Group Title: sun.
Title: The sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075914/00040
 Material Information
Title: The sun
Uniform Title: sun
Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sun Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: August 11, 1906
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tallahassee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Leon County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Leon -- Tallahassee
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.451667 x -84.268533 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 18, 1905)-v. 3, no. 47 (Sept. 12, 1908).
Numbering Peculiarities: Published at Tallahassee, Fla., June 23-Sept. 12, 1908.
General Note: Claude L'Engle, editor.
General Note: "If it's right, we are for it."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075914
Volume ID: VID00040
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33400104
lccn - sn 95047216
 Related Items
Other version: Morning sun (Tallahassee, Fla.)
Succeeded by: Dixie (Jacksonville, Fla.)

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CONGE STION IMPEDES


BItNoe Gopy'S Go


B VSINESS


This 'is the Snowing Made by Testimony Taken by Railroad
Commissioner Burr in Jacksonville.


RAILROAD


FACILITIES ARE TOTALLY INADEQUATE


Business Belonging to Jacksonvilte Being Diverted, and
Savannah Reaps Benefit of Jacksonville's Tie Vp
by the Raihoads.


In presenting the story of the congestion of the terminal yards
in Jacksonville,, as brought out by the investigations held in Jack-
sonville by Commissioner R. Hudson Burr, who was authorized by
the Railroad Commission of the State of Florida to take this testi-
mony, no better way presents itself for introducing the story, than
the statement made by Mr. Burr at the opening of the hearing. This
journal has from time to time printed accounts of the congested
condition of Jacksonville terminals, and it was the first journal in
this State to call attention to this matter. The agitation of the
subject by this journal directed the attention of the Railroad Com-
mission to this matter, which resulted in the investigation of Mr.
* Burr. In order to round up the story extracts from the typewritten
transcript of the testimony will be presented on these pages.
Friday. July 13, 1906, at 10 o'clock A. M., the hearing of testi-
mony in the matter of the Railroad Commission of the State of
Florida investigating the alleged congested condition of the freight
yards of certain Transportation Companies in the City of Jack-
sonville was begun. There were present Commissioner R. Hudson
Burr and a representative of the various Railroad Companies and
lumber dealers.
PRELIMINARY STATEMENT BY MR. BURR.
Gentlemen :-I am here representing the Railroad Commission of
Florida for the purpose of making an inquiry into the congested
..-l-_ ...a*1%& -. 1..1 4+l ..ninalm nf thf heitv ofn .Taflrsonvill I Tlh


corn


oiti n of the ra way erm n y .
elaston has been having considerable complalat about the con-


editions here. It has been stated to us by shippers or conslgps
that they cannot get cars placed promptly for unloading. On, te
other hand, the officials of the Bailroad Companies have stated t.
the Commission, at various times, that the consignees at this port
are largely responsible for this state of affairs in that they fail tp
unload their products promptly when can are furnished. The pti
pose of this investigation Is to get the facts as best we can, from
both the shipper's standpoint and the railroad's standpoint,
which I shall make a report to the full Board upon the tt
taken at this meeting and my findings from such tetimos
order that the blame may rest wherever it belongs, whether
upon the shoulders of the railroad people or upon the lumber A1*
pers or .other consignees la Jacksonville. We will proceed by.
mining the lumber men M t. All these eaminations wtill
taken under oath, and I deslre to state that in order to save
and not unnecessarily burden the records I would like the
neae to confine their sttatnelt to this condition of con g
here and not lead off on other complaints that have no WO
upon this question.
The examination then proceeded.
In handling this testimony, which covers 252 t
paper The Sun will present extracts from the mos5
THE EXACT WORDS OF THE WITNiSai, ad or at
the case may be presented with justice to both the ee d
the railroads, extracts from the testimony of the cdnsignees t
extracts from the testimony of the railroad offlcals will be
sented.
In this Issue the testimony tf the consignees is given. Iet
week's Issue will contain theM of the o. R R. oSci als"


- THIRDPAGS FOR.,ONT1NU4TIOR OFT 5 ~ ina w

T,~








*
CLAUDE L'BENLE
Editor


SIT'S RIGHT, WE ARE FOR I


THE


SUN


IT


A. K. TAYLOR
Cartoonist
.. .. ...


N ILLvUtRATI WEKW.Y WIT ,A WII.L OF ITS OWN, PRINTED FOR THE PEOPLE OF FLORIDA. sy T S fl'U COTA
,_'-L TAlAiEEi L RFLORIDMA, AUGUST 11, I'W 5Iy9. pa5
in"


1~~~~~ ~








.7


Tfig SUN


Utvd, Pft


Congestion Impedes BushWS..


(Continued From Page One.)
A. T. BRm, being sworn, testified as follows:
Q--Mr. bce In wbat line of business are you
engaged in Jacksonville? A-In handling lumber
tor Ipplgr & Russell Co.
Q-Do you have any trouble with railroads
about getting ars placed at the docks? A-Yes
sir.
Q-How many cars have you on hand now?
A-Well last night 1 had '18.
Q-How many of these ars- have you ordered
placed at the dock? A-I haven't the exact num.
ber of cars to mind, but it was near 75.
Q-What reasons do your forwarding agents
give for not unloading ears, If any? A-None, ex.
cept that they are not put in place for unloading.
We unload them if they are there.
Q-Do you suggest any remedy for the present
congested oouditioni in Jacksonville? A-No, sir,
only to get the cars placed where we can get at
them. And also placed as we order them. W3
order certain cars and ask that they put them In
for us and they put something else in which
causes quite a delay. If we could get all the cari
of one order we could disunarge them in a much
shorter time. If they were placed as merchan-
dise cars are placed we could do our business a
good deal more promptly in unloading.
Q-Has the Seaboard sufficient facilities for
handling that character of business. A-If the
Clyde Line Would move the lumber as it is on-
fered to them the Seaboard has sufficient facili-
ties to my mind.
F. B. Waymer was the next witness. To the
preliminary questions Mr. Waymer answered that
he was In the lumber business in Jacksonville it.
the interest of Bliss & Van Auken and the Otter
Creek Lumber Co. He testified as follows:
Q-Do you ship through this port by vessel?
A-We do only to a limited extent, for the very
reason that we wouldn't ship one car through
here If we didn't have to.
Q-Why do you say that you would not sh..b
here If you did not have to? A-The railroad
troubles are too great to avoid and delays are too
expensive. It cost so much more money.
Q-Do I understand by that that you are divert-
Ing a part of your freight? A-We ship every-
thing we can through Fernandina because it is so
much cheaper and a much more satisfactory
business.
Q-What trouble have you with the railroads i.i
getting ars placed at the docks? A-There are
Atlantic Coast Line cars that left the mill May
18th, were reported here June 30th, ordered on
that date and haven't been placed yet. (This
hearing was held July 13th.) Other cars run
from that date down to July 7th. With the Sea-
board there was one which the order was give
for May $lit and it hasut been placed yet.
Q-Have you room to upload any of these cam
on the Seaboard docks if they were delivered to
you? A-The Seaboard cars eo to the Talley-
rand dock, controlled by the St. Johns River
Terminal Co., and there is room to unload them
there.
Q-How many cars have you? A-We have 22
cars that are in this port now.
Q-Yoa say you have room to unload them?
A-We asked information from the St. Johnr
River Terminal Co. June 25th and asked for a re-
ply to our later on July 9th. It was delayed that
long. On July 11th we get the reply that they
cannot accept them from connecting lines be.
cause all their tracks are crowded. There is no
space on any of our wharves, was the answer'.
The forwarding company say they are ready to
unload it and are asking for their cars.
Q-Th6 terminal company said there was no
space to unload your ears? A-Yes sir, they were
ordered at the Talleyrand docks.
Q-And the forwarding company say there is
spaes? A-Tes sir, that they will unload.
Q-Mr. Waymer, are you engaged In the saw
md business as well as the wholesale lumber bu.
inea? A-Yes air.m
Q-Had this congestion here caused you any.
trouble at the mill in getting cars? A-That i
the argument of the railroads
Q-,n your opinion have they sufficient facilities
here for handling 200 can at a time. A-l don't
think they have. I think that their present pro-
paratlon will give them sufficient room for them,
but nfacltIes are short in the terminal company.
I don't think they have sufficient by any means.
Q-The St Johns River Terminal Co.? A--Ye

dock pape enough? A-I do not for their Steamf
er buaees.. I don't know that they are having
any other space but that. .
Q-Has there been an trouble In getting veu-
sel8s hre for the last few months? A-T-eroeas
beef. I Npord an correct there is quit a fleet
Q-What particular reasons have been giver


you for the failure to place cart A-They don't
give any reason. They don't answer our' le:
ters except that in writing to WI., Qolep I *o
lowed that up by a personal visit and he ttld me
that the Terminal Co. would not take the ears.
Q-Did he say what reason the TermOnal d0.
gave him? A-An embargo because they had
more than they could handle.
Q-You would unload those cars promptly It
they were given to you? A-Yes Sir.
Q-Have there ever been sufficient fac litie for
handling the business of this port in these teral.
nals? A-Why there might have been to start
with. They have not now. This means the
Terminal Co.
S. A. Sier was the next witness. He testGfeI
in substance the same as did Mr. Waymer, stat-
ing that he did business in Jacksonville, shipped
by vessel and steamer, and that he had had coa-
siderable trouble in getting cars placed.
Q-Please state what trouble you had. A-Do
you wish a general statement or speliflt?
Q-I would like to have specific statements it
you can give them. A-I have in my hand oopl0e
of orders to the railroad agent for different cars
and each order dated. On June 19, 1900, we or-*
dered car No. 9881 placed at dock 4 for a cargo
now incomplete. The car was placed and un-
loaded on June 19th. On the same day, the 19th.
we ordered car 2481: It was placed for unload-
ing July 3rd. June 19th we ordered ear 18061. ft
was placed for unloading July 10th. June 19th we
ordered car 13117. It was placed for unloading
July 4th. May 8, 1906, we ordered car 4308. It
has not yet been placed for unloading. (July
13th.) June 28th we ordered A. 0. L. 1038. It
has not been placed. On the same day we ordered
ear A. C. L. 1690. It has not yet been played.
Mr. Siser then continued giving specific In
stances, citing numbers of cars, with delays aver-
aging like those shown in the cases specified
above.
Q-What reason has been given you by the
Coast Line, Mr. Slier, for the failure to promptly
place these cars? A-No reason whatever has
been given. When I have seen them personally
they always say they are doing the best they can.
I have been informed in verbal conversations with
various local officials and agents that they have
been very much crippled in their equipment, en.
gines in particular. I visited Mr. Spenoer's of.
flee (the terminal agent) and saw his Chief Clert
and with him went to the Yardmpater's office and
talked the matter over, and they -stated in my
presence to Mr. Spencer's man that certain o.*
gines, mentioning the numbers, were broken dowI.
Q-Could you probably have unloaded all these
cars you have mentioned if they had been placed
promptly? Could you have unloaded them
promptly? A-I will say that almost without ex-
ception every car placed for unloading ls unloaded
the day It is placed.
Q-Well, during this time that these cars have
been delayed you have had space to unload them?
A-I have always had space. And we have pled.
ty of space today to unload every car we have In
the city.
Q-Have you been damaged, Mr. Sister, by rae
son of this slowness in delivery? A-We have
been seriously damaged. As I said a few minutes
ago we have a lighter tied up at the dock today at
$2.50 a day, waiting for cars to be placed, And
that is only one instance out of six or eight, one
after the other, wilhin the last 60 days.
Q-Tbe mills you do bulness with are exper
fencing trouble in getting ears? A-Unlmte
trouble.
Mr. 8sier then read some telegrams from the
Martel Lumber Co., many of them, whdit. telo
grams urged Mr. Slier to get the cars at te mill
for them so that they could ship his orders, aml
complained repeatedly about the non-arrival of
the cars.
--You have been ordering these ear for that
mill yourself? A-We have been orer tha
and they have been ordering ta We a-v twhW
other vessels bound here that are expected dal,
that will carry about 1,100,00 feet cIohIner.T
order Is ,elng out by the AXlipeka saw mills at
Ifay, Pla. I haven't ot their telera but the
have been wiring us almost t da ahey cat
ship on account of lnablty to get cars, all hbe
ging us to do something to help them out I
this particular tase we can ie box ca, which s
quite a relef to the airoa, I U est Sd. They
claim they can furnish box ears, but I have re-
quested box car almost daily, time and. Use
again, and don't get them. bo in chartering ves
sets wu have been delayed In lmost every in

Q-And your inability to ge thb lumber hete
promptly makes you helta to arter? A-It


Onmulating a cargo on the wharf O eout of the
inability to get cars. That is the reason
Is so ongested today,-because it taketOUS I l,
so lolg to complete a cargo
Q-*Do you ever follow up auy of _your orer
peronally to urg delivery after their ie to
deliver within a certain time? A-Oh Halm
our time we gi1e to that. i wi my. C Om
missioner, that so far as we a rewUoerne41 n tho
matter we have never, that I know of, had a mat
plaint from the railroad company of 'ot die
charging cars
Q-Mr. Biter, if you have any 0othe statement
you would like to make, or any reme to a'-ga
for the coneted on r t t
A-Well, Mr. F missoepor, I do"t thk that I
could suggest a remedy fmro the wd stand"
point. It is earnest belief JttdfIt by ouret,
perlence and from my, obNe=v t,
trouble here 1 aimeet xueulvly It4t F r,
reads and their inability to e t
ments. '; '
Q-=Lak of track room? A--Well it has
In .0ur 0. f t" :
Q-iLank ksof motive power?, A-Well,
say, lack of efficiency. I don't know, thou It
appears to me it is as much a lack of efficieaor au
anything lse, and lack of motive power.
Q-Lack of efficiency. You mean by that that
the men having to execute thtse orders sea not
to have the abl to properly Ispatch'b teas?
A-Yed air, on tb theory It I heaay, but Mr.
Mason will verity it (or he tels me). WhW
you give the written order today w r, a I st of M
to be played it has to be pea t a
again Dause the man Who has It ha ot It re
destroyed It, and it you didn't tollow It 'u dadly
the delay would be much greater than It It.
o ,I .


,L Pl be o be, l.Hoa t hat he er
ooney, ko4i, A o&.; that ht
Jthrogh Jmekoe s eby vssel and
trouble In gettang a piMan at thet5
be h 4 now 14 t Uw anl of wohik
month; that ht rdea mttn a
It web nt pied ere rqe Ss-.
goIw*d sMp Io wilting.
Wsc onha M ron you oOw i to

rothem *tey b. toUg to e WuS t To

they yoYourON I "oWo Vi
can,4 it you o t uhl!d


avup brot ot buo wc k d: i -
&.0Oo, oa the Ata ers. UOa
SQ-Have yooaterv bMe er bewd. Mi4r
tuat on tmo e doeks that y MOMaZZ5 5h
Oan you a4 thad e? A'.tLPaffi&b -t
Yom we .kvo 8 bm eve, Nm'
thre or fourw. hW"" -I-
up but not but what l outd toM
am sMA at, 2 e


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Nw'tb~.Paz.


TH]BvSUN


Congestion Impedes Business


(Continued from Pap Three.)
able to get the business handled in Jacksonville.
Continuing, he said:
"And with the further result that it prevents us
from getting good business from these good buy-
ors and dmage our business and the business of
the rallroeds."
SQ-Thto damage you speak of to your firm
would also apply to the city of Jacksonville gen.
really? It Is hurting Jacksonville isn't It? A-
Well I should say it does hurt Jacksonville. It is
ust that little percentage of business that is belnj
knkd out entirely. I have four vessels here in
Jasksonville and also plenty of steamer space ,to
take are of this business. It isn't that we lack
epaie The milUs have got the lumber cut. We
want the lumber and we can release the cars and
turn them rignt back if we can get them.
The witness-Here is a wire that i might add to
the ones Mr. user gave. It is as follows "Mar-
tel. Jl.,, July 1U, 106. Cooney, Eckatein & Co.
Jacksonville, Fla. Letter received. Closed down
absolutely. Cannot furnisa additional order 438.
Do not expect to run any next week, in fact can-
not until receive 80 fiats (Sisned) Martel Lum.
ber Co." I have about 50 of those, continued the
witness. "I would nave brought them along but j
did not want to take the valuable time of the Com-
mission."
Mr. L D. Drysdale was the next witness. His
testimony was substantially the same as that of
the others proceeding him, with the exception
Uhat be was in the retail lumber business. He
Na the same trouble in getting ,ars placed.
Q-Mr. Drybdale, what excuses were given you
for not turning these cars over to you? A-Well,
when I made the order it was made for four car.i.
Two came over within two days and I waited two
or three days and then called them up and asked
them for the others. Tney said they would go
tomorrow. And then I tried again the next day
and the next day until I pot tired ot promises and
drove out to Mr. Spencer's office and he said they
would go over the next day and that has been lb
or 80 days ago.
Q,-He said they would go over the next day?
A-Yea, he said they would go over that day or
the next day. I think the trouble is because the
engines are broken down all the time.
Q-Mr. Drysdale, have you any experience ot
delays prior to the partiousar lot of cars you are
talking about? A-Tes sir. We don't do any-
thing but walt though.
Q-Has it been occasionally or pretty regularly.
A-No sir, I'm on the Southern Ry. and they give
me good service.
, Q--Your shipments come over the Coast Luns
and the Southern? A-Yes sir, and the Seaboard.
but I have quit shipping on the Seaboard because
every time they get a car over here It Is in bao
order, and the other companies won't take it.
H. T. Barker was then called. He testified that
he was a forwarding agent and did business for a
number of firms. He said that his trouble was in:
pettig the steamer shipments handled; that he
had no difSfiulty In getting the sailing shipments
handled and had been so advising his clients.
Mr. W. E. Gullette was called. He said that ha
was agent for Chas. S. Hirsoh & Co.; that he had
48 carn on the A. C. L. yard, 19 on the Seaboard
and 43 on the 8t. Johns Terminal yard.
Q-The 43 anWeon the St. Johns Terminal yard,
why are they aot unloaded Mr. Gullette? A-Be-
cause they haven't been placed as ordered and
partly because they haven t got the dock facilities
for handling them.
Q-tIf they were all placed on the yard would it
be possible for you to unload them? A-It they
would place them promptly as ordered we would
handle just about twice the amount of lumber a4
we do now the way they are being placed.
Q-How long have those cars been on the St.
Johns River Terminal yards? A-I couldn't teil
you, sir. Some of them are Just in and some of
them have been into r quite a while. I got a car
Just the other day and handled it that came in
way back on the lt of May. The trouble seems
to be this; there is no conformity of action be-
tween the railway officials and the lumbermen.
We have lumber on the docks that is lying there
and has been for months, some of It I have one
order that is nearly a year past due and fo*
months the mill cutting it has reported it ueat and
ready to ship but the failure of the railroads to
furnish them ears necessitate their either shut.-
tins down or piling new cut lumber over the top
of it and then ship as they can get ears. In thi
meantime what lumber has been shipped here o'i
the order has been held by thr railroads on their
congested yards and prevents our filling our or-
ders on time, which is veTry expensive.

Seaboard do would you unload them? A-In
most cases y.


