the Research Associate
Program and serves as editor of the irregularly published series, Arthro-
pods of Florida and Neighboring Land Areas. He is an Associate Editor of
The Florida Entomologist.
F. W. Mead is the survey entomologist for the state. The Cooperative
Economic Insect Report (CEIR) has been a joint effort of the USDA and
DPI for the past 20 years. Weekly reports of insect activities are for-
warded to Washington, D.C., where all state reports are combined and
published in the CEIR. Monthly reports are combined with other reports
of DPI technical sections and are published as the TRI-OLOGY Technical
Report.
R. E. Woodruff is in charge of the library development program for
the entomology portion of DPI. The DPI library is the primary repository
for the taxonomic and general zoogeographic literature, while the Hume
Library at the University of Florida is the primary repository for all other
subject areas. Dr. Woodruff and Dr. Tom Walker coordinate the ento-
mological library purchases for the 2 organizations to eliminate costly and
unnecessary duplication.
G. W. Dekle works closely with the University of Florida, IFAS,
Department of Entomology and Nematology, and Bill Pierce and Hugh
Collins, DPI, Bureau of Plant Inspection, on economic insect and mite
problems.
E. E. Grissell is developing and curating the Hymenoptera, particu-
larly the Chalcidoidea, as related to biological control. He is also a mem-
ber of the DPI Editorial Committee and Associate Editor of The Florida
Entomologist.
Each man is responsible for curating the groups of arthropods as-
signed to him.






Thirty-first Biennial Report


Cooperative Economic Insect Survey Program
F. W. Mead, Taxonomic Entomologist
The Division is the cooperative state agency under contract with the
USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Plant Protection and
Quarantine Programs, and New Pest and Detection and Survey Staff, to
prepare weekly survey reports and annual summaries of economic insect
conditions in Florida. Highlights in the weekly reports and annual sum-
maries from Florida and other states are published by the USDA in the
weekly Cooperative Plant Pest Report (CPPR). DPI distributes the TRI-
OLOGY Technical Report each month to summarize the most significant
insects, plant pathogens, and nematodes found in Florida. Most of this
information results from the processing and determination of samples
sent to DPI during the preceding month. The author, as survey ento-
mologist, is responsible for assembling the entomology portion of TRI-
OLOGY each month and for editing the entire publication once every 3
months. Information is received from many sources, but perhaps the most
consistent general source is from the DPI office in Gainesville, which acts
as the state clearing house as well as the focal point for technical services
to DPI personnel around the state. Much important information is ob-
tained from the University of Florida, IFAS, research centers and exten-
sion scientists, USDA personnel, and professional scouts such as R. B.
Baker. All of these reports help in varying degrees to fulfill the objectives
of the survey and detection program. These objectives are:
1) To assist agricultural workers by supplying current information
on insect activity so that crops can be more adequately protected
from insect attacks.
2) To aid and assure more prompt detection of newly introduced
insect pests.
3) To determine losses caused by insects.
4) To maintain records on the occurrence of economic insects.
5) To aid manufacturers and suppliers of insecticides and control
equipment to determine areas of urgent need for supplies and
equipment.
6) To develop a workable insect pest forecasting service.


Biological Control Laboratory
E. E. Grissell, Taxonomic Entomologist
During the biennium approximately 18 requests (involving about 32
species) have been made to move arthropods through the Division's
Biological Control Laboratory. Requests have been made by various
branches of the USDA, University of Florida, and Division of Plant
Industry. Intended uses include screening of potential biological control
agents (parasites and predators) and behavioral studies. During the bi-
ennium the following parasites were released in Florida:






Division of Plant Industry


1974 Biosteres longicaudatus Ashmead and Opius oophilus Fullaway
(Bracondiae) to control Anastrepha suspense (Loew) (Tephritidae), Neo-
chetina bruchi Hustache (Bruchidae) to control Eichhornia crassipes
(Mart.) Solms-Laubach (Pontederiaceae) 1975 Pediobius foveolatus
(Crawford) (Eulophidae) to control Epilachna varivestris Mulsant (Coc-
cinellidae), Telenomus remus Nixon (Scelionidae) to control Spodoptera
frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Noctuidae); 1976 Amitus hesperidum Silvestri
(Platygasteridae) and Prospaltella opulenta Silvestri (Eulophidae) to con-
trol Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby (Aleyrodidae), Aphytis theae (Cam-
eron) (Eulophidae) to control Fiorinia theae Green (Diaspididae), and
Euplectrus sp. near comstockii Howard (Eulophidae) to control Anti-
carsia gemmatalis Hubner (Noctuidae).

Cooperative Library Agreement
R. E. Woodruff, Taxonomic Entomologist
All library activities are conducted as a part of the standing co-
operative agreement between DPI and the University of Florida. Special
efforts are being made to increase the book and periodical resources of
both institutions with a minimum of duplication of effort and finances.
The DPI library continues to be the primary repository for taxonomic and
zoogeogiaphic literature, whereas the University of Florida emphasizes
the other aspects of entomology.
The joint holdings now constitute the finest such research and refer-
ence library in the southeastern United States.
Several changes took place in library personnel during the biennium:
Mr. Andrew Kolesar was replaced by Mrs. Sue Quist, who was replaced
by Mrs. Ann Owens, the current librarian.
Several recently accessioned collections of insects have been accom-
panied by special literature collections on the respective taxonomic
groups. In many cases they are lifetime collections impossible to duplicate
today at any price. Since they often exceed the total other acquisitions,
they are a very important part of our holdings. Following is a list of some
of these collections:
1) Dr. H. F. Strohecker, retired professor of zoology, University of
Miami, donated his reprint collection (over 1000) on Orthoptera
and Coleoptera and about 40 books on Orthoptera. This included
the Orthoptera volumes from the Biologia Centrali-Americana
and other rare items.
2) Mr. E. A. Munyer, Florida State Museum, Gainesville: 60
volumes of 3 learned society proceedings.
3) Dr. Gerald L. Greene, IFAS, AREC, Monticello: 31 books and
separates on entomology.
4) Dr. F. N. Young, Dept. of Zoology, Indiana University, Bloom-
ington, Indiana: 230 reprints and 30 books.






Thirty-first Biennial Report


Studies on Methods Alternative to Chemical Control
of the Caribbean and Papaya Fruit Flies
R. W. Swanson, Entomologist
This program, in cooperation with and based at the Agricultural
Research and Education Center in Homestead, has been active since
the late sixties. Two parasitoids, Biosteres longicaudatus (Ashmead) and
Doryctobracon cereum (Gahan) were released for possible control of the
Carib-fly, Anastrepha suspense Loew, during 1969-1974. Both of these
parasitoids are now established in Florida.
During 1975-76 a number of parasitoids were imported from Hawaii
and Trinidad and some of these were released against A. suspense on the
Center grounds.
Parisitoid Importations Releases
Opius trinidadensis Gahan 7 4
Opius oophilus Fullaway 10 7
Opius bellus Gahan 1 0
Opius spp. 1 0
These parasitoids are now being evaluated by monitoring the release
sites.
During the release site monitoring of our earlier releases we have
collected Opius anastrephae Vier on several occasions. These were the
first records of this species collected on the United States Mainland.
Attempts are now underway to colonize this parasitoid.
The papaya fruit fly, Toxotrypana curvicauda Gerst., which has al-
ways been the bane of backyard papaya growers has now become a
problem for the small commercial growers. We have concentrated our
studies on: (1) attempting to colonize this fly under artificial conditions,
and (2) evaluating a pheromone produced by the males. Two possible con-
trol measures for this fly are female annihilation or male sterilization.
There is also a parasitoid in Mexico that attacks this fly which possibly
could be utilized.

Special Projects
H. A. DENMARK, Chief of Entomology

(1) Phytoseiidae of Puerto Rico (completed).
(2) Phytoseiids of Jamaica.
(3) Description of phytoseiid mites associated with apple trees in
Australia (completed).
(4) Phytoseiid genera of the world.
(5) Developing plans for a biological control building and program
for the citrus blackfly.






44 Division of Plant Industry

G. W. DEKLE, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Continued work on an illustrated publication on the soft scale
insects of Florida, a joint project with Dr. M. L. Williams, Depart-
ment of Entomology and Zoology, Auburn, Alabama.
(2) Investigations with Dr. L. C. Kuitert, University of Flor-
ida, IFAS, Department of Entomology and Nematology, on the
use of chemicals for control of insects and related pests on orna-
mentals (completed).
(3) Wax scale studies. A joint project with Dr. John Davidson, Uni-
versity of Maryland, College Park (completed).
(4) Root mealybug, Rhizoecus spp., studies with Edson J. Hambleton,
Collaborator, USDA, Entomology Research Service, Washing-
ton, D.C. (completed).
(5) Revision of the armored scale insects of Florida (completed).
(6) Revision of the caterpillars on corn (completed).

W. MEAD, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Continuation of the European corn borer survey, especially by
helping to coordinate use of blacklight traps and the processing
of samples. The European corn borer was first detected on a
Florida crop (sorghum) during the summer of 1974 by an ento-
mology student at the University of Florida, Mr. Allen
E. Knutson. It was subsequently found in several more
"Panhandle" counties, so now it is assumed that most of the Pan-
handle counties are very lightly infested. For the summer season
of 1976, plans were to shift the emphasis of the trapping program
to the northern part of the peninsula. No one has observed any
economic damage by the European corn borer in Florida to date.
(2) Continuation of systematic research on the planthopper genus
Oliarus.
(3) Continuation of the monitoring and detection of insects
attracted to blacklight traps at 3 locations in Alachua
County, with special attention given to economic moths and He-
miptera.
(4) Collection and identification of some of the more important in-
sects in Florida alfalfa fields, with emphasis on Hemiptera.
(5) Continuation of identification and numerical counts of many
hemipterous species collected by W. H. Whitcomb and co-workers
in an ecological study at Tall Timbers Research Station, Talla-
hasee.
(6) Identification of hemipterous insects collected by IFAS entomolo-
gists on or near palms suffering from lethal yellowing disease,
in southern Florida.
(7) Identification of Hemiptera collected by P. H. Callahan in light
traps at different levels on a television tower.






Thirty-first Biennial Report


(8) Identification of Hemiptera collected by several graduate stu-
dents in the course of their graduate studies.
(9) Continuation of the compilation of bibliographies on J. S. Cald-
well and R. F. Hussey.
(10) Continuation of the project to transfer the Hussey collection of
scientific literature from boxes to folders in a standard filing
system.


~~ Li


~9* "'A


Fig. 2. Agricultural extension agent explaining to peanut farmers in Jackson
County, Florida, the proper survey techniques in evaluating insect populations in
the new pest management approach.


R. E. WOODRUFF, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Taxonomy, biology, ecology, behavior, and distribution of a
myrmecophilous beetle, Myrmecaphodius excavaticollis (Blanch.),
associated with the imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren.
This project was started in 1969 and continued through the pres-
ent biennium. Some of the information gained will prove valu-
able in any suppression and survey studies of the imported fire
ant. Numerous samples from fire ant nests and blacklight traps






Division of Plant Industry


in Brazil, collected by Dr. W. H. Whitcomb and associates, are
expected to shed light on host specificity of the inquilines as
well as elucidate the taxonomy of this complex of species. The
investigations should culminate in publication soon.
(2) Scarab beetles of Florida (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). This proj-
ect has continued for the past 18 years. Part of the information
was used for a Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Florida in
1967. Since that time over 1 million additional specimens have
been collected and the data used to update the text which was
published as Vol. 8 of the "Arthropods of Florida" series. This
volume (Part I) covers the 107 species representing the sub-
families Scarabaeinae, Geotrupinae, Aphodiinae, Acanthoceri-
nae, Ochodaeinae, and Hybosorinae. Part II, covering the re-
maining 134 species of the subfamilies Cetoniinae, Dynastinae,
Melolonthinae, and Rutelinae is in preparation and several
thousand specimens have been studied. It is now anticipated that
these will be divided into 2 additional parts (i.e., Part 2 Phyl-
lophaga, 50 species, and Part 3 all remaining groups, about 84
species).
(3) Arthropods associated with packrats, Neotoma floridana small,
on Key Largo, Florida; conducted jointly with Dr. R. M. Baranow-
ski, Agricultural Research and Education Center, Homestead.
Monthly samples have been taken over a 3-year period and run
through Berlese funnels. Several blind, wingless, and some pre-
sumably new species have been discovered in the nests. This
population of packrats is disjunct over 200 miles from the main-
land population. The arthropods from the Keys are of great
interest zoogeographically and particularly those from such a
unique niche as the nests of this endemic packrat. The rapid de-
struction of the habitat on Key Largo makes this study even more
urgent before the rat and its arthropod associates become extinct.
Several of the arthropods have been proposed for inclusion in the
Federal endangered species list.
(4) Food habits of the burrowing owl in Florida; in cooperation with
Dr. C. T. Collins (Long Beach State College, California) and W. D.
Courser (University of South Florida). Numerous pellets have
been analyzed from several Florida burrowing owl populations
(e.g., Trenton, Gainesville, Tampa). These have contained about
90 percent Scarabaeidae of about 15 species. Several samples were
studied during the biennium, and publication of the results is
anticipated within the next biennium.
(5) Taxonomic studies of the myrmecophilous (ant-loving) and
termitophilous (termite-loving) Aphodiinae (Coleoptera: Scar-
abaeidae) of North and South America; portions jointly with
Antonio Martinez (Buenos Aires, Argentina), O. L. Cartwright
(U.S. National Museum), Pedro Reyes (Mexico City), and Jon
Krikken (Leiden, Holland). This is a broad, long-range study






Thirty-first Biennial Report


which will probably be broken down into several individual
studies. However, material is being accumulated at a rapid rate
which will facilitate this study. Many bizarre new species have
been found, especially from tropical regions of the world.
(6) Study of fossil insects from the West Indies. This is also a long-
range project, previously using only material from asphalt de-
posits in Trinidad. During the last part of June 1976, several dozen
beautifully preserved insects were found in amber in the
Dominican Republic. It is anticipated that, with grant support,
more material will be secured and many undescribed forms
should result.
(7) Screening blacklight samples for foreign pests. Several traps,
especially at Key West, Fort Myers, Tampa, Miami, and Jackson-
ville, have been checked regularly for detection of species not
known in Florida and which are likely to be introduced. In ad-
dition, samples have been received regularly from Trinidad
(through the courtesy of Dr. F. D. Bennett, Commonwealth
Institute of Biological Control, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (through
U.S. Navy), Jamaica (through Dr. R. M. Baranowski, Agricultural
Research and Education Center, Homestead), and Barbados
(through Dr. M. M. Alam, Ministry of Agriculture, Bridgetown).
Dr. F. S. Blanton has continued to provide the residue from traps
operated for his sand fly (Culicoides) studies, providing valuable
samples from Central and South America. Residue from several
thousand blacklight trap samples has been stored in pint jars and
arranged geographically. The first inventory on these collections,
taken June 1974, indicated 10,461 samples (3,146 foreign; 7,315
domestic) on hand. Over 1,000 domestic and 324 foreign samples
have since been added. These samples provide a resource of several
million documented specimens which will provide seasonal and
geographic distribution data, as well as valuable reference
material for taxonomic studies. Every blacklight trap sample is a
unique collection because of the changing factors which affect the
catch (e.g., weather, surroundings, time of year). Each year
hundreds of localities are so ecologically modified that it would
be impossible to duplicate most of these samples. Long after many
natural areas are destroyed, we will have a source of information
on what insects once occurred there. The value of these samples
is emphasized by the fact that several taxonomists have made
special trips to Gainesville in order to study this material.
(8) Revision of the Mexican species of Aphodius (Coleoptera: Scar-
abaeidae) in collaboration with Dr. R. D. Gordon, U.S. National
Museum. Over 2,000 specimens were mounted and labeled from
previous Mexican collections. It is anticipated that there will be
more than 100 species involved in the study. Some time was spent
on this project during a visit to the U.S. National Museum in
March 1974, and some drawings have been completed.






