• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 Report of the division directo...
 Library
 Methods development
 Technical assistance
 Fiscal
 Bureau of apiary inspection
 Bureau of budwood registration
 Bureau of entomology
 Bureau of nematology
 Bureau of pest eradication and...
 Giant African snail
 Lethal yellowing
 Spreading decline
 Sugarcane rootstalk borer...
 Personnel training
 Bureau of plant inspection
 Grades and standards
 Grove inspection and citrus...
 Lettuce mosaic
 Plant products entering peninsular...
 Nursery site inspection
 Nursery site inspection
 Bureau of plant pathology














Title: Division of Plant Industry biennial report
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075925/00008
 Material Information
Title: Division of Plant Industry biennial report
Alternate Title: Biennial report
Abbreviated Title: Div. Plant Ind. bienn. rep.
Physical Description: v. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Division of Plant Industry
Publisher: Florida Dept. of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Publication Date: 1972-1974
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Plant inspection -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Plant diseases -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Dept. of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 26th (1964/66)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year ends June 30.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: 39th (July 1, 1990-June 30, 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075925
Volume ID: VID00008
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01242950
alephbibnum - 001511744
lccn - sn 86001883
lccn - sn 86001883
issn - 0888-9554
 Related Items
Preceded by: Biennial report

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
    Front Matter
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Table of Contents
        Page iv
        Page 1
    Report of the division director
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Library
        Page 5
    Methods development
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Technical assistance
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Fiscal
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Bureau of apiary inspection
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Bureau of budwood registration
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Bureau of entomology
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    Bureau of nematology
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
    Bureau of pest eradication and control
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
    Giant African snail
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
    Lethal yellowing
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
    Spreading decline
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
    Sugarcane rootstalk borer weevil
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
    Personnel training
        Page 129
        Page 130
    Bureau of plant inspection
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
    Grades and standards
        Page 136
        Page 137
    Grove inspection and citrus survey
        Page 138
    Lettuce mosaic
        Page 139
    Plant products entering peninsular Florida
        Page 140
    Nursery site inspection
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
    Nursery site inspection
        Page 146
    Bureau of plant pathology
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
Full Text
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
AND CONSUMER SERVICES
Doyle Conner, Commissioner


IellELIAL


DIVISION OF PLANT INDUSTRY


july 1, 11 2 -
imine 30,197 4


;O0







Division of Plant Industry

Thirtieth

Biennial Report

July 1, 1972 June 30, 1974


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
AND CONSUMER SERVICES
Doyle Conner, Commissioner
DIVISION OF PLANT INDUSTRY
Halwin L. Jones, Director



Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Division of Plant Industry
Post Office Box 1269
Gainesville, Florida 32602








FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF
AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER
SERVICES


DIVISION OF PLANT INDUSTRY



Plant Industry Technical Council


Vernon Conner, Chairman (Citrus)............................................ Mount Dora
Roy Vandegrift, Jr., Vice Chairman (Vegetable)........................ Canal Point
Lawrence W. Clements (Citrus) ......................................................... Bartow
Colin English, Sr. (Citizen-at-Large)................................................... Tallahassee
Foster Shi Smith (Forestry) ............................................................. Starke
Felix H. Uzzell (Apiary).................................................................. Sebring
Joseph Welker (Ornamental Horticulture)................................... Jacksonville
Fred J. Wesemeyer (Commercial Flower)..................................... Ft. Myers
Halwin L. Jones, Secretary............................................................. Gainesville




Administrative Staff


Halwin L. Jones, Director............................................................... Gainesville
S. A. Alfieri, Jr., Assistant Director......................................... Gainesville
G. D. Bridges, Chief of Budwood Registration....................... Winter Haven
J. K. Condo, Chief of Plant Inspection ......................................... Gainesville
H. A. Denmark, Chief of Entomology........................................... Gainesville
G. G. Norman, Chief of Methods Development............................ Gainesville
P. M. Packard, Chief of Apiary Inspection.................................. Gainesville
C. Poucher, Chief of Pest Eradication and Control................. Winter Haven
C. P. Seymour, Chief of Plant Pathology ..................................... Gainesville
A. L. Taylor, Chief of Nematology ........................................... Gainesville








TABLE OF CONTENTS

REPORT OF THE DIVISION DIRECTOR .......................................... 2
Library .......................................................... ......................... 5
Methods Development ........................................................... 6
Technical Assistance .............................................................. 9
Fiscal .......................................................... ............................ 11
BUREAU OF APIARY INSPECTION .................................... .......... 18
BUREAU OF BUDWOOD REGISTRATION ........................................... 28
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY .............................................. ............ 34
BUREAU OF NEMATOLOGY .............................................. ............ 91
BUREAU OF PEST ERADICATION AND CONTROL .......................... 105
Fruit Fly Detection ..................................................................... 105
Giant African Snail ...................................................................... 108
Lethal Yellowing ........................................................................ 111
Spreading Decline ..................................................................... 115
Sugarcane Rootstalk Borer Weevil ............................................. 121
Personnel Training ...................................................................... 129
BUREAU OF PLANT INSPECTION ....................................................... 131
Grades and Standards ................................................................. 136
Grove Inspection and Citrus Survey .............................................138
Imported Fire Ant ....................................................................... 138
Lettuce M osaic ............................................................................... 139
Plant Products Entering Peninsular Florida .............................. 140
Plants Imported by Florida Growers ............................................ 140
Premium Quality Citrus Trees .................................................... 140
Nursery Site Inspection .............................................................. 141
Soybean Cyst Nematode ............................................................. 141
Turf Grass Certification .............................................................. 146
BUREAU OF PLANT PATHOLOGY ....................................................... 147









This public document was promulgated at a cost of $3,770.89 or $3.77 per
copy, to inform the general public, Legislature, and other interested
parties on the programs and investigative efforts of the Division of Plant
Industry.















Gainesville, Florida


Honorable Doyle Conner, Commissioner
Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services
The Capitol
Tallahassee, Florida 32304


Dear Commissioner:

I am pleased to present herewith the 1972-74 Biennial Report for the
Division of Plant Industry.

Respectfully,



/ -y

HALWIN L. JONES, Director
Division of Plant Industry








REPORT OF THE DIVISION DIRECTOR

Halwin L. Jones

Major events of the 1972-74 biennium include the continued spread of
lethal yellowing. The Division phased out its cutting and removal program
and instituted an oxytetracycline injection program as a more practical and
effective method of control. The United States Environmental Protection
Agency approved a label on June 18, 1974, to market the antibiotic to aid in
combating the lethal yellowing blight. Oxytetracycline (sold under the trade
names Terramycin and Uri-tet) is now available to consumers in South
Florida through local nurseries, feed stores, and flower shops. The Division
of Plant Industry now distributes oxytetracycline to local governments at
one-half the wholesale price for injection of palm trees on public property.
Thirty-nine municipal governments have begun treatment programs for
lethal yellowing. Division personnel have assisted in training government
personnel in the application of the chemical. The Division's current lethal
yellowing program emphasizes oxytetracycline injections and the replanting
of coconuts with resistant Malayan palm varieties as the most effective
methods of controlling the disease. Helicopter surveys are still conducted
every 3 months in an effort to keep a check on the disease.
With a total of 191 Jamaican Tall palms victimized by lethal
yellowing at the end of 1971 throughout 2 counties, the casualty list has now
risen to an estimated 65,000 within the counties of Monroe, Dade, Broward
and Palm Beach.
In addition, 6 new genera of palms were believed to be affected by lethal
yellowing during the biennium. The new host list includes the Christmas palm,
Pritchardiapacifica and thurstonii, the Talipot palm, Arikury, Windmill, Date,
Canary Island Date palm, and Phoenix dactylifera.
The West Indian sugarcane rootstalk borer weevil, Diaprepes
abbreviatus, commonly known as the "Apopka Bug," was found infesting 2
nurseries during May and June 1974. Since the weevil had never been
found in a commercial ornamental nursery before, no recommended
treatment for certification of balled and burlapped or container grown hosts
of this pest had ever been established. However, research work by the
USDA and Division scientists has since indicated that the chemical Abate
(Biothion) shows promise as an effective larvicide. Certification for nursery
stock moving from infested nurseries requires balled and burlapped and
container stock material to be dipped in Abate and foliage must be sprayed
with carbaryl (Sevin). The plants are held for 7 days before they can be moved.
The weevil now infests some 32,640 regulated acres in the
Apopka-Plymouth area, of which 3,944 acres of citrus are infested.
The last live giant African snail, Achatina fulica, was found in July 1972
in Opa Locka. This infestation was discovered as a result of a reply from a
homeowner responding to a brochure he had received. A brochure campaign
was conducted in the summer of 1972 in an effort to locate any undetected
infestations of the snail. This campaign proved most successful.
Approximately 150,000 attractive pamphlets were mailed to all residents
surrounding a known infested area. An evaluation of the effectiveness of the








Thirtieth Biennial Report


campaign by the University of Miami indicated that about 50 percent of the
patrons who received the brochure read it and made a decision as to
whether or not snails were present on their properties.
Biometric surveys have been conducted regularly by the Division in
cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture. If results of
upcoming surveys continue to prove negative, it is expected that the snail
will be declared eradicated in April 1975. So far, results appear promising.
Other incidents of major importance during the biennium include the
relocation of the Budwood Foundation Grove, investigations into the
biological control of milkweed vine, and implementation of a new spreading
decline policy.
The number of nurseries under inspection this biennium increased by
845, bringing the total to 5,044 by June 30, 1974, in comparison to the 4,199
recorded in 1970-72. Nurseries were inspected on an average of 3.15 times,
compared with a 3.07 average for the previous biennium.
Citrus nursery acreage showed a slight increase during 1972-74, with
the amount of citrus nursery stock available for commercial grove use
totaling approximately 4.5 million trees.
Nursery stock in the state at the end of the 1970-72 biennium numbered
361,263,459 plants in comparison to the 366,033,200 reported at the end of
the 1972-74 period. Trees grown for reforestation are included in these
totals.
The old Budwood Foundation Grove, located on 491/2 acres of state
land near the intersection of Interstate 4 and US 27 near Disney World, has
been phased out and abandoned as a victim of "progress' The grove was
purchased by developers of a circus-oriented attraction. The new grove,
which is located on 80 acres of citrus on 4 tracts of land near Dundee, is
equipped with seed treatment facilities, a virus test greenhouse, a barn, and
a screenhouse. Bureau personnel were mainly involved with activities
concerning the relocation of the grove during the 2 year period.
The Bureau of Plant Pathology initiated investigations into the use of a
biological control agent for suppression of the milkweed vine, Morrenia
odorata, which plagues many Florida citrus groves. A new strain of the fungus,
Phytophthora citrophthora, is being tested in the control of the vine. This is
the first time a species of Phytophthora has ever been used in the biological
control of a major weed pest.
The Gainesville and Winter Haven plant pathology laboratories
processed 11,841 plant disease specimens and 59 new diseases were
reported for the State of Florida.
A new spreading decline policy was implemented, which stipulates that
citrus growers assume an increased percentage of the cost of the control of
the burrowing nematode, Radopholus similis, until July 1976, when the entire
cost of the buffer phase of the program will be financed by the Florida citrus
industry.
Biological buffers established during the biennium have resulted in a
net reduction of 111,571 linear feet of buffers being maintained during the
1972-74 period.
With an Environmental Protection Agency ruling which prohibits the








Division of Plant Industry


use of mirex bait in the control of the imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta,
in aquatic areas and coastal counties, the ant moved into 4 more counties
during the biennium. New imported fire ant infestations were detected in
Indian River, Hendry, Lee and Levy counties during 1973.
The Bureau of Entomology made 60,445 identifications from 11,988
samples received. A major inventory of the Florida State Collection of
Arthropods was completed in June 1974. The collection now contains
998,420 pinned specimens; 130,000 vials containing specimens in fluid
preservatives; 87,000 slide-mounted specimens; and 214,000 papered
specimens in curated form, with several million additional specimens awaiting
preparation.
Since the Biological Control Laboratory was dedicated in July 1973, 5
parasites and 5 predators have been tested under security measures by the
Division of Plant Industry to evaluate their effectiveness against plant
pests.
The Bureau of Nematology has continued to assist in the identification
of nematodes from nursery crops, turf farms, proposed nursery sites, soil
pits, and private homes.
Nematology reference facilities were improved during the biennium,
which aids in making more rapid and efficient identifications. Plant
specimens identified by the Bureau reached a new high of 1,938, compared
with 1,757 last biennium.
The Apiary Bureau continues to work in the detection and destruction
of honeybee colonies infested with American Foulbrood disease. During
1972-74, apiary inspectors examined 384,484 colonies in 10,155 apiaries and
found 2,850 colonies in 713 apiaries to be infected with the disease.
Reorganization of the Division's Technical Assistance Office, formerly
known as the Information and Education Office, took place during the
biennium. This office assists the technical bureaus in coordinating general
printing, including technical circulars and leaflets, as well as publicizing
Division policies and programs through press releases to statewide news
media.
During the biennium, the Methods Development Office supervised the
Division's capital outlay construction projects. Duties entailed long-range
planning and budgeting, pre-construction conferences for site selection, and
investigation and approval of construction documents and drawings.
The Division's library collection contained a total of 8,078 volumes as of
30 June 1974. Progress has been made in the cataloging and binding of library
materials, with 588 volumes cataloged and 555 volumes bound during the
biennium, making the collection much more functional to the staff.









Thirtieth Biennial Report


LIBRARY
Andrew Kolesar, Librarian


The library collection as of 30 June 1974 was 8,078 volumes. Upon the
approval of the Library Committee an extensive culling of the library
collection was started in July 1972. To date, this has resulted in
approximately 641 obsolete volumes being discarded from the collection.
This resulted in gaining much needed shelving space, while permitting the
collection to further develop and contain only the most significant library
resources. Essential purchasing coupled with our excellent existing collection
has enabled us to meet the technical needs of the Division.
Substantial progress in cataloging and binding of library materials has
been accomplished during this period. A total of 588 volumes was
catalogued and 555 volumes were bound, making the collection much more
orderly and functional to the staff.



1972-74 Acquisitions

Gifts of library materials were received from the following persons:
H.V. Weems, Jr., D.E. Stokes, R.P. Esser, R.H. Arnett, W.H. Pierce, F.W.
Mead, H.A. Denmark, L. Maxwell, G.W. Dekle, E.E. Grissell, L. Berner,
S.A. Alfieri, Jr., and the University of Florida Agriculture Library.

Gifts: (approximately) 3,359
Periodicals:
Exchanges 63
Gifts, regularly received,
(including state and
government publications) 140
Subscriptions (Paid) 181

The Collection

Size (Volumes as of June 30, 1972) 8,078
Purchases 318
Bindings 555
Microfiche units 143
Reels of microfilm 21

Job-Related Activities

(1) Assistant Librarian (courtesy appointment), University of Florida.
(2) Library Services and You. A paper presented at the Florida Department
of Agriculture Annual Business Conference, Tallahassee, 8 September
1972.








Division of Plant Industry


METHODS DEVELOPMENT
Gerald G. Norman, Methods Development Coordinator

Supervision of the Division's capital outlay construction projects is one
of the responsibilities of this unit. Since this requires a very considerable
amount of time, and has not been previously recorded here, this report
will be devoted entirely to this portion of our work.
The section's duties related to construction include long-range planning
and budgeting, various pre-construction conferences involving site selection,
investigation and approval, and participation in the development of design,
schematic and construction documents and drawings. They also include
cooperation and liaison with and between the several state agencies concerned
with construction, contracting, funding, and purchasing.
Supervision, consultation and arbitration are also required once
construction has begun with architects, engineers and suppliers. Collabora-
tion with other state and federal agencies may also be necessary in the
creation of some of the uniquely complex and specialized structures being
built.
After World War II many pesticides, superior to any previously known,
became available for agricultural use. Some of these were broad phase,
killing both harmful and beneficial insects; others were "hard types," with
long residual effects. Due to increasing concern among environmentalists,
most of these pesticides have now been restricted or their use has been
cancelled completely. To fulfill its function under law, the Division has had
to seek other means of protecting the state's agricultural interests from
dangerous pests and diseases. Two ancient agricultural processes,
fumigation and biological control, have been adapted to this purpose. by
means of modern technology.

Fumigation

In order to permit the movement of citrus into and through the
western citrus producing states, the Division designed, built and equipped a
prototype fumigation chamber, allowing in-place fumigation of truck/trailer
cargoes without off-loading the fruit. This was done by means of ethylene
dibromide vapors circulated within the trailer body at velocities in excess of
100 mph, and with complete vapor recirculation in less than 1 minute.
Although many self-styled experts maintained that this type of fumigation
could not be done, 2 additional permanent chambers have now been
constructed and are also being used successfully. During the 1973-74 fruit
shipping season, 1,318,841 cases (4/5 bu) of fruit were fumigated by these 3
units, thus ensuring continuance of a profitable market that would otherwise
have been closed to Florida citrus growers.

Biological Control Laboratory

Another outgrowth of continuing pesticide restriction is a return to the
use of biological control. Early applications of this technique were relatively








Thirtieth Biennial Report


simple and straightforward, usually using a harmless organism to attack a
specific pest. Unfortunately, most such direct methods have long since been
discovered. Contemporary procedures are much more complex, requiring
control and manipulation of the environment, and complete isolation and
security. The Division's first Biological Control Laboratory, completed
during the period covered by this report, is an excellent example of the
intricate requirements of the physical facilities necessary in this work. In
addition to humidity, light and temperature controls, this laboratory is
provided with differential negative air pressure (under vacuum) and also
contains 32 environmental control chambers within the structure where
even more precise controls of the environment can be produced. The design,
development, and successful completion of buildings of this kind and the
equipment they contain is highly complex. Other recent construction is listed
below.




1. 1 warehouse, 60' x 140', clear-span, all metal on a heavy-duty 6" steel
reinforced concrete slab (space in this warehouse has already been
increased by approximately 20% by the addition of a mezzanine).

2. 6 Orlyt greenhouses, 14' x 18'.

3. 1 receiving and holding greenhouse, 28' x 36'.

4. 1 headhouse, 16' x 46'.

5. 1 pumphouse, 8' x 10'.

6. 1 flammable storage unit, 8' x 10'.

7. 2 air-conditioned research greenhouses, 14' x 18'.

8. 1 security fence of 6' steel mesh, 1,750' long.

9. 1 well, 6' x 80'.

10. 1 water storage tank, 5,000 gal.

11. 6,750 sq. ft. of heavy duty access and driveway paving.


Construction plans for the future include:












GENERAL REVENUE
None


Winter Haven:
Arboretum
Sterilizer
Greenhouse
Warehouse

Total General Revenue:


Division of Plant Industry

1973-74 CARRY-OVER
NURSERY TRUST
Gainesville:
Quarantine Greenhouse $ 58,950
Fumigation Chambers 88,000
Warehouse 35,000


$ 52,11!
6,91w
14,12!
45,171

$118,32i


1974-75
Gainesville:


5

5
6

6


Pollution Control Unit $ 21,185

Total Nursery Trust $203,135
118,326

Combined Total Pending $321,461


Meetings Attended

Nov. 7-10, 1972 Florida State Horticultural Society, Miami Beach

Nov. 6-9, 1973 Florida State Horticultural Society, Miami Beach


Job Related Activities

1974 President, Florida State Horticultural Society

Secretary-Treasurer, Hughes Memorial Foundation Fund







Thirtieth Biennial Report


TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
E. M. Collins, Jr., Information Specialist

Technical Assistance is the new name given to this office and is
consistent with the programs and activities conducted by this section,
formerly known as the Information and Education Office.
Personnel are responsible for publications; news releases; feature
articles; a quarterly magazine; a bi-monthly newspaper; coordinating
general printing; public relations; still, motion picture and studio
photography; audio visual materials and training aids; exhibits; and other
duties as assigned by the Division Director.
Publications released by the Division of Plant Industry during the
biennium included: Publications of the Division of Plant Industry, 1915-1972;
Agromyzidae of Florida, Vol. VII; Scarab Beetles of Florida, Vol VIII;
Florida's Certified Nursery List; Grades and Standards for Nursery Plants,
Part I; Orchid Diseses; and Biennial Report, 1970-72.


News Bulletin

This quarterly magazine serves as an informational source for
nurserymen, growers and other persons in the agricultural industry. During
the biennium it had a controlled circulation of approximately 9,000, including
nurserymen, stock dealers, citrus growers, state and federal agricultural
officials, libraries in a number of countries, newspapers, magazines, and radio
and television stations throughout Florida. This publication provides
information on Division programs and serves as an official outlet for rules and
regulations concerning the movement of plants and plant pests in Florida.


Reporter

The bi-monthly house organ was distributed to all active and retired
personnel. Articles in the Reporter covered Department and Division policy,
as well as professional and job-related activities of the employees.


Still Photography

Photographs of Division activities, taken in the field and in the studio,
were provided for publication in the News Bulletin, Reporter, Tri-ology,
technical circulars, leaflets and major publications, and for distribution to
statewide news media.
The photo lab handles approximately 150 black and white work orders
each year, with nearly the same number of requests for color photography.
Photography was provided for all Division publications, and assistance
was rendered to other state and federal agencies, as well as to the
Division's technical bureaus.









Division of Plant Industry


Motion Picture Photography

Personnel filmed several public service announcements in Miami for
lethal yellowing with Commissioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner. The 30 -
and 60-second film spots emphasized the cutting and removal of diseased
palms and the planting of the Malayan variety of coconut palm as controls
for lethal yellowing.


Art Work

The Technical Assistance Office was without an artist for 3 months
during the biennium due to resignations and reclassifications. Approxi-
mately 175 art work orders were completed during the biennium. Maps,
charts, graphs, signs, posters, illustrations, and other visual aids were
prepared for Division bureaus and other agencies involved in programs
administered by the Division of Plant Industry. Layout was provided for
most Division publications, including the technical circulars, Tri-ology, News
Bulletin, and the Reporter. Layout was also prepared for publication of
Grades and Standards, Part I. Cover design and layout were provided for
the 1970-72 Biennial Report and for Orchid Diseases. A design was
completed for an arboretum of citrus varieties, which is being constructed in
Winter Haven.


Exhibits

A live fire ant exhibit, along with an exhibit depicting the general
activities of the Division of Plant Industry, was shown at Legislative
Appreciation Day in Tallahassee.
Other exhibits on Division activities were displayed at the Manatee
County Fair, Farm City Week in Cocoa, and at a boy scout show at Camp
Blanding.
Lethal yellowing exhibits were provided for the Miami Municipal
Flower Show and the Florida Nurserymen and Growers Association's
Annual Trade Show in Tampa.
An orchid disease exhibit was presented for the Ridge Orchid Society
in Winter Haven.
A portable exhibit of Division activities is now on the drawing board
with completion expected by mid-1975.








Thirtieth Biennial Report


FISCAL OFFICE
A.R. Mooneyham, Accountant

Summaries of the application of budgeted funds identified by the
Division's activities are contained in Tables 1 through 4 for the fiscal years
1972-76, respectfully. Each table lists the program components, based on
Florida's Planning and Budgeting System and are subject to approval and
adjustment, as applicable, by the Commissioner of Agriculture and the State
Legislature.
Table 1

1972-73 Allotments and Expenditures
(Actual)


Allotments Reserves


GENERAL ACTIVITIES

Administrative Direction
& Support

Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library-Methods
Development

Consumer Protection Maintenance
of Business Standards

Bureau of Plant Inspection
Truck Fumigation -
Citrus Tree Survey

Property Protection
& Preservation


386,175 13,299 372,876


1,043,580 39,774 1,003,806


Bureau of Entomology
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bureau of Pest Eradication
& Control
Fire Ant Control
Spreading Decline
Fruit Fly Survey
& Control
Snail Eradication


258,851
217,074
128,292
131,078
121,673


9,094
7,833
4,657
3,969
4,004


249,757
209,241
123,635
127,109
117,669


74,519 9,288 65,231


180,128
217,692
125,698


33,762
4,001
10,378


146,366
213.691
115,320


10,485 4,451


Expenditures


6.034









Division of Plant Industry


Weevil Eradication
Lethal Yellowing

Total Property
Protection & Preservation

Total General Activities


FIXED CAPITAL OUTLAY



Warehouse Joist Gainesville
Quarantine Greenhouse
Gainesville
Bio-Control Unit Gainesville
Air-Conditioner, Orlyt
Greenhouse, Gainesville

Total Fixed Capital Outlay


Allotments

81,451
194,075

1,741,016


3,170,771


General
Revenue

3,828
6,472

274,400
18,528


303,228


Reserves

4,980
1,854

98,271


151,344


Expenditures

76,471
192,221

1,642,745


3,019,427


Trust Expenditures

3,828
58,950 65,422

52,600 327,000
18,528


111,550 414,778








Thirtieth Biennial Report


Table 2

1973-74 Allotments and Expenditures
(Actual)


General
Revenue


Trust Expenditures


GENERAL ACTIVITIES


Administrative Direction
& Support

Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library-Methods
Development

Consumer Protection-Maintenance
of Business Standards

Bureau of Plant Inspection
Truck Fumigation
Tree Survey

Property Protection
& Preservation

Bureau of Entomology
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bureau of Pest Eradication
& Control
Fire Ant Control
Spreading Decline
Fruit Fly Survey & Control
Snail Eradication
Weevil Eradication
Lethal Yellowing
Bio-Control Laboratory

Total Property Protection
& Preservation


350,159 32,577 382,736


1,014,255 147,957 1,162,212


263,838
211,464
129,928
136,533
131,589

48,763


105,570
171,866
137,428
3,766
29,518
230,895
19,118

1,620,276


263,838
211,464
129,928
136,533
131,589

48,763


60,442 166,012
151,702 323,568
137,428
27,361 31,127
11,158 40,676
230,895
19,118

250,663 1,870,939


2,984,690 431,197 3,415,887


Total General Activities








14 Division of

FIXED CAPITAL OUTLAY
ALLOTMENTS



Warehouse Insecticides
Gainesville
Entomology Wing Gainesville
Citrus Budwood Greenhouse
Winter Haven
Citrus Budwood Screenhouse
Winter Haven
Fumigation Chambers (2 units)
Gainesville

Total Fixed Capital Outlay
Allotments

TOTAL ALL APPROPRIATIONS


Plant Industry


General
Revenue



425,297
31,723


Trust

35,000


19,465


88,000


Total


35,000

425,297
31,723

19,465

88,000


476,485 123,000 599,685


3,461,175 554,197 4,015,372








Thirtieth Biennial Report


Table 3

1974-75 Allotments and Expenditures
(Estimates)

General
Revenue Trust Total

GENERAL ACTIVITIES


Administrative Direction & Support

Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library-Methods
Development

Consumer Protection-Maintenance
of Business Standards

Bureau of Plant Inspection
Truck Fumigation-Tree Survey

Total Consumer Protection
Maintenance of Business
Standards


456,997 78,780 535,777


1,021,640
116,150

1,137,790


131,852
39,526

171,378


153,492
155,676

1,309,168


Property Protection
& Preservation


Bureau of Entomology
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bureau of Pest Eradication
& Control
Fire Ant Control
Spreading Decline
Fruit Fly Survey & Control
Snail Eradication
Weevil Eradication
Lethal Yellowing
Bio-Control Laboratory

Total Property Protection
& Preservation

Total General Activities


300,513
254,035
164,354
163,824
154,140

51,533


291,323
345,333
198,368
10,670
157,831
420,085
30,000

2,542,009


4,136,796


300,513
254,035
164,354
163,824
5,000 159,140


51,533


100,060 391,383
177,147 522,480
198,368
31,296 41,966
11,925 169,756
420,085
30,000

325,428 2,867,437


575,586


4,712,392









16 Division of Plant Industry

FIXED CAPITAL OUTLAY
ALLOCATION General
Revenue Trust Total
Additions & Improvements 118,300 118,300
Winter Haven
Entomology Wing (planning) 4,000 4,000
Gainesville
Pollution Control Gainesville 21,300 21,300

Total Fixed Capital Outlay 122,300 21,300 143,600
Allocations

TOTAL ALL APPROPRIATIONS 4,259,096 596,886 4,855,992








Thirtieth Biennial Report


Table 4

1975-76 Allocations
(Requested)

General
Revenue Trust Total

GENERAL ACTIVITIES


Administrative Direction & Support

Director-Fiscal-Technical
Assistance-Library-Methods
Development

Consumer Protection-Maintenance
of Business Standards


Bureau of Plant Inspection 1,198,450
Truck Fumigation-Tree Survey 142,991
Total Consumer Protection Maintenance


of Business Standards


Property Protection & Preservation

Bureau of Entomology
Bureau of Plant Pathology
Bureau of Nematology
Bureau of Apiary Inspection
Bureau of Citrus Budwood
Registration
Bureau of Pest Eradication
& Control
Fire Ant Control
Spreading Decline
Fruit Fly Survey & Control
Snail Eradication
Weevil Eradication
Lethal Yellowing
Bio-Control Laboratory

Total Property Protection
& Preservation

Total General Activities

FIXED CAPITAL OUTLAY
No Fixed Capital Outlay Items
were requested for FY 1975-76


1,341,441



347,997
324,461
221,653
178,085
218,550


510,603 36,968 547,571


163,635


163,635


1,362,085
142,991

1,505,076


347,997
324,461
221,653
178,085
218,550

73,508


73,508


452,306
447,365
225,495
11,140
178,952
510,398
35,179


100,000 552,306
155,546 602,911
225,495
34,050 45,190
13,117 192,069
510,398
35,179


3,225,089 302,713


5,077,133 503,316


3,527,802


5,580,449








Division of Plant Industry


BUREAU OF APIARY INSPECTION
Philip M. Packard, Chief of Apiary Inspection

The original and continuing objective of the Apiary Bureau is the
detection and destruction of honeybee colonies infected with a disease
known as American foulbrood. In order to be successful in this activity,
Florida apiary inspectors are methodically examining the brood of hundreds
of thousands of honeybee colonies located throughout Florida. In addition to
the inspection of native honeybee colonies, apiary inspectors are constantly
on the alert for bee diseases which might be brought into Florida by
migratory beekeepers. The examination of native, migratory and so-called
backyard honeybee colonies coupled with the destruction of infected colonies
has kept sources of infection to very low levels.
Informing small beekeepers of the advantages of using disease preven-
tative chemicals continues to be an important objective of the Apiary
Bureau.

