Group Title: sun.
Title: The sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075914/00037
 Material Information
Title: The sun
Uniform Title: sun
Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sun Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: July 21, 1906
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tallahassee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Leon County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Leon -- Tallahassee
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.451667 x -84.268533 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 18, 1905)-v. 3, no. 47 (Sept. 12, 1908).
Numbering Peculiarities: Published at Tallahassee, Fla., June 23-Sept. 12, 1908.
General Note: Claude L'Engle, editor.
General Note: "If it's right, we are for it."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075914
Volume ID: VID00037
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33400104
lccn - sn 95047216
 Related Items
Other version: Morning sun (Tallahassee, Fla.)
Succeeded by: Dixie (Jacksonville, Fla.)

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Waies StevaMl. editor of the Tampa. Tribune, sometimes preaches & ser-
S ml,- anl his latest effort in this regard is Inspired by the WhiteThaw trag-
dwav TWO Trtbunm, in its issue of Wednesday, says:
T Th lud,. laastg lights of Broadway, the discordant note of clinking wino
S ql)en1w tb big restaurants which line its ruddy way, the false, the artill-
l# Idg0-la4A1 otthltenderloin, why does it call alluringly to the in-
Belp, -1tb, heard the cry afar. Early she answered it, and a,
Io~iase lyl she wlU'bear Its seared scars and awful stains.
WioOloOsft IWbt ten thousand. Millions ot dollars and two world.
f.m.... a ...lla acraeatre apart The othsw- unknown,.go down,
down, di owit A.om r els -in-the violous dark slough alone tells that
S tmey ha iheFbiw. ,. .
It lIsftsim of, thw9sarlle' citis atud thqe las towns that the girls
of the b*vey*W'N4bt type come. They,knak little oU l nothing of the world.
If they havM witel thKeA are seeo eatiaste for the gmt, shallow, artificial
thlag whitb to41e appear to bq desroble.
A, auteamoebie is t t O t to be hlA agwhioh brings real joy. A dinner at
MaNdal" or ai sper i thl rathatskHerltu bHotsi Marlborough is supposed
to g1vs a etIea positto. it1l9 ,
The pt s aa4Whito mimug creatures that -hourly wend their high-heel id
way down th"ua4 bt Broadway do not eemr tobe able to distinguish between
the reau and tiuiealt.
It is ottobt Mend t atithatthey falltear victims to such men as Stan-
foV'White. AN ev at his stAdtoleVw supposed to give one of these an
exalted heghft In Bloistan cItrcw. Mly riawnucent girl has learned too
late that a supp thesWmeant nothing mer tham a moment's amusement to
the meaoof thatEgat l giled artificialawrld. To the girl it was the first
downwad step to wm e tinu deatbK'
Sir was a girl wit, ideals anda purpoMs She had .a rare opportunity t.)
do so-MU twm while in the artistlt world, but one frivolous step and it
was lost elmw "
The lgthat-Waplomdd background, and went to New York to go on the
jtagt W lthaiability, but began, like.so many hundred others, in a mail
way. 81 wm haadome, she was attractive, and It was not long before she
wu, WtoW to be oneot a small party In that selfat e .and now too famous
T.'oata taste of the rotten, morbid; unreal lib led to another. The next
timea uggYV some other reason for going, Thealwbecame hardened an4
Ino exO- u was made. She wa only one of doaens wM l became crazed with
the ides tht eating amnd dfakig, ma hirls In a motor, betting at the
ree, a pat face and dyed hIMr costttuted living
SThat elwP ecry of thwboehius to coam and be one of the artificial mob Ia
proghaM on of thU evolutions of the maddued moment. The wise mother,
tme timoMttuI father, consider long bere they permit their daughter to
:jol that unnatural throng.


DYTH3


II


Hat R tr M eta. sta&sO and blecYles.-Manatee River
The Journal learns with pleasure ,T '_
that the people of SarSaaN s have be Nationalo Reeontlisfor 'Tam .
coat enthused over the matter oThe passage' of the reso utln ca-l.
good roMfrom that point to Bradeut*k la on the President to Issue a procla.
town, and that Coimty Comm lMb ri mation concerning the propoMed Ista-
Whitalh and Baxter hav takes the mis Canal Expostion in this city in
1-M-O SM- m that the project has be"
matter up l a business way n eao recognitionand sa
poseto put it through as early a dat ties,
&a- ...n..e.le. Next to an appropriation, re.ogn.
Aie seeted will shorten the tloi M an action is a valuable im.
ditams nearly two atles and besiMd petus to the proposed exposition.
aea.Mioatf-g the cedar hamunok Btt, now that Congress has g.ven
tUedfg lads will follow tne shWro its kindly aid, It remains for the
lite t Sarasota bay, passing though people of Tampa to do their rt-an
bsi sad Indian beach, and will be their part is practically the whole
oW at the most beautiful drives 4A thing, so far as planning, promIotn,
* A Wits a ha rfce rod ar ging and actually holding the ex
Mug Btdntowm and 0S4rft.% position are concerned.
tla tWo p _M will be bmilt in It Is a vast proJect-wlth les than
16 th6th e m MM f tbI, much large and mu k oWebw city


F~elyn -Nesbi~tOiulyQoms.'siflithosum: WhaPass
Down the1tEkW w Bo~q

Officeof' TRIO, UN,.


Scripps-MdRae Syndicate,
Cincinnati, Ohio.
Gentlemen-We have a recolleitonu of seeing this editorial in one of your
string of papers, butwe-are not.aure. Please let us know if this Is not one
of your editorials, borrowed by this FlbrfidUedit;:a k*ft *itb date oa
xhich it first appeared in your string. Yours very truly,
TTTHUIN,

By Katherine Leekie.
New York, June 29.-The lurtd, flashing lights of Broadway, the discordant
note of clinking wine glasses in the big restaurants which line its ruddy way,
the false, the artificial; the hideous life of the tenderloin, why does it cti
ialluringly to the innocent to come and.seek ruin?
Evelyn Nesbitt, a girl of 15, heard the cry air. Eagerly she answered it,
and as long as abe iiveshe will bear its seared scars and awful staias.
She is only one girl of 10,sO. Milolinsof dollars and two world famous
names make- her a creature apat. The others, unknown, go down, down,
lown! A momentary circle inttlWvitelbs dark slough alone tells that they
l.ave ever been.
Few of these; fortunately, coirn to' tliaunreal New York at the tender age
this girl did.
It is from the country, the-smaller citW#Xd the large towns that the girls
of the Evelyn Nfsbtt type come. Tty M*ittle, or-nothin,, of the world.
If they have idepls they ass msooan bast'afor the great, shallow, artificial
things wtch tothem apmpeatobdeskswei
An automobile l-thougt he a thiagwtelch brings reaL joy. A dinner
at Martin's, or a supper ae rathakele o the Ifotel Marlborough is sup-
posed to give a stanch pot -ain lit
The pink and white mte creattmu a talhourly ,wendtheir hIgiL heeled
way down the bright Broadway do not sadtP'be able to diastngu i between
the real and the unreal Its not to bole.isared at that they tan asy vie-
tims to sue menaa ,ttoItor WhiteS As.vaiIag at.hts studlowus suposed
to give one of these -anexslted aeligtS 4Bhemlan circles. Many an innno-
cent girl has larned to latethat a ep0 thilre nmeot'pro"In more than a
moment's amusementto tAesd of th gtt artlial word. TO tho
girl it was the first downwaritAtep tl o. thaiGestia
I knew smueanone. Ile waa gtVfitkideals and a purpoe. BShhad a
rare opportunity to do som@ ,Wftb*, .&whdfte in the artia.Weridobut one
frivolous. stp and it wMhsthteigr lIe should hawskanm- better, but
!lke Eve of old, sne was iiqaiMma tor thse pa J .
This girl had a spleqoit Now i tb&kNd a a hetoN N York
to go on the stage. aheha4 ablt ebaHt IMnM, lke s i-he Dudother,
in a small way. She was handuim a Bew attracute, ali4 a not long
before she was invitetdto:bewoB *s am pasty im \tSmand now
too-fanuwas studio. Shitoi l .wt going, a nto.
lier answer was that" se M bstb inMurd, that shet palo
igd that her itaetD *a wW,' st11 to protect her. i she
only wished to go to sswa.ttagike. -
Thatone- tate of the rottenitbV, unreal life TO&tt next
time she gave some othTWMROW 0ng Then Then. and
no exeamuwas mad. w mone of domes with
the ide that e w10 1s a a
an i a 41M"I was the
price oa-"t lift"S..
That hollow Crry otf the boto come and bl mob is
probably ow ,tthIeveI n t M e mthe maide h mother,
the thoughtfuatustSW Iong before th daughter
join that uaatai thap*-


than Tamp&u hba takeW tIfi ye- for be kept i m .,..-Tmmap T7-
arranging Its big exposti~ea even bum ....T I
at that, it Is doubtful If it maKado all. Wtk S.WKXO have beem started
the neciarg Work in. th0 owad t Jaksm rag-
Tampa, however, is not I tx haM rr T aniisod m of I poratlo
of l)ermittlng the Usorf' t-, w A e th o ,of tla
rail In Itns
It. thea Iredttae nimayn has bd .the .rad Ii bWWlt Into
I cre fo aN this city it mw g sve aui b e oui A
There is, howew, no time to be and wll oevimiLy mat.. 0
loot t ~ at tef *
Work must. baw at a'*MwIsmu


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ly at, 1t06


THE SUN


Trail of the,


Being the True and Astonishing:


ham's Rascalities in Liberty County, V'ir

of Years Durinr Which He Stole Nearly


BY CLAUDE L'ENGLE.


He was as mild a mannered man as ever slit a
throat or scuttled a boat"
The Forbes Purchase.
General William Augustus Bowles was a Mary-
der, who held a command in the British army
the Revolutionary War. He was a man of
brilliant mind, versatile talents and doubtful hon.
,r. Dismissed from the British army at Pensa-
I&a, be turned pirate and cruised the Apalachi-
ola bay and neighboring waters in a small boat
anned by Indians, carrying a six-pounder.
His piratical adventures were so successful
at he amassed a comfortable fortune, married
e daughter of an Indian chief and ilved among
e Creeks. In 1789 he led an unsuccessful ex-
dition against Pensacola, then in the hands o!
e Spaniards, and was for this act restored to
vor with the English. He soon became dissat-
fed with his life and went north and became an
ctor, and afterwards achieved a reputation as a
portrait painter in the Bahamas.
Returning to America he was sent to establish
a trading post among the Indians, but being ambi-
tious his mission did not satisfy him, so he went
among the Indians and persuaded them to Join
him in making war against the Spaniards.
So persuasive was he tnat the Indians not only
consented to join him, but gave him the title of
King of Florida, and under his leadership,
marched against St. Marks and captured the fort.
Shortly afterwards the Spaniards forced him to
give it up and his Indian followers surrendered
him, whom they now called the Lying Captain, to
the Spaniards who took him to Moro Castle
where he ended his adventurous life in its dun-
geons.
In 1803 a great tract of land bordering on the
Apalachloola River and St. George Bound was
ceded by Spain to John Forbes & Co., successors
to the firm of Panton Leslie & Co., in payment of
debts incurred by the Indians and for depreda-
tions their boats had suffered from the piraticul
adventures of William Augustus Bowles.
Bowles Reincarnated In Graham.
If I could subscribe to belief in the re-incarna-
tion of spirits, I would say that the spirit of Wil-
liam Augustus Bowles, pirate and adventurer, had
been re-incarnated in Jonn Alexander Graham, of
Manatee. Bowles had seen the land, and had
forced unwilling tribute to the black flag, under
which he sailed. Graham operated on the land,
but his methods were none the less those of the
pirate.
Between the Ocklocknee and Apalachicola riv-
ers lies the county of Liberty, a large part of
which was the original FOrbes purchase. From
border to border, life moves on simply, naturally,
Its quiet undisturbed and unbroken by the shrill
whistle of the locomotive, or any of the sounds at-
tendant upon the march of development-virginal
and primeval.
In Arcadian simplicity the people tilled the
soil, in peace their children grew to manhood
and womanhood around the humble home, mar-
ried and lived Just as they had lived before them.
Kind-hearted, trusting, law-abiding, content in the
homely plenty the soil yielded for their simple
wants, they lived their allotted time and were
gathered to their fathers.
Bristol, the county seat, is a clean little village
of perhaps two or three hundred people, al-
though the ensaus gives it a population of only
fifty. To reach Bristol you go by boat from the
landing at River Junction down the river.
About thirty or forty miles, as the bird flies, yum
find the town, hidden away a mile from the river,
high up among the pines and black-jacks.
To this Arcadian corner where tne rasor-back
roams the streets, his rights unquestioned, and
where the whip-poor-will and nooting owl boll
nightly concerts, while the stars loot down from
the peaceful heavens, along in the eighties came a
young man who was employed as clerk ton the
State Department of Education under Superlnten.
dent RNsele.
Enter the w0;nt
John A. Graham's advent into Liberty county
was to lecture at the Teacher's Institute hebold that
year at Bristol. His poished manners and Set
tone gained ha the frsidmp of pe stle,
trusting people he met and t A trip leearUts
to the teaches, be laid the plan of the tdft
Piece of paruy tht has behe perpetrated In u.