Q-At present could you get them unloaded?
A-I could unload most of them. We can't unload
them all there some days because they have not
the track facilities, in fact, with all the Increase
of business the Seabcsrd Air Line today hasn't
really the facilities for handling lumber that they
had four years ago. They did have a make-shift
of a dock there then but it is mostly sand now.
Q-There is room tnere to take care of a large
amount of lumber If that floor was placed? A-
.Considerably more lumber than there is now, sir.
if that was floored over.
Q-Couldnt the space that is used now be
doubled by flooring the balance of that sandy
ground between the tracks A-No, I don't think
it could b,) doubled, but it could be very largely
Increased. They haven't any great amount of
terminals any way.
SQ-You could unload the Coast Line cars right
away if you could get them, couldn't you? A-Our
docks are pretty crowded right now, sir. Our
allotment of docks on the Coast Line. We hav3
five schooners in here now. One of them is wait*
ing for lumber from Savon, from the West mills
Line from Crystal River, a couple of cars, and as
soon as we get that-we could go right ahead and
load them and make considerable room on the
dock. The others are at the S. A. L. dock, wait-
ing for lumber from Savin, from the West mills,
and when we get that lumber we will be able to
clear up quite a little lumber space at the S. A. L.
Q-Well, you understand that there is a con-
gested condition here? A-There is a little of it.
Q-That is what I want to get your view on.
A-Well each one of us has different views. My
theory is that the increase of business through the
port of Jacksonville has not been met by the rail-
roads. They have failed to equip themselves
with sufficient rolling stock and dock facilities and
terminals to that extent that the business is more
than they can handle.
Q-How long has this beei the case? A-It
has been the case for nearly a year, sir. The co.,-
gestion here has been something fearful for sev-
eral months and I think it will be congested until
the railroads equip themselves with sufficient fa.
cilities to handle the business. The port has sim-
ply outgrown the roads.
Q-Have the roads had reasonable notice of th3
picking up of this business to prepare themselves
to handle it? A-it has been steadily growing,.
sir. Statistics have shown that it has grown right
along from ten or eleven million to twenty a
month.
Q-None of the companies here have provided
themselves with increased facilities outside the
Coast Line, have they? A-You mean dock and
railroad facilities?
Q-Yes-. A-I think the balance of them, sir,
are using the same old engines that. they used ten
or eleven years ago.
Q-Do you think trat the Coast Line dock facil-
Ities are sufficient? A-1 do not, sir. I don't
think they are more than half sufficient for the
business that road gets.
Q-Is there anything else you would like to
state, Mr. Gullette? A-I don't know, sir. I think
I have about answered everything necessary. I
think the trouble is simply the want of proper
facilities by the railroads. They need more en
gines and more cars. Their business has in-
creased and itf they have made any additions of
that sort we haven t been able to detect it. The
trouble is we can't get charter on an uncertainty
any way. They cost like thunder, and when the
bring the lumber in it is simply impossible for ui
to charter so as to meet tne consignments prompt-
railroads are not furnishing sufficient flats to
ly. We have five vessels here now and only two
of them can get their lumber although I have sev.
eral million feet of lumber in Jacksonville.
Q-Is that caused by the failure of the railway
company to place the cars? A-Fallure to place
the cars so that the demand could be met.
It was developed at this point in the testimony
that none of the brokers were of the opinion that
the situation could be relieved by transferring
lumber to Fernandina as had been suggested
They all pronounced it impracticable In this
connection the statement of Mr. 8iser is of inter-
est. Referring to the transfer of shipments from
Jacksonville to Fernandina he said:
"There isn't a shipper of lumber in Florida but
would ship his lumber through Fernandina If it
were possible to do so. because in the first place
he would save at least 25 center on a thousand
feet on the ocean freights. In our case we never
bring a Seaboard Air Line shipment into Jackson.
vllle unless it is for steamer shipment and that is
very little. But I don't think there is anybody
that could possibly throw tneir shipments to Fe.-
nandina that are coming in here because Fernan
dia is first choice. All of the ail business off
the Seaboard will go to Ieruandina naturally
hy get better service, better rates and better
facilities for loading than we get hre."
Then followed the testimony of Mr. G. H. May,


Mr. W. F. Jones, Mr. E. G. Phinney, all of whom
testified that they were in the lumber business in
Jacksonville and made statements substantially
the same as those contained In the testimony or
the other gentlemen quoted.
Mr. F. V. Hull, of the Barne & Jesup Co., naval
stores factors, was called and sworn.
Q-Are you in any trouble with the railroads
about getting cars placed for unloading? A-
Very much, yes sir.
Q-How many cars have you on hand now not
placed? A-That 'is hare to say. The railroads
tail to notify us of the arrivals. We have re-
quested it repeatedly but they don't notify us at
all. We made written request Jan. 1, Feb. 14, Mci.
23, and May 1st. We have failed to receive any
notice of arrivals.
Q-Do you think the delay to your shipments is
due to their (the railroads) failure to have sum
client force to unload them? A-Why it is cer.
tainly the fault of the railroad.
Q-What effects are these delays having o0a
your business and the business of Jacksonville
and also the shipping interests of the State? A-
Well, It has quite an effect. Some of the ship-
ments that would naturally come to Jacksonville
are diverted to other points, Bavannah for in.
stance, if the freight rate isn't too great. Just on
account of the congestion we lose the handling of
the commodity to a very large extent.
Q-If the stuff could be handled more promptly
there would be more stuff in? A-Nearly double
I think.
Mr. Chas. J. Angell then testified, substantially
the same as the other lumber men.
Joe King, Jr., was then called and sworn. He
filed a list of cars which he had ordered placed
and couldn't get which he said was made up by
his bookkeeper. He said that he had gotten bet-
ter service from the A. U, L. than from any other
road and that there never had been a time that he
could not have unloaded his oars If they had been
placed; that the answer that he got from the rail-
roads was that they were doing the best they
could. He said he had very little trouble with
the Coast Line, that his trouble was with the Sea.
board and the St. Johns River Terminal Co. He
related a contention he had had with the officials
of the St. Johns River Terminal Co. about an em-
bargo that had been placed on it. Continuing he
said
"But our main trouble has been with the Sea-
board. We try not to buy anything on the Sea-
boadr. We Just lose the shipment. I have a bill
here of $375 on the Coast Line, lumber that had
to be bought. The lumber was out and we did
all we could to get cars, the mill did too, but we
had to buy it and here is the bill I spoke to Mr.
Williams about it. Of course they laugh at you,
give you the horse laugh, if you go after them for
any money. I'm afraid now that all of us are go-
Ing to 'catch It' for coming up here and testifying
against them."
Q-What is the general effect of these delays oa
your business and the business of the port of
Jacksonville generally? A-We have written our
people on the steamer business that we want no
more steamer orders; that we'll do without them
entirely; and we could do more steamer business
than sail business under different conditions.
Q-I mean have you had to sustain any consid-
erable loss by reason of this congestion and fail-
ure to place these cars? A-Well, in a general
way I have and everybody else here has, that lt,
lumbermen. But in a specific way that waits to
be seen. When these vessels arrive I may have
demurrage to pay. In a general way it affects us
all.
Q-Your mill connections are having trouble to
get cars to send lumber on? A-Awful, awful!
I got a telegram from the Dowlings 60 days ago
I believe it was, and I had to go to Savannah to
see the Coast Line and get some cars. If it wasn't
ior the Coast Line they would just have to go out
of business. It's very few 8. A. I. ears we ever
can get. They require 22 car a day to move their
lumber at Live Oak. I sent an order the other
day to .Morrison for certain stuff. He said:
"If you can't get It In Jacksonville just cancel
your order. We haven't had any cars In three
weeks and we can't handle the order because we
can't get them."
Q-Do you want to say anything further, Mr.
King? A-Well, I Just want to say this. What I
think is the cause of this trouble in Jacksonville.
The business in Jacksonville, I understand, has
trebled in the last five years, but the railroads, it
seems, with the exception of the Coast Line,
haven't grown along with it and the growth of the
Cast Line has been very diminutive compared
with the growth of the business, so that today the
business has outgrown the facllitlMe.
SMr. Kng suggeted that the CommlalQn estab
ish a rule of $10 a day demurrage both for ship-
(Continued on Page i&)


-' '.


August lit ioo((D


I













August UI, 1906


THE SUN


Fifth!a


QUALITY


of MERCY


Report of the Proceedings of the Board of Pardons

: : : In Session Last Week : : :


Perhaps the most onerous, certainly the most
painful duty deyolving upon the State officials, I
the work of considering application for pardons,
and either granting or denying appeals for mocy.
(Under the existing laws the Governor, the
Comptroller, the Attorney General, the Commis-
stpner of Agriculture and the Secretary of State
constitute the State Board of Pardons. Formerly
two justices of the Supreme Court, the Governor,
Attorney General and Secretary of State made up
the personnel of the Board of Pardons.
Until recently the board adjusted Its time of
meeting to the convenience of persons represent-
ipg petitioners for pardons, but several months
ago it adopted a rule setting the first Thursday in
ecoh month as a regular day for the meeting .ft
the Board.
The Board of Pardons was primarily created as
a final court of appeals where evidence discovered
after the courts had passed upon a case or some
similar contingency arose might be considered.
It is vested with discretionary power to interfere
with the execution of the decrees of the courts.
That it is now resorted to as the highest court
of appeal far more frequently than was contem-
plated when it was created cannot be disputed.
There are approximately 1,800 State, and about
the same number of county convicts in the State,
and every one of them has the right to make an
application for a pardon. A large proportion of
them avail themselves of this right. There aro,
hundreds of applications now on file in the Gover-
nor's office waiting consideration.
In many of them a voluminous mass of evidence
is submitted with the applications. In the Cooper
case, the most famous case that the board has
ever considered, it would take a week to read the
records and evidence on file The careful consid-
eration of these documents by the members of
the board and the personal investigations they
make in some cases to enable them to con*
solentlopsly discharge their duties, adds greatly to
their work.
The State Board of Pardons may truly be said
to be between the devil and the deep sea. It in
severely criticized for the pardons it grants and
the sentences it commutes. It is also severely
criticised for those it denies. So between the
Scylla and Charybdis of public opinion, faithfully
doing the best they can, by the lights they have,
the board pursues the unpleasant path of duty It
must walk.
At the regular meeting of the board hold August
2nd and 3rd twenty three cases were considered.
Bight petitions were denied; three were passed
for further consideration: in two cases of life im-
prisonment, involving three persons the death
sentences were commuted to life imprisonment;
and ten wore granted conditional pardons. As
there were several cases of general Interest before
the board it will be Interesting to mention them
with the reasons given by the board for interfer-
ing with the judgments of the courts.
The cases where clemency was granted and the
reasons given are as follows:
Jackson and Ellen Broados, who were convicted.
in the Criminal Court of Record in Duval County,
in 1902, of a misdemeanor, and sentenced respec-
tively to six months and thirty day terms in the
county Jail were granted full pardons because it
appeared that Ellen Broades had practically serv-
ed her thirty day sentence and Jackson Broadej
had become insane and is now confined in a sani-
tarium outside of the State.
Alex Henderson, convicted in the Duval County
Criminal Court of Record in 1900, of the crime of
second larceny, and sentenced to ten years in the
penitentiary. It appeared that he had already
served more than six years of his sentence and
had been of good behavior. and the amount of the
property stolen being only $1.50, he was granted
a conditional pardon.
A. H. Anderson, convicted in the Duval County
Criminal Court of Record in June, 1901, of the
crime of assault with intent to commit murder
and sentenced to eight years in the penitentiary.
It appeared that he had served, including proper
credits for good behavior, more than six years of
his sentence, he was granted a conditional pardon.
Travis Graham, who was convicted in Putnam
County in 1906 of grand larceny and sentenced to
three years in the penitentiary. Graham had con-
fessed his crime and made full restitution before
the trial and had been of good behavior during the
period of his Imprisonment .nd by the petition of
numerous eitlsens of Florida and Alabama, there
was every reason to believe that a full reforma-
tion had been secured, he was conditionally pa.
downed.
The petition of Jesse Cain, convicted In Colum-


bla County in 1895 of murder and sentenced tO
death, was considered. After conviction Cain had
escaped from Jail and lived in the state of South
Carolina for nearly twelve years, leading a sob*r
law-abiding life, married and raised a family and
accumulated considerable property. The evidence
submitted to the board raised grave doubts that
the murder was premeditated, and numerous citi-
zens of Columbia County and of South Caroline,
Invoking the clemency of the board, he was grant-
ed a commutation of the sentence to five years at
hard labor in the penitentiary, to date from Au.
gust 2nd, 1906. 1U
James Hin, convicted in Volusia County, Ii
1893, of murder with a recommendation to the mer-
cy of the court, and sentenced to life imprisob.
ment. Hill was only a boy when he committed
the murder and has served twelve years and been
of good behavior. During his confinement he has
suffered great impairment of eyesight and lost a
part of one foot. He was granted a conditional
pardotL.
John Bryant, convicted in Leon County in 1899
of murder, with a recommendation for mercy, it
appearing that he had served more than six years
and been of good behavior, and that he was only
a boy when the crime was committed, and that his
brother, who was subsequently tried and acquit-
ted was the chief actor in the commission of tho
crime, he was granted a conditional pardon.
Richard Hamilton, convicted in Marion County
in 1900 of the crime of rape and sentenced for
life, was granted a conditional pardon, he having
served six years with good behavior and the evi
dence presented to the board raising a grave
doubt of his guilt.
C. A. Yant, convicted in Leon County in 1900 of
the crime of rapo and sentenced for life was also
granted a conditional pardon. Many of the offi-
clais connected with the convict camps, including
State Supervisor Newton A. Blitch, and many
other citizens invoking the clemency of the board,
and it appearing that his health is much impaired
by his imprisonment and his right arm broken.
Hamilton Griffin, convicted in Monroe Couqty
in 1908 for assault with intent to commit murder,
and sentenced to serve five year, was granted a
conditional pardon. He nad served three years of
his sentence with good behavior and was a mere
boy when the crime was committed. Many citi-
zens petitioned for his pardon.
Nearly two days was devoted to the considera'
tion of the case of George (aldwell and Nelsoni
Larkins, under sentence of death for the. murder
of Hon. N W. Eppen in September 1904, for which
lhanm Pdwards and thry were convicted In Jail.
uary 1905, at a special term of court at Tallaha.-
see. Caldwell and Larklns were convicted upon
the evidence of Isham Edwards, who was hung forl
the murder. Before his execution Edwards mado
a statement exonerating Calowell and Larkins
Notwithstanding this a det.th warrant was issued
setting June 5th for their execution. A petition
signed by citizens of Lonn and Duval counties.
asking for a respite of sixty days for additional
time for the examination of evidence was pre-
sented to the Governor who withdrew the death
warrants two days before the date of the execu
tion. *"' "
At this session of the board affidavits purport
ing to account for the whereabouts of the prison
ners the night of the murder were presented. Pow
members of the board, including the Governor, be-.
lieve that while these affidavits did not fully stab
lish the innocence of Caldwell and Larkins. they
did raise very grave doubts of their guilt Gover.
nor Broward announced to *he board, after a ful
investigation of the evidence, that he had de
cided that there was such doubt as to the guilt on
the men, that he could not oonsclentiously Issue
death warrant and that he would not do so. even I'f
the board allowed sentence to stand, until no
conclusive proof of Willt wis presented to him
The board considered that it was imposing j hard.
ship on Leon County to require It to pay the Sex
penses of he prisoners keeping them in the Duo
val County jail Indefinitely, ,nd voted to commute
the sentence to life imorisonment. Four member|
of tho five voted for commutation of the sentence
In discussing the matter of the commutation of
the death penalty In this caseam, and the freuentet
criticisms of the board, Hon. J. Emmet Wolfe
who is secretary of the State Board of Pardons
raid:
"As civilisatlon advances a sentiment In favor
of abolishing the death sentence is growing, tI
the State of Kansas there are fifty men under sen
tence of death, and no governor can be found w0l
will issue warrants tor their e*ecction. The n
ber of murders committed aiaest daily l flonle


proves that the infliction of the death penalty do"
not deter the commission of crime.
"Probably the public execution ofj Iliam Id-
wards and his being sent from the AlloWe 4lreot
to heaven, according to his statenent. hala one
more to encourage the comw of crime la
Leon County than will the qet l4azeration of
Caldwell and Larkins for lifo in those ovlt amps.
"If later developments should walusively
their guilt they will have been saucently puniah-
ed for the crime. If they had been executed and
subsequent events had shown that thy are inno-
cent the Governor and the board might smter
many an unquiet night tor having onpoated to
Inflict the death penalty in a ase where the evi-
dence was not conclusive enough to place their
guilt beyond a reasonable doubt."
The appended correspondence will show sme
of the interesting process which delay justtoe.
They relate to the case of Noble Collins, Who Is
under sentence of death in Lake ountaty, and fo
whom a death warrant was issued and withdrawn.
Ocala, F, Augut 8rd, 19.
his Excellency, N. B. Broward, Governor,
Tallahassee ia
My Dear Sir-I beg to call your attention to the
fact that a convict by name "Noble Collins," now
in Jail at Tavares, Lake County, Florida, under
death sentence for murder, has been there for
many months.
I am advised that execution wa suspended to
allow a petition to be presented askIng for a 0cor
mutation to life imprisonment, one that would
have been proper if the Jury had understood that
ess than the whole could have made at
dation for mercy. It ti a nardahip and a peat
ourden on the people of that county that the mat.
ter remains without action. I do not know who
is responsible, but some one is guilty of meet cua
able negligence, and the people have asked m.
to do what I could In the matter. I kow of noth-
Ing but to call your attention to the sttate, thAt
you may take such course as seems adviable, for
I am persuaded that you are not aequa#4ted with
the facts.
I have the honor to be, with very great respect,
Yours very truly,
W. 8. BULLOCK.
Augut 4, 1906.
Judge, W. 8. Bullock,
Ooala, Fla.
Dear Sir-The Governor has referred to me
your letter of the 8rd. Inst maling Inquiry as to
the causes of the delay in the Noble Collins cae,
and I beg toeadvise you as follows:
On Feb. Oth, 190, a stay of execution waM
granted ton this ca by the Governor upon, r
ceipt of an urgent letter faw Mr. Alfred Sft Llair
Abrams, copy of which I enclose.
You will note that Mr. Abrams state sn his let.
ter that ten members of the Jury that tried Col-
line were in favor of a recommendation to mercy
and would have so voted if they had been advised
by the court that such a reomnmendatio could be
made by a majority of their number, and Mr.
Abrame was strongly of the opinion that scad
fact should entitle the said Collins to a commuta.
tion to life imprisonment, and yWo will also note
that Mr. Abrams say: "If you and the rest of
the pardoning board should agree with me is this
matter I will at once send ycu full p ua In
the cane as certified by the jury itself."
In accordance with the request of oaid letter
the execution of said Colins was suspended.
After securing this stay Mr. Abrams dropped
the matter and has failed to forward aay proof
the matters stated in bhie letter or otherWfee pIl
the Board of Pardone In mssesslon of fact upo
which action could be tAk,,n, although I ba
written him throe letters 'equoeting such Ifo*
nation, the last letter being written June 4th,
190. ,.
finally deciding that Mr. bramns did o Intend
to take any action, as he would not even a o
Ndge rooSlpt of my. ltte, .I wrote on J r,
, 1906, to Mr. T. B. Lanler stating tbn hot ln the
? caseand asking him that be farnist me with thi
Snecesary proof to lay before the Bopd of Par.
does.
SMr. Len ier promaptly roiled eno a tate.

titio f sromiAA


* ..p~
* t~' ~,
*'' ~; :x~i~


j *


. Uhe








~,.,


THE SUN


S


-m



Unpublished



Letters of Pat


Mavournin.
MTia the divil's own quandary 01 am In, Spotts
dear, an' to whom can 1 turn in me daylimmer
but to you, me frin', who manny's the tolrne have
come to me raysoue phin 01 roamed the sthrates
Iv Tallahassee unable to lowkate the dough bas
thot is so alsy for thim phats nixt, but so turr.-
ble pylusive to thim phat's not.
Here's how the pussle box opens up to me this
Auhgust martin' in me dear owld Olland, phin 01
am iet after radin me mail thot the latest stame
greyhound do be after bringing' me from across
the pond.
By their powers but tne .andydates for Gover-
nor must hbo plucked the tail fithers ouwt iv
the whole covey of early bnr-r-ds, judgin' by th3
number thot's alriddy out for this job. Tin iv
thim, no less, hov written to me askin' for me in-
Buence an' support; an' i am jist after raycivia'
a personal call from Gineral Albert Gillchreest,
who as yer know is travillin' abroad, sollclitin'
that same. So much hov 01 been disturbed by
the perplizlty of the onusual situashun thot 01
absintmindedly rayfused the loan iv slvin dollars
which same Albert was after offering' me; it
thing 01 alver hov done since the good auld days
in the Call-Chipley Sinitortat fight, phin money
was so plentiful thot we used tin dollar bills to
wrap our ohewin' tobacco up in.
The cause Iv me mental, disturbance which 01
tell ye is so great that three tolmes, no lisas, In
wan day 01 caught mesilf on me way to ask foer
Job Iv worruk,-an' by the blissid intervention iv
the Saints raymlmbered me pledge ist In tolm.e
ter save mesllf, and 01 would not hov dared to look
mellf again in the face if 01 had succeeded in
caryin' out me desperate Impulse; phat's distract-
in' me, 01 say, is trying' to pick the Goobernayt,-
rial candidate out of the bunch that will hoy
THE BIGGEST DOUGH BAG BEHIND HIM, be-
fore I commit meolif.
01 hear thot Gineral Albert has made a go"n
big bunch Iv money out Iv land speculayahuna,
but barring' the turning' loose Iv a few small coins
for the purchs ITv some candy for the school
childer, 01 boy not raymarked thot he has chang-
ed from his tight wad proolivitays thot he dti-
played in ahl their muscular activity during' the
last session.
Phat 01 want you to do fer me is to find out
which oandydate foer Governor will go to the post
with the most East Coast money on him. Thot's
the boy which will raycelve me loyal, enthoosla.i-
tie support 01 know not who the others may b1
fer, but as for me, Olm for HIM. For well do ye


Congestion Impedes Business
continuedd Prom Page Four.)
per@ and transportation oompa!ee, instead of the
dollar a day which is now charged.