Brazilian Bee
Regulatory officials and researchers are vitally concerned about the
possible introduction of the Brazilian bee into the United States.
The still unsolved problem of the identification of the Brazilian bee is of
foremost importance to both researchers and regulatory officials as they
search for some method of controlling the spread of this unwanted insect.
Since its introduction and accidental release in Brazil in 1957, the
African bee (Apis mellifera adansonii) has spread over most of South
America, interbreeding with native South American honeybees and forming
a hybrid cross known as the Brazilian bee.
This exceptionally aggressive and ferocious strain of honeybee has
become a serious public nuisance and a major problem to the beekeeping
industry of South America. The Brazilian bee not only attacts intruders but
takes over hives of other honeybee strains. It forages so aggressively that
other strains of honeybees kept by beekeepers have virtually disappeared in
areas where the Brazilian honeybee has taken over.
With the finding of the mite Acarapis woodi (Rennie) on the Brazilian
honeybee, regulatory officials of the United States are doubly concerned
when faced with the possible introduction of the tenacious Brazilian
honeybee plus the possible entry into the United States of the mite. It is
agreed that even with chemical and biological control methods in Central
America, there remains a real possibility that the Brazilian bee will be
introduced by travelers between South and North America. If introduced
and retains its aggressive characteristics, the Brazilian bee certainly would
affect beekeeping in most of the United States.

Chalk Brood

A fungus disease called "Chalk brood," caused by a fungus,
Ascosphaera apis var. major (Prokschl & Zobl) Ovie & Spiltoir, appeared
frequently in Florida during the first year of the biennium. In some cases








Thirtieth Biennial Report


this fungus reached epidemic stages, hampering the spring buildup of
colonies before the citrus bloom. It is reported that Chalk brood has caused
important losses in France, Switzerland, Italy, Austria, Poland, and
Romania. In the United States it has been reported in nearly every state in
the nation.
Experiments in Europe with a fungicide called "Thiabendazole" showed
some control of Chalk brood. Tests with other fungicides showed some
control of mycoses (diseases caused by fungus organisms), but were found
toxic to all stages of the honeybee including egg, larva, pupa, and adult.
Consequently, they were ruled out as controls for Chalk brood. During the
second year of the biennium, Chalk brood in Florida did not appear to reach
epidemic proportions, thereby causing no real economic losses.


Resume of Bureau of Apiary Inspection Activities

1972-73 1973-74

Apiaries inspected 5,353 4,802
Colonies inspected 193,382 191,102
Counties inspected 60 55
Apiaries infected with AFB 420 293
Colonies infected with AFB 1,702 1,148
AFB colonies destroyed 1,702 1,148
Apiaries with new infections of AFB 308 195
Florida Permits issued 752 827
Special Entry Permits issued 212 258
Point-to-Point Permits issued 117 149
Certificates issued 114 139

During the biennium, apiary inspectors examined 384,484 colonies in
10,155 apiaries and found 2,850 colonies in 713 apiaries to be infected with
American foulbrood. The Apiary Bureau issued 470 permits for 148,137
colonies of out-of-state bees to move into Florida, and 266 special moving
permits for moving from point to point within the state. Florida beekeepers
were issued 1,579 moving permits and 253 certificates of inspection. The
sum of $22,341 was paid to Florida beekeepers in compensation for bees and
equipment destroyed because of American foulbrood. The operating cost of
the Bureau was $207,902, or approximately $0.54 per colony inspection.
During the biennium, 5 beekeepers reported 132 honeybee colonies
stolen. Memorandums were sent to all apiary inspectors giving the
description of this stolen equipment in an attempt to locate the missing
items.

Road Guard Report
Monthly reports from the road guard stations during the biennium
indicated 93,697 colonies and 154,137 supers moved into Florida from other
states. Road guard reports also showed 97,299 colonies and 125,304 supers








Division of Plant Industry


left Florida for destinations across the nation.
Personnel of the Bureau of Apiary Inspection examined and certified
24,071 colonies for queen and package bee producers. Apiary reports
indicated 110,289 colonies were inspected and certified for shipment to the
following states: Connecticut 586; Georgia 11,695; Illinois 1,489; Iowa -
1,247; Kansas 1,727; Maine 1,941; Maryland 1,923; Massachusetts -
1,244; Minnesota 11,238; Nebraska 364; New Jersey 649; New York -
10,670; North Carolina 296; North Dakota 21,102; Ohio 5,971;
Pennsylvania 4,322; South Carolina 5; South Dakota 15,043; Tennessee -
72; Texas 442; Virginia 1,143; West Virginia 2,599; and Wisconsin 14,521.

Honey Certification Program

During the biennium, apiary inspectors sampled 417 drums of Tupelo
honey and delivered 111 composite samples to the Department's Food
Laboratory for analysis and certification. These samples were examined for
flavor, color, soluable solids, moisture, and pollen count. Ninety-two
composite samples from 352 barrels were certified as Tupelo honey. Nineteen
samples from 65 barrels failed to certify as Tupelo honey. Moisture content
of the samples averaged 17.5 percent.

Diseased Larval Examinations

The Chief of Apiary inspection made 42 microscopic examinations of
decomposed honeybee larvae during the 1972-73 fiscal year. In 1973-74, 39
microscopic examinations were made. The smears were sent in by apiary
inspectors and beekeepers to determine the pathogen that caused the death
of the larvae.
Twenty-three dead adult honeybee samples were sent to the
Department's Pesticide Residue Laboratory for analysis and pesticide
identification.

Inspection

Apiaries Inspected Colonies Inspected

Inspectors 1972-73 1973-74 1972-73 1973-74 Biennium

0. C. Albritton 694 702 30,915 34,023 64,938
J. R. Hall 77 3,148 3,148
D. W. Helle 827 606 19,752 18,325 38,077
J. C. Herndon 496 477 26,892 25,631 52,523
W. R. Johnson 490 520 19,365 24,293 43,658
W. M. Langston 375 134 17,110 5,930 23,040
M. C. Morgan 669 272 23,540 9,183 32,723
P. M. Packard 206 280 8,568 10,368 18,936
L. Putnal 463 576 21,927 26,381 48,308
H. W. Russell 603 618 12,108 14,527 26,635
J. B. Young 530 540 13,205 19,293 32,498
5,353 4,802 193,382 191,102 384,484








Thirtieth Biennial Report


Compensation


Colonies Destroyed


Compensation


1972-73 1973-74 1972-73 1973-74 Biennium


0. C. Albritton
J. R. Hall
D. W. Helle
J. C. Herndon
W. R. Johnson
W. M. Langston
M. C. Morgan
P. M. Packard
L. Putnal
H. W. Russell
J. B. Young


250 63
-27
142 82
134 168
365 315
170
399 93
37 39
137 218
117 110
11 33

1,702 1,148


Expenditures


1972-73 1973-74 Biennium


Capital Outlay
1 Ford Pickup


Salaries
Administrative & Field

Expenses
Travel
Office Supplies
Gas & Oil
Tires & Batteries
Repairs
Printing
Field & Maintenance Supplies
Insurance
Telephone
Personnel Board
Vouchers Other Than Travel


GRAND TOTAL


$ 94,011.00 $ 81,288.62 $175,299.62


$ 12,179.00 $ 12,356.00 $ 24,535.00
82.00 213.00 295.00
4,434.00 3,672.33 8,106.33
726.00 772.70 1,498.70
1,955.00 2,445.72 4,400.72
329.00 157.00 486.00
541.00 216.49 757.49
1,377.00 1,532.00 2,909.00
100.00 132.00 232.00
299.00 176.00 475.00
62.00 268.33 330.33

$ 22,084.00 21,941.57 $ 44,025.57
$117,953.00 $103,230.19 $221,183.19


Inspectors


$1,506.00

687.00
894.00
2,610.00
456.00
1,440.00
108.00
690.00
576.00
48.00
$9,015.00


$ 672.00
120.00
648.00
2,496.00
3,138.00

1,476.00
822.00
2,220.00
1,374.00
360.00
$13,326.00


$ 2,178.00
120.00
1,335.00
3,390.00
5,748.00
456.00
2,916.00
930.00
2,910.00
1,950.00
408.00

$22,341.00


$ 1,858.00


$ 1,858.00








22 Division of Plant Industry

Meetings

The following meetings were attended by the Chief of Apiary Inspection:

August 21-22, 1972 Beekeeper's Institute, Lake Placid.

September 14, 1972 Polk County Beekeepers Association, Bartow.
Presented a talk.

October 2, 1972 Georgia State Beekeepers Convention, Homerville.
Presented a talk.

October 18,1972 Greater Jacksonville Fair. Judged honey exhibits.

November 1-3, 1972 Florida State Beekeepers Association Convention,
Winter Haven. Presented apiary report.

January 22-23, 1973 Apiary Inspectors of America Convention, Madison,
Wisconsin. Toured USDA Bee Laboratory and attended class in
microbiology.

January 24-26, 1973 American Beekeepers Federation Convention,
Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

February 26, 1973 Central Florida Fair, Orlando. Judged community
honey exhibits.

August 15, 1973 Beekeeper's Institute, Camp McQuarrie, Astor.
Presented a talk.

October 12, 1973 Georgia State Beekeepers Association Convention,
Fargo. Presented a talk.

October 17, 1973 Greater Jacksonville Fair. Judged honey exhibits.

November 1-3, 1973 Florida State Beekeepers Association Convention,
Jacksonville. Presented apiary report.

December 13, 1973 Florida Agriculture Council, Orlando.

January 28-29, 1974 Apiary Inspectors of America Convention, Tucson,
Arizona. Elected director representing southern states. Toured Bee
Research Center and attended class in microbiology.

January 30, to February 1, 1974 American Beekeeping Federation
Convention, Hot Springs, Arkansas.

February 25, 1974 Central Florida Fair, Orlando. Judged honey exhibits.








Thirtieth Biennial Report


SUMMARY OF APIARY INSPECTION WORK
BY COUNTIES
July 1, 1972 to June 30, 1973


Apiaries Colonies
Infected Infected New
Apiaries Colonies American American Colonies Infect-
Inspected Inspected Foulbrood Foulbrood Destroyed tions


Alachua
Baker
Bay
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Calhoun
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
De Soto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Franklin
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Gulf
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Leon


61 61 30


3,806
3,086
197
220
2,474
1,793
1,366
249
108
4,172
5,839
1,996
94
2,931
134
408
744
473
711
3,442
627
3,281
7,787
509
7,159
8,090
516
3,810
514
1,117
2,532
13,045
1,960
3,958


County


3 6

3 20









Division of Plant Industry


Apiaries Colonies
Infected Infected New
Apiaries Colonies American American Colonies Infec-
County Inspected Inspected Foulbrood Foulbrood Destroyed tions


Levy
Liberty
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Monroe
Nassau
Okaloosa
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sarasota
Seminole
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Wakulla
Washington


29 85 85

1 2 2
2 10 10





65 311 311

4 15 15
1 4 4

38 215 215
3 5 5

13 20 20


TOTALS 5,353 193,382 420 1,702 1,702 308


4 46
209 7,314
8 311
58 1,390
67 2,369
41 455
12 301
16 128
3 120
385 14,212
7 260
95 1,714
90 2,967
102 2,690
492 23,711
80 1,065
21 147
172 7,003
1 2
23 1,440
166 7,497
29 1,340
52 1,484
158 9,126
179 11,166
128 5,946








Thirtieth Biennial Report


SUMMARY OF APIARY INSPECTION WORK
BY COUNTIES
July 1, 1973 to June 30, 1974


Apiaries Colonies
Infected Infected New
Apiaries Colonies American American Colonies Infec-
County Inspected Inspected Foulbrood Foulbrood Destroyed tions


Alachua
Baker
Bay
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Calhoun
Clay
Columbia
Dade
De Soto
Duval
Franklin
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Gulf
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Leon
Levy
Liberty


3,704
3,628
62
365
2,159
1,542
1,056
143
3,572
5,960
2,431
1,809
1,105
810
46
204
4,973
2,091
3,447
4,664
1,815
8,522
7,625
120
1,694
891
3,480
10,018
2,914
1,982
7
5,798


28 28








26 Division of Plant Industry


Apiaries Colonies
Infected Infected New
Apiaries Colonies American American Colonies Infec-
Inspected Inspected Foulbrood Foulbrood Destroyed tions


Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Nassau
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Sarasota
Seminole
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Wakulla
Washington


144
2,198
435
300
248
281
10,696
28
3,291
5,484
4,524
29,099
931
11
7,881
6
2,670
6,044
3,534
2,390
8,989
9,315
3,966


54 8


TOTALS 4,802 191,102 293 1,148 1,148 195


County









Thirtieth Biennial Report


YEARLY SUMMARY OF APIARY INSPECTION WORK


Apiaries Colonies
Inspected Inspected


June 30,
,,








,, 1


11 ,,
,,
,,



















,, 11
"t "
"l "
"1 "
"
"1 "
"t "
"t "
"t "
"
"r "
"t "
"t "
"t "
"t "
"
"l "
"1 "
"t "
"t "
"t "
"t "
"t "
"t "
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"r "
"r "
"t "
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"r "
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"t "


1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974


Year Ending


3,344
3,544
3,451
3,371
3,414
3,711
3,671
3,347
2,646
2,371
2,265
2,464
3,266
3,710
3,082
2,872
2,836
3,259
5,102
5,885
6,168
5,813
4,932
5,123
5,056
4,991
5,693
5,497
5,230
5,680
5,833
6,337
6,519
5,912
5,788
5,273
4,713
5,353
4,802


Apiaries
Infected
American
Foulbrood


Colonies
Infected
American
Foulbrood


73,415
72,795
64,668
70,655
76,851
81,950
83,354
80,823
73,649
69,262
71,161
87,674
98,147
105,678
105,296
95,405
88,206
92,267
135,168
157,388
176,616
162,885
159,692
153,677
149,227
152,288
173,538
169,411
166,641
179,861
189,802
197,833
218,493
192,651
185,752
176,608
176,153
193,382
191,102


131
98
173
416
234
371
698
524
456
379
959
683
391
406
369
772
578
1,366
2,158
1,421
1,180
1,121
1,623
1,329
1,422
1,271
1,053
1,546
1,614
1,709
1,340
1,768
1,712
1,707
1,317
2,092
1,683
1,702
1,148








Division of Plant Industry


BUREAU OF CITRUS BUDWOOD REGISTRATION
G.D. Bridges, Chief of Budwood Registration

On 29 November 1972, Florida's governor and cabinet officers acting in
their capacities as Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund accepted an
offer by Circus World, Inc., to exchange 491/2 acres of state land on which the
Budwood Foundation Grove was located for 80 acres of high land near Dundee
planted to commercial grove. The trustees' decision came after several months
of intensive search for a suitable alternate Budwood Foundation Grove site,
and careful study of the advantages and disadvantages of the proposed move.
The difference in value of the exchange properties would provide funds
($164,200) to defray moving expenses, construct facilities, and make
improvements needed to continue an effective Citrus Budwood Registration
Program. Activities associated with relocating the Budwood Foundation Grove
dominated the biennium.
Circus World officials made several requests to the Department for an
early exchange of deeds, and on 30 June 1974 the Bureau was able to
declare the moving, construction and phasing out activities substantially
complete.
Disease problems which have plagued the citrus industry for several
years became worse. Despite a massive research effort, the cause of Young
Tree Decline has not been identified. Tree losses continue to mount and are
especially heavy in areas of shallow soils. Presently it appears unlikely that
citrus on any rootstock currently in use will be completely immune to this
condition. Factual evidence demonstrating a rapid and widespread buildup
of tristeza virus infection was presented in the 1970-72 report. Now, effects
of this uncontrollable natural infection are apparent in areas, including the
east coast, where sour orange rootstock is widely used.
Exocortis indexing of presumably negative scion trees continues to play
a priority role in the overall virus indexing program of the Bureau in order
to meet the growing need for budwood suitable for use on Carrizo citrange,
Rangpur lime, sweet lime, and other exocortis susceptible stocks.
The extremely high incidence of exocortis in old-line budwood and the
greatly increased use of rootstocks susceptible to this virus bring into
perspective the Bureau's indexing and horticultural study projects with
nucellar seedlings. This continuing effort, begun in 1955, has thus far led to
virus indexing and horticultural screening of 799 individual candidate trees.
The outstanding trees from this large group now provide Florida's only
horticulturally tested and virus-free bud sources for 13 commercial varieties.
Cumulative individual tree yields amoig 49 (18-year-old) Foundation
nucellar Valencial seedlings ranged from a low of 944 pounds of fruit to a
high of 2,998 pounds. Such wide variation in fruitfulness, apparently a
heritable characteristic, effectively illustrates the necessity for careful
horticultural study.
Grower interest in the performance of the various scion selections and
rootstocks at the Budwood Foundation Grove continued to increase. On
several occasions these interested visitors came from locations a hundred or
more miles away to observe specific trees. Total budwood distribution for
the period from Foundation Grove trees reached nearly 1/2 million. More
than 118,000 bud-eyes of 'Hughes' nucellar valencias were supplied to growers,








Thirtieth Biennial Report


and other popular foundation nucellas accounted for most of the remaining
263,000 buds sold.
This biennium, Bureau activities produced $26,907 in revenue for the
state, or 57.6% of the total expenditures in all categories excluding salaries.

A. The 'Old' Budwood Foundation Grove 1960-1974
This planting was originally conceived as a budwood bank where
valuable registered bud-lines could be maintained free of viruses and
compared horticulturally under uniform conditions. Sixteen hundred grove
heaters and 4 wind machines provided cold protection at a location that was
the best available but not ideal, since only about 30 acres were warm
enough for citrus. By diligent use of cold protection equipment the grove
served its purpose and was brought successfully through periods of severe
cold including the costly December 1962 freeze. By 1967, however, natural
spread of tristeza virus in the area made it impossible to maintain a
virus-free planting there. A smaller planting was established in an isolated
location at the Ona Range Cattle Station in an attempt to maintain
tristeza-free bud sources, but by 1972 natural infection at this location was
also out of control.
Despite tristeza problems and size limitations, the 'Old' Budwood
Foundation Grove provided a valuable service to the industry. By
responding affirmatively to 1,291 separate official requests for registered
budwood, throughout its history the original Budwood Foundation Grove
provided the industry with 1,062,455 bud-eyes that were principally used to
produce privately owned registered bud-source groves. These scion groves
in turn became the budwood source for the 251/2 million registered nursery
trees produced by program cooperators to date. By adding to this total the
several million trees grown in company-owned nurseries where technical
registration was not maintained it becomes apparent that MORE THAN
ONE-THIRD OF ALL THE GROVE TREES IN FLORIDA ORIGINATED
FROM THE REGISTERED PARENT CLONES REPRESENTED IN THE
BUDWOOD FOUNDATION GROVE. (Table 1.)
Moreover, it was through the regular virus testing procedures and the
horticultural study of old-line and nucellar selections at the Budwood
Foundation Grove that the industry was able to utilize 2.8 million
exocortis-free nursery trees on such susceptible rootstocks as Carrizo
citrange et al by 1974.

Table 1. Rootstocks Used for Registered Nursery Trees, 1953-1974

Rootstock Trees (thousands) Percent

Sour orange 9,445.1 38.5
Rough lemon 8,293.1 33.8
Cleopatra 2,724.5 11.1
Carripzn itrange 2004.3 8.2


I


v - - -- ... b








Division of Plant Industry


Rootstock Trees (thousands) Percent

Sweet seedling 620.4 2.7
Trifoliata 603.7 2.5
Milam 436.5 1.8
Rangpur lime 85.6 .3
Troyer citrange 75.9 .3
Estes rough lemon 70.9 .3
Citrus macrophylla 47.9 .2
Sweet lime 45.4 .2
Ridge pineapple 14.1 .06
Miscellaneous and
not specified 77.8 .3
Grand total this analysis 24,529.9
Overall grand total 25,594.2


Yield records and fruit quality data recorded each year at the Budwood
Foundation Grove facilitated discovery and elimination of several mediocre
parents. Poncirus trifoliata was shown to be a useful rootstock for special
situations and certain varieties. Tree performance records also showed that
sweet lime could be an important rootstock in Florida unless future
problems develop with tristeza virus. By disposing of the older grove,
information on the eventual reaction of sweet lime rootstock to infection
with tristeza may be delayed several years.

B. The 'New' Budwood Foundation Grove, 1974-

Immediately following the land exchange decision on 29 November
1972, Bureau personnel began a continuing series of carefully coordinated
actions designed to get the new Budwood Foundation Grove established at
absolutely the earliest possible date. Since all the various properties had
nearly mature unharvested fruit crops at the time of Florida Cabinet action,
no physical change was possible on the Circus World properties until the
crops were harvested. Prior to the removal of fruit, the exchange groves
were quickly mapped, tree condition evaluated, and a tree count made by
variety. A decision was then reached on a location for the barn and service
area and priorities established for clearing the acreage necessary for the
new plantings. By intensively studying records of all trees at the old
Budwood Foundation Grove and searching for desirable additions among all
registered parents not previously represented, the basic design for a new
Budwood Foundation Grove began to emerge.
Harvesting delayed grove clearing operations until 17 March 1973,
when a bulldozer began work on 10 acres of grove area that included the
sites chosen for the new service area and a 1.2-acre nursery to be used to
produce trees for the future groves. Making the newly cleared land suitable








Thirtieth Biennial Report


for replanting was carried forward rapidly; the existing irrigation systems,
which had been removed to facilitate land clearing, were re-installed with
appropriate modifications to suit future uses.
The newly cleared land was leveled, tree roots left by the bulldozer
removed, and the nursery site and grove rows were fumigated. On 17 May
1973 a seedbed was planted at the new nursery site, and on 21 May the first
of 792 grove trees to be moved from the old Foundation Grove were planted
in the Dundee area. The work of lining out 28 varieties of rootstock
seedlings at the Dundee nursery began 8 June, using liners from a seedbed
established for that purpose at the old Budwood Foundation Grove site. The
budding of trees for the new Budwood Foundation Groves. began in
November 1973, less than a year after the decision to exchange properties.
By the end of the fiscal year (30 June 1974) more than 4,288 future
Foundation Grove trees were budded and growing well in the Dundee
nursery.
The additional usable acreage at the new Budwood Foundation Grove
site 80 as opposed to 30 provides enough flexibility to permit planting by
blocks based on fruit type and season of maturity. A design of this type
simplifies harvesting, promotes more efficient grove care, and makes the
collection of horticultural data much easier. Areas to be planted by spring
1975 include the following blocks:
Block A Mandarins and hybrids (2 acres)
Block B Navel oranges (4 acres)
Block C Late oranges and grapefruit (24.4 acres)
Block D Early and midseason oranges (10 acres)
Block E Rootstock types and nucellar selections (10 acres)
Block F Limes and lemons (2 acres)
Bud source trees of minor varieties have been established in the barn
area where they help with landscaping.
The extra space at the new grove site has several other advantages:
1. A wider selection of rootstocks is possible and can be expected
to produce much needed information for the industry.
2. An increased number of scion selections can be compared
horticulturally and, because replication is possible, smaller horticultural
differences can be determined.
3. The Bureau will become nearly self-supporting within 5 years, and
will produce income on 26 acres of mature commercial citrus while the
newly planted groves are being brought to a productive stage.
The rapidly increasing rate of aphid-spread tristeza infection, which has
been mentioned briefly, deserves additional comment. In order for the
Bureau to continue effectively serving the industry under present
conditions, certain physical facilities were required. Specifically, the need
was for adequate greenhouse and screenhouse space. A portion of the funds
provided by Circus World, Inc., have been used to supply these facilities.
Other facilities available at the new Budwood Foundation Grove site
include:
1. Area lighting and chain link fence for security around the barn
area.