erty County since the days of William AuguSatP
Bowles.
When he returned to Tallabalsee he beo bu
ing tax certlacates to land in Liberty _7
from W. D. Barnes, then Comptroller. A t he
bought them covering forty-aore traots, then
hundred-acre tracts, next w0ole ectlo
townships, paying an some instance LM THA
FOUR MILLS PER ACRI., For certficate co 00
ering one tract of forty-five, thousand aoreM 1
paid $175.00. Abstracts now on record inl Libert?
County show that Graham had tax deeds to two
hundred thousand aores, purchased from the
State for a song.
In 1887 Graham returned to Liberty County
and began logging on a large scale, supplying the
large mills at Carrabelle with logs. He em-
ployed a large number of teams and men and paid
ig wages. He operated in the county from 1US
to 1893. During those years he out a wide swatn
in the section, he fitted up a handsome oloe to
Tallahassee and became known as a "yomn Na-
poleon of Finance."
His manner were pleasing, but he had the faoe
of a villain, the ethics of a freebooter and the
methods of a pirate.
During the years 1887-1892 he sold 400,000 acres
of land in Liberty County to which he nad
ABOSLUTELY NO LMB*AL TITLB, except tax
deeds that were QUESTIONED ON THUIM
FACE, to 200,000 sores.
When Graham set out to steal Liberty County it
was necessary for him to have assistance. The
clerk of the court, D. G. Harrell, was a man d
scribed as a good, well-meaning man, but Vyey
weak, and a drunkard. Graham's keen, eye duM.
covered In him an easy victim. He bent all t~s
accomplishments of tongue and manner, ***s-
plemented by bountiful supplies of whiskey, iue-
ly administered, and Harrell became as wax in
his hands. The things he would not have uone
sober, he did drunk.
Graham had access to the clerk's offle AT ALL
TIMES and spent his time there. He made ab-
sracts of deeds which HARRELL CERTIFIED,
making alterations, it is said, to include lands not
originally Included in the schedules.
Another victim he found In Haley T. Block-
er, who was the last receiver appointed by the
court for the Apalachicola Land Co. This com-
pany had large holdings of timber lands, of the
,original Forbes purchase, granted in payment of
Bowles depredations, early In 1800. e lands
had practically ALL BBEN SOLD by John Beard
and other former receiver of the Apat ola
Land Co. When Mr. Beard's reoeivehilp was
terminated, Haley T. Blocker was appointed to
confirm Mr. Beard's sales and to wind up the ft.
fairs of the company.
Page 652 of Book F, Records of Liberty County,
shows entry tf a deed from Haley f. Btocker, RHo
ceiver, to John Alexander Graham, under date of
Feb. 24, 1888, to 136,000 acres of land. tMllowlSu
this is an entry of tax deed from the bate to
Graham conveying 200,000 acre and four other
entries of deeds from Bloeker to Graham ooavey-
ing various large tracts Entries show tIhe
lands in tracts varying from 10,000 to 186"00
acres sold by Oraham to Jameau 6 Gaie of Ma.
waukee, Wis., for whlh he was paid apprd l.
m lately $326,00
Whether Graham actuady had deeds ftm
Blocker to all these lahds or not is act Iows,
but after he had fortified himself with abstae
to everything he wasted eartlmd by Mmm.l
Clerk of the Court, he went to Chicago end Me
the lands, about 400,000 aces, to James L, Gate
of Milwaukee.
The deeds from Blocker were later jHOWN To
BB FRAUDULANT, the lats havt already
been sold by former revem an were ai
by Judge Walker in a degree io whh be declared
them void. ee record Le'S Ca ow
et aL vs. Apalashncola Lead Co.
After the sale to Gatesthe qela oa the
validity of OGraham's tUe w rased, and Oa
mt his lawyer to Brist to makeo tnv eia
tiUos, bet when arrived, lae in 18m e fod
ONE or THU RUCOID BOu MA rSn-
RIOULY DISAMA e t bea to
Milwaukee to confer with 0tee sad boln h
return found that Hamre f bam M i
ALSO DIAPPUAR3X HanreO bad hee a
hopeless sit and a lw amumb eig' WM ie
That Orathh iiel c


Serpei

of John A. Ora-


i.g a Period

e 'County


i4~R .4

~


COUNI t He will .orw .S. t






With he certfied abetrac nd
NAerk he 8 claim ha
016Y PERS
CPITTED
and the fact that deed
.4 e abandoned
IAo THAT GRAHAM
th oe s o free acce ss to
lyto Graham AS THE O
Wath hid uertiled abstra c
NALS 00N, his claims had
the fe that Blooker's deeds
as t poessed o
of land of do tftite for which h
over $00,00,, aknowleged himself bit
perbaos wsOel co"eludilg that "the hair
hound is good for the wound," entered into a
traet with Gram la waich he promised to
him a commlslon to eoll the Inids.
Graliaml mueded in elllnr 00,000 aores for
Gate" fr 100, and -9Wed ats for his co.m-
Ud"WnVol. Robert Wt. WOW rent


9,.


5,037.5, set bese a, ha ttle
be am t it was premn athWesad _t
ham's title to a la ert O a
bat, because Gates Me -aiprow. .
speciio serve sad Graham p id
performed the service.
Undew this Udgm i'gept a of tel
ate by Gram were lmfd ol bi
Oraham thereby obtained sherlt ets
#wre for wh bh be paid, under w tha
S0osT.95. This deedwas record
IM, Book page 11401, Reworfr
This deed laid the foundaU for
by Graham. He I meequenti old n
Wlsoe, his Mtker-g. A SoMr dthe bis-ti
eraO- os Of *d$800. under w v aml A~r> a I-


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,PINTEID FOR THE PEOPLE OF, FLORIDA, BY THE


TALJASEE. FLORIDA, JULY 21. It ,


SUN 00o TALLAHASSEIRi FLA.


onp tt White-
Thaw Tady.


Wallace Stovall, editor of the Tampa Tribune, sometimes preaches ser-
u0on, and his latest effort in this regard is inspired by the White-Thaw trag-,
wey. The Tribune, 16 Its Issue of Wednesday, says:
The lurid, bashing lights of Broadway, the discordant note of clinking wine
glasses la the big restaurants which line its ruddy way, the Talse, the artll-
Shl4epu os.o'the tenderloin, why does it call alluringly to the in-
.velyn Nesbit, 16, heard the cry afar. Eagery she answered it, and ai
I a. si U se I.. 'bear its seared scars and awful stains.
'IlBoal& 1l 4 e iob ten thousand. Millions of dollars and two world-
famous Unaes lake her a creature apart., The others, unknown, go down,
down, dowi, A momatary circle In the vicious dark slough alone tells that
they h e e be ... ..
It Is ro t oemat;the bstaller citi0S adM tle o1W.l towns that the girls
of the veynNMblt tpe y ome. Th .'kn* Mll ttle clothing of the world.
I ththey have deals, th arft sn ot aside for the great, shallow, artificlnl
things which to them appear to desirble.
An automobile Is thoIht to b thlagwhich brings real joy. A dinner at
Martin's or aspper l t rathskeller efthe Hot4l Marlborough Is supposed
to giveatauit.positl-t.% 1 I I
The'Ink avwhite mIsnlg creatures ^tat hourly wend their high-heeled
way down the* hght Broad*ay do nt 'seem tobe able to distinguish between
the realandt h ueal. "ot
It Is not to be M d at that they talleasy victims to such men as Stan-
ford White. An Sm gat his std as t ive oe of thee an
exalted light lnebian ci. M y any Intlocent girl has learned too
late that a supper there meant nothing more than a moment's amusement to
the men of that gldOed artficil world. To the girl it was the flrnt
doiwatrd staPe ot h ban eath .
She wasa 'girl, wht Ideals and a purpose. She had a rare opportunity to
do soethlg low while In the artistUo world, but one frivolous step and it
was lost foreive'.
The ditW had *splendid background, and went to New York to go on the)
atage.l oeB a billty, but began, like so many hundred others, in a mail
way. Re wal handsome, she was attractive, and It was not long before she
wS 0lat4d to be one of a small party In that self-same and now too famous
t ft taste of the rotten, morbid, unreal life l'ed to another. The next
time shsiave some other reason for going. The she became hardened ant
1to excume was made. She wa only one of doasew who became erased with
the idea that eating and drinking, mad whirls In a motor, betting at the
M painted face and 4yd har ooUttuted living.
That hollow cry of the bhotse to come and be one of the artificial mob is
probably one of the evolutions of the maddened momesit. The wise mother,
the thoughtful father, consider long before they permit their daughter to
loin that unnatural throng.


Thinks T., Brethren


Hard Road to tarasota.
The Journal learns with pleas9ue
that the people of Sarasota have bo0
come enthused over the matter of a
good road from that point to Brade*u-
town. and that County Commissioner
Whitaker and Baxter have taken the
matter up in a business way and pro*
pose to put It through as early a date
au practicable.
The route selected will shorten the
distance nearly two miles and besdes
accommodating the cedar hammock
trucking lands will follow toe shore
line of Sarasota bay, passing through
Well and Indian beach, and will be
one of the most beautiful drives In
Florida. Wita a hard surface road
connecting Bradentown and Sarasot.t
the two points will be brought an
closer touch with eei Oth er. gIW
reducing the time distance tor M


autos and bleceles.-Manatee River
Journal.
National Reognltl"o foi Tampa.
The passage! of the rreolution call*
lug on the President to Isse a pfoola-
mation concernitg the proposed stai-
mian Canal ibxpelUodoIn this olty in
1908, meaas that the project has been
given nationall recognition and sanac
tion.
Next to an appropriation, recogn.-
ton and sanction is a valuable im-
petus to the proposed positiono.
But, now that Congress has given
Its kindly aid, it remains for the
people of Tampa to do their part-and
their part Is practically the whole
thing, so far as planning, promoting,
arranging and actually holding the ex-
position are concerned.
It is a vastproject-wlth less than
a a and much elty


WHiY THE LtURID CkIl
W K"; "5 '. a ";,
INO N, T?

Evelyn Nesbit Only One of the Thos ts Who Pass
Down the Ruddy Way of BrodiWay.
.Offlce Qf TH. SUN,.
Tallahtssee, Fla., July 9, 1906.


Scripps-MdRae Syndicate,
Cincinnati, Ohio.
Gentlemen-We have a recollection of seeing this editorial in one of your
string of papers, but we are not sure., Please let us know ift this is not one
of your editorials, borrowed by this Florida editor, aM give \t thb date on
which it first appeared in your string. Yours very truly,
THB SUN.
.Claude45 Jngle.
By Katherine Leckle.
New York, June 29.-The lurid, flashing lights of Broadway, the discordant
note of clinking wine glasses in the big restaurants which line its ruddy way,
the false, the artificial, the hideous life of the tenderloin, why does it cail
alluringly to the innocent to come and seek ruin?
Evelyn Nesbitt, a girl of 165, heard the cry afr. Eagerly she answered it,
and as long as she lives she will bear its seared scars and awful stains.
She is only one girl of 10,000. Millions of dollars and two world famous
names make her a creature apart. The others, unknown, go down, down,
down! A momentary circle in the vicious dark slough alone tells that they
have ever been. % -'
Few of these, fortunately, come to this unreal New York at the tender age
this girl did.. 1 ,
It Is from the country, the smaller cities and the large towns that the girls
of the Evelyn Nesbitt type come. They know little, or nothing, of the world.
It they have deals thy have s they are soon ast asidefor the great, shallow, artificial
things which to them appear to be desirable. ,-
An automobile is thought to .be a thing which brings real joy. A dinner
at Martin's, or a supper in the rathskeller of the Hotel Marlborough is sup-
posed to give a stanch posotebn in life,
The pink and white mining creatures that hourly, wend'their high heeled
way down the bright Broadway do not sep to e able to distinguish between
the real and the unreal. It is not to bqe wondered at that the. fall easy vic-
tims to suon men as Stanford White. An evening at his studio was supposed
to give one of these an exalted night in Bohemian circles. Many an lanno-
Tcnt girl has learned too late that a upper there meant nothing more than a
troment's amusement. to the end of that gayly gilded artificial world. To the
girl it was the first downward step to Vorse than death.
I knew such an one. She was a girl with ideals and a purpose. She had a
rare opportunity to do something worth while in the artistic world, but one
frivolous Step and it was lost forever. She should have known better, but
!ke lve of old, sne was inqulsitive, and bit of the apple of the le ofknwledge..
This girl had a splendid New England background, and ca'e to New York
to go on the stage. She had ability, but Degn, like' so ma ~ huAdre4 others,
In a small way. She was handsome, she was attractive, aM It wa not long
'before she was invited to be.one of small patty in tlt am4 and now
too-famous studio. She told me she was going, and I b 1 e'd ir not to.
Her answer was that she could not be injured, that she hato"tet 0 pride
obd that her Inneritanoe was strong to protect her. 'She she
only wished s tooto see what it was like. .
That one taste of the rotten, morbid, unreal life led to a hr. ,-Tt next
time she gave some other reason for going. Then she besehavdensd and
no excuse was made. the was only one of dozens whorlen6fjm* with
te idea tht eautng, drinking, aid whirls In a motpo, bs etti a 4thitces, a
painted fame and dydl hair consatuted living. Latre i she t*iMat was the
price of life. A,
That hollow cry of the chors to come and be one aof the'attllojal mob Is
probably one of the evolutions of the maddened momett, TL wise mother,
the thoughtful atner, consider long before they pI t thi anughter lo
join that unnatural throng.,

than Tampa, has taken four years for be kept up unoeanly.--Tam. a T*
arranging its big exposition, and eveu bune
at that, it I doubtful f t doubtful if it can do all Work seem to have been started
the necessary work in that time OntheTapand Jacksonville raluu
Tampa, however, is not in the habitroad. The articles of Incorporation
of permitting the use of the word were published and the route of tha
.fail in its projects, and with the right road laid out hgpe time ago. The re
people and the right influences behind ports from Oalnesvlle show that work
it, the Isthmia Cana* Exposition may 'hasbeg=n .I the road Is built into
be a creditable affair. this cityIt will give another outlet
There Is, however, no time to be and will eventual mesa the coming
Work must begin at once and murat of rwh.


4


Or


2
I


matn


""**^tte
--*-*- *-**













Liy tit 1066


THIR SON


- The


Trail of the $epe


Being the True and Astonishing St' of John A. (ra-

ham's Rascalities In Liberty County, *6in a Period

of Years Durlnr Which He Stole Nearly e County


ovilow'


BY CLAUDE L'ENGLE.