Mr. H. E. Day was called and sworn. He testi-
fied that he has a specific knowledge of the termi-
nal yards of the Seaboard and a general knowl-
edge of the others. (Mr. Day was up to a short
time ago local agent for the Seaboard in Jackson-
ville). He testified that the Seaboard did not
have sufficient motive power to take care of its
yard switching; that orders were not executed
promptly; that the clerks were underpaid; that
they did not have sufficient force. Cottinng he
said:
'They (the Seaboard) are doing about twice a3
much business as they were doing ton years ago
and they've got practically the same ore now
that they had then. Practically 0 per ent. of the
swlith engines are out of service all the time.
ft the want of a yardmaster or dookmaster the
lumber is thrown Indiscriminately on the docks.
Q-What effect are these delays having on the
general business interests of JaoksonvlU6?T A-
Well, fromt my observation and views It is having
very sorlete effect on Jackeenville as an export
point. I knew personally of a number of people


know the words in the auld proverb,-
"As long as the money nolds out to burn,
The vilest grafter will not turn."
So please, please, Spottsle darlint, get Frank
Hough to ask Major Healey to ask Pleas Holt to
ask Mr. Triay to ask You-Know-Who, which won
Iv those menshuned for Governor will be the real
wan fer ahl thrue lovers iv liberty and lucre ter
rally to.
Ordinarily me well known pollytical astootness
wud anable me to put me unerrin' finger on tho
guy selected by the MAIN GUY, wid me eyes
shut; for ther unfettered columns if the terrified
press iv me bayloved adopted State wud guide
me to him like a martin flies ter his gourd. But
now Its different.
Phin 01 scan the pages of the Tropical Sun iv
West Palm Beach 01 see Jawn Watson played
up for a winner. Takin' up nixt the St. Augui
tine Record 01 rade thot Sinator Crill is. their
man: daymanded by the paypul. Turnin' next to
that'dear an' dignified Times-Union Of see, as us-
ual, nothin'-excipt now an' thin a quotation
from the Record about Crill an' another from
some iv the other rayspectaoly conservative chat-
tels iv Uncle Henry, boostin' Watson an' Crill.
01 wud feel humiliated at me want iv POLLY-
tical perspicacity if it were not for their fact that
the cunnin' little Met is In the their same fix as 01
find mesllf. Whin it comes to the fine noses for
location' the dough bag, its Willie Ringworm and
Dufuse Bustle thot hov thim; an' divil a line do
01 see in the columns iv tnot grafters' barome-
ter ter indaycate which iv those mentioned a.i
Goobernaytorial Timber carries their 0. K. 'v
Florida's great dayviloper.
Now Spotts, me auld Third House colleague.
come to the rayleif iv wan who is now far from
other land Iv Flagler and flowers, by loosenin' u.)
the string thot ties the mouth iv the bag in which
ye kape yer sure things, an' cable me their name
of the rale thrue pathriot who has been selected
to rule over a free payple by the only original
genuine, full grown disbursers iv the long green
in great and glorious gobs.
01 hav an appointment in Hyde Park tomorree
with Gineral Albert Gilchreest at which he ex-
plets me ter give him my promise iv support in
exchange for a folve "pun" Bank of England
note. Oi'll put ye wise so ye will not think me
unthrue ter the motto adopted by their ancient
an' honorable order iv The Greedy Galoots iv
Graft, in which we are both Past Masters, which
motto ye will raymimber is,--"Us Fer their Heav-
test Dough Bag." 01 ixpict to throw the con in-
to Gineral Albert good and plenty, by takin' the


who have contemplated going into the mill busi-
ness In this State and after investigating the con-
ditions In Jacksonville have gone out Into other
States and gone Into other business. I know that
where the mills could get cars some of them, they
have diverted the orders to Savannah and Fornan.
dinm and other points rather than bring it to
Jacksonville. Of course that shuts out that much
lumber trom here.
Mr. Dexter Hunter was called and sworn. He
testified that he had been engaged in the lumber
business for 30 years in Jacksonville; that his
cars had been delayed 40 days or over; that he
could have unloaded them it they had been deliv-
ered to him. He further testified that on account
of the uncertainty in the delivery of cars it was
impossible for him to make definite charters of
vessels. Continuing Mr. Hunter said:
"My opinion is that the railroads ought to In-
crease their facilities. My impression is that
there don't begin to be the amount of facilities
here today that there Is in Savannah, whereas I
think the lumber shipments from this port are
much larger than from Savannah. On the other
hand I think the dealers ought to provide them
selves better in the way of transportation from
Jacksonville. I believe that if every dealer here
would put one or two steamers to towing barges
he would have a service he could rely on."


pace iv money off him an' oroasin' me finger
phin 01 promise ter support him for Governor, bo
thot the promise won't bind me at ahi, at ahl.
'Twill serve him right fer the way he treated ,A
at the last mission whin, as Mpaker Iv the House,
he cud hov put us onto manny a pace of aslay moa
ey, but didn't. His treatment iv us was most as bai
as that dealt out ter our ris' Steve Melton by
thot little Payter Knight, but not quite for phat
Payter did to Steve molgnt be designated ,s
""cruel an' unusual punishment."
01 bear thot Jawn Stockton is afther trying' to
get auld man Ives who howlds down the Job iv
Treasurer iv the City of Jacksontille, ter go up
against me auld frin' an' countryman Dilla Casal-
dey, whin the time comes ter Disla ter ask their
paypul to rayellct him Clerk iv the Circuit Court
fer Duval County. Iv course ye know phat's eat-
in' Jawn. He's mad because billa bate good lit.
tle Willie Baker, Jawn's brother-in-law, out iv the
Sinator's Job, by managing' Harry Buckman's camn
paign good enough ter syllot Harry hands down
over Willie. But perhaps ye haven't caught on
to Jawn's scheme. 01 piped it in a minute. It's
this way. Auld man Ives has made a good bi'
pace iv money'out iv their gum business an'
Jawn has ut framed up that the aule man will
stand fer a shake down for about ten thousand
plunks fer a campaign fund, which Jawn will put
Into the general pot, and thin Jawn will come out
foer Governor.
Iv course this is tauld to ye confidentially,
which as ye know, acoordin' to other rules, limits
ye to sixty-folve dayscreet frin's in raypaytin ut.
01 may be late rayturnin' to dear auld Florida
foer 01 hov Jlst learned trom me auld political
teacher Dick Croker, thot Willie Randolph
Hearst will run for Governor Iv New Yorc.
Looks like a chanst for me to git under the spout
whin Willie taps his barrel.
In the meantime raymimber not to foergit thot
I'll be on hand whin their coin begins to circu-
late in Florida. Regards to our great Sinatnr
(Jim 01 mane iv course, we never had but wan)
whin ye see him. May the sBaits river bleas
him! 'Twas him, as ye know, thot got me pin-
sion from Uncle Sam, on aooount iv me strainia'
me back liftin' the end iv the foretopeail sheet
rope whin Oi was serving' me country on the
second class battleship Texan. It was thin thot
01 ray echoed the memorable worrods iv Admiral
Schley at the battle of hantiago,-"Damn the
Texas."
Till 01 write agin 01 am-


Yoirs 10derly,


PAT.


Mr. Hunter further testified in answer to quest
tons that the port of Jacksonville was going t'
have a very large shipment of lumber for the next
ten years.

Mr. W. M. Toomer, an attorney in Jacksonville.
presented a formal complaint In writing from the
United Grocery Co. In general terms the com-
plaint was to the effect that for a number of
months past there hAd existed in the city of Jack-
sonville conditions of unnecessary delay in the re-
celpt and forwarding of commodities; .that the de-
lay was detrimental te the jobbing Interests of the
ctly; that the facilities for hatlina outgoing
freight were entirely IaadeOuate.and unatidsfac
tory; that the homrs for the receipt of freight too
short, the number of employees too limited, that
they were underpaid and overworked; that the re-
sponsibility for these conditions rested w t1those
higher up in authority who are either ignorant or
or uninterested in conditions at Jacksonville.
Mr. Chas. B. Ost, shipping and receiving cleric
for the United Grocery Co., was sworn. In an-
swer to questions he said:
"It certainly appears that they must have an in-
sufficient force," speaking of the railroad, "from
the fact that their platforms are blocked and they
are unable to move the freight ina time so that the
(Continued on Page Seven.)


August 11, 190o


fop















,AGIIT FROM


THE SUN



CASU AL


CAL.a


Gossip of and About floridans Great and Greater Who VIstt the Capital B tM u
SThey aveIo


A hotbble figure at the Leon during the past
week was that of former Governor W. 8. Jennings.
The reporter ease upon him seated in one of the
innumerable porch rookers provided for the com-*
tort of guests, and reading one of the State papers,
while a frown slowly gathered on his face. A
query as to it4 cause brought forth this:
"It has become the fashion with a certain sort
and a certain set of papers to discredit and decry
the aotta oLall our public men. No one is safe,
however high and pure his motives, and no one is
tree from the slender of thee sheets. So far haR
this gone, that the time is coming, if not already
come, when the young men of the country will
have no other thought than that all public men
are corrupt aid that all men who hold public o)'-
fice do so for the purpose of being corrupt."
Governor Jennings' administration is of too
recent dte to have passed out of the public minWl,
but many of his services to the State have not
been told. One of the things accomplished by him
was the compilation of figures showing the status
of State lands. Up to three years ago the matter
of how many acres the State owned, how many
had been patented to corporations, individuals or
other owners, etc., was a sealed book. IndeeI,.
more than once the statement had been made In
legislative bails that the State owned no more
land, and one speaker, advocating the granting of
a charter to a corporation that had asked it, used
these words: "Give 'em the grant of all the lands
they can locate that ain't already granted. Y)u
can't lose anything because the State don't own
any more." Governor Jennings, after laborious
researches, both in Tallahassee and Washingtoz,
prepared sufficient data to give his successors in
office, and all others who might wish it, accurate
information on this subject. The labor required
in making these researches was enormous but
was quite justified by the results of it.
Fred P. Cone, who will represent Columbia
County In the Senate when the next Legislature is
in session, spent a day or two in the capital last
week on business before the Pardoning Board.
Mr. Cone's home is at Lake City, which is equiva-
lent to saying that Mr. Cone has "convictions" i'n
the subject of University removal. All the citi-
zens of Lake City have like "convictions."
"I don't want to be quoted," remarked Mr. Coue
to the reporter, who had brought up the subject,
"because what I have to say about this matter I


Congestion Impedes Business.
(Continued from Page Six).
teams can be unloaded. When I was employed by
the Seaboard, about a year ago, they were not al-
lowed to carry a sufficient number of clerks and
frequently our shipments would have to be car-
ried over from one day to the next after belun
hauled on our trucks to the depot.
Q-Mr. Oat, without going into the number of re-
ceiving or checking clerks at the different lines do
1 understand from you that you regard the force
as inadequate? A-Yes sir. From my past ex.
perience I regard it as not only inadequate but so
poorly paid that it is Impossible to get good men.
I know in the past a good many of the men, per.
haps getting $40 a month, would have to work all
kinds of hours during the busy season and it la
not posalble to get competent clerks to do the
amount of work required for the pay.
Q-In reference to solid cars what trouble, if
any, have you had In getting bills of lading? A-
Well, we frequently have delays of three or four
days in doing that. I have a list of those cars
which will explain itself better. On them you will
find cars delivered on the 22nd were received on
the 27th delivered on the 1st or 2nd of the next
month.
In answer to questions Mr. Oat testified that it
was impossible for him to place the blame for the
delay in solid car shipments. His cars were de-
rivered to the St Johns Terminal Co. and this
company, in answer to complaint about delay,
would say that they delivered them to the trans-
potting railroad and this railroad would say that
they hadn't received them.
Mr. Oat further testified in answer to questions
that the hours for receiving freight were entirely
too short and that the rule which was advertised
to go into effect on the 16th would change the
closing hour from 4 o'clock to 8 o'clock.
Q-If this early closing prevents your sending
your orders In there on time they remain over, I
understd r 24 hours? A-Yes sir.


shall say In the Senate chamber next spring."
"So Lake City doesn't consider the matter set-
tied?"
"Settled! Lake City as only just begun to
fight. And I may add that we shall cease to fight
only when we cease to live. And when I come to
Tallahassee next April 1 saall give the State a
story that has never before been made ptuilo.
But I don't care to talk about that now. I'm get-
ting ready to take a vacation and all these mat-
ters will be put aside till cooler weather.
"It is a pretty warm subject, then?"
"I leave about the 15th for New York," was the
frigid reply, and the reporter, considering dismre-
tion the better part of valor, questioned no more.
*
Hon. Newton A. Blitch, Ntate Inspector of Oon.
victs and Democratic nominee for Railroad Com.
mission, was one of a little group on the hotel
veranda a few days since, ot which Governor
Broward was the center.
"Is the next Governor in tois group, Mr.
Blitch?" queried the apparently ever-present re-
porter.
"That's a question I can answer only so far. as
concerns myself," was the reply. "The report
that I am a candidate for that hign office is pot
correct. THE SUN 'called the turn' on me wheo
it said that I had been named for another office
too'recently to avow a candidacy for that one just
now. No, I deny that I ever made such a state-
ment, though I am told that running for office
sometimes becomes a habit."
"That reminds me," said the Governor. "When
I was married the second time I had one darky
laying out my clothes and another helping me pu i
on my gloves and another doing something else,
and so on. As I walked out of the house to get in
the carriage one of these darkies said to the
other: 'Huh! Cap'en looks fine In a silk hat. I
didn't know he wore a silk hat.' And the other
darky answered, 'Oh yasi kas sir! He ALWAYS
wears a silk hat when he gits married.' And th.a
laugh that followed drowned Mr. Blltch's deolpra-
tion that he had not acquired the office holding
"habit."
Mr. J. B. Christie of Jacksonville was in Tellar
hassee several days last week, appearing bebre
the Pardoning Board as attorney for Oaldwell and
Larkins, the two negroes who were implicated in
the murder of Hon. N. W. Eppes about two years


Q-In the meantime freight shipped from Sa-
vannah 24 hours prior to that would have reached
Jacksonville would it? A-Certainly.
Q-Well, then, it practically means that Savan.
nah Is put on an even feottng with Jaoksonvilloe
jobbers In making deliveries to various stations In
Florida, does It not? A-In the event of that
freight being delayed 84 hours It would, certainly.
Q-That would be a very serious hardship on
the business interests of Jacksonville, would It
not? A-a-It would be an intolerable one, sir.
Q-This (the delay) is largely due to their fail-
ure (the railroads) to provide help enough to load
the stuff? A-One very essential reason, sir, in
my opinion, Is that so far as I know they are per-
feetly helpless to put any more on.
Q-Why? A-Because the powers around the
throne won't permit them. At least so they deo.
clare. #
Mr. B. G. Lasslter, General Manager of the
United Grocery Co., testified under oath that quito
a lot of the territory contributary to Jacksonville
was open to both Jacksonville and Savannah as
competitive territory; that If Jacksonville ship-
ments were delayed 24 hours Jacksonville Joblers
could stand no chance to compete with Savannah
for business to points to whleh the freight r
were equal.
Q-You say, Mr. Lasslter, that the prices mre
practically the same and that the competition is
in thematter of delivery? A-Yes.
Q-And 24 hours In favor of Savannah pite
Jacksonville out of business? A-That is the way
I look at It, sir.
In answer to several questions, Mr. Lasster
at the depots would result In a delay of 24 hour,
said that the curtailment of the receiving hours
would put Savannah over Jaksonville or on an
equal footing; that the hours should be increased
to 6 or 4 o'lock in the afternoon. In frthera.
swer to questions, on the matter of carload ship
ments, Mr. Lasster testified that carload shi.o
ments were delayed three to five days; that the


RWAM


conditions had prevailed about tour years to his
certain knowledge.
Q-A-re they getting were or bettt A-O
Worse.
Q-What is the reason of that? A--The in-
creaso l business is the only way I can odenut
for it The business has IOreased 4and they have*
n't Increaped their facitl'eI
Q-What facilities A-Pr handling the stutf.
Bnstnse and everything else as well.
Q-Have you Made any complaint to the o6om-
pante in reference to the conditions that yOu men_
tion? A-Oh, yes str.
Q-Then the trouble, in your opinion, is that
the railroad comina ts do not employ suffietit
help to mreeive the goods that you other them for
the time that they require it to be delivered in?
A-Yes, that's It exsotly, sir.
Mr. C. T. oty being oal.ed and sworn, test.
fled subettianly the same as Mr. iLajpr and
Mr. Oat, that the facilities were tsufilt, the
force too small and overworked nd a
that the time for reolvinc right t
short; that conditions had ben bad to his certain
knowledge, for the last three or four w r that
the delays in handling solid cm were
ble, due to the insufficient rolling stook a*d the
failure of the railroads to tnore Oe theli m e nt
to keep pace with the tnoeas of bstaeu In
further answer to questions he said:
I have had a number W FaelohasW eme t6 me
and state that they'ean buy their gedo ld In van.
nah and get better delivery than fRem Jeakim-
Mr. Doty further testified and R omeaid a Spe.
cde instance tht one of ts oesteim swRe owe4
his company $ULM said that he had plesj ,f lOm-
ber to ship but be eosldnt wt'tthits t hip it
in and was ut veTry maeh a4ha ti't
reason why he ecola, py itt, ,
Other witneassese #tliare l s ia !anyv
the same as that quoted, and aZ sw r wi
a since n ceptia4t, mM he bltae the ral-
roads.


The railroad Side of this Question will be Peuntedin Next W* i o
Twimoany of Bailrod Offllals will mbe given ul as fi lm


-'p
~
A
...... ., -'


"Pol


~I(


I9


142


ago. Mr. Christle succeeded In having the I*-
tence of these men commuted to lift' aprisonment
and hie speech before the Pardoni Bard wS a
masterplece of convininng loe. Mr. Christle
was County lolicitor for Duval County for nearly
a sore of years and his varied experience dur-
lao that time has given aim a knowledge of
criminology which ft@ aim peuliarly to present
the present cse. He has t"w *ra'ker" dialect
down to prfectloA and Ids "speolbes" li thitdia-
lect are laimitable. He was bora In Jeftsou
County, near Lake Mlooosuklo, which .noted ftr
its ine crop of cotton, owmr an "crker" ohul*
dren. Judge Parkhill's fathers arm was next to
Judge Christie's and the latter gentlemAas allow'
lan himself to "remlnias,' remarked- that every.
thins was raised on the farm whoe he wa a
ooy, before the war, emyt mortp y
mother had a spianing Whee!" he srla _aid made
not only the clothes we wore buthe atert for
them. They were of homespun &ad were dyq
with pokeberry Juice." f .
When Mr. Christie was County Bollltor, undeo
the act creating the office no was allowed $6 for
every copylction of a misiaemeanor aid $10 for
each felony. He used to refer to his matd>
meanor convictions as barrels of flour as they
formed the majority of the oopyvltions. On one
occasion there was one man on the jury who had
ideas about thb liberties of the people and in three
days had freed twelve negroee. By the second
day Judge Christie could stand it no loner with.
out remonstrating to the cracker jury. Rlitn o.
a big wad of Natural Leaf and storing it away ca
the starboard side, he caught the inoorrlgble
juror by the lapel of his coat and said, "Good Loi
A'mighty man. What you mean by train loo"e
all them nalgers? You've cost me four barrels .'
flour today."
When In the full swing of an arSgment the
Judge forgets everything except hi subject an4
makes gestures like one of those things you et
of a Christmas tree and pull with a tri l and his
harangues remind one of the devll-batingo 0ortsv
tons of a Hardshell Baptist preacher. He will
play on the soft pedal for a short space of time
and then suddenly, without any warning, ill turn
on the loud pedal, give the pgnl ood a4d
strong. But Attorney General ompll*
rented In ope0 session Cristle's able preseta-
tion of the case that engaged him before the
Board last week.