Division of Plant Industry


2. A second storage barn to provide proper pesticide storage, to
house seed treatment equipment, and make available a protected area to
accommodate a plant growth chamber needed to eliminate disease from bud
lines to be maintained virus-free in the screenhouse. This expensive growth
chamber equipment is on loan from the United States Department of
Agriculture, Orlando.
3. All growing areas will have permanent-set irrigation, replacing
the antiquated portable sprinkler pipe used in the past.
4. A centrally supplied heating system will provide cold protection
in the nursery and cold pockets.
Working with the bloom of 1973, Bureau staff members carried out
moderately extensive closed pollination work in the old Budwood Foundation
Grove and test nurseries. From this work approximately 175 very young
nucellar seedlings representing 10 cultivars have been added to the pool of
potentially superior bud-sources for the distant future.

Cooperative Projects

Root rot and foot rot caused by the fungus Phytophthora parasitica
Dastur has become a serious problem in citrus nurseries. Repeatedly
cropping the same area, heavy fertilizer rates, and over irrigation, all
apparently contribute to the problem. Several cooperative projects carried
out jointly with USDA mycologist, Dr. Gordon R. Grimm, have sought to
find effective preventive procedures and methods for dealing with existing
infections. While definite progress has been made, the situation is not yet
under control.
Cooperative plantings with Dr. A. P. Pieringer of the Agricultural
Research and Education Center at Lake Alfred, containing registered
grapefruit, navel and pineapple oranges, produced their first horticultural
data based on the 1973-74 crop.

Indexing

Virus indexing of Foundation selections and parent candidates
continued as usual in several blocks at the Winter Haven test plot and the
'old' grove site, with the latter being phased out by moving 4 rows of
incomplete tests to the Lake Fanny nursery.
Exocortis tests of nearly 700 individual trees, potentially negative for
this virus, located in registered scion groves were conducted in the field
(Winter Haven test plot) during the 2-year period and the owners were
informed of results. Tristeza and exocortis indexing of Foundation trees and
parent candidates amounted to 3,000 tests which were conducted by the
Winter Haven pathology laboratory.
Program participants and Validated Source Planting cooperators, now
numbering more than 600, were represented in 15 new scion groves totaling
3,400 trees, and the production of nearly 3 million registered nursery trees.
Registration of more tnan 1,200 trees was accomplished during the
biennium.









Thirtieth Biennial Report


Miscellaneous Activities

Budwood Registration Program training was provided by G. D.
Bridges, C. O. Youtsey and L. H. Hebb for Division training classes XXV,
XXVI, XXVII, XXVIII and XXIX, 2 Florida Southern College advanced
citrus classes, and graduate students majoring in citrus from the University
of Florida. Visitors from 22 foreign countries were taken on field trips to
virus test plots and citrus groves in the area.
G. D. Bridges and/or C. O. Youtsey attended special meetings in
Gainesville or Winter Haven for staff, personnel and budget matters; and in
Tallahassee, Orlando, Lakeland and the Lake Alfred Experiment Station
in connection with Spreading Decline, Young Tree Decline, Florida State
Horticultural Society's Budwood Committee, and Nominating and Member-
ship Committee. Eight meetings of Florida Citrus Nurserymen's Association
and one Production Managers' meeting were attended.
Attendance and participation in the following professional meetings
took place: International Organization of Citrus Virologists Sixth
Conference, South Africa and Swaziland; Citrus Growers' Institute,
Kissimmee; Florida State Horticultural Society Annual Meetings, Miami
Beach; Indian River Annual Citrus Seminars, Vero Beach; USDA Annual
Field Days, Foundation Farm, Leesburg; University of Florida Fruit Crops
Seminar, Gainesville; First International Citrus Short Course and tour,
Gainesville and citrus growing area; Southwest Florida Citrus Producers'
Seminar, LaBelle; Polk County Extension Citrus Rootstock Seminar,
Bartow.
G.D. Bridges and C.O. Youtsey received the "Best Paper" award from
Florida State Horticultural Society for "Natural Tristeza Infection of Citrus
Species, Relatives and Hybrids at One Florida Location from 1961-71"
presented at the 85th Annual Meeting, Miami Beach.
Other papers or talks prepared for publication were:
Youtsey, C.O., and G.D. Bridges. Unreported stem pitting symptoms of
Florida Citrus. International Organization of Citrus Virologists Proceed-
ings of Sixth Conference.
Bridges, G.D. The Florida Citrus Budwood Registration Program.
Proceedings of the First International Citrus Short Course.
Lawrence, F.P., and G.D. Bridges. Rootstocks for citrus in Florida. Univ. of
Fla. Circ. 394.








Division of Plant Industry


BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
H.A. Denmark, Chief of Entomology

Summary

The Bureau of Entomology provides arthropod identification service,
conducts limited investigations of certain economic problems, assists in
instructing plant specialists, continues to build a general reference collection,
and conducts taxonomic investigations.
There were 60,455 specimens identified from 11,988 samples received
during the biennium. (An identification may consist of one or many
specimens representing a single species.) The Florida State Collection of
Arthropods (FSCA) now contains approximately 998,420 pinned and labeled
specimens, 87,000 slide mounts, 130,000 vials, and 214,000 papered specimens,
for a total of over 1,429,420 processed specimens.
The European garden snail, Helix aspersa Muller, has been eradicated
from the Disney World nursery area. This snail has been intercepted from
California on several occasions and has been successfully eradicated each
time.
The sugarcane rootstalk borer weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus (L), was
found in an ornamental nursery within the infested area for the first time.
Measures are being taken to treat all nursery stock leaving the site.
A leaf beetle, Microtheca ochroloma Stal, was found in a nursery on
watercress. This species has been reported from Alabama and Louisiana
feeding on crucifers and watercress. Apparently the beetle is established only
in one nursery.
The coffee bean weevil, Araecerus fasciculatus (De Geer), was found
infesting citrus in the Zellwood area in the fall of 1971. It causes early variety
fruit to drop due to primary feeding and ovipositing its eggs in the fruit. Each
year since the original find, the weevil has caused up to 80 percent of the
fruit to drop in localized areas.
Two adults of the gypsy moth, Porthetria dispar (Linnaeus), were
collected from a gypsy moth trap set out for the summer at a trailer camp
north of Wabasso, Indian River County, the latter part of September 1973.
The area is under heavy surveillance, but no additional specimens have been
found.
Red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta Buren, spread to 4 more
counties during 1973.
Giant African snail, Achatina fulica Bowdich, appears to have been
eradicated. The last live specimen was taken 13 April 1973, and the last
treatment was applied April 1974. The infested areas will be surveyed 2 years
following the last find.
Since the Biological Control Laboratory was dedicated in July 1973, 5
parasites and 5 predators have been tested under security measures to
evaluate their effectiveness against pest insects.
The Arthropod Introduction Committee has processed 79 requests
involving 153 species during this biennium. Anyone wishing to introduce
insects should write to:








Thirtieth Biennial Report


H. A. Denmark, Chairman, Arthropod Introduction Committee, Division
of Plant Industry, P. O. Box 1269, Gainesville, Florida 32602.



Bureau Activities
A Biological Control Laboratory was dedicated 12 July 1973 at the
Doyle Conner Building in Gainesville. The laboratory will house the
personnel representing 3 cooperating agencies (Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry; University
of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences; and the U.S.
Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service). It contains 3
separate laboratory-offices, a receiving and processing room, a security
holding room, a temperature control room with 32 individual temperature
control chambers, a temperature-humidity controlled room, and 4
greenhouses. Two greenhouses are equipped with vats for aquatic weed
research. Intake and exhaust air from fans and air-conditioning units in the
4,800 sq. ft. structure is filtered through a 60-mesh screen in the security
area. The security-holding room maintains a negative air pressure to
prevent airborne insects from escaping to the exterior through the
entrance.
This laboratory will serve as a clearing house for most of the
southeastern United States in the introduction of exotic species. The
International Biological Program (IBP), under the National Science
Foundation, administered by the University of California, has developed a
pilot program for pest management, stressing biological control. This project
has resulted in the selection of quarantine facilities at Gainesville for the
introduction of parasites and predators for control of pests of various crops.
An eulophid parasite, Pediobius foveolatus (Crawford), has been
successfully reared in the Biological Control laboratory. It was introduced
from India where it parasitizes the chrysomelid genus Epilachna. It was
released in Quincy 22 May 1974 for control of the Mexican bean beetle,
Epilachna varivestis Mulsant. If it becomes established in North Florida and
can overwinter, it should provide a means of biological control each spring
and summer as the Mexican bean beetle develops and moves north.
To date the USDA, ARS, and the University of Florida, IFAS, have
requested permission to test 5 parasites and 5 predators under security for
their effectiveness against pest insects.
The Arthropod Introduction Committee has been established to regulate
the movement of arthropods into and within the State of Florida. It is
composed of: H. A. Denmark, Chairman, Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry; Dr. C. L Campbell,
FDACS, Division of Animal Industry; Dr. John Mulrennan, Florida
Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services; Dr. W. G. Eden and Dr.
W. H. Whitcomb, University of Florida, IFAS, Department of Entomology
and Nematology; Dr. Donald E. Weidhaas, USDA, Agricultural Research
Service; and LL Col. Brantley Goodson, Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission.








Division of Plant Industry


Among the organisms for which requests have been made (249 to date)
are: Insects, millipedes, mites, scorpions, spiders, ticks, snails, and
protozoan malaria parasites. They are requested for a variety of studies,
including insecticidal tests, biological control investigations with parasites and
predators, genetic studies and ant colonies, scorpions, and spiders for both
scientific studies and as pets. During this biennium 79 requests have been
received, involving 153 species.
Funds were requested, but not received, from the 1972-73 and 1973-74
Legislature for doubling the space of the Entomology Bureau. Space is badly
needed in order to continue the development of the Florida State Collection of
Arthropods at its present rate.
R. W. Swanson developed laboratory rearing techniques for mass
rearing of Biosteres longicaudatus Ashmead. This led to a grant requested
by Dr. R M. Baranowski of the University of Florida, Agricultural Research
and Education Center at Homestead, for rearing and releasing B.
longicaudatis on Biscayne Key for the control of the caribfly, Anastrepha
suspense (Loew). Mr. Swanson is also working on the life history of the
papaya fruit fly, Toxotrypana curvicauda Gerstaecker, which could lead to a
sterile release program for the eradication of the papaya fruit fly.
E. E. Grissell was employed 1 June 1973 to identify and curate the
Hymenoptera. This position is particularly important with a strong
emphasis on the use of parasites for pest management programs.
PUBLICATIONS: Two volumes in the series Arthropods of Florida and
Neighboring Land Areas were published this biennium. Twenty-four circulars
and several papers in scientific journals were also published.
IDENTIFICATIONS: Identifications of the various arthropod groups
are made by 6 entomologists. The entomologists and the groups for which
they are responsible are as follows:
G. W. Dekle: Scales, mealybugs, and all immature
stages.

H. A. Denmark: Aphids, ants, mites, thrips, and ticks.

E. E. Grissell: Hymenoptera, except Formicidae.

F. W. Mead: Adult Lepidoptera; Diptera, suborder
Nematocera, which includes midges
and mosquitoes; Hemiptera; Homop-
tera: Psyllidae, plus suborder Auahe-
norhyncha, which includes leafhop-
pers, planthoppers, spittlebugs, tree-
hoppers, and cicadas.

H. V. Weems, Jr.: Adult higher Diptera (suborder Bra-
chycera), Aleyrodidae, Arachnida (ex-
cept Acarina), and miscellaneous
smaller arthropod groups.


Adult Coleoptera and Orthoptera.


R E. Woodruff:








Thirtieth Biennial Report


Dr. L A. Hetrick, University of Florida, IFAS, Department of
Entomology and Nematology, continues to do routine identifications of
termites. Dr. Dale Habeck, University of Florida, IFAS, Department of
Entomology and Nematology, identifies the Arctiidae adults and immatures,
and some other immature Lepidoptera. Drs. Minter J. Westfall, Lewis
Berner, and Fred C. Thompson, University of Florida, Department of
Zoology, identify the Odonata, Ephemeroptera, and Mollusca, respectively.
During the biennium 60,455 specimens were identified from 11,988
samples received. Identified specimens added to the collection include:
221,550 pinned and labled, 8,733 slide mounted, 8,446 vials, and 35,041
papered specimens. The Florida State Collection of Arthropods now totals
approximately 998,420 pinned and labeled, 87,000 slide mounted, 130,000
vials and 214,000 papered specimens, for a total of over 1,429,420 pinned and
processed specimens.
Seven insect cabinets were purchased during the biennium.
AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY: H. V. Weems, Jr., is the head curator
and is responsible for the overall development of the Florida State Collection
of Arthropods. He also coordinates the Research Associate Program and
serves as editor of the irregularly published series, Arthropods of Florida and
Neighboring Land Areas.
F. W. Mead is the survey entomologist for the state. The Cooperative
Economic Insect Report (CEIR) has been a joint effort of the USDA and DPI
for the past 18 years. Weekly reports of insect activities are forwarded to
Washington, D. C., where all state reports are combined and published in the
CEIR. Monthly reports are combined with other reports of DPI technical
sections and are published as the TRI-OLOGY Technical Report.
RE. Woodruff is in charge of the library development program for the
entomology portion of DPL The DPI library is the primary repository for the
taxonomic and general zoogeographic literature, while the Hume library at
the University of Florida will be the primary repository for all other subject
areas. Dr. Woodruff and Dr. Tom Walker coordinate the entomological library
purchases for the 2 organizations to eliminate costly and unnecessary
duplication.
G.W. Dekle works closely with the University of Florida, IFAS,
Department of Entomology and Nematology, and Bill Pierce, DPI, Bureau of
Plant Inspection, on economic insect and mite problems.
E.E. Grissell is developing and curating the Hymenoptera, particularly
the Chalcidoidea, as related to biological control.
Each man is responsible for curating the groups of arthropods assigned
to him.

Cooperative Library Agreement
R.E. Woodruff, Taxonomic Entomologist

All library activities are conducted as a part of the standing cooperative
agreement between DPI and the University of Florida. Special efforts are
being made to increase the book and periodical resources of both institutions
with a minimum of duplication of effort and finances. The DPI library








Division of Plant Industry


continues to be the primary repository for taxonomic and zoogeographic
literature, whereas the University of Florida emphasizes the other aspects of
entomology. We firmly believe the joint holdings now constitute the finest
such research and reference library in the southeastern United States.
Several recently accessioned collections of insects have been accompa-
nied by special literature collections on the respective taxonomic groups. In
many cases they are lifetime collections impossible to duplicate today at any
price. Since they often exceed the total other acquisitions they are a very
important part of our holdings. Following is a list of some of these
collections:

1) Dr. Alan Stone, retired USDA taxonomic entomologist This
collection consisted of over 5,000 separate items (mostly reprints and
separates) of over 92,000 pages on the Order Diptera (flies). It was
offered to us at a nominal price of $2,000.
2) Dr. Harold S. Peters, retired USPHS, CDC entomologist As a part
of a joint purchase with the University of Florida, Department of
Entomology, this specialized collection of specimens and literature on
the Order Mallophaga(bird lice) was received. The Library consisted
of several bound volumes and 517 unbound volumes, bulletins, and
reprints, making it one of the most complete on this Order
anywhere.
3) Dr. H. F. Strohecker, retired zoologist, University of Miami:
Approximately 19,000 pages on Orthoptera and 15,000 pages on
Coleoptera and Lepidoptera. These consist of books and separates as
a part of the purchase/donation of his collection of Orthoptera and
the beetle family Endomychidae.
4) Dr. F. M. Snyder (deceased): 40 books and 745 reprints and
separates on the Order Diptera.
5) Dr. Lewis Berner, Department of Biological Sciences, University of
Florida: Several thousand separates and books on the Order
Ephemeroptera, one of the best collections in existence (approximate
value $2,427) and general entomological separates (1,941 items)
and monographs (224 items).
6) Dr. Dorothy J. Knull, Columbus, Ohio: 1,910 books, reprints and
separates, with primary emphasis on leafhoppers (Homoptera:
Cicadellidae).
7) Dr. H. K. Wallace, retired head, Department of Zoology, University
of Florida: 38 books and bound reprints and several thousand
separates on spiders.
8) Dr. R M. Baranowski, University of Florida, Agricultural Research
and Education Center, Homestead: 189 bulletins and separates on
syrphid flies (Diptera: Syrphidae).
9) Dr. Rodney Dodge (deceased, formerly associated with the Bureau of
Entomology, Division of Plant Industry): Several dozen books and
several hundred separates on various insect groups, but predomi-
nantly Sarcophagidae and Tachinidae (Diptera).
10) Dr. G. B. Fairchild, Research Associate, Florida State Collection of
Arthropods: 241 reprints, separates, and monographs.








Thirtieth Biennial Report


11) Dr. Martin H. Muma, retired entomologist, University of Florida,
Agricultural Research and Education Center, Lake Alfred: 513
bulletins and seperates on mites and ticks (Acarina).
12) Dr. Harry Hoogstraal, Head, Department Medical Zoology, U. S.
Naval Medical Research Unit No. 3, Cairo, Egypt; 212 separates plus
translations of 54 publications (originals in Russian and Japanese),
and a 355 page bibliography on ticks and tick-borne diseases.
Biological Control of The
Caribbean Fruit Fly
R.W. Swanson, Entomologist

Studies have continued on the biological control of Anastrepha suspense
(Loew) since 1968. This work is being conducted with Dr. R. M. Baranowski
at the University of Florida's Agricultural Research and Education Center,
Homestead. Since 1971 there have been no new parasite importations; work
has been extended on the parasites we have already proved to have potential.
These parasites are Parachasma cereum (Gahan) and Biosteres longicaudatus
Ashmead, both of which were colonized in the laboratory from our original
importations.
P. cereum from Trinidad has done well in the laboratory except that it
will not adapt to artificial rearing techniques. This fact indicates that mass
rearing would be almost impossible. Close to 50 different media have been
tried with no appreciable success. This was the first parasite released and it
has been released 21 times to date. Most of these releases have been in
Miami Springs or South Dade County. Through our sampling techniques we
have determined that this parasite is slow to disperse but in a given area it
often returns a high percent of parasitization. In 3 years, however, it did not
increase significantly.
B. longicaudatus, introduced from Hawaii and Mexico, has done
extremely well in the laboratory. In competition tests with P. cereum, it was
completely dominant An important factor regarding B. longicaudatus is that
it has adapted to our artificial rearing techniques and approximately 20,000
parasites are reared weekly. Anastrepha suspense has been monitored, using
McPhail traps, on Key Biscayne, a relatively isolated island, with the idea of
determining the fly population and then making inundative B. longicaudatus
releases. After 3 years of trapping, releases were initiated in November 1973.
As of 30 May 1974 a total of 936,305 parasites were released. The results are
in the process of evaluation by fruit sampling and checking the resulting
parasite/host ratio.
B. longicaudatus was also released in other parts of Dade County and
several other counties by dispensing containers of parasites to the interested
public.
Studies have been initiated on the papaya fruit fly, Toxotrypana
curvicauda Gerst, one of the pests responsible for limiting the papaya
industry in Florida. Methods for laboratory rearing of these flies are being
developed. The male apparently releases a pheromone that attracts the
female which could lead to a control or eradication of this fly. No native
parasites have been discovered in these studies to date.








Division of Plant Industry


The only Anastrepha trapped during the biennium other than Anastrepha
suspense (Loew) was A. endentata Stone at Key West, 25 October 1973, F.
A. Buchanan in McPhail trap.


Sugarcane Borer, Diatraea Saccharalis
(Fab.) (Pyralidae: Lepidoptera)
G.W. Dekle, Taxonomic Entomologist

The sugarcane borer is considered a serious pest of corn. It is known to
occur in Florida, Texas, Mexico, the West Indies, Colombia, Guyana, Brazil,
Argentina, Ecuador, and Peru.
In 1968 the larva of this lepidopteron was found infesting pampas grass
Cortaderia selloana (Schult) Aschers & Graebner, at Samsula, Florida, and
has continued to require control measures each year by a grower in his
plume-production operation. Azodrin 3.2 EC, a constemic insecticide, is
labeled for use on pampas grass.
Francis Ware, Plant Specialist, Division of Plant Industry, found 900
container-grown pampas grass stools infested at a nursery located in the
vicinity of Windermere on 21 September 1973. The plants were quarantined,
and a special survey was initiated. The survey resulted in 6 nurseries
quarantined for infested container pampas grass.
Dr. Gerald L Greene, IFAS entomologist who cooperated with DPI
entomologists in developing the control for this borer in field grown pampas
grass, has recommended the following spray program for container stock.
Azodrin 3.2 (water miscible insecticide) at a dosage of 1/ gal. (42 oz.) to
100 gal. of water is applied as a course spray to the foliage of each container
plant (Azori 5, water miscible insecticide, is also available in Florida.
Dosage: 1/5 gal. [25 oz.] to 100 gal. of water.) A spray application is to be
applied every 2 months to the infested plants. Following the spray application
do not apply irrigation for 24 hours. If it should rain 1/4 to 1/2 inch within 24
hours on treated plants, retreatment is necessary for effective control.
Safety Precautions:
1) Do not enter spray block for 2 days.
2) Follow manufacturer's label in handling the insecticide.
3) Azodrin-treated plants are prohibited from sale for 2 weeks following
treatment

Other hosts for sugarcane borer in Florida are: corn, Zea mays L;
papyrus grass, Cyperus papyrus L; sorghum, Sorghum vulgare Pers.; and
sugarcane, Saccharum officinarum L
Distribution records recorded for Florida by DPI are: Apopka, Canal
Point, Cutler Ridge, Delray Beach, Everglades, Goulds, Homestead,
Hypoluxo, Leesburg, Ochopee, Orlando, Pahokee, Plant City, Plymouth,
Punta Gorda, Samsula, Taft, West Hollywood, Windermere, and Zellwood.








Thirtieth Biennial Report


Camellia Mining Scale, Duplaspidiotus
claviger (Cockerell) (Coccidae: Homopera)
G.W. Dekle. Taxonumic Entomologist


Duplaspidiotus (=Pseudaonidia) claviger (Cockerell), camellia mining
scale, an armored scale insect, was first collected in Florida in 1962. The
scale has been found on Camellia spp. in 11 Florida counties: Alachua,
Charlotte, Citrus, Hardee, Hernando, Hillsborough, Manatee, Osceola, Pasco,
Pinellas and Polk Since 1971 the pest has been found established in many
home gardens in Lakeland.
The infestation found at the Harry P. Leu Gardens in Orlando during
1974 probably has been in the gardens for many years. Dr. L C. Kuitert,
Entomologist, University of Florida, IFAS, Gainesville, is now evaluating the
control procedures recommended for this pest of camellia.
A circular released on camellia mining scale by DPI in 1962 is being
revised for distribution to nurseries and county agents. Copies of the circular
will be available to homeowners upon request


A Root Mealybug, Rhizoecus palastineae
(Hambleton) (Pseudococcidae: Homoptera)
G.W. Dekle, Tux.cnomc Entomologist

A mealybug collected on paperwhite narcissus bulbs, Narcissus tazetta L.
'Papyraceus' by J. G. Godbold, Agricultural Extension Director, Clay County,
Florida, was identified by Edson J. Hambleton, Coccidologist, USDA.
Washington, D. C., as Rhizoecus palestineae (Hambleton).
Hambleton made the following comments on the mounted specimens sent
to him for identification: "This nice collection of well mounted specimens
agrees almost perfectly with the Middle East species I described in 1946 as
Ripersiella palestineae. The Florida specimens appear to be somewhat larger
in some of the measurements but morphologically they are the same.
"Since I am synonymizing Ripersiella in a New Zealand paper, you
should refer to the species now as Rhizoecus palestineae (Hambl). This
represents a new introduction to the United States as well as a new host
record. The species, in so far as our records are concerned, is known from
Palestine, Syria and Greece. The museum material was all intercepted in
quarantine."
Hambleton published the following host list which appeared in Revista
De Entomologia 17 (1-2): 1-77, August 1946, Rio de Janerio, Brazil: Cyclamen
tubers, Arum palaestinum Boiss. (Liliaceae), Arum dioscoridis Sibth. and
Smith, Sternbergia clusiana Ker-Gawl (Amaryllidaceae), Iris vartanii Foster
(Iridaceae), Colchicum decaisnei Boiss. (Liliaceae), and Iris sofarana Foster.
A special survey of the infested nursery was made by W. H. Pierce, DPI
Entomologist, accompanied by G. F. Carter and H. W. Collins, DPI Plant
Specialists, 22 January 1974. Nine samples were collected from which 36








Division of Plant Industry


slides were made. The material was examined by Hambleton and the
following new hosts were recorded: Narcissus sp., Rumex crispus L. (sour
dock), Sonchus oleraceus L. (weed), Sporobolus poiretii (Roem & Schult)
Hitchc. (smut grass), Paspalum urvillei Steud. (vasey grass), and an
unknown grass. Slide specimens are deposited in the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods.

Temik 10 G Investigations
G.W. Dekle, Taxonomic Entomologist

Investigations of Temik 10 G, a systemic granular insecticide, were
continued during 1973 with Dr. L.C. Kuitert, Entomologist, University of
Florida, IFAS.
Temik 10 G was applied at a dosage of 1/4 and /2 teaspoon at 12-week
intervals to nursery plants in gallon containers. Good control was obtained on
oleander scale, Pseudaulacaspis cockerelli (Cooley), on palm (fig. 1); on the
scale, Fiorinia theae Green, on Camellia spp., and on a mealybug on silver
buttonwood, Conocarpus erectus L (fig. 2).
Camellia mining scale, Duplaspidiotus claviger (Cockerell), a stem
infesting armored scale, was not controlled with Temik 10 G whenever used
at /z and 1 teaspoon per gallon container at 12-week intervals.
In our tests we also demonstrated dosages above the recommended level
and found it was responsible for the marginal necrosis on Chrysanthemum sp.
(fig. 3).
























Fig. 1. Palm infested with oleander scale, Pseudaulacaspis cockereli
(Cooley); plant on right received Temik 10 G; plant on left check.








Thirtieth Biennial Report


A,







Fi. eaybgcotrl Slvrbutnwod oncaps rets ; lnto


1'S


Fig. 2 Mealybug control. Silver buttonwood, Conocarpus erectus L; plant on
right received Temik 10 G; plant on left check.




lmPa3plL4L


Fig. 3. Marginal necrosis caused by Temik 10 G to
Dosage: /4 teaspoon to 4" pot; check plant at right


Chrysanthemum sp.