"He was as mild a mannered man as ever alit a
throat or scuttled a boat."
The Forbes Purchase.
'General William Augustus Bowles was a Mary-
lander, who held a command in the British army
in the Revolutionary War. He was a man of
brilliant mind, versatile talents and doubtful hon-
or. Dismissed from the British army at Pensa-
cola, he turned pirate and cruised the Apalachi-
cola bay and neighboring waters in a small boat
manned by Indians, carrying a six-pounder.
His piratical adventures were so successful
that he amassed a comfortable fortune, married
the daughter of an Indian chief and lived among
the Creeks. In 1789 he led an unsuccessful ex-
pedition against Pensacola, then in the hands of
the Spaniards, and was for this act restored to
favor with the English. He soon became dissat-
isfied with his life and went north and became an
actor, and afterwards achieved a reputation as a
portrait painter In the Bahamas.
Returning to America he was sent to establish
a trading post among the Indians, but being ambi-
tious his mission did not satisfy him, so he went
among the Indians and persuaded them to Join
him in making war against the Spaniards.
So persuasive was he tnat the Indians not only
consented to Join him, but gave him the title of
King of Florida, and under his leadership,
marched against St. Marks and captured the fort.
Shortly afterwards the Spaniards forced him to
give it up and his Indian followers surrendered
him, whom they now called the Lying Captain, to
the Spaniards who took him to Moro Castle
where he ended his adventurous life in its dun-
geons.
In 1803 a great tract of land bordering on the
Apalachicola River and St. George Bound was
ceded by Spain to John Forbes & Co., successors
to the firm of Panton Leslie & Co., in payment of
debts incurred by the Indians and for depreda-
tions their boats had suffered from the piratical
adventures of William Augustus Bowles.
Bowles Reincarnated In Graham.
If I could subscribe to belief In the re-incarna-
tion of spirits, I would say that the spirit of Wil-
liam Augustus Bowles, pirate and adventurer, had
been re-incarnated in Joan Alexander Graham, of
Manatee. Bowles had seen the land, and had
forced unwilling tribute to the black flag, under
which he sailed. Graham operated on the land,
but his methods were none the less those of the
pirate.
Between the Ocklocknee and Apalachicola riv-
ers lies the county of Liberty, a large part of
which was the original Forbes purchase. From
border to border, life moves on simply, naturally,
its quiet undisturbed and unbroken by the shrill
whistle of the locomotive, or any of the sounds at-
tendant upon the march of development-virginal
and primeval.
In Arcadian simplicity the people tilled the
soil, in peace their children grew to manhood
and womanhood around the humble home, mar-
ried and lived Just as they had lived before them.
Kind-hearted, trusting, law-abiding, content in the
homely plenty the soil yielded for their simple
wants, they lived their allotted time and were
gathered to their fathers.
Bristol, the county seat, ts a clean little village
of perhaps two or three hundred people, al-
though the census gives it a population of only
fifty. To reach Bristol you go by boat from the
landing at River Junction down the river.
About thirty or forty miles, as the bird flies, you
find the town, hidden away a mile from the river,
high up among the pines and black-jacks.
To this Arcadian corner where tee rasor-back
roams the streets, his rights unquestioned, and
where the whip-poor-will and footing owl hold
nightly concerts, while the stars looK down from
the peaceful heavens, along In the eighties came a
young man who was employed as clerk In the
State Department of Education under Superinten-
dent Russell.
Enter the Serpent.
John A. Graham's advent Into Liberty county
was to lecture at the Teacher's Institute held that
year at Bristol. His polished manners and fluent
tongue gained him the friendship of the simple,
trustingl people he met, and on this trip, lecturing
to the teachers, he laid the plan of the boldest
piece of piracy that has been perpetrated ha Lib-


erty County since the days of William Augut"s
Bowles.
When he returned to Tallahassee he began buy-
ing tax certlfcates to land In Liberty County,
from W. D. Barnes, then Comptroller. At r*t lie
bought them covering forty-are tracts, then onaq
hundred-acre tracts, next whole socttos an d
townships, paying an some lastances LfSs THAN
FOUR MILLS PER ACRE. For certifoiate cov
ering one tract of forty-five, thousand aoree he
paid $176.00. Abstracts now on record In Liberty
County show that Graham had tax deeds to two
hundred thousand acres, purchased from the
State for a song.
In 1887 Graham returned to Liberty County
and began logging on a large scale, supplying the
large mills at Carrabelle with logs. He em-
ployed a large number of teams and men and paid
big wages. He operated in the county from 187
to 1893. During those years he out a wide swatn
In the section, he fitted up a handsome offloe in
'tallahassee and became known as a "young NaM
poleon of Finance."
His manner were pleasing, but he had the fate
of a villain, the ethics of a freebooter and the
methods of a pirate.
During the years 1887-1892 he sold 400,000 acres
of land in Liberty County to which he bad
ABOSLUTELY NO LEGAL TITLE, except tax
deeds that were QUESTIONED ON THEIR
FACE, to 200,000 acres.
When Graham set out to steal Liberty County It
was necessary for him to have assistance. The
clerk of the court, D. G. Harrell, was a man dA-
scribed as a good, well-meaning man, but voey
weak, and a drunkard. Graham's keen, eye dw.-
covered in him an easy victim. He bent all t~a
accomplishments of tongue and manner, s,' -
plemented by bountiful supplies of whiskey, foi*
ly administered, and Harrell became as wax In
his hands. The things he would not have done
sober, he did drunk.
Graham had access to the clerk's office AT ALL
TIMES and spent his time there. He made ab.
tracts of deeds which HARRELL CERTIFIED,
making alterations, it is said, to Include lands not
originally Included in the schedules.
Another victim he found In Haley T. Block-
er, who was the last receiver appointed by the
court for the Apalachioola Land Co. This com .
pany had large holdlngs of timber lands, of ti4e
.original Forbes purchase, granted la payment of
Bowles depredations, early in 1800. hese lands
had practically ALL BEEN SOLD by John Beard
and other former receivers of the Apaiaihoolts
Land Co. When Mr. Beard's receivership was
terminated, Haley T. Blocker was appointed to
confirm Mr. Beard's sales and to wind up the af-
fairs of the company.
Page 652 of Book F, Records of Liberiy County,
shows entry of a deed from Haley t. Blocker, Re-
ceiver, to John Alexander Graham, under date of
Feb. 24, 1888, to 185,000 acres of land. Followiu4
this is an entry of tax deed from the btate to
Graham conveying 200,000 acres and four other
entries of deeds from Blocker to Graham convey-
ing various large tracts. Bntries show these
lands in tracts varying from 10,000 to 185,000
acres sold by Graham to James .G Oaes of Mil.
waukee, Wis., for which he was paid apprt.l-
mately $220,000. *
Whether Graham actually had deeds from
Blocker to all thee lands or not is not known,
but after he had fortified himself with abstreao
to everything he wanted Wrtfled by Harrel,
Clerk of the Court, he went to Chicago and so:
the lands, about 400,000 acres, to James L Gates
of Milwaukele
The deeds from Blocer were later SHOWN TO
BE FRAUDULENT, the lands having already
been sold by former receivers, and were st aside
by Judge Walker In a decree In which he declared
them void. See record Leon County. Gair
et al. vs. Apalachicola Land Co.
After the sale to Gates the question of the
validity of Graham's title was raed, ad Gates
sent his lawyer to Bristol to make Investlga
ions, but when he arrived, late In 1880, he found
ONE OF THE kl COk) BOOKS HAD MYflT -
RIOUSLY DISAPPMARD. He went back to
Milwaukee to confer with Gates and upon his
return found that Harrell had abandoned hTis of-
fee. and THU OTHBR RuOC3Ou0 BOOK HAY)
ALSO DISAPPEARED. Hairei had beome a
hopeless sot and a few moths later was re
ported to have died in Geora. -. ,
That Graham stole, or ea-e to stofet Sh
record books sad I NO OWN IN LUaYv


the unpro


He will for


BwNbMiTTED T TAFi
and the fact that t i
HarreU abandoned
fact THAT GRAHAM
who had free access to
Ay to Graham AS THE G
With his ertlfed abstract
NALS GONM, his claims had b
the fact that Blooker's deeds
the tests of the courts. ',
Gates flad in himef possessed o
of land of doubtful title for which he
over $200,000, acknowledged himself bit
perhpa wisely onoludnag that "the hair
hound istd fo the wound," entered Into a
tract with Granam In which he promised to
him a commission to sell the lands.
Graham u d i selin 100,000 acres for
Gates for $100,000, and sued Gates ho his comr
6 66,ol. RIobert WWillhams preeentd
During the trial Judge Walk d s& the
boech that he know Grabha t t, bl!
and It was his duty to pitot Gsti,
represented by counsel, from al iM d.
lag thi attitude Graham,
1IA07ST.S1 not beoauae a had e
because it was proven h aetb' osaei
ham's title to a large part of them wa *Iod;
but, because Gates bad promised wt" fI u ar
speofit seirle and Oraham proved tot i' ihad
performed the service .
Under this Jsdgment a part of the land old t
Gates by Grahanm were levied on by trlhe f
Graham thereby obtained sheriff's deIertrP
acre for which he paid, uar thbe
I8,037,95. This deed was recorded
1890s Book F, pages 100401, Records Let.
This deed laid the foundation for a ew teS'
by Grahaa. He ubseque.ati old4 *gIt Ft7,
Wilson, his fatherlaw, tor the ameged obsM*
soato&* of Om, under warranty 43M1 a large
body at land, Itluding the lands eov14ed by ta
(No k, p Dages .118415. 5lUbty 0ouptyl ,fm
thatto a rt ot he lSa -e
w cos^yt4


IR bXn OV
-BOVY


tral f he~pmt i 140"
of s Mift6 ethro lC a lomta~g e
NineOtof eway ten mn yb 'hewOf
in Ubert) COut) whoen uAed aot~~
may "He Isa mad rand an1
this county" There 4.WaA
tots Mr.Frank R4wav-s

seated from t%# geerol
a. bold -umuscuupsaml
es6 alfees toa S"
U~he ho'.audw~


4


I
:11
.L tfM


a.p


:+ .. +. ?

1 '9
y' '
.'i^i


.9; )~
A *


*<*-."


* >* f


, I t I 1"'i "R













Fourth Pagb


ThB~$I5N


July 21, 1i90


- ,.~ .&A.w.,.-,. e.


R.R. omi CpstRelieves Congestion


Commissioner Burr, w I"as authorized byt i .at day, NOT A WHOIlSALE GROCER
railroad Comlalon vto lvtigte the conga ste itOWD UP with the exception of two represen-
condition of the rllw terminals at Jackson tattvy of the United Grocery Co., one from the
ville, and who, la Ipn 00el of this autholautl6n l 8rngtellow Doty Co., and one other. I was told
spent three and abit dysiin Jacksonville last that the grocers had determined not to testify
week investigating Sad taking testimony is now adt he reason given to me was that they were
in Tallahassee. The aettib of the Commission afraid Of being "punished" by the railroads. Ex-
HAS ALR T RM URLTED IN MUCH GOOD planation of this was given that many of the
to the shippers of the State. wholesale grocers rented from the railroad com.
The teetimoay taken showed so clearly that pny.
the raaleds were not properly equi.wed to "Another very significant feature of the hea. ing
handle thelolidlnes that was offered th that the was the voluntary appearance before the Comm.s-
rairoadfs, it latcipation of the actln* f the Co 01 sloner of Mr. B. G. Lasseter, General Manager of
mlsO i have already taken step to relieve this the United Grocery Co., and Mr. W. M. Toomer,
cont@a as much as possible the attorney of the company, wno submitted the
A case in point which, altolghb of compara- following, which will be made part of the tran-
tively small importance In' ttolf, but which is script of the testimony:
of great importance as sa e bct lesson of what, Jacksonvlle, Florida, July 14, 1906.
the railroads CAN D. they feel that they are The Railroad Commission of one State of Florida,
likely to be COMPHB 'IQ DO IT, is that of the Tallahassee, Florida.
R. D. Drysdale Gentlemen-We respectfully ask your considers
While the te w being taken Mr. Drys- tion of the conditions now prevalent and which
dale said thaMil a had some cars loaded for a number of months have existed in the city
with luni n Io llwhich had been there and port of Jacksonvill3, with reference to the de-
for ,omni.use and which he had tried for many livery to and receipt by the railroad companies at
days p lv played without being able to get this port of outgoing freight, in less than car
lhoueW9 d '0r delivery, and that he had despair- load lots, and as well the unnecessary and unrea.
e str being able to get these cars. sonable delay in the transfer from one line to
mtlsiioneIr lBurr, In presence of several Hail- another and the placing of incoming and outgoing
4.r ,oa who, being summoned to testify solid cars.
WM ..i ltg their turn to go 0.1 the stand, said: The delay in switching and placing solid cars
Sthe numbers of these cars with you, is not only unreasonable but is seriously detri-
'. UidaleT" Mr. Drysdaeo answered, "No, I mental to the Jobbing interests of this city.
lgven got them." Mr. Burr said, "If you will The facilities afforded by the railroad companies
M the numbers of thesecars. -will under- for receiving outgoing freight in less than car-
This wa In the morning, tory in a number of ways. The hours during
At the hearing in the afternoon Mr. Drysdale which freight of this class is received are entirely
agan being present, Mr. Burr asked him if he too short; the facts being that the average freight
now had the numbers of those cars he wanted. ternr'l in Jacksonville is open practically only
"It isn't aoeensary," said Mr. Drysdale, "1THI seven '(7) hours out of twenty-four (24) for the
CARS HAVB BBBN PLACED." receipt of freight of this class and during a large
When asked about his trip Mr. Burr said: part of that time because of arbitrary require-
"It is impossible for me to remember all the ments as to distribution of freight along the
testimony which was given at the hearing. The platforms, the approaches are blocked with loaded
stenographer estimates that it wi., cover about teams, at heavy expense and loss to us and others
375 typewritten pages. I can only say in a gen- engaged in the same line of business.
oral way that I found the conditions in Jackson. We have found tne local officials and employees,
ville even worse than I expected to find them. as a rule, capable and always courteous but the
My investigations there have convinced me that conditions against which we complain and which
this is the most important thing which the tail- have become Intolerable are attributable, in our
road Commissiton has before it. There is no doubt judgment ,to the fact that the railroad and term.
that the business of the State is seriously inter- nal companies here are not equipped with a suffl.
fered with by this congested condition. cent number of switch engines and crews.
"With but one or two exceptions the shippeft The number of employees is too limited. These
who testifed at the hearing said that the fault employees, as a rule, are underpaid and over-
lay la the want of proper equipment and terminal worked and the responsibility for these conditions
faellitles oa the part of tae railroad to handle is to be charged to those higher up in authority
the business offered them. who are either ignorant of or uninterested in the
"I visited the docks of the Atlantic Coast Line conditions at Jacksonville.
at Talleyrand. I found them stored to their ut- So notorious have become the conditions here
mot capacity with lumber. I found the lumber that trade organizations in adjoining States and
piled on them much higher than is customary. cities like savannah, have met to consider meas-
Mr. Spencer, the agent, assured me that vessels ures of relief for the freight congestion existing
drawing 19 feet -could ow load at this dock, and here.
taat the dredge which had been at work at the We ask that under the authority vested in
bar just beyond the dock would be kept at work your commission and under tae general rules now
until this or a greater depth was made perma- in force, or such additional rules as you may see
neat Mr. Spencer also told me that the creet proper to adopt for dealing with this situation:
reading ealonlside of the railroad property would that the Atlantic Coast Line Railway, the Sea.
be dredged out and a track laid along the creak so board Air Line Railway, the Florida East Coast
tat light 0 o1uld come into the creek and be Railway and the St. Johns River Terminal Corn
loaded wita lumber direct from the cars. pany be required to equip themselves with an ad
"I vs vilted the docks of the Seaboard Air equate amount of rolling stock and a sufflclen
Line Railway. I found that the dock room WAS number of employees for the prompt and propel
NOT PROPERLY UTILIZED. The lumber was handling of business here and we especially ask
piled I mek manner as to waste a large amount for the passage of a rule requiring that the local
of Ipace -s the dook. The area to the north of the freight terminals shall be opened for the receipt
dooks was et floored between the tracks, and for of outgoing freight, in less than car load lots, from
lack of th covering It is impossible to utilise a seven o'clock in the morning to five o'clock in the
larp arm for trg lumber. From my observa- afternoon.
tion I think I wI be well nlside of the mark, it UNITED GROCERY COMPANY,
I msy that thrqartrs of a million feet more By B. G. Lasseter,
lumber eold be sto ed ea this dok Ift the space General Manager
was properly tled. This would live opportunity Toomer & Reyolds,
for the dishargnlag of 7 ars ae t ooe, which Attorne.
would help considerably iM relieving the coage- "What course will you take, Mr. Burr, in deal.
tios. ing further with this question, and how soon do
Perhape the most signiacant thing that hap- you think that the Commissionn will be ready to
ped at the meeting wa. the determination of take action?"
the Wholesale Gre1es to make no complnatt, al- "I will," said Mr. Burr, "go carefully over the
though It ame out in the testmo thalit they testimony as soon as it is sent to me. The
were sutering greatly on account of this uoirM, stenographer said that it would require ten days
thon. The day on which the lumber broken were to transcribe his notes. When the record is be-
testifying I adted a wholeale grocer who was fore me I will then be able to make up my report,
present to give me a list of names of wholesale to the Commissilon. In my opinion it will be
grocers so that I might summon them to appear necessary for the Commission to go carefully over
the next day and tetify. This man said, 'It isn't its rules and see whether or not they are sufficient
necessamry for you to do that. The will be a to cover conditions shown in this testimony; if
meeting of the Wholesale Groers Anseiation to. not, to set about making the nearly rules to
night The members will be potled that you cover them. As to the time lwi rtaketo set
are here and they will all be gad to come volun ready to commence proceedins for the relief of
t *ru this eongsested condition, I will say, that, In my