Division of Plant Industry


(9) Survey of the Scarabaeidae of Tall Timbers Research Station,
with special emphasis on their ecology in relation to fire and
habitat management. This project is a small part of the overall
fire ecology studies being conducted at Tall Timbers by its staff
(i.e., W. H. Whiteomb, Donny Harris, Wilson Baker, and Ed &
Roy Komarek). Over 100,000 Scarabaeidae have been collected by
bulk sampling techniques (e.g., blacklight traps, pitfall traps,
Berlese samples) and are now being processed. Many rare and
interesting species have been turned up by these intensive
surveys and will make Tall Timbers one of the best known faunal
areas within the state. Many of the data were recorded in The
Scarab Beetles of Florida.
(10) Cooperative study with the Center for Wetlands (Dr. H. T. Odum)
University of Florida, on a "Cypress Wetland Project." A half-
time technician was provided to process bulk insect samples pre-
paratory to their study and identification. This study involves
comparison between cypress domes into which effluent has been
pumped and natural check domes. The ultimate aim is to deter-
mine if adverse environmental effects result from such wastes
and to explore avenues for disposal of the great quantity of human
wastes. Several thousand vouchered specimens have been added
to the collections as a part of this study.
(11) Special survey for a European dung beetle. In 1973 an unrec-
ognized dung beetle was discovered in south Georgia and north
Florida. It was determined to be a common European species,
Onthophagus taurus, and in September 1975, surveys were con-
ducted in company with Dr. Truman Fincher, Zoologists, USDA,
Parasitology, Tifton Experiment Station, Georgia, and Dr. Fathy
Shalaby of the Egyptian Ministry of Agriculture. It was found
to be widely distributed, although not previously known from
the U.S., and the results were published (see publications).
(12) Arthropods associated with the gopher tortoise (Gopherus
polyphemus). Mr. Ray Ashton, Florida State Museum, requested
identification of arthropods from 10 excavated burrows. This in-
cluded 88 specimens of 39 species. Several previous collections
have been studied and recorded, with much new information.
Preparation has begun on a chapter on arthropod associates, for
inclusion in a book on gopher tortoises to be authored by Drs.
W. A. Auffenberg and James Layne and published by the Uni-
versity of Florida Press.
(13) Citrus weevils of the West Indies. This project is a joint one with
Dr. E. E. Grissell and includes the parasites of the weevils as well.
It was initiated because of the difficulties encountered in ob-
taining chemical controls of the introduced West Indian Dia-
prepes abbreviatus, now a pest of citrus in central Florida. During
the biennium 3 trips were made (2 to Jamaica and 1 to the
Dominican Republic) to obtain weevils and their parasites. As a






Thirty-first Biennial Report


result several thousand weevils of several species were obtained
for taxonomic studies and egg parasites were brought back alive
for culture (see Grissell's report elsewhere). The project involves
clarifying the nomenclature of this group of weevils in order to
have a firm base for parasite work and for basic information to
use in any biological control program. Additional collecting is
anticipated in other West Indian islands, and museum study will
be required to complete the project.
(14) Survey of Arthropods of the proposed Cross Florida Barge Canal
routes. This survey was a part of an overall study funded by the
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers through the Florida Game &
Fresh Water Fish Commission. The basic purpose was to sample
the fauna as thoroughly as possible (primarily by bulk sampling
techniques and such as blacklight traps, Malaise traps, Berlese
funnels, and pitfalls) and then to make an assessment of the im-
pact the canal might have on the fauna, with special emphasis
on the endangered species found.
The study got underway about 1 April 1975, and sampling
continued through May, 1976. Support for the project was termi-
nated on 1 February 1976, and reports were submitted at that
time. The great quantities of specimens (well over 1 million) and
the great diversity require the services of many taxonomic spec-
ialists. Only a few groups of insects were completely studied (es-
pecially Scarabaeidae by Woodruff and water beetles by Dr.
F. N. Young) and these included 25,813 specimens.
As a result of this survey, vouchered samples are now avail-
able for study, regardless of the decisions relative to completion
of the Cross Florida Barge Canal. Most environmental impact
statements concerning rare or endangered species of Arthropods
are difficult to make because the fauna is so incompletely known.
Studies such as this one at least provide base data for future
taxonomic, zoogeographic, and ecological studies for use in
making environmental impact statements.

E. E. GRISSELL, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Survey of egg parasites of Diaprepes abbreviatus and related
weevils.
(2) Torymidae section of revised Catalog of Hymenoptera of America
north of Mexico (completed).
(3) Taxonomy and world catalog of Torymidae.
(4) Study of the genus Rileya and world Rileyinae (Eurytomidae).
(5) Taxonomy of Tanaostigmatidae.
(6) Nesting biology of Pterocheilus texanus (Eumenidae) (completed).
(7) Nesting biologies of Pluto new species and Prionyx thomae
(Sphecidae).
(8) Behavior of Sparasion sp. (Scelionidae).







Division of Plant Industry


(9) Survey of salt marsh insects and preparation of guide to Hymen-
optera of eastern United States salt marshes (guide to be pub-
lished by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration).

H. V. WEEMS, JR., Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Continuation of a taxonomic and ecological study of the Syr-
phidae of Cranberry Glades, a large disjunct bog in Monongahela
National Forest of West Virginia.
(2) Continuation of a long-range study of the taxonomy and ecology
of the Syrphidae of Mexico, especially Volucellinae, involving
occasional trips during the several seasons of the year.
(3) Continuation of a taxonomic and ecological study of the
Syrphidae of the southern escarpments of the Appalachian Pla-
teau.
(4) Preparation of a publication on the genus Salphingogaster, family
Syrphidae, based on a study made jointly with Dr. Lloyd V.
Knutson.
(5) Participation in a faunal survey of fire ecology and habitat man-
agement study of the arthropods of Tall Timbers Research Sta-
tion and the surrounding wooded areas of northern Leon County.
(6) Preparation of an illustrated bulletin on arthropod groups, pri-
marily pertaining to their identification, habitat relationships,
seasonal and geographic distribution, and techniques for collect-
ing them with emphasis on Florida.
(7) Preparation of an illustrated bulletin on the Florida State Col-
lection of Arthropods and the Research Associates Program
which supports its development and publications on arthropods.
(8) Accumulation of material for an eventual illustrated bulletin on
fruit flies and related groups.
(9) Identification of Syrphidae for other individuals and institutions
as a part of the process of further building a research collection
of Syrphidae and a more thorough knowledge of this family of
flies, especially those of the Nearctic and Neotropical Regions.
(10) Visit other institutions in North and Central America which
maintain substantial arthropod collections in order to observe
curatorial techniques, arrange exchanges of specimens, and
study collections in specific areas of taxonomic interest and re-
sponsibility.
(11) Make occasional field trips to conduct special insect surveys, to
collect material for taxonomic study in special interest groups
(especially Syrphidae), and/or make general collections for the
Florida State Collection of Arthropods.
(12) Conduct exchanges of reference material to make the Florida
collection more complete. A special continuing effort is being
made to obtain representatives of the principal arthropod pests
occurring in other pasts of the world which constitute a potential
threat to Florida agriculture. This will materially aid staff spec-






Thirty-first Biennial Report


ialists in making more rapid, accurate, and complete identifica-
tions. It also provides additional material for taxonomic research,
display, and teaching purposes.
(13) Examination of samples taken from insect flight traps, light
traps, and several kinds of baited traps located in various parts
of Florida and from those operated by collaborators in various
foreign lands, notably the Bahamas, the West Indies, Mexico, and
Central America. Valuable material obtained from these traps is
processed and added to the Florida State Collection of
Arthropods, and some specimens of special interest are noted in
the TRI-OLOGY Technical Report.
(14) Experiments with designs for more effective insect flight traps
and field testing of these traps.
(15) Prepare the arthropods portion of the manuscript concerning the
rare and endangered plants and animals of Florida, with assist-
ance from the members of the Special Committee.
(16) A continuing special effort is being made to develop complete sets
of the entomological publications of some of the most important
and most prolific dipterists; similar efforts are being made to
develop the reprint files for the various other groups.
(17) Extensive renovation, reidentification, and relabelling of the
large collection of Mallophaga purchased from Mr. Harold S.
Peters.

Job Related Activities
H. A. DENMARK, Chief of Entomology
(1) Member, Agricultural Growth in An Urban Age Committee.
(2) Member, Search Committee for replacement of Dr. W. G. Eden.
(3) Member of Citrus Blackfly Technical Committee.
(4) Chairman, Arthropod Introduction Committee.
(5) President, USDA Club 1974.
(6) Professor (courtesy appointment), University of Florida, IFAS,
Department of Entomology and Nematology.

G. W. DEKLE, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Associate Professor (courtesy appointment), University of
Florida, IFAS, Department of Entomology and Nematology.
(2) Instructor of Entomology Taxon, University of Florida, IFAS,
Department of Entomology and Nematology.
(3) Member, Entomology In Action Committee, Florida Entomo-
logical Society 1974-1976.

E. E. GRISSELL, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Assistant Professor (courtesy appointment), University of
Florida, IFAS, Department of Entomology and Nematology. On
PhD Committee of one graduate student.






Division of Plant Industry


(2) Member, Editorial Committee, Division of Plant Industry.
(3) Associate Editor, "The Florida Entomologist."

R. E. WOODRUFF, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Assistant Professor (courtesy appointment), University of
Florida, IFAS, Department of Entomology and Nematology.
(2) Associate Editor, Florida Entomologist, quarterly journal of the
Florida Entomological Society, until 1975 (after 6 years service).
(3) Editor, The Coleopterists Bulletin, international quarterly journal
of the Coleopterists Society, until December 1975 (after 5 years
service).
(4) Nominated for president, the Coleopterists Society, election to be
held August 1976.
(5) Merit badge counselor (Nature Study), Boy Scouts of America.
(6) Editorial Board, Insect World Digest, bimonthly journal pub-
lished by the Biological Research Institute of America.
(7) Prepared display of original artwork to be presented at Inter-
national Congress of Entomology, Washington, D.C., in August
1976; included the official symbol to be used for the Congress.
(8) Advisory Board, North American Beetle Fauna Project, Bio-
logical Research Institute of America.
(9) Contributing Author and Family Coordinator (Scarabaeidae),
Checklist of North American Beetles, to be published by the
Biological Research Institute of America.
(10) Field Associate in Entomology, Florida State Museum, Gaines-
ville, Fla.
(11) Elected to membership in 1975 to the Council of Biology Editors,
the organization responsible for writing the style manual used by
most scientific journals.
(12) Member, Color Standards committee, The Coleopterists Society
(report in Ent. Soc. Amer. Bull. 22 (1): 76-79).
(13) Chairman, Nominating Committee, Florida Entomological Soc-
iety, 1976.
(14) Chairman, Special By-Laws Committee, Florida Entomological
Society, 1975.

F. W. MEAD, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Adjunct Associate Professor, University of Florida, IFAS, De-
partment of Entomology and Nematology.
(2) Secretary, Florida Entomological Society, 1974-76.
(3) Representative from Florida to annual workshop on Insect Sur-
vey and Losses in the Southeastern Branch, Entomological Soc-
iety of America.

H. V. WEEMS, JR., Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Associate Editor, Florida Entomologist, quarterly journal of the
Florida Entomological Society.






Thirty-first Biennial Report 53

(2) Professor (courtesy appointment), University of Florida, IFAS,
Department of Entomology and Nematology.
(3) Vice President and Program Chairman, Florida Entomological
Society, 1974-75; President, Florida Entomological Society, 1975-
76.
(4) Chairman, Special Committee on Insects and Terrestrial Inverte-
brates, Florida Committee on Rare and Endangered Plants and
Animals.
(5) Member, "Work Group" on "Development of Criteria for Eval-
uation of Collections," part of a larger Committee on Systematics
Resources, Entomological Society of America.
(6) Acting institutional representative, Association of Systematics
Collections.
(7) Institutional representative and Florida Entomological Society,
Head Lice Transmission and Treatment Symposium, Miami,
Florida, 26 January 1976.

Trips and Meetings
August 10-26, 1974: Arthropod collection trip to western North Carolina
and West Virginia (H. V. Weems, Jr. on annual leave).
August 16-17: Meeting of the Florida Committee on Rare and Endangered
Plants and Animals in Florida, University of South Florida, Tampa
(R. E. Woodruff).
September 4-6: Florida Entomological Society Annual Meeting, Orlando
(G. W. Dekle, H. A. Denmark, F. W. Mead, H. V. Weems, Jr., R. E.
Woodruff).
September 11-13: FDACS Annual Conference, Tallahassee (H. A. Den-
mark, F. W. Mead, H. V. Weems, Jr.).
September 26-27: Regulatory meeting re Diaprepes, Winter Haven (R. E.
Woodruff).
October 6: Cacao germ plasm meeting, Washington, D.C. (H. A. Den-
mark).
November 5-8: Florida State Horticultural Society Annual Meeting,
Miami Beach (G. W. Dekle, H. A. Denmark, H. V. Weems, Jr.).
November 19-20: Regional Inspectors Workshop, Tavares (R. E. Wood-
ruff).
December 1-6: Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting, Min-
neapolis, Minn. (G. W. Dekle, H. A. Denmark, H. V. Weems, Jr.).
December 5: Regional Inspectors Workshop, Winter Haven (R. E. Wood-
ruff).
December 10: Better Fruits Spray Program meeting, Lake Alfred (H. A.
Denmark).
December 16-26: California Academy of Sciences, University of California
(Division of Biological Control), California Department of Agricul-
ture (E. E. Grissell).
January 22, 1975: National Tropical Foliage Short Course, Orlando (G. W.
Dekle, H. A. Denmark).
January 22: Inter-agency conference to evaluate needs and availability of






54 Division of Plant Industry

museum scientific services, Florida State Museum, Gainesville, R. E.
Woodruff).
January 27-30: Entomological Society of America, Southeastern Branch
Annual Meeting, Raleigh, N.C. (F. W. Mead).
February 18-20: Survey of the South American leaf beetle, Microtheca
ochroloma, at Tampa and Oviedo (R. E. Woodruff).
March 16-19: Archbold Biological Station for conference with Committee
on Endangered Species of Plants and Animals of Florida and arthro-
pod collecting (H. V. Weems, Jr.).
March 20-22: Florida Academy of Sciences Annual Meeting, Lakeland
(H. V. Weems, Jr.).
March 31-April 11: Tucson, Arizona to pick up Asilidae and Leptogas-
tridae collection of Dr. C. H. Martin and visit LSU, Texas A & M
University, University of Texas, University of Arizona, and several
Research Associates (H. V. Weems, Jr.).
March 17-18: Tall Timbers Research Station for review of pitfall trapping
program, Tallahassee (R. E. Woodruff).
March 31-April 8: Jamaica, in search of citrus weevils and their parasites
(E. E. Grissell, R. E. Woodruff).
April 9: Legislative Appreciation Day, Tallahassee (H. A. Denmark).
April 11: Conference on endangered species, Winter Park (R. E. Wood-
ruff).
April 15: Insect survey of the proposed Cross Florida Barge Canal routes,
Ocala and vicinity (R. E. Woodruff).
May 8-11: Annual meeting of the (American) Association of Systematics
Collections, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York (H. V. Weems, Jr.).
May 15-June 2: U.S. National Museum, Washington, D.C. to identify
parasitic Hymenoptera (E. E. Grissell).
May 18-20: Annual meeting of the Council of Biological Editors, Gaines-
ville (H. V. Weems, Jr., R. E. Woodruff).
May 20: IFAS Agricultural Field Day, Bradenton (G. W. Dekle, H. A.
Denmark).
June 7-July 6: Trip to Mexico and the southwestern U.S. (H. V. Weems,
Jr. on annual leave).
June 9-22: Jamaica, citrus root weevil egg parasite survey (E. E. Grissell,
R. E. Woodruff).
June 18: Interagency Endangered Species meeting, Tallahassee (H. A.
Denmark).
July 7-11: Studying Scarabaeidae at University of Arizona, Tucson (R. E.
Woodruff).
July 30-August 6: Chi Phi Fraternity Annual Congress, Asheville, N.C.;
visited Research Associates Col. Lester Lampert in Asheville and Mr.
Willi Rosenberg in Waynesville; collected insects at Lake Junaluska
(H. V. Weems, Jr. on annual leave).
August 13-14: Surveying for European dung beetle, Tall Timbers Re-
search Station, Tallahassee and vicinity (R. E. Woodruff accompanied
by Dr. T. Finsher and Dr. F. Shalaby).






Thirty-first Biennial Report


August 19: Public hearing on Cross Florida Barge Canal, Jacksonville
(R. E. Woodruff).
September 3-5: Florida Entomological Society Annual Meeting, Gaines-
ville (G. W. Dekle, H. A. Denmark, F. W. Mead, E. E. Grissell, H. V.
Weems, Jr., R. E. Woodruff).
November 4-7: Florida State Horticultural Society Annual Meeting, Or-
lando (H. A. Denmark, H. V. Weems, Jr.).
November 29-December 4: Entomological Society of America Annual
Meeting, New Orleans, La. (G. W. Dekle, H. A. Denmark, F. W. Mead,
R. E. Woodruff).
December 11-22: Trip to Tuscon, Arizona topick up remainder of Dr.
C. H. Martin's collection and visit Research Associates in Albuquer-
que, New Mexico; Witchita Falls, Texas; and Clinton, Miss. (H. V.
Weems, Jr.).
December 15-January 2, 1976: Lecture and laboratory on parasitic
Hymenoptera to graduate students and faculty at Rutgers Univer-
sity; field trip to New Jersey salt marsh; visited University of Dela-
ware and USDA Beneficial Insects Introduction Laboratory in Wash-
ington, D.C. (E. E. Grissell).
January 12-14: National Tropical Foliage Short Course, Orlando (G. W.
Dekle).
January 15: Indian River Citrus Seminar, Cocoa Beach (R. E. Woodruff).
January 25-28: Trip to Archbold Biological Station; Head Lice Trans-
mission and Treatment Symposium, in Miami; Subtropical Exper-
iment Station; visits with several Research Associates of the FSCA
(H. V. Weems, Jr.).
February 6: Citrus Blackfly Meeting, Ft. Lauderdale (H. A. Denmark).
February 9-10: Citrus Blackfly Meeting, Ft. Lauderdale (H. A. Denmark).
February 17-21: Citrus Blackfly Survey, Ft. Lauderdale (F. W. Mead).
February 18-19: Citrus Blackfly Meeting, Lakeland (H. A. Denmark).
February 23-27: Citrus Blackfly Survey, Ft. Lauderdale (E. E. Grissell).
February 26-March 14: Field trip to Cali, Colombia to collect with Univ-
ersity of Florida graduate student, Mr. Richard W. Wilkerson, a
Student Associate of the FSCA (H. V. Weems on annual leave).
March 18: Diaprepes Meeting with USDA, IFAS, and DPI, Lake Alfred
(R. E. Woodruff).
March 23-25: Citrus Blackfly Survey, Ft. Lauderdale (H. A. Denmark).
March 28-April 2: Trip to Baton Rouge, Louisiana to pick up part of the
Diplopoda collection of Dr. Nell B. Causey and obtain donated orbitid
mite collection and library from Dr. J. P. Woodring. Visited Research
Associates Mr. Gayle T. Stickland and Mr. Vernon A. Brou (H. V.
Weems, Jr.).
March 29-April 3: Citrus Blackfly Survey in Texas and Mexico to eval-
uate chemical and biological control (H. A. Denmark).
April 5-6: Citrus Blackfly Meeting, Winter Haven (H. A. Denmark).
April 8: Survey for European dung beetle, Madison (R. E. Woodruff).