Division of Plant Industry


Cooperative Economic Insect Survey Program
F.W. Mead, Taxonomic Entomologist

The Division is the cooperative state agency under contract with the
USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Plant Protection and
Quarantine Programs, and Pest Survey and Technical Support Staff, to
prepare weekly survey reports and annual summaries of economic insect
conditions in Florida. Highlights in the weekly reports and annual summaries
from Florida and other states are published by the USDA in the weekly
Cooperative Economic Insect Report (CEIR). DPI distributes the TRI-OLOGY
Technical Report each month to summarize the most significant insects, plant
pathogens, and nematodes found in Florida. Most of this information results
from the processing and determination of samples sent to DPI during the
proceeding month. The author, as survey entomologist, is responsible for
assembling the entomology portion of TRI-OLOGY each month and for editing
the entire publication once every 3 months. Information is received from
many sources, but perhaps the most consistent general source is from the
DPI office in Gainesville, which acts as the state clearing house as well as the
focal point for technical services to DPI personnel around the state. Much
important information is obtained from the University of Florida, IFAS,
research centers and extension scientists, and from USDA personnel.
Information on insects affecting commercial citrus was supplied by Dr. W. A.
Simanton, Agricultural Research and Education Center, Lake Alfred, until Dr.
Simanton's retirement in 1973. All of these reports help in varying degrees to
fulfill the objectives of the survey and detection program. These objectives
are:
1) To assist agricultural workers by supplying current information on
insect activity so that crops can be more adequately protected from
insect attacks.
2) To aid and assure more prompt detection of newly introduced
insect pests.
3) To determine losses caused by insects.
4) To maintain records on the occurrence of economic insects.
5) To aid manufacturers and suppliers of insecticides and control
equipment to determine areas of urgent need for supplies and
equipment.
6) To develop a workable insect pest forecasting service.



Hawthorn Lace Bug
F.W. Mead, Taxonomic Entomologist

The hawthorn lace bug, Corythucha cydoniae (Fitch), is a widely
distributed pest of rosaceous plants. In Florida, most of the records are
from the northern part and from Pyracantha, a popular ornamental. This lace
bug can inflict severe damage to Pyracantha leaves.








Thirtieth Biennial Report


..










Fig. 1 Hawthorn lace bug injury and discoloration to Pyracantha leaves.
Two leaves at left: upper surface; 2 leaves at right: lower surface, revealing
excrement and stains. (For further information see Ent. Circ. No. 127,
December 1972.)

First Florida or United States Records of
Invertebrates Reported Through the
Cooperative Survey Program
July 1972 June 1974
F.W. Mead, .Surry Entfimuolgist

1. AN ARMORED SCALE, Chortinaspis subchortina (Laing): New state
record. Collected on centipede grass, Eremochloa ophiuroides Hack, at
Pensacola, Escambia County, by D. Mullins, 12 July 1972. Determined
by G. W. Dekle.
2. A WEEVIL, Anthomus flavus Boheman: New U. S. and North
American record. Adults were swept from Barbados cherry tree,
Malpighia glabra Linn., at residence in Hialeah, Dade County, by C. E.
Stegmaier, 25 July 1972. Determined by R.E. Warner. During the
following year several hundred more specimens were collected in Dade
County. A. flavus is a pest of Malpighia spp. on the islands of Puerto
Rico, St. Croix, St. Thomas, and St. John. Type locality is Guadeloupe.
Damage, caused by development of immature stages in fruit, resembles
that of plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) a crescentic
russeting scar on the skin and puckering of flesh underneath. The larva
confines its feeding to one area, and the pupa is formed in a chamber
close to the seed. It is also found in Puerto Rico on leaves of bulrush,
Scirpus validus Vahl., and has been reared from fruit of false-coffee,
Farmaea occidentalis Muell.
3. A THRIPS, Salpingothrips aimotofus Kudo: New U. S. record. Collected
on kudzu, Pueraria thunbergiana Benth., at Gainesville, Alachua County,







Division of Plant Industry


by R. Hemenway, 26 August 1972. Determined by I. Kudo.
4. AN ORCHID WEEVIL, Metamasius sp., near aurocinctus (Champion) or
monilis Vaurie: New U. S. record. First collected in form of 2 adults
within an orchid house at Naranja, Dade County, by W. E. Wyles, 13
December 1972. On 19 December 1972, a larva and adult were collected
on an oncidium orchid at the same nursery in Naranja by Wyles and J.
H. Knowles, Jr. Another adult was collected on an orchid, Notylia
sp., at Naranja by Wyles and W. H. Pierce, 2 January 1973. These
orchids presumably had been imported from Ecuador 4 months earlier.
The orchids were fumigated with methyl bromide, and the nurserywas
treated with Lindane. No weevils have been found since. (See Ent. Circ.
No. 129 for further information.)
5. A THRIPS, Taeniothrips hawaiiensis (Morgan): New U. S. record.
Collected on 8 occasions at 5 locations in Volusia County from rose,
Pittosporum tobira Ait., Ligustrum japonica Thunb. blackberry, and
Viburnum by J. N. Pott, and 1 collection in Gadsden County from
Pueraria thunbergiana Benth. by J. C. Reid. Earliest collection was from
rose at Daytona Beach, Volusia County, 19 April 1967. Latest collection
was from kudzu at Quincy, Gadsden County, 26 September 1972.
Determined by S. Nakahara. These are the only known infestations in
North America. Species is polyphagous and widely distributed in the
Orient, southeast Asia, India, Pacific Islands, and Hawaii. T. hawaiiensis
has been reported damaging orchids and has also been reported as a
minor pest of garden beans in Hawaii.
6. A SOFT SCALE, Coccus capparidis (Green): New continental U.S.
record. Intercepted at Yermo, San Bernardino County, California, 25
March 1974 on orange plant (leaves) from Florida by H.L. Scotton.
Determined by S. Nakahara. C. capparidis was described from Capparis
moonii from India, and has been recorded from Hawaii. This coccid has
been intercepted in agriculture quarantine on Codiaeum, Cyprideum,
and Dendrobium from India: on Codiaeum from the Bahamas and
Honduras; and Alyxia olivaeformis (Gaud.) and mock orange, Murraya
paniculata Jack., from Hawaii. There are no reports of damage by this
coccid. It has been suspected that C. capparidis had been present in
Florida for some time.


Special Projects

H. A. DENMARK, Chief of Entomology

(1) Completion of the Biological Control Laboratory.
(2) Phytoseiidae of Brazil (completed).
(3) Phytoseiidae of Puerto Rico.
(4) Ants associated with soybeans, with Dr. W. H. Whitcomb,
University of Florida, IFAS, Department of Entomology and
Nematology (completed).
(5) Predator mites and thrips associated with tea scale on camellias,
with Dr. W. H. Whitcomb and Fred Collins, University of Florida,
IFAS.







Thirtieth Biennial Report


(6) Description of new species of phytoseiid mites associated with
apple trees in Australia.
(7) Attraction of lovebug, Plecia nearctica Hardy, to the highways,
with Dr. P. S. Callahan, USDA, Agricultural Research Service.

E. E. GRISSELL, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Continuation of a long-range study of the taxonomy of Torymidae,
including the beginning of a world catalog.
(2) Initial study of the genus Rileya leading toward a revision of the
world Rileyinae (Eurytomidae).
(3) Study of the genus Dibrachys (Pteromalidae) with the description
and biology of a species parasitic upon the mud dauber, Sceliphron
(completed).
(4) Nesting biology of Pterocheilus texanus, a ground-burrowing
wasp.
(5) Initial survey for parasites of scale insects attacking citrus.

H. V. WEEMS, JR., Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Continuation of a taxonomic and ecological study of the Syrphidae
of Cranberry Glades, a large disjunct bog in Mononogahila National
Forest of West Virginia.
(2) Continuation of a long-range study of the taxonomy and ecology of
the Syrphidae of Mexico, especially Volucellinae, involving
occasional trips during the several seasons of the year.
(3) Continuation of a taxonomic and ecological study of the Syrphidae
of the southern escarpments of the Appalachian Plateau.
(4) Participation in a faunal survey of fire ecology and habitat
management study of the arthropods of Tall Timbers Research
Station and the surrounding wooded areas of northern Leon
County.
(5) Preparation of an illustrated bulletin on arthropod groups,
primarily pertaining to their identification, habitat relationships,
seasonal and geographic distribution, and techniques for collecting
them with emphasis on Florida.
(6) Preparation of an illustrated bulletin on the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods and the research associates program
which supports its development and publishes on arthropod
studies.
(7) Accumulation of material for an eventual illustrated bulletin on
fruit flies and related groups.
(8) Identification of Syrphidae for other individuals and institutions
as a part of the process of further building a research collection of
Syrphidae and a more thorough knowledge of this family of flies,
especially those of the Nearctic and Neotropical Regions.
(9) Visit other institutions in North and Central Florida which
maintain substantial arthropod collections in order to observe
curatorial techinques, arrange exchanges of specimens, and study
collections in specific areas of taxonomic interest and responsi-
bility.







Division of Plant Industry


(10) Make occasional field trips to conduct special insect surveys, to
collect material for taxonomic study in special interest groups
(especially Syrphidae), and/or make general collections for the
Florida State Collection of Arthropods.
(11) Conduct exchanges of reference material to make the Florida
collection more complete. A special continuing effort is being made
to obtain representatives of the principal arthropod pests occurring
in other parts of the world which constitute a potential threat to
Florida agriculture. This will materially aid staff specialists in
making more rapid, accurate, and complete identifications. It also
provides additional material for taxonomic research, display, and
teaching purposes.
(12) Examination of samples taken from insect flight traps, light traps,
and several kinds of baited traps located in various parts of Florida
and from those operated by collaborators in various foreign lands,
notably the Bahamas, the West Indies, Mexico, and Central
America. Valuable material obtained from these traps is processed
and added to the Florida State Collection of Arthropods, and some
specimens of special interest are noted in the TRI-OLOGY
Technical Report.
(13) Experiments with designs for more effective insect flight traps and
field testing of these traps.

R.E. Woodruff, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Taxonomy, biology, ecology, behavior and distribution of a
myrmecophilous beetle, Myrmecaphodius excavaticollis (Blanch),
associated with the imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren.
This project was started in 1969 and continued through the
present biennium. Some of the information gained will prove
valuable in any suppression and survey studies of the imported fire
ant. Numerous samples from fire ant nests and blacklight traps in
Brazil, collected by Dr. W. H. Whitcomb and associates, are
expected to shed light on host specificity of the inquilines as well
as elucidate the taxonomy of this complex of species. The
investigations should culminate in publication soon.
(2) Scarab beetles of Florida (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). This project
has been continued for the past 16 years. Part of the information
was used for a Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Florida in
1967. Since that time over 500,000 additional specimens have been
collected and the data used to update the text which was published
as Vol. 8 of the "Arthropods of Florida" series. This volume (Part
I) covers the 107 species representing the subfamilies Scarabae-
inae, Geotrupinae, Aphodiianae, Acanthocerinae, Ochodaeinae, and
Hybosorinae. Part II, covering the remaining 134 species of the
subfamilies Cetoniinae, Dynastinae, Melolonthinae, and Rutelinae is
in preparation and several thousand specimens have been studied.
Publication of this part is anticipated during the next biennium.
(3) Arthropods associated with packrats, Neotoma floridana small, on
Key Largo, Florida; conducted jointly with Dr. R. M. Baranowski,
Agricultural Research and Education Center, Homestead. Monthly
samples have been taken over a 3-year period and run through








Thirtieth Biennial Report


Berlese funnels. Several blind, wingless, and some presumably new
species have been discovered in the nests. This population of
packrats is disjunct over 200 miles from the mainland population.
The arthropods from the Keys are of great interest zoogeographi-
cally and particularly those from such a unique niche as the nests
of this endemic packrat. The rapid destruction of the habitat on
Key Largo makes this study even more urgent before the rat and
its arthropod associates become extinct.
(4) Food habits of the burrowing owl in Florida; in cooperation with
Dr. C. T. Collins (Long Beach State College, California) and W. D.
Courser (University of South Florida). Numerous pellets have been
analyzed from several Florida burrowing owl populations (e.g.,
Trenton, Gainesville, Tampa). These have contained about 90
percent Scarabaeidae of about 15 species. Several hundred samples
were studied during the biennium and publication of the results is
anticipated within the next biennium.
(5) Taxonomic studies of the myrmecophilous (ant-loving) and
termitophilous (termite-loving) Aphodiinae (Coleoptera: Scarabaei-
dae) of North and South America; portions jointly with Antonio
Martinez (Buenos Aires, Argentina), O.L. Cartwright (U.S.
National Museum), Pedro Reyes (Mexico City), and Jon Krikken
(Leiden, Holland). This is a broad, long-range study which will
probably be broken down into several individual studies. However,
material is being accumulated at a rapid rate which will facilitate
this study. Many bizarre new species have been found, especially
from tropical regions of the world. Study in the U.S. National
Museum, during March 1974, clarified some of the taxonomic
problems and permitted study of critical material.
(6) Study of fossil insects from asphalt deposits in Trinidad. This is
also a long-range project, on which some time was spent extracting
specimens from matrix and rough-sorting for future study. These
fossils are extremely important for zoogeographic studies
because of the few known insect fossils from the West Indies. The
only others are specimens in amber from the Dominican Republic.
(7) Continued improvement and testing a light weight, collapsible,
black-light insect trap. This has provided us with a more efficient
trap for both 12-volt and 110-volt operation. These traps are now
in use by various taxonomists and entomology departments around
the country. Several have been provided for collectors in the
tropics who are a part of the Research Associate Program of the
Florida State Collection of Arthropods and who are providing us
with a wealth of material as a result.
(8) Screening blacklight samples for foreign pests. Several traps,
especially at Key West, Fort Myers, Tampa, Miami, and
Jacksonville, have been checked regularly for detection of species
not known in Florida and which are likely to be introduced. In
addition, samples have been received regularly from Trinidad
(through the courtesy of Dr. F. D. Bennett, Commonwealth
Institute of Biological Control), Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (through
Mr. Herb Bolton, U. S. Navy), Jamaica (through Dr. J. H. Frank,







Division of Plant Industry


Sugar Manufacturers' Association, Mandeville, and Dr. R. M.
Baranowski, Agricultural Research and Education Center, Home-
stead), and Barbados (through Dr. M. M. Alam, Ministry of
Agriculture, Bridgetown). Dr. F. S. Blanton has continued to
provide the residue from traps operated for his sand fly
(Culicoides) studies, providing valuable samples from Central and
South America. Residue from several thousand blacklight trap
samples has been stored in pint jars and arranged geographically.
The first inventory on these collections, taken June 1974, indicated
10,461 samples (3,146 foreign; 7,315 domestic) on hand. These
samples provide a resource of several million documented
specimens which will provide seasonal and geographic distribution
data, as well as valuable reference material for taxonomic studies.
Every blacklight trap sample is a unique collection because of the
changing factors which affect the catch (e.g., weather, surround-
ings, time of year). Each year hundreds of localities are so
ecologically modified that it would be impossible to duplicate most
of these samples. Long after many natural areas are destroyed, we
will have a source of information on what insects once occurred
there. The value of these samples is emphasized by the fact that
several taxonomists have made special trips to Gainesville in order
to study this material.
(9) Supervision of the preparation of a list of State Plant Board and
Division of Plant Industry publications from 1915 to 1972. This list
was prepared by Miss Irene Ayers and has been published as Div.
Plant Ind. Bull. 9:1-136.
(10) Revision of the Mexican species of Aphodius (Coleoptera:
Scarabaeidae) in collaboration with Dr. R. D. Gordon, U. S.
National Museum. Over 2,000 specimens were mounted and labled
from my previous Mexican collections. It is anticipated that there
will be more than 100 species involved in the study. Some time
was spent on this project during a visit to the U. S. National
Museum in March 1974.
(11) Special Study and surveys for newly introduced and potentially
economic beetles:
(a) Microtheca ochroloma Stahl. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).
This South American species was first found in Florida at
Tampa on 12 April 1972 by Plant Specialist Ray Simmons,
on watercress. It is a pest of crucifers (e.g., cabbage,
mustard, collards, etc.) elsewhere. A survey of the original
site in June 1974 indicated the small infestation was still
present, but it was not found in any other locality. An
entomology circular on this species is in preparation.
(b) Ambrosia beetles (Scolytidae) in ornamental dracenas.
Central American and West Indian canes of dracenas have
been imported into Florida for several years by the
ornamental nursery trade. During the biennium several
severe infestations of ambrosia beetles, Xyleborus ferru-
gineus (Fab.) and X. affinis Eichh., were discovered in both








Thirtieth Biennial Report


sprouted and unsprouted canes. Cooperative work was
initiated with Dr. R. A. Hamlen, University of Florida,
IFAS, Agricultural Research and Education Center, Apop-
ka, on the status of the infestations and possible control
methods. These resulted in Entomology Circular No. 140
and a control paper in press.
(c) An orchid weevil new to the United States (Coleoptera:
Curculionidae). An infestation of a species of Metamasius
not known in the U. S. was found at Naranja, Florida, in
December 1972 on orchids imported from Ecuador. The
species is near M. aurocinctus (Champion), but may yet
prove to be undescribed. Diligent control efforts in the
nursery involved have resulted in what we believe to be
eradication. Entomology Circular No. 129 was prepared to
facilitate recognition of this pest.
(d) Scyphophorus acupunctatus Gyll., a weevil pest of yucca
and agave. A nursery at Samsula, Florida, was found
heavily infested with this weevil by Plant Specialist J. N.
Pott in May 1973. The plants involved were presumably
imported from California. Entomology Circular No. 135 was
published jointly with Entomologist W. H. Pierce, who
supervised treatment of the plants with chlordane and
cygon. Control has been fairly good, but eradication does
not appear practical.
(12) Survey of the Scarabaeidae of Tall Timbers Research Station, with
special emphasis on their ecology in relation to fire. This project is
a small part of the overall fire ecology studies being conducted at
Tall Timbers by its staff (i.e., W. H. Whitcomb, Donny Harris,
Wilson Baker, and Ed & Roy Komarek). Over 70,000 Scarabaeidae
have been collected by bulk sampling techniques (e.g., blacklight
traps, pitfall traps, Berlese samples) and are now being processed.
Many rare and interesting species have been turned up by these
intensive surveys and will make Tall Timbers one of the best
known faunal areas within the state. Many of the data were
recorded in The Scarab Beetles of Florida.
(13) Cooperative study with the Center for Wetlands (Dr. H. T. Odum),
University of Florida, on a "Cypress Wetland Project' A half-time
technician is provided to process bulk insect samples preparatory
to their study and identification. This study involves comparison
between cypress domes into which effluent has been pumped and
natural check domes. The ultimate aim is to determine if adverse
environmental effects result from such wastes and to explore
avenues for disposal of the great quantity of human wastes.

F. W. MEAD, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Identification and numerical counts of most of the Hemiptera and
Homoptera (Auchenorhyncha) in a 5-year ecological study at Tall
Timbers Research Station, Tallahassee. This project, initiated in








Division of Plant Industry


1969 by Professor W. H. Whitcomb, University of Florida, IFAS,
has the support of Tall Timbers Research Inc., E. V. Komarek,
Director.
(2) Daily operation of a blacklight trap at the border of the
agricultural experiment station grounds, University of Florida, and
the Doyle Conner Building area. Main purposes of this trapping are
to provide a numerical count of certain economic moths for the
weekly survey report and to detect other important insects.
(3) Continue work on a revision of Oliarus in North America north of
Mexico (Homoptera: Cixiidae).
(4) Systematic research on Oliarus in neotropical region.
(5) Systematic research on Haplaxius (Homoptera: Cixiidae) especially
in Florida.
(6) Collection and identification of some of the more important insects
in Florida alfalfa fields, with emphasis on Hemiptera and
Homoptera.
(7) Special identification services were provided to several scientists
needing taxonomic help in their research work. Examples included
Hemiptera from pecan trees and environs at localities in Georgia
(requested by Mr. W. L. Tedders, USDA, Fruit and Nut
Laboratory, Byron, Georgia); Hemiptera (mostly predatory
species) from various crops at Quincy, Florida (requested by Mr.
Paul Martin, graduate student); Homoptera (Auchenorhyncha)
from palms and environs at Ft. Lauderdale and Miami areas
(requested by the lethal yellowing of palms research team);
Hemiptera and Homoptera (Auchenorhyncha) from quail crops of
birds sampled at Tall Timbers Research Station (requested by Dr.
E. V. Komarek); some Homoptera (Auchenorhyncha) in collection
of Indiana University (requested by Prof. F. N. Young). Fulfilled
requests from determination of waxhoppers (Oliarus spp.) from
University of Arkansas, University of Kentucky, and Florida A &
M University. Several boxes of miscellaneous Hemiptera and
Homoptera sent for determination are still being examined.
(8) Several hundred identified leafhoppers and planthoppers were
donated to the University of Florida, Plant Virology Laboratory at
Gainesville, for use by Dr. F. W. Zettler in his course on
identification of insect vectors.


Job Related Activities

H. A. DENMARK, Chief of Entomology
(1) Professor (courtesy appointment), University of Florida, IFAS,
Department of Entomology and Nematology. On Ph.D. committee
of 2 graduate students.
(2) Membership Committee, Gamma Sigma Delta.
(3) President, Gainesville USDA Club, 1974.
(4) President, Florida State Employees Association, Alachua County
Chapter, 1974.








Thirtieth Biennial Report


(5) Member, Florida Citrus Pest Management Steering Committee.
(6) Member, Florida Committee on Pests and Environment.
(7) Member, USDA, ARS, Southern Region Formal Program Review
Committee of Gainesville laboratories.

E. E. GRISSELL, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Assistant Professor (courtesy appointment), University of Florida,
IFAS, Department of Entomology and Nematology. On Ph.D.
committee of one graduate student.
(2) Lectured and conducted laboratory section on "Systematics and
Parasitic Hymenoptera" for course in biological control of insects
at University of Florida.
(3) Member, Editorial Committee, Division of Plant Industry.

F. W. MEAD, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Associate Professor (courtesy appointment), University of Florida,
IFAS, Department Entomology and Nematology.
(2) Secretary, Florida Entomological Society, 1972-74.
(3) Member, Insect Survey and Losses Committee of the Southeastern
Branch of the Entomological Society of America, 1972-73.

H. V. WEEMS, JR., Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Associate Editor, Florida Entomologist, quarterly journal of the
Florida Entomological Society.
(2) Assistant Curator in Arthropods, Florida State Museum, Univer-
sity of Florida.
(3) Professor (courtesy appointment), University of Florida, IFAS,
Department of Entomology and Nematology.
(4) Chairman, Honors and Awards Committee, Florida Entomological
Society, since 1969.
(5) Chairman, Special Committee on Insects and Terrestrial Inverte-
brates, Florida Committee on Rare and Endangered Plants and
Animals.

R. E. WOODRUFF, Taxonomic Entomologist
(1) Assistant Professor (courtesy appointment), University of Florida,
IFAS, Department of Entomology and Nematology. Served on 2
Ph.D. committees.
(2) Associate Editor, Florida Entomologist, quarterly journal of the
Florida Entomological Society, since 1969.
(3) Editor, The Coleopterist Bulletin, international quarterly journal of
the Coleopterist Society, since December 1970.
(4) Merit badge counselor (nature study), Boy Scouts of America.
(5) Managing Editor, Insect World Digest, bimonthly journal
published by the Biological Research Institute of America.
(6) Prepared entomological display for the "Object Gallery" of the
Florida State Museum opening in June 1974.








Division of Plant Industry


(7) Entomology in Action Committee, Florida Entomological Society,
1973-74.

G. W. DEKLE, Taxonomic Entomologist

(1) Associate Professor (courtesy appointment), University of Florida,
IFAS, Department of Entomology and Nematology.
(2) Instructor of Entomology Taxon, University of Florida, IFAS,
Department of Entomology and Nematology.
(3) Program Committee, Florida Entomological Society, 56th Annual
Meeting, 1973.
(4) Co-chairman, Cocciodea Symposium Committee, Entomological
Society of America, 1974.
(5) Vice President and Program Chairman, Gainesville USDA Club
1973.


Trips and Meetings

July 5-7, 1972: National Plan for the Management of Systematic Resources
Meeting, Washington, D. C. (H. A. Denmark).
July 18-19: Committee on Pests and Environment, Miami (Denmark).
August 19-September 15: 14th International Congress of Entomology,
Canberra, Australia, and field work in Australia with Dr. H. E. Hinton,
Head, Department of Zoology, University of Bristol, England (R. E.
Woodruff).
September 6-8: Florida Entomological Society 55th Annual Meeting, Tampa
(Denmark, G. W. Dekle, F. W. Mead, H.V. Weems, Jr.)
November 7-10: Florida State Horticultural Society Annual Meeting, Miami
(Denmark, Dekle).
November 21: Committee on Pests and Environment, Lake Wales
(Denmark, Weems).
November 15-17: U. S. Navy Biennial Pest Control Recertification Course
for Southeast Region, Pensacola (Mead).
November 26-30: Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting,
Montreal, Canada (Denmark, Dekle, Weems).
December 1: Florida Anti-Mosquito Association Fall Conference, Gainesville
(Mead).
December 5: Florida Citrus Spray and Dust Schedule Meeting, Lake Alfred
(Denmark).
January 9-11, 1973: Entomology-Nematology Research Planning Conference
Gainesville (Mead).
February 15-16: Florida Entomological Society Executive Committee
Meeting, Orlando (Mead).
February 27-28: Pest Control Conference, Gainesville (Mead).
February 27: Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission Meeting on
Arthropod Introduction, Tallahassee (Denmark).
March 1-2: Tall Timbers Conference on Ecological Animal Control by
Habitat Management (No. 5), Tallahassee (Denmark, Mead, Weems,
Woodruff).








Thirtieth Biennial Report


March 12-14: Imported Fire Ant Meeting, New Orleans, Louisiana
(Denmark).
April 4: Legislative Appreciation Day, Tallahassee (Denmark).
April 6-8: Board of Directors of the North American Beetle Fauna Project,
Tall Timbers Research Station, Tallahassee (Woodruff).
May 6-10: To Indianapolis, Indiana, to pick up beetle collection of Charles
E. White (deceased) which was willed to the Florida State Collection of
Arthropods (Woodruff).
June 16-July 17: Field trip to Mexico (Weems, C. R. Artaud).
June 21-24: Lepidopterists' Society 24th Annual Meeting, Sarasota (Mead).
August 4-26: First International Congress of Systematic and Evolutionary
Biology, Boulder, Colorado (August 4-12), and on return trip visited
Colorado State University; Oregon State University; Washington State
University, Entomology Department, Oregon Department of Agricul-
ture, Salem; and University of Idaho (Weems).
September 12-14: Florida Entomological Society 56th Annual Meeting,
Miami Beach (Denmark, Dekle, Mead, Woodruff, Weems, Grissell).
November 6-9: Florida State Horticultural Society Annual Meeting, Miami
Beach (Denmark, Dekle, Weems).
November 13: Administrative Training Course, Tallahassee (Denmark).
November 25-29: Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting, Dallas
Texas (Denmark, Dekle).
December 3-29: U. S. National Museum, Washington, D. C., to study and
identify parasitic Hymenoptera (Grissell).
December 7-8: Florida Committee on Rare and Endangered Plants and
Animals meeting, Camp McQuarrie, Ocala National Forest (Woodruff,
Weems).
December 13: Florida Agricultural Council Annual Meeting, Orlando
(Denmark).
January 28-30, 1974: Tropical Foliage Short Course, Orlando (Dekle).
February 28-March 1: Tall Timbers Conference on Ecological Animal
Control by Habitat Management (No. 6), Gainesville (Denmark, Dekle,
Mead, Weems, Woodruff).
March 3-28: U. S. National Museum, Washington, D. C., to study collection
of Scarabaeidae as a part of a cooperative agreement with the USDA,
Systematic Entomology Laboratory (Woodruff).
March 11-12: Employee Performance Evaluation Meeting, Tallahassee
(Denmark).
March 21-23: Florida Academy of Sciences 38th Annual Meeting, Orlando
(Weems).
April 3: Annual Legislative Appreciation Day, Tallahassee (Denmark).
April 20-21: Florida-Caribbean Orchid Association Short Course, Miami
(Dekle).
April 23: Senate Ways & Means Committee Meeting, Tallahassee
(Denmark).
May 14: Subtropical Branch, Florida Entomological Society Meeting, Miami
(Woodruff).
May 14-15: Interagency Pesticide Conference, Gainesville (Denmark).
May 14-17: U. S. National Museum, Washington, D. C., to identify parasitic
Hymenoptera (Grissell).