7HE SUN


Let all the opponents of the drainage proposition of the Trustees of the
Internal Improvement Fund-
Take notice
And by all of the opponents we include every class and every person who
has opposed it.
We Include the great corporations who are opposing it from selfish in*
tereats;
We include the hangueon, ward heaters and professional politicians for
ie veue only. who beg the crumbs that fall from the bounteously laden tables
of the affluent corporations;
Weinclude the lawyers who are separating wealthy land owners, whether
Individuals or corporations, from their money, and annexing it unto them-
elves In the shape of fat fees pald them to make
the figt; ..- -
We include editors who, with no independence
of thought or spirit, follow blindly the lead made
by those whom they have been accustomed to res-
ognise as powerful because they are rich.
We Include the hired men of the corporations
who are opposing it because they want-to hold
their jobs.
To all of these, therefore, severally and collec-
tively, we say-
'WARE THE DREDGE.
For the drede is worklng.
Every dipperful of mud and soft rook which the
State's dredge "Everglades" is now taking from
the route that leads to Okeechobee from the sea,
is just that much more convincing argument that
the opposition will not prevail.
This powerful machine overcomes all obstacles
:n its path.
As the dipper goes down it scoops up whatever
Is in the way of the progress of the dredge and
slowly but Irrosaistably piles it to one side.
Tho opposition has done the best It could. It
has utilised every moment of the time and has
brought to bear every means to Impede at its di'-
posal, by court processes; by public speaking; by
reams of literature sent through the malls; by
columns of stuff, publication paid for, In the
newspapers: and by abusing and misrepresenting
those whom the people put In charge of the
work.
But, drainage has gone steadily on, until it has
reached the point of actual operation, and the
time is near at hand when arguments will melt
and fall away before the logic of practical demon-
btration.
In spite of the efforts of the opposition to brin4
in side Issues the proposition of the drainage of
the Everglades will be decided STRICTLY ON N
ITS MERITB.
No power possessed by the opposition, how-
ever strong they may be in wealth and Influence,
will be gret enough to stop the work of the
dredge "Everglades."
The work will go on, and as It progresses the
determination of the issue of the practicability
and feasibility of the plan will be left to actual
demonstration Instead of the judgment of any
one based on theory.
If the operations of the dredge show that the
Everglades can be drained there will be found
ecarcoly a corporal's guard who will oppose it.
Governor Broward and the Trustees do not fear
the Issue.
All that they havo ever asked is the opportu-
nity to test the points of practicability and feasti-
bility by trial.
If they are right in their estimate, as we think ,
they are, they will deserve and GAIN the plaudits
of all men for their seal In carrying out their
Ideas an to their duty.
If they are wrong, and the actual working
proves that the proposition is neither practical
nor feasible they still deserve credit which we
think the passage of time will bring to them, for
using their best efforts to perform their duty as
they saw It and allowing no terror of biased oritt-
clam to swerve them f rot it
So, again we say, to all those who cannot put
their hands on their hearts and, say "I opposed it
because I conscientiously believed that it was
right to oppose it,"
Get out of the way, for the dredge is working.
0
A. K. TAYLOR LUAVES THE SUN. I


sr


E D I T 0


SaWud.,x ut 11u 1 1I906

WARE THE DREDOR I


It is with regret that we make the announce-
meat that Mr. A. K. Taylor Is no longer connected
with this Journal.
The severance of this connection, which dates
trom August 4th, results In a loss to TH S BUN L
of a talented artist whoe work did much to make
THB SUN well known and well liked by the people of this State.
The writer loses the cooperation of a worker who devoted his time and
the beet apreeusln of his talents, as well as the best thought of his brain,
to the work In hand.
Private reason made It ImpossIble f4r Mr. Taylor to move from Jackson.
ville to Tallahassee, and it was found impractefable for two men who must
neoessarlly be In such close touch, as the editor and the cartoonist of a paper,
to work so ar apart. '
Asa ist Mr. Taylor has no equal In the Southern States and his
work on THr bUN haa been the best that he haM doe4t.
M?. Taylor not only possesses the power of )ll-fttileo to that marked


.licated. We will continue the cartoon feature i n THE SUN and will do
,in THE SUNi TH hichtSt N will d
procure, ard is the best our limitations will permit us to
wThe cartoon which appear on this page was drawn by Mr Taylor last
week and the lt of his creationsthat will appear in UN.
We notice that the St. Augustine Record tenvl admires the True
True Delmoerat, Bro. Collins' ,Tallab-. t shame shetl Withot being Per'
Ronal at all, but Just because we happened to thnkfm o t, otuw t na asn
that a certain sulphuric genUme is said to admre sw a l te


t. i*


degree which places him among the best of the wO r' 4rtoonl4sts, but hl:
mind is particularly fertile in ideas, and his ablit4o o birtg Out the poi L
of the story he has to tell, make his cartoons creations.
It has been a pleasure to work with so keen an ntellect as Mr. Taylor's
und the personal relations of the editor and the cartopolst of THE SUN were
Po cordial that work with him was robbed of Its drudtery.
With an eye quick to see a condition that is of vita lnterest to those whom
he expects to reach, with a mind awake to the possibilities of situations as
they develop, and with a hand skillful enough to present the conditions so
that each person seeing the pictures that he draws, wonders how the artist
came by the very thought that was in his own mind-such is the cartoonist
who can be truly styled great. Mr. Taylor measures up to all of the specit.
cations contained In our estimate of a great cartoonist.
We do not expect or hope to replace Mr. Taylor. His work cannot be du-


I MEN* EMW


lmmp


I











A AL S
A L S


s,


THE SUN


CONDEMNED BUT NOT DISMAYED.
We print elsewhere In this issue a telegram which we received from Mr.
J. W. Bell, editor of the Palmetto News, of Palmetto, Fla., to whom we wired
a request to send it.
It will be san by this telegram that John A. GRAHAM WAS EXONERA-
TED by the Manatee County Democratic Executive Committee AND THE"
SUN CONDEMNED.
We will try to recover from the blow dealt us by the Manatee Committee
as best we may.
In the day of our woe we are comforted by the conviction that we are
I eight; and nla the darkness with which we are whelmed, at present, we see
the ray of light which our ABILITY TO PROVE EVERY CHARGE WNB
MADE AGAINST GRAHAM hangs before our eyes.


, \,i


/


sr


NINVCHAE
5aiwi kg.Auglut 11. 1906


have them. W- aw arn xlou to know i -
Did he proe4Ae Rq ~r o D and B, that M, a en Msing ever sinOe
he had fe as b Lbety Court Clerks
We want to know this becasue-
Nearly every man In. Libety County believes that GRAHAM ATOLU
THOSU BOOKS, and more eonerating can be done if Graham will P3.
DUOCBE TH ..
Dihoneatly getting ertid opes of the records of Liberty Cou1ty
abtri the et4let plee of resca thl t Graham does. He ha bans ade to
fool MONEYD MON WITH THM MANY TIMES, and as these are about
the wharpeot men we know of we are not sutpriied that he was able to fool
the Exesutive Committee of Maatee County.
The faet that he has oertlfed sople of the reorder of Uberty County is
the very thing with which we have ohargd him, and we proved by a ina.
s-pectlo -o".A tatlion tom the records them.
shelves thA theer stifled ooples wre FRAUDU
We are not sp d at this because exonert-
ing letters and pt ar easy to obtans by a
man who has redued the art of mendeelos
plausibUlty to the fne point that Graham has..
The only thlng that we are sup led at lA
the story whioh came from Manate so that TB
SUN should have bsee eondemed, beesae THB
SUN wa not asooordod tho privlpgee of ropa n.
taUtion before the Oommttee.
The language of the call lsued by the Chair.
man and n tod in the Palmetto News contained
an Invtato to Graham to appear before It.
NO SUCH INVITATION V AS lGIVN TO THi
SUN.
l OWe took the liberty, however, to send a letter
to the Chairman of that Committee. We do not
even know that the letter was received asu the
Chairman has not yet honored us with an
acknowledgement of its receipt,
We call attention f the Manatee Committee to
the fact that even so prejudced a people as the
Jews of Jeruslem did not ondoemn the Namatne
in his absonoe, and that h he Roman4 soldiers them-
relvos gave him the oppottholty to *spoak it hi
own belitical powef.s t tht
Whitewashwe are talking stabout thndidate of the
buslnes we rise to ssk;
What right has the Mantee DemoPratt0 Bxeou.
tire Committeea to onm ;RBlUN?
"The powers, po11me by the Committee awe
poltidal powers BOLELT, and only DIRECTORY
Whitewashing a rgltliained andidate of the
party is quite in the line of committee work.
Condemning a public journal that prlnts the'
truth is an unwarranted impertinence.
But in spite of this surprising action on the
part of th Committee representing the Demo-
eratio people of Manatee Qouaty, W1 WILL NOT
vPORSAXK THIS PEOPLE.
f We will yet save thm from the digraWd whiob,
by the tion of thtis Committee, they seem de.
Stonedm to bring upon themselves, of being
S rented in the lslalatlve counells of this
by a man of ao dt r amefol t record, on vhlih li
written fraud, dect thievery and even rer,



In the Seantime, we notify the members of the
rathamt of Graam.


SMana e Olomi ttae le t to makeo any eng to
ents for the naet we months.
There will be more work for them to do In the
whitewashing line.
We will put it up to them to do some more ex-
honerattin by printtn from time to time
/ 0Art-tAn PROWN of Oraham's raeslity.


DEFEAT IS MADE A VICTORY.
We said on this page a week or two ago that
aome defets were more glorious than vbotore,
"ad we referred to the defeat of Solicitot rt
in, his prosecution of the Ic Trust lat JoAW4
vitle as an example.
At that time we did not sntitpate that the Ja k-
lo nvllo Icer t would pry t role of con a
Solitor Rnm's rote of Davy Crookett.
We apoi to Solicitor Bryan for ea0llina l.
fna cl of the Ie Trust a defeat, and WeirWt
that e will pardon us for not begins weeed of
ufeeMt foresght to be able to cai It atT?4T
S Its RIORT NAMK ,
Withthe inform 2tl vouesa ed to ua te
retrospective glance at saemptlhod e t, we
nOw correct the mistake we made nd c
4th.


We warn Graham that we will not let up on him as long as he is In poae
tion to do harm to the people of Florida.
And we are more determined by this last demonstration of his ability to
fool rood people that he is a dangerous man to be let loose In this State.
We predict that the Executive Committee on Manatee County, and all
theirss who pay credit the fae statements of Graham, which he is ever
rea,:- to make about his honesty, will In time be convinced that Graham
Is a" we have branded him, a common swindler and practiced thiet.
We note that Graham produced certified copies of records of Liberty Coun
ty, ozoneratlg himself from charge made by uw.
We have not Nees these certid coplee, but we are convinced that he did


He ha acceaplished the ob* t of hts iiI"7h i 'r aldOrftb
torm, oad It give as pleaWetn Ielude n o lWotor I sthl ,4 d ot
wish to onvate sdm salem it be r the aed the ito that the
should beho coveted.
The oeset of all eridm poessutimlito l let meety.
The eleett of Soldtor Brtea's pre etuUs el 80 st, home he seaMed
f operang the lee Trust Trust, woaAi E 6-IN-b 'mIte Mr
to enbjeet them to a fon, abt to P. IUwl 'W 1503freetbeOfi l
ncombnatles which they had orae e OtoveIg. them ol dsaeslasn
(Cosatsed cm lap Tvef) 1


4
A, ~.
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* ;, 1-










THE. SUN


White Cat


Austt 11, &06



W. W. JACOBS
(Copyright 1905 by W. W. Jawob.)


' The traveller stood lookAing from the tap-room
window of the Caulifower at the falin rain.
The village street below was empty, an every.a
thing was quiet with the 0exeption of the garrul-
ios old man smoking with much enjoyment on
the settle beatid him '
"It'll do a power o' good," said the ancient,
oraning his ak round ase edge of the settle and
turning a bleared eye an the window. "I ain't
like come folk; I never did mind a drop o' rain.'
The traveller grunted and, returning to the
settle opposite the old man fell to lastly strok-
ing a eat which had stroided In attracted by thi
warmth of the small fire wlch smouldered In the
giate, *
"He's a good mouer," said the old man, "but
I expect that Smith the landlord would sell 'lm
to anybody for art a crown: but we 'ad a cat in
Claybury onee that you couldn't ha' bought for a
hundred golden sovereigns"
The traveller continued to caress the cat.
"A white oat, with one ya ler eye and one blue
one," continued the old agn. "It mounds queer,
but It's as true aI sit 'ore wishing that I 'Id
another mug o' ale as good as the last you gave
me."
The traveller, with a start.that upset the eat'i
nerves, Afihe4 his own mug, and then ordered
both to be refilled. He stirred the fire Into a
blase, and, lighting his pipe and putting one foot
on to the hob, prepared to listen.
It used to belong to old man Clark, young Joe
Clark's uncle, said the ancient, smacking hli
lips delicately over the ale and extending a trem.
uous claw to the tobacoo-pouch pushed towards
him; and he was never tired of showing It off to
people. He used to call It 'is blueyed darling,
and the fuss 'e made o' that oat was sinful.
Young Joe Clark couldn't bear it, but belng:
down in 'is uncle's will for five cottages and a bit
o' land briginrg in about forty pounds a year, he
'ad to 'lde his feelings and pretend as he loved
it. He used to take It little drops o' cream and
tit-bits o' meat, and old Clark was so pleased thet
'e promised 'Im that he should 'ave the cat along
with all the other property when 'e was dead.
Young Joe aaid he couldn't thank 'im enough,
and the old man, who 'ad been ailing a long time,
made 'im come up every day to teach 'im 'ow to
take care of it carter he was gone. He taught
Joe 'ow to cook its meat and then chop it up
Ane; 'ow it liked a clean saucer every time toe'
Its milk; and 'ow he wasn't to make a noise whoa.
it was asleep.
"Take care your children don't worry It, Joe,"
he sea one day,' very sharp. "One o' your boys
was pulling its tall this morning, and I want you
to clump his 'ead for 'la."
"Which one was it?" sea Joe.
"The slobbery-nosed one," sen old Clark.
"I'll give 'lm a clout as soon a get 'ome," se84
Joe, who was very fond of 'is children.
"'Go and fetch 'l nand do it 'ere," see the old
man; "that'll teach 'im to love animals."
Joe went off 'ome to fetch the boy, and artery
his mother 'ad washed hia face, and wiped his
nose, an' put a clean plaueytore on 'im, he took
'1m to 'Is uncle's and clouted his 'ead for 'im.
Arter that Joe and 'Is wife 'ad words all night
long, and next morning old Clark, coming In from
the garden, was just in time to see 'Im kick the
cat right acrost the kitchen.
He could 'ardly speak for a minute, and when
'e could Joe see plain wot a to l he'd been. Pust
of all 'e called Joe every name he could think of
-which took 'is a long time-and then he orde'-
ed 'm ou outof 'is house.
"You shal 'ave my money won your betters
have done with it," he sea, "and not afore.
That's all you've done for yourself."
Joe Clark didn't know wot he meant at the
time, but whe old Clark died three months at%
terwards 'he found out His uncle 'ad made a
new will and left everything to old George Bars
for as long as the eat lived, providing that he
took care of It When the cat was dead th.3
property was to go to Joe.
The oat wa oly two year old at the time,
and George Barstow, who was art oramy with Joy,
said It shouldn't be is fault if it didn't live au-
other twenty yerso
The funny thing was the quit way Joe dark
took it. He didn't mee to be at all out up
about it, and when Henry Walker sald It wu a
hame, 'e maid he didn't mind, and that George
Baretow was a old mtn, and he wal quite wel-
come to 'ave the property as long as the cat lived.
"It must eome to me by the tle ren aa old
man" he se.a, "and that's all I care about."
Henery Walker went off, and as 'e passed the
cottage where old Clark used to live, and which
George Barstow 'ad moved into, 'e spoke to the
eld man over the pallnga and told Im wet Joe
Clark 'ad said. George artow only tel and
went on stooping and prying over 'I frost garden.


"Bin and lost something?" sen Henery Walker,
watching 'Inm.
"No;I'm ending," se George Barstow, very
neroe, and picking up something. "That' the
fifth bit o' powdered liver I've found in my gar
den this morning."
Henery Walker went off whistling,.and the opin.
Ion he'd 'ad o' Joe Clark began to improve. Hes
spoke to Joe about It that afternoon, and Joe sal
that If 'e ever accused 'im o' such a thing agaltp
he'd knock 'is 'ead off. He said that he 'ope'l
the cat 'ud live to be a hundred, and that e'd no
more think of giving it poisoned meat than Heu-
ery Walker would of paying for 'is drink so louw
as 'e could get anybody else to do it for 'm.
They 'ad bets up at this 'ere Caulidow er pub-
lie,'ouse that evening as to 'ow long that cat 'ul
live. Nobody gave it more than a month, and
Bill Chambers sat and thought o' so many ways
o' killing it on the sly that it was wunnerful to
hear 'im.
George Barstow took fright when he 'eard ot
them, and the care 'e took o' that cat was wunner-
ful to behold. Art its time it was shut up in the
back bedroom, and the other art George Blarstow
wa fussing carter it till that eat got to hate 'im
like pison. Instead o' giving up work as he I
thought to do 'e told Henery Walker that 'e'd
never worked so 'ard in his life.
"Wot about fresh air and exercise for it?" sea
Henery.
"Wot about .Joe Clarkl' sea George Barstow.
"I'm tied 'and and foot. I dursent leave the
house for a moment. I ain't been to the Cauli-
flower since I've 'ad it and three times I got out
o' bed last night to see Ift it was safe."
"Mark my words," sea Henery Walker; "it that
cat don't 'ave exercise, you'll lose it."
"I shall lose it. if It does 'ave exercise," ses
George Barstow, "that I know."
He sat down thinking carter Henery Walker 'ad
zone, and then he 'ad a little collar and chain
made for it, and took it for a walk. Pretty nearly
every dog in Claybury went with 'em, and the cat
was in such a state o' mind afore they got 'ome he
couldn't do anything with it. It 'ad a at as soon
as they got indoors, and George Barstow, who 'adl
read about children's fits in the almanac, gave it a
warm bath. It brought it round immediate, and
then it began to tear round the room and up and
downstairs till George Barstow was afraid to go
near it.
It was so bad that evening sneezing, that George
Barstow sent for Bill Chambers, who'd got a good
name for doctoring animals, and asked 'im to give
It something. Bill said ne'd got some powders at
'ome that would cure it at once, and he went and
fetched 'em and mixed one up with a bit o' butter.
"That's the way to give a cat medicine," he sea,
"smear it with the butter and then it'll lick it off,
powder and all."
He was just going to rub It on the cat when
George Barstow caught 'old of 'is arm and stopped
Im.
"How do I know it ain't prison sea he. "You're
a friend o' Joe Clark's, and for all I know he may
ha' paid you to prison it."
"I wouldn't do such a thing," sea Bill. "Yo'n
ought to know me better than that."
"All right," sea George Barstow, "you eat it
then, and I'll give you two shillings instead o'
one. You can easy mix some more."
"Not me," sea Bill Chambers, making a face.