Division of Plant Industry


April 17-24: Texas A & M University, College Station, to identify Hymen-
optera (E. E. Grissell).
May 12: Citrus Blackfly Meeting, Orlando (H. A. Denmark).
May 13-16: Annual meeting of the Association of Systematics Collections,
Blacksburg, Virginia and visited Department of Entomology at Vir-
ginia Tech. (H. V. Weems, Jr.)
May 24-28: Citrus blackfly meeting in Orlando; Inspection of incoming
foliage meeting in Miami; review biological control work in Home-
stead; review research work on citrus blackfly in Ft. Lauderdale
(H. A. Denmark).
May 24-28: Citrus Blackfly Survey, Ft. Lauderdale (E. E. Grissell).
June 7-28: Citrus root weevil egg parasite survey, Dominican Republic
(E. E. Grissell, R. E. Woodruff).
June 13-16: Field trip to Northern Mexico, accompanied by Research
Associate, Dr. Charles C. Porter and joined by Prof. & Mrs. James
E. Gillaspy, and another Research Associate, Mr. Terhune S. Dickel
(H. V. Weems, Jr. on annual leave).
June 14-16: Peanut and Soybean Pest Scouting School, Chipola Junior
College, Marianna (F. W. Mead).
June 15-17: Regional Service Centers Meeting, Washington, D.C. (H. A.
Denmark).


Talks
H. A. DENMARK, Chief of Entomology

March 26, 1975: "Biological Control of Insects," WCTV, Tallahassee.
October 2, 1975: "Introduction to Insects" and tour of Entomology
Bureau, 1st Grade, Terwilliger Elementary School, Gainesville.
October 13, 1975: "Damage of Forest Trees by Mites," Lake City
Junior College, Mr. Chris Anderson's class on tour of Ento-
mology Bureau.
November 6, 1975: "Florida State Collection of Arthropods and Its
Importance to Florida Agriculture," Florida State Horticul-
tural Society Annual Meeting, Lake Buena Vista.
February 26, 1976: "Ornamental Insects and Mites," Dr. Charlie
Johnson's Ornamental Horticulture Class, University of Florida,
Gainesville.

G. W. DEKLE, Taxonomic Entomologist

July 11, 1974: "Some Insect Parasites of Ornamentals and Turf,"
Kiwanis Club, Palatka.
July 22, 1974: "Diaspididae, Armored Scale Insects," Univer-
sity of Florida, EY-490 Class, Gainesville.
August 1, 1974: "Diaspididae, Armored Scale Insects," Univer-
sity of Florida, Laboratory EY-490, Gainesville.






Thirty-first Biennial Report


October 9, 1974: "Orchid Insects," Orchid Society, Key West.
November 4, 1974: "Insects, Mites and Other Arthropods That
Attack Orchids," Orchid Society, Sarasota.
November 7, 1974: "Scale Insects-Plant Parasites," Florida
Horticultural Society Annual Meeting, Miami.
November 19, 1974: "Scale Insects on Ornamental Plants," Hi
Neighbor, Channel 12 TV, Jacksonville.
January 23, 1975: "Orchid Insects and Control," Ridge Orchid Society,
Winter Haven.
November 5, 1975: "Soft Scale-Plant Parasites," Florida Horti-
cultural Society Annual Meeting, Lake Buena Vista.
January 8, 1976: "Insects of African Violets," Gainesville African
Violet Society, Gainesville.
February 13, 1976: "Greenhouse Insects," Speedling Grower
Short Course, Sun City.

E. E. GRISSELL, Taxonomic Entomologist

October 9, 1974: "Systematics of Parasitic Hymenoptera," Bio-
logical Control Class, University of Florida, Gainesville.
October 27, 1975: "Stinging Insects Found Around the Home,"
Channel 12 TV, Jacksonville.
November 14, 1975: "Systematics of Parasitic Hymenoptera," Bio-
logical Control Class, University of Florida, Gainesville.
December 17, 1975: "Identifying Parasitic Hymenoptera," In-
sect Systematics Class, Rutgers University, New Brunswick,
New Jersey.
June 2, 1976: "Systematics of Parasitic Hymenoptera," Biological
Control Class, University of Florida, Gainesville.

F. W. MEAD, Taxonomic Entomologist

September 4, 1974: "The European Corn Borer," Florida Entomo-
logical Society Annual Meeting, Orlando.
September 6, 1974: "Unusual Hemiptera Records from Florida,"
Florida Entomological Society Annual Meeting, Orlando.
September 13, 1974: "The European Corn Borer," FDACS Annual
Business Conference, Tallahassee.
September 4, 1975: "The Cooperative Insect Survey in Florida,"
Florida Entomological Society Annual Meeting, Gainesville.
January 28, 1976: "Leafhoppers and Their Economic Importance,"
Hi Neighbor, Channel 12 TV, Jacksonville.

H. V. WEEMS, JR., Taxonomic Entomologist

July 22, 1974: "Termites," Station WCTV, Tallahassee.
July 15, 1975: "Endangered and Threatened Species of Arthropods
in Florida," Channel 12 TV, Jacksonville.






Division of Plant Industry


July 28, 1975: "Florida State Collection of Arthropods," Channel 12
TV, Jacksonville.
September 4, 1975: "Environmental Protection and Endangered and
Threatened Arthropods," Florida Entomological Society Annual
Meeting, Gainesville.
October 2, 1975: "Arthropods," visiting 1st Grade from Terwilliger
Elementary School, Gainesville.
May 20, 1976: "Work of the Bureau of Entomology," Dr. Charlie
Johnson's Horticulture Class, University of Florida, on tour of
arthropod museum, Gainesville.

R. E. WOODRUFF, Taxonomic Entomologist

September 6, 1974: "Scolytid Beetle Control in Propagation Cane of
Dracaena fragrans 'Massangeana,"' joint paper with R. A.
Hamlen, Florida Entomological Society Annual Meeting,
Orlando.
January 23, 1975: "Florida State Collection of Arthropods," and tour
of Entomology Bureau (2 groups for 1 hour each), Dr. James
Lloyd's Entomology Class, University of Florida, Gainesville.
January, 1975: "Diaprepes" Slide Talk organized for use of Technical
Assistance at Florida State Fair, Tampa.
August 25, 1975: "Arthropod Survey of the Cross Florida Barge Canal
Routes," Hi Neighbor, Channel 12 TV, Jacksonville.
September 10, 1975: "The Citrus Weevil Situation," Florida Citrus
Growers' Institute, Sebring.
January 15, 1976: "The Weevil Situation," Indian River Seminar,
Cocoa Beach.


Awards
G. W. DEKLE, Taxonomic Entomologist

35 Year Certificate of Appreciation, Florida Department of Agricul-
ture and Consumer Services.

F. W. MEAD, Taxonomic Entomologist

Recipient from the Florida Entomological Society of "Certificate of
Appreciation for services rendered in the field of entomology" at
the 58th Annual Meeting, September 4, 1975.


Publications
Dekle, G. W., L. C. Kuitert, and D. E. Short. 1974. Orchid insects control
and four major pests. Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant
Ind., Ent. Circ. 150. 4 fig. (Revision of Ent. Circ. 65)






Thirty-first Biennial Report


., and L. C. Kuitert. 1975. Camellia mining scale, Duplaspidiotus
claviger (Cockerell) (Diaspididae: Homoptera). Fla. Dept. Agric. &
Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 152. 4 p., 9 fig. (Revision of
Ent. Circ. 1)
and J. B. Heppner (senior author). 1975. Mimosa webworm,
Homadaula anisocentra Meyricle (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae). Fla.
Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 157.2 p., 2
fig. (Revision of Ent. Circ. 14).
1976. Green scale, Coccus viridis (Green) (Coccidae: Homoptera).
Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 165.2
p., 2 fig.
1976. Illustrated key to caterpillars on corn. Fla. Dept. Agric.
& Cons. Serv., Div. Plant Ind., bull. 4. 16 p., 21 fig. (Revised)
1976. Armored Scale Insects of Florida. Fla. Dept. Agric. & Con-
sumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Arthropods of Florida and Neighboring
Land Areas 3:1-358; 280 fig.
Denmark, H. A. 1974. Two new species of phytoseiid mites from Wisconsin
apple orchards (Mesostigmata: Phytoseiidae). Fla. Ent. 57(2):145-148,
12 fig.
1974. Boxwood budmite, Phytoptus canestrinii Nalepa, in Florida
(Acarina: Eriophyidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div.
Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 147. 1 p., 5 fig.
__ 1974. Kenneth E. Bragdon (1886-1974). Fla. Ent. 57(3):224.
57(3):224.
1975. A false spider mite, Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes),
damage to aphelandra (Acarina: Tenuipalpidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. &
Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 154. 1 p., 2 fig.
and E. Schicha. 1975. A new species of Amblyseius Berlese
(Acarina: Phytoseiidae) from apple in Australia. Proc. Linn. Soc.
N.S.W. 99(3):145-150.
__ and E. Schicha. 1975. A new species of Phytoseius Ribaga
(Acarina: Phytoseiidae) from apple in Australia. Proc. Linn. Soc.
N.S.W. 99(4):177-180.
1975. A persimmon gall mite, Eriophyes theospyri (K.) (Acarina:
Eriophyidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind.,
Circ. 159. 1 p., 5 fig.
__ and Martin H. Muma. 1975. the Phytoseiidae (Acarina:
Mesostigmata) of Puerto Rico. Jour. Agric. Univ. Puerto Rico 59(4):
279-304.
__ 1975. Florida State Collection of Arthropods and its importance
to Florida agriculture. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 88:525-526.
__ Martin H. Muma (senior author), and Allen G. Selhime. 1975.
An annotated list of predators and parasites associated with insects
and mites on Florida citrus. Fla. Agric. Exp. Sta. Bull. 634B. 46 p.
and H. V. Weems, Jr. 1976. The Florida State Collection of
Arthropods. Assn. Systematics Coll. Newsletter 4(1):1-2; 1 fig.
__ William A. Phillis (senior author), and H. L. Cromroy. 1976.
New host and distribution records for the mite genera Dermanyssus,






Division of Plant Industry


Ornithonyssus and Pellonyssus (Acari: Mesostigmata: Laelapoidea) in
Florida. Fla. Ent. 59(1):89-92.
and H. H. Keifer (senior author). 1976. Eriophyes lantanae
Cook (Acarina: Eriophyidae) in Florida. Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer
Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 166. 2 p., 9 fig.
Grissell, E. E. 1974. The Eumenes, or potter wasps, of Florida. Fla. Dept.
Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 146. 2 p., 4 fig.
-_ 1974. A new Dibrachys with a key to the Neartic species. Fla.
Ent. 57:313-320.
J. R. McGraw (senior author), and R. C. Wilkinson. 1974.
Hymenopterous parasites of Rhyacionia spp. in Florida. Fla. Ent.
57:326.
1975. The Zethus of Florida (Hymenoptera: Eumenidae). Fla.
Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 153.
2p., 3 fig.
1975. Ethology and larva of Pterocheilus texanus (Hymenoptera:
Eumenidae). J. Kansas Ent. Soc. 48:244-253.
- and R. M. Bohart (senior author). 1975. California wasps of the
subfamily Philanthinae (Hymentoptera: Sphecidae). Bull. Calif.
Insect Survey 19:1-92.
-- 1975. The carpenter bees of Florida. I. Xylocopa. Fla. Dept.
Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 160. 2 p., 6 fig.
-- and C. Goodpasture (senior author). 1975. A karyological study
of nine species of Torymus (Hymenoptera: Torymidae). Can. J. Genet.
Cytol. 17:413-422.
-_ and R. M. Bohart (senior author). 1976. Pemphredoninae. In
Bohart, R. M. and A. S. Menke, Sphecid wasps of the world, a generic
revision. University of California Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles,
p. 155-201.
Grissell, E. E. 1976. The carpenter bees of Florida. II. Ceratina
(Hymenoptera: Apidae: Xylocopinae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer
Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 167. 2 p., 5 fig.
Mead, F. W., and J. L. Herring. 1974. A cactus bug, Chelinidea vittiger
aequoris McAtee, in Florida (Hemiptera: Coreidae). Fla. Dept. Agric.
& Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 149. 2 p., 1 fig.
1975. Annual summary of economic insects in Florida, 1974. Fla.
Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., 40 p.
and D. H. Habeck (senior author). 1975. Lantana lace bug
Teleonemia scrupulosa Stal (Hemiptera: Tingidae). Fla. Dept. Agric.
& Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 156. 2 p., 4 fig.
1975. The fringetree lace bug, Leptoypha mutica (Say)
(Hemiptera: Tingidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div.
Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 161. 2 p., 4 fig.
1976. Annual summary of economic insects in Florida, 1975. Fla.
Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., 44 p.
__ 1976. The South African citrus psyllid, Trioza erytreae (Del
Guercio) (Homoptera: Psyllidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv.,
Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 161. 4 p., 2 fig.






Thirty-first Biennial Report


Weems, H. V., Jr., and H. F. Loomis. 1974. Oxidus gracitis (Koch) and
Orthomorpha coarctata (Saussure), two milliped pests in Florida. Fla.
Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 145. 2 p.,
4 fig.
__ and William G. Genung (senior author). 1974. A grass stem
infesting otitid fly (Diptera: Otitidae). Fla. Ent. 57(3):308.
__ 1975. Orange spiny whitefly, Aleurocanthus spiniferus (Quaint-
ance) (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv.,
Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 151. 2 p., 5 fig.
__ and W. H. Whitcomb. 1975. The brown recluse spider, Loxosceles
reclusa Gertsch and Mulaik (Araneae: Loxoscelidae). Fla. Dept.
Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 158. 2 p., 1 fig.
C. A. Musgrave, and S. L. Poe. 1975. The vegetable leafminer,
Liriomyza sativae Blanchard (Diptera: Agromyzidae), in Florida.
Fla. Agric. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 162. 4 p., 8
fig.
_- and H. A. Denmark (senior author). 1976. The Florida State
Collection of Arthropods. Assn. Systematics Coll. Newsletter 4(1):1-2;
1 fig.
Woodruff, R. E. 1974. A South American leaf beetle pest of crucifers in
Florida (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer
Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 148. 2 p., 5 fig.
and R. A. Hamlen (senior author). 1975. Scolytid beetle control
in cane of Dracaenafragrans 'Massangeana'. J. Econ. Ent. 68(2):231-
232.
__ and G. T. Fincher (senior author). 1975. A European dung beetle
new to the U.S. Coleopterists Bull. 29(4):349-350.
__ 1975. The past five years. Coleopterists Bull. 29(4):209-210.
1975. The tortoise beetles of Florida II, Plagiometriona clavata
(Fab.) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer
Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 155. 2 p., 5 fig.
1976. The tortoise beetles of Florida III, Eurypepla calochroma
floridensis Blake (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. &
Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 163. 2 p., 3 fig.
1976. The tortoise beetles of Florida IV, Metriona bicolor (Fab.)
(Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer Serv.,
Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 164. 2 p., 5 fig.



Florida State Collection of Arthropods
H. V. Weems, Jr., Taxonomic Entomologist
At the third annual meeting of The Association of Systematics Collec-
tions (ASC), held 9 May 1975 on the campus of Cornell University, the
Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, sponsoring
the Florida State Collection of Arthropods, was voted into membership
in the ASC. The ASC was founded 7 July 1972 by unanimous vote of the






62 Division of Plant Industry

Conference of Directors of Systematics Collections. The new association
came into being because the Conference of Directors of Systematics Col-
lections recognized the need for a new and more representative organiza-
tion of institutions concerned with systematics resources and the services
they provide to science and society. The constitution of the association
provides for advisory councils on which there will be representatives
from those communities of science and society utilizing the systematics
resources of the nation. The purpose of the ASC is to foster the care,
management, preservation, and improvement of systematics collections
and to facilitate their utilization in science and society by: providing
representation for institutions housing systematics collections; encourag-
ing direct interaction among those concerned with systematics collections
and their use; providing a forum for consideration of mutual problems;
and promoting the role of systematics collections in research, education,
and public service through coordination of information concerning needs
of users, planning and implementation of advisory services, and develop-
ment and implementation of national goals and priorities. Membership in
the ASC is open to any non-profit institution in the United States of
America maintaining systematics collections and giving satisfactory
evidence that its collections are permanently housed and curated, main-
tained to satisfactory standards, managed by a permanent staff of trained
scientific personnel, used in support of research and the publication there-
of, and accessible to science and society. The ASC has rapidly emerged
as the principal American organization of institutions, with associate
members in Canada and Mexico, that maintain significant systematics
collections of plants and animals as part of their resources. An illus-
trated article titled "The Florida State Collection of Arthropods," written
by H. A. Denmark and H. V. Weems, Jr., appeared in volume IV, number
1 of the Association of Systematics Collections Newsletter, published in
February 1976. According to the Entomological Society of America's
advisory committee report, the FSCA is the largest collection of arthro-
pods in the southeastern United States. The library which supports this
collection also is the most complete in the southeastern United States.
An outstanding collection was purchased for the Florida State Collec-
tion of Arthropods jointly by the University of Florida and the Florida
Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. The Asilidae and
Leptogastridae collections of Dr. Charles H. Martin of Tucson, Arizona
were purchased, and Dr. Martin donated 265 Schmitt boxes (insect stor-
age boxes), together with miscellaneous files and a portion of his personal
library; his wife subsequently donated an additional 16 insect storage
boxes. The Martin Collection, numbering 30,749 pinned, labelled speci-
mens, and rich in type material, is an outstanding research collection of
Asilidae and Leptogastridae from all of the major continents of the world
and various island areas.
Dr. Nell B. Causey, a world-renown authority on Diplopoda and for
many years a Research Associate of the FSCA, retired in April 1976
following a teaching career in the Zoology and Physiology Department
of Louisiana State University. At that time Dr. Causey donated to the






Thirty-first Biennial Report


FSCA approximately half of her extensive collection of millipeds, world-
wide in scope. Dr. Causey retained the remainder of her collection in order
to continue her taxonomic research on Diplopoda. We anticipate, however,
that eventually Dr. Causey will deposit the remainder of her collection
in the FSCA, together with her taxonomic library. This collection, rich
in type material, is one of the outstanding diplopod collections in the
world. A detailed inventory on that portion received for the FSCA is given
in the section of this report titled "Major Contributions to the Florida
State Collections of Arthropods."
During the biennium a special project was completed-the complete
renovation of the FSCA's collection of Mallophaga consisting of 4,486 slide
mounts representing 8 families, 107 genera, and 382 species. This entire
collection was studied and reidentified by Dr. K. C. Emerson, after which
the entire collection was relabelled by Mrs. Ernestine Mercer.