Division of Plant Industry


May 18: Executive Committee meeting of Florida Committee of
Endangered Plants and Animals, Maitland (Weems).
May 30: Clarification of Fair Labor Standards Act, Tallahassee (Denmark).
June 10: Survey sugarcane rootstalk borer weevil, Apopka (Denmark,
Woodruff).

Talks

H.A. DENMARK, Chief of Entomology
January 9, 1973: "Relationship between the Bureau of Entomology,
Division of Plant Industry, FDACS, and the University of Florida,
IFAS, Department of Entomology and Nematology:' Fruit Crops
Seminar, Gainesville.
January 16, 1973: "Pollution Problems in Our Environment," University
of Florida, Political Science Class, Gainesville.
February 25, 1974: "What is Biological Control,' Channel 12 TV
Interview, Jacksonville.

G. W. DEKLE, Taxomomic Entomologist
September 7, 1972: "Effectiveness of Systemic Insecticides in
Controlling Pests of Ornamental Plants:' with L. C. Kuitert, Florida
Entomological Society 55th Annual Meeting, Tampa.
April 20, 1974: "Orchid Insects, Insecticides, Where do we go from
Here'' Florida Caribbean Orchid Association Short Course, Miami.

F. W. MEAD, Taxonomic Entomologist

September 8, 1972: "Identification of bigeyed bugs, Geocoris spp., in
Florida:' Florida Entomological Society 55th Annual Meeting,
Tampa.
November 16, 1972: "Ornamental and Turf Pests- Biology--Control'' U.
S. Navy Biennial Pest Control Recertification Course for
Southeast Region, Pensacola.
September 14, 1973: "The lace bug, Corythucha floridana, and its close
relatives'' Florida Entomological Society 56th Annual Meeting,
Miami Beach.
November 6: "Entomology in Florida,' Entomology Seminar, Ohio State
University, Columbus.
November 14: "Entomology in Florida:' Wheaton Club of Naturalists,
Ohio State University, Columbus.

H. V. WEEMS, JR., Taxonomic Entomologist

January 9, 1973: "The Florida State Collection of Arthropods;'
Entomology and Nematology Research Review and Planning
Conference, University of Florida, Gainesville.
January 25, 1973: "How to tell the good guys from the bad guys"'
Geranium Circle, Gainesville Garden Club.








Thirtieth Biennial Report


March 24, 1973: "The Florida State Collection of Arthropods and the
Research Associate Program associated with it,' Florida Academy
of Sciences Annual Meeting, University of West Florida, Pensacola.

R. E. WOODRUFF, Taxonomic Entomologist

January 16, 1973: "Entomological Sources;' University of Florida class,
Gainesville.
October 22, 1973: "Tropical Entomology:' University of Florida class,
Gainesville.
February 4, 1974: "Entomological Ramblings in Australia:' University of
Florida, Department of Entomology Seminar, Gainesville.
May 14, 1974: "Entomological Ramblings in Australia:' Subtropical
Branch, Florida Entomological Society, Miami.

Awards
R. E. WOODRUFF, Taxonomic Entomologist

Designed the symbol, which was chosen in competition, for the 15th
International Congress of Entomology to be held in Washington, D.
C., 1976.
Grant from Australian Academy of Sciences, Commonwealth Scientific
and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), Dr. Howard Hinton,
and the Department of Entomology, University of Florida, for
partial support in attending the International Congress of
Entomology in Australia, August 1972.

Publications
Dekle, G. W. and C. E. Stegmaier (senior author). 1972. The cornblotch
leafminer, Agromyza parvicornis Loew (Diptera: Agromyzidae). Fla.
Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 123.
S. L. Poe (senior author), and D. E. Short. 1973. Control of
Rhizoecus americanus (Hambleton) (Pseudococcidae: Homoptera) on
ornamental plants. Georgia Ent. Soc. 8 (1): 20-26.
S. L. Poe (senior author), and D. B. McConnell. 1973. Control of
root mealybugs on foliage plants. Fla. Foliage Grower 10(2): 4-8.
and H. V. Weems, Jr. (senior author). 1973. A blotch leafminer,
Amauromyza maculosa (Malloch) (Diptera: Agromyzidae). Fla. Dept.
Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 132.
S1973. Tessellated scale, Eucalymnatus tessellatus (Signoret)
(Homoptera: Coccidae). Fla. Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant
Ind., Ent. Circ. 138.
1974. A key to the greenhouse soft scale insects (Coccidae:
Homoptera). Fla. Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent.
Circ. 144.
Denmark, H. A., J. B. Beavers (senior author), and A. G. Selhime. 1972.
Predation by Blattisocius keegani on egg masses of Diaprepes
abbreviatus in the laboratory. J. Econ. Ent. 65(5): 1483-1484.
W. H. Whitcomb (senior author), A. P. Bhatkar, and G. L.








Division of Plant Industry


Greene. 1972. Preliminary studies on the ants of Florida soy bean
fields. Fla. Ent. 55(3): 129-142.
and Sidney L. Poe. 1972. The gladiolus thrips, Taeneothrips
sim 3s (Morison), in Florida (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Fla. Dept. Agr.
& Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 119.
1972. Eriophyes parulmi (Keifer) in Florida (Eriophyidae:
Acarina). Fla. Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div., Plant Ind. Ent. Circ.
125.
and Philip S. Callahan (senior author). 1973. Attraction of the
"lovebug:' Plecia nearctica (Diptera: Bibionidae), to UV irradiated
automobile exhaust fumes. Fla. Ent. 56(2): 113-119.
1973. Tetranychus evansi Baker and Pritchard in Florida
(Arcarina: Tetranychidae). Fla. Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div.
Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 134.
and John E. Porter. 1973. Regulation of importation of arthropods
into and of their movement within Florida. Fla. Ent. 56(4): 347-358.
S1973. Harold Rodney Dodge (1913-1973). Fla. Ent. 56(4): 300-304.
and Philip S. Callahan (senior author). 1973. The "lovebug"
phenomenon. Proc. Tall Timbers Conference on Ecological Animal
Control by Habitat Management 5: 93-101.
1974. Two new species of phytoseiid mites from Wisconsin apple
orchards (Mesostigmata: Phytoseiidae). Fla. Ent. 57(2): 145-148.
Grissell, E. E. 1973. New species of North American Torymidae. Pan-Pac.
Ent. 49: 232-239.
1973. Sceliphron caementarium (Drury), a mud daubing wasp. Fla.
Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 136.
1974. [1973]. New species of Eurytoma associated with Cynipidae.
Pan-Pac. Ent. 49: 354-362.
1974. The hornets and yellow jackets (Vespula) of Florida. Fla.
Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 142.
Mead, F. W. 1972. Key to the species of bigeyed bugs, Geocoris spp., in
Florida (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae). Fla. Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv.,
Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 121.
S1972. European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hubner), detection
methods. Fla. Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ.
122.
G. L. Greene, W. H. Whitcomb, and T. M. Neal (senior author).
1972. Spanogonicus albofasciatus (Hemiptera: Miridae): a predator in
Florida soybeans. Fla. Ent. 55(4): 247-250.
1973. The hawthorn lace bug, Corythucha cydoniae (Fitch), in
Florida (Hemiptera: Tingidae). Fla. Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div.
Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 127.
1973. Alvah Peterson- (1888-1972) (obituary). Fla. Ent. 56(2):
149-150.
1973. A lace bug, Corythucha floridana Heidemann, (Hemiptera:
Tingidae). Fla. Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent.
Circ. 133.
1973. Garden fleahopper, Halticus bractatus (Say) (Hemiptera:
Miridae). Fla. Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ.
137.








Thirtieth Biennial Report


1974. The wheel bug, Arilus cristatus (Linnaeus) (Hemiptera:
Reduviidae). Fla. Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent.
Circ. 143.
Weems, H. V., Jr. 1972. Apple maggot, Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh)
(Diptera: Tephritidae). Fla. Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant
Ind., Ent. Circ. 126.
1973. Citrus whitefly, Dialeurodes citri (Ashmead) (Homoptera:
Aleyrodidae). Fla. Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent.
Circ. 128.
and G. W. Dekle. 1973. A blotch leafminer, Amauromyza maculosa
(Malloch) (Diptera: Agromyzidae) pest of chrysanthemum. Fla. Dept.
Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 132.
and G. B. Fairchild (senior author). 1973. Diachlorus ferrugatus
(Fabricius), a fierce biting fly (Diptera: Tabanidae). Fla. Dept. Agr. &
Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind.,Ent. Circ. 139.
C.B. Philip (senior author), and G. B. Fairchild. 1973. Notes on
Eastern Nearctic Haematopota, Merycomyia, and Chrysops, and
descriptions of male of C. zinzalus (Diptera: Tabanidae). Fla. Ent. 56(4):
339-346.
and H.F. Loomis. 1974. Oxidus gracilis (Koch) and Orthomorpha
coarctata (Saussure), two milliped pests in Florida. Fla. Dept. Agr. &
Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 145.
Woodruff, R. E. 1972. New United States record a sugarcane weevil
(Nicentrus saccharinus). Coop. Econ. Insect Rept. (USDA) 22(27): 431.
1972. The coffee bean weevil, Araecerus fasciculatus (DeGeer), a
potential new pest of citrus in Florida (Coleoptera: Anthribidae). Fla.
Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 117.
1973. Charles E. White collection. The Coleopterists Bulletin 27(2):
112.
and W. H. Pierce. 1973. Scyphophorus acupunctatus, a weevil pest
of yucca and agave in Florida (Coleoptera: Curuclionidae). Fla. Dept.
Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind.,Ent. Circ. 135.
1973. Nicentrus saccharinus Marshall, a potential sugarcane pest
recently introduced into Florida. Fla. Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv.,
Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 124.
1973.An orchid weevil new to the United States (Coleoptera:
Curculionidae). Fla. Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent.
Circ. 129.
1973. The scarab beetles of Florida (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae).
Part I. The Laparosticti (Subfamilies: Scarabaeinae, Aphodiinae,
Hybosorinae, Ochodaeinae, Geotrupinae, Acanthocerinae). Arthropods
of Florida and Neighboring Land Areas 8:i-xi + 1-220.
,and C.I. Ayres (senior author). 1973. Publications of the Division of
Plant Industry 1915-1972. Fla. Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant
Ind. Bull. 9: 1-136.
S1973. New entomological journal: Insect World Digest.
Coleopterists Bull 27(1): 40.
and R. A. Hamlen. 1974. Ambrosia beetles (Scolytidae) in
ornamental dracaenas in Florida. Fla. Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv.,
Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 140.








Division of Plant Industry


Florida State Collection of Arthropods
H.V. Weems, Jr., Taxonomw Entomologist

An important collection was purchased for the Florida State Collection
of Arthropods jointly by the University of Florida and the Florida
Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. The H. F. Strohecker
collection of Orthoptera, which includes representatives of virtually all of the
species and subspecies known to occur in North America was purchased,
and Dr. Strohecker donated his collection of endomychid beetles, largest in
the world. He also donated his private library which included numerous
publications on Endomychidae, Orthoptera, and various other groups of
insects. Also purchased through the cooperative efforts of the University of
Florida and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
was the bulk of the personal entomological library of a noted dipterist, Dr.
Alan Stone, who retired during the biennium from many years of service at
the U. S. National Museum of Natural History. Dr. Lewis Berner completed
the donation, made over a period of several years, of his entomological
library, files, and collection of Ephemeroptera, one of the three largest in
the New World. Dr. H. Rodney Dodge donated his entomological library and
collection of Sarcophagidae. Dr. Dorothy J. Knull donated her large library
of Homoptera publications. Dr. James T. Goodwin donated his collection of
adult and immature Tabanidae, especially valuable because much of the
collection was reared from field-collected material. Mrs. John W.
McReynolds donated the Calosoma beetle collection of her late husband.
This is one of the most extensive collections of Calosoma beetles in the
world. Mr. Charles E. White donated posthumously his large, neatly curated
collection of North American Coleoptera. Dr. John E. Porter donated his
collection of insects of public health and quarantine importance. The
Jacksonville Naval Air Station donated most of its collection of arthropods
related to human welfare, including world-wide representation of arthropods
which are vectors of diseases of humans and domestic animals. Tall Timbers
Research Station donated thousands of vials of arthropods collected at the
station by means of various kinds of traps. Mr. Joe Schuh donated
numerous insects of Oregon and neighboring states, including virtually his
entire collection of identified and unidentified Diptera. Dr. Martin H. Muma
donated many thousands of alcohol-preserved arthropods collected in New
Mexico and Arizona, including several thousand vials of identified spiders.
Dr. Septima C. Smith donated her extensive library and collection of
Odonata. Many others made valuable contributions during the biennium,
most of which are itemized on the following pages.
A major and detailed inventory of the Florida State Collection of
Arthropods was completed in June 1974. This showed the collection to
contain 998,420 pinned specimens, 130,000 vials containing specimens in fluid
preservatives (1 to many specimens per vial), 87,000 slide-mounted
specimens, 214,000 papered specimens in curated form (1 or more specimens
per envelope), with several million additional specimens awaiting
preparation. The collection contains 526 primary types holotypess
lectotypes, or equivalent) plus approximately 9,600 paratypes. The collection







Thirtieth Biennial Report


contains approximately 72,700 identified species covering virtually all
groups of arthropods except aquatic Crustacea. These figures do not include
several large private collections which have been committed to the Florida
State Collections of Arthropods. The inventory report covers only
collections basically supported by the Division of Plant Industry, Florida
Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the University of
Florida, but an agreement is in the process of being finalized in 1974
whereby institutional support will be provided also by Florida A & M
University, in Tallahassee, and collections developed there by the
Laboratory of-Aquatic Entomology (which, in July 1974, will become a
full-fledged Department of Entomology) will become an integral part of the
Florida State Collection of Arthropods, and part of the collection will be
housed there. Over 100 officially appointed Research Associates currently
support the development of this collection.
The Florida State Collection of Arthropods is currently housed in 2,750
Cornell cabinet drawers, 5,000 insect storage boxes, 5,700 double-row racks
for 4-dram vials. 10-dram vials, and olive bottles, several thousand slide
boxes, and several cabinets for the storage of envelope material. In addition,
a special shelf collection contains 11,666 blacklight trap and pitfall trap
samples of miscellaneous arthropods preserved in 75% isopropyl alcohol in
pint and quart jars. The collection is supported by the most extensive
library in the southeastern United States.


Major Contributions to the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods

*Dr. R. M. Baranowski (University of Florida, IFAS, Agricultural Research
and Education Center, 18905 S. W. 280th Street, Homestead, FL 33030)
39 blacklight trap samples of insects from Jamaica; 38 blacklight trap
samples from Jamaica, collected by M. Winegar; small taxonomic
library consisting of 189 bulletins and separates on several families of
Diptera, mostly on Syrphidae.

Dr. Fred D. Bennett (Commonwealth Inst. Biol. Control, W. Indian Station,
Gordon Street, Curepe, Trinidad, West Indies)
88 blacklight trap samples of insects from Trinidad.

*Dr. Lewis Berner (Professor, Zoology, and Acting Director, Division of
Biological Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611)
Private library and bibliographical card file (a highly specialized library
and McBee Keysort card file covering the arthropod order Ephemerop-
tera); a personal library of entomological publications totaling 2,650
items, including 1,941 reprints and bulletins and 224 monographs and
periodicals. (This is in addition to Dr. Berner's large library of
Ephemeroptera publications which he had donated earlier.)


*Research Associate of the Florida State Collection of Arthropods







Division of Plant Industry


*Dr. Franklin S. Blanton (IFAS, Department of Entomology & Nematology,
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611)
159 blacklight trap samples; 2,000 slide-mounted biting midges, family
Ceratopogonidae, representing 20 species of Culicoides, including 100
paratypes.

Lt. Herbert T. Bolton (Prev. Med. Section, MCB Camp Butler, FPO Seattle,
WA 98773)
15 blacklight trap samples of insects from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; 13
blacklight trap samples of insects from Cuba; 17 blacklight trap samples
of insects from Okinawa.

*Mr. Vernon A. Brou (Route 3, Box 111, Prairieville, LA 70769)
5,277 pinned, labelled insects collected by the donor in Louisiana,
consisting of 29 Diptera, 155 Hymenoptera, 10 Neuroptera, 2
Plecoptera, 2 Trichoptera, 50 Hemiptera, 48 Homoptera, 547
Coleoptera, and 4,434 neatly spread Lepidoptera;6 vials of alchohol-pre-
served spiders (89 specimens) and 1,145 pinned, labelled insects con-
sisting of 293 Homoptera, 186 Hemiptera, 147 Diptera, 373 Coleoptera,
21 Orthoptera, 112 Hymenoptera, 3 Odonata (spread), and 10 Neurop-
tera, all collected in Louisiana; 2,035 pinned, labelled insects, consisting
of 113 exotic Lepidoptera; 788 U. S. Lepidoptera; 1,134 domestic insects
other than Lepidoptera: 425 Diptera, 535 Coleoptera, 1 Trichoptera, 1
Psocoptera, 14 Hemiptera, 13 Homoptera, 135 Hymenoptera, 10
Odonata; 1,437 pinned, labelled domestic arthropods collected by the
donor, mostly in Louisisna, consisting of: 828 Lepidoptera (Unidentified:
332; identified: 496); the following unidentified: 4 Odonata, 14 Orthop-
tera, 48 Hemiptera, 37 Neuroptera, 387 Coleoptera, 2 Mecoptera, 9 Tri-
choptera, 79 Diptera, 27 Hymenoptera, and 1 Pseudoscorpionida.

Dr. R. F. Denno (Department of Entomology, Rutgers University, New
Brunswick, NJ 08903)
Approximately 200 pinned, labelled, authoritatively identified Chalcidoi-
dea representing 16 species, 16 genera, and 6 families (11 of the genera
and all of the species are new to the FSCA; at least 2, and possibly 4
are undescribed species, and 1 genus and 2 species may represent new
North American records).

*Mr. Terhune S. Dickel (1652 N. W. 9th Avenue, Homestead, FL 33030)
239 pinned, spread, labelled, identified Lepidoptera collected in the
United States and Canada, representing 42 species of which 15 are new
to the FSCA; 115 pinned, labelled, identified Lepidoptera (103 domestic,
including specimens from Alaska; 12 from Mexico) representing 10
species . almost all of exceptional interest.

*Dr. H. Rodney Dodge (deceased 15 June 1973)
1,397 pinned, labelled arthropods collected in Florida by the donor con-
sisting of: 11 Dermaptera, 55 Orthoptera, 11 Lepidoptera, 105
Hemiptera, 67 Homoptera, 30 Neuroptera, 1 Odonata, 261 Diptera, 124







Thirtieth Biennial Report


Hymenoptera, 722 Coleoptera, 1 Embioptera, 2 Psocoptera, 5 Thysa-
noptera, and 2 Pseudoscorpionida.

*Dr. Norville M. Downie (505 Lingle Terrace, Lafayette, IN 47901)
Approximately 5,108 papered, identified Coleoptera representing 1,300
U. S. species; 247 specimens representing 75 species from British
Columbia, Canada, and from Mexico.

*Mr. Byrd K. Dozier (32 Corydon Drive, Miami Springs, FL 33166)
1,C97 pinned, labelled insects consisting of 21 domestic Coleoptera, 784
exotics, 863 domestic, and 29 foreign specimens.

*Mr. Herbert L. Dozier, Jr. (3715 Marlbrough Way, College Park MD
20740)
2,146 pinned insects (2,084 labelled), mostly collected in the
southwestern United States, consisting of 118 Hymenoptera, 188
Diptera, 40 Lepidoptera, 1,363 Coleoptera, 17 Neuroptera, 87
Homoptera, 248 Hemiptera, 11 Dermaptera, 2 Plecoptera, 46
Orthoptera, and 26 Odonata.

*Mr. Boyce A. Drummond, III (University of Florida graduate student
currently working for 14 months in Ecuador)
12 blacklight trap samples and 57 Malaise trap samples of insects
collected in Ecuador.

*Dr. Thomas C. Emmel (823 S. W. 5th Avenue, Gainesville, FL 32601)
714 pinned, labelled Lepidoptera representing 131 authoritatively
identified species as follows: 691 spread and 12 unspread domestic
specimens, 7 spread and 4 unspread exotics.

*Dr. G. B. Fairchild (16 N. W. 22nd Drive, Gainesville, FL 32605)
5 entomological books; 34 very rare flies in the family Pantophthalmi-
dae representing 6 authoritatively identified species; 918 pinned,
labelled, identified Tabanidae; 407 insects collected in Australia
consisting of 124 pinned, labelled specimens (111 Diptera, 3 Lepidop-
tera, 5 Hymenoptera, 1 Homoptera, 2 Hemiptera, 1 Orthoptera, 1
Coleoptera) and 283 pinned, unlabelled specimens (144 Diptera, 3
Orthoptera, 9 Hymenoptera, 8 Homoptera, 2 Hemiptera, 1 Mecoptera,
11 Coleoptera); 1,090 pinned, labelled, identified Tabanidae representing
45 species (7 paratypes); 293 Canadian specimens; 65 Oriental
specimens; 199 pinned insects collected in Nova Scotia; 3 quarts
and 1 pint of blacklight trap samples collected in Florida; 1 Malaise
trap sample (dry-stored) collected in Florida; 171 pinned, labelled
insects collected in Central America (14 species and 7 genera new to the
FSCA) 42 pinned, labelled identified Australian Diptera; 463 pinned,
labelled exotic (Canada) insects; 1,430 pinned, labelled, authoritatively
identified Tabanidae, including 5 paratypes, representing 55 species (48
specimens representing 16 Palearctic; 1,382 specimens representing 39
Neotropical species); 64 insects collected in Florida (35 unlabelled, 29
labelled); 241 scientific publications (bulletins, monographs, and







Division of Plant Industry


reprints in the field of entomology and related subjects; 86 pinned,
unlabelled, undetermined, domestic insects, including 50 Tabanidae (72
Diptera, 2 Hymenoptera, 4 Neuroptera, 3 Lepidoptera, 3 Coleoptera, 1
Homoptera, 1 Orthoptera); 11 pinned, labelled, undetermined, domestic
insects (6 Diptera, 1 Orthoptera, 2 Coleoptera, 2 Hymenoptera); 13
papered insects (7 Lepidoptera, 1 Ephemeroptera, 5 Odonata); 2
unmounted Malaise trap samples from Florida.

*Dr. J. Howard Frank (Department of Health, Entomological Research
Center, P. O. Box 520, Vero Beach, FL 32960)
77 blacklight trap samples of arthropods from Florida.

*Dr. James T. Goodwin (Department of Biology, Memphis State University,
Memphis, TN 38111)
69 vials of identified adult Mecoptera representing 7 species; 546 vials
of immature Tabanidae, including numerous larval exuviae, represent-
ing 22 species (adults also are included in some vials); 1,053 pinned,
labelled, identified Tabanidae (many of them reared specimens)
representing 36 species from Florida, Tennessee, South Carolina,
Mississippi, and Arkansas.

*Mr. Harold N. Greenbaum ((graduate student) Dept. of Entomology &
Nematology, IFAS, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611)
500 pinned, labelled insects consisting of 232 Coleoptera, 17
Trichoptera, 28 Hemiptera, 15 Homoptera, 11 Neuroptera, 147 Diptera,
2 Mecoptera, 1 Thysanoptera, 1 Dermaptera, 2 Isoptera, and 36
Orthoptera; 61 pinned, labelled insects (21 Homoptera, 40 Hemiptera)
from Missouri, Kansas, Michigan, and New Jersey; 6 pinned, unlabelled
Syrphidae, 1 Homoptera; 2 vials of miscellaneous Diptera collected in a
Malaise trap in Florida; 78 pinned, labelled, identified sawflies in the
families Argidae, Diprionidae, Tenthredinidae, and Siricidae, represent-
ing 52 species, of which 23 are species new to the FSCA; first repre-
sentatives of a sex of 2 species are included; 51 sawflies (Symphyta) (21
domestic; 30 from Canada, Costa Rica, and England) representing 33
species, 10 of which are new to the FSCA and 1 our first representative
of a sex of that species; 345 pinned, labelled insects consisting of: 136
Coleoptera, 97 Diptera, 34 Homoptera, 22 Hemiptera, 2 Plecoptera, 1
Blattoidea, 1 Psocoptera, 3 Trichoptera, 1 Megaloptera, 8 Orthoptera, 14
Mecoptera, 2 Odonata, 23 Lepidoptera, (including 17 spread specimens)
and 1 spider, collected by the donor in Virginia, West Virginia and
Kansas.

*Dr. D.H. Habeck (1103 N. W. 36th Avenue, Gainesville, FL 32605)
3,960 pinned, labelled insects consisting of 315 exotic and 21 domestic
Hemiptera, 442 exotic and 100 domestic Homoptera, 122 exotic and 30
domestic IHymenoptera, 351 exotic and 332 domestic Coleoptera, 40
exotic Orthoptera, 9 exotic Dermaptera, 2 exotic and 3 domestic
Neuroptera, 1 exotic and 2 domestic Mecoptera, 26 exotic and 477
domestic Lepidoptera, and 236 exotic and 14 domestic Diptera.







Thirtieth Biennial Report


Dr. D. Elmo Hardy (Dept. of Entomology, University of Hawaii, 2500 Dole
Street, Room 18, Honolulu, HI 96822)
383 Drosophilidae, including 64 paratypes, representing 151 species of
Pomace flies, almost all new to the FSCA.

*Mr. Fred C. Harmston (1940 Larkspur Drive, Ft. Collins, CO 80521)
905 unidentified specimens (688 pinned, labelled specimens) consisting
of 5 Homoptera, 25 Hemiptera, 12 Coleoptera, 7 Neuroptera, 9
Hymenoptera, 847 Diptera (including 29 Syrphidae, 32 Tabanidae, 51
Pipunculidae); 5 cigar boxes containing several hundred dry, layered
insects (mostly Diptera) taken by sweeping in Colorado; 2 boxes, each
containing several unprocessed insect flight trap collections; 262 pinned,
labelled insects consisting of 8 identified Tabanidae representing 3
species; 121 (84 pinned, labelled) identified Dolichopodidae representing
21 species, including holotypes of 2 new species described by the donor
and 2 paratypes of another species, (coll. U.S.).

*Mr. Edwin I. Hazard (Insects Affecting Man & Animals Lab., USDA, 1600
S. W. 23rd Drive, Gainesville, FL 32608)
10 blacklight trap samples of insects, 25 Coleoptera in pillboxes, all
from Panama, 836 pinned, labelled, domestic Coleoptera (Cleridae,
Cerambycidae, Buprestidae, Elateridae); of these 789 were authorita-
tively identified.