opinion, it 1Will pAxty days before thi Boarn
will 'be prepared to tke action.
In the meatim tht shippers who a. siTer.
Ing most ca'S g rhIte. as far as it lies in the
power of the Comml6 1011O to afford it, b I applvino
to the Commission. I will Illustrate tiis Iy
example: Just before I Wett Tallahass, i make
the Jacksonville trip the Commission r, ,,iva,
telegram which read 'Have about $2,,~ worth
lumber cut to order due Ship May 20th., hav had
cars ordered and note received yet.' iginid j.
8. McAlister, Reddlok, Fla. I wired Mi .\hAlis.
ter as follows: 'Wire me Aragon Hotel, Jackson.
ville, how many and the kind of cars yon nelll
1 received at Jacksonville this answer, laiteld the
11th of July: 'Need four fiats at once.' As sqon
as I got this telegram I wenc'to the ofnle of Mr.
Ford, General Superintendent of the A. C. I,.. anl
directed him to furnish these cars and als, sent
him a letter to that effect. When I return to Tal.
lahassee I received a letter from Mr. I ',)ni, *,d,(4l
July 12th, in which he advised me as filh,\s:
'Four flats were placed at Reddir.k for \ii .1. s.
McAlister by train 801 this date.'
"For the benefit of all whose busin.-s ini.' 1,,
threatened with loss for lack of cais i v,iii ay
that every case that has come befoeli, i r.i.,,.
mission for attention has been att.indil 11, aid
the cars were procured without any iimo, delay
for the shipper who complained. From this it
would appear that although the question as i
whole may not be satisfactorily adjusted by thW
Commission for sixty days, the Commis-in cvan
and will do much for the relief of shippers if the
shippers will make application to it."
"Do you contemplate any further invest iti~ms
into this matter, Mr. Burr?"
"Yes, while I am waiting for the tians i;:t of
the testimony it is my purpose to again viit ack.
sonville to inspect the yzaids and dot ks of the
St. Johns Teiminal Co. which a nad nit .ain i,.nt
time to go over in my last visit"
"Are there any complaints from other points in
the State about delay in the transportation of
freight?"
"I am inclined to answer your question ny
handing you the map of Florida and asking you
to put your finger on as many places as you like
and those places will be the places from which
this Commission has received complaints from
shippers about the diEiculty oL getting their goods
noved. In other words, the conditions are bad
everywhere, and in my opinion there will be no
permanent relief until the railroads are com-
pelled to provide themselves with the proper
equipment and facilities for handling the busi-
ness."

Progress of the Dredge Everguades
Fort Lauderdale, Fla., July 16, 1906.
Hon. J. E. Wolfe,
Tallahassee, Fla.
Dear Sir-I only write to say that everything
on this end is progressing very nicely. "The
Everglades" is doing good wor.., and while we
have handled a great deal of soft rock, it is
being handled with perfect ease.
I expect to increase the force on the working
dredge tomorrow and work from daylight until
dark, until we can get our two crews a little bet,
ter trained, then we will commence working both
day and night
The water is gradually falling, and I think
that it will only be a short while until it is about
normal again.
Will write you again Wednesday. When may
we expect Gov. Broward again? Mr. HendricKs,
the machinist sent here from Chicago, has about
finished his work and is anxlous to go back uomie,
but I have asked him to remain with us until
the Governor eame.
Truly yours,
FRED A. BRYAN.
T'-. alhssa Democrat denies that it re
ceives pay for its oppoitiUon to luverglade drain,
age, but admits that it did receive pay for some
plates it printed on that subject at the sam, rate
it charged Congreana La4 for correcting a
mis-statement it had mae about hlm. Will the
Democrat please tell who paid it for printifn
those plates? What will the Democrat charge
for correcting the statement t made some weeks
ago naming several South florida gentlemen as
the financial backers of the Florida News Bureau
One of the gentlemen has deled emphaticallY
that he har contributed a p for the purpose
mentioned. The Demora ihed the tate
ment that he was a oorbutr ad now that tb
tion would haduge thake the cor
rectlonu.-Dsoto d


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Our


SDrain -


age


Primer


Dialogue Between Little Algtrnon and His Pa, Continued From Last Week.
Alg.-You remember, Pa, that you promised to tell me some more about
drainage? You told me last week that these people who are writing against
the proposition to drain the Everglades are doing it because they are PAID
TO DO IT. You told me that the very people who were running the Jack.
qonville Literary Bureau, which is putting out all the stuff against drainage
for the newspapers at $2 a column, are the people who tried to fix up A
scheme a little while ago to drain this land in connection with the State, eaI)
party to the agreement putting up a dollar an acre. You told me also that
the State had been trying for fifty years to have the Everglades drained by
private contract You also said that all of these schemes having failed, the
present Trustees, who, by the very Act creating them, were obligated to
drain, had now determined TO DO THMMBLRTJVES what they could not get
any one to do by contract You said something about the talk about spend-
ing the people's money for drainage was idle talk and talk put forth tor the
purpose to deceive. I don't understand this exactly and I want to ask you to
explain a little bit more on this line. Now tell me, It the Trustees are
spending public money why is it that they are not spending the PEOPLE'S
money to drain the Everglades?..
PaL-I confess, my son, that the question is a natural one and it Is easy to
g;o wrong about this. It has been so easy to deceive the people that those
who had an interest In deceiving them have had a very nice time on this
same proposition. I will try to make it plain to you, my son. The Trustees
nre spending money derived from the sale of lands. When the United Sttes
Government gave the lands to the State it pave them with the distinct undei-
standing that they were to be drained. When the State Legislature creted
the Board of Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund and vested in this
Board the title to the lands, it directed the Board to dispose of the land as it
paw fit, for the purpose of drainage and reclamation. Although this was a.
public trusi the funds arising from its operation could not be properly called
the PEOPLE'S MONEY, because the people could not get the benefit of this
money, it could not be used for ANY OTHER PURPOSE than the caktla g
out 01 the trust creted by the Legislature to drain and reclaim. Except la
the sense of being beneficiaries of this trust the people have NOTHING TO
DO WITH IT, and after the trust was vested in the Trustees the Legislature
could not direct how the money should be spent. It is what I mign describe
by coining the phrase "a quasi public trust." The fine distinction whieh
can be drawn between a public fund of this nature and the other public
funds, which come directly from the people, has enabled the opponents of
this drainage enterprise to create the impression, by sheer force of much
repetition, that the Trustees were souandering the people's money. If the
Trustees had used the money derived from the sale of thee lands for any
other purpose than to drain and reclaim swamp and overflowed lands, they
would have made themselves liable to prosecution for breach of trust, besides
being guilty of fattthlesnem in discharging it
Ag.-I think Ive got that. Now please tell me why it is that the Trustees
did not have a complete survey made of the entire Everglades region, with.
(etimates as to cost. before they undertook to do any digging.
Pa.-I see, Algy, that you have been tainted by what you'ye seen written
in the papers tha are againSt drainage because their bosses, or the people
who become their bosses by paying for their space, have said about this u.
veylng business. There bave been two United States Government surore
made of the region around Lake Okeechobee and from the lake to the glf.
One was made in 1879, under thm direction of Col. Gilmore. Another was
made by Capt. J. W. Sackett, under the direction of Capt. Black. Althbodh
these surveys were made eight years apart, the reports on file in the War
Department at Washlinton are almost identical7l the same. CaLot. SLkett's
report shows a difference between his survey and that of the 187 survey s
to the water level at a point 43 miles from the point of beginning, of a little
over two Inhebs.
AlS.-Then you don't think. pa, there's any use for any more surveys?
Pa.-Why certainly not. Just let me draw for you a mental piOture of the
Rverglade. It is an Immense saw rrass flat. Just as level as the ocean and
as unbroken as to surface. Everything that can be known about the surfte
of the Everglades was discovered and made known by these two Govern.
meant surveys. There are NO NATURAL OBSTACLB8 IN THE WAY of
cutting anals through this area. snob as nresant themselves to salmlar seo
terprises elsewhere. There are no mountains. sno hills,. no valleys. It is one
vast, level surface, hlpher In the widdli than in any other point, and Jqst a&
water runs of of a turtle's back In all directions, so does the water from
lAke Okeechobee. which Is the hirhet point, run to the East to the At.
lantlo Ocean, to the South, and to the West to the Gulf .
Alg.-But ps, how could it be perfectly level and be higher In tne middle
at the ane time?
Pa.-When I used the term perfectly level I used it to describe the etect
roduced apom the eye of a person standln on a steamboat dk l ake
Okchobee sad k around hi. As an actual t the M level
Ahows a hfl of 1 t ft Lake Okeebhobee to the .I


July


p
il~
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anos of 2u mle&a Mkesflto4 t1O to
eye CANNO Wi dt f" ,
thver laes1


PaT-. TeThe 51"SOB F
ha le I... :otIt "la.--.

the sffm 9L aY ts e0a tt"


wurle les authan mor ft dorainag w t o $then t>a'f a s-
nSidto l epth.An then, Las IOk bo6 wadto as


WeAt to edn 4, 0l t, *o
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Nrew e 4o, e

Worth In 18l. J. O. Frio lad oIt i
dipper ln ol. p lct the o p
a. t*b .solet,,eb

th dredge surface withinaar told th, h
soft until exposed to t ,,
rer paddle goea through tub hao tha
will take les than a million dolars to cut the main canals whql tbs
alder necesaary to lower the water In Lake Okeeohobee and to ppad ou,
let for drainage 41trlote Into thole cnat. _, iv, l


dipper would pick up. Th told them how many-dpporfula iK -h
edgee oould move. The engineer told them how mnaroublo yult
rial per mile, had to be ex0aYated tocut aalii
deep They knew how may o at
in a working day. It wa a saimpl!e/ c. .

o" n t ,u ... 6j .... -- $

a, Aw ,l ,
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Oh '\001 bafid, r


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Sixth Page


THE SUN


July 21,1906


GUEOCRRORIftL TIMlBER
CHIP3 MiD 3PLIIITEIW


Shaking

Mr. Syd L. Carter, of Gainesville, is, as every
one knows, a candidate for the Speakership of
the House at the next session of the Legislature.
Mr. Carter says, however, that he will feel no
bitterness it he is not elected as his ambition is
not personal. His candidacy is in the interest of
the University of Florida, or, rather, of Gained-
ville as the seat of the University. Of his oppo-
nents he says: "George Matthews of Ocala is a
mighty nice fellow, but he's a 'crank,' he has
always been known as a crank. But he's a nice
follow. Eugene Matthews of Starke is also a
nice fellow, a mighty nice fellow, but he is no
everlastingly nice that anybody can do anythin:I
with him. He is so anxious to please that he
lots folks run over him."
What the Starke Matthews thinks of Carter and
the Ocala Matthews or what the Ocala Matthews
thinks of Carter and the Starke Matthews, is not
at present known to this scribe; but if either or
both ever come to the Capital he will surely ask
him qr them.
When asked if Everglades drainage was an
Issue in Alachua County in the last campaign
Mr. Carter replied that the subject, as an issue.
was never once mentioneQ. As to his own opin.
ion of that matter, it was still, for lack of sufll-
clent information, unformed, but he proposed to
Inform himself upon it before the Legislature
convened and if he found it right and practicable
would certainly favor it; that as for the reams of
printed matter now going the rounds of the press
and bearing the hall-mark of the Literary Bu.
reau, it was absolutely worthless in shaping opin-.
ions as the puollc is advised that it Is simply
paid-for printed matter and nothing more.