"Well, three shillings, then," sea George Bars-
tow, getting more and more suspicious like; "four
shillings-five shillings."
Bill Chambers shook nis 'ead, and George Bar.
stow, more and more certain that he 'ad caught
im trying to kill 'is cat and that 'e wouldn't eat
the stuff, rose 'im up to ten shillings.
Bill looked at the butter and then 'e looked at
the ten shillings on the table, and at last he shut
'is eyes and gulped it down and put the money in
'is pocket.
"You see, I 'ave to be careful, Bill," sea Georg
Barstow, rather upset.
Bill Chambers didn't answer 'Im. He sat there
u white a sheet, and making such extraordlna.
ry faces that George was art afraid of 'Im.
"Anything wrong, Bill?" he sea at last.
Bill sat staring at 'Ima, and then all of a sudden
he clapped 'is 'andkerchtef to 'is mouth and, get.
ting up from his chair, opened the door and rush.
ed out. George Bartow thought at fust that he
'ad eaten pison for the sake o' the ten shllings,
but when 'e remembered that Bill Chambers 'ad
got the most delikit stummick In Chaybury hd
altered 'is mind.
The eat was better next morning, but Georg
Barstow had 'ad such a ght about It 'e would
let it Ko out of 'is sight, d Joe C k bean to
think that 'e would 'ave to wait longer fea that
preeprty than 'e had thought carter o To e*t
'sm talk anybody ha' toutthat r e loved th e
cat We didn't pay much attention to it up at


9


V.
~


The


I


the Cauliflower 'ere, ex@pt maybe to wink to 'iI
-a thing he couldn't a ber-but at 'on,, ,
course, his young 'ins thought as everythi. h,,
said was Gospel; and obe day, coming 'ome troj,
work, as he was passing George Barstow's h< w,
paid out for his deeitfulnes .
"I've wronged you, Joe Clark," se George h-in.
tow, coming to the door, "and I'm sorry for it."
"Oh!" sea Joe, staring.
"Give that to your little Jimmy," ses G(Uer.
Barstow, giving Um a 1tlulng. "I've give 'ii,
one, but I thought arterwards it wasn't eno:iiih.'
"What for?" ses Joe, staring at 'im agin.
"For bringing my cat 'ome," sea George 'ir-
tow. "'Ow it got out I can't think, but I lost it
for three hours, and I'd abcoAt given it up whe;i
your little Jimmy brought it tmo e in 'is iarn.
He's a fine little chap and 'e does you credit.'
Joe Clark tried to speak, but he couldn't get
word out, and Henery Walker, wot 'ad just coint.
up and heardd wot passed, took hold of 'is arn iuil
helped 'Im home. He walked like a man in I
dream, but art-way he stopped and cut a st ie,
from the hedge to take 'ome to little Jimmy. Ho
said the boy 'ad been asking him for a stick ror
some time but up till then 'e'd always forgotten it,
At the end o' the fust year that cat was siit
alive, to everybody's su.-pnse; but George liBrs.
tow took such care of it 'e never let it out of 'is
sight. Every time 'e went out he took it witi
'im in a hamper, and, to prevent its being pisone!,
he paid Isaac Sawyer, who 'ad the biggest family
in Claybury, sixpence a week to let one of 'is hovs
taste its milk before it had it.
The second year it was ill twice, but the hoi'
doctor that George Barstow had got for it sai
. that It was as 'ard as nails, anil with care it iniight
live to be twenty. He said that it wanted more
fresh air and exercise; but when he heardd 'ow
George Barstow come by it he said that p'r'aps it
would live longer indoors arter all.
At last one day, when George Barstow 'ad lh en
living on the fat o' the land for nearly three yea 1 i,
that cat got out agin. George 'ad raised the front
room winder two or three Inhcbe to throw son-"
thing outside, and, afore Ae knew wot was 'appenr
ing, the cat was outside and going up the road
about twenty miles an hour.
George Barstow went after it, but he might ai
well ha' tried to catch the wind. The cat was art
wild with joy at getting out agin, ana he could t
get within art a mile of it.
He stayed out all day without food or drink, fol-
lering. It about until it came on dark, and then, o
course, he lost sight of it, and, hoping against
'ope that it would come home for its food, he went
'ome and waited for It. he sat up all night doz-
ing in a chair in the front room with the door le t
open, but it was all no use; and carter thinking fo'
a long while wot was best to do, he went out awil
told some o' the folks it was lost and offered a '
ward of five pounds for it.
You never saw such a bunt then in all your litf.
Nearly every man, woman and child in Claybury
left their work or school and went to try and eari
that five pounds. By the afternoon George Bars.
tow made It ten pounds provided the cat waA
brought 'ome safe and sound, and people as wir,
too old0 to walk stood at their cottage doors to
snap it up as it came by.
Joe Clark was hunting for it 'Igh and low, aitI
so was 'Is wife and the boys. In fact, I b'liev',
that everybody In Claybury excepting the parson
and Bob Pretty was trying to get that ten pound.
0' course, we could understand the parson-, -
pride wouldn't let 'Im; but a low, poaching, thlev-
Ing rascal like Bob Pretty turaftg up 'ts nose at
ten pounds was more than we could make ou.
Even on the second day, when George Barstow
made it ten pounds down and a shilling a week fo'
a year besides, he didn't offer to stir; all he di I
was to try and make fun o' them as was looking,
for It.
"Have you looked everywhere you can thilitj
of for it, Bill?" he ee to Bill Chambers.
"Yes, I 'ave," see Bll.
"Well, then, you want to look everywhere else,'
sex Bob Pretty. "I know where I should look if I
wanted to find it"
"Why don't you find it, then?" ses Bill.
"'Cos I don't want to make mischief," xeg Bol
Pretty. "I don't want to be unnelgshbourly to Jo
Clark by interfering at all."
"Not for all that money?" xs BIlL
"Not for fifty pounds," see Bob Pretty; "Y'o
ought to know me better than that, Bill Chant
"It's my belief that you know more aboutt
where that cat is than you ought to" sex Joe Gu'
bins.
"You go on looking for it, Joe,"see Bob Pret-
ty, grnning; "It's good exercise f you, and
you've only lost two days' work."
"I'll give you a a crown if you let me search
(Continued ea Pap 18)







Aipt 11


Auguit 11,1906


- THE SUN


THE JUNGLE


SYNOPSIS OP


PREVIOUS
TERL.


The story of "The ungle,"
Binclair's novel, which has
the Government investigation i
method employed by the Beef
has its origin aan actual F
town romance.
In Ashland awnue-"back
stock yard"-the wedding tool
The frst chapter merely s~
broad-showldered butcher being
to a young girl who sees n
hero. The weddinging il its
queneas is described in thEis
The wedding ceremony is typ
Packingtoin. It ends at down
Jurgs and hie bride, Ono, depa
ly realizing that the control
which are a feature of the fee
not nearly br the expense of t
mosny,.
Practically penniless, Jurgis t
bride'she shall not return to M
the packing house-he will wor
and late. He could not work
but the thought of seeing her
bute toward their support was
rest to hMm.
On arriving in Ohicago, J.
las, a Lithuanian, who ran a do
sen store in Packingtown, guide
gil, One. Marike and the remain
the party through the stock
after he had ives these lodgi
this section of the story the au
veals some of the things tha
startled the country. He tells
Government inspector, typical
kind, ofie at the door of the i
room and feels the glands of th
for tuberculosis-but if ane co
with the inspector and heard i
ing things about cattle disee
*bicil, would let a dosen bodi
him without investigation. Th
cd of preparation of meat is
portrayed is this installment
eren the simple-minded child
nature from Lithuania revolt
the conditions described and
ed is the contaminated preci
Faokingtown.
Maria, who "had nothing
with her save her two brown
and the word 'Job,' had found
In one of the smaller plants
and painting cans. The little
were happy and had but one f
bother them-the cost of living.
board and lodging was cost
much. So 1hey decided, ogai
advice of sedvilas, who sai
would be swindled, to buy a
house, dividing the ownership
them.
Copyright, 1.90, by Upton A
AU rights reserved.
Published by courtesy of Dol
Page & Co.
CHAPTER IV. (Continue
Bo, there was on y old Ded
nas. Jurgis would have had h
too, but he was forced to ackn
that this was not possible, I
sides, the old man woula not
spoken of-it was his whim t
that he was as lively as any b
had come to America as full
ns the best of them, and now
the chief problem that wor
son. For every one that Jurn
to assured him that It was a
time to seek employment for
man in Packingtown. 8Sedvi
him that the packers did n
keep the men who had growl
their own mrvlee-to say no
taking on new ones. And not o
it the rule here, it was the rul
where in Ameritca, so far as h
To stisfy Jurgis he had asui
policeman, and brought back i
sage that the thing was not
thought of. They had not t
to old Anthony, who had cons
spent the two days wanderli
from one part of the yards to
and had new come nome to he
the triumph of the others,
bravely g saying th~ J 4


ThrNl Hnlt
Novel t


CHAP. his turn another day.
Their good luck, they felt, had given
them the right to think about a home,
1pton and sitting out on the doorstep thvqt
caused summer evening they held oonsulta.
nto the tion about it, and Jurgis took occa-
Trust, slon to broach a weighty subject.
backing. Passing down the avenue to work that
morning he had seen two boys leaving
of the an advertisement from house to house
k piece. and seeing that there were pictures
kows a upon It Jurgis had asked for one, and
wedded had rolled it up and tucked it Into his
him a he had been talking had read it to him
rotees- shirt. At noontime a man with whom
chapter. and told him a little about It, with the
Iical of result that Juiris had conceived a
whom wild Idea.
irt, sa. He brought out the placard, which
bitisho. was quite a work of art It was near-
st, will ly two feet long, printed on calendee-
he ore. ed paper, with a selection of colors
so bright that they shone even In the'
tells Mh moonlight. The center of the placard
ork is was occupied by a house. brilliantly
r* earl painted, new, and dassling. The roof
hard, of it was of a purple hue, and trimmed
oniri. with gold; the house itself was il-
Sabhor very, and the doors and windows redoil.
It was a two-story building, with a
8sedvi* porch in front and a very fancy scroll-
eli.cte, work around the edges; it was conm-
ecd A.r. plete in very tiniest detail, even tho
;der of doorknob, and there was a hammock
der ,of on the porch and white lace curtains
it d, in the windows. Underneath this,
t6o. Is In one corner, was a picture of a hua-
t0or band and wife in loving embrace; In
it have the opposite corner was a cradle, with
h ow a fluffy curtains drawn over it, and a
Of hi. smiling cherub hovering upon silver-
freesMNg colored wings. For fear that the sig-
Ie cattle nifcance of all this should be lost,
naersed there was a able, in Polish, Lithuan-
nterest- Ian and German-"Dom. Nalml.
Me, the Helm." '"Why pay rent?" the lingual
es poae tic circular went on to demand.
ie meth- "Why not own your own home? Do
vividly you know that you can buy one for
it, and less than your rent? We have built
Iron of thousands of homes which are now
against occupied by happy families."-80o It
witness- became eloquent, picturing the bliss.
ncts of fulness of married life in a house with
nothing to pay. It even quoted
to take "Home, Sweet Home," and made bold
y arms to translate It into Polish-thouith
id wor for some reason it omitted the Lith-
labeling uanian of this. Perhaps the trans-
coterMe later found it a difcult matter to be
thino to sentimental in a language In which a
Their sob is known as a "gukssiojimas" and
ing too a smile as a 'nusissypsojlmas."
Inst the Over this document the family por"
Id theV ed long, while Ona spelled out Its con-
i mall tents. It appeared that this house
among contained four rooms, besides a bano-
ment, and that It might be bought for
fifteen hundred dollars, the lot and
Sinclair. all. Of this, only three hundred dol-
lars had to be paid down, the balance
ubleday, being paid at the rate of twelve dol-
lars a month. These were frightful
sums, but then they were In Amerele,
I) where people talked about such with-
d.) out fear. They had learned that they
An. would have to pay a rent of nine dol-
le lalrs a month for a flat, and there was
Im rest, no way of doing better, unless the
owledge family of twelve was to exist In one
uand, be- or two rooms, as at present It they
hear it paid rent, of course, they might pay
o insist forever, and be no better off; wherW
boy. He as, if they could only meet the eztra
of hope expense in the beginning, there would
he was at last come a time when they would
ried his not have any rent to pay for the rest
is spoke of their lives.


waste of
the old
las told
ot even
I old in
thing of
inly was
Ie every-
ie knew.
ked the
the me-
Sto be
old this
squently
ig about
another,
ar about
smiling
rpuld be


They figured It up. There was a IIt-
tie left of the money belongnl to
Teta lisbleta, and there was a litte
left to Jurgis. Marla had about fifty,
dollars pinned up somewhere aIn h
stocklngs, and Grmdfhther Anthony
had part of the money he had gotten
for his farm. if they all combined
they would have enough to make th4
first payment; and If they had em-
ployment, so that they could be sure
1f the future, Its might really prove
the best plan. It was. of course, not
a thing evan to be talked of lihtty:
it was a thing they would have to
stift to the bottom. And yet, o th'a
otbar hand, If they were golog to
make the venture, the sooner they did
it the better; for were they aot pay


Thirteenth Page


ItwwAmIftCffaL


wjurn v v ruvmuunin beto to IU In all the .5o= he OUld think of.
hat has Startled y WN Mb; the sat altt
hat has 4.0 uMd =yOU
-- j' 'I sf-.;o. ii It ded" Joe L'.hr.blO to snek
.i, rent all the tiM e, a livs O X ID l
most horrible way bwesidMe lt& sd S O d tOL Tha pi w "so
was used t dirt-there amw wltUre otw, amd t .g-W uWW.a"
that could wrl a m 4aA "Af ipods for, ai n itt 'o l
with a raso*a ga_,.Whei wilitt.i0 4 mow, '* I'm elt' to be


w


~, j


r~s~


gather up the flea off the floo of t ...
sleeping room by the 'handful. s en, WtJ
that sort of thing would' nt do f ir a daylls S owVAJS e
Ona. They mustr7We a better prelI th ,rdm -tea
of some sort very oon,4fuls saidd Whena to _ae ....
It with all the assuranm e o a man got them
who had Just made dollar' and fift- other i Whits Withon e b
seven cents In a Ingtle o,day, Jurgs to be new, a in, every time scas,
was at a lose to understad why, to be oceled. ed tover the b
with wages as thy were, so many of to hint t this, the W M ne ly
the people of this district should live that the piurhaeis
the way they did. In shortly. To presmuA t
The next day Matija went to saee ha seed to be dob s s
her foreladyy," and was told to report and ver th Sr RIen
the Alrst of the week, and learn the of them ever spokes
business of can painter 'Mrija went lws called n"~-n "a
home, singing out loud all the w, deteenue and ity, .
and was Just in time to join Ona and The aous had a bas ement.
her stepmother as they were gettlG two feet below the stret line,
out to go and make Inquiry concern- single story, about mis feet above It,
nlg the housa. That evening the reached by a light of stp, 1 n add*-
three made their report to the men-. ont weasn atto, ade by the
the thing was altogether as represent- peak of the roof, and having one small
ed in the circular, or at any rate *. window In each end. The street in
the agent had said. The houses lay front of the nouse was unpaved and
to the south, about a mile and a halt unlighted, and the view from it oon.
from the yards; they were wonderful sited of a few exactly similar houses
bargains, the gentleman had assured scattered here and there upon lots
them-personally, and for their own ow up with dingy brown weds.
good. He could do this, so he explain the house side contained four
ed to them, for the reason that he rm plastered white; the btaement
had himself no Interest In their sale- was bt a frame, the walls being un-
he was merely the agent for a co. plastered and the floor not laid. The
pany that had built them. These agent explained that the houses Were
were the last, and the company ws built that way, as the purchasers g
going out of business, so itf any one rally preferred to finish the ba-
wished to take advantage of this won. ments to suit their own taste. The
derful no-rent plan, he would. have to ttlic was also .uSAiAthed-the family
be very quick. As a matter of fact had been figuring that in cas of an
there was just a little uncertainty a emergency they could rent this attle,
to whether there was & single booue b theyfound that there. was got
left; for the agent had taken so many even a floor, nothing but jolits, and
people to see them, and for -1 he beneath them the lath and plaster of
knew the company might have parted the ceiling below. All of this, how.
with the last. Seeing Teta El.bliet's ever, did not chill their ardor as Mach
evident grief at this news, he added as might have been expected, because
after some hesitation, that if the of the volubility of the get. There
really Intended to make a purchase was no end to the advance of the
he would send a telephone msage house, as he set them fort, and he
at his own expense, and have one of was not silent for an instant; he
the houses kept So it had finally showed them everything down to the
been arranged-and they were to g looks on the doors and the oatoboa on
and make an Inspection the following the windows. and how to work tem.
Sunday morning. He showed them the sink in the kiteh-
That was Thursday; and all th e, with running water and a uoec.
rest of the week the killilng-gl g at something which TetNlsbiset. had
Brown's worked at full press, and never her wildest dramss hoped
Jurgs cleared, dollar s. enty. to After a discovery sck as
cents every day. That was at the ratet ait we.ld have seemed "ygrate-uS
of ton and one-half dollars a week, oto w S d any felt, o, their ftrie to
forty-five a month; Jurgls was hot she ,their we to otheetr dfet.
able to figure, except it was a very StIll they war peasant people, and
simple dum, but Ona was like light. they hung on to their money by in-
ning at such things, and he work4 stcst; It was quite nla vain that the .
out the problem for the family. Mar t hinted at porowptneo ,
Ja and Jonas were each to pay *ix- W 4d s, they would e, the told
teen dollars a month board, and the him, they could not decide until they
old man Insisted that be could do the hd had more time. And so they
same as soon as he got a place- wes home again, and all day a&d
which might be any day now. That even al other were fgurng and de-
would make ninetythree dollars. beating. It was an agoby to them to
Then MaUija and Jona wre betWeen have to make up their mlnds In a mat
them to take a third share i t. h ter Nui a this. They never eould
house, which would leave only eight ages all together; there were o
dollars a month f6r Jurgis to lot. may ana uments upon each side, i d
bute to the payment, So they Wou4 one wold be obstlnate, and no eme
have eighty-five dollars a moathW*-or, Wldd the rest have convinced him
suppolang that Dede Antanau Od not than It would transpire that his sg- .
get work at one, MsVenty dolite' ments had Caused another to wAr.
month-whlech ought surely to bei uflI OMw, tio the evening, when they wert
lent for the support eof a familyof a all n harmon, and the hbourn Was as
twelve., Nod as bought. SMedvll s eo e ts 4
An hour beloe the' time on i a 11v. oes $ oeartow ing no 1
day moral th eouti party ctru e" ls tpori opwnhln. Hetol.d
They bade addreed written oC a ce srnt peplewho WA n
piece of peper, which they showed to eettin tis b "t r.
some e M no aSd then. It proved to w--d. .* wut .
be a long mile ad a half, but they molt *ure to into fa tight 0
walked it, ao li nour or e late and losw all ther amg ,; t
the agent put m al appea'an., He -M .i 4 o0 e ,Se T hat L56
was smooth and florid giqSnap 4iJy.j!ggy.L! f
*^ Uy sresed, and he siekethetr a *J10?P4 W
iaUS~ I freely, whiph ave hhi a *Ah to* ^ W iJgf N
He eeorted ton to the houe whist .JJ_ rm AWlw
was ooe of a lod absyw of the tyeot Si\E2 hwm:
where arhlteetUre is a luxlsry that ou r Sa, thr w,
dlstpeni with. Oaa'# hor s~on cen o tl ,
fore the hee was sot as it was uuww --j.?..
Is the pitetm'o the dolor schotte as other aaweredS at*
dhlsae% h scue thing, ap4


.~" Ut
A.


'I
4
a'


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y fft-^







'. *',,'~;*

4


THE SUN


The


White Cat


B,
W. W. JACOBS
(Copyright 1906 by W. W. amObs.)


t I I A -


The travelle sood looking from the tap-room
window of the Cauilower at the falling rain.
Th village t IloW was empty, and every
thi waiwih the exeption of the garrul-
on old maan 'mg with much enoyment on
'te settle behind hbln
"It'll do a power o' good," said the ancient,
eraiang his t round me edge of the settle andw
turnag a blealed eye on the window. "I ain't
like *oem folk; I never did mind a drop o' rain.'
he tIraveller grunted and, returning to the
settle opposite the old man feli to lasUiy strok-
lag at wloh had stroled In attracted by th,
warth of the small fire which smouldered in the
"Heo a good mouser," said the old man, "but
Sexpeo that Smith the landlord would sell 'ln
to anybody for art a crown; but we 'ad a cat in
Vlaybury onee tht you couldn't ha' bought for a
Sundred golden sovereigns"
The traveller continued to caress the cat.
"A white oat, with one yaller eye and one blue
one," continued the old man. "It sounds queer,
but it's as true as I sit 'ore wishing that I 'a
another mug o' ale as good as the last you gave
me."
The traveller with a start.that upset the oat'j
nerves, finished his own mug, and then ordereal
both to be reflled. He stirred the fire into &
blase, and, lighting his pipe and putting one foot
on to the hob, prepared to listen.
It used to belong to old man Clark, young Joe
Clark' uncle, asad the ancient, smacking hibi
lips delicately over the ale and extending a trem.
ulous claw to the tobacco-pouch pushed toward
him; and he was never tired of showing it off to
People. He 'ued to call it 'is blue-eyed darling,
and the fuss 'e made o' that oat was sinful.
Young Joe Clark couldn't bear It, but belng;
down in 'is uncle's will for five cottages and a bit
o' land bringinglin about forty pounds a year, he
'ad to 'ide his feelings and pretend as he loved
it. He used to take it little drops o' cream and
tit-bits o' meat, and old Clark was so pleased that
'e promised 'lm that he should 'ave the cat along
with all the other property when 'e was dead.
Young Joe said he couldn't thank 'im enough,
and the old man, who 'ad been ailing a Ion time,
made 'im come up every day to teach 'Im ow to
take care of it arter be was gone. He taught
Joe 'ow to cook its meat and then chop it up
fine; 'ow it liked a clean saucer every time fo'
its milk; and 'ow he wasn't to make a noise whao,
It was asleep.
"Take care your children don't worry it, Joe,"
he sea one day, very sharp. "One o' your boys
was pulling itS tall this morning, and I want you
to clump his ead for 'I,."
"Which one was it?" sea Joe.
"Thp slobbery-nosed one," ses old Clark.
"I'll give 'lm a clout. as soon as Sget 'ome," seM
Joe, who was very fond of 'Is children.
'"Go and fetch 'ln and do it 'ere," see the old
man; "that'll teach 'm to love animals."
Joe went off 'ome to fetch the boy, and artery'
his mother 'ad washed his face, and wiped his
nose, an' put a clean planeyfore on 'im, he took
'i*m to 'is uncle's and clouted his 'ead for '1m.
Arter that Joe and 'is wife 'ad words all night
long, and next morning old Clark, coming In from
the garden, was just in time to see 'im kick the
cat right acrost the kitchen.
He could 'ardly speak for a minute, and when
'e could Joe see plain wot a fo)l he'd been. TFuwt
of all 'e called Joe every name he could think of
-which took 'la a long time-and then he ordo'.
ed 'lm out of 'is house.
"You shal 'ave M money wen your betters
have done with It," he ses, "and not afore.
That's all you've done for yourself."
Joe Clark didn't know wot he meant at the
time, but whep old Clark died three months ar.
terwards 'he ound out. His uncle 'ad made a
new will and left everything to old George Bars-
for uas long as the eat lived, providing that he
'took care of It. When the cat was dead th,3
property was to go to Joe.