*Mr. Gerd H. Heinrich (Dryden, ME 04225)
4 olive bottles containing blacklight trap collections of insects: 6 pinned,
labelled, insects consisting of 4 Diptera, 1 Hymenoptera, and 1
Homoptera; a 5-volume set by Mr. Heinrich titled Synopsis and
reclassification of the Ichneumoninae Stenopneusticae of Africa south
of the Sahara (Hymenoptera); 409 dry-stored insects collected in
Florida, Arkansas, Tennessee, New York, New Hampshire, and Maine;
631 unmounted (dry-preserved) Hymenoptera collected in Arkansas,
Tennessee, and Maine; 10 alcohol-preserved Malaise trap samples of
insects collected (4 taken in Maine, 6 taken in Newfoundland, Canada);
1 Malaise trap sample of insects collected by Heinrich at Dryden, Maine,
and preserved in ahcohol; 1 alcohol-preserved Malaise trap collection
taken by donor in Newfoundland, Canada.

*Mr. J. Richard Heitzman (3112 Harris Avenue, Independence, MO 64052)
3,330 pinned, labelled, identified Lepidoptera representing 586 neatly
spread specimens, 35 of which were collected in Missouri and Texas;
969 pinned, labelled, unspread identified Lepidoptera, 98 papered exotic
Lepidoptera, and 98 papered exotic Coleoptera; 1 male and 1 female
paratype of a newly described species, Papilio joanae; 708 pinned,
labelled insects consisting of 463 Coleoptera, 3 Hemiptera, 1
Homoptera, 54 Diptera (including 32 Syrphidae), and 187 identified
Lepidoptera (75 neatly spread); 135 pinned, labelled, identified,
domestic Lepidoptera, including 92 neatly spread specimens.







Division of Plant Industry


*Mr. Roger L. Heitzman (3112 Harris Avenue, Independence, MO 64052)
733 Lepidoptera, consisting of 482 pinned, labelled, unspread, identified,
domestic moths representing 130 species; 249 papered, identified, exotic
moths and butterflies representing 116 species from Austria, Hungaria
and Japan.

*Mr. John B. Heppner (Dept. of Entomology & Nematology, 3103 McCarty
Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611)
24 pinned, labelled, identified sawflies representing 12 species of which
11 species are new to the FSCA ( 1 Argidae; 23 Tenthredinidae), all
collected in the western United States; 1,464 pinned, labelled insects
(1,432 from United States; 32 from Mexico), consisting of the following:
12 authoritatively identified Cicindelidae representing 7 species: 2
identified Arctiidae representing 2 species from California; 1,450
unidentified insects (45 Orthoptera, 16 Dermaptera, 325 Hemiptera and
Homoptera, 509 Coleoptera (including 31 from Mexico), 8 Neuroptera,
360 Diptera (including one from Mexico), and 187 Hymenoptera); 10
vials of insects which Mr. Heppner has collected in West Virginia, New
York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, Massachusetts,
Vermont, and the Quebec Prov. of Canada (8 vials of Trichoptera, 1 vial
of Ephemeroptera, and 1 vial of winged ants); 102 vials containing 369
insects, mostly collected in California by the donor, consisting of: 50
vials of Lepidoptera (86 undetermined specimens, 86 determined
specimens representing 172 species), 27 vials of Coleoptera (98 undeter-
mined specimens), 11 vials of Diptera (52 undetermined specimens, 1
determined specimen), 3 vials of Trichoptera (3 undetermined
specimens), 1 undetermined Hymenoptera, 1 vial of Neuroptera (3
undetermined specimens), 1 undetermined Plecoptera, 2 vials of
Ephemeroptera (6 undetermined specimens), 3 vials of Homoptera (4
undetermined specimens), 3 vials of Hemiptera (25 undetermined
specimens), 1 vial of Dermaptera (3 undetermined specimens).

*Mr. C. P. Kimball (West Barnstable, MA 02668)
1,059 pinned, labelled insects from Mexico and Central America consist-
ing of the following: 7 Homoptera, 2 Hemiptera, 1 Hymenoptera, 1
Coleoptera, 1 Orthoptera, 1 Mecoptera, 1 Ephemeroptera, 5 Trichoptera,
1 Plecoptera, and 1,039 Lepidoptera (210 neatly spread; 465 identified
to species by Kimball); 1,361 pinned, labelled, identified Lepidoptera (94
neatly spread) and 2 papered Atlas moths.

Mr. H. L. King (2215 La Salle Street, Sarasota, FL 33581)
1,043 pinned, labelled, spread Lepidoptera (440 identified, 603 unidenti-
fied) collected by the donor in Mexico and Central America.

Dr. Dorothy J. Knull (330 E. Dunedin Road, Columbus, OH 43214)
A highly specialized entomological library consisting of 1,910
publications covering the arthropod order, Homoptera.

Mr. Denis D. Kopp (Research Assistant, Department of Entomology,








Thirtieth Biennial Report


University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65201)
115 pinned, labelled identified Membracidae representing 41 species
collected in Missouri.

*Mr. H. F. Loomis (5355 S. W. 92nd Street, Miami, FL 33156)
208 Diplopoda, (78 collected from Costa Rica and Washington, U. S.),
including 1 holotype and 90 paratypes from the U. S.; West Indies (70
specimens representing 34 species, including 34 paratypes representing
19 new species); Baja California, Mexico (6 specimens representing 2
species, including 2 paratypes of 1 species); Nicaragua (1 paratype); 144
Diplopoda (84 exotic, 60 domestic) including 16 holotypes and 89 para-
types representing 21 species, 19 of them described as new; 84 of the
specimens were collected in So. Costa Rican Highlands, mostly by the
donor.

*Mr. John W. McReynolds (P. O. Box 182, Nevada, MO 64772) (deceased 22
May 1974)
1,093 pinned, labelled insects consisting of : 23 identified exotic Coleop-
tera; 258 identified domestic Coleoptera; 25 unidentified exotic Coleop-
tera; and the following unidentified domestic groups: 654 Coleoptera, 63
Diptera, 23 Hymenoptera, 4 Trichoptera, 2 Neuroptera, 11 Homoptera,
and 30 Hemiptera; 1,674 pinned, labelled, identified Calosoma
(Coleoptera) representing 110 species, a little more than half of the
described species of the world, including representatives of all of
Breuning's subgenera except Camedula Motschulsky and Microcalosoma
Breuning.

*Mr. Bryant Mather (213 Mt. Salus Drive, Clinton, MS 39056)
149 pinned, labelled, spread, identified insects consisting of the
following: 7 Mecoptera, 55 Neuroptera, 77 Trichoptera, 6 Lepidoptera
and 4 Psocoptera, collected in Mississippi; 149 pinned, labelled, spread,
identified insects collected in Mississippi by the donor, consisting of 149
Trichoptera, 37 Neuropotera, and 37 Lepidoptera (33 Pyralidae, 4
Nymphalidae).

Dr. Frank W. Mead (Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer
Services, Division of Plant Industry, Bureau of Entomology, P. O. Box
1269, Gainesville, FL 32602)
1,214 pinned, labelled insects consisting of the following: 722 Homoptera
(26 specimens identifiedd, 13 Hymenoptera, 3 Diptera, and 3
Coleoptera; 4 vials of Acarina with host data; 170 identified Homoptera,
Hemiptera, Lepidoptera, and Diptera collected in Florida, North
Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Virginia.

Mr. Edward P. Merkel (Project Leader, Forest Insect Research, Naval
Stores and Timber Production Laboratory, U. S. Forest Service, P. O.
Box 3, Olustee, FL 32072)
272 vials of alcohol-preserved Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera, Diptera,
Coleoptera, Hemiptera, etc. reared from or collected on long-leaf and







Division of Plant Industry


slash pine, together with card files giving additional information of
rearing, biology, ecology, habitat, etc. All of this material was
accumulated over a period of many years at the Olustee laboratory in
connection with studies by Mr. Merkle and Mr. Bernard Ebel on
arthropods associated with long-leaf and slash pine in Florida especially
those associated with pine cones and new-growth tips of branches.

*Dr. Martin H. Muma (P. O. Box 2020, Silver City, NM 88061)
187 pitfall trap samples of arthropods from Arizona and New Mexico
and 319 vials consisting of 309 vials of identified spiders collected in
New Mexico and Arizona and 10 vials filled with hundreds of Hemiptera
collected in New Mexico and Arizona; 96 alcohol-preserved collections of
miscellaneous arthropods taken in can traps in New Mexico; 714 vials of
alcohol-preserved arthropods collected by the donor in New Mexico
(each vial containing 1 to many specimens), consisting of: 703 vials of
authoritatively determined Araneida, 1 vial of determined Diptera, 1
vial of determined and 3 vials of undetermined Orthoptera, 1 vial of
determined and 2 vials of undetermined Hemiptera, 2 vials of
undetermined Hymenoptera, and 1 vial of undetermined Homoptera
(aphids).
*Dr. Gayle H. Nelson (Department of Anatomy, Kansas City College of
Osteopathy & Surgery, 2105 Independence Avenue, Kansas City, MO
64124)
1,321 neatly pinned, labelled, identified, domestic Coleoptera represent-
ing 398 species, including over 600 Buprestidae; 896 specimens have
additional biological data, and 150 have the genitalia dissected out.
Included are 16 paratypes and 4 topotypes; 6 pinned, labelled,
identified, domestic Buprestidae of 2 species, including 5 paratypes.

*Drs. C. W. and L. B. O'Brien (Lab of Aquatic Entomology, University P. O.
Box 111, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL 32307)
1,558 pinned, labelled, domestic insects consisting of: 736 Coleoptera,
185 Diptera, 72 Hymenoptera, 53 Hemiptera, 2 Lepidoptera, 1 Orthop-
tera, and 2 Dermaptera (55 specimens were accompanied by host data);
507 pinned, labelled Hymenoptera, including 488 from the United
States, 12 from Canada, and 7 from Mexico; 26 blacklight trap samples
of insects from Florida; 14 Fulgoroidea; Dictyopharidae representing 8
species all new to the FSCA.

*Mr. W.H. Pierce (Peace Corps, P.O. Box 147, Nuku 'al ofa, Kingdom of
Tonga, South Pacific)
2,723 pinned, unlabelled insects collected in Florida consisting of 2,262
Diptera, 438 Hymenoptera, 1 Lepidoptera, 3 Odonata, 2 Orthoptera, 5
Coleoptera, 3 Neuroptera, and 9 Mecoptera; 14 technical bulletins
relating to Diptera, Hymenoptera, Thysanoptera, Homoptera, and
Acarina; 564 pinned, unlabelled Dolichopodidae identified to species
collected in Florida; 698 pinned, unlabelled, identified Dolichopodidae
and 2 pinned, unlabelled unidentified Syrphidae, all collected in Florida;
537 pinned, unlabelled insects collected in Florida via Malaise trap








Thirtieth Biennial Report


consisting of 4 Coleoptera, 2 Neuroptera, 177 Hymenoptera, and 354
Diptera. 12 pinned, unlabelled specimens of Procecidochares sp.
collected in Florida; 1,877 pinned, unlabelled insects collected in Florida
consisting of: 1,318 Diptera, 481 Hymenoptera, 15 Coleoptera, 18
Homoptera, 3 Hemiptera, 14 Neuroptera, 3 Orthoptera, and 25
unspread Lepidoptera; 81 pinned, unlabelled Lepidoptera collected in
Florida; 130 pinned, labelled, identified Dolichopodidae representing 72
species, including first representatives of both sexes of 1 species and
first representatives of a sex of 3 other species; 1,543 Diptera including
580 Dolichopodidae determined to genera by the donor, 929
Hymenoptera, 1 Coleoptera, 6 Homoptera, 1 Lepidoptera; 1 Blacklight
trap sample of insects from Florida.

*Dr. John E. Porter (National Sanitation Inspection Service, 5790 W.
Flagler Street, Miami, Fl 33144)
1,951 pinned, labelled insects, including 1,685 identified specimens
representing 169 species as follows: 1,426 identified Culicidae
representing 169 species, including 75 specimens from Haiti and the
Dominican Republic representing 33 species, of which 7 are new to the
FSCA; 140 specimens of miscellaneous Diptera, mostly Tabanidae,
including 72 identified specimens representing 32 species; 385 Psyllidae,
including 187 identified specimens representing 9 species, plus 11 pill
boxes and 16 vials of unmounted Psyllidae; 723 slide-mounts of
arthropods, including 537 identified slides representing 75 species, as
follows: 653 slide-mounted Culicidae, including 502 identified slides
representing 65 species; 70 slide mounts of miscellaneous arthropods
(Acarina, Dermaptera, Siphonaptera, etc.) including 35 identified slides
representing 10 species; 8 Schmitt boxes.

*Dr. Walfried J. Reinthal (4026 Sequoyah Avenue, Knoxville, TN 37919)
600 pinned, labelled, spread, identified, domestic Lepidoptera collected
by the donor; 946 Lepidoptera consisting of 25 unidentified, domestic
specimens stored in envelopes and 921 pinned, labelled spread specimens
(exotic: 118 identified, 107 unidentified; domestic 484 identified, 212
unidentified).

*Mr. Steve Roman (205 Shady Hollow, Casselberry, FL 32707)
6 pinned, unlabelled flies collected by the donor at Torreya State Park;
26 pinned, labelled, spread, identified Florida Lepidoptera collected by
the donor representing 11 species, 8 of which are new to the FSCA and
1 of which is new for the state of Florida (8 species of Lycaenidae, 1
Hesperioidea, 2 Nymphalidae); 2 specimens of the sphingid moth,
Pholus satellitia (Drury), new to the FSCA and part of a series
collected by Mr. Roman which he believes to be the first Florida
records.

*Mr. Joe Schuh (4039 Shasta Way, Klamath Falls, OR 97601)
6,359 pinned, labelled insects collected in Oregon by the donor consist-
ing of the following: 2,465 Hymenoptera (2,464 identified, 1








Division of Plant Industry


unidentified), 3,114 unidentified Diptera, 779 Coleoptera (767 authorita-
tively identified, 12 unidentified); 13 half pint and other small size
bottles filled with alcohol-preserved Coleoptera and Hemiptera; 970
pinned, labelled, identified U. S. Diptera representing 284 species and
subspecies (938 Syrphidae representing 271 species and subspecies; 32
Stratiomyidae, including 1 paratype, representing 13 species); 1,753
pinned, labelled, identified insects (1,744 domestic, 1 Belgium Congo, 8
Switzerland), representing 494 species, consisting of 339 Hemiptera,
family Lygaeidae, representing 25 species, and 1,414 Diptera,
representing 469 species, and including 1 holotype, 1 allotype, 20 para-
types, and 2 topotypes, including the following: 363 Asilidae (127
species), 61 Therevidae (24 species), 90 Rhagionidae (23 species), 133
Stratiomyidae (34 species), 334 Tabanidae (113 species), 39 Bombyliidae
(21 species), 105 Conopidae (25 species), and 289 miscellaneous other
families of Diptera (102 species). Most of this neatly processed material
was collected by the donor in Oregon, Washington, and California. The
following were new to the FSCA: 1 species of Xylophagidae, 1 species
of Sciaridae, 1 species of Blephariceridae, 1 species of Anthomyiidae, 1
species of Anthomyzidae, 2 species of Ephydridae, 2 species of
Rhagionidae, 1 species of Phoridae, 1 species of Sphaeroceridae, 2
species of Psilidae, 3 species of Empididae, 2 species of Acroceridae, 10
species of Bombyliidae, 12 species of Therevidae, 3 species of Stratio-
myidae plus first representatives of a sex of 3 additional species, 5
species of'Tabanidae, and 23 species of Asilidae.

Dr. H. A. Scullen (Department of Entomology, Oregon State University,
Corvallis, OR 79331)
69 Cercerini, Sphecidae (54 Cerceris representing 39 species; 15
Eucerceris representing 14 species) representing 53 species either new
to the FSCA or representing a sex of a species new to the FSCA.

Dr. Septima C. Smith (2425 S. Adams Street, Ft. Worth, TX 76110)
Personal collection of more than 15,000 Odonata, plus her Odonata
library.

Mr. B. J. Smittle (1605 N. W. 71st Street, Gainesville, FL 32605)
163 blacklight trap samples of arthropods from Florida.

*Mr. Carl E. Stegmaier, Jr. (11335 N. W. 59 Avenue, Hialeah, FL 33012)
74 vials of Hymenoptera, collected by the donor. Most of these several
hundred specimens were reared from various host plants or from other
insects which they were parasitizing, and they have been identified by
U. S. National Museum of Natural History specialists.

Mr. George C. Steyskal (Syst. Ent. Lab., USDA, c/o U. S. National
Museum of Natural History, Washington, D. C. 20560)
18 reprints of entomological publications by the late Dr. A. L.
Melander; reprints of 134 of his entomological publications, giving the
Division of Plant Industry a complete set of the 246 entomological
publications to date by Steyskal.








Thirtieth Biennial Report


*Dr. Karl J. Stone (813 N. W. 20th Street, Minot, ND 58701)
210 vials and small jars of miscellaneous arthropods taken in can traps
in North Dakota.

*Mr. Gayle T. Strickland (1744 Brocade Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70815)
1,042 pinned, labelled, neatly spread, identified Lepidoptera, represent-
ing 170 species collected in Louisiana.

*Dr. H.F. Strohecker (6101 S.W. 44th Terrace, Coral Gables, FL 33155)
6,000+ pinned, labelled, identified beetles in the family Endomychidae,
order Coleoptera representing 743 species and subspecies (36 trino-
mials), including 571 allotypes, paratypes, and cotypes representing 155
species; 966 pinned, labelled Orthoptera from Mexico and South
America, including 878 authoritatively identified specimens represent-
ing 217 species and 88 unidentified specimens representing 23 species.
A private library of books, bulletins, and separates in excess of 15,000
pages . consists of publications, mostly taxonomic or zoogeographical
in nature, concerning Arthropoda, especially the orders Orthoptera
and Coleoptera, many of which are out of print and no longer available
from either publishers or book dealers, plus many other which are
extremely difficult to obtain at any cost.

Tall Timbers Research Station (Route 1, Box 160, Tallahassee, FL 32303)
During the past biennium, more than 2,500 vials of arthropods were
donated to the FSCA. These consisted of both bulk samples blacklightt
traps, pitfall traps, Berlese funnels, de-vac, etc.) and sorted specimens
resulting from several specific projects at Tall Timbers: (1) fire ecology--
burned (at various intervals) and unburned plots; (2) habitat
management--disturbed and undisturbed plots, including agricultural
modifications; (3) faunal survey of the Tall Timbers Station. These
collections were received through the courtesy of Dr. W. H. Whitcomb,
Dr. E. V. Komarek, Mr. Wilson Baker, Mr. Donny L. Harris, and Mr.
Leroy Collins.

Dr. William J. Turner (Dept. of Entomology, Washington State University,
Pullman, WA 99163)
51 pinned, labelled, identified Rhagionidae representing 18 species, of
which 11 were new to the FSCA.

Dr. Howard V. Weems, Jr. (Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer
Services, Division of Plant Industry, P. O. Box 1269, Gainesville, FL
32602)
8,779 pinned, labelled insects collected by the donor and other members of
his family in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, and West Virginia,
consisting of the following: 1,520 Hymenoptera, 4,608 Diptera, 632
Coleoptera, 16 Neuroptera, 39 Homoptera, 7 Orthoptera, 63 Lepidoptera,
(5 spread), 127 Mecoptera (spread), and 73 Hemiptera; 2,247 pinned,
labelled insects collected via insect flight traps in Florida by the donor;
288 pinned, labelled insects collected in Florida via Malaise traps; 41








72 Division of Plant Industry

vials of miscellaneous arthropods, consisting of 16 vials of arthropods
collected in Florida and Texas (1 Isopoda; 1 Scorpionida and 9
Araneida, Arachnida; 1 Collembola, 2 Ephemeroptera, 1 Psocoptera and
1 Homoptera) and 25 vials of arthropods collected in Mexico (4
Diplopoda; 1 Pedipalpida, 2 Phalangida, and 7 Araneida; 2
Ephemeroptera, 1 Trichoptera, 4 Plecoptera, 3 Isoptera and 1
Hymenoptera); 415 insects (138 domestic, 277 exotic (Mexico))
preserved in plastic envelopes with collection data (68 Odonata, 1
Orthoptera, 346 Lepidoptera); 3,665 pinned, labelled insects (2,735
domestic (Colorado, Oregon, Washington), 930 exotic (Mexico))
consisting of 2,184 Diptera, 852 Hymenoptera, 426 Coleoptera, 98
Hemiptera, 50 Homoptera, 25 Lepidoptera, 14 Dermaptera, 7
Neuroptera, 1 Ephemeroptera, 1 Trichoptera, 1 Plecoptera, 11
Orthoptera, and 5 Mecoptera; 39 of the vials, in addition to the basic
data of locality, date and collector, include additional data . elevation,
host, or habitat, or kind of trap in which collected.

Mr. Charles E. White (2441 E. Northview Avenue, Indianapolis, IN 46220)
(deceased March, 1973)
20,098 arthropods as follows: 2,764 pinned, labelled, unidentified
domestic arthropods consisting of 8 Orthoptera, 7 Dermaptera, 34
Hemiptera, 10 Homoptera, 4 Neuroptera, 2,672 Coleoptera, 1
Lepidoptera, 23 Diptera, 4 Hymenoptera, and 1 Acarina; 17,334 pinned,
labelled, authoritatively identified Coleoptera (26 exotic, 17,308
domestic) representing 3,427 species; 48-drawer insect storage cabinet
complete with unit pinning trays. This is an exceptionally neatly
curated collection.

*Mr. Joseph Wilcox (21171 Mohler Place, Anaheim, CA 92806)
59 Asilidae, including 43 paratypes and 2 topotypes, representing 29
species, all new to the FSCA; 3 pinned, labelled Syrphidae collected in
California.

Dr. Roger N. Williams (Ohio Agricultural Research & Development Center,
Ohio State Experiment Station, Wooster, OH 44691)
58 blacklight trap samples from Cuiaba, Brazil.

*Dr. Nixon Wilson (Department of Biology, University of Northern Iowa,
Cedar Falls, IA 50613)
67 vials of assorted arthropods as follows: 55 vials of Acarina (690
identified, domestic ticks, 14 unidentified, domestic ticks, and 6 uniden-
tified, exotic ticks); 2 vials (4 unidentified, domestic spiders); 1 vial (2
unidentified, domestic Chilopoda); 1 vial (6 unidentified, domestic
Isopoda); 1 vial (1 unidentified, domestic Psocoptera); 2 vials (6
unidentified, domestic Coleoptera); 3 vials (3 unidentified, domestic
Diptera;, 1 vial (unidentified, domestic Hymenoptera), and 1 vial (13
identified domestic Mallophaga); 22 vials containing 5,200 unidentified
specimens as follows: 1 vial (3,011 Collembola), 3 vials (4 Psocoptera), 1
vial (1 Hemiptera), 1 vial (2 Homoptera), 2 vials (25 Diptera), 1
vial (1 Arachnida, Chelonethida), 1 vial (2 Arachnida, Araneida), 7 vials
(1,197 domestic, 2 exotic Arachnida, Acarina); 7 vials of unidentified








Thirtieth Biennial Report


specimens as follows: 1 vial (1 Collembola), 1 vial (1 Psocoptera), 1 vial (1
Thysanoptera), 1 vial (1 Diptera), 2 vials (7 Hymenoptera), 1 vial (1
Arachnida, Acarina); 20 vials of alcohol-preserved arthropods consisting
of: 1 vial (23 unidentified, domestic Collembola); 1 vial (1 unidentified
domestic Hemiptera); 1 vial (1 unidentified exotic Homoptera); 1 vial (7
unidentified, domestic Coleoptera); 4 vials (7 identified, domestic
Diptera); 12 vials (332 unidentified, domestic and 1 exotic
Arachnida, Acarina). Dr. Wilson also donated 200 slide-mounted,
identified Acarina representing 10 species (25 slide mounts of Florida
specimens representing 3 species and 175 slide mounts of specimens
from Japan, Indonesia, Thailand, and India representing 7 species. 20
vials of alcohol-preserved arthropods consisting of : 1 vial containing 23
unidentified domestic Collembola; 1 vial containing 1 unidentified,
domestic Hemiptera; 1 vial containing 1 unidentified, exotic Homoptera;
1 vial containing 7 unidentified, domestic Coleoptera; 4 vials containing
7 identified, domestic Diptera representing a single species; 12 vials
containing 332 unidentified, domestic & 1 exotic Arachnida, Acarina.

*Dr. Willis W. Wirth (9821 Rosensteel Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20910)
87 slide-mounted Ceratopogonidae, including 4 paratypes, representing
9 species.

Dr. D. L. Wray (Entomologist Emeritus, North Carolina Department of
Agriculture, Raleigh, NC 27611)
69 slide-mounted, identified Collembola, with representations of several
species new to the FSCA.

*Dr. Frank N. Young (Department of Zoology, Indiana University,
Bloomington, IN 47406)
632 mounted, labelled, identified Tenebrionidae (Coleoptera) represent-
ing numerous isolated populations of a relictual species, important in an
understanding of the complicated taxonomic problems in this group; 20
pinned, labelled Scarabaeidae from Florida, representing a rare species;
18 insects preserved in alcohol, collected in the Galapagos Islands,
Ecuador, by the donor, consisting of 7 Orthoptera, 1 Thysanura, 7
Coleoptera, 2 Hymenoptera, and 1 Homoptera; 61 pinned, labelled
determined domestic Coleoptera (including 7 paratypes representing 3
species); 22 pinned, labelled, identified insects consisting of the
following: Diptera: Tabanidae, 7 U.S. specimens representing 3 species;
Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae, 5 specimens (2 Ariz., 3 Mexico) representing
1 species, and Dytiscidae, 10 paratypes representing 8 new species of
Anococheilus from Brazil, Venezuela, and Mexico, described by the
donor.

*Mr. C. F. Zieger (3751 Sommers Street, Jacksonville, FL 32205)
336 pinned, labelled insects collected by the donor, consisting of: 96
neatly spread Lepidoptera (63 from Trinidad, 12 from Puerto Rico, 71
from Florida and North Carolina), 32 Coleoptera, 57 Diptera (including
27 Syrphidae), 94 Hymenoptera, 6 Hemiptera, 1 Orhtoptera; 328
pinned, labelled insects collected in Florida consisting of 119 Diptera, 31
Hymenoptera, 24 Coleoptera, 11 Hemiptera, and 143 neatly spread
Lepidoptera.








Division of Plant Industry


Other Contributions to the Collection

Dr. Warren Adlerz (University of Florida, IFAS, Agricultural Research
Center, Box 388, Leesburg, FL 32748)
1 vial containing approximately 100 adult grape seed chalcids (Prodeca-
toma cooki (Howard), family Eurytomidae) collected in Florida by
donor.

Mr. M. M. Alam (Ministry of Agriculture, Science & Technology, P. O. Box
505, Bridgetown, Barbados, West Indies)
61 blacklight trap samples of insects from Barbados, West Indies.