One of those rumors which originate from most
anywhere and from nowhere ln particular, floated
Into the capital this week, to the effect that the
Hon. hep Clark of Calhoun County, affection.
ately, hfaillarly and amusingly known as "The
Kid Senator" at the last session, had ambitions
to serve the State nla the capacity of Its Seore-
tary. I do not get this directly from Mr. ClarK
and it would therefore be unfair to him to accuse
him of the Intention to contend with the Hon. H.
Clay Crawford in the next general primary for
this high offloe, As I have said, it was one of
those rumors that float around in the air. Thece
Is no particular reason why Mr. Clark should not
be a candidate for Secretary of State. His youth
certainly should be no bar. For that matter I do3
not think that Mr, Clark is overburdened with
lack of years, although i is appewaOe and his
general air of good nature make him look younger
than he is. The direct question nas not been put
to him, but, the Hon. H. Clay Crawford shows no
signs of being tired of occupying the chair which
he has so acceptably filled and which hie father
filed with so much edit to himself and honor to
the State. i .
I see that tne newspaper paragrapher are say-
ing that the Hon. W. L Douran ofb wanne
County is being named a a possible candidate


the


Old Plum


for Speaker. W. R. Dorman will perhaps be bot-
ter known if I call him Riley Dorman. He has
been a prominent figure in the counsels of both
second and third houses in Tallahassee for some
years. He was particularly prominent in the lob-
by of the Leon Hotel, and in other places where
statesmen are made and unmade, the week before
the convening of the caucus of the last Legisla-
ture. It will be remembered that Major Healy
felt himself aggrieved because the people for
whom he had oeen doing political work for yeaas
had not consulted him about the choice for Speakc-
er, but had gone ahead wita the wire pulling that
was expected to place John Watson in the chair.
This, it will be recalled, was not particularly rel-
ished by the indefatigable Major and for once his
reputation for good nature received a little jar.
"I'll show 'em a thing or two," quoth the Major,
and enlisting the services of "Riley the Ready,"
and John Luther of Oldtown as lieutenants the
Major proceeded to do the best he could for Gil.
cnrist, and everybody knows what the Major's
best effort generally results in. Riley Dorman,
as I said, was very prominent in the caucus
counsels that wound up by the Giachrist forces
being able to carry the necessary number of votes
into a private caucus on the ground floor of the
Leon the day before the real caucus met.
Mr. Dorman is also known as the Cracker ora-
tor of the House. He possesses quite a little nat.
ural eloquence, has a good flow of words and a
voice of proved carrying power. Probably his
best effort during the last session was in second.
ing the nomination of James Piper Taliaferro to
the U. S. Senate. Whether Riley's reputation as
a speaker will be sufficient to make him THh
Speaker is not yet shown in the cars, and on the
broad principle that nobody can tell what will
happen until it is JUST ABOUT TO HAPPEN,
one would be foolish to say that the Hon. Riley
has no chance. If he has any intention of become.
ing a candidate for Speaker he has kept it pretty
well to himself. In conversation with his
brother, who is an employee in the office of the
Secretary of State, no information coula be had
as to Riley's intention, his brother declaring
that Riley had not mentioned the matter to him.

Every once in a while a perusal of the columns
of the State press will bring to light a sentence
that looks rather harmless and unimportant, but
which really is significant of things that are hap.
penLng that are of great importance to the peo-
ple. The Miami Metropolis, which has generally
echoed East Coast Railway sentiment, but which
cannot be classeQ as an East Coast owned paper,
in discussing the primary law in a recent issue
quoted the Hon. John W. Watson, Representa-
tive-elect from Dade County to tne State Legiat.-
ture. Following the quotation was tlis sentence:
"The Metropolis concurs with Mr. Watson Inl
this amendment as well as in ALL THE OTHER
CHANGES he promises to advocate."
As a sample of sweeping endorsement this Is
tole real article. It shows an agrment between
two genPtlemen on a very vexed queatUon which


Tree1


no other two gentlemen have been able to agr,,
upon, namely, the changes wnich it would he aJ-
visable to make in the primary law. Followit;
closely on the announcement by the Tropical Sun
(a paper whicn .ls known to be East Coast ownel)
of the candidacy of Mr. Watson for Governor (it
the State, this complete concurrence in Mr. Wat-
son's views by the Miami Metropolis can be r.e
garded as one of the endorsements of Mr. Wat.-
son's candidacy f6r Governor whici can be ex-
pected to follow in all newspapers devoted to th,'
furtherance of the political policies of Florida's
great developer, who finds time, while bridginN
the Atlantic Ocean, to interest nimself largely
In the political affairs of his adopted State.
Be it known that this pointing out of te iutNfl-
ences behind Mr. Watson's supposed candlila(y
for Governor is in no wise to be taken a*s o4lpo-
sition of this journal to kir. Watson. Unless tht
gentleman has changed in the last few months I
am ready to concur in most of the political views
of Mr. Watson. We have found ourselves (1-
gether upon most questions and I have a hilgh rE
gard for Mr. Watson's character, both political
and moral. I merely point, In passing, to the iu-
fluences which seem to be behind certain cunldi-
dates for office.

One of the State newspapers has a column
headed "Talked of for. Governor." In it I notet 3
clipping to the effect that "Florida newsvj I)'r
men are generously endorsing Editor Frank HaP*
ris' candidacy."
This belongs to that species of hoary h11adl
customs wnich are followed because people have
gotten into the habit of following them. At foi0-
year intervals during tue past two ldecad '
Frank Harris' probable candidacy for (Governor
nag been discussed. The worthy Mr. Harris Is 11
member of the clan of perpetual, ancient and ho1
orable, everlasting and continual, candidates "i
which every State and every oo00nty has its nuti
ber. I do not doubt that the Harris boom f
Governor in 1908 will suffer the same pleasant d'
mise that has followed other quadrennial Hard
booms to the contrary of which man's nimeon'
runneth not. It would seem that as Nestor 0o
Florida editor Mr. Harris holds a place in VFlo
da affairs t at no effervescent dream of temop
rary office holding could induce him tvhange tf'
another title.

Another paragraph has friendly mentiol(l f
Albert W. Gilchrist as gubernatorial tililr i
the genial Albert ever had such an aspirntion
received its death blow when Albert rai lh
career as Speaker of the last House of flePre
ientatives. When the caucus had decree tha;
Albert would be the Speaker I mane the Pre "'l
tion that Albert would be a disappointment d
his desire to play the role of.a Constitutionl ,l
pounder, coupled with his inclination to ) .l
would induce him to occupy too much v.:i, alh
time, to the detriment of the passage of ft*.ori
(ContUned o Pan P 7.)


4,,'
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4 1 7'"
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. a. .' i j i I*'i 'a _______________ -- I-I__-_


Browa rd ,TiaI~e T1e6 ?
-i!. '0., TA ) Vol ffeJL''F'w", IIJ F 12h


S vOonor N. B. Broward returned l~t week
from a trip north', He' MW t'to New York'to sirv,
together ,withltJage. Alton B. *Parkes. Judge
OGeWre ray. Hpa. tbtrd P. Olney, Mr. Thomas
Wanamaler, "and othbr 4isiangi.hed Ameicanas,
as a member df the International Policy Holders
* *.d 'sD** **-s '4'; C ,n *
To a representative of THE 8U Qovy, Broward
talked Iteretingly of the meeting, Its object and
its re=u
"We met at the Waldorf-Astoril Upq;,' beawn
,the Cte'vetor, "had an informal reception and in-
*,troduction to each other and then went to lunch-
'"eon. which was served in the room adjoining the
flMIdttee room. At 2 o'clock the committee con-


and organized by electing Hon. Richard
ey Chairman, Mr. Seymour Eaton Secretary
. R. Scrugham Organization Manager.
Sfirst purpose of the meeting was to organ-
Ld ipsup an a4dress to the people, calling
attention to the faqt that the committee had
lpd, ind, to Ita object. The Legislature of
ate t New York. at its last session, enacted
;a,= among other things, provided a mode
!tiUBdlreetors of the New York Life and
feo Insurance Companies by which
pit y.Iders in theie two. companies will
i prata lwy of exercising their rights In
1g ffisear, whioh was only a form until this
as ctd.Th e law provides that'all the
We fthe +90 companies shall go out of
he mot of December, of this year I
It provides that these two companies
paiW up lists of all persons holding pollcles
M empanle, and, shall file such lists in
S office in ever State in the Union,
i' having such list Ina the New York
Is.f fhese lists was furished the committee
met ip NewYork .sat week. The law also
e that the p-reseat directors of the two
l %hall.' oms a& tick, for directors
*:hal be -ntitl Adl tiston ticket"
,iol_ t. be onliate ndt later than July
ItpvdMs t*at the comml4e shall nomi-.
l tiV et not waterr than August, 18th, this
'to be called "Committee Ticet." the
s of .the' committee 'ar to' o'nd thee
I5' c t 1 'f tbhesoTley aqmlers in, the two
ni L t i'oughoqt he world, to.furnish them
'of he e.w Yor law and" to give them
information 'concerning howi to vote the


td law t require that the policy, holder sBall
mlak lils baltot as he 'desires, seal It In an en-
velp, register it and direct It te, the company,
with a notation on the, envelop to the effect that
'this envelop contains a ballot for directors of the
New York Life Insurance Co., (or Mutual Life,
as the case may be) to be opened by the Com-
missioner of Insurance for the State of New
York, in (the presence of the directors of the comrn-
pany and a committee representing the Interna-
tional Policy Holders Committee.'
"In this way the Legislature has provided a
method, plain and simple, by which the policy
holders in the two companies who desire a change
in the management thereof may brjng about that
result. The Legislature of the State of New.York
has done its part by legislating out of office the
old management, and has provided this method
by which a change can be maae whenever It is
found that the money is being used to benefit the
individuals who chance to be omeets of the com.
pany Instead of solely for the benefit of the policy
holds.
"I do not care to criticise the management by
the directors of the past and present as I think
It best that whatever criticism is to be made
Saho. & be ila he shape of facts culled from the
repot of the New York Legislative Investigating
'. Committee and such other specific data as will be
" omilad ahent out by the committee dnder
t he direetioi of Hon. Richard Olney., Hon. Alton
B. Parker, Mr. Samuel Untermeyer. and, Mr. Sey.
mour Baton, who are fn easy read of so much
data as has been collected.
"I am quite sure tmat as soon as the policy hold-
ers are apprised of the law enacted by the Legsla.'
tare of the State of, New York recently, and Afnd
how easy it is to control -by simply marking a
ballot that will be sent them and returning it as
described and having it counted, they will 1e,
spend quickly and take possession of the organic.
nation oi the two companies by electtl'men who
will represent the policy holdMers their 1-
terests rather than mam who will turn 6ver the
nale hundred million dollar of funds to the
spesolatom of Wall street a hbebeen dotme I the


without interet, or willV eyo
te, (t,,-w ifrA9 ^,,


-AAAA- AIL


"The so 4 (U< *6 SW oine L
sending out tu m ua nd0s Mi.
of the po01rY5oldhlt, fltM
charged with' te a d
by August 19th kad IthI* het W *
ballot count d mela *" I I'. .
Ink "dail r thakoflg th
"The committee ta the iUlrl we hMar. /
man. The member of A.imittt W
pay. They are me who orie '
purpose of informln polley W Wbl, t .
tione heretofore exlting In th li b, <4gl
the Insurance oomn M le, of ,t IMaIs1 ,sw steq ttoheWte0r maI
copies of the laws d other llhttue up i u th st,0 at
subject, and of so antornItt i, I ler
tast he Can enjoy e be"e~t4 h shekM dsrhtT
from the full exerol of his righW, by Ml" .glg
the business of the ampalsm fot the benelt of been oti dr, h
the policy holder l tead o(f f tMl.4. It df W t
few self-appointed core who have are( ecOome + o xOei
a selfperpetuating by." .
"The personnel oCthe committee 4 Ia i j ot I;i i
teresting one, is it |t, Governor? suooeeded In aleasingl
"Well, the committee is compaoted of. oae ot had peioiwlyu ppp!t
the bluest men i1V this oolnt ueit tM is ory oftan S. il
Alton B. Parker, e Democratic candidate for AeJrbfba'#tMa
Preeldent in 1904; auugeOorgeGimy,o'Dla. GWeolgeI*0
ware, wuo was a member of the Paris Peace Op.i Allobowm i
mission that made te treaty between W gMin, awU nl A PlOr A *ro,
the United States id who0 'bie b mettioned "
lately U a probable appointee to th Supraeme o
Court of the United States: Genbi PBy
packer of Pennsylvasnia;' 0Goernor Johnpn of 0tate
Mlnnesota; 0overno Roberts O nF. onacut, W a
ien. Richard P.. Olbpy Chafrman of th C I ,
tee'who was W Cletalnd'l dbinet, Mr. ` -1l
Wanamaker, a son the
and gs ,t ,uMerha who, rP
premumi onlll0A I ran t- ale
dilretors .i'th th Mutual a the New, York. y,
Ife : Insurance Oo isneqto ; ,and J.
H. Hem of Bou Callina'."
, "Are the people riparew taking much Inter. ..W*
eat In this imatterr prope
"It require a matter off great impptapgoe to' Ieog
bring together a oImmittee* oompoled of suoa c
busy meo as I hav~ut .,, ,
"What was the t strl e. fatoe of this A
meeting, Governor? What Impressed yu t st i. .
deeply?" :) ,. ,/,,... ^ ^,i, rUif lwA tl .,
toThe most impre 1v lato a, i b t
that these men, all of thematuUsy w4okeiwals ti .
respective fields, malt of thes o overg flfy a are
age, should leave thoir homes and their workand
their own individu a'ntsts to itsema e
triotio duty for the neft ofAbe.
the public good, without a*s tou of W b 5
reward or the p n of elf itrests.
look upon it as ah s tsa0 a v i t .!te
could be rotten toreompoeicggCo a17
number of truly I_.
And these men wer athM i #re o ptof
the country. One the gentleoen present and
who had probably veled th mr dlitan.e *- t bpp
to be present, was r. Ohl o Oaliforf1a~ O ',
publishes the San "oe,
newspaper. I heard Kr. Li
had opposed Bryan his gretand 3
paign, but he was f Brysan dh 4
had made him so."
"Did you fnd any ng, to thi
meeting, upon the te of tatq
"They served to pha iS
the necessity for 8 to li fe
by State o foials w th
four Yesm as their tS'
"You paid a visit Wshgos *4
ing, did you not.
"Ye, my trp to ashlston was t
pontmenttomeet on. J W 0W ll sqAjP o a9h
ot Asio& e g AiHon. ward med. M f f
the Bureau of Irrigation atd rsnq .
tons, whicl appolatment had beeS
by Hos. N WppM 'Mrl's a,11 I.'a lu Mi
Wa DeprImest to at

ooafdest, will ae productmi ve o
tour t andw tho ad eru r oiUs.. v S4
nt e oditkms here -ad see q v
w1llb possble t give Goers + i our. i