The cat was only two years old at the time,
and George Barstow, who wuas art crasy with joy,
said It shouldn't be Is fault if it 4tdidn't live au.
other twenty year.
The funny thing was the quiet way Joe Clark
took it He didn't seem to be at all cut up
about it, and when H ry Walker said It was a
shame, 'e said he didn't mind, and that George
'Barstow was a old man, and he was quite wel-
come to 'ave the property as long as the at lived.
"It must come to me by the time ana old
man" he ses. "and that's all I care about."
Henery Walker went off, and as a* paued the
cottage where old Clark used to Itve, and which
George Barstow 'ad moved into, 'e spoke to the
Ild man over the palinglas and told 't wet Joe
SClark 'ad said. Georsge Barstow only gated and
went on stooping and prying over 'Is treat Sgarden.


"Bin and lost something?" ses Henery Walker,
watching 'Im.w v
"No;I'sm ending sea George Barstow, very
fierce, and picking up something. "That's the
fifth bit o' powdered liver I've found in my gar.
den this morningg"
Henery Walker went off whistling, and the opin-
ion he'd 'ad o' Joe Clark began to improve. tie
spoke to Joe about it that afternoon, and Joe sail
tht it 'e ever accused 'Im o' such a tbng agail
he'd knock 'is 'ead off. He said that he 'opel
the cat 'ud live to be a hundred, and that 'e'd no
more think of giving it poisoned meat than Heu-
ery Walker would of paying for 'is drink so lon4
as 'e could get anybody else to do it for 'im.
They 'ad bets up at this ere Cauliflower pub.
li0-'ouse that evening as to 'ow long that cat 'ul
liVe. Nobody gave It more than a month, andI
Bill Chambers sat and thought o' so many ways
o' killing It on the sly that it was wunnerful to
hear 'inm.
George Barstow took fright when he heardd ot
them, and the care 'e took o' that cat was winner.
ful to behold. Art its time it was shut up in the
back bedroom, and the other art George Barstow
was fussing arter it till that eat got to hate 'lim
like pison. Instead o' giving up work as he li
thought to do 'e told Henery Walker that 'e'd
never worked so 'ard in his life.
"Wot about fresh air and exercise for it?" sea
Henery.
"Wot about .Joe Clark?'t sea George Barstow.
"I'm tied 'and and foot. I dursent leave the
house for a moment. I ain't been to the Caull-
flower since I've 'ad it and three times I got out
o' bed last night to see it it was safe."
"Mark my words," sea Henery Walker; "ift that
cat don't 'ave exercise, you'll lose it."
"I shall lose it. if it does 'ave exercise," ses
George Barstow, "that I know."
He sat down thinking arter Henery Walker 'ad
gone, and then he 'ad a little collar and chain
made for it, and took it for a walk. Pretty nearly
every dog in Claybury went with 'em, and the cat
was in such a state o' mind afore they got 'ome he
couldn't do anything with it. It 'ad a fit as soon
as they got indoors, and George Barstow, who 'aq'
read about children's fts in the almanac, gave it a
warm bath. It brought it round immediate, and
then it began to tear round the room and up and
downstairs till George Barstow was afraid to go
near it.
It was so bad that evening sneezing, that George
Barstow sent for Bill Chambers, who'd got a good
name for doctoring animals, and asked 'im to give
it something. Bill said ne'd got some powders at
'ome that would cure it at once, and he went and
fetched 'em and mixed one up with a bit o' butter.
"That's the way to give a cat medicine," he sea,
"smear it with the butter and then It'll lick it off,
powder and all."
He was just going to rub it on the cat when
George Barstow caught 'old of 'is arm and stopped
im.
"How do I know it ain't pison?" sea he. "You'r'e
a friend o' Joe Clark's, and for all I know he may
ha' paid you to prison it."
"I wouldn't do such a thing," sea Bill. "Youl
ought to know me better than that"
"All right," sea George Barstow, "you eat It
then, and I'll give you two shillings instead o'
one. You can easy mix some more."
"Not me," sea Bill Chambers, making a face.
"Well, three shillings, then," see George Bars.
tow, getting more and more suspicious like; "four
shillings-five shillings.,"
Bill Chambers shook nis 'ead, and George Bar.
stow, more and more certain that he 'ad caught
Im trying to kill 'is cat and that 'e wouldn't eat
the stuff, rose 'Im up to ten shillings.
Bill looked at the butter and then 'e looked at
the ten shillings on the table, and at last he shut
'is eyes and gulped it down and put the money in
'is pocket.
"You see, I 'ave to be careful, Bill," sea Georg
Barstow, rather upset.
Bill Chambers didn't anwer 'im. He sat there
as white as a sheet, and making such extraordina.
ry faces that George was art afraid of 'rim.
"Anything wrong, Bill?" he sea at last
Bill sat 'ti ng at 'im, and then al ot a sudden
he clapped 'Is 'andkerchief to 'is mouth and sget-
tins up from his chair, opened the door and rush.
ed out George Barstow thought at ft that he.
'ad eaten prison for the sake o the ten shills
but when 'e remembered that Bill Chambers 'ad
got the most dellkit stummlck In Chaybury h
altered 'Is mind.
The cat was better next morning, but George
Beastow had 'ad such a fright about It 'e would t
let it ho out of 'Is sight, and Joe Clark began to
think that 'would 'ave to wait longer for that
proeprty than 'e had thought,arter all. To 'eAr
cat We didn't pay much attention to IUp at


spotugu ,~


Now


t/'


the Cauliflower 'm, eot be to wink it in
--a thins he couldn't I bear-but at 'oi., i,
course, his young 'ns thouXht as everythiwu ii,
said was Gospel; and obe day, coming 'ome from
work, as he was paitg George Barstow's h&i wo,
paid out for his deettflnees.
"I've wronged yo, Jo ,Clark." see George 11t: ,.
tow, coming to the door "and I'm sorry for it."
"Oh!" ses Joe, staring.
"Give that to yor ltt AJmy.Is" ses G(or g
Barstow, giving Pm 't ll n "I've give '1n1
one, but I thought arterwards it wasn't enoiih.i. '
"What for?" ses Joe, string at 'in agin.
"For bringing my cat 'ome," se George lr..
tow. "'Ow it got out I cant think, but I lost t
for three hours, and I'd abit given it up whlu
your little Jimmy brought $ to me In is ;iini,
He's a fine little cap aand 'e 1 you credit.
Joe Clark tried to peak, b h couldn't g.t
word out, and Heury Walker, Wot 'ad Just cuu,1
up and heardd wot passed, took hold of 'is arm ~mil
helped 'im home. He waleM like a man in ,
dream, but art-way he stopped and cut a Mt ini
from the hedge to take 'ome to little Jimmy. i(,
said the boy 'ad been asking him for a stick for
some time but up till then 'e'd always forgotten it.
At the end o' the ft year that oat was still
alive, to everybody's su.ptlse; but George Bias
tow took such car of it'e never let it out of 'is
sight. Every time 'e went out he took it with
'im in a hamper, and, to prevent its being pisonecd,
he paid Isaac Sawyer, who 'ad the biggest family
In Claybury, sixpence a week to let one of 'is hboys
taste Its milk before it had It.
The second year it was ill twice, but the hors,-
doctor that George Barstow had got for it saMi
that it was as 'ard as nails, and with care it might
live to be twenty. He said that it wanted miior
fresh air and exercise; but when he heardd 'ow
George Barstow come by it he said that p'r'aps it
would live longer Indoors arter all.
At last one day, when George Barstow 'ad iben
living on the fat o' the lapd for nearly three yea ,'
that cat got out again. George a' raised the front
room winder two or three laced to throw somr-
thing outside, and, afore he knew wot was appearr
Ing, the cat was outside and going up the roadi
about twenty miles an hour.
George Barstow went a&ter it, but he might as
well ha' tried to catch the wind. The cat was ait'
wild with Joy at getting out agin, ana he could t
get within art a mile of it..
He stayed out all day without food or drink, 'ol-
lering. it about until it came on dark, and then, o
course, he lost sight of it, and, hoping against
'ope that It would come home for Its food, he we;~t
'ome and waited for it. he sat up all night do(1/-
Ing in a chair in the front room with the door let,
open, but it was all no use; and arter thinking for
a long while wot was best to do, he went out awl
told some o' the folks it was lost and offered a -*
ward of five pounds for it.
You never saw such a bunt then in all your lit'.
Nearly every man, woman and child in Claybury
left their work or school and went to try and ear':
that five pounds. By the afternoon George Bars
tow made it ten pounds provided the cat wa4
brought 'ome safe and sound, and people as wi
too old- to walk stood at their cottage doors to
snap It up as it came by.
Joe Clark was hunting for it 'gsh and low, anil
so was 'is wife and the boys. In fact, I b'liev'
that everybody in Claybury excepting the parson
and Bob Pretty was trying to get that ten pound
0' course, we could understand the parson- ';
pride wouldn't let 'In; but a low poaching, thi v-
Ing rascal like Bob Pretty turning up nose at
ten pounds was more than we oould make oI'.
Even on the second day, when George Barstow
made It ten pounds down and a shllng a week ro,
a year besides, he didn't offer to stir; all he di
was to try and make fun o' them as was looking :
for It.
"Have you looked everywhere you can think
of for it, Bill?" he see to Bill Chambers.
"Yes, I 'ave," se Bill.
"Well, then, you want to look everywhere else,
sea Bob Pretty. "I know where I should look It I
wanted to find it"
"Why don't you find it, then?" ses Bill.
"'Cos I don't want to make mischlef," ses Bo,
Pretty. "I don't want to be unneighbourly to 'Jo
Clark by interfering at all.'"
"Not for all that money?" se Bill.
Not for fifty pounds," ses Bob Pretty; "Y""
ought to know me better than that, Bill Chali
"It's my belief that you know more aboutt
where that eat is than you ought to," sea Joe Gu'
bins.
"You go on looking for it. Joe," s Bob Pre.
ty, grinning; "It's good exerolse f you, anl
you've only lost two days' work."
"I'll give you art a row itf you let me search
(Coatinued ea Pamg 1.)






-:
'~j. 'A


A"~w 141" 106


TheSPiN


e'!mPar.


THE JUNGLE


ThrilHn Story of Pa
Novel that ha Sti6


SYNOPSIS OP


PREVIOUS
TIR&a


The story of "he Jungle,"
Sinclair's9 novel, which heas
the Government investigation i
methods employed by the Beef
hoe its origin an actual P
town romance.
In Ashland avense-"back
etock yards"-the wedding tool
The srest chapter merely #i
broad-holdered butcher being
to a youvn girl who sees in
hero. The wedding in all its
quenes ie described in this
The wedding ceremony i tyl
Packingtown. Itf de at dow
Jurgie and his bride, One, dep
ly realizing that the contri
whsch r9 a feature of the fed
not nearly beer the expense of t
money.
Practically penniless, Jurgis d
bride she shall not return to i
the packing house--he will wo
and late. He could not work
but the thought of seeing her
bute toward their support wto
rent to him.
On arriving in Chicago, J.
lae, a Lithuanian, who ran a d
sen store in Packingtown. g il
gis, On, Mari4. and the real
the party through the stock
after he had given them lodg
this section of the story the au
veals some of the things the
startled the country. He tell
Government inspector, typical
kind, site at the door of the
room and feels the glands of t0
for tuberculosis-but if one co
with the inspector and heard
ing things about cattle disee
cflcial would let a dosen bod
him without investigation. TA
cd of preparation of meat ia
portrayed in this inetallmet
eren the simple-minded chil
nature from Lithuania revolt
the conditions described and
ed In the contaminated prec
oackingtown.
Marina, who "had nothing
with her save her two brawx
and the word 'ob,' had foup
in one of the smaller plants
tind painting oae. The little
were happy and had but one
bother them-the cost of living
board and lodging was cos
tuch. So they decided, aga
advice of Bsedvilas, who sc
would be swindled, to buy
bouse, dividing the ownership
them.
Copyright, 190, by Upton
All rights reserved.
Published by courtesy of Do
Page d Co.

CHAPTER IV. (Contlnu4
So, there was on y old De
nas. Jurgis would have had I
too, but he was forced to acki
that this was not possible,
sides, the old man woule no'
spoken of-it was his whim
that he was as lively as any
had come to America as full
ns the best of them, and now
the chief problem that wor
son. For every one that Juro
tP assured him that It was a
time to seek employment fol
man in Packingtown. Ssedv
him that the packers did n
keep the men who had grow
their own servlce-to say n
taking on new ones. And not
it the rule here, It was the ru
where in America, so far as
To satisfy Jurgis he had as
policeman, wad brought back
sage that the thing was no
thought of. They had not
', old Anthony, who had con
'1)ent the two days wander
fom one part of the yards t
'.nd had now come some to h
,he triumph of the others,
bravely R asiag tha^ J


CHAP- his turn another day.
Their good luck, they felt, had given
them the right to think about a home,
Upton and sitting out on the doorstop that
caused summer evening they held oonsulta*
Into the tion about it, and Jurgis took ooon-
frust, *ion to broach a weighty subject
Packing. Passing down the avenue to work that
morning he had seen two boys leaving
of the an advertisement from house to house
k place, and seeing that there were picture
hows a upon it, Jurgis had asked for one, and
wedded had rolled It up and tucked It Into his
him a he had been talking had read it to him
grotes. shirt. At noontime a man with whom
Chapter, and told him a little about It, with the
pical of result that Jurgis had conceived u
, when wild idea.
irt, sad. He brought out the placard, which
buttons, was quite a work of art. It was near-
st, owil ly two feet long, printed on calende*.
the Cre ed paper, with a selection of color'
so bright that they shone even in the'
tells his moonlight The center of the placard
work in was occupied by a house. brilliantly
rk early painted, new, and dassling. The roof
hard, of it was of a purple hue, and trimmed
costri. with gold; the house itself was il.
t abhor, very, and the doors and windows red.
It was a two-story building, with a"
Bsedvi porch in front and a very fancy scroll-
eliMftes. work around the edges; it was com-
edteer. plete in every tiniest detail, even the
.cd Jtl- doorknob, and there was a hammock
inderof on the porch and white lace curtains
i ard in the windows. Underneath this,
ig. In in one corner, was a picture of a hua*
thor re band and wife in loving embrace; in
at have the opposite corner was a cradle, with
I hoto fluffy curtains drawn over it, and a
1 of hti smiling cherub hovering upon silver-
freezing colored wings. For fear that the slg-
he cattle nificance of all this should be lost,
Versed there was a lable, in Polish, Lithusa-
interest" lan and German-"Dom. Nalml.
me, the Helm." '"Why pay rent?" the linguti-
les PMs tic circular went on to demand.
,e meth- "Why not own your own home? Do
vividly you know that you can buy one for
nt, and less than your rent? We have built
dren of tUouasnds of homes which are now
against occupied by happy families."-So It
witness- became eloquent, picturing the bliss-
incts of fulness of married life in a house with
nothing to pay. It even quoted
to take "Home, Sweet Home," and made bold
'y arms to translate it into Polish-thouti
nd work for some reason it omitted the Uth-
labelin* uanlan of this. Perhaps the trans-
coteri= later found It a difficult matter to be
thing to sentimental in a language in which a
. Their sob is known as a "gukusiojimas" and
ting too a smile as a nusissypsojilmas."
inst the Over this document the family por-
\id they ed long, while Ona spelled out its con-
a small tents. It appeared that this house
among contained four rooms, besides a baso-
ment, and that it might be bought for
fifteen hundred dollars, the lot and
Sinclair. all. Of this, only three hundred dol-
lars had to be paid down, the balance
ubleday, being paid at the rate of twelve dol.
iars a month. These were frightful
sums, but then they were in Americn,
e..) where people talked about such with-
nd.) out fear. They had learned that they
do Ants- would have to pay a rent of nine dol-
dem est lars a month for a flat, and there waA
him rest, no way of doing better, unies the
knowledge family of twelve was to exist In one
and, be- or two rooms, as at present. It they
t hear it paid rent, of course, they might pay
to insist forever, and be no better off; where .
boy. He as, If they could only meet the extra
of hope expense in the beginning, there would
r he was at last come a time when they would
rried his not have any rent to pay for the rest
ds spoke of their lives.


waste of
r the old
ilas told
lot even
rn old in
thing of
only was
ule every-
he knew.
Liked the
the mes
Dt to be
told this
sequently
ing about
another,
ear about
smiling
Ypuld be


They figured it up. There was a Ii.-
tie left of the money belonging to
Teta Elsbieta, and there was a little
left to Jurgis. Marija had about fifty,
dollars pinned up somewhere In her
stockings, and Grandfather Anthony
had part of the money he had gotten
for his farm. if they all oombMnod
they would have enough to make thin
first payment; and if they had em
ployment, so that they could be sure
nf the future, it, might really prove
the best plan. It was. of course, not
n thing even to be talked of lightly:
It was a thing they would have to
sift to the bottom. And yet, on thi
otbor hand. If they were going to
make the venture, the sooner they did
It the bettor; for were they not pay


The next day Ma'tja weat to iee
her foreladyy," and was told to report
the first of the week, and lemt the
business of can pantr. 'Mi Weat
home, singing out loud all the 'wa,
and was Just in time to Join Ona ana
her stepmother as they wore gettlna
out to go and make Inquiry 0onoern-
Ing the housa. That evening the
three made their report to the men-,-
the thing was altogether as represent.-
ed in the circular, or at any rate *i
the agent had said. The houses lay
to the south, about a mile and a half
from the yards; they were wonderful
bargains, the gentlemap had assured
them-personally, and for their own
good. He could do this, so he explain
ed to them, for the reason that he
had himself no interest In their sale-'
he was merely the agent for a corm.
pany that had built them. These
were the last, and the company was
going out of business, so If any one
wished to take advantage of this won.
derful no-rent plan, he would.bhve to
be very quick. As a matter of fact
there was just a little uncertallty a *
to whether there was a single aboue
left; for the agent had taken so m6Any
people to see them, and for 11 he
knew the company might have parted
with the last. Seeing Tetsa libieta's
evident grief at this news, he added,
after some hesitation, that If they
really Intended to make a purchase,
he would send a telephone message
at his own expense. and have one of
the houses kept So it had finally
been arranged-and they were to go
and make an inspection the following
Sunday morning.
That was Thursday; and all the
rest of the week the killing-gug at
Brown's worked at full pres-te, and
Jurgis cleared 'a dollar seventy-0v6
cents every day. That was at the rate
of ten and one-half dollars a week, or
forty-five a month; Jurgis was not
able to figure, except It was a very
simple dum, but Ona was like light.
ning at such things, and she worked
out the problem for the family. Mart-.
Ja and Jonas were each to pay six-
teen dollars a month board, and the
old man insisted that he could do the
same as soon as he got a places-
which might be any day qow. That
would make ninety-three dollars.
Then Marja and Jonas weri betWeen
them to take a third share In tM
bouse, which would leave olit s t
dollars a month for Jurgis to' Wt*
buto to the payment. So they woul4
have eighty-five dollars a monthe-or,
supposing that Dede Antanas ~1d not
get work at once, seventy dollars 6
month-which ought surely to be asgum
dlent for the support of a family of
twelve.
An hour before the time on Sufa-
day morning the entire party set o0t
They had the addree written on a
piece of paper, which they showed to
some one now oid theS. It proved to
be a long mile and a half, but they
walked It, and half an hour or o later
the agent put pu a a ppeara* o He
I was a smooth and florid u a
I l!eantly dressed, and he
lauae freely, which Pave 1lf' a
great advantage Ip dealing with them.
He escorted them to the bou *
was one of a lon rw of theiy
frame dwellings of the neighbohoo,
where archmitecture Is a luxr that
dispensed with. Ona1s he^u*an