Major Contributions to the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods
Dr. Thomas R. Ashley (4631 N. W. 30 Street, Gainesville, Florida 32605)
995 pinned, labelled, unidentified arthropods (43 exotic, 952 domestic)
consisting of: 1 scorpion, 1 tarantula, 6 Dermaptera, 27 Orthoptera,
5 Homoptera, 68 Hemiptera, 46 Diptera, 148 Hymenoptera, 596 Cole-
optera, 65 Neuroptera (wings spread), and 32 Lepidoptera (wings
spread); much of this material is from the Western United States,
and it includes representatives of several species new to the FSCA.
Donated with this neatly processed collection were 13 new insect
storage boxes (black, cardboard); 215 vials of insects (1 Thysanura,
2 Collembola, 6 Ephemeroptera, 22 Odonata, 5 Orthoptera, 6 Isoptera,
2 Plecoptera, 2 Dermaptera, 2 Embioptera, 1 Psocoptera, 2 Thysanop-
tera, 18 Hemiptera, 7 Homoptera, 6 Neuroptera, 42 Coleoptera, 4
Trichoptera, 36 Lepidoptera, 21 Diptera, and 30 Hymenoptera), in-
cluding 66 vials of identified domestic insects (108 specimens identi-
fied to genera, 387 specimens identified to species), 131 vials,
containing 1,468 unidentified, domestic specimens, and 18 vials con-
taining 228 exotic, unidentified specimens.

*Dr. R. M. Baranowski (Entomologist, University of Florida, IFAS, Agri-
culture Research & Education Center, 18905 S. W. 289th Street, Rt. 1,
Homestead, Florida 33030) 62 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects
(37 from Jamaica, 21 from Trinidad, and 4 from Florida), all collected
by the donor.

Dr. Fred D. Bennett (Commonwealth Institute of Biological Control, West
Indian Station, Gordon Street, Curepe, Trinidad, West Indies)
42 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects collected by the donor in
Trinidad.
*Research Associate of the Florida State Collection of Arthropods.






Division of Plant Industry


*Mr. Dale R. Birkenmeyer (Metabolism & Radiation Research Labora-
tory, USDA, ARS, State University Station, Fargo, North Dakota
58102.
47 quarts (in sealed cans) of alcohol-preserved ultraviolet light trap
collections of insects taken by the donor in Minnesota and Georgia.

*Dr. F. S. Blanton (Professor Emeritus, Dept. of Entomology & Nema-
tology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
2,124 pill boxes of miscellaneous insects, mostly Culicidae (1,278 pill
boxes of identified specimens and 846 pill boxes of unidentified speci-
mens), from Florida, Panama, Trinidad, Puerto Rico, Guatemala,
Nicaragua, Honduras, El Salvador, and Cuba; 29 slide mounts of
Culicidae (11 from Florida, 18 exotic); 225 vials of Culicidae from
Costa Rica; 442 pinned, labelled insects consisting of 46 identified
exotic insects (miscellaneous) and 396 domestic insects (93 uniden-
tified, 303 unlabelled, identified insects, mostly Culicidae); 374 slide
mounts of identified Ceratopogonidae (76 domestic, 220 exotic), in-
cluding 46 paratypes, representing 76 species (7 domestic, 69 exotic);
40 slide boxes containing 4,000 slide-mounted, identified Ceratopo-
gonidae from Central America, South America, and Florida; 8 mos-
quito trap samples of insects from Florida.
*Mr. Vernon A. Brou, Jr. (Rt. 1, Box 74, Edgard, Louisiana 70049)
10,008 pinned, labelled insects (10,002 collected in Louisiana by the
donor; 6 exotic) consisting of 372 Odonata (141 spread, 231 unspread),
44 Trichoptera, 74 Neuroptera, 12 Ephemeroptera, 6 Isoptera, 137
Orthoptera, 722 Hemiptera, 466 Homoptera, 477 Hymenoptera, 1,002
Diptera, 2,574 Coleoptera, 3,288 Lepidoptera (3,599 spread, deter-
mined; 96 spread, undetermined; 418 unspread, determined; 9 un-
spread, undetermined), including 4,017 Lepidoptera determined to
species.

*Dr. Nell B. Causey (922 Park Avenue, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701)
7,058 vials and bottles of alcohol-preserved arthropods containing
10,445 unidentified, domestic specimens; 4,166 unidentified exotic
specimens; 4,287 identified, domestic specimens; 863 identified, exotic
specimens (1 vial of Crustacea: Isopoda containing 3 exotic specimens;
7 vials of other Crustacea containing 35 exotic specimens; 3 vials of
Arachnida: Scorpionida containing 2 domestic and 7 exotic speci-
mens; 4 vials of Arachnida: Acarina containing 4 exotic specimens;
88 vials of Arachnida: Araneida containing 28 domestic and 60 exotic
specimens; 731 vials and bottles of Chilopoda containing 969 domestic,
unidentified, 49 domestic, identified, 1 exotic identified, and 298 exotic
unidentified specimens; 6,224 vials and bottles of Diplopoda containing
9,446 domestic, unidentified, 4,238 domestic, identified, 3,759 exotic,
unidentified, and 862 exotic, identified specimens). This collection
also contained 37 vials of Diplopoda (39 identified and 44 unidentified)
and 38 vials of Chilopoda (46 identified and 13 unidentified) without






Thirty-first Biennial Report


locality data. In addition there were 129 assorted insects mixed in
with the Diplopoda & Chilopoda, both domestic and exotic. The fol-
lowing type specimens were part of the collection: 19 domestic and
1 exotic holotypes, 1 domestic allotype, 47 domestic paratypes, 1 do-
mestic topoparatype, 64 domestic and 3 exotic topotypes, and 31 do-
mestic and 55 exotic specimens labelled "type."

*Mr. Terhune S. Dickel (1652 N.W. 9th Avenue, Homestead, Florida
33030)
120 neatly pinned, spread, labelled, identified Lepidoptera repre-
senting 3 rarely collected Florida species; 101 Chlorostrymon simae-
this sarita (Skinner), 13 Danaus eresimus tethys Forbes, and 6 Meta-
morpha stelenes biplagiata Linnaeus (the malachite); 351 pinned,
neatly spread, labelled Lepidoptera representing 13 species of butter-
flies collected in Florida and Colorado by the donor; 194 pinned,
labelled, neatly spread, identified species and subspecies, some of
them very rare in collections, collected by the donor in Florida, Colo-
rado, Wyoming, Montana, Arizona, Pennsylvania, North Carolina,
and Alaska (13 specimens).

*Dr. Norville M. Downie (505 Lingle Terrace, Lafayette, Indiana 47901)
510 envelopes containing 1,568 identified Coleoptera collected by the
donor in Indiana, Idaho, and British Columbia, (24 envelopes contain-
ing 141 beetles were from B. C.); 1,022 envelopes with collection data
containing 2,358 specimens representing 1,022 species of Coleoptera
representing 52 families collected by the donor in Indiana, Illinois,
Florida, Ontario, and British Columbia.

*Mr. Boyce A. Drummond, III (graduate student), (Dept. of Zoology,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
84 ultraviolet light trap samples and 28 insect flight trap samples
of insects collected by the donor in Ecuador.

Prof. L. M. Ehrhart (Dept. of Biological Sciences, Florida Technological
University, Box 25000, Orlando, Florida 32816)
174 vials of arthropods which are ecto- or endoparasites of vertebrate
animals (consisting of the following vials: 1 Diptera larva, 29 Si-
phonaptera, 1 Mallophaga, 148 Acarina (15 mites, 133 ticks)), accom-
panied by host data, collected in the course of an ecological survey on
Merritt Island, Florida, by the donor and associates.

*Dr. Thomas C. Emmel (Dept. of Zoology, University of Florida, Gaines-
ville, Florida 32611)
5,400 pinned, spread, labelled, identified Lepidoptera from Mexico,
including the Yucatan Peninsula, British Honduras, Guatemala, Ec-
uador, and Costa Rica.






Division of Plant Industry


*Dr. G. B. Fairchild (16 N.W. 22nd Drive, Gainesville, Florida 32603)
230 ultraviolet light trap (some CO2-baited samples of insects (Flor-
ida, 182; Grand Bahama Island, 2; Nova Scotia, Canada, 46) collected
by the donor and assistants; 61 envelopes (48 envelopes of Lepidoptera
from England, Argentina, Panama; 13 envelopes of Diptera, Hy-
menoptera, Odonata, Lepidoptera, & miscellaneous insects from Nova
Scotia, Canada); 1 pill box of miscellaneous insects from Florida;
5,427 pinned insects consisting of 4,098 labelled specimens (3,862
Diptera, including 3,479 determined Tabanidae (Fla., 185; India, 52;
Panama & Colombia, 3,242); 151 Coleoptera; 25 Hymenoptera; 7
Neuroptera; 30 Lepidoptera; 1 Homoptera; 7 Hemiptera; 1 Orthop-
tera; 14 Trichoptera) and 1,329 unlabelled specimens (1,086 Diptera;
101 Coleoptera; 11 Hemiptera; 1 Homoptera; 66 Lepidoptera; 30 Hy-
menoptera; 11 Orthoptera; 12 Neuroptera, 4 Plecoptera; 2 Mecoptera;
5 Trichoptera). The pinned material included 3,637 specimens identi-
fied to species, 23 specimens with wings spread, and 4,009 exotics
(India, 53; Nova Scotia, Canada, 521; Spain, 183; Panama & Colom-
bia, 3,252), including to paratype Tabanidae from Panama. Also do-
nated were 8 entomological monographs, 2 entomological reprints,
and 220 entomological journal issues.

*Dr. Hermann Flaschka (Chemistry Dept., Georgia Institute of Techno-
logy, Atlanta, Georgia 30332)
3,788 pinned, labelled insects (part of a collection purchased by Dr.
Flaschka ... the private collection of Dr. Harold L. Willis of Platte-
ville, Wisconsin) consisting of 387 Diptera (357 undetermined, 30
determined), 319 Hymenoptera including 13 exotics (279 undeter-
mined, 40 determined), 174 Orthoptera (44 undetermined, 130 deter-
mined), 421 Hemiptera (358 undetermined, 63 determined), 226
Homoptera (212 undetermined, 14 determined), 2 undetermined
Dermaptera, 13 undetermined Plecoptera, 12 undetermined Tricop-
tera, 36 undetermined Neuroptera, 8 undetermined Mecoptera, 16
undetermined Ephemeroptera, 75 undetermined Odonata, 192
spread, undetermined Lepidoptera, and 1,907 undetermined Coleop-
tera; 1,190 pinned, labelled, identified, domestic Coleoptera repre-
senting 28 species of Cicindelidae; 493 pinned, labelled, domestic
Coleoptera (46 unidentified, 453 identified ... mostly Cicindelidae).

Mr. Sergio Fragoso (graduate student), (Dept. of Entomology & Nema-
tology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
1,881 insects from Brazil, consisting of 334 papered Coleoptera and
1,547 pinned, labelled specimens (16 Orthoptera, 2 Hemiptera, 15
Homoptera, 11 Hymenoptera, 8 Diptera, and 1,495 Coleoptera ..
1,470 undetermined and 25 determined representing 21 species).

Mr. L. Richard Franz, Jr. (Department of Natural Science, Florida State
Museum, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)






Thirty-first Biennial Report


38 vials of Pedipalpida from the Dominican Republic and 2 islands
in the British West Indies, Grand Cayman and Mona; 5 vials of
Florida surface and cave aquatic Amphipoda; 36 jars containing 115
alcohol-preserved, fresh water Crustacea representing 15 species of
crayfishes, genus Procambarus, and 3 species of amphipods, genera
Gamnarus, Crangonyx, Hyalella; these specimens include several
rarely collected, unpigmented, cave-adapted species. Many of the
specimens were collected as a part of the Cross-Florida Barge Canal
Environmental Impact Study, funded by the United States Army
Corps of Engineers and administered by the Florida Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission, and the Osceola National Forest
Environmental Impact Study funded by the United States Fish and
Wildlife Service.

*Mr. Harold N. Greenbaum (University Farm, Rt. 6, Dept. of Ento-
mology, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701)
172 insect flight trap samples (Florida, 132; Arkansas, 40) collected
by the donor; 1,818 pinned insects consisting of 822 labelled speci-
mens (528 Diptera, including 86 identified Tabanidae; 45 spread
Lepidoptera; 107 Coleoptera; 119 Hymenoptera; 7 Homoptera; 1
Hemiptera; 7 Trichoptera; 2 Orthoptera; 1 Ephemeroptera; 5 Neur-
optera) and 996 unlabelled specimens (895 Diptera; 18 Coleoptera; 35
spread Lepidoptera; 23 Hymenoptera; 15 Homoptera; 2 Hemiptera; 8
Orthoptera) collected in Florida (27 specimens) and Arkansas (1,791
specimens) by the donor.

*Dr. Dale H Habeck (IFAS, Dept. of Entomology & Nematology, 201
Entomology & Nematology Research Lab., University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida 32611)
1,203 pinned, labelled insects (585 Homoptera, 287 Hemiptera, 245
Coleoptera, 19 Hymenoptera, 65 Diptera, 1 Orthoptera) collected by
the donor in Brazil and Argentina; 294 specimens are accompanied
by significant data in addition to the base of locality, date of
collection, and collector; 228 pinned, spread, labelled Lepidoptera
collected in France by the donor, including 98 determined specimens
representing 39 species; 1,617 pinned, labelled insects consisting of
86 specimens from Florida (5 Coleoptera, 81 neatly spread Lepidoptera)
and 1,531 exotic insects collected by the donor in Austria, Yugo-
slavia, Great Britain, and Costa Rica (39 Orthoptera, 6 Dermaptera,
247 Hemiptera, 438 Homoptera, 5 Neuroptera, 277 Coleoptera, 31
Hymenoptera, 284 Diptera, and 209 Lepidoptera, (190 spread, 19
unspread).

*Mr. Fred C. Harmston (1940 Larkspur Drive, Fort Collins, Colorado
80521)
5 adult snow scorpionflies (Mecoptera: Boreidae) and 1 true fly
(Diptera) collected on the surface of snow in Colorado by the donor;






68 Division of Plant Industry

477 pinned, labelled insects collected by the donor in Colorado, Utah,
North Dakota, Wyoming, Oregon, Nebraska, Arizona, Texas, and
New York, consisting of the following: 378 identified Culicidae rep-
resenting 14 species; 25 unidentified Syrphidae; 37 unidentified
Tabanidae; 7 other unidentified Diptera; 30 unidentified Hymenop-
tera.

*Mr. J. Richard Heitzman (3112 Harris Avenue, Independence, Missouri
64052)
5,712 pinned, labelled, identified Lepidoptera (962 neatly spread,
1,750 unspread) collected by the donor in Missouri, Kansas, Ark-
ansas, and Nebraska.

*Mr. John B. Heppner (graduate student), (Dept. of Entomology & Nema-
tology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
15,004 pinned, labelled insects (837 Orthoptera (281 spread), 41
Dermaptera, 6 Mecoptera (5 spread), 225 Neuroptera (36 spread),
364 Lepidoptera (364 spread), 1,765 Homoptera, 2,125 Hemiptera,
563 Coleoptera, 10 Trichoptera, 3,300 Hymenoptera, 5,768 Diptera)
(including 683 exotics: 52 Canada, 632 Uganda), including 1,463
identified specimens (including 4 Hymenoptera paratypes and 14
Hymenoptera topotypes) collected (most of them by the donor) in
California, Hawaii, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Louisiana, Miss-
issippi, Florida, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia,
Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Vermont, New
Hampshire: Canada; Mexico; Uganda. Many species are new to the
FSCA. Also donated were 8 ultraviolet light trap samples (6 Florida,
2 Uganda); 206 unmounted Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae; 171 vials and
bottles of alcohol-preserved arthropods (Arachnida: Acarina, Arane-
ida; Insecta: Thysanura, Collembola, Ephemeroptera, Psocoptera,
Embioptera, Isoptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera, Hemiptera, Homop-
tera, Dermaptera, Orthoptera, Hymenoptera (including Formicidae)
collected by the donor in California, Arizona, Texas, Florida, South
Carolina, Tennessee, West Virginia, New Jersey, New York, Penn-
sylvania, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire; Canada.