portanlee the eheb f thilstW e J', sjt
'*perdt Whht^hasbt -'up /


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TTHE

; ^ Jt l OITOR ANAND TWW lriy 8
Sare a iloriou than say victory tha has ever been won
S, the ghtg animal, was dowed with a ll of his own and put
tWe & wrld to work out h own mt .,
Ssam e as 4t a, *U ntor W.'J. Bryan reaelve
e at the a o t p 4 to s tory th le trust ase.
t' ot to sIa P the aets of our neighbors, when
K -^ acta are ro y Wht a plum In the opinion of
toM ei o are tri.l oMpiracy toIn the
W WiOW (otrt otf ootf tjl'5ace e latn weekM
W~~e v *th euleet that the cttiseo of Jaghllavule took
aotoaaredl o the WrdilAt rded byi the jury.
We have hardi that th plae of beuuies o Mr. D. P. Myeson, Jr., who
was one Of* the Iror, wa pearte" w moh anmeS *showli' th d SUpproVA.
We have beamr that .44i r e c e loon was followed on the street
by theI who tir dsapproval la words.
Sdo~t reMe aors AS IMPORTANT even if they are TRU.
We have no desire to eemen oOl*te of erime, OWPT FOR THU
UXAMLB that a oviteoig may et to othes.
biWhole oblest 4*Se law i to MVBNT the M OMMISBION OFV

n means of orime SOLLY AS A DE-
*W' 88 PSSON^ ad a protetlon to Innooent persea, not
i n o w erportant whaerh particular do.
wiith Ae a trust wee convicted or not
as th adynilatvam of umean law that trivial thing often


di, comanlty of Intereats, obligations of
glo-ll may Influened te verait of a Jury
t or deeadaats.
suc a triUl as the one conducted last week nl
a iasep In this State.
SWould have resolved the warning from this
9 Il retraint of trade are DANGBROUS
ride should number among Its oftiers, a man
Mla4 NICB SARY TO BE DONE, even though
Sole of oriMa have, for one of their ser-
So hia dty when the doing places him in
k4 Inential WdU9IOI.
d e m he prosecuted the gentlemen whom
O guilty of illegally combining against the in
Sthat he ha not yet begun to eight. He
eoutlonagasllt the gentlemen who control
10 IW the prie of Ice is reduced.
ready shOwn by Mr. Bryan WB BBLIEVK


some


e 61 thls ato of the proseeution of the lee trust, whlch has not
ntl b ht out but which we think tos of the greatet sianlf
a we61 Ieadtd report that we hear concerning the grocery
re t4 a0 mOR that It s known In Jackasonvile, that
BryaM ed hi Information agalust the beef
Shld a meeting, at which they gath.
(( edof elaestoa Ion lretralntof trade, and
y, but some the less DETBRMINBDLY, consigned
i to ha. W hpe that the bird of freedom will
tls- eMe he of the departed trut; and spread his
Shave been alicted sore and previously by, thi
MAW :e::lt Of lIf
hu drawn a cartoon which we print on this page,
othtruts and the law. We commend this picture
oett f I the ounatle In this tate, with the hope
ll draw m It such inspiration will prompt them to get Into
a'oon asM possible.
0
GRAHAM AmAIN-PLEAllE XCUSE US.
at this aeekthe fourth of a Mries of articles on the mlidotga
Iraha ltoh d ede It was our duty to present
oersoalfo the people as their servant It is proper for the
aa of him t a esrUcatloo as to character.
a I a twayI repreiasl the people, knowing Graham
rthy.as th e t benett of this knowledge.
Sa M rigt to defend mse from the
ie Hao IMsnituted salt agatest this journ.l,
id ,t ,rt libel.
SaW asdthough we were unwllin4
SOhepsp so basM as those which have been
by aha e obligatuon upon s to respondto
ad of an WhO bethnks he has been damaged by
Mev to the people a brief recital of
kaham's$ --a- $ad deceit.
s realize oMtol do esdes "aplag onea
wver rat d h ra t may a bee
he that the peop*ale lt ti of rd s etal re the one we
about Graham. We edwe Bow with a premeA that we* willose
m seriu with neat week's su. We would dose It now, after so
bm orth and so cmdutv: provnla o oup changes agalnt
.we have prted to t this ts Iot w r M*ot hefa t that we
SCROWM PI of Grahao m raeoalty yet to offor.
may we will Mate that we have plenty more as damning fae
s aS those we ha ve pripte, wh If we ver conclude
S eo time has arrived, we wi use as seemso beet to us.
bthe last time that we hal give spae ot this page to
,.take. the oprtut ot ,ittlw what w have ad bets,
we afS P ormn at "y thie tle a4 t whatever we

4;ihStptat pettsrmsaoeee


SUN


VACATIONS GOOD-.UT POING DUTY ,4' .W
Vacations In the summer time, especially to lord tt otac
and we congratulate every one who o so fortunate tuated that he can
take a long vacation.
This observation i of course extended to tnolude oM a o s
private ltiseas. ..' '
We learn that It has been the custom for teo u.*1 t00 Iu4lroad
Commislon of Florida to take a v nation In tho s .
We are Informed that it haalso o is n the Ocu! Pr1?
loners to be away at the same time, leaving os thM o e to the
people's business.


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The Right Weapon in tl
Our m niml thoge en further than this In tat we.hae lban a Um
SometsAllteOf the CommsIsom have bmaway at he asm tlm%
leaving the Seretary to d to te routine,ad to pomtaPO
of th people's mOt tresr the eomriai to prornm oat
This Is as It should ba
We have ano ritilm to make
On the ontray we Congratulate the people of Morida m that a Ue
ECA for their ServantsM wvise enough TO SA Trh OP.
R TION, In order that they might be better fitted to do the people
work.
Railroad Commsonr Morgn is now away on a vti
Railroad Comssioner B rowne is .ao away on a vacation.
Weare loth to them n emen back toduy.
We wish It wer so that IY, could enjoy the fuH prIod of therc dfttem
plated vctions.
Bets vIr mwe ay be todo it, we too hveo
amd we ww ow tumto itI F W N =


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THE SftN


CALL AT TITJ R, TT
We, theM e, a'y to Commissioner Morgan and to Commissionor
BrowOe ,
"COME BACK TO TALLAHASSEE.
"THORU IS WORK POR YOU TO DO.
"On the meopip pnterViney t It necessary for you to go."
Commlai n Al. r ound by investigation that the business of the
State IS ,aRMfULt f ,' WM l Kl WITH, od account of the congested'
condition of te'rmal of Jacksonville. He has taken a masm of
testimony. It aeesary for the Commission to digest thia testIony,
TO FIND THS FIqT and to APPLY THE REMEDY.


A


Handso-Weld It-.

Commiearaoar Bur has doe all that one Commissioner can do. *
The "Commissom canot at Vnless there s a n .
IT 18 NBCUSSBAY FOR THE COMMISSION, TO ACT.
THE TXM TO ACT IS NOW. .
THERE SHOULD BB NO DELAY.
VAST IN Sm ARM AT TAKE.
The cltisens of thi State are suffering serious losses EVERY DAY THAT
THIS ACTION 1i DLATED.
Commiuseoer Br has ad that It will take tenoo days to get this testimony
in such shape as will enable him to make his report.
The Comautlal-, ALL Or THEM, should be here at the end of that toe
days to hst Mr. Buq's report and to ACT ON IT AT ONCE.
There ever haa been a time, sinoe the Comminaielo was formed, whbe the
need for pe aUonB was so great, the chance to beunet the people a
ready, ner the .e Stor reet so urgent.
The p aed their aerats Mad the ersv ahol or, the ,aWt
ML a 4 .


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arms.Wedeem ibis. petisp so sbtbrui mmi.
privile4 qi u~is p ifto w~ab~ ao4~u
(0or SO ~t h ~ bit *4th~
ijeaed L th New~or A~~t~da lat ~~edBP ~(~ *''


The Mtate, Land Qpmu5"Piowli. Irntu#
&ame of public-lands Istoelasit d*tmou~t~hs.
to $5 an meXMste tw L E

Uf th sopot Teom were.010e T ibf


The MOO ~thud sold o00s40 0. U810i~ h* bsifl
eudntcomo~~qttha fa loll What~6~I~~4
Would be sa0d Of A'&nd Oo=0*10eoe o k 1t t ot~~~
then boAsted oftesae
lfor, notwithstading th ii;6wfofth i T~~iii w OPitaWOn DM ha i*kVf
thase saleare not mae tdll Mm~U1 ettlers. Am'&' rule to'wl%
iqld to rp 0 or4 to ui d A fls#~~ ~~Ii~$t Is1st
tiers; the corporations eMAW teg 0' ~ t h tao~ e*"a ~
*hase, the settlers aYti bls
And more The oroslpn adetht 1900111 i b ut0.000 009t *11'
voll little paroolgAt a tu lle ftw~u the hI ot h tlE l~.
They chab tedvlp~s tteSttbi 11m ~wt~
roat unto the pressure 0 urhaesloafU~t Nog~ieet.~wt

Whatd pi ty;hat the peat Stat.@1TO"~Wt Wb~ 1dn ~

Wealth 100hfVated StatbS.seila not h av bswefin sdoghte4eee
have' 1he14tbepe060a o,1a iltmndlerI Te WO aetrse
tlnsto6'actual soter~ ~i wd "",brow no st IFbaei* h sv, ~ M
nue to the State, but would bteattmaWeda grtt pWaFsebv*tE
Ing farmers. I .I ;"I
Tonas Is sellimtebohrpot ~peta r~e
it too late to sa"teoi ~~ ~

A SUBGSW~OIOMTO T145 1. I. I'rjUSTIIK& *.'-
Two Weeksagwer t


Internal'into im ppnet FudI igt ak hto Otbr'~I.~
Trustees adopt tb OU I eetuiuhhI ionS
volume 5Sot the printed mg*tesotiithq tto tebon

"Resolved, ThAt upon ruet oo si itrote a~*~~hw Is

request be rateirqoto the,
thereto, plriorto tUe turalashlsgot n ar t..0bic4I4u
or maps, relaftiveto tleitersal I~raw,Memt imuqpalLV t
That when copies Od lisa k q4edsootorotk$O' s* i
she19 to 64 App"lcatomti~t 41W ihetete U sh do hetj* e
through the ia Id p4t etay hjIbs
furnish a iopwy = fLdd wttee~p~si~ ~ i~o
We think thi rebolutd"~Is MeY;ub uatVwar$$.
The firta Impveuosoft 4 yI.~ws ~thtteTute mee
theiral"horty M Assn
Kapreto,~a tbatbT
applian om at a" shallhe
fore hit qs elat oriuf, alb, a"hu via-,h *

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July 21,194


THE SUN


Temptation of Mr. Burge


By
W. We JACOBS
(Copyright 1906 by W. W. Jacobi.)


V I


Mr. Higt, jeweller, eat In the smatl parlour bep
bind hib shop, Pi hubwngrily at a supper-table
which had been laid some time before. It was a
quarter to ten by the small town clock on the
meanteplce, and the jeweller rubbing his hands
ovr the .re tried in vain to remember what
etquitte had to say about a meal before the ar-
rival of an expected uest.
"He must be coming by the lut train after all,
sir." itd the housekeeper entering the room and
glancing at the clock. "I suppose these London
gentlemen keep such late hours they don't un-
derstap .us country folk wanting to get to bed
in decent time. You must be wanting your sup.
per, sr.".
Mr. Higgs sighed. "I shall be glad of my sup-
per," he said slowly, "but I dare say our friend
is hungrier still. Travelling ti hungry work."
"Perhaps he is thinking over his words for the
seventh day," said the housekeeper solemnly
"Forgetting hunger and thirst and all our poor
earthly feelings in the blesuednms of his work."
"Perhaps so," assented the other, whose own
earthly feelings were particularly strong just at
that moment.
"Brother Simpeen used to forget all about meal-
times when he stayed here," said the housekeeper,
clasping her hands. "He used to sit by the win-
dow with his eyes half-closed and shake his head
at the smell from the kitchen and call it flesh-
pete of Bgypt He said that If it wasn't for keep-
tag up his strength for the work, luscious bread
and fair water was all he wanted. I expect
Brother Burge will be a similar sort of man "
"Brother Clark wrote and told me that he only
lives for the work," said the jeweller, with an-
other glance at the clock. "The chapel at Clerk-
enwell is crowded to hear him. It's a blessed
favour and privilege to have such a selected In.
strument staying in the house. "I'm curious to
see him; from what Brother Clark said I rather
fancy that he was a little bit wild in his younger
days"
"Hallelujah!" exclaimed the housekeeper with
fervour.. "I mean to think as he's seen the error
of his ways," she added sharply, as her master
looked up.
"There he is," said the latter, as the bell rang.
The housekeeper went to the sidedoor, anu
drawing back the bolt admitted the gentleman
whose preaching had done so much for the small
but select sect known as the Beventh Day Primi-
tive Apostle. She came back into the room tfo.
lowed by a tall stout man, whose upper lip and
short stubby beard stretched with grey seemed a
poor match for the beady eyes which lurked be-
hind a pair of clumsy spectacle.
"Brother Samuel Burge inquired the jeweller,
The vidtor nodded, and regarding him with
a mile charged with fraternal love, took his
hand In a huge grip and shook it fervently.
"I am glad to see you. Brother Higgs," he Oaia,
regrdng him fondly. "Oh, 'ow my eyes have
eAedto b seat upon youl Oh, 'ow my ears
to hearken unto the words of your
He breathed thickly, and taking a seat sat with
his hands upon his knoes, looking at a fine piece
of eold beet which the housekeeper had just placed
S2Bre Clark well" Inquired the Jeweller,
placing a hair for him at the table and taking
up his carvinknife.
"Dear Brother Clark is in excellent health I
thank you," said the other, taking the proffered
chair. "Oh! what a man he is; what a Instru-
meet for good. Always strteMhing out them
bleed hands of 'is to make one of the fallen a
Seventh Day Prtmltltve"
"And sucoees attend. his efforts?' said the
jeweller.
"Succes,. Brother!" repeated Mr. Burge, eating
rapidly and gesticulating with his knlfe. "Sue-
cees ain't no name for it Why, sinte this day
last week he has saved three pickpocket, two
Balvationist. one bigamist and a Roman Oath-
olic."
Brother Hia. murmured his admiration. "You
are also a power for good" he said wisttlolly.