Sdilerest, for one Ihing. and t^ A


URa e wasnCt aft, :0* ;y br
pek 9nthe roaof, nt
window in each end. The
front of the nous was unpav d 4
unlighted, and the view from
stated of a few etaotly similar h
scattered here and there upon Io
grown up with dingy brown
The home Inside contained fow
was be a frame the walls b eau-
platered and the floor Ao n hli T
agent explained that the house wee
built that way, as the purchasers gen
rally preferred to fnlsh the ak*,
meat to sult the own taste. The
atUQ wa1 41ao uaAlsbed-the family
had been figuring that In ase of an
mergenoy they could rent this attic,
bt ther fOund that therb was Not
bven a f-oor, nothing but Joists, and
bqneath thom the lath and plaster of
thoe celisn below. All of this, how.
ever, did not chill their ardor asa mach
M mCght have been expected, beamse
of the volubility of the aent The
was bo end to the advMata es Of the
house, as he set them forth, and he
was not allent for an Instant; he
showed them eerythln down to the
looks on the doors and te Catches on
the windows, and bow to work ghem.
He showed them the sink In the kiteh
en, with running water and a ieteoc,
something which Teta BlsM ta. had
never in her wildest dreams, hoped
to posess After a ,lsovu7 sech 5
thait would have seemed uncrate
to d y fault, akndw theytred to
shuttheir ey to otier defects. ; Y
Still they war peaant people, and
the hungo heir money b y I
stiat; it was quite in vai that the .
aent hinted at prompten, they
woIld se, they would see told
him, they oul not decide untl they
had had more time. And so they
went home again, and ll day and
evening there were afgring and de-
batng. It was an agony to them to
have to make up their minds tI a mat.
ter sp*~ as ths. Theo never could
agree all together; there weeo *
any argument upon each sides ao
me would be obstinate, and no eooer
d ud the ret have convinced him
han It would transpire that his argt ,
eats had caused another to waqer.
Oses t, the eveainlS whe lhey we
al. A, harmony, ad the 4owae *a
p0od as bought, ISedvtltss eap In ain
upset them5a T. aedvylas ba o
men tpwoperty-ownin. Be told te
weld 0 e o8 Ieople who hadbe
doe to death In this "buyn r.
boe" wtndile. .They would r i.
mast oure to-at Into uht intot
and loees all their osey;m 5o

be & VP

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"IT4 .4 -


August Il, 306


HE SUN


S4iZHAM FOOLS THE

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE


Lut weel THB SUN reooeived in a lag envelope a copy of the current
Su of the Palmetto News (Manate County) containing the following:
A .0D MOVE.
The following circular letter* a been ssed by Chas. T. Curry, chairman
of Manateo Oounty DemorSNBNxecutive Committee, to the members of the
committee, whieh The N I unlocks its forms to make room for:
8eoIous eharees hal been publicly made agaut John A. Graham, Demo-
crato amilnee for eMtave in the Legislature for Manatee County,
nla TH SUN, a pr published In Jacksoanville, Duvat County, Florida.,
it 1 d le, in the interest of the Democratic party in Manates
Codhty, or the exeuUtive committee for Manatee County for the
purpose ,Si such steps a may be deemed advisable and for the best
inle party, and to prevent threatened independentism, unless
s S the committee, as well as to unite against threatened over-
gth L he party by the Soclalistic candidate for the office.
A Wasting of the committee is therefore called to meet at the court house
at 3fdentown on Wedneeday, the 8th day of August, 1906, at 11 o'clock a.
,L for the purpose of discuEEing the matter referred to and taking such
etifon as may be then deemed advisable.
The matter being one of great importance, you are especially requested
to be present either In person or by proxy; if by proxy, such proxy must be
held by an elector of your'own precinct.
Mr Graham will be rested to be present and will be given an opportu.
nity to be heard in his o behalf.

Wednesday morning THtloUN sent a telegram to the editor of the Pal.
metto News, of whioh tfo aijng is a copy:
Auf. 8. 1906.


records of Liberty County exoneratlg himself from charges of Sun. Pro.
ducod other papers and letters vlndletio* of himself. He was unanii, uslyy
eonarated by the Committee and The Sun cond e ed.
In order to let the good whitewashing work go on THE BUN hani; the
Manatee County Committee-
Thit-With its compliments-
CUTS MADE BY PHOTOGRAPHIC PROCESS PPOM ORIGINALS.


CUSMD-yPOORPI RCS FPMOIIAS


CAPITAL CITY BANK


9ey to lk ordurq


DI Iif-


-


m ww~u' -' -- I.


Check given by John A. Graham to A. Rosedale, a
house In Tallahaesee. The check was dishonored and
dale was convicted of keeping a gambling house by
Court In 1903, paid his fine and left the State.


keeper of a gambling
Is still unpaid. Rose
Leon County Circuit


Day press rates.


Palmetto, Fla.
Thanks for your tip. Wire tonight, press rate, story committee meeting,
hundred words or more, your judgment. CLAUDE L'NGLE.
As the shades of night were falling an answer came.
This was the answer:


The Sun,


Palmetto, Fla., Aug. 8, 1900. .


Cut shows the gambler's Indorse- Cut shows bank slip, made by same
ment on the check. bank on which check was drawn when
Poseadle left It for collection.
This Is one of Graham's string of protested checks. Graham did not hus-
tie to make this one good because he was shrewd enough to know that being
givnn to a gambling house proprietor to discharge a gambling debt, payment
of it could not be informed, nor any trouble come to him from this piece of
petty swindling.


EDITORIAL.
(Continued from Page Nine.)
His prosecution of the Jacksonville Ice Trust has had this result.
The combination is broken, and the priae of ice has been lowered so that
the people do not suffer.
It this result had been accomplished by the conviction and punishment of
the men he informed against it would have been good. That it has been
accomplished just as effectively without it, is bsarn-'R.
No onea not even Solicitor Bryan, classed the members o01 the Ice Trust in
Jackmonville as common criminals, but their illegal practices were working a
h-rdship upon the people and it was necessary, for the good of the people,
to put a stop to them.
This is what Solicitor Bryan has done.
Therein lies his victory, and we congratulate him and the Ice Trust alike,
that the good has been done without the seceesity of any one suffering.
The father counts it a happy day when he can correct the fault in his
child without causing the child to suffer.
The State, which in many cases stands in the same position to the people
as a father does to his without hardship upon those who practiced it.


The Qualityof Merch.
Continued from Page Five.
If the case has imposed any hardship on the
people of Lake County and a burden on its tax-
payers, it is a hardship and a burden that could
long ago have beon removed had Mr. Abrams or
any other cltisen of that county taken the trouble
to forward the necessary papers to this offoe.
There has certainly been not the slightest negli-
gence on the part of the Governor or any one in
his office. I would be pleased ift the people of
Lake County could be advised of the situation
with reference to this case eo that they can place
the responsibility for the "culpable ngligence*
which you mention where it properly belongs.
I have the honor to be, with great respect,
Very truly your,
J. uMMBT WOLFE,
Secretary Board of Pardona
Hon. N. B. Broward.
Talahame, Fla.I
My Dear Governor-I feel that it is my duty to
write In regard to the case of Noble Oolna now
under sentence to hang here on the 9th. At the
triat of Collins I was not his attoraey,.but on hia
earnest appeal to me to question the witneMe, I
agreed to do that much for him and announced to
the court that I would do nothing more. I paid
no attention to the charge of the court, taking It
for granted that the usual charge in such cae
would be given. After the verdict of the jury I
learned that they stood ten to two for a recom-
mandation to mercy, but as the oburt had tailed
to hare them that a majority could recommend
to mercy and redue the unahment to I
raoment, they rain out and ballot frb


The people who didn't vote for
Broward are saying the State made a
mistake in not electing the other
man. The blindest men in the world
are those who will not see. The anti-
Browardites started out blind and
they are blind yet. But, fortunate-
ly for the State, they do not repre-
sent the people.-Southern Argus.

Governor Broward and Hon. John
Si. Beard, senator-elect for Escambia
county, will meet in joint debate on
the Everglades drainage question, in
Pensacola on the 20 inst. There is no
finer speaker xn the State than John
Beard and in the matter of mere ora.
tory he has the advantage of the gov-
ernor, but when he gets through with
this debate, we would not be surprised
if he should be in a proper frame of


nearly three hours trying to get unanimous on
that proposition, but finally as the two that were
for hanging would not yield the ten went over to
them and brought in a verdict of murder in the
first degree without recommendation to mercy.
Now there is no doubt whatever about the guilt
of the man, but it seems to me that under the cir.
cumstances he is entitled to his life.
It was clearly the verdict of the jury that he
should go to prison for life and but for the over-
sight of the court in not charging the Jury that a
majority could recommend to mercy he would
now be in the chain gang for life earning some-
thing for the county. While it is true that our
Supreme Court has held that it is not a reversible
error for the court to not charge that a majoritr
of the Jury can recommend to mercy, when no
such charge is requested, yet it seems to me that
if through an oversight, either on the part of the
court or the attorney for the accused, uch charge
was not given and the jury stood overwhelmingly
tor a recommendation to mercy, but did not so
recommend because they were under the mis-
taken tmprssion that such a recommendation
must be made by unanimous vote, then the ac-
cused under these circumstances should not be
permitted to suffer the death penalty. It you and
the rest of the Pardoning Board should agree
with me to this matter I will at once send you the
full particulars in the case as certified to by the
Jury itself.
There is a strong sentiment here that the 'man
should not hang and nearly every man, woman
and child in the county will gladly sign a peUUoa
that he be spared. If you wishto have the state.
meats of the jurors and others In the case I would
be glad if you at once grant a stay eo that I may
Y M to et them for o L amnotmak.
lg this appeal to you througmm any sympathy for


mind to appreciate the dispatch sent
to Gen. Price, then commanding the
Confederate forces in the trans-Mis-
sissippi, by Gen. Jeff Thompson, who
had attacked a force of the enemy and
had been badly used up: "General;
met the enemy today. Fought him like
the d-l and got whipped like h-1.
Lost all the artillery. Yours, Jeff
Thompson."-Bartow Courier-Inform-
ant.

Governor Broward began last week
the actual work of draining the Ever-
glades by starting one of the dredges
to digging dirt. The Governor can
be hindered but not stopped in th's
great improvement He is now dl;-
ding dirt for the canal, and his ene-
mies are throwing mud.-Southern
Argus.


Argus.


the condemned man, for ue is abusing me to.'
everything he can think of, but I make it simply
because I think that Justice demands it. It was
the verdict of the jury that he was guilty of mu!
der in the first degree-they were unanimous on
that, then on the question of a recommendation to
mercy they stood ten to two, and a large majority
of them held out for the recommendation to m'r-
cy for nearly three hours, wher as a matter ,1
fact had they known that a majority of them,
could recommend to mercy they would have
brought in their verdict in five minutes. As a n,
man life is involved in this I trust that you wi;i
give it most careful consideration and if I am
right in my contention commute the punishment
to lifo imprisonment
Very respectfully yours,
ALFRED S'. CLAIR-ABRAMS.
Tavares, Fla., Feb. 1st, 1906.

Tavares Fla. Nov, 1905,
Mr. H. B. Broward, Governor,
Tallahassee, Fla. My Dear sir I Wont rL
wright you A few Lines ,n the Regardes of Nobl,
Collings which now I have in jail waitten on you
what to Doe with him. I under stand the negro'
is gotten some white Lades to wright to you not
to hang him. I will say if thear Ever was a negro
ort to Be hung he is one. he has kill 8 negro0
wimen so tha say and he Curses Ever oflcer and
ses what he will Doe If he get out. and I think
it is my Duty to Let youk now how he is cutten
up in Jail. I hope you May Consider it Close B'
Fore you may Make It a Life aenten.
I am hear to Doe my Duty as a Sherif, Redy
and Willing to swing him if you say o. Hope to
hear from at Bny Time. yours Very Truly, H. E.
MureeSher
bSrill


TwIOth Pagp


r..


J. W. Bell,


Tallahassee, Fla.
Committee In session nearly all day. Graham produced certified copies of


&41"e


I


It INAL
Salfatwsk 9b."Id


-C6116


s 42 1


.1


7


A941#6-4 4i;*


. I











August gi, 1906


THE SUN


Thirteenth Page


Stetson University as

a Training School

By Rev' Frank W. Cramer.
The School of Mechanics Arts at Stetson Uni-
veriMty, I' )"aeLan a. tIs becoming one of the
most useful In the University. The course In
this school Is two years long. At the end of that
time the student may enter a useful career or go
into the College of Technology for advanced
work and a, pfesalonal career. Inside of one
year he hM ttaned proficiency enough to eun-
bie him tAo do ar better work than half the
mechanics that are now working all over Flori-
da at good wages.
The Bohol of .Mechanics Arts alms to lay :%
strong foundation both In theory and manual
practice for those looking forward to work ni
electricians, linemen, draftsmen. telegraph and
telephone Inspectors, machinists, tool makers,
pattern makers, builders of machinery, boiler
makers, Inventors, salesmen, dealers, foremen,
carpenters, Joiners, bridge builders,, structual
workers, plumbers, steam fitters, gas fitters, me-
chanics, apprentices and students.
When the Baptist Young People's Conventioa
came tO DeLand, May 22-S24 1906, they were sup.
prised,to see the fine work done in the wood
working shops of this school. One boy had built
a goo4 boat 20 feet long, doing all the work him.
self In accordance with the model miniature.
Ther were fancy chairs and tables, book cases
and tabarets, picture frames, mirrors, lap boards,
Morris' chair, mantel pieces, made for huge fire
places, letter boes8 and many other things too
numerous to 'mentoo. They were done in hard
woods. All the work was done by students.
They have turling lathes, band saws, jig saws,
circular saws and the completest equipment for
doing this sort of work.
There are 11 rooms in the wood and iron work-
ing shops. They are all large well lighted and
supplied with suitable apparatus. The Manual
Training room is equipped with 16 adjustabl.
benches and 16 complete sets of tools for elemen-
tary wood work. The carpenter and joiner shop
is equipped so that each student may have for hit
own use a bench with vise, also a complete set of
plane saws, chisels, hammers and squares. The
lathe and wood turning room has in it electrical
ly driven lathes of various kinds, circular saws,
band saws with separate motors. The machine
shop has a goodly assortment of electrically driv-
en engine lathes, speed lathes, drill presses, a
sharper, a hack saw, a milling machine, a wet
tool grinder and a fine equipment of excellent
working tools. So with the steam fitting room,
mechanical drawing, free hand drawing foundry,
engine, dynamo and boiler rooms.


The White Cat.
(Continued from Tenth Page.)
your house Bob," sea Bill Chambers, looking at 'im
very 'ard.
"I couldn't do it at the price, Bill," ses Bob
Pretty, showing his 'sad. "I'm a pore man, but
I'm very partikler who I ave oome* into my 'ouse.
0' course, everybody left off looking at once
when they heard about Bob--ot that they belle v-
ed that he'd' be such a fool as to keep the cat In
his 'ouqe; and that evening. as soon as it was
dark, Joe Clark went round to see 'im.
"Don't tell e as that at's found, Joe," see
Bob Pretty ae Joe opened the door.
"Not as 've 'erd of," said Joe, stepping Inside.
"I wanted to sOk to you about it; the sooner It'i
found the bett shall be pleased."
"It does y q Ied.t" Joe dark," sea Bob Pretty.
"It's my It's dead," me. Joe, looking
at '1m very 'erd; Ybut I want to make sure afore
taking ovethe p ."
Bob Pretty looked atlm sad then he gave a lit-
tle cough. "Oh, you want it to be found dead," he
se.s "Now, I wonder whether that cat's worth
most dead or alive?'
Joe Clark coughed then. "Dead, I should
think." he ses at last.
"Georpge Barstow's just 'ad bills printed offering
fifteen pounds for it," ses Bob Pretty.
"Ill give that or more when I come Into tha
property," se Joe Clark.
"There's nothing like ready-money, though, Is
there?" see Bob.
"I'll promise it to you in writing, Bob," ses Joe,
trembling.
"There s some things that don't look well in
writing. Joe," says Bob Pretty, considering; "be-
sides, why should you promise it to me'?'
"O' course I meant If you found it," ses Joe.
"Well, 11 do my best, Joe," ses Bob Pretty;
"and none of us can do no more than that, can
they?"


They sat talking and argufying over it for over
an hour, and twice Bob Pretty got up and said 'e
was going to see whether George BaMstow would-
nt offer more. By the time they parted they was
as thick as thieves, and next morning Bob Pretty
-.. s- ^ 14 ..^. 41' r 1 0 4 ,


was wearing Joe Clark's' watch and chain, ani
Mrs. Pretty. was up at Joe's housee to snO wther
there was any of 'is furniture as she 'ad a fancy
tor.
She didn't seem to be able to make up 'or mind
at fust between a chest o' drawer that 'ad be*
longed to Joe's mother and a andfther elook.
She walked from one to the other or about tea
minutes, and then Bob wao 'ad come In to '0p1
ner, told 'er to 'ave both.
"You're quite welcome, he se; "aint she
Joe Clark said "Yes," and carter he 'ad helped
tnem carry 'em' ome the Prettys went back and
took the best bedstead to pieces cos Bob said as
it was easier to carry that way. Mrs. Clark 'ad @o
go and sit down at the bottom o' the garden with
the neck of 'er dress undone to ive herself air,
but when she saw the little Prettyo each walk.
ing 'ome with one of 'er best chairs on their I'ads
she got and walked up and down like a mad
thing.
"I'm sure I don't know where we are to put it
all," ses Bob Pretty to Joe Oubbins, wot was look*
ing on with other folks, "but Joe Clark to that
generous he won't 'ear of our leaving anything."
"Has 'e gorn mad?" ses Bill Chambers. staring
at 'im.
"Not as I knows on,' see Bob Pretty, "It's 'la
good-'artedness that's all. He feels sure that that
cat's dead, and that he'll 'ave George Barstow'p
cottage and furniture. I toldlim he'd better wait
till h3'd made sure, but 'e wouldn't."
Before they'd finished the Prettys 'ad picked
that housee as clean as a bone, and Joe Clark 'ad
to go and get clean straw lor his wife and chil-
dren to sleep on; not that Mrs. Clark 'ad any sleep
that night, nor Joe neither.
Henery Walker was the fust to see what it really
meant, and he went rushing off as fast as e oould
run to tell George Barstow. George couldn't be-
lieve 'im at fust, but when 'e did he swore that if
a 'air of that cat's head was harmed 'o'd 'ave
the law o' Bob Pretty, and artery H Walker
ad gone 'e walked round to tell 'ims so
"You're not yourself, George Barstow, se you
wouldn't try and take away my character
that," ses .Bob Pretty.
"Wot did Joe Clark give you all them thing
for?" ses George, pointing to the furniture.
"Took a fancy tq me, I spouse as Bob. "Pea.
pie do sometimes. There's something about me
at times that makes 'ema ike me."
"He gave 'em to you to kill my seat seorge
Barstow. "It's plain enough for anybody to Saee
Bob Pretty smiled. "I expeut itturna up e4
and sound one 'of these days," he a, "and then
you'll come around and beg m pardon. Pyape*
"P'r'haps wot?" ses George astow, carter wait-
ing a bit. .
"P'r'aps somebody 'asgot It. sad Is keeping 1it
till you've drawed the fftee pounds 0ut o the
bank," seo Bob, looking at la very hard.
"I've taken It out o. the beak," sea Oeorg,
starting; "it that cat's alive. Bob, and u've got
it, there's the fifteen pounds the momenUt yo 'andd
it over."
'Wot d'ye mean-me gut it?" ses Bob Pretty.
"You be careful' of my onaracter."
"I mean it you know where It is," ses George
Barstow trembling all over.
"I don't say I couldn't fnd It, it that's wot yoe
mean," see Bob. "I can gin'rally ind things
when I want to."
"You find me that cat, alive and well, sand the
money's yours, Bob," se George, hardlyy able to
speak, now that 'e fancied the cat was still alive.
Bob Pretty shook his 'sad. "No; that won't
do," he ses. "8'pose I did 'ave the luck to and
that pore animal, you'd say I'd had it all the time
and refuse to pay.'

"I swear I wouldn't, Bob,' see George Barstow,
jumping up.
"Best thing you can do if you want me to try
and find that cat," says Bob Pretty, "is to give am
the fifteen pounds now, and I go and look for It
at once. I can't trust you, George Barstow."
'And I can't trust you," se George Beatow.,
"Very good," ses Bob, g stth up, theirss no
'arm done. P'r'haps Joe Cdark'11 find the eat Is'
dead and p'r'haps you'll find It's alive. It's all
one to me."
George Barstow walked off ome, but he was lai
such a state o' mind 'o didan know wot to do,
Bob Pretty turning up 'Is nosn at Aiten pounds
like that made 'im think that Joe Clarkt 'ad
promised to pay 'Im more it the eat was dead;
and at last, arter worrying about It for a couple o
hours, 'e came up to this 'ere Cauliflower and of-
fered Bob the fifteen pounds.
"Wot's this for?" se Bob.
"PFor fnadln my eat," see George.
"Look here, se Bob, handling it back, "I've 'at
enough o' your Insults; I don't know where your
cat Is."
"I mean for trying to find it, Bob," ses George
Barstow.