*Mr. C. P. Kimball (West Barnstable, Massachusetts 02668)
1,064 pinned, labelled, identified Lepidoptera (86 spread, 978 un-
spread) from Florida, Massachusetts, Wisconsin, and Idaho.

Mr. Kenneth W. Knopf (graduate student), (Dept. of Entomology & Nema-
tology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
76 pinned, labelled, unidentified insects (3 spread Lepidoptera, 31
Diptera, 23 Coleoptera, 7 Hymenoptera, 1 Orthoptera, 10 Hemiptera,
1 Homoptera) collected in Florida, New York, and Michigan by the
donor; 337 pinned, labelled insects (108 Coleoptera, 10 Diptera, 35
Hemiptera, 39 Homoptera, 55 Hymenoptera, 6 Orthoptera, 84 spread
Lepidoptera) collected in Trinidad, West Indies, by the donor.






Thirty-first Biennial Report


*Col. Lester L. Lampert, Jr. (17 Hillview Circle, Asheville, North Carolina
28805)
4 bottles of alcohol-preserved insects from North Carolina (10 Lepidop-
tera larvae of miscellaneous species; 2 bottles of miscellaneous insects
from North Carolina); 956 pinned, labelled Coleoptera representing
11 families of Coleoptera (Staphylinidae, Tenebrionidae, Hetero-
ceridae, Dermestidae, Hydrophilidae, Bostrichidae, Anobiidae,
Scoliidae, Passalidae, Curculionidae, and Cantharidae), from North
Carolina, South Carolina, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Tennessee,
Arkansas, Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Arizona, California,
Colorado, Idaho, & Nebraska; there were 574 undetermined
specimens, 239 specimens identified to genera, and 143 specimens
identified to species (representing 24 species).

*Mr. Harold F. Loomis (5355 S. W. 92nd Street, Miami, Florida 33156)
720 specimens representing 92 species of Diplopoda from the United
States, Panama, and Jamaica, including 26 holotypes, 4 allotypes, and
618 paratypes representing 76 new species described by Loomis.

Dr. Charles H. Martin (7360 N. La Oesta, Tucson, Arizona 85704)
30,749 pinned, labelled Asilidae and Leptogastridae (17,157 speci-
mens from 44 states of the United States; 13,575 exotics from many
parts of the world, including all major continents), including 16
holotypes, 13 allotypes, 1,604 paratypes, 187 topotypes, 61 homeo-
types, 2 cotypes (syntypes), 37 genotypes, and 4 metatypes (1,982 total
type specimens) representing 1,445 identified species plus 8,270
specimens identified to genera and 3,724 specimens identified to
family.

Mrs. Luretta B. Martin (7360 N. La Oesta, Tucson, Arizona 85704) 16
insect storage boxes.

*Mr. Bryant Mather (213 Mt. Salus Drive, Clinton, Mississippi 39056)
627 pinned, labelled, identified Lepidoptera, Neuroptera, Trichop-
tera, Plecoptera, Odonata, Mecoptera, and Psocoptera (including
461 specimens with wings spread) collected by the donor in Hungary,
Czechoslovakia, Austria, Turkey, Switzerland, Spain, France, Den-
mark, England, Japan, Canada (Alberta, Labrador), Mexico (total of
64 exotics), and the United States (Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas,
Oklahoma, Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Maryland,
Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, Wyoming, Arizona, California); 18
vials of alcohol-preserved Trichoptera and Plecoptera collected by the
donor in Mississippi, Georgia, Virginia, West Virginia, Oklahoma,
Colorado, Utah.

Dr. Michael L. May (Dept. of Zoology, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida, 32611)
1,629 pinned, labelled insects consisting of 1,565 domestic and 64






70 Division of Plant Industry

exotic specimens as follows: 3 Mecoptera, 1 Siphonaptera, 3 Psocop-
tera, 8 Dermaptera, 27 Neuroptera, 68 Orthoptera, 58 Homoptera,
204 Hemiptera, 185 Hymenoptera, 144 Diptera, 437 Coleoptera, and
491 spread, identified Lepidoptera; 50 alcohol vials containing mis-
cellaneous mature and immature insects; 15 cardboard insect boxes; 1
notebook containing collection data and additional field notes corre-
sponding to all numbered specimens.

Dr. Frank W. Mead (Bureau of Entomology, Division of Plant Industry,
Florida Dept. of Agriculture & Consumer Services, P. O. Box 1269,
Gainesville, Florida 32602)
51 ultraviolet light trap samples collected in Florida by the donor.

Dr. D. R. Minnick (Dept. of Entomology & Nematology, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
925 pinned (634 labelled, 291 unlabelled), domestic insects (1
Ephemeroptera, 14 Odonata, 43 Orthoptera, 3 Isoptera, 1 Plecoptera,
5 Dermaptera, 5 Embioptera, 1 Psocoptera, 1 Anoplura, 72 Hemiptera,
47 Homoptera, 15 Neuroptera, 510 Coleoptera, 1 Mecoptera, 4
Trichoptera, 52 Lepidoptera (27 spread), 63 Diptera, 87 Hymenoptera);
7 vials of immature Lepidoptera.

*Dr. Martin H. Muma (P. O. Box 2020, Silver City, New Mexico 88061)
97 pints of alcohol-preserved pitfall trap samples of arthropods from
Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona; 36 alcohol-preserved ultraviolet
light trap samples of arthropods collected in New Mexico and Arizona;
9 vials of miscellaneous arthropods from Texas and 37 vials of identi-
fied Scorpionida from New Mexico. All material was collected by the
donor.

*SSgt. Robert D. McManaway (PSC 3, Box 16243, APO U.S. Forces, San
Francisco, California 96432)
142 unmounted, unidentified insects collected by the donor in Panama,
consisting of 22 Hymenoptera (Formicidae), 23 Homoptera (Cicadi-
dae), and 97 Coleoptera (14 Scarabaeidae, 46 Lampyridae, 37
Meloidae); 6 Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae collected in Mississippi; 158
envelopes containing 133 Odonata and 26 very large saturniid
Lepidoptera collected by the donor in the Philippine Islands; 225
pinned insects consisting of 178 labelled specimens (73 spread
Lepidoptera, 18 Hemiptera, 79 Coleoptera, 8 Orthoptera) and 47 un-
labelled specimens (28 Coleoptera, 12 Homoptera, 1 Hemiptera, 1
Orthoptera, 3 Hymenoptera, 2 Diptera collected in the Philippine
Islands by the donor.

*Mr. Willian H. Pierce (Division of Plant Industry, Florida Department
of Agriculture & Consumer Services, P. O. Box 1269, Gainesville,
Florida 32602)






Thirty-first Biennial Report


3,571 neatly pinned, unlabelled insects (3,119 Diptera (including 260
identified Tephritidae), 228 Hymenoptera, 12 Hemiptera, 35 Homop-
tera, 143 Coleoptera, 10 Neuroptera, 12 Odonata, 12 spread
Lepidoptera) collected by the donor on the island of Tonga, South
Pacific; 115 vials of alcohol-preserved arthropods (3 Chilopoda; 1
Diplopoda; 1 Araneida; 2 Scorpionida; 4 Pseudoscorpionida; 104
Insecta; 35 Coleoptera, 32 Homoptera, 12 Hemiptera, 4 Orthoptera,
7 Hymenoptera, 3 Neuroptera, 3 Diptera, 1 Odonata, 1 Isoptera, 2
Dermaptera, 4 miscellaneous) collected by the donor on Tonga; each
vial contained 1 to many specimens. Also collected on Tonga by the
donor were 12 plastic bags of miscellaneous alcohol-preserved
arthropods and 6 alcohol-preserved insect flight trap samples of
insects; 4 insect flight trap samples collected in Florida by the donor.

Dr. Sidney L. Poe (Dept. of Entomology & Nematology, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
4,107 pinned, labelled insects (4,031 domestic, 76 exotic from the
United States (Florida, Georgia, Tennessee, North Carolina, Louisi-
ana, Alabama, Arkansas, New Mexico, California, Washington, Mis-
souri, Ohio, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Colorado), Virgin Islands,
Puerto Rico, Cuba, Guatemala, Panama, Colombia, Canada, and
Australia, consisting of the following: 30 identified exotic Coleoptera;
46 unidentified exotic Coleoptera; 447 identified domestic insects
(95 Hemiptera, 30 Homoptera, 114 Coleoptera, 21 Lepidoptera, 54
Diptera, 107 Hymenoptera); 3,584 unidentified domestic insects (72
Odonata, 197 Orthoptera, 1 Isoptera, 6 Plecoptera, 3 Dermaptera,
323 Hemiptera, 62 Homoptera, 17 Neuroptera, 10 Mecoptera, 419
Diptera, 534 Hymenoptera, 1,544 Coleoptera, 293 spread Lepidoptera,
and 102 unspread Lepidoptera); 53 Schmitt boxes.

*Dr. Charles C. Porter (Dept. of Biological Sciences, Fordham University,
Bronx, New York 10458)
35 vials of alcohol-preserved insects, mostly Hymenoptera, collected
in insect flight traps in McAllen, Texas; 10 alcohol-preserved insect
flight trap samples of insects from the state of New York; 348 pinned,
labelled insects consisting of 342 Diptera (198 from Peru, Bolivia,
Argentina, and Mexico; 144 from the United States: Texas, North
Carolina, Maryland, New Jersey, Virginia) and 6 Hymenoptera:
Ichneumonidae (1 paratype female Epirhyssa phoenix Porter from
Argentina, 1 female Polycyrtidea limits Cushman from Texas, and
holotypes of 4 species described as new by the donor: Cyclaulus eremia,
Prosthoporus terani (new genus and species), Epirhyssa wisei, and
Epirhyssa theolides.

*Dr. Walfried J. Reinthal (4026 Sequoyah Avenue, Knoxville, Tenessee
37919)
242 envelopes of insects (58 envelopes containing 64 Odonata from







Division of Plant Industry


Tennessee; 184 envelopes: 72 containing 101 Lepidoptera, Diptera,
Hymenoptera, Coleoptera, etc. from Austria and 112 containing 124
insects from Switzerland: 1 Mecoptera, 39 Hymenoptera, 74 Diptera,
4 Coleoptera, 6 Lepidoptera); 1 bottle of miscellaneous insects from
Austria; 98 pinned, labelled, identified Hemiptera from Tennessee;
477 pinned, spread, labelled, identified Lepidoptera: Papilionidae (460
domestic, 17 exotic) representing 24 species from Alabama, Arkansas,
Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Kansas,
Illinois, Louisiana, Maine, Missouri, Massachusetts, Nebraska, New
Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina,
Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont,
Washington, Wisconsin; Canada; Mexico; 90 pinned, labelled, identi-
fied Homoptera from Puerto Rico. All specimens were collected by
the donor.

Dr. Richard H. Roberts (1306 N.W. 51 Terrace, Gainesville, Florida
32605)
532 pinned, labelled insects (unidentified: 1 Orthoptera, 1 Hymen-
optera, 103 Diptera, including 93 Syrphidae; 427 identified Diptera:
386 Culicidae representing 46 species, 26 Ceratopogonidae repre-
senting 11 species, 10 Syrphidae representing 3 species, 5 Calliphori-
dae representing 3 species) collected by the donor in Texas, California,
Colorado, Montana, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Ohio, New York
and Mississippi.

Mr. Thomas E. Rogers (graduate student) (2418 N.E. 7th Street, Ocala,
Florida 32670)
481 pinned, labelled insects (102 Coleoptera, 343 Hymenoptera, 18
Odonata, 18 spread Lepidoptera) collected in Florida, Georgia and
Delaware by the donor.

*Mr. William Rosenberg (P. O. Box 366, Hazelwood, North Carolina 28738)
5,086 European Coleoptera consisting of 4,115 pinned, labelled, and
identified; 565 pinned, labelled, unidentified; 416 envelopes of un-
mounted specimens, 1 to several per envelope (400 envelopes of speci-
mens identified to species).

*Mr. Joe Schuh (4039 Shasta Way, Klamath Falls, Oregon 97601)
11,177 pinned, labelled insects (1,455 Diptera, 68 Homoptera, 1,196
Hemiptera (237 species from the United States, Bolivia, Brazil, Peru,
Cyprus, India, and the Philippine Islands), 45 Lepidoptera (43 spread),
2 Neuroptera, 9 Psocoptera, 13 Orthoptera, 123 Odonata (6 spread),
673 Hymenoptera, 7,593 Coleoptera), including allotype and 1 para-
type; 9,503 specimens are identified to species (Diptera, 1,209 speci-
mens, 450 species; Hemiptera, 1,196 specimens, 237 species, including
151 specimens representing 61 species from Mexico & Canada;
Coleoptera, 6,357 specimens, 394 species, including 64 specimens from






Thirty-first Biennial Report


Mexico and Canada; Hymenoptera, 673 specimens, 92 species; in-
cluded were 731 exotic specimens: 2 Neuroptera from Australia; 13
Orthoptera from Brazil, Mexico, and India; 129 Coleoptera from
Australia, Japan, Thailand, India, Chile, Mexico, and Canada; 587
Hemiptera from India, Philippine Islands, Cyprus, France, Peru,
Chile, Brazil, Bolivia, and Mexico. Almost all of the North American
specimens were collected by the donor, predominantly in Oregon and
California, and several hundred species were new to the FSCA. Also
donated were 20 vials of Pseudoscorpionida (9 Peru, 1 Arizona, 1
Nevada, 9 Oregon).

Dr. B. J. Smittle (1605 N.W. 71st Street, Gainesville, Florida 32601)
382 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects collected in Alachua
County, Florida by the donor.

Mr. Karl Stephan (3038 E. Eastland, Tucson, Arizona 85716)
42 pinned, labelled, identified Colydiidae (Coleoptera), including 13
paratypes from Arizona, Texas, Nevada, and Ontario, Canada (1 speci-
men); 996 pinned, labelled Coleoptera (176 identified, 9 exotic, 10 para-
types; 820 unidentified, 154 exotic); 1 ultraviolet light trap sample
collected in Arizona by the donor.

*Mr. Gayle T. Strickland (1744 Brocade Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana
70815)
2,000 pinned, spread, labelled, authoritatively identified Lepidoptera
of which more than 1,800 are sex determined; all but a few were col-
lected in Louisiana by the donor and are exceptionally neatly
processed. Included are 809 skippers representing 37 species deter-
mined by the donor and confirmed, many by genitalic examination,
by Mr. Kilian Roever, a specialist on that group; also included are
69 butterflies determined by the donor and 1,122 moths (232 macro-
lepidoptera and 890 microlepidoptera) identified by authorities on
the various families.

*Dr. Mac A. Tidwell (Delta Regional Primate Research Center, Covington,
Louisiana 70433)
14,376 neatly pinned, labelled, identified Tabanidae representing 98
North American species. Long series of some species demonstrate
structural and color variations over the geographic ranges of those
species.

Dr. Howard V. Weems, Jr. (Bureau of Entomology, Division of Plant
Industry, Florida Dept. of Agriculture & Consumer Services, P. O.Box
1269, Gainesville, Florida 32602)
22,657 pinned, labelled insects consisting of 20,025 Diptera, 1,086
Hymenoptera, 573 Coleoptera, 420 Neuroptera, 211 Mecoptera, 214
Hemiptera, 67 Homoptera, 30 Orthoptera, and 31 Dermaptera col-






Division of Plant Industry


elected by the donor and other members of his family in Florida,
Georgia, North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Louisiana, Missis-
sippi, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Oregon, and Washing-
ton. Numerous species were new to the FSCA.

*Mr. Richard C. Wilkerson (University of Florida graduate student),
(International Center for Medical Research and Training, Uni-
versidad del Valle, Tulane University, Apartado Aereo 5390, Cali,
Colombia)
179 chlorocresol-preserved insect flight trap samples of insects,
36 plastic envelopes of unmounted insects, mostly Hymenoptera,
collected in insect flight traps, and 11 alcohol-preserved, ultra-
violet light trap samples of insects collected in Colombia by the
donor.

Mr. Curtis E. Williams (704 Foster St., Marlin, Texas 76661)
155 authoritatively-identified, envelope-preserved Odonata repre-
senting 20 species collected in Texas by the donor, including 6 reared
specimens. All specimens are exceptionally well preserved, some
treated with acetone. All of these species are uncommonly-collected
species, and several are exceptionally rare and are the first repre-
sentatives for the FSCA. Also donated were 57 excellent kodachrome
slides of Odonata for the FSCA.

*Dr. Nixon Wilson (Dept. of Biology, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar
Falls, Iowa 50613)
314 vials of alcohol-preserved arthropods consisting of 118 vials of
identified specimens (9 vials of Arachnida: Acarina, 10 specimens,
9 species; 109 vials of Siphonaptera, 165 specimens, and 9 species) and
196 vials of unidentified specimens (vials: 1 Chilopoda; 1 Diplopoda;
1 Microthelyphonida; 116 Arachnida: Acarina; 7 Arachnida;
Araneida; Insecta: 10 Collembola, 8 Psocoptera, 4 Thysanoptera, 5
Homoptera, 4 Hemiptera, 2 Neuroptera, 19 Coleoptera, 2 Lepidoptera,
10 Diptera, 6 Hymenoptera); 53 slide mounts of Arachnida: Acarina
(45 slide mounts of 116 exotic specimens representing 1 species; 8
slide mounts of 8 specimens representing 3 species).

*Dr. Willis W. Wirth (Systematic Entomology Lab., USDA, c/o U.S.
National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D. C. 20560.)
28 pinned, labelled, identified Ephydridae representing 5 species,
including a paratype of Brachydeutera sturtevanti Wirth which is
new to the FSCA; 99 identified, slide-mounted Ceratopogonidae (in-
cluding 10 paratypes representing 8 species) representing 56 species,
28 genera, virtually all species new to the FSCA.