"Brother Clark tells me in his letter that your
exhortations have been abundantly blessed."
Mr. Burge shook his head. "A lot of it falls
by the wayside," he said modestly, "but some of It
is an eye-opener to them as don't entirely shut
their ears. Only the day before yesterday I ad
two jemmies and a dark lantern sent me with a
letter saying as 'ow the owner had no further use
for 'ema."
The jeweller's eyes glistened with admiration
not quite untinged with envy. "Have you ex-
pounded the Word for long?" he inquired.
"Six months," replied the other. "It come to
me quite natural-I was on the penitent bench on
the Saturday, and the Wednesday afterwards I
preached as good a sermon as ever I've preached
in my life. Brother Clark said it took 'is breath
away.."
"And he's a judge too," said the admiring
Jeweller.
"Now," continued Brother Burge, helping him-
self plentifully to pickled walnuts. "Now there
ain't standing room in our Bethel when I'm ex-
pounding. People come to hear me from all parts
--old and young-rich and poor--and the Apostles
that don't come early 'ave to stand outside and
catch the crumbs I throw 'em through the win-
ders."
"It is enough," sighed Brother Higgs, whose
own audience was frequently content to be on the
wrong side of the window, "it is enough to make
a man vain."
"I struggle against it, Brother," said Mr. Burge,
passing his cup up for some more tea. "I fight
against it hard, but once the Evil One was almost
too much for me; and in spite of myself, and
knowing besides that it was a plot of 'is, I nearly
felt unlifted."
Brother Higgs, passing him some more beef,
pressed for details.
"He sent me two policemen," replied the other,
scowling darkly at the meanness of the trick.
"One might 'ave stood, but two come to being
pretty near too much for me. They sat under
me while I gave 'em the Word 'ot and strong, and
the feeling I had standing up there and telling
policemen what they ought to do I shall never
forget."
"But why should policemen make you proud?"
asked his puzzled listener. -
Mr. Burge looked puzzled in his turn. "Why,
hasn't Brother Clark told you about me?" he in.
quired.
Mr. Higgs shook his head. "He sort of-sug.
gested that-that you had been a little bit wild
before you came to us," he murmured apologeti-
cally.
little bit wild?" repeated Brother
Burge, in horrified accents. "Me? a little bit
wild."
"No doubt he exaggerated a little," said the
jeweller hurriedly. "Being such a good man him.
self, no doubt things would seem wild to him
tuat wouldn't to us-to me, I mean."
"A little bit wild," said his visitor again. "Sam
Burge, the Converted Burglar, a little bit wild.
Well, well!"
"Converted what?" shouted the Jeweller, half-
rising from his chair.
"Burglar," said the other shortly. "Why, I
should think I know more about the inside o*
gaols than anybody In England; I've pretty near
killed three policemen, besides breaking a gent's
leg and throwing a footman out of window, and
then Brother Clark goes and says I've been a
little bit wild. I wonder what he would 'ave?"
"But you-you've quite reformed now?" said
the Jeweller, resuming his seat and making a
great effort to hide his consternation.
"I 'ope so," said Mr. Burge, with alarming hu.
mility; "but it's an uncertain world, and far be
it from me to boast. That's why I've come here."
Mr. Higgs, only half-comprehending, sat back
gasping.
"If I can stand this," pursued Brother Burge,
esticulating wildly in the direction of the shp,
"If I can stand being here with all these 'ere
pretty little things to be 'ad for the trouble of
picking of 'em up, I can stand anything. Tempt
me, I says to Brother Clark. Put me in the way
o temptation. I says. Let me see whether the
3vil One or me is the strongest; let me 'ave a
good old up and down with the Powers 0' Dark-
nees and see who wins."
Mr. Higgs, gripping the edge of the table with
both hands, gazed at thiis new Michael in speech-
lees consternation. new Mchael n
"I think I see his face now," said Brother
Burg with tender enthusiasm. "All in a glow
it waI, and he patted me on the shoulder and
msays, 'i send you on a week's mission to Dun.
cembe,' he says, and 'you shall stop with Brother


I


Higgs who 'a a hop full o' cunning wrou,
vanities In tlVeo nd pld.'" 0
"But suppose said the Jeweller, finding ki
voice by a tPrat rt "suppose victory 1 isM
given unto Yo'00,-1
"It won't make any difference," replied his.
itor. "Brother Crk promised that it should
'af you fall, Brother,' he says 'we'll help you p
again. When you are tired of sin come back to
us-there's always a welcome.'"
"But-----" began the dismayed Jeweller,
"We can only do-our beat," said Brother 1u1
"the rest we must leave. I 'ave girded my loi
for the fray, and taken much spiritual sus
ance on the way down from this little by
book."
Mr. Higgs paid no heed. He sat inarvelli
over the fatuousness of Brother Clark and tryi
to think of ways and means out of the dilem
into which that gentleman's perverted enthusl
had placed him. He wondered whether it wou
be possible to Induce Brother Burge to sleep el
where by offering to bear his hotel expenses, a
at last, after some hesitation, broached the sub
ject.
"Whatl" exclaimed the other, pushing his plate
from him and regarding him with great severity,.
"Go and sleep at a hotel? After Brother CIluf
has been and took all this trouble? Why,,
wouldn't think of doing such a thing."
"Brother Clark has no right to expose you b
such a trial," said Mr. Riggs with great warmth.
"I wonder what he'd say if he 'eard you," r
marked Mr. Burge sternly. "After his going aln
making all thee arrangements, for you to try
and go and upset 'em.' To ask me to shun the
fight like a coward; to ask me to go and hide a
the rear-ranks in a hotel with everything locked
up, or a Coffer Pallsa with nothing to steal."
"I should sleep far more comfortably if I knew
that you were not .undergoing this tremendous
strain," said the unhappy Mr. Higgs, "and besides
that, if you did give way, it would be a serious
business for me-that's what I want you to lool
at. I am afraid that if-if unhappily you did fal
I couldn't prevent you."
"I'm sure you couldn't," said the other cordially
"That's the beauty of it; that's when the Ev|
One's whispers get louder and louder. Why,
could choke you between my finger and thumni
it unfortunately my fallen nature should be to
strong for me, don't Interfere whatever you do
I mightn't be myself."
Mr. Higgs rose and faced him gasping. "Not
even-call 'for-the police-I suppose," he jerkerl
out.
"That would be interfering," said Brother Burg
coldly.
The Jeweller tried to think. It was past eleven
The housekeeper had gone to spend the night wit
an ailing sister, and a furtive glance at Blrott
Bure's small shifty eyes and fat unwholesome
face was sufficient to deter him from leaving his
alone with his property, while he went to ask the
Police to give an eye to his house for the niht
Besides, it was more than probable that Mr. Burge
would decline to allow such a proceeding. Widt
a growing sense of his peril he resolved to tr
flattery.
"It was a great thing for the Brethren to s
cure a man like you," he said.
"I never thought they'd ha' done it," isaid M1
Burge frankly. "I've 'ad all sorts trying to col
vert me; crying over me and praying over ro
I remember the first dear good man that called
me a lost lamb. He didn't say anything else fo
a month."
"So upset," hazarded the Jeweller.
"I broke his jor, pore feller," said Brot!f
Burge, a sad but withal indulgent smile lilhti1
up his face at the vagaries of his former cared,
"What time do you go to bed, Brother?"
"Any time," said the other reluctantly. "I suP
pose you are tired with your journey?"
Mr. Burge assented, and rising from hit chai
yawned loudly and stretched himself. In th
small room with his huge arms raised he look
colossal.
"I suppose," said the jeweler, still seeking
re-assure himself, "I suppose dear Brother Clar
felt pretty certain of you, else he wouldn't ha
sent you here?"
"Brother Clark said 'What Is a jeweller's sh
compared with a 'uman soul. a priceless 'urn
soul? replied Mr. Burge. "What is a few 'e
gaws to decorate them that perish, and make th'
vain, when you come to consider the opport'int
of such a trial, and the good it'l do and the (i
It'll be-if I do win-end testify to the concre
tlon to that effect? Why, there's sermons for
lifetime nla It."
(Continued on Page Fourteen.)


, %p 1w


q










JloHy J1, UNG6



THE JUNGLE


SYNOPSIS.
The story of "The Jungle," Upton Sinclair's
sovel MPhich am cashed the Government investi-
ga0tos into the method4 employed by the Beef
Trut, had its origin in a actual Packingtown
romnse.'
in 4hland Avenue-"baok of the stock yards"
-th- wedimg took place.
The o.. t chapter merely shows a broad-should-
ered butcher being wedded to a young girl who
a0i tis him a hero. The wedding in all its gro-
tequeness a described in this chapter. The wed-
ding ceremony i typical of Packingtown. At
midnight the formalities ended.
The chapter closes with a description of Pack.
ingtown festivities and tells how beer is promise
ously passed around.
Sinclair portrays in well-selected words the
dress of the denisen of that section.
Nearly all of the characters introduced in the
story are employed in the stock yards and the
prelude which tells of their social life is to be
followed by a story of their toil in the big yards.

copyright, 1906, by Upton Sinclair. All Rights
Reserved.


CHAPTER I.-(Continued.)


In the meantime there was going on in another
corner of'the room an anxious conference between
Teta Elzbieta and Dede Antanas, and a few of
the more Intimate friends of the family. A trouble
was come upon them. The veselija is a compact,
a compact not expressed, but therefore only the
more binding upon all. Every one's share was
differentr-and yet every one knew perfectly well
what his. share was, and strove to give a little
more. Now, however, since tney had come to the
new country, all this was changing; it seemed as
If there must be some subtle poison In the air
that one breathed here-it was affecting all the
young men at once. They would come In crowds
and fill themselves with a fine dinner, and then
sneak of' One would throw another's hat out of
the window, and both would go out to get it, and
neither would be seen again. Or now and then
half a dozen of them would get together and
march out. openly, staring at you, and making
fun of you to your face. Still others, worse yet,
would crowd about the bar, and at the expense of
the boost drink themselves sodden, paying not the
least attention to any one, and leaving it to be
thought that either they had danced with the
bride already, or meant to later on.
All these things were going on now, and the
family was helpless with dismay. So long they
had toiled, and such an outlay .they had made!
Ona stood by, her eyes wide with terror. Those
frightful bills-how they had haunted her, each
item gnawing at her soul all day and spoiling
her rest at night. How often she had named
them over one by one and figured on them as she
went to work-fifteen dollars for the hall, twenty-
two dollars and a quarter for the ducks, twelve
collars for the musicians, five dollars at the
church, and a blessing of the Virgin besides-and
so on without an end! Worst of all was the
frightful bill 'that was still to come from Gralcst-
nas for the beer and liquor that might be con.
sumedL
One could never get in advance more than a
guess as to this from a saloon keeper-and then,
when the time came, he always came to you
scratching his head and saying that he had
guessed too low, but that he had done his best-
your guests had gotten so very drunk. By him
you were sure to be cheated unmercifully, and
that even though you thought yourself the dear*
est of the hundreds of friends he had. He would
begin to serve your guests out of a keg that was
half full, and finish with one that was half empty,
and then you would be charged for two kegs of
beer. He would agree to serve a certain quality
at a certain price, and when the time came yo-1
and your friends would be drinking some horrible
poison that ooold not be described. You might
onplaloo but you would get nothing for yoar


.'~*., .,'


Thrmi~g8~o~clltw
~t"Wll 'A


pains but a ruined evening; w. J r gOi& to
law about it, you mht we to a t
once. The ealoon i t
big polit ics ina i Wi
trouble with b*
to pay what yon pi
What made all ti th6 m6pe
It was so hard on the few that
their best There wav poo o4d oSW
for Instance-he had alree
and did not every onu t ow
vMas had just m! tgged ,t fat
for two huudred oda to met o e- "' aoath'
overdue rent? And toen there W wl*l Old
ponl Antele-who waS a wtdovdiig e i h th,
children, and the rheUtmatislem Mb"etd. and 413
washing for the tradespeople oi HIcEt.,d tUtA
prices it would break your heart to a
Aniele had given the entire profit of h
for several months. Bight 'of them she
and she kept them nla a ittle pae feitd aro
on her back stairs. All day iwig the helida l
Aniele Were raking in the dump for fdO4 for
these chickens; and sometmewhen tho oomp
tuition there was too Afere, you liht e theP on
Halted street walkingg lobe otOh gutterse aMi
with their mother folloWing to see that Oa one
robbed them of their finds.
Money could not, tell the value of these oi ne
to old Mrs. Jutknene-she valued them dif
ently,' for she had a feeling that she ,wa `6
something for nothing' by means ot the at
with them she was getting th better of 4 wor
that was gettit, the better of hbet I w so ,
other ways. So she watched theta e ve ho
the day, and had learned to see lik a4t ow at
night to watch them then. One of th
been stolen long ago, and not a mo 0
that some one did not try to teaI 5V As
the frustrating of this one attempt Inijlvd a
score of false alarms it will d t dt
a tribute old Mrs. Juisuene brought, O
Teta Blsblita had onoe loaned hTe
for a few day a aved4 h0r m tu
out of her house.
More and mqre trends gathered 'rrud hie
the lamentations about these thing was Ou on,


of a saint. Finally there came
some one, and the story was rtolt
listened in slender, with his great
knitted. Now and then thee i
gleam underneath them and he
about the room. Perhaps he would
go at some of those fellows with h
sts; but then, doubtless, he real
good It would do him. -No bill, we
for turning out any one at this tj
there would be the scandal-and
nothing except to get away with (
world go its own way. So his 8a4
he merely sa4d quietty: "It is d
Is no use of .welplgs teta $isbPU
Then his look turned toward 4
close to his side, and he saw the.
ror in her eyes. "Little one" he
voice, do not worry-it will no
We will pay them all somehow, ,I
or." That was always what Jui
had grown used to it as the solutic
ties-"1 will work harder" He Ii
Lithuania when one ofcial had
port from him, and another had a
lag without it, and the two had
of his belongings. He had said it
York, when the smoothspoken a,
them in hand and made them
prices, and almost prevented Ud
plahoe In spite of their paying. b
third time, and Oa drew a deep i.
wonderful to have a husband, u
woman-and a husband who
leme, and who was so big as
The last sob of little uebu,
stifled, and the orchestra has oe
minded of It duty. Theko*evem
but there are few now ,ft to. i
very soon the oolleetlo I over, a
danes oneA more beg -t
night, however, and thgs are
before. The danee are M
of tho ave ba n ri
ago paed thestage
after hour, witbt e* asm ,
they were only I l ,
growing stupor. The me M t
Uhtly, but there wil. be Si.,i
w aelther will see the
couples do note 4e
the oomer, where r ,; .
laoed. Others, wko'ttr,1?
more, wasder abpot^h .A