"Oh, well, I don't mind that, se Bob, taking
It "I'm a 'ard-workntg man, and Ive got to be
paid for my time; it's on'y fa to my wife sad
children. Ill start now."
He fished up 'Is be1r, and while Ot othe.
chaps watms tia i Ge0or* B w t a .td Ik
was Joe Clark d epp todr t a


beg to all la all the names he oould think oL
"Dont you worry." ne Bob; "*he oat ain't
found et."
"'* It dea," asee Jo Clark, dyale to speak.
'"Ow should I kdow?" see Bo ; 'wat' wet F
got to try and find out. 'Tat's wot 70 "e me
your furniture tor, ad wot George Baetw pve
me the fifteen pounds for ain't It? Now,
Sustop ao now, 'a 'm r oina to begin look.
*e started looking there nd then, and for the
next two or three days Geore Banrow an4 Joe
Clark see 'lm walking up and down with his
handss nla 'Is pocket look ng over garden eam
and calling "Puss"' He asked everybody %es
whether they 'ad seen a wkite oar with one blue
eye and one yller one, and veay time ease
into the Ciaullower he put his 'ead over the bar
and sUed "Pus" 'ooP, as 'e said it was as likely
to be there as anywhere else.
It was about a week after the cat 'ad ditna-
pea"d that Georg satow was stand" i at Is
door talk to Joe lark, who was l eat
must be dead and 'e wanted 's property, when
he as a man coming up the road carryi a
basket stop and speak to Bill Oamber. JUt
as o got near them an awful "mlaow" oome from
the basket and George DBatow and Joe Clark
started as it they'd been shot.
"He's found it?" shouts Bill Ohamber poinUtl
to the mpan.
"It's been living with me over at Ling for a
week nearly," see the man. "I tried to drive It
away Wveral times, not knowing that there was
fifteen pounds ofored for It."
George Barstow tried to take 'old of the basket.
"I want that afl U.aounds fust," sea the man.
"That's on'y right and fair, George," see Bob
Pretty, who 'ad just come up. "You've got all
the luck, mate. We've been hunting Ish and low
for that eat for a wek."
Then George Bartow tried to explain to the
man a call Bob Pretty names at the same time;
butIt Was all no good. The man sad it 'ad north.
I to do with 'Im wot he 'as paid to Bob Prett.;
ald at last they fetched Polceman White over
.from Cdford, and George Banstow signed a paper
to pay Ave shillings a week tilt the reward was
paid.
George Barstow 'ad the oat for five yea carter
that, but he never let It get away agis. Thy
It to ke each other In time and died within a
fo g of each other, so that Joe lark got Is
property carter all.
Florida's Attorney General In Dual Rele.
During the past few days the Attorney General
of the State of Florida has received an Important
omlmuaication from Hon. Lewis Nixon, who is
chairman of the Plan and BSope Committee in
o f the reOeption to be acordRd Hon. Wll.
Jima Jenlngs Bryan whon he retufts from his
trip around the world.
Theo 4o UM1catlon which Hon. W. H. Mills,
Attorny General of Florida, haM received nforMa
him that he has been appointed a member of
th*1 commIttee. He will, thereore in
add"tl o bavin the honor of bein one oi the
twelve ioridtanft invited to attend the reepton,
have th frthe honor of rig on what wi
the Io important of the sublemmlttee formed
by the aa and Scope Comitee hh lb twre,
s ans o of sthe ommeral Trae
Trust under whose Muspless the recpptloh
will be Wven August 80th
In ths way HOe. W. H. BllUs will find himself
In the dol poItlon of gueet and ha tor, a a
member 0 the reception committeetheWe wil be
datiU8 suietnt to make ble attoeadae at thld
ocMason truly more In tae nature of a heot tha
of tough of course it will partake of both.
Mr. U will most ably lit thit ,mton ft d the
selection by the committee, of which Mr. xon Io
chairman. fha not only been most We, but, as
reMulta win show, most satisfactory.

PROGRESS OP DRAINAGB WORK.
A dispatch to THB BUN received Thueday of
ihis week contain the information that the
dredge "Bvrglades" was peted while at wrek
nea lbort Lauderdale last Wednesday by a party
oonslsting bf Mr. Yieus, represents tUe builde,
Governor Broward and CompptrOrer om
ettatg the Trutee, and Capt D oate, t
Ohemist, and was rfonuteed by aT a
plete worklc ma e. Their teuh fSS
ed that the* a diggina g p em t
A dipper con two and a nalf o yrds
of rook every e durtiang The
dredge handle the rook without WI
perfect ease.
An Ineon of the dredg e ,.keeombe
showed tAIt was 9proa a sMl mnand
that this dreiso woma br t L hSL


* 4 .7
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Ahfa.**~s*Im b..~


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- THE. JUNGLE
(Optnuft from Page 11.)
too was robbery. It was all robber,
for a r man. After allf a hour
of *uo dprelag ep onvereatlo they
had their mlna dsqu ite made up that
they had beean aed at the brik of a
preclploes but thea Ssoedvlas went
away, and .oma0 who was a sbaMp
little 'an, reminded them that the
delliatenta bunlues was a failure,
to its proprietor, sad that
this m amount for his pessimistic
views. WiMe of couree, reopened
the subjeutl
.The oatrlling factor was that they
could not stay where they were-they
had to go somewhere. And when
they gave up the house plan and do
oided to rlt, the proepet of paying
out alnne dollr a month forever they
found J as hard to face. All day
and all night for nearly a whole week
they wrestled with the problem, anit
then In the end Jurg s took the reM
sponsibility. Brother Jonu had go;.
ten his Job, and was pusing a trucI
In Durham's; and the killingxgang at
Brown's continued to work early and
late, so that Jurgi$ grew more confi-
dent every hour, more certain of his
mastership. It was the kind of thing
the mia of the family had to decide
and carry through, he told himself.
Others might have failed at it. but ho
was not the falling kind-he would
show them how to do it He would
work all day, and all night, too, If
need be; he would never rest until
the house was pimd for and his people
had a home. so he told them, and
so In the end the decision was mad.4.
They had talked about looking a'.
more houses before they made the
purchase; but then they did not know
where any more were, and they diL
not know any way of finding out. The
one they had seen held the sway in
their thoughts; whenever they
thought of themselves In a house, It
was this house that they thought of.
And so they went and told the agent
that they were ready to make the
agreement. They knew, as an ab*
stract proposition, that In matters of
business all men are to be accounted
liars; but they could not but have
been Influenced by all they had heard
from the eloquent agent, and were"
quite ppsredd that the house was
something they had run a risk of loe-
ing b their delay. They drew a deep
breath when he told them that thoy
were still In time.
They were to come on the morrow,
and he would have the papers all
drawn up. This matter of papers
was one In which Jurgis understood
to the full the need of caution; yet
he could not go himself-every one
told him that he could not get a hol4
iday, and that he might lose his Job
by asking. So there was nothing to
be done but to trust it to the women.
with Saedvlas, who pVomised to go
with thm. Jurgia spent a whole eve.
ning impressing upon them the mso
riousnee of the occasion-and then
finally, out of innumerable hiding
places about their persons and la
their b e forth the pro-
clous w M of money, to be done up
tightly In a little bag and sewed fast
in the l o lining ta lbleta's dress.
Early In the morning they sallied
forth. Jgs hBad given them so
many nlastruotiUoas and warned them
agalast so many perils that the wo
men were quite pale with fright, sad
even the tImpedrturbable dellateasen
vender, who prided himself upon be.
Ing a busnteesMe man, was ill at easae.
The agent had the deed all ready and
invited them to sit down and read It:
thias Baedvllas proceeded to do--
palnful and laborious process, during
which the agent drummed upon the
desk Teta labieta wa so ember.
raised that the perspiration eame out
upon her forehead In beads; for was
not this reading da much as to say
plainly to the gentleman's face that
they doubted hin honesty? Yet Jokn.
baa Baedvllas read on and on; and
presently there developed that he had
good reason for dolnq so. For a hot*
rtble suspleon had betun dawnlng In
his mlnd; he knitte I hi brows more


and more as he read. This was not
a deed of sale at all, so far as e
could aee-It provided only tor rte
renting of the property! It was hard


August 11, 106


FHIB SUN


to tll, with all this strange legoa
argon, words he had never he
before; but was not this plain-"'th
party of the frat part hereby cove-
a&Mts and agrees to rent to the aid
party of the second part!" And then
agan-a monthly rental of twelve
dollars, for a period of eight years and
tour moathsa" Then 8sedvilas took
off his spectaotes and looked at thg
agent and stammered a question.
The agent was most polite, and ex-
plained that that was the usual for-
mula; that it was always arranged
that the property should be merely
rented. He kept trying to show them
something in the next paragraph:
but 8sedvilas could not get by the
word "rental"-and when he transla*
ted it to Teta eBlbleta, she, too, was
thrown Into a fright They would
not own the home at all, then, foi
nearly nine years! The agent, with
infinite patience, began to explain
again; but no explanation would d,)
now. Bisbleta had firmly fixed in her
mind the last solemn warning of Ju-r
gis: "If there in anything 'wrong, do
not give him the money, but go out
and get a lawyer." It was an agonia.
ing moment, but she sat in the daar,
ner hands clenched like death, and
made a fearful effort, summoning all
her powers, and gasped out her pu:-
pose.
Jokabus translated her words. She
expected the agent to fly into a pa+.
(Continues on Page Fifteen.)


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THE SUJN


;-wW


Pit t'Ala


TlfBmJWNOLE.
(Comt'ned from a orteM.)
stonl but be was, to bewildermenu.
as ever imperturbable; he even offes
ed to go and ts aSwyer tor her, but
she deiaie4 in. They went a long
way, OB 110 1 1 to 0a aman who
would o Thelet
any one laa teI whea,
after half as hour, they came in
with a lawyer, and beard him greet
the agent by b irsAt name 1
They felt that all was lost; they sat
like i!n0uoned to hear the
re th warrant. There
was notl e that they could do
-they wer trappedI The lawyer
read over the deed, and when he had
read it he Informed isedvilas that it
was all perfectly regular, that the
deed was a blank deed such as wasi
often used Into these sales. And was
this regular? the old man asked-
three hundred dollars down, and the
balance at twelve dollars a month,
till the total o: fifteen hundred dol-
dars had been paid?T Ye, that wus
correct. And it was for the sale of
such and suck a house-the house and
jot and everything? Yes-and this
lawyer showed him where that was
all written. And it was all perfectly
clear-there was no trick about it ot
any sort? They were poor people,
and this was all they had in the world,
and it there was anything wrong they
would be ruined And so Szedvilas
went o6, asking one trembling queo
tion after- another, while the eyes of
the women folk were Axed on him in
mute agony. They could not under-
stand what he was saying, but they
knew that upon .it their fate deo
ended. And ;iem at last he had
questioned until there was no more
questioning to be done, and the time
came for them to make up their
minds, and either close the bargain
or reject it, it was all that poor TetA
Elslbieta could do to keep from burst
ing into tears. Jokubas nad asked her
it she wished to sign; he had asked
her twice-and what could she say?
How did she know if this lawyer
were telling the truth-that he was
not in the conspiracy? And yet, how
could she say so-what excuse could
she give? The eyes of every one in
the room were upon her, awaiting her
decision; and at lact, halt blind with
her team, she began fumbling in her
Jacket, where she had pinned the
precious money. And she brought it
out and4 unwrapped it before the
men. All of this Ona sat watching
from a corner of the room, twisting
her hands together, meantime, in a
fever of fright Ona longed to cry
out and tell her stepmother to stop,
that it was all a trap; but there seem-
ed to be something clutching her byv
the throat, and she could not make a
sound. And so Teta Blibleta laid the
money on the table, and the agent
picked it up and counted it, and then
wrote them a receipt for it and pass.
ed them the aeod. Then he gave a
sigh of *atisfaction, and rose and,
shook hands with them all, still as
smooth and polite as at the beginning.
Ona had a dim recollection of the
lawyer telling 8sedvilas that his
charge was a dollar, which occasion*
ed some debate, and more agony; ani
then, after they had yald that, too,
they went out into the street, her step
mother clutching the deed in her
hand. They were eo weak from
fright that they could not walk, but
had te sit down on the way.
So they went home, with a deadly
terror gnawlag at their souls; and that
evening Jurgis came home and heard
their story, and that was the end.
Jurgis was sure that they had been
Swindled, and were ruined; and he
tore his hair and carsed like a mad-
man, swearing that he would kill the
agent that very night In the end he
sealed the paper and rushed out ol
the house, and all the way across the
yards to Halated street. He dragged
SZedvllas out from his supper; anol
together they rushed to consult an-
other lawyer. When they entered
his offce the lawyer sprang up, for
Jurgias looked like crasy person,


with lyings hair and bloodshot eyes.
Hi companion explained the situation
and the lawyer took the paper and
began to read it. while Jgis gtood
clutching 'th & d with knotted


handa, trembling I every nerve. in
no or wthe layer looked FlORIDk fCMtb G
andaskoda question of 8sedvilas; LI V um iw G
the other did not know a word that e Tal W .
was saying, but his eyes wee x .....- .
upon the lawyers face, striving in an IT POs EsUaR IT SMBRACEL.
agony of dread to read his Ulnd. He Idea looatMto. 001101 T Of L
saw the lawyer look up and laugh. Bxellent equment S"0Ao of
and he gave a gasp; ae ma nal84.h p4 *
something to 8sedvllas, and Jwrste ep
turned upon his friend, his heart al0 eagnw *t
most stopping.DSaw
"Wellf" he panted. 0o
"Ho says it is all right," said Bued- Hh moral eatronment Art.,
vilas. Admirable eU spirit School of apeslon.
"All right!" *team hat, electric light
"Yes, he says It is just as it should t-.
be," and Jurgis, in his relief, sank Young ladles .a0p0t* 0ollegt T A g
down Into a chair. at once for dormito room. t Wedi sday e
"Are you sure of it?" he gasped, and continues eight moth
made Szedvilas translate question at bor ostalogue and detailed inatef nation Write to
ter question. He could not hear it ot At a
ten enough; he could not ask with
enough variations. Yes, they ha4t
bought the house, they had really
bought it It belonged to them, they fA d or
had only to pay the money and it IIJAIIUW
would be all right Then Jurgis cov.
ered his face with his hands, for
there were tare in his eyes, and he
felt like a fool. But he had had asho
a horrible frignt; strong man as he ein.
was, it left himn almost too weak to Grain-l
stand up. IU
The lawyer explained that the reu. D A lAne
tal was a form-tme property was said IVVm Us o s
to be merely rented until the last pay. TOP3R P0 WIW
ment had been made, the purpose be.
ing to make it easier to turn the par. trva WP
ty out if he did not make the pay. Dirct V A WftCS
ments. So long as they paid, how*
ever, they had nothing to fear, the U1
house was all theirs.
Jurgis was so grateful that he paid
the half dollar the lawyer asked with* a)1O C W iL(UOUgn 0
out winking an eyelash, and then ven
rushed home to tell the news to ta e fh km
tamily. He found Ona In a taint aniwoil M er I
the babies screaming, an4 the whole a .s e L
house in an uproar-tor it had been Of WtU p
believed by ail that he had gone to
murder the agetst. It was hours b'ee on a c t-
fore the excitement could be calmed; 1 %0 a'f0 6 0 ft M
and all through that cruel night Jut-,tA aid ra"#A
gis would wake up now and then and
hear Ona and her stepmother in the
next room, sobbing softly to them*
selves. 80
CHAPTER V.
They had bought their mome. It
was hard for them to realisa that the
wonderful house was thetra to move
into whenever they eabos. They spent
all their time thinking about it, and
what they were oing to put into it. -TO QUIOI.LYIU C 9D WW IREAt WRRQW-O
As their week with Aniele was up in A BIbI ) i t .
three days, they lost no time in get. NowAa_ ___ _M_ 9
ting ready. They had to make some THI eCHRISTIAN W3RK 1 S* ELE
shift to furnish it, and every instant MMxmAm.iJU
of their leisure was given to dishes
ing this.
A person who had such a task bo. THE OE .SAWATIO N
fore him would not need to look very To ensble wins em these
far in Packingtown-he had only to bal KM Vt SIe
walk up the avenue and read the NO t ayo Ahe topics huseI to B
signs or get Into a street ar, to ob. tsll at
tain full Information as to pretty
much everything a human reature
could need. It was quite touchinA,
the seal of people to 'n that his
health and happiness were provided .*L,...' a
for. Did the person wish to smoke? aM. lh eIlerlas, iangs.
There was a little discourse about I
cigars, showing him exactly why the ,* *
Thomas Jefferson vfeent Perfeeto Teold...........3gBOTH *.So
was the only cigar worthy of the a M adSWi pl w&M W 6lM fAMl A- A A& % 1
name. Had he, on the other hand, w I
smoked too muchT Here was a rmi*
edy for the smoktng habit, twenty. *AO
live doses for a quarter, and a ere ars
absolutely guaranteed in ten does
In Innumerable ways such as this, the _
traveller found that somebody had ______________________
been busied to make smooth his paths
through the world, and to let hlt NW UUS- RU.1S
know what had been done for him*. SW Smu s 41
In Packsetown the advetitsementr
had? style dll of their own e adapted !
to the peculiar population. One would
be tenderly solicittous. "Is your wife -
pale?" it would inquire. "Is she dis* .


try Dr. Lanahan's Ite Preservers?' "'.. 1
Another would be Jocular In toe, -- *- ...........z...:....:..-


slapping you on the back, so toj *__* *R** -*inz....
"Don't be a chump!" it would hii 1 **a*** **
"Go and get the Gollth h Bunion Cure.' "u lleMsm elJm
"Cet a move on you!" would chame an
another. "T's itYO yuwear the 5
WL W W1 1 .M


s .xA
A ~


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>1'';',^^
*: ''"s
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if .t's Printing
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To Clubbing Offer on this page
add Bryan's Commoner one year
and send $6.50 for all. Send
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Read every word in this announcement, for It is the opportunity ,I
year. Seven of the greatest magazine in the country have cominb.blid to h.
offered together at a greatly reduced r4te. Never before was such an nll. ;r
given to the public and it is safe to say never will it be made again. T'hi\
ear several main have increased their subscription price, which sho ew
how much greater this offer really is. The only reason we are making it to
the people of this State is because we have increasedthe subscriptlon price, if
THE MM to 9 per yer, and we want all Florida to read T mK .


cosmopolitan, one year, -
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THE COSMOp I TAN which wa recent p by Mr. W. R. Hearst. has
no thb en rt been reatlmy Imroved byt nW management and i
now the mopular ten-oent Illutrated monthly In theworid. Already Its. ales have
increased 100 over what they were four months agowhen Ibecam a part of the fa-
mous Hearst publihing oranation. The publishers a M no e*fort to secure for it
all that is most deible in the way of pictures storliesM d-ar -. A an example, pic-
tures by Frederic Remington and stories by W. W. Jamobs are now running in the Cosimo-
polita. and a strong nw serial by H. 0. Wells.
THE REVIEW OF REVIEWS ubtantal Ameriaan men and women are toiig
Sn W~"**-* W IO n tokeep up with the timesand theatre going to
take the shortest cut-which to The Review of Reviews-a monthly survey of the world's
progress.
W M iN' NO E COMPANIN not excelled by any other home ani
WOMANS HOME COMPANION family publication In world. Stories
fMhions, aticlel, Illustrtions.
PEARnSON't s one of the leading fiction ma munes of the day both its aerial and
c EsiAr n a shortstores being by authors of worldwide reputation. Pearson's Is
considered authority on book reviews.
THE AMERICAN MA AZINE or thirty yn known ee' Maazine.
Hd fund ling I to ln itw lately Po, cumed by a powerful syndl.
te and no funds arelackn to make it one of the best magalnes In Amelria.
TOM WATON'S MAGAZINE No monthly m n toAmerica ever before
W6400121 b met with Wch huart welcome a did Ton
Watson's by all lases of people, and deservedly so, for Mr. Watson is at oboe the foremost
writer and cleared thinker before the public today. It is lled with the best thoughts of
the best minds on all subleetC of Interest to the American people.
THE SUN paper with will of Itsown, and to by far the bet paper
Florida-commending all right and cenuringallwrong.


If you want one magazine with our paper for a ear, you cannot do better than to a p
one of following offers, while they are hot off the bat and before they are withdr 0% I
COSMOPOLITAN, one yea r .............. .......................... .... 00
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