Dr. Robert E. Woodruff (Bureau of Entomology, Division of Plant In-
dustry, Florida Dept. of Agriculture & Consumer Services, P. O. Box
1269, Gainesville, Florida 32602)






Thirty-first Biennial Report


13 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects (1 Mexico, 2 New Mexico,
3 Arizona, 2 Texas, 1 Colorado, 2 Arkansas, 1 Kansas, 1 Florida) and
2 hand catch samples (1 Mexico, 1 Arizona) collected by the donor;
104 vials and bottles of miscellaneous insects, several to many per
container, and 2 vials of identified Coleoptera, collected by the donor in
North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Ohio, Florida, and Arizona.

*Mr. David G. Young (graduate student), (Department of Entomology &
Nematology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
27 vials of miscellaneous alcohol-preserved insects and spiders col-
lected in Bolivia via light trap or aspirator tube by the donor; 7 ultra-
violet light trap samples of insects from Colombia taken by the donor;
10 pinned, labelled paratypes of Nemopalpus nearcticus Young, 1974
(family Psycholidae) from Florida; 50 slide mounts representing 9
species of Psychodidae from Colombia, including 10 paratypes of
Lutzomyia recurva Young, 1973, and 12 paratypes of Lutzomyia
yuilli Young, 1972; 752 pinned, labelled insects collected in Brazil
in insect flight trap by the donor, consisting of the following: 1 Isoptera,
2 Hemiptera, 27 Homoptera, 139 Coleoptera, 6 spread Lepidoptera,
269 Hymenoptera, and 308 Diptera.

Dr. J. Porter Woodring (Dept. of Zoology and Physiology, Louisiana State
University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803)
2,375 slide mounts of Acarina: Orbatidae, including 881 slide mounts
of identified orbatid mites from the United States and 101 identified
exotic orbatid slide mounts representing a total of 132 species, in-
cluding 149 type series slide mounts (97 adult paratypes, 5 plesiotypes,
47 immatures: larvae, hypopi, protonymphs, deuteronymphs, trito-
nymphs); 1,360 slide mounts of unidentified United States orbatids and
33 slide mounts of unidentified exotics; the slide-mounted specimens
represent the following geographical areas: United States: Louisiana,
Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, North Carolina, Virginia,
West Virginia, Kentucky, Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, Con-
necticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, Maine, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin,
Minnesota, Kansas, Arkansas, Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, South
Dakota, Utah, Idaho, Oregon, California, Arizona, Texas; exotics:
Canada, Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Costa Rica, Bahama Islands,
Brazil, Peru, New Zealand, China. NOTE: All of the holotypes from
the Woodring Collection have been deposited in the (United States)
National Museum of Natural History. 37 slide boxes were donated to
the FSCA. Also donated were 508 vials and bottles of alcohol-preserved
Acarina (unidentified: 245 United States, 48 exotic; identified: 107
United States, 94 exotic, representing a total of 132 species, including
5 vials of mite paratypes); this included 102 vials of ticks, 63 identified
representing 26 species, and 406 vials of mites, 138 identified repre-
senting 106 species. The following geographic areas were represented
by the alcohol-preserved collections: United States: Louisiana, Florida,
Mississippi, Georgia, Tennessee, North Carolina, Kentucky, New






76 Division of Plant Industry

Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Connecticut, Vermont, Ohio,
Arkansas, Texas, Minnesota, Idaho, Montana, Utah, California,
Oregon; exotic: Canada, Mexico, Honduras, Jamaica, Uraguay, Peru,
Colombia, Ecuador, Brazil, New Zealand, Malaya, Pakistan, Kenya,
Tanganyika, South Africa, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia, Austria,
Germany, Holland, England. Also donated were 1,759 reprints of
Acarina publications by 271 authors and 62 volumes of the journal
Acarologia.

*Dr. Frank N. Young (Dept. of Zoology, Indiana University, Bloomington,
Indiana 47406)
1,427 pinned insects (1,317 labelled, 110 unlabelled; 461 identified
to species) collected by the donor in the United States, mostly in
Indiana, Florida, Texas, Oklahoma, Alabama, California, and South
Dakota, consisting of 232 Diptera, 267 Hymenoptera, 1 Neuroptera,
1 Orthoptera, 119 Homoptera, 24 Hemiptera, 24 Lepidoptera(12 speci-
mens spread), and 759 Coleoptera; 67 pinned, labelled Diptera:
Culicidae from Colombia, and 1 Diptera from Venezuela; 1 sweep-net
sample of miscellaneous insects from Oregon; 14 pill boxes of insects
from California, Oregon, Washington, Texas, Arkansas, Alabama,
Florida, and British Columbia, Canada; approximately 848 alcohol-
preserved insects consisting of 469 Coleoptera (including 4 paratypes
of 1 species of Dytiscidae), 301 Hymenoptera, 25 Homoptera, 7 Hemip-
tera, 50 Diptera; 162 bottles of various sizes each containing a few
dozen to several thousand alcohol-preserved insects representing
a great number of species collected by the donor in Indiana, Florida,
Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas, Texas, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Cali-
fornia, Oregon, Washington, Canada: British Columbia, and Mexico;
21 ultraviolet light trap collections of insects taken by the donor
in Indiana (20) and Oklahoma (1).


Other Contributions to the Collection

Mr. Albert Allen (1015 Day Drive, Boise, Idaho 83705)
8 pinned, labelled, identified Ambrysus mormon minon La Rivers
(Hemiptera: Naucoridae) from Idaho collected by the donor.

Mr. John O. Atwood (student), (Dept. of Entomology & Nematology, Uni-
versity of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
4 slide-mounted Anoplura (1 Haematopinus eurysternus (Nitzsch),
family Haematopinidae; 3 Linognathus stenopsis (Burmeister), family
Linognathidae).

Mrs. Brenda Beck (4730 N.W. 39th Terrace, Gainesville, Florida 32601)
4 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects collected by the donor in
Alabama and Texas.






Thirty-first Biennial Report


*Mr. William M. Beck (Laboratory of Aquatic Entomology, P. O. Box 111,
Florida A. & M. University, Tallahassee, Florida 32303)
17 Cicindelidae (Coleoptera) from Florida preserved in alcohol.

Mr. Fred Collins (graduate student), (Dept. of Entomology & Nematology,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
29 pinned, labelled, identified Coleoptera; 5 vials of unidentified
Diptera preserved in alcohol.

*Dr. Charles V. Covell, Jr. (Dept. of Biology, University of Louisville,
Louisville, Kentucky 40208)
83 pinned, labelled insects collected by the donor in Florida, Kentucky
and California, including 30 neatly spread, identified Lepidoptera
representing 27 species, some of them uncommonly collected species,
39 unidentified Coleoptera, and 14 unidentified Hemiptera.

Dr. Harvey L. Cromroy (Dept. of Entomology & Nematology, University
of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
5 slide mounts of a mite, Eutrombicula alfreddugesi (Oudemans)
(Trombiculidae).

Mr. Lloyd Davis (graduate student), (Dept. of Entomology & Nematology,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
117 pinned, labelled, unidentified Scarabaeidae from New Mexico;
99 pinned, labelled, unidentified insects, mostly from New Mexico,
of the following orders: Coleoptera (94), Lepidoptera (2), Diptera (2),
Hymenoptera (1); 167 ultraviolet light trap$ samples of insects col-
lected in Florida by the donor.

Mr. Alan W. Doty (Route 1, Box 394-B, Landrum, South Carolina 29356)
14 vials and bottles of arthropods collected by the donor on Okinama
Island and South Korea, consisting of 1 Odonata, 3 Orthoptera, 1
Thysanoptera, 2 Hemiptera, 5 Homoptera, 37 Coleoptera, 5 Diptera,
3 Hymenoptera, 9 Lepidoptera, 2 Diplopoda, 4 Chilopoda, 6 Araneida,
and 2 Phalangida.

*Mr. Byrd K. Dozier (1266 12 Street, Imperial Beach, California 92032)
212 pinned, labelled, unidentified insects (20 domestic, 192 exotics
from Mexico, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Puerto Rico, Haiti and the Bahama
Islands): 1 Diptera, 5 Hymenoptera, 2 Hemiptera, 40 Homoptera, and
164 Coleoptera (18 domestic, 146 exotic); 1 paratype of a buprestid from
Arizona, Acmaeodora acanthicola W. F. Barr; 32 unpinned, unlabelled
insects: 30 Coleoptera (17 from Australia, 13 from Philippines) and
2 Hemiptera (from Philippines).

*Mr. Peter C. Drummond (Route 1, Box 342, Micanopy, Florida 32667)
6 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects collected in Costa Rica by
the donor.






Division of Plant Industry


Mr. S. W. Dunkle (Dept. of Zoology, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida 32611)
7 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects collected by the donor, 5 from
Mexico and 2 from Florida.

Dr. W. D. Edmonds (Biological Sciences Dept., California State Polytech-
nic College, 3801 W. Temple Avenue, Pomona, California 91766)
249 taxonomic separates (reprints), all of which are on Hemiptera-
Homoptera.

*Dr. E. G. Farnworth (Institute for Ecology, University of Georgia,
Athens, Georgia 30602)
4 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects collected on the Fiji Islands
by the donor.

Mr. Paul H. Freytag (Dept. of Entomology, University of Kentucky, Lex-
ington, Kentucky 40506)
10 pinned, labelled, identified Stylogaster biannulata (Say) (Family
Conopidae) from Kentucky.

Mrs. Willis J. (Jean) Gertsch (Portal, Arizona 85632)
7 color drawings of spiders drawn on Christmas cards, 3 black-and-
white drawings and 76 color drawings of spiders (all 8Y x 11"), and 31
color paintings of spiders drawn by Mrs. Gertsch. These are pro-
fessional illustrations.

Mr. Jayson I. Glick (graduate student), (Dept. of Entomology & Nema-
tology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
47 pinned, labelled, identified Gasterophilidae adults with associated
puparial cases... all reared material from Florida.

*Dr. James T. Goodwin (2122 Cross Key, San Antonio, Texas 78245)
288 pinned, labelled, identified, reared Tabanidae from Panama, each
with its puparial skin, representing 5 species.

Dr. J. Linsley Gressitt (Bishop Museum, Honolulu, Hawaii 96817)
6 males and 6 females (pinned, labelled, determined) of the taro
"leafhopper" Tarophagus proserpina (Kirkaldy), (actually a delphacid
Homoptera), which is a principal pest of taro, Colocasia esculenta
Schott in Hawaii and the East Indies.

Dr. Alan Hardy (California Dept. of Agriculture, 1220 N Street, Sacra-
mento, California 95814)
Paratypes of 2 species of Scarabaeidae from California: 1 Phobetus
chearyi Hardy, 1 Pseudocotalpa giulianii Hardy.

*Mr. Gerd H. Heinrich (Dryden, Maine 04225)
2 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects collected by the donor in






Thirty-first Biennial Report


Newfoundland, Canada; 30 pinned, labelled insects (26 Diptera, 3
Hymenoptera, 1 Coleoptera) collected in Florida by the donor.

*Mr. Roger L. Heitzman (3112 Harris Avenue, Independence, Missouri
64052)
4 pinned, labelled, spread paratypes of Hypagyrtis brendae R. L.
Heitzman (Lepidoptera: Geometridae).

*Dr. Lawrence A. Hetrick (1614 N.W. 12th Rd., Gainesville, Florida 32605)
317 pinned, domestic Coleoptera (26 of these were labelled); 2 vials of
identified Psocoptera collected in Florida by the donor and repre-
senting 2 species, 1 of which (Lepinotus inquillinus Heyden) is the
first record for Florida.

Dr. Ronald W. Hodges (Entomologist, Insect Identification 7 Parasite
Introduction Branch, USDA, U.S. National Museum, Washington,
D.C. 20560)
1 sample of leaf mines caused by a micro-lepidopteran.

Mr. F. William Howard (Dept. of Entomology, Louisiana State University,
402 Life Sciences Building, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803)
7 pinned, labelled, identified Pipunculidae representing 3 species
from Louisiana, one of them new to the FSCA.

Mrs. Anne T. Howden (Carleton University, Dept. of Biology, Ottawa,
Canada)
14 pinned, labelled, identified Curculionidae, 13 of which are from
Colombia and Venezuela, and 1 domestic, representing 11 species
(with paratypes of 9 species).

Mr. John B. Iverson, III (Florida State Museum, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida 32611)
1 ultraviolet light trap sample of insects from Caicos Islands, Bahamas.

Dr. Richard L. Jacques (Entomology Dept. of Biological Sciences, Farleigh
Dickinson University, Rutherford, New Jersey 07076)
20 pinned, labelled, identified Coccinellidae (Coleoptera) representing
2 foreign species recently introduced accidentally into New Jersey.

*Mr. Roy 0. Kendall (Route 4, Box 104-EB, San Antonio, Texas 78228)
23 pinned, labelled insects (5 Syrphidae, 1 Pompilidae, and 17 Orthop-
tera) collected in Texas by the donor.

Dr. George F. Knowlton (Dept. of Biology, Utah State University, Logan,
Utah 84322)
1 ultraviolet light trap collection of insects collected in Utah by the
donor.






80 Division of Plant Industry

Mr. Jay M. Lamdin (USDA, Insects affecting Man and Animals Lab.,
University of Florida campus, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
1 bottle containing 100+ 3rd and 4th instar flannel moth caterpillars
(Lagoa crispata Packard) reared from foliage of Quercus spp., at
Arnell, Ellis County, Oklahoma, by the donor as a part of his study of
immature Lepidoptera with urticating hairs of spines.

Mr. Clarence Edward Leach (2131 N.W. 55 St., Gainesville, Florida 32608)
5 adults and 1 immature Centruroides gracilis (Latreille) (Slender
Brown Scorpion) collected in Palm Beach County, Florida.

Mr. Harry J. Lee (22646 MacBeth Avenue, Fairview Park, Ohio 44126)
27 pinned, labelled Scarabaeidae from Ohio, of which 5 were identi-
fied.

Mr. Leonard L. Lengyel (c/o Mrs. Manuela R. Alban, Rizal Street, Laoag
City, Ilocos Norte, Republic of the Philippines)
47 unmounted, unlabelled insects from the Philippines, representing
1 Homoptera, 8 Hemiptera, and 38 Coleoptera.

Dr. A. E. Lewis (1360 Paseo Redondo, Burbank, California 91501)
40 pinned, labelled, unidentified Trogidae from Arizona, Alabama,
Texas, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, New Mexico, and California.

*Dr. J. E. Lloyd (Dept. of Entomology & Nematology, University of Flor-
ida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
128 pinned, labelled insects collected by the donor, consisting of 60
identified Coleoptera (27 from India and Costa Rica and 33 from Flor-
ida, New Jersey, and Maine; 44 identified Homoptera (Florida, Texas,
Virginia), 24 unidentified Hemiptera (Florida, North Carolina, Il-
linois, New Jersey, New York); 70 pinned, labelled insects collected
by the donor in Indonesia: 3 Orthoptera, 13 Hemiptera, 5 Homoptera,
39 Coleoptera, 1 Lepidoptera, 4 Diptera, 5 Hymenoptera; 13 reprints
of scientific papers.

Mr. Ian Moore (647 El Monte Road, El Cajon, California 92020)
169 pinned, labelled, identified Coleoptera (Staphylinidae) repre-
senting 88 species from Florida, Texas, Arizona, Colorado, and Cali-
fornia (12 Mexico, 157 U.S.), including several species new to the
FSCA.

Mr. E. A Munyer (Florida State Museum, University of Florida campus,
Gainesville, Florida 32611)
Donated to the DPI library the following: 51 paperbound volumes of
the Transactions of the Illinois State Academy of Sciences, 4 paper-
bound volumes of the Bulletin of the Illinois Natural History Survey, 4
hardbound volumes of the Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of






Thirty-first Biennial Report


Science, and 1 paperbound volume of the Proceedings of the Indiana
Academy of Science.

Dr. Carol Musgrave (Dept. of Entomology & Nematology, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
Several hundred leafminer adults (Agromyzidae: Liriomyza sp.)
reared from celery from Palm Beach County, Florida.

Mr. Paul J. McLeod (Dept. of Entomology, University of Arkansas,
Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701)
145 pinned, labelled insects from Arkansas collected by the donor
(11 Coleoptera, 1 Homoptera, 63 Hemiptera, 24 Orthoptera, 8 spread
Odonata, and 38 spread Lepidoptera.

Mr. Douglas J. B. McReynolds (Dept. of English, East Carolina Uni-
versity, P. 0 Box 2707, Greenville, North Carolina 27834)
10 pinned, labelled insects collected in North Carolina by the donor,
consisting of 4 undetermined Coleoptera, 4 determined Homoptera
representing 1 species of Cicadidae.

Mr. Thomas M. Neal (Dept. of Entomology & Nematology, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
1 ultraviolet light trap sample of insects from Key Largo, Florida;
2 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects, 1 from Texas and 1 from
Mexico; 9 pinned, labelled, spread skippers, Pholisora catullus
(Fabricius), collected by the donor in northwestern Florida and be-
lieved to be the first Florida records for this species of Lepidoptera.

Mr. Cyrus J. Nicholson (Division of Animal Industry, Florida Dept. of
Agriculture & Consumer Services, Sebring Air Terminal, P. O. Box
821, Sebring, Florida 33870)
1 elephant louse, Haematomyzus elephants Piaget (Mallophaga:
Haematomyzidae) collected in Sarasota, Florida, on an elephant im-
ported from India.