Dr. D. J. Borror (Department of Zoology & Entomology, Ohio State
University, Columbus, OH 43210)
A complimentary new copy of the 2nd edition of the Borror & Delong
textbook (Portuguese version), Introducao ao Estudo Dos Insectos.

Mr. Ralph E. Brown (Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer
Services, Division of Plant Industry, P. O. Box 1269, Gainesville, FL
32602)
2 blacklight trap samples of insects from Puerto Rico.

Mr. Samuel Calhoun (HMC, Box 52, Base Sanitation, FBPO Norfolk, VA
29593)
5 blacklight trap samples of insects from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Dr. Brian Cheary (Wau Ecology Inst., P. O. Box 77, Wau, Territory Papua
& New Guinea)
17 Scarabaeidae from Papua & New Guinea, including 3 Rhyparus, a
termitophilous genus, and 1 Eupatorus sp. male, a giant rhinoceros
beetle.

Dr. Carl Childers (Department of Entomology, University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO)
115 vials containing 558 insects (517 undetermined, 41 d!: cd),
mostly from Missouri and the midwest, as follows: s of
Lepidoptera (81 vials containing 400 undetermined :.. ii vials
containing 35 determined specimens, 17 vials of Cole ,. (16 vials
containing 102 undetermined specimens, 1 viai containing 6 determined
specimens, 3 vials containing 10 undetermined Diptera, 1 undetermined
Hymenoptera, 1 vial containing 3 undetermined Neuroptera, 1
undetermined Orthoptera.

Mrs. C. Howard Curran (1302 Peters Drive, Leesburg, FL 32748)
3 bound volumes and 1 unbound volume of publications on Arthropoda
and Mollusca for the Division of Plant Industry library.

Mr. C. F. Dowling (11545 S. W. 107th Ct., Miami, FL 33156)
34 numbers of the Annals of the Entomological Society of America and








Thirtieth Biennial Report


18 numbers of the Anales de la Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biologicas.

Dr. Truman Fincher (USDA, ARS, Animal Parasite Research Lab., Georgia
Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton, GA 31794)
54 pinned, labelled Coleoptera (45 domestic undetermined, 8 exotic
undetermined, 1 exotic determined).

Dr. George W. Folkerts (Department of Zoology, Entomology, Auburn
University, Auburn, AL 36830)
3 blacklight trap samples from the Galapagos Islands.
Mr. Oscar F. Francke (Department of Zoology, Arizona State University,
Tempe, AZ 85281)
47 Scorpionida representing 10 species from Texas, Arizona, Nevada,
Utah, and Washington contained in 10 vials.
Mr. L. Richard Franz, Jr. (Department of Natural Science, Florida State
Museum, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611)
1 female cave-dwelling crayfish Troglocambarus macelanei Hobbs, new
to the FSCA.

Dr. S.W. Frost (Professor Emeritus, Department of Entomology, College of
Agriculture, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
16802)
5 adults and 4 pupal cases of Blepharida dorothea (Chrysomelidae)
mounted and unlabelled.

Mr. A. J. Gilbert (2550 Mariposa Street, Room 3081, Fresno, CA 93721)
3 specimens of 2 species of recently described, rare "rain beetles"
Pleocoma from California.

Dr. Carter R. Gilbert (Department of Natural Science, Florida State
Museum, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611)
8 blacklight trap samples and 8 vials of alcohol-preserved insects from
Colombia.

Dr. Harry Hoogstraal (Comm. Officer, Cairo: Office Naval Attache
(NAMRU-3), Department of State, Washington, D. C. 20360)
206 reprints of arthropod publications by Dr. Hoogstraal and other
members of his staff and associates.

*Mr. Ronald L. Huber (2896 Simpson Street, St. Paul, MN 55113)
15 pinned, labelled, neatly spread, identified Lepidoptera representing
15 species collected in Minnesota (5 species of Satyridae, 1 Pieridae, 3
Lycaenidae, 1 Nymphalidae and 5 of Hesperiidae); all of these species
are rare to uncommon, at least in Minnesota, and virtually all are new
to the FSCA.

Dr. M. T. James (Department of Entomology, Washington State University,
Pullman, WA 99163)
6 Stratiomyidae representing 3 species, 2 of them new to the FSCA.

Dr. E. L. Kessel (Assoc. Curator of Insects, California Academy of Science,








Division of Plant Industry


Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, CA 94118)
10 Platypezidae representing 9 species and 9 genera, all new to the
FSCA.

Mr. K. W. Knopf (graduate student, Department of Entomology & Nemato-
logy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611)
81 vials of identified Hymenoptera representing 3 species of Braconidae
reared by the donor from Samea multiplicalis from Florida.

Mr. James H. Knowles, Jr. (deceased 23 May 1974)
2 blacklight trap samples of insects from Andros Island, Bahamas, and 3
blacklight trap samples of insects from Goulds, Florida.

Lt. P.G. Koehler (DVECC, Naval Air Station, Box 43, Jacksonville, FL 32212)
28 blacklight trap samples of insects from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Mr. Noel L. Krauss (2437 Parker Place, Honolulu, HI 96822)
87 miscellaneous insects, including fruit flies, from New Hebrides,
unmounted in pill box.

Dr. A. M. Laessle (N. W. 45 Ave, Gainesville, FL 32601)
3 vials of miscellaneous insects collected in Jamaica.

*Dr. James E. Lloyd (Department of Entomology & Nematology, University
of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611)
4 pinned, labelled, identified Lampyridae (Luciola obsoleta (Olivier))
collected in New Guinea; 9 vials of identified spiders collected in New
York, Kentucky and Florida.

Mr. Jack McLeod (3001 S. W. Hawthorne Road, C-7, Gainesville, FL 32601)
14 vials and bottles of arthropods collected on Okinawa Island and
South Korea by Mr. Alan W. Doty, consisting of: 1 Odonata, 3
Orthoptera, 1 Thysanoptera, 2 Hemiptera, 5 Homoptera, 37 Coleoptera,
5 Diptera, 3 Hymenoptera, 9 Lepidoptera, 2 Diplopoda, 4 Chilopoda, 6
Araneida, and 2 Phalangida.

Mr. Tim Neal (graduate student, Department of Entomology and
Nematology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611)
6 blacklight trap samples of insects from Florida; 5 specimens of
Eudamus dorantes collected in Florida, including specimens taken at
Gainesville, Yulee, Bartow, Lake Worth, and Homestead.

*Dr. John S. Nordin (1826 Roan Drive, Warrington, PA 18976)
31 pinned, spread, identified Lepiodoptera representing 3 species, all
new to the FSCA, collected by the donor in New Jersey and
Pennsylvania; 7 pinned, labelled, unidentified Coleoptera (1 Elateridae,
6 Carabidae) collected in New Jersey by the donor.

Mrs. A. Ladonia O'Berry (Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer
Services, Division of Plant Industry, Bureau of Entomology, P. O. Box
1269, Gainesville, FL 32602)








Thirtieth Biennial Report 77

1 blacklight trap sample of insects from Suwannee, Florida.

Dr. H. Eugene Ostmark (Division of Tropical Research, Tela Railroad Com-
pany, La Lima, Honduras)
82 Sacrabaeidae, in alcohol, undetermined from Honduras.

Mr. Richard S. Peigler (Department of Entomology, Clemson University,
Clemson, SC 29631)
58 pinned, labelled insects consisting of 1 Pyrgotidae (Diptera) and 57
neatly-spread Lepidoptera.

Dr. Norman Platnick (Asst. Curator of Arachnida, Department of
Entomology, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West
at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024)
30 vials of spiders.

*Dr. Charles C. Porter (Department of Biological Science, Fordham
University, Bronx, NY 10458)
80 pinned, unlabelled Diptera, including 47 Syrphidae, collected in
Bolivia and Argentina; 1 paratype of Anacis tucumana Porter (family
Ichneumonidae); 7 Malaise trap collections of miscellaneous insects,
preserved in alcohol, taken at McAllen, Texas.

Dr. Charles V. Reichart (Department of Biology, Providence College,
Providence, RI 02918)
5 pinned, labelled paratypes (2 males, 3 females) a newly described
species of Hemiptera from Florida, Buenoa marki Reichart 1971.

Mr. Pedro Reyes (Hacienda de Rancho Seco # 224, Frac. Hda. de Echegaray,
Naucalpan, Edo. de Mexico)
214 foreign insects, unmounted, unidentified.

Mr. David' B. Richman (graduate student, Department of Zoology,
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611)
11 bottles & vials of identified scorpions from California, Arizona,
Texas, and Mexico (1 vial, 1 specimen) . 12 adults, plus 50+
immatures of one species ... representing 10 species, almost all new to
the FSCA.

Mr. Jack Schuster (Department of Entomology & Nematology, 3103
McCarty Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611)
13 Scarabaeidae representing 5 species and 1 Hemiptera, all unmounted,
from Peru; 16 large Pentatomidae collected in Peru by the donor; 60
pinned, labelled unidentified, domestic Coleoptera; 9 alcoholic, un-
mounted, Coleoptera from the Dominican Republic; 1 alcoholic,
unmounted Coleoptera from Ecuador.

Dr. W. W. Smith (IFAS, Dept. of Entomology & Nematology, 344-B
Entomology Research Lab., Archer Road, Gainesville, FL 32611)
14 pillboxes (80 specimens) and 6 slide mounts (14 specimens) of
identified Nematocerus Diptera.








Division of Plant Industry


Mr. Neal R. Spencer (2205 S. W. 91st Street, Gainesville, FL 32601)
3 pill boxes of assorted insects collected in France and India; 244
pinned, labelled insects consisting of the following exotics (from Guam):
6 Orthoptera, 4 Dermaptera, 12 Hemiptera, 7 Homoptera, 1Neuroptera,
15 Hymenoptera, 17 Diptera, and 53 Coleoptera; domestic: 3 Ephe-
meroptera, 1 Odonata, 4 Orthoptera, 22 Hemiptera, 13 Homoptera, 7
Hymenoptera, 13 Diptera, 60 Coleoptera, and 4 Lepidoptera (3 of them
spread); 18 paper triangles containing 18 Odonata collected at Rodman
Reservoir, Putnam County, Florida; 6 pinned, unlabelled insects (3
Hemiptera, 1 Odonata, 1 Hymenoptera, 1 Coleoptera) collected in
Florida by the donor.

Dr. T. E. Summers (IFAS, Sugarcane Insect Investigations, Box 156, Canal
Point, FL 33438)
18 blacklight trap samples of insects from Florida.

Mr. Robert W. Swanson (Entomologist, University of Florida, Agricultural
Research & Education Center, 18905 S. W. 280th Street, Homestead,
FL 33030)
41 pinned, unlabelled Syrphidae flies, Ornidia obesa (Fabr.), collected in
Florida by the donor.

Dr. C.A. Triplehorn (Department of Zoology & Entomology, Ohio State
University, Columbus, OH 43210)
1 vial packed full with several hundred Homoptera and Hemiptera from
Piracicaba, South Brazil collected with blacklight trap in 1966 by Dr.
Tripplehorn; 1 vial of Scarabaeidae from El Zamarona, Honduras,
collected with blacklight trap in 1965 by Dr. Triplehorn.

*Dr. Karl R. Valley (Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, Bureau of
Plant Industry, Harrisburg, PA 17120)
3 pinned, labelled, identified Lauxaniidae representing 2 species new to
the FSCA.

Mr. Richard C. Wilkerson (Department of Entomology & Nematology, 3103
McCarty Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611)
2 pupae and 20 larvae, preserved in alcohol, of a conifer sawfly; 2
Malaise trap collections taken in Mexico; 13 Malaise trap collections (9
dry-stored, 4 preserved in alcohol); 29 pinned, unlabelled insects; all
material was collected in Florida.

Dr. Robert E. Woodruff (Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer
Services, Division of Plant Industry, Bureau of Entomology, P. O. Box
1269, Gainesville, FL 32602)
15 blacklight trap samples collected from Florida and North Carolina.








Thirtieth Biennial Report


Research Associates
of the
Florida State Collection of Arthropods

The Research Associate Program has continued to develop and to make
a vital contribution to the Florida State Collection of Arthropods and to the
effectiveness of the arthropod identification service provided the citizens of
the State of Florida. Research Associate appointments were extended by
Florida Commissioner of Agriculture, Doyle Conner, to the following 13
men: Dr. William F. Buren, Mr. Paul H. Carlson, Dr. Charles V. Covell,
Jr., Dr. Hermann Flaschka, Dr. J. Howard Frank, Dr. Arden R. Guafin, Dr.
James T. Goodwin, Col. Lester L. Lampert, Mr. Robert D. McManaway, Dr.
William B. Muchmore, Mr. William H. Pierce, Mr. William Rosenberg, and
Dr. Mac A. Tidwell. A new category of Student Associate was established,
and appointments were given to Mr. Boyce A. Drummond, III, Mr. Harold
N. Greenbaum, Mr. John B. Heppner, and Mr. Dave G. Young, all graduate
students in entomology at the University of Florida. Six appointments were
terminated during the biennium. Two who have made major contributions
to our program over many years died during the biennium- Dr. H. Rodney
Dodge (15 June 1973) and Mr. John W. Mc Reynolds (22 May 1974).
Another whose death was not reported in our last biennial report was Dr.
C. Howard Curran, who died 23 January 1972. Three others who were
long-time friends of the program, although not Research Associates, were
Mr. Charles E. White, coleopterist from Indianapolis, Indiana (died March
1973), Dr. John W. Wilson, former head of the University of Florida
experiment station at Sanford (died 22 May 1974), and Dr. Alvah Peterson
from Columbus, Ohio (died 11 September 1972). Dr. Peterson, a world
renowned authority on immature insects, a former staff member of the
Division of Plant Industry's Bureau of Entomology, and an honorary
member of the Florida Entomological Society, died at the age of 83.

Research Associates of the Florida State
Collection of Arthropods
(Effective 30 June 1974)
1. Dr. Ross H. Arnett, Jr., Professor of Biology, The Biological Research
Institute of America, Inc., 57 West Glenwood Drive, Latham, New
York 12110. (Beetles of the United States; Oedemeridae of the world;
pollen-feeding insects).

2. Dr. Richard M. Baranowski, Entomologist, University of Florida, IFAS,
Agr. Research & Education Center, 18905 S. W. 280th Street, Route
1, Homestead, Florida 33030. (Biology and Taxonomy of Hemiptera,
especially of Florida)

3. Dr. Joseph A. Beatty, Department of Zoology, Southern Illinois
University, Carbondale, Illinois 62901. (Spiders of North America,
especially of the southeastern United States)

4. Mrs. Elisabeth C. Beck, Entomologist, Bureau of Entomology, Div. of








Division of Plant Industry


Health, Fla. Dept. of Health & Rehabilitative Services, P. O. Box 210,
Jacksonville, Florida 32201. (Insects of medical importance, especially
adult Chironomidae, Ceratopogonidae, and Culicidae of Florida)

5. Mr. William M. Beck, Jr., Laboratory of Aquatic Entomology, Univ. P.
O. Box 111, Tallahassee, Florida 32307. (Ecology and taxonomy of
aquatic insects)

6. Dr. Allen H. Benton, Department of Biology, Fredonia State College,
Fredonia, New York 14063. (Ecology, distribution and host
relationships of Siphonaptera: life history of small mammals; wildlife
management; conservation education)

7. Dr. Lewis Berner, Prof. of Zoology and Acting Director, Div. of
Biological Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.
(Ephemeroptera of North America, especially of the southeastern
United States; bottom dwelling insects of large rivers of the
Southeast.

8. Mr. Dale R. Birkenmeyer, Metabolism & Radiation Research Lab.,
USDA, ARS, Fargo, North Dakota 58102. (Blacklight trapping of
insects in North Dakota and Minnesota; cotton boll weevil
sterilization by chemicals and/or radiation)

9. Dr. Franklin S. Blanton, Entomologist, IFAS, Dept. of Entomology &
Nematology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.
(Insects of public health importance, especially Ceratopogonidae of
Middle America; taxonomy of Culicidae and other Diptera;
ornamental insect control)

10. Mr. Vernon A. Brou, Route 3, Box 111, Prarieville, Louisiana 70769,
(Lepidoptera: Sphingidae of the world)

11. Mr. Don Bryne, Suwannee Laboratory, Route 5, Box 249-B, Lake City,
Florida 32055. (Exotic insects and other arthropods, especially
Lepidoptera; arthropods of Mexico, Central America, and South
America; cacti)

12. Dr. William F. Buren, Dept. of Entomology and Nematology, 3103
McCarty Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.
(Taxonomy, biology, and ecology of Formicidae)

13. Mr. Paul H. Carlson, Laboratory of Aquatic Entomology, School of
Agriculture and Home Economics, University P.O. Box 111, Florida
A & M University, Tallahassee, Florida 32307. (Aquatic insects,
especially Ephemeroptera and Odonata)

14. Dr. Nell B. Causey, 376 Life Science Building, Zoology and Physiology
Dept., Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803.
(Systematics of Diplopoda)







Thirtieth Biennial Report


15. Mr. Harry K. Clench, Section of Insects and Spiders, Carnegie Museum,
4400 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213. (New World
Lycaenidae: classification of Lycaenidae: African Lycaenidae; butter-
fly zoogeography; butterfly behavior; West Indian butterflies)

16. Dr. Charles V. Covell, Jr., Associate Professor of Biology, Dept. of
Biology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky 40208. (Lepi-
doptera; insects of Kentucky)

17. Mr. Terhune S. Dickel, 1652 N. W. 9th Avenue, Homestead, Florida
33030. (Lepidoptera of North and Central America; butterfly
conservation; butterfly migrations)

18. Dr. H. Rodney Dodge, Bureau of Entomology, Division of Plant
Industry, Florida Dept. Agr. & Consumer Services, Doyle Conner
Bldg., Gainesville, Florida 32602. (Sarcophagidae of the world)
(Deceased 15 June 1973)

19. Dr. Thomas W. Donnelly, Department of Geology, Harpur College
State Univ. of New York, Binghamton, New York 13901. (Systema-
tics, life histories, and distribution of Odonata of the world, especially
of Latin America and the West Indies)

20. Dr. N. M. Downie, 505 Lingle Terrace, Lafayette, Indiana 47901
(Coleoptera of North America)

21. Mr. Byrd K. Dozier, 32 Corydon Drive, Miami Springs, Florida 33166.
(Coleoptera of the New World; Buprestidae of the world)

22. Mr. Herbert L. Dozier, Jr., 3715 Marlbrough Way, College Park,
Maryland 20740. (Taxonomy of several families of Coleoptera,
especially Cocinellidae)

23. Mr. Boyce A. Drummond, III (Student Associate), Department of
Zoology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611; current
address: c/o Institute Linguistico de Verano, Casilla 5080, Quito,
Ecuador.
(Lepidoptera, especially the ecology, behavior, and mimicry of
Rhopalocera of the Neotropics)

24. Mr. Peter C. Drummond, Route 1, Box 342, Micanopy, Florida 32667.
(Systematics of terrestrial and littoral Isopoda, especially of Florida
and the West Indies)

25. Dr. William G. Eden, Chairman, Department of Entomology &
Nematology, IFAS, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.
(Entomology & Nematology; Administration)

26. Dr. Thomas C. Emmell, Associate Professor, Dept. of Zoology, 421








Division of Plant Industry


Bartram Hall, West, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.
(Population biology, life histories, taxonomy, evolution, genetics,
ecology of Rhopalocera, especially Nearctic and Neotropical groups)

27. Dr. G. B. Fairchild, 16 N. W. 22nd Drive, Gainesville, Florida 32603.
(Tabanidae of the world, especially of the Neotropics; Psychididae;
Phlebotomus of the world)

28. Dr. Edward G. Farnworth, Project Manager, Research Associate,
Institute of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens Georgia 30601.
(Tropical Lampyridae: bioluminescent behavior, ecology, systematics)

29. Dr. Herman Flaschka, Chemistry Department, Georgia Institute of
Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332. (Coleoptera and Lepidoptera)

30. Dr. B. A. Foote, Department of Biological Sciences, 265 McGilvrey Hall,
Kent State University, Kent Ohio 44242. (Systematics of Diptera,
especially Sciomyzidae, Chloropidae, Otitidae, Tephritidae, and
Micropezidae; ecology and life cycles of acalyptrate Diptera)

31. Dr. J. Howard Frank, Division of Health, Entomological Research
Center, P. O. Box 520, Vero Beach, Florida 32960. (Coleoptera,
especially Staphylinidae)

32. Dr. Arden R. Gaufin, Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt
Lake City, Utah 84112. (Taxonomy, biology, and ecology of
Plecoptera)

33. Mr. William G. Genung, Entomologist, University of Florida, IFAS, Agr.
Res. & Edu. Center, P. O. Drawer, A, Belle Glade, Florida 33430.
(Biology, ecology and control of insects of vegetable crops, field crops
and pastures)

34. Dr. Eugene J. Gerberg, Director, Insect Control and Research Inc., 6601
Johnnycake Road, Baltimore, Maryland 21207. (Lyctidae and
Bostrychidae; Culicidae, particularly of the Tropics; arthropods of the
Cayman Islands, BWI; rearing techniques for various insects,
particularly mosquitoes)

35. Mr. Glen R. Gibbs, 11101 Caribbean Blvd., Bldg. C-4, Apt. 114, Miami,
Florida 33157. (Lepidoptera of southern Florida)

36. Dr. James T. Goodwin, Department of Biology, Memphis State
University, Memphis, Tennessee 38111. (Taxonomy, ecology, and life
history of Tabanidae)

37. Mr. Harold N. Greenbaum (Student Associate), Department of
Entomology and Nematology, 3103 McCarty Hall, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Hymenoptera, especially Sym-
phyta)








Thirtieth Biennial Report


38. Dr. Dale H. Habeck, Professor, IFAS, Dept. of Entomology &
Nematology, 201 Entomology & Nematology Res. Lab., University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Ecology and taxonomy of
Nitidulidae; immature Lepidoptera of North America; Arctiidae,
Noctuidae and Stenomidae of North America; biology and control of
vegetable insects; plant resistance to insects)

39. Dr. Gonzalo Halffter, Laboratorio de Sinecologia y Biogeografia,
Departamento de Zoologia, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biologicas,
Carpio y Plan de Ayala, Institutio Politecnico Nacional, Mexico 17,
D.F. (Taxonomy of Scarabaeidae; zoogeography of America, ecology
and behavior of Coleoptera)

40. Mr. Fred C. Harmston, 1940 Larkspur Drive, Fort Collins, Colorado
80521. (Taxonomy of Dolichopodidae and Culicidae of North and
Central America; vector control associated with water resource
projects; Colorado tick fever, tularemia)

41. Mr. Donny Lee Harris, Entomologist, 1810 N. W. 23rd Blvd.,
Apt. #274, Gainesville, Florida 32605. (Carabidae; habitat manipula-
tion)

42. Mr. Edwin I. Hazard, Insects Affecting Man & Animals Lab., USDA,
1600 S. W. 23rd Drive, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
32611. (Taxonomy and biology of the Megaloptera; primary research
in insect pathology with special interests in the Microsporidia
(Protozoa) and virus diseases of aquatic arthropods)

43. Mr. Gerd H. Heinrich, Dryden, Maine 04225. (Ichneumoninae of the
world; birds of Africa, Europe and Asia)

44. Mr. J. Richard Heitzman, 3112 Harris Avenue, Independence, Missouri
64052. (Nearctic Lepidoptera, all Rhopalocera; Heterocera of
Missouri; life histories of Nearctic Lepidoptera; photography of
insects; identification of Neartic Lepidoptera)

45. Mr. Roger L. Heitzman, 3112 Harris Avenue, Independence, Missouri
64052. (Lepidoptera of North America, especially Geometridae)

46. Mr. John B. Heppner (Student Associate), Department of Entomology
and Nematology, 3103 McCarty Hall, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Microlepidoptera)

47. Dr. Lawrence A. Hetrick, Entomologist, 1614 N. W. 12th Road,
Gainesville, Florida 32615. (Forest insects and wood products
infesting insects, especially Isoptera)

48. Mr. Harry 0. Hilton, P. 0. Box 144, Shalimar, Florida 32579.
(Lepidoptera of the southeastern United States and Mexico; insect
photography)







Division of Plant Industry


49. Mr. Ronald L. Huber, 2896 Simpson St., St. Paul, Minnesota 55113.
(Cicindelidae of the world; Nearctic Lepidoptera, especially Sphin-
gidae, Hesperiidae)

50. Dr. Fred Clifford Johnson, II, Professor, Florida State Museum, Room
284, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (Biology of
Odonata)

51. Mr. Roy 0. Kendall, Mountain View Acres, Route 4, Box 104-EB, San
Antonio, Texas 78228. (Life histories, spatial and temporal
distribution of Rhopalocera of Texas and contiguous land areas;
interests include larval food plants, parasites, predators, diapause,
chromosomes, and migratory habit)

52. Mr. Charles P. Kimball, West Barnstable, Massachusetts 02668.
(Lepidoptera of North America, especially of Florida)

53. Mr. Harold L. King, 2215 La Salle Street, Sarasota, Florida 33581.
(Lepidoptera of North and Central America and the West Indies,
especially Lycaenidae)

54. Dr. Louis C. Kuitert, Entomologist, IFAS, Dept. of Entomology and
Nematology, 206 Newell Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida 32611. (Aquatic Hemiptera of North America; biology and
control of tobacco, peach, truck crop, pasture, and ornamental insects
of Florida)

55. Colonel Lester L. Lampert, 17 Hillview Circle, Asheville, North Carolina
28805. (Coleoptera)

56. Dr. James N. Layne, Director of Research, Archbold Biological Station,
Route 2, Box 380, Lake Placid, Florida 33852. (Ecology, behavior and
physiology of mammals; general vertebrate biology; hosts and
geographic distribution of Florida Siphonaptera and other parasitic
arthropods)

57. Dr. James E. Lloyd, Professor, IFAS, Dept. of Entomology &
Nematology, 3103 McCarty Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida 32611. (Taxonomy, ecology and behavior of Lampyridae and
other luminescent insects)

58. Mr. Harold F. Loomis, 5355 S. W. 92nd Street, Miami, Florida 33156.
(Taxonomy of western hemisphere Diplopoda)

59. Mr. Robert D. McManaway, 5819 Hicham Drive, Dayton, Ohio 43541.
(Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, and Odonata)

60. Mr. John W. McReynolds, P. O. Box 704, Eagle Pass, Texas 78852.
(Insects in general, especially Carabidae and Cicadidae; Calosoma
(Carabidae of the world) (Deceased 22 May 1974)








Thirtieth Biennial Report


61. Dr. Ellis G. MacLeod, Dept. of Entomology, University of Illinois,
Urbana, Illinois 61801. (Larvae and adults of Neuroptera of the world,
especially Megaloptera and Rhaphidioidae; fossil insects)

62. Mr. Bryant Mather, 213 Mt. Salus Drive, Clinton, Mississippi 39056.
(Lepidoptera, Trichoptera, Neuroptera, Mecoptera, and Cicindelidae of
Mississippi; variation, distribution in time and space)