Dr. William L. Nutting (Dept. of Entomology, University of Arizona,
Tucson, Arizona 85721)
1 pair of Dermaptera, Vostox excavatus Nutting and Gurney, known
only from Arizona. This is a new species for FSCA.

Mrs. Ladonia O'Berry (6732 S.W. 53rd Avenue, Gainesville, Florida 32608)
4 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects collected in Florida by the
donor.

*Drs. Charles and Lois O'Brien (Entomology, P. 0. Box 111, Florida
A. & M. University, Tallahassee, Florida 32307)
1 vial of unidentified Curculionidae collected by the donors at Payne's





82 Division of Plant Industry

Prairie, Alachua County, Florida; 30 botanical and zoological bul-
letins and separates; 2 vials of miscellaneous insects (1 Honduras, 1
Canal Zone); 4 pill boxes of miscellaneous insects (Mexico, mosquito
trap); 22 pint samples of ultraviolet light trap collections (Mexico (3),
Guatemala (1), Nicaragua (1), Costa Rica (2), Panama (2), Honduras
(4), Texas (2), Florida (3); small food jar samples: Mexico (3), Florida
(1), all collected by the donors.

Mr. Richard S. Peigler (303 Shannon Drive, Greenville, South Carolina
29607)
134 pinned insects (6 spread, identified Lepidoptera; 108 spread,
unidentified Lepidoptera; 20 unidentified insects: 12 Diptera, 5
Hymenoptera, 2 Homoptera, 1 Hemiptera) collected in South Caro-
lina by the donor. This included a male and 2 females of a recently
described species, Anisota peigleri Riotte, new to the FSCA.

*Mr. Steve J. Roman (205 Shady Hollow, Casselberry, Florida 32707)
10 Mexican and 1 domestic Coleoptera in alcohol; 24 pinned, labelled
Diptera collected in Mexico by the donor.

Mr. Vincent D. Roth (Resident Director, Southwestern Research Station
(of the American Museum of Natural History), Portal, Arizona 85632)
Male and female of a net-winged midge, Dioptopsis arizonica
Alexander (Diptera: Blephariceridae).

*Dr. Reece I. Sailer (Dept. of Entomology & Nematology, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
7 pinned, labelled, identified Diptera, consisting of 1 Tabanidae, 1
Dolichopodidae, and 5 Tachinidae reared from insect hosts; 8 pinned,
labelled, identified Corixidae (Hemiptera) representing 4 species new
to the FSCA; 4 pinned, labelled Podisus maculiventris (Say) (Hemip-
tera); 2 pairs of Hemiptera; Trichocorixa verticalis verticalis from
sellaris; 4 pinned, labelled Cecidomyiidae from Gainesville, Florida,
reared from ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) 1 pinned, labelled
tachinid fly, Ormia lineifrons Sabrosky, from Florida; 14 pinned,
labelled, undetermined insects (1 Coleoptera, 13 Hemiptera); 6 mono-
graphs of entomological groups.

Mr. Jack Schuster (graduate student), (Department of Entomology and
Nematology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
35 vials of exotic arthropods from Puerto Rico, Costa Rica, Mexico,
British Honduras, Peru, and Canada (3 Araneida; 1 Amphipoda; 3
Diplopoda; 1 Isopoda; 1 Scorpionida; 3 Phalangida; 23 Insecta; 9
Coleoptera, 5 Hymenoptera, 1 Diptera, 2 Lepidoptera, 2 Orthoptera,
3 Homoptera, 1 Hemiptera).

Dr. Rowland M. Shelley (North Carolina State Museum of Natural
History, P.O. Box 27647, Raleigh, North Carolina 27611)





Thirty-first Biennial Report


1 male paratype of a recently described milliped, Cleidogona medialis
Shelley, from North Carolina.

Mr. Neal R. Spencer (2205 S.W. 91st St., Gainesville, Florida 32601)
3 slide-mounted, unidentified Thysanoptera; 2 slide-mounted, iden-
tified Lepidoptera; 47 vials of arthropods consisting of the following:
1 unidentified Orthoptera, 1 identified Neuroptera, 1 unidentified
Dermaptera, 2 unidentified Thysanoptera, 10 vials of Odonata
(3 identified, 7 unidentified), 10 Hymenoptera (3 domestic, uniden-
tified; 5 domestic, identified; 2 exotic, identified), 3 vials of un-
identified Lepidoptera larvae, 6 Coleoptera (3 identified domestic,
3 unidentified domestic), 13 Araneida (8 unidentified domestic, 1 un-
identified exotic, 4 identified domestic).

*Dr. H. F. Strohecker (University of Miami, Dept. of Biology, P. O. Box
249118, Coral Gables, Florida 33124)
231 pinned, labelled exotic insects consisting of 49 determined
Erotylidae and 182 undetermined insects (149 Coleoptera, 1 Diptera,
9 Hymenoptera, 23 Hemiptera).

Mr. William Thacker (216 S.W. 4th Avenue, Gainesville, Florida)
1 very large, exotic scorpion which Mr. Thacker claimed to have
collected alive in a storeroom of a shop in Clermont, Florida in
July 1965 ... it is a species not known to be established in Florida.

Mr. Mike Thomas (1896 40 Avenue, Apt. #2, Vero Beach, Florida 32960)
131 rare alcohol-preserved Scarabaeidae from Florida.

Dr. F. Christian Thompson (Systematic Entomology Lab., USDA, c/o
U.S. National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC 20560)
2 pinned, labelled, identified West Indian Syrphidae, each represent-
ing a species new to the FSCA: (Ocyptamus deceptor)(Curran) and
Sterphus jamaicensis (Gmelin).

Dr. Patrick H. Thompson (P.O. Drawer GE, College Station, Texas 77840)
1 vial containing 14 Syrphidae collected in an insect flight trap in
Texas by the donor.

Mr. Darwin Tiemann (6241 Aberdeen Avenue, Goleta, California 93017)
10 pinned, labelled, identified Coleoptera: Phengodidae (5 paratypes
each of 2 species, 1 from Brazil (Phrixothrix tiemanni Whitmer) and
1 from California (Zarhipis tiemanni Linsdale).

*Mr. Karl R. Valley (Bureau of Plant Industry, Pennsylvania Dept. of
Agriculture, 2301 N. Cameron St., Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17120)
Synoptic collection of insects associated with ornamental juniper in
Pennsylvania consisting of 21 pinned, labelled specimens represent-






Division of Plant Industry


ing 10 species of Diptera, Hemiptera, and parasitic Hymenoptera,
and 2 slide-mounts and 1 vial representing 2 species of scale insects.

*Dr. H. K. Wallace (Professor Emeritus, Dept. of Zoology, University
of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611)
The Spiders of New Zealand, volumes 1-4, 797 pages.

*Mr. Joseph Wilcox (6451 Vista del Sol, Anaheim, California 92817)
7 pinned, labelled Volucella (Diptera: Syrphidae) collected in Califor-
nia by the donor.

Mr. James Wiley (Route 4, Box 250, Gainesville, Florida 32601)
3 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects collected on Eleuthera
Island, Bahamas, by the donor.

Dr. R. F. Wilkey (P.O. Box 185, Bluffton, Indiana 46714)
10 Berlese funnel samples of arthropods collected by the donor in
Indiana and Florida.

Mr. D. P. Wojcik (Insects Affecting Man and Animals Lab., USDA,
Gainesville, Florida 32611)
9 ultraviolet light trap samples of insects from Brazil; 18 pitfall trap
samples of insects from Florida and Georgia.

Research Associates of the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods
The Research Associate Program has continued to develop and to
make a vital contribution to the Florida State Collection of Arthropods
and to the effectiveness of the arthropod identification service provided
the citizens of the State of Florida. No new Research Associate appoint-
ments were made during this biennium, but a special effort was made to
keep the program vital and productive. All members who had not been
active in the program recently were contacted more than once to deter-
mine their continuing interest in the program as evidenced by their
activities. Four appointments were terminated during the biennium due
to inactivity of those associates. A long-time Research Associate, Mr.
Charles E. Seiler of the University of Florida Agricultural Research and
Education Center, at Belle Glade, died on 2 May 1975 following an ex-
tended illness. Mr. Seller's special research interest was the biology and
ecology of Hymenoptera, especially Sphecidae and Pompilidae. Another
who was a long-time friend of the program, although not a Research
Associate, was Dr. Charles H. Martin of Tucson, Arizona. Dr. Martin, a
world authority on Asilidae and Leptogastridae, died 21 October 1975. His
world-wide collection of Asilidae and Leptogastridae, as noted elsewhere
in this biennial report in greater detail, was purchased for the FSCA from
Dr. Martin several months before his untimely death.





Thirty-first Biennial Report


Research Associates of the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods
(Effective 30 June 1976)
1. Dr. Ross H. Arnett, Jr., Professor of Biology, The Biological Research
Institute of America, Inc., P. O. Box 108, Rensselaerville, New
York 12110. (Beetles of the United States; Oedemeridae of the
world; pollen-feeding insects).

2. Dr. Richard M. Baranowski, Entomologist, University of Florida,
IFAS, Agr. Research & Education Center, 18905 S. W. 280th
Street, Route 1, Homestead, Florida 33030. (Biology and Tax-
onomy of Hemiptera, especially of Florida).

3. Dr. Joseph A. Beatty, Department of Zoology. Southern Illinois Uni-
versity, Carbondale, Illinois 62901. (Spiders of North America,
especially of the southeastern United States).

4. Mrs. Elisabeth C. Beck, Entomologist, Bureau of Entomology, Div. of
Health, Fla. Dept. of Health & Rehabilitative Services. P.O. Box
210, Jacksonville, Florida 32201. (Insects of medical importance,
especially adult Chironomidae, Ceratopogonidae, and Culicidae
of Florida).

5. Mr. William M. Beck, Jr., Area of Entomology and Structural Pest
Control, Div. of Rural Development. School of Science and Tech-
nology, Florida A. & M. University, Tallahassee, Florida 32307.
(Ecology and taxonomy of aquatic insects).

6. Dr. Allen H. Benton, Dept. of Biology, Fredonia State College, Fre-
donia, New York 14063. (Ecology, distribution and host relation-
ships of Siphonaptera; life history of small mammals; wildlife
management; conservation education).

7. Dr. Lewis Berner, Professor, Dept. of Zoology, University of Florida,
Gainesville. Florida 32611. (Ephemeroptera of North America,
especially of the southeastern United States; bottom dwelling
insects of large rivers of the Southeast).

8. Mr. Dale R. Birkenmeyer, Metabolism & Radiation Research Lab.,
USDA, ARS. State University Station. Fargo, North Dakota
58102. (Blacklight trapping of insects in North Dakota and Min-
nesota; cotton boll weevil sterilization by chemicals and/or radia-
tion.

9. Dr. Franklin S. Blanton, 4015 S. W. 21st Street, Gainesville, Florida
32601. (Insects of public health importance, especially Ceratopo-
gonidae of Middle America; taxonomy of Culicidae and other






Division of Plant Industry


Diptera: ornamental insect control). (Emeritus Professor, Uni-
versity of Florida. Retired August 1974).

10. Mr. Vernon A. Brou, Route 1, Box 74, Edgard, Louisiana 70769,
(Lepidoptera: Sphingidae of the world).

11. Dr. William F. Buren, Professor, Dept. of Entomology and Nema-
tology, 3103 McCarty Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida 32611. (Taxonomy, biology, and ecology of Formicidae).

12. Mr. Paul H. Carlson, Dept. of Entomology and Economic Zoology,
Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29631. (Aquatic
insects, especially Ephemeroptera and Odonata).

13. Dr. Nell B. Causey, 922 Park Avenue, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701.
(Systematics of Diplopoda). (Dr. Causey retired from Dept. of
Zoology and Physiology, Louisiana State University, in April
1976).

14. Dr. Charles V. Covell, Jr., Associate Professor of Biology, Dept. of
Biology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, 40208.
(Lepidoptera; insects of Kentucky).

15. Mr. Terhune S. Dickel, 1652 N. W. 9th Avenue, Homestead, Florida
33030. (Lepidoptera of North and Central America; butterfly con-
servation; butterfly migrations).

16. Dr. Thomas W. Donnelly, Dept. of Geology, Harpur College State
University of New York, Binghamton, New York 13901. (Sys-
tematics, life histories, and distribution of Odonata of the world,
especially of Latin America and the West Indies).

17. Dr. Norville M. Downie, 505 Lingle Terrace, Lafayette, Indiana 47901.
(Coleoptera of North America). (Professor, Dept. of Psychology,
Purdue University).

18. Mr. Byrd K. Dozier, USDA, Box 436, San Ysidro, California 92073.
(Coleoptera of the New World; Buprestidae of the world).

19. Mr. Herbert L. Dozier, Jr., Rt. 1, Box 164-D, Seneca, South Carolina
29678. (Taxonomy of several families of Coleoptera, especially
Cocinellidae).

20. Mr. Boyce A. Drummond, III (Student Associate), Dept. of Zoology,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Lepidoptera,
especially the ecology, behavior, and mimicry of Rhopalocera of
the Neotropics).






Thirty-first Biennial Report


21. Mr. Peter C. Drummond, Rt. 1, Box 342, Micanopy, Florida 32667.
(Systematics of terrestrial and littoral Isopoda, especially of Flor-
ida and the West Indies).

22. Dr. William G. Eden, Sudden Shores, Route 1, Pell City, Alabama
35125. (Entomology & Nematology; Administration). (Dr. Eden
retired from Chairman, Dept. of Entomology & Nematology, Uni-
versity of Florida, in September 1975).

23. Dr. Thomas C. Emmel, Chairman, Dept. of Zoology, 421 Bartram
Hall, West, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.
(Population biology, life histories, taxonomy, evolution, genetics,
ecology of Rhopalocera, especially Nearctic and Neotropical
groups).

24. Dr. G. B. Fairchild, 16 N. W. 22nd Drive, Gainesville, Florida 32603.
(Tabanidae of the world, especially of the Neotropics; Psycho-
didae; Phlebotomus of the world). (Courtesy Professor, Dept. of
Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida).

25. Dr. Edward G. Farnworth, Project Manager, Research Associate,
Institute of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia
30601. (Tropical Lampyridae: bioluminescent behavior, ecology,
systematics).

26. Dr. Herman Flaschka, Chemistry Dept., Georgia Institute of Tech-
nology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332. (Coleoptera and Lepidoptera).

27. Dr. B. A. Foote, Dept. of Biological Sciences, 265 McGilvrey Hall,
Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242. (Systematics of Diptera,
especially Sciomyzidae, Chloropidae, Otitidae, Tephritidae, and
Micropezidae; ecology and life cycles of acalyptrate Diptera).

28. Dr. J. Howard Frank, Division of Health, Entomological Research
Center, P.O. Box 520, Vero Beach, Florida 32960. (Coleoptera,
especially Staphylinidae).

29. Dr. Arden R. Gaufin, Dept. of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake
City, Utah 84112. (Taxonomy, biology, and ecology of Plecoptera).

30. Mr. William G. Genung, Entomologist, University of Florida, IFAS,
Agr. Research & Education Center, P.O. Drawer A, Belle Glade,
Florida 33430. (Biology, ecology and control of insects of vege-
table crops, field crops and pastures).

31. Dr. Eugene J. Gerberg, Director, Insect Control and Research Inc.,
6601 Johnnycake Road, Baltimore, Maryland 21207. (Lyctidae






88 Division of Plant Industry

and Bostrychidae; Culicidae, particularly of the Tropics; arthro-
pods of the Cayman Islands, BWI; rearing techniques for various
insects, particularly mosquitoes).

32. Mr. Glen R. Gibbs, 9271 Marine Drive, Miami, Florida 33157. (Lepi-
doptera of southern Florida).

33. Dr. James T. Goodwin, 2122 Cross Key, San Antonio, Texas 78245.
(Taxonomy, ecology, and life history of Tabanidae). (Captain and
Consulting Environmental Entomologist, USAF Environmental
Health Laboratory, Kelly Air Force Base).

34. Mr. Harold N. Greenbaum, University Farm, Route 6, Dept. of Ento-
mology, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701.
(Hymenoptera, especially Symphyta).

35. Dr. Dale H. Habeck, Professor, IFAS, Dept. of Entomology & Nema-
tology, 201 Entomology and Nematology Res. Lab., University
of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Ecology and taxonomy
of Nitidulidae; immature Lepidoptera of North America;
Arctiidae, Noctuidae and Stenomidae of North America; biology
and control of vegetable insects; plant resistance to insects).

36. Dr. Gonzalo Halffter, Director, Museo de Historia Natural de la Ciu-
dad de Mexico, Nuevo Bosque de Chapultepec, Apartado Postal
18-845, Mexico 18, D. F. (Taxonomy of Scarabaeidae; zoogeog-
raphy of America, ecology and behavior of Coleoptera).

37. Mr. Fred C. Harmston, 1940 Larkspur Drive, Fort Collins, Colorado
80521. (Taxonomy of Dolichopodidae and Culicidae of North and
Central America; vector control associated with water resource
projects; Colorado tick fever, tularemia).

38. Mr. Donny Lee Harris, Entomologist, 1810 N. W. 23rd Blvd., Apt.
274, Gainesville, Florida 32605. (Carabidae; habitat manipula-
tion).

39. Mr. Edwin I. Hazard, Insects Affecting Man & Animals Lab., USDA,
1600 S. W. 23rd Drive, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
32611. (Taxonomy and biology of the Megaloptera; primary re-
search in insect pathology with special interests in the Micro-
sporidia (Protozoa) and virus diseases of aquatic arthropods).

40. Mr. Gerd H. Heinrich, Dryden, Maine 04225. (Ichneumoninae of the
world; birds of Africa, Europe and Asia).

41. Mr. J. Richard Heitzman, 3112 Harris Avenue, Independence, Mis-
souri 64052. (Nearctic Lepidoptera, all Rhopalocera; Heterocera






Thirty-first Biennial Report


of Missouri; life histories of Nearctic Lepidoptera; photography of
insects; identification of Nearctic Lepidoptera).

42. Mr. Roger L. Heitzman, Dept. of Entomology, University of Missouri,
Columbia, Missouri 65201. (Lepidoptera of North America, es-
pecially Geometridae).

43. Mr. John B. Heppner (Student Associate), Dept. of Entomology and
Nematology 3103 McCarty Hall, University of Florida, Gaines-
ville, Florida 32611. (Microlepidoptera).

44. Dr. Lawrence A. Hetrick, Consulting Entomologist, 1614 N. W. 12th
Road, Gainesville, Florida 32615. (Forest insects and wood prod-
ucts infesting insects, especially Isoptera). (Emeritus Professor,
University of Florida).

45. Mr. Harry 0. Hilton, P.O. Box 144, Shalimar, Florida 32579. (Lepi-
doptera of the southeastern United States and Mexico; insect
photography).

46. Mr. Ronald L. Huber, 2896 Simpson St., St. Paul, Minnesota 55113.
(Cicindelidae of the world; Nearctic Lepidoptera, especially
Sphingidae, Hesperiidae).

47. Dr. Fred Clifford Johnson, II, Professor, Dept. of Zoology, University
of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Biology of Odonata).

48. Mr. Roy 0. Kendall, Mountain View Acres, Rt. 4, Box 104-EB, San
Antonio, Texas 78228. (Life histories, spatial and temporal dis-
tribution of Rhopalocera of Texas and contiguous land areas;
interests include larval food plants, parasites, predators, dia-
pause, chromosomes, and migratory habits).

49. Mr. Charles P. Kimball, West Barnstable, Massachusetts 02668.
(Lepidoptera of North America, especially of Florida).

50. Mr. Harold L. King, 2215 La Salle Street, Sarasota, Florida 33581.
(Lepidoptera of North and Central America and the West Indies,
especially Lycaenidae).

51. Dr. Louis C. Kuitert, 2842 S. W. 1st Avenue, Gainesville, Florida
32601. (Aquatic Hemiptera of North America; biology and con-
trol of tobacco, peach, truck crop, pasture, and ornamental insects
of Florida). (Emeritus Professor, University of Florida, retired in
June 1976).

52. Colonel Lester L. Lampert, 17 Hillview Circle, Asheville, North
Carolina 28805. (Coleoptera).






Division of Plant Industry


53. Dr. James N. Layne, Director of Research, Archbold Biological Sta-
tion, Rt. 2 Box 380, Lake Placid, Florida 33852. (Ecology, be-
havior and physiology of mammals; general vertebrate biology;
hosts and geographic distribution of Florida Siphonaptera and
other parasitic arthropods).

54. Dr. James E. Lloyd, Professor, IFAS, Dept. of Entomology & Nema-
tology, 3103 McCarty Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida 32611. (Taxonomy, ecology and behavior of Lampyridae
and other luminescent insects).

55. Mr. Harold F. Loomis, 5355 S. W. 92nd St., Miami, Florida 33156.
(Taxonomy of western hemisphere Diplopoda). (Deceased 4 July
1976).

56. SSgt. Robert D. McManaway, PSC 3, Box 16243, APO U.S. Forces,
San Francisco, California 96432. (Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, and
Odonata).

57. Dr. Ellis G. MacLeod, Dept. of Entomology, University of Illinois,
Urbana, Illinois 61801. (Larvae and adults of Neuroptera of the
world, especially Megaloptera and Rhaphidioidae; fossil insects).

58. Mr. Bryant Mather, 213 Mt. Salus Drive, Clinton, Mississippi 39056.
(Lepidoptera, Trichoptera, Neuroptera, Mecoptera, and Cicin-
delidae of Mississippi; variation, distribution in time and space).

59. Dr. Edward L. Mockford, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Illinois State
University, Normal, Illinois 61761. (Systematics and biology of
Psocoptera of the world, especially of the New World).

60. Dr. William B. Muchmore, Dept. of Biology, University of Rochester,
River Campus Station, Rochester, New York 14627. (Taxonomy
and ecology of Pseudoscorpionida).

61. Dr. Martin H. Muma, P.O. Box 2020, Silver City, New Mexico 88061.
(Ecology of North American deserts; ecology, biology and behavior
of solpugids, spiders, scorpions, and tarantulas). (Entomologist
Emeritus, IFAS, University of Florida).

62. Dr. Gayle H. Nelson, Dept. of Anatomy, Kansas City College of Osteo-
pathic Medicine, 2105 Independence Avenue, Kansas City, Mis-
souri 64124. (Coleoptera; especially the biology and taxonomy of
Buprestidae).

63. Dr. John S. Nordin, 1826 Roan Drive, Warrington, Pennsylvania
18976. (Lepidoptera, especially Hesperiidae; ecology).






Thirty-first Biennial Report


64. Dr. Charles W. O'Brien, Area of Entomology and Structural Pest
Control, Div. of Rural Development, School of Science and Tech-
nology, Florida A. & M. University, Tallahassee, Florida 32307.
(Taxonomy of Curculionidae; ecology of Coleoptera; biogeography
of Coleoptera).

65. Dr. Lois B. O'Brien, 3009 Brookmont Drive, Tallahassee, Florida
32303. (Fulgoroidae of the world).

66. Dr. Dennis R. Paulson, Dept. of Zoology, University of Washington,
Seattle, Washington 98105. (Systematics, zoogeography, ecology,
behavior, and life history of Odonata of North and Central
America; systematics and ecology of Vertebrata, especially Am-
phibia, Reptilia, and Aves).

67. Dr. William L. Peters, Chairman, Area of Entomology and Struc-
tural Pest Control, Div. of Rural Development, School of Science
and Technology, Florida A. & M. University, Tallahassee, Flor-
ida 32307. (Higher classification of Ephemeroptera; ecology and
life history of Florida Ephemeroptera).

68. Mr. William H. Pierce, Division of Plant Industry, Fla. Dept. of
Agriculture & Consumer Services, P.O. Box 1269, Gainesville,
Florida 32602. (Taxonomy and ecology of Dolichopodidae and
Ephydridae).

69. Dr. Charles C. Porter, Dept. of Biology, Fordham University, Bronx,
New York 10458. (Ichneumonidae of the New World).

70. Dr. John E. Porter, National Sanitation Inspection Serv., 5790 W.
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida 33144. (Culicidae; public health
entomology).

71. Dr. George W. Rawson, 10405 Amherst Avenue, Silver Springs,
Maryland 20902. (Nearctic Rhopalocera, life history study, and
conservation of rare and threatened butterflies).

72. Dr. Walfried J. Reinthal, 4026 Sequoyah Avenue, Knoxville, Tennes-
see 37919. (Ecology, systematics and distribution of Rhopalocera
in Oklahoma, Tennessee, Great Smoky Mountains National Park,
Virgin Island National Park, Puerto Rico and all Caribbean
area, including Trinidad and Tobago, and Central America).

73. Dr. Jonathan Reiskind, Associate Professor, Dept. of Zoology, 428
Life Sciences Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Flor-
ida 32611. (Systematics, ecology and behavior of Arachnida, es-
pecially Clubionidae; mimicry).






Division of Plant Industry


74. Mr. John N. Reynolds, Curator, Area of Entomology and Structural
Pest Control, Div. of Rural Development, School of Science and
Technology, Florida A. & M. University, Tallahassee, Florida
32307. (Insects in general; arthropod curatorial procedures and
techniques).

75. Mr. William Rosenberg, P.O. Box 366, Hazelwood, North Carolina
28738. (Coleoptera).

76. Dr. Reece I. Sailer, 3847 S. W. 6th Place, Gainesville, Florida
32607. (Biological control of insect pests and weeds. Taxonomy
of Heteroptera). (Graduate Research Professor, Dept. of Ento-
mology and Nematology, University of Florida).

77. Mr. Joe Schuh, 4039 Shasta Way, Klamath Falls, Oregon 97601.
(Insects of North America, especially of Oregon; Hemiptera;
Coleoptera; agricultural insect control).

78. Dr. Kenneth A. Spencer, Exwell Farm, Bray Shop, Callington
PL178QJ, Cornwall, England. (Diptera; biology, taxonomy and
zoogeography of Agromyzidae of the world).

79. Mr. Carl E. Stegmaier, Jr., 11335 N. W. 59th Avenue, Hialeah,
Florida 33012. (Life history and ecology of Tephritidae, Chlorop-
idae, and Agromyzidae associated with their host plants and para-
sites. Studies on the interrelationships of insects associated with
native plants, especially the native weeds of south Florida).

80. Dr. Karl J. Stone, 813 N. W. 20th Street, Minot, North Dakota
58701. (Taxonomy and natural history of spiders; biological con-
trol).

81. Mr. Gayle T. Strickland, 5116 Highland Road, Apt. 28, Baton Rouge,
Louisiana 70808. (Lepidoptera, including distribution, life his-
tories).

82. Dr. H. F. Strohecker, Emeritus Professor, Dept. of Biology, Univer-
sity of Miami, P. O. Box 249118, Coral Gables, Florida 33124.
(Endomychidae of the world; Orthoptera of the new world).

83. Mr. William B. Tappan, Associate Entomologist, University of
Florida, IFAS, Agriculture Research & Education Center, P. O.
Box 470, Quincy, Florida 32351. (Biology and control of insects
and nematodes attacking shade-grown cigarwrapper and flue-
cured tobaccos).

84. Mr. Dade W. Thornton, 3226 N. W. 11th Court, Miami, Florida






Thirty-first Biennial Report


33127. (Coleoptera of North and Central America and the West
Indies; photography).

85. Dr. Mac A. Tidwell, Dept. of Zoology, Louisiana State University,
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803. (Taxonomy and ecology of Tab-
anidae).

86. Mr. Karl R. Valley, Pennsylvania Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of
Plant Industry, 2301 N. Cameron Street, Harrisburg, Pennsyl-
vania 17120. (Biology and life history of acalyptrate Diptera).

87. Dr. Thomas J. Walker, Jr., Entomologist, IFAS, Dept. of Ento-
mology & Nematology, 3103 McCarty Hall, University of Flor-
ida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Taxonomy of ensiferan Orthop-
tera; insect acoustics).

88. Dr. Howard K. Wallace, Emeritus Professor, Dept. of Zoology, 320
Bartram Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.
(Araneida, especially Lycosidae and Salticidae of the eastern
United States).

89. Dr. Minter J. Westfall, Jr., Professor, Dept. of Zoology, 411 Bartram
Hall, West, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.
(Taxonomy, life history, ecology, zoogeography and behavior of
Odonata, especially of the new world).

90. Dr. Willard H. Whitcomb, Entomologist, IFAS, Dept. of Ento-
mology & Nematology, University of Florida 3103 McCarty Hall,
Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Biological and integrated control of
arthropods, especially with reference to Florida; taxonomy and
ecology of spiders and ants).

91. Mr. Joseph Wilcox, 6451 Vista del Sol, Anaheim, California 92817.
(Asilidae of North America, Mydidae of the world).

92. Dr. Nixon Wilson, Dept. of Biology, University of Northern Iowa,
Cedar Falls, Iowa 50613. (Vertebrate ectoparasites, especially
Ixodidae).

93. Dr. Willis W. Wirth, Systematic Entomology Laboratory, USDA,
% U.S. National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C.
20560 (Systematics of Diptera, especially aquatics, Ceratopo-
gonidae, Ephydridae, and Chironomidae).

94. Dr. D. O. Wolfenbarger, Consulting Entomologist, 29220 S.W. 187
Avenue, Homestead, Florida 33030. (Truck crop, ornamentals





Division of Plant Industry


and tropical fruit insects; insect dispersion). (Retired from
University of Florida in June 1974).

95. Mr. David G. Young (Student Associate), Dept. of Entomology and
Nematology, 3103 McCarty Hall, University of Florida, Gaines-
ville, Florida 32611. (Psychodidae, especially the genus Phle-
botomus).

96. Dr. Frank N. Young, Dept. of Zoology, Indiana University, Blooming-
ton, Indiana 47406. (Neotropical and Nearctic aquatic Coleoptera).

97. Mr. Charles F. Zieger, 3751 Sommers Street, Jacksonville, Florida
32205. (Lepidoptera of North and Central America; insects as-
sociated with aquatic plants).








Publications by Research Associates
of the Florida State Collection of Arthropods*
Berner, Lewis. 1975. The mayfly family Leptophlebiidae in the south-
eastern United States. Fla. Ent. 58(3):137-156.
Fairchild, G. B. 1975. The North American species of Silvius (Silvius)
Meigen (Diptera: Tabanidae). Fla. Ent. 58(1):23-27.
Genung, William G., and Howard V. Weems, Jr. 1974. A grass stem in-
festing otitid fly (Diptera; Otitidae). Fla. Ent. 57(3):308.
Goodwin, James T. 1976. Notes on some "rare" eastern Nearctic Tabanidae
(Diptera); state records and host-parasite relationship for other
species. Fla. Ent. 59(1):63-66. Bur. of Ent. Contr. No. 333.
Greenbaum, Harold N. 1975. A new species of Acantholyda from Florida,
with keys to the adults and larvae of Florida species (Hymenoptera):
Pamphiliidae: Cephalciinae). Fla. Ent. 58(1):45-52.
1975. A new Doryctinus Roman from Florida (Hymenoptera:
Braconidae). Fla. Ent. 58(3):213-215.
Heppner, John B. 1976. Synopsis of the genus Parargyractis (Lepidoptera:
Pyralidae: Nymphulinae) in Florida. Fla. Ent. 59(1):5-19.
Johnson, F. Clifford. 1974. Taxonomic keys and distributional patterns
for Nearctic species of Calopteryx damselflies. Fla. Ent. 57(3):231-248.

*Published with support from the Fla. Dept. Agric. & Consumer
Serv. and/or including a footnote indicating affiliation as a Research
Associate of the Florida State Collection of Arthropods.






Thirty-first Biennial Report


Kendall, Roy 0. 1974. Two moth species (Pericopidae and Notodontidae)
new to Texas and the United States. J. Lep. Soc. 28(3):243-245. Bur. of
Ent. Contr. No. 282.
1974. Confirmation of Rhopalocera (Pieridae, Nymphalidae)
dubiously recorded for Texas and the United States. J. Lep. Soc. 28(3):
249-252. Bur. of Ent. Contr. No. 289.
1975. Larval foodplants for seven species of hairstreaks (Ly-
caenidae) from Mexico. Bull. Allyn Mus. Ent. No. 24:1-4. Bur. of Ent.
Contr. No. 312.
1975. Larval foodplants, spatial & temporal distribution for five
skippers (Hesperiidae) from Texas. J. Lep. Soc. 30(2):105-110. Bur. of
Ent. Contr. No. 313.
and W. W. McGuire. 1975. Larval foodplants for twenty-one
species of skippers (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae) from Mexico. Bull.
Allyn Mus. Ent. No. 27:1-7. Bur. of Ent. Contr. No. 316.
1976. Larval foodplants and life history notes for some metal-
marks (Lepidoptera: Riodinidae) from Mexico and from Texas. Bull.
Allyn Mus. No. 32:1-12. Bur. of Ent. Contr. No. 340.
Lloyd, James E., and W. B. Muchmore. 1975. Pseudoscorpions phoretic on
fireflies. Fla. Ent. 57(4):381.
Loomis, Harold F. 1975. New millipeds in a noteworthy collection from
Jamaica. Fla. Ent. 58(3):167-185. Bur. of Ent. Contr. No. 314.
__ 1975. Three new parajulid millipeds from Texas. Fla. Ent. 58(3):
217-220. Bur. of Ent. Contr. No. 315.
Mather, Bryant. 1974. Amblyscirtes carolina and A. reverse in Mississippi
and Georgia. J. Lep. Soc. 29(3):177-179. Bur. of Ent. Contr. No. 305.
Mockford, Edward L. 1974. The Echmepteryx hageni complex (Psocoptera:
Lepidopsocidae) in Florida. Fla. Ent. 57(3):255-267. Bur. of Ent. Contr.
No. 306.
1974. Trichadenotecnum circularoides (Psocoptera: Psocidae)
in southeastern United States, with notes on its reproduction and
immature stages. Fla. Ent. 57(4):369-370. Bur. of Ent. Contr. No. 307.
and Howard A. Evans. 1976. Descriptions and records of some
Philotarsidae from Trinidad, West Indies (Psocopter). Fla. Ent. 59(2):
171-182. Bur. of Ent. Contr. No. 339.
Muchmore, William B. 1974. Pseudoscorpions from Florida. 3. Ephactio-
chernes, a new genus based upon Chelanops tumidus Banks (Cherne-
tidae). Fla. Ent. 57(4):397-407. Bur. of Ent. Contr. No. 302.
1975. Pseudoscorpions from Florida. 4 The genus Dinochernes
(Chernetidae). Fla. Ent. 58(4):275-279. Bur. of Ent. Contr. No. 322.
1976. Pseudoscorpions from Florida and the Caribbean area. 5.
Americhernes, a new genus based upon Chelifer oblongus Say (Cherne-
tidae). Fla. Ent. 59(2):151-163. Bur. of Ent. Contr. No. 334.
and J. E. Lloyd (senior author). 1975. Pseudoscorpions phoretic
on fireflies. Fla. Ent. 57(4):381.
Muma, Martin H. 1974. Solpugid populations in southwestern New Mexico.
Fla. Ent. 57(4):385-392. Bur. of Ent. Contr. No. 298.




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