63. Dr. Edward L. Mockford, Department of Biological Sciences, Illinois
State University, Normal, Illinois 61761. (Systematics and biology of
Psocoptera of the world, especially of the New World)

64. Dr. William B. Muchmore, Dept. of Biology, University of Rochester,
River Campus Station, Rochester, New York 14627. (Taxonomy and
ecology of Pseudoscorpionida)

65. Dr. Martin H. Muma, Entomologist Emeritus, IFAS, University of
Florida, P. O. Box 2020, Silver City, New Mexico 88061. (Ecology of
North American deserts; ecology, biology and behavior of solpugids,
spiders, scorpions, and tarantulas)

66. Dr. Gayle H. Nelson, Dept. of Anatomy, Kansas City College of
Osteopathic Medicine, 2105 Independence Avenue, Kansas City,
Missouri 64124. (Coleoptera; especially the biology and taxonomy of
Buprestidae)

67. Dr. John S. Nordin, 1826 Roan Drive, Warrington, Pennsylvania 18976.
(Lepidoptera, especially Hesperiidae; ecology)

68. Dr. Charles W. O'Brien, Entomology, P. O. Box 111, Florida A&M
University, Tallahassee, Florida 32307. (Taxonomy of Curculionidae;
ecology of Coleoptera; biogeography of Coleoptera)

69. Dr. Lois B. O'Brien, Entomology, P. O. Box 111, Florida A&M
University, Tallahassee, Florida 32307. (Fulgoroidae of the world)

70. Dr. Jose M. Osorio, Carrera 21, No. 10-66, Barquisimeto, Edo Lara,
Venezuela. (Venezuelan insects)

71. Dr. Dennis R. Paulson, Dept. of Zoology, University of Washington,
Seattle, Washington 98105. (Systematics, zoogeography, ecology,
behavior, and life history of Odonata of North and Central America;
systematics and ecology of Vertebrata, especially Amphibia, Reptilia,
and Aves)

72. Dr. William L. Peters, Prof. of Entomology, P. O. Box 111, School of
Agr. & Home Economics, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee,
Florida 32307. (Higher classification of Ephemeroptera: ecology and
life history of Florida Ephemeroptera)








Division of Plant Industry


73. Mr. William H. Pierce, Peace Corps, Box 147, Nukualofa, Kingdom of
Tonga. (Taxonomy and ecology of Dolichopodidae and Ephydridae)

74. Dr. Charles C. Porter, Dept. of Biology, Fordham University, Bronx,
New York 10458. (Ichneumonidae of the New World)

75. Dr. John E. Porter, National Sanitation Inspection Serv., 5790 W.
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida 33144. (Culicidae; public health
entomology)

76. Dr. George W. Rawson, 10405 Amherst Avenue, Silver Spring, Mary-
land 20902. (Nearctic Rhopalocera, life history study, and conserva-
tion of rare and threatened butterflies)

77. Dr. Walfried J. Reinthal, 4026 Sequoyah Avenue, Knoxville, Tennessee
37919. (Ecology, systematics and distribution of Rhopalocera in
Oklahoma, Tennessee, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Virgin
Is. Nat. Park, Puerto Rico and all Caribbean area, including Trinidad
and Tobago, and Central America)

78. Dr. Jonathan Reiskind, Associate Professor, Dept. of Zoology, 428 Life
Sciences Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.
(Systematics, ecology and behavior of Arachnida, especially Clubioni-
dae; mimicry)

79. Mr. John N. Reynolds, Florida A&M Univ., Entomology, P.O. Box 111,
Tallahassee, Florida 32307. (Insects in general; arthropod curatorial
procedures and techniques)

80. Mr. Kilian Roever, 3739 W. Townley Avenue, Phoenix, Arizona 85021.
(Lepidoptera, especially Rhopalocera, Hesperioidae, Sphingidae,
Theclinae)

81. Mr. William Rosenberg, P. O. Box 366, Hazelwood, North Carolina
28738. (Coleoptera)

82. Dr. Reece I. Sailer, 3847 S. W. 6th Place, Gainesville, Florida 32607.
(Biological control of insect pests and weeds. Taxonomy of
Heteroptera)

83. Mr. Joe Schuh, 4039 Shasta Way, Klamath Falls, Oregon 97601. (Insects
of North America, especially of Oregon; Hemiptera; Coleoptera;
agricultural insect control)

84. Mr. Charles E. Seller, University of Florida, IFAS, Agr. Res. & Edu.
Center, P. O. Drawer A, Belle Glade, Florida 33430. (Biology and
ecology of Hymenoptera, especially Sphecidae and Pompilidae)

85. Dr. Kenneth A. Spencer, 10 Willow Road, London NW3 1TJ, England.








Thirtieth Biennial Report


(Diptera; biology, taxonomy and zoogeography of Agromyzidae of the
world)

86. Mr. Carl E. Stegmaier, Jr., 11335 N. W. 59th Avenue, Hialeah, Florida
33012. (Life history and ecology of Tephritidae, Chloropidae, and
Agromyzidae associated with their host plants and parasites. Studies
on the inter-relationships of insects associated with native plants,
especially the native weeds of south Florida)

87. Dr. Karl J. Stone, 813 N. W. 20th Street, Minot, North Dakota 58701.
(Taxonomy and natural history of spiders; biological control)

88. Mr. Gayle T. Strickland, 1744 Brocade Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana
70815. (Lepidoptera, including distribution, life histories)

89. Dr. H. F. Strohecker, University of Miami, Dept. of Biology, P. O. Box
249118, Coral Gables, Florida 33124. (Endomychidae of the world;
Orthoptera of the new world)

90. Mr. William B. Tappan, Associate Entomologist, University of Florida,
IFAS, Agr. Res. & Edu. Center, P. O. Box 470, Quincy, Florida
32351. (Biology and control of insects and nematodes attacking
shade-grown cigarwrapper and flue-cured tabaccos)

91. Mr. Dade W. Thornton, 3226 N. W. 11th Court, Miami, Florida 33127.
(Coleoptera of North and Central America and the West Indies;
photography)

92. Dr. Mac A. Tidwell, Rama de Entomologia, Colegia de Postgraduados,
Chapingo, Mexico. (Taxonomy and ecology of Tabanidae)

93. Mr. Karl R. Valley, Pennsylvania Dept. of Agr., Bureau of Plant
Industry, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17120. (Biology and life history of
acalyptrate Diptera)

94. Dr. Thomas J. Walker, Jr., Entomologist, IFAS, Dept. of Entomology &
Nematology, 3103 McCarty Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida 32611. (Taxonomy of ensiferan Orthoptera; insect acoustics)

95. Dr. Howard K. Wallace, Professor, Dept. of Zoology, 320 Bartram Hall,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Araneida, especially
Lycosidae and Salticidae of the eastern United States)

96. Dr. Minter J. Westfall, Jr., Professor, Dept. of Zoology, 411 Bartram,
West, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Taxonomy,
life history, ecology, zoogeography and behavior of Odonata,
especially of the new world)

97. Dr. Willard H. Whitcomb, Entomologist, IFAS, Dept. of Entomology &








Division of Plant Industry


Nematology, University of Florida, 3103 McCarty Hall, Gainesville,
Florida 32611. (Biological and integrated control of arthropods,
especially with reference to Florida; taxonomy and ecology of spiders
and ants)

98. Mr. Joseph Wilcox, 6451 Vista del Sol, Anaheim, California 92817.
(Asilidae of North America, Mydidae of the world)

99. Dr. Nixon Wilson, Dept. of Biology, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar
Falls, Iowa 50613. (Vertebrate ectoparasites, especially Ixodidae)

100. Dr. Willis W. Wirth, Systematic Entomology Laboratory, USDA, c/o
U.S. National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D. C. 20560.
(Systematics of Diptera, especially aquatics, Ceratopogonidae,
Ephydridae, and Chironomidae)

101. Dr. D. O. Wolfenbarger, 29220 S.W. 187 Ave., Homestead, Florida
33030. (Truck crop, ornamentals and tropical fruit insects; insect
dispersion)

102. Mr. David G. Young (Student Associate), Department of Entomology
and Nematology, 3103 McCarty Hall, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida 32611. (Psychodidae, especially the genus
Phlebotomus)

103. Dr. Frank N. Young, Dept. of Zoology, Indiana University,
Bloomington, Indiana 47406. (Neotropical and Nearctic aquatic
Coleoptera)

104. Mr. Charles F. Zieger, 3751 Sommers Street, Jacksonville, Florida
32205. (Lepidoptera of North and Central America; insects associated
with aquatic plants)


Publications by Research Associates of the
Florida State Collection of Arthropods*

Baranowski, Richard M., and R. W. Swanson (senior author). 1972. Host
range and infestation by the Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspense
(Diptera: Tephritidae), in south Florida. Proc. Florida State Hort.
Soc. 85:271-274.
Blanton, Franklin S. (junior author), and Willis W. Wirth. 1974. A new
Florida sand fly closely related to Culicoides haematipotus Malloch
(Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). Fla. Ent. 57 (1): 23-26.


Published with support from the Fla. Dept. Agr. & Consumer
Services and/or including a footnote indicating affiliation as a Research
Associate of the Florida State Collection of Arthropods.








Thirtieth Biennial Report


Donnelly, Thomas W. 1973. The status of EnaUagma traviatum and westfalli
(Odonata: Coenagrionidae). Proc. Ent. Soc. Washington 75(3):
297-302.
Fairchild, G. B., C. B. Philip (senior author), and H. V. Weems, Jr. 1973.
Notes on Eastern Nearctic Haematopota, Merycomyia, and Chrysops,
and description of male of C. Zinzalus (Diptera: Tabanidae). Fla. Ent.
56(4): 339-346.
and H. V. Weems, Jr. 1973. Diachlorus ferrugatus (Fab.), a fierce
biting fly (Diptera: Tabanidae). Fla. Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv.,
Div. Plant Ind., Bur. of Ent. Circ. 139.
Greenbaum, Harold N. (junior author), and Charles C. Porter. 1972. The first
record of Idiogramma bridewelli (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae:
Tryphoninae). Fla. Ent. 55(3): 183-184.
Heitzman, J. Richard, and Robert L. Heitzman. 1972. New butterfly records
for the United States (Hesperiidae and Libytheidae). J. Res.
Lepidoptera 10(4): 284-286.
Heitzman, Roger L. 1973. Life history studies of Idaea obfusari (Walker)
(Geometridae). J. Res. Lepidoptera 12(3): 145-150.
.1973. An annotated checklist of the Missouri Geometridae
(Lepidoptera). J. Res. Lepidoptera 12(3): 169-179.
Johnson, Clifford. 1973. Distribution patterns and their interpretation in
Hetaerina (Odonata: Calopterygidae). Fla. Ent. 56(1): 24-42.
1973. Variability, distribution and taxonomy of Calopterya dimidiata
(Zygoptera: Calopterygidae). Fla. Ent. 56(3): 207-222.
Kendall, Roy 0., and Perry A. Glick. 1972. Rhopalocera collected at light in
Texas. J. Res. Lepidoptera 10(4): 273-283.
Kuitert, L. C., and H. L. Cromroy (senior author). 1973. The Blueberry Bud
Mite, Acalitus vaccinii (Keifer)(Acarina: Eriophyidae).Fla. Dept. Agr.
& Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 130.
Loomis, H. F. 1972. Millipeds associated with ants in Washington state. Fla.
Ent. 55(3): 145-151.
1972. Millipeds from the Atlantic lowlands of Costa Rica. Fla. Ent.
55(3): 185-206.
1972. Some notes on the milliped family Paeromopidae, with a
description of a new species. Fla. Ent. 55(4): 259-262.
1973. Poratioides disparatus, a tiny new stylodesmid milliped from
south Florida, mostly represented by females. Fla. Ent. 56(4):
321-323.
1974. Millipeds from southern Costa Rican highlands. Fla. Ent.
57(2): 169-187.
and H. V. Weems, Jr. (senior author). 1974. Oxidus gracilis (Koch)
and Orthomorpha coarctata (Saussure), two milliped pests in Florida.
Fla. Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 145.
Muchmore, William B. 1973. Comparison of ground surface spiders in four
central Florida ecosystems. Fla. Ent. 56(3): 173-196.
.1974. Pseudoscorpions from Florida. 1. The genus Aldabrinus
(Pseudoscorpionida, Olpiidae). Fla. Ent. 57(1): 1-7.
1974. Pseudoscorpions from Florida. 2. A new genus and species,
Bituberochernes mumae (Chernetidae). Fla. Ent. 57(1): 77-80.








Division of Plant Industry


Pierce, W. H., and R. E. Woodruff (senior author). 1973. Scyphophorus
acupunctatus, a weevil of yucca and agave in Florida (Coleoptera:
Curculionidae). Fla. Dept. Agr. & Consumer Serv., Div. of Plant Ind.,
Ent. Circ. 135.
Porter, Charles C. and Harold N. Greenbaum. 1972. The first record of
Idiogramma bridewelli (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae: Tryphoninae)
from Florida. Fla. Ent. 55(3): 183-184.
Porter, John E., and H. A. Denmark (senior author). 1973. Regulation of
importation of arthropods into and of their movement within Florida.
Fla. Ent. 56(4): 347-358.
Spencer, Kenneth A., and Carl E. Stegmaeir, Jr. 1973. Agromyzidae of
Florida with a supplement on species from the Caribbean. Arthropods
of Florida and neighboring land areas 7: 1-205.
Stegmaier, Carl E., Jr. and G. W. Dekle. 1972. The Corn Blotch Leafminer,
Agromyza parvicornis Loew (Diptera: Agromyzidae). Fla. Dept. Agr.
& Consumer Serv., Div. Plant Ind., Ent. Circ. 123.
1972. Notes on some Sarcophagidae (Diptera) reared from snails
(Mollusca) in Florida. Fla. Ent. 55(4): 237-242.
1972. Parasitic Hymenoptera bred from the family Agromyzidae
(Diptera) with special reference to south Florida. Fla. Ent. 55(4):
273-282.
1973. Dasiops passifloris (Diptera: Lonchaeidae), a pest of wild
passion fruit in south Florida. Fla. Ent. 56(1): 8-10.
1973. Some insects associated with the Joe-Pye Weed, Eupatorium
coelestinum (Compositae), from south Florida. Fla. Ent. 56(1): 61-65.
1973. The corkscrew 3-awn, Aristida gyrans (Gramineae), and its
insect associates in south Florida. Fla. Ent. 56(2): 135-139.
1973. Colonization of the puncturevine stem weevil, Microlarinus
lypriformis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) with notes on parasitism in
south Florida. Fla. Ent. 56(3): 235-241.
(junior author), Kenneth A. Spencer. 1973. Agromyzidae of Florida
with a supplement on species from the Caribbean. Arthropods of
Florida and neighboring land areas. 7: 1-205.
and Horace R. Burke. 1974. Anthonomus flavus (Coleoptera:
Curculionidae) a fruit-infesting weevil of the Barbados cherry,
Malpighia glabra (Malpighiaceae), new to North Ameria. Fla. Ent.
57(1): 81-90.
Walker, Thomas J. 1974. Gryllus ovisopis n. sp.: a taciturn cricket with a
life cycle suggesting allochronic speciation. Fla. Ent. 57(1): 13-22.
Whitcomb, W. H., H. A. Denmark, A. P. Bhatkar, and G. L. Greene, 1972.
Preliminary studies on the ants of Florida soybean fields. Fla. Ent.
55(3): 129-142.
T. M. Neal (senior author), G. L. Greene, and F. W. Mead. 1972.
Spanogonicus albofasciatus (Hemiptera: Miridae): a predator in
Florida soybeans. Fla. Ent. 55(4): 247-250.
Wirth, Willis W., and Franklin S. Blanton. 1974. A new Florida sand fly
closely related to Culicoides haematopotus Malloch (Diptera:
Ceratopogonidae). Fla. Ent. 57(1): 23-26.








Thirtieth Biennial Report


BUREAU OF NEMATOLOGY
A.L. Taylor, Chief of Nematology

During the 1972-74 biennium the Bureau of Nematology continued its
service of identification of nematodes from nursery crops, turf farms,
proposed nursery sites, soil removal pits, worm farms, and private homes.
The information from sample examinations has been fed back to contribute
to decision making by the growers. Mistakes such as making shipments of
nursery stock to states where they might be refused are prevented, and
the value of methods for control or prevention of nematode infestation is
confirmed. Results of sample examination are also of value in educating
nurserymen to the realization that use of nematode control methods adds
value to their plants, and that failure to use nematode control detracts from
that value, often to a point of total loss.
A large amount of time has also been spent in improvement of facilities to
increase accuracy of our reports, and to get them to the manager of the
enterprise concerned more rapidly. Laboratory facilities and procedures
have been improved to make better use of our technicians' time, and
reference facilities have been improved to aid in making identifications more
rapidly and completely.
Direct aid has been given to nurserymen and others by personal visits to
their operations. Instruction has also been provided to managers, foremen
and workers through personal contacts.
Contributions have been made to the science of nemotology by publishing
papers in scientific journals, attending meetings and seminars, occasionally
teaching classes at the University, and giving demonstrations of our work
for university classes.

Botanical Work
K.R. Langdon, Nematohogist

The botanical work for the Division of Plant Industry is handled in the
Bureau of Nematology by K.R. Langdon. This consists of the following
categories with approximate percentages of time devoted to each as
indicated: plant identification, 45%; checking host plant lists, 20%;
reviewing manuscripts as a member of the Publications Committee, 15%;
reviewing introduction permit applications submitted to the Aquatic Plant
Introduction Committee, 10%; reviewing introduction permit applications
submitted to the Plant Pathogen Introduction Committee, 5%; curating
(developing and maintaining) the herbarium and seed collection, 5%. With
increased activity in other areas, time had to be taken away from the
herbarium and seed collection. This has resulted in a large backlog of
material requiring further processing.
Plant identification provides reliable identification of host plants of
insects, plant diseases, and nematodes, as well as identification of some
cultivated plants, weeds, etc., which are of concern for one reason or
another. This service is provided primarily for Division of Plant Industry
personnel, but is also available to others. Plant specimens identified during








Division of Plant Industry


the biennium reached a new high of 1,938, compared with 1,757 last
biennium.
A herbarium has been established and is being further developed and
maintained as a source of reference plant specimens. These pressed,
identified, and mounted specimens are useful for comparison with material
submitted for identification. The herbarium now contains 1,585 specimens
including 271 sheets added during the biennium.
In addition to the pressed specimens, a seed collection is also being
developed and maintained for comparison and identification purposes. The
seed collection now contains 616 specimens.

Regulatory Programs
Statistics

The relationship between the biennial budgets of the Bureau of
Nematology and the numbers of samples received for identification of
nematodes or plants is shown in fig. 1. The budget has closely followed the
increase in sample load for the past 12 years, indicating that the total cost
per sample has remained nearly constant in spite of inflation.
Distribution of samples by categories was as follows:
Regulatory
Turf Certification 1,223
Site Approval 3,301
Green Tag Certification 1,937
White Tag Certification 2,099
Yellow Tag (California Certification) 8,166
Soil Pit 654
Miscellaneous 2,147

Subtotal 19,527

Regulatory Related
Caladium Survey 503
Cabbage Survey for Sugarbeet Cyst Nematode 2,087
Lethal Yellowing Survey 43
Turf Cyst Nematode Survey 297
Miscellaneous Surveys 507
Experimental 907
Cooperative Diagnostic Problems 299
Nematode Problems 562

Subtotal 5,205

Botanical
Number of plants identified 1,938

Subtotal 1,938


Total


26,670








Thirtieth Biennial Report


Certification Failures

Of the 1,937 samples examined for green tag certification, only 2
Scindapsis sp. samples failed due to burrowing nematode, (Radopholus
similis (Cobb) Thorne), infestation.
Of the 8,166 samples examined for California shipment certification, 29
including Ficus diversifolia, Musa sp., Peperomia sp. and Philodendron spp.,
were found infested by burrowing nematode.
The 3,301 samples for site approval certification were almost double the
number received for this purpose last biennium. One sample failed because
of infestation of Psidium guajava with burrowing nematode. Infestations of
Citrus, mixed roots, Sabal palmetto and Persea sp. with citrus root
nematode (Tylenchulus semipenetrans (Cobb)) were responsible for 87, 25, 4
and 1 failures, respectively.


FVscal Years

Fig. 1. Relationship between biennial budgets and numbers of samples
received for identification of nematodes and plants.








Division of Plant Industry


Turf Certification

A total of 1,223 samples was examined, a considerable decrease from
last biennium. Six samples failed turf certification requirements. One
centipede sample failed due to ring nematodes, and 5 Bermuda grass
samples failed due to infestations of spiral, stunt, and pseudo root-knot
nematode of turf.
Nematodes not previously reported on turf are listed below under grass
species and cultivar names (in quotation marks).

Cynodon dactylon (Bermuda grass)
'Ormond' Hemicriconemoides wessoni, Macroposthonia sphaerocephala,
Nothocriconema mutabile, Paratylenchus sp., Peltamigratus sp., and
Tylenchorhynchus martini.
'Tifdwarf Criconema sp., Hemicriconemoides wessoni, Hypsoperine
graminis, and Trichodorus christiei.
'Tifgreen' Hemicriconemoides wessoni, Hoplolaimus tylenchiformis,
Nothocriconema mutabile, Peltamigratus sp., Pratylenchus coffeae
coffeae, Rotylenchulus sp., Trichodorus christiei, Tylenchorhynchus
claytoni, T. latus, and T. martini.
'Tifgreen 328' Hemicycliophora similis, Hoplolaimus tylenchiformis,
Hypsoperine graminis, Peltamigratus christiei, Trichodorus christiei,
and Tylenchorhynchus martini.
'Tifway' Hemicriconemoides wessoni, Nothocriconema mutabile,
and Peltamigratus christiei.
'Tifway 419' Belonolaimus longicaudatus, Criconema sp., Hemicricon-
emoides wessoni, Hemicycliophora similis, Hoplolaimus tylenchiformis,
Peltamigratus christiei, Paratylenchus amblycephalus, and Trichodorus
christiei.

Eremochloa ophiuroides (centipede grass)
Hemicycliophora sp. and Trichodorus christiei.

Paspalum notatum (barnyard grass)
Belonolaimus sp., Helicotylenchus sp., Hemicriconemoides wessoni,
Hemicycliophora sp., Hypsoperine graminis, Peltamigratus sp., Trich-
odorus christiei, and Tylenchorhynchus martini.

Stenotaphrum secundatum (St. Augustine grass)
'Bitter Blue' Dolichodorus sp., Helicotylenchus crenacauda, Hemicri-
conemoides wessoni, Macroposthonia curvata, M. sphaerocephala,
Paratylenchus amblycephalus, P. microdorus, Trichodorus christiei,
Tylenchorhynchus martini, T. latus, and Xiphinema chambers.
'Floratine' Criconema sp., Dolichodorus heterocephalus, Helicotylen-
chus crenacauda, H. erythrinae, H. pseudorobustus, Hemicycliophora








Thirtieth Biennial Report


similis, Hypsoperine graminis, Macroposthonia curvata, Paratylenchus
microdorus, Trichodorus christiei, and Tylenchorhynchus martini.

Zoysia Japonica (Japanese lawngrass)
'Emerald' Belonolaimus longicaudatus, Helicotylenchus crenacauda,
Hemicriconemoides wessoni, Hemicycliophora similis, Hoplolaimus
tylenchiformis, Hypsoperine graminis, andTrichodorus christiei.


Identification Aids
Nematode Collection
J.B. MacGowan, S~'matnlgist

The Bureau maintains a collection of nematode specimens with
emphasis on plant parasites. The collection contains 5,638 units which
include microscope slides, a large reservoir of bottled specimens, and
preserved host material showing disease symptoms. Material is received
into the collection from specialists in Florida, throughout the United States,
and the world.
There are 2,996 whole-mount permanent microscope slides, including
valuable type specimens, plant-parasitic nematodes, human and animal
parasitic nematodes, other helminths, biological control agents, and selected
invertebrates. There are an additional 998 microscope slides of stained
histological sections, bringing the total number of microscope slides to 3,994.
Specimens preserved in formalin number 1,644 bottles and vials. These
contain diseased plants and plant parts showing symptoms of nematode
damage, nematodes parasitic to plants, nematodes parasitic to animals and
man, other helminths, biological control agents, and selected invertebrates.
The nematode collection serves 2 functions. It is a source of reference
and comparison for the identification of plant parasitic nematodes. It also
serves as an educational aid for students, interested citizens, and
professional workers.
The collection is under constant active expansion and reevaluation in
order to maintain a valuable professional service to the State of Florida.


Nematode Taxonomic Retrieval Systems
R.P. Esser, Nematologist

To facilitate correct identification of plant parasitic nematodes involved
in regulatory programs and to insure recognition of new nematode pests
that may enter Florida, a comprehensive taxonomic filing system is
maintained. In the biennium 17 new genera and 279 species descriptions of
plant parasitic nematodes were added to the system, bringing the total to








Division of Plant Industry


94 genera and 1,974 species. Eighty-one taxonomic publications were added
to the taxonomic card file bringing the total to 354.


Surveys

Heterodera schachtii on Cabbage
R.P. Esser, Nematologist

Two types of surveys for the sugarbeet cyst nematode (Heterodera
schachtii (Schmidt) which attacks cabbage and other crucifers in Florida
were conducted during the biennium, with a total of 2,087 soil and root
samples collected and analyzed.
The first survey, conducted in 1973, was a comprehensive statewide
survey to determine the geographic range of Heterodera schachtii in
keeping with sugarbeet nematode quarantine, Chapter 5B-39.02 of the
Division' of Plant Industry Rules and Regulations. The nematode was found
to be common in the vicinity of Sanford (Seminole County) and at 2
locations in Volusia County. The second survey, conducted in 1974, was a
follow-up of possible infestations indicated by the 1973 survey, with most
samples collected from fields showing symptoms of nematode injury. No
new infestations were detected.
Other nematodes detected in 100 or more cabbage samples during the
surveys include Belonolaimus longicaudatus, Macroposthonia spp., Helico-
tylenchus spp., Trichodorus christiei and Tylenchorhynchus spp.
Plant parasitic nematodes not reported previously in association with
cabbage include Dolichodorus heterocephalus, Helicotylenchus cavenessi, H.
dihystera, H. pseudorobustus, Hemicriconemoides wessoni, Hemicycliophora
similis, Heterodera weissi, Hoplolaimus tylenchiformis, Macroposthonia
curvata, M. sphaerocephala, Meloidogyne arenaria arenaria, M. xenoplaz,
Nothocriconema mutabile, Peltamigratus sp., Pratylenchus brachyurus, P.
zeae, Rotylenchulus reniformis, ScuteUonema brachyurum, S. bradys,
Tylenchorhynchus ewingi, T. martini, and Xiphinema spp.
A number of infested cabbage fields in the counties under regulation
have been fumigated with a nematocide (D-D mixture) prior to planting.
These fields had good yields of cabbage, but heavy populations of the cyst
nematode were often found on the cabbage roots. This indicates that the
cabbage cyst nematode will be difficult to control, and that there is a
possibility of poor yields, especially if cabbage or other crucifers are planted
every season.
A second statewide survey is planned in 1976.




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