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July 21,19%


TItG Page


THE SUN


Temptation of Mr. Burge


W. W. JACOBS
(Copyright 1905 by W. W. Jacobs,.)


Mr. WHimA Jewler., at to the small parlour be
hind his shop, pgpaog hungrily at a supper.table
which had been laid some time before. It was a
quart*' t 0 tUp by the small town Clock on the
matlplepie and the Jeweller rubbing his hands
ovw the fire tried in vain to remember what
etiquette had to say about a meal before the Uar
rival of as expected gut.
"He must be coming by the last train after all,
sir," oId the housekeeper entering the room and
glanoing at the clock. "I suppose these London
gentlemen keep such late hours they don't un-
derstap ,us country folk wanting to get to bed
in decent time. You must be wanting your sup-
per, sir.",
Mr. Higge sighed. "1 shall be glad of my sup-
per," he aid slowly, "but I dare say our friend
is hungrier still. Travelling is hungry work."
"Perhaps he is thinking over his words for the
seventh day," said the housekeeper solemnly
"Forgetting hunger and thirst and all our poor
earthly feelings in the blessedness of his work."
"Perhaps so," assented the other, whose own
earthly feelings were particularly strong Just at
that moment
"Brother Simpson used to forget all about meal-
times when he stayed here" said the housekeeper,
clasping her hands. "He used to sit by the win-
dow with his eyes half-losed and shake his head
at the smell from the kitchen and call it flesh-
pets of Egypt. He said that if it wasn't for keep.
tag up his strength for the work, luscious bread
and fair water was all he wanted. I expect
Brother Burp will be a similar sort of man"
"Brother Clark wrote and told me that he only
live for the work," aid the jeweller, with an.
other glance at the clock. "The chapel at Clerk-
enwell is crowded to hear him. It's a blessed
favour and privilege to have such a selected in-
strument staying in the house. "I'm curious to
see him; from what Brother Clark said I rather
fancy that he was a little bit wild in his younger
days."
"Hallelujah!" exclaimed the housekeeper with
fervour. "I mean to think as he's seen the error
of his ways," she added sharply, as her master
looked up.
"There he is," said the latter, as the bell rang.
The ousekeeper went to the sidedoor, ana
drawing back the bolt admitted the gentleman
whose preaching had done so much for the small
but select seat known as the Seventh Day Primi-
tive Apostles. She came back into the room fol-
lowed by a tall stout man, whose upper lip and
short stubby beard stretched with grey seemed a
poor match for the beady eyes which lurked be-
hind a pair of clumsy spectacles.
"Brother Samuel Burp?" inquired the Jeweller,
The vidtor nodded, and regarding him with
a mile charged with fraternal love, took his
hand in a huge grip and shook it fervently.
"I am glad to see you. Brother Higgs," he said,
regarding him fondly. 'fO, 'ow my eyes have
earnedto be setuponyou Oh, 'ow my ears
'a longed to hearken unto the words of your
volet"
He breathed thickly, and taking a eat sat with
his hands upon his knees, looking at a fine piece
of cold beet which the housekeeper had Just placed
upon Lhe 46
"I Brother Clark well' Inquired the Jeweller,
placing a chair for him at the table and taking
up his oarvlngklfte
"Dear Brother Clark is in excellent health I
thank you," sald the other, taking the proffered
chair. "Ohl what a man he is; what a Instru-
meat for good. Always stretching out them
blesased hands of 'is to make one of the fallen a
Seventh Day Primitive."
"And suceas attend his efforts?" said the
Jeweller.
"Successe Brother!" repeated Mr. Burge., eating
rapidly and gesticulating with his knife. "Sue-
aees ain't no name for it Why, since this day
last week he has saved three pickpockets, two
Balvtlonist., one bigamist and a Roman Oath.
oltc."
Brother Hip murmured his admiration. "You
are ato a power for good." he said wistfolly.


"Brother Clark tells me in his letter that your
exhortations have been abundantly blessed."
Mr. Burge shook his head. "A lot of it falls
by the wayside," he said modestly, "but some of it
is an eye-opener to them as don't entirely shut
their ears. Only the day before yesterday I 'ad
two Jemmies and a dark lantern aet me with a
letter saying as 'ow the owner had no further use
for 'em."
The Jeweller's eyes glistened with admiration
not quite untinged with envy. "Have you ex-
pounded the Word for long?" he inquired.
"Six months," replied the other. "It come to
me .quite natural-I was on the penitent bench on
the Saturday, and the Wednesday afterwards I
preached as good a sermon as ever I've preached
in my life. Brother Clark said it took 'is breath
away.."
"And he's a Judge too," said the admiring
Jeweller.
"Now," continued Brother Burge, helping him-
self plentifully to pickled walnuts. "Now there
ain't standing room in our Bethel when I'm ex-
pounding... People come to hear me from all parts
-old and young-rich and poor-and the Apostles
that don't come early 'ave to stand outside and
catch the crumbs I throw 'em through the win.
ders."
"It is enough," sighed Brother Higgs, whose
own audience was frequently content to be on the
wrong side of the window, "it is enough to make
a man vain."
"I struggle against it, Brother," said Mr. Burge,
passing his cup up for some more tea. "I fight
against it hard, but once the Evil One was almost
too much for me; and in spite of myself, and
knowing besides that it was a plot of 'is, I nearly
felt unlifted."
Brother Higgs, passing him some more beef,
pressed for details.
"He sent me two policemen," replied the other,
scowling darkly at the meanness of the trick.
"One might 'ave stood, but two come to being
pretty near too much for me. They sat under
me while I gave 'em the Word 'ot and strong, and
the feeling I had standing up there and telling
policemen what they ought to do I shall never
forget."
"But why should policemen make you proud?"
asked his puzzled listener.-
Mr. Burge looked puzzled in his turn. "Why,
hasn't Brother Clark told you about me?" he in-
quired.
Mr. Higgs shook his head. "He sort of--sug.
tested that-that you had been a little bit wild
before you came to us," he murmured apologeti-
cally.
little bit wild?" repeated Brother
Burge, in horrified accents. "Me? a little bit
wild."
"No doubt he exaggerated a little," said the
Jeweller hurriedly. "Being such a good man him-
self, no doubt things would seem wild to him
tuat wouldn't to us-to me, I mean."
"A little bit wild," said his visitor again. "Sam
Burp, the Converted Burglar, a little bit wild.
Well, well!" *
"Converted what?" shouted the Jeweller, haltf-
rising from his chair.
"Burglar," said the other shortly. "Why, I
should think I know more about the inside o'
gaols than anybody in England; I've pretty near
killed three policemen, besides breaking a gent's
leg and throwing a footman out of window, and
then Brother Clark goes and says I've been a
little bit wild. I wonder what he would 'ave?"
"But you-you've quite reformed now?" said
the Jeweller, resuming his seat and making a
great effort to hide his consternation.
"I 'ope so." said Mr. Burge, with alarming hu.
ml4ty; "but it's an uncertain world, and far be
It from me to oast. That's why I've come here."
Mr. Higgs, only half-comprehending, sat back
gasping.
"If I can stand this," pursued Brother Burge.
esticulatng wildly in the direction of the sh
"if I can stand being here with all these 'ere
pretty little things to be 'ad for the trouble of
picking of 'em up, i can stand anything. Tempt
me. I says to Brother Clark. Put me in the way
o' temptation. I says. Let me see whether the
Evil One or me is the strongest; let me 'ae
egoo ld up and down with the Powers o' Dark-
ness and see who wins."
Mr. Hnggs. gripping the edge of the table with
both hands, gazed at tis new Michael in speech-
"IBu think 1 see his face now," said Brother
Burgs, with tender enthusiasm. "All in a glow
it wasi and he patted me on the shoulder and
says, ll send you on a week's mission to Dun-
cembe,' he says, and 'you hdal stop with Brother


,*


I


Higgs who a's a hop full o' cunning wroun
vanities in silvO r U d told.'"
"But suppole," iadd the Jeweller, finding
voice by a Ire .ftort, "suppose victory is A
given unto ou.",
"It won't make any difference," replied his
itor. "Brother Oglrk promised that it shouldit
'If you fall, Brother,' he says 'we'll helil you lp
again. When you are tired of sin come back to
us-there's always a welcome.'"
"But--- began the dismayed Jeweller,
"We can only do our best," said Brother Bu
"the rest we must leave. I 'ave girded my loi
for the fray, and taken much spiritual sus
ance on the way down from this little hy
book."
Mr. Higgs paid no heed. He sat marvelli
over the fatuousness of Brother Clark and tryl
to think of ways and means out of the dilem
into which that gentleman's perverted enthusi
had placed him. He wondered whether it wo
be possible to induce Brother Burge to sleep el
where by offering to bear his hotel expenses, a
at last, after some hesitation, broached the su
Ject.
"What!" exclaimed the other, pushing his plate
from him and regarding him with great severity,
"Go and sleep at a hotel? After Brother Clatk
has been and took all this trouble? Why,.
wouldn't think of doing such a thing."
"Brother Clark has no right to expose you te
such a trial," said Mr. HIggs with great warmth.
"I wonder what he'd say if he 'eard you," re
marked Mr. Burge sternly. "After his going al
making all these arrangements, for you to try
and go and upset 'em.' To ask me to sun tkh
fight like a coward; to ask me to go and hide a
the rear-ranks in a hotel with everything locked
up, or a Coffer Pallis with nothing to steal."
"I should sleep far more comfortably if I knew
that you were not undergoing this tremendous
strain," said the unhappy Mr. Higgs, "and besides
that, if you did give way, it would be a serious
business for me-that's what I want you to 10oo
at. I am afraid that if-if unhappily you did fal
I couldn't prevent you."
"I'm sure you couldn't," said the other cordial
"That's the beauty of it; that's when the Ev
One's whispers get louder and louder. Why,
could choke you between my finger and thuni
it unfortunately my fallen nature should be t
strong for me, don't interfere whatever you d
I mightn't be myself."
Mr. Higgs rose and faced him gasping. "N0o
even-call 'for-the police-I suppose," he jerked
out.
"That would be interfering," said Brother Burp
coldly.
The Jeweller tried to think. It was past elevye
The housekeeper had gone to spend the night wit
an ailing sister, and a furtive glance at Brotht
Burge's small shifty eyes and fat unwholesoa
face was sufficient to deter him from leaving blt
alone with his property, while he went to ask the
Police to give an eye to his house for the night.
Besides, it was more than probable that Mr. Bu
would decline to allow such a proceeding. Wit
a growing sense of his peril he resolved to t
flattery.
"It was a great thing for the Brethren to
cure a man like you," he said.
"I never thought they'd ha' done it," said
Burge frankly. "I've 'ad all sorts trying to C
vert me; crying over me and praying over n1
I remember the frst dear good man that call
me a lost lamb. He didn't say anything ese 1I
a month."
"So upset." hazarded the Jeweller.
"I broke his jor, pore feller," said BIrot
Burge, a sad but withal indulgent smile light'%
up his face at the vagaries of his former career.
"What time do you go to bed, Brother?"
"Any time," said the other reluctantly. "I sOP
pose you are tired with your Journey?" .
Mr. Bur- assented, and rising from his chlt
yawned loudly and stretched himself, In thn
small room with his huge arms raised he look
coloessal.
"I suppose," said the Jeweler, still seeking t
re-assure himself, "I suppose dear Brothe" ('ta
felt pretty certain of you, else he wouldn't ha
sent. you here?"
"Brother Clark said 'What is a Jeweller' sh
compared with a humann soul. a priceless ''m
soul replied Mr. Burge. "What is a felw e
gaws to decorate them that perish, and make th
vain, when you come to consider the opporl*'n
of such a trial, and the good it'll do and the ,r
it'll be-if I do win-end testify to the concrt
tlon to that effect? Why, there's sermons fore
lifetime nto it."
(Continued on Page Fourteen.)












July 1, 1906


THE sN


THE JUNGLE


ThrliNni 8
Nolveli


SYNOPSIS


the story of "The Jungle," Upton Sinclair's
Povel yhich has aosed the Government investi-
gatiose into the methods employed by the Beef
Trst,. had its origin in an actual Peckingtown
ro1maso
In Aghland Avewnse-"back of the stock yards"
-the weddingg took place.
The fst chapter merely shows a broad-should-
ered b tcher being wedded to a young girl who
soee in Aim a hero. The wedding in all its gro.
tesquenese is described in this chapter. The wed.
ding ceremony i- typical of Packingtown. At
midnight the formalities ended.
The chapter closes with a description of Pack.
ingtown festivities and tells how beer is promisec
ously passed around.
Sinclair portrays in well-selected words the
dress of the denizens of that section.
Nearly all of the characters introduced in the
story are employed in the stock yards and the
prelude which tells of their social life is to be
followed by a story of their toil in the big yards.


copyright 19006, by Upton Sinclair.
Reserved.


All Rights


CHAPTER I.--(Continued.)


In the meantime there was going on in another
corner of' the room an anxious conference between
Teta Elzbleta and Dede Antanas, and a few of
the more intimate friends of the family. A trouble
was come upon them. The veselija is a compact,
a compact not expressed, but therefore only the
more binding upon all. Every one's share was
differentr-and yet every one knew perfectly well
what his i share was, and strove to give a little
more. Now, however, since tney had come to the
new country, all this was changing; it seemed as
if there must be some subtle poison in the" air
that one breathed here-it was affecting all the
young men at once. They would come In crowds
and fill themselves with a fine dinner, and then
sneak off. One would throw another's hat out of
the window, and both would go out to get it, and
neither would be seen again. Or now and then
half a dozen of them would get together and
march out, openly, staring at you, and making
fun of you to your face. Still others, worse yet,
would crowd about the bar, and at the expense of
the host drink themselves sodden, paying not the
least attention to any one, and leaving it to be
thought that either they had danced with the
bride already, or meant to later on.
All these things were going on now, and the
family was helpless with dismay. So long they
had tolled, and such an outlay they had made!
Ona stood by, her eyes wide with terror. Those
frightful bills-how they had haunted her, each
item gnawing at her soul all day and spoiliung
her rest at night. How often she had named
them over one by one and figured on them as she
went to work-fifteen dollars for the hall, twenty-
two dollars and a quarter for the ducks, twelve
collars for the musicians, five dollars at the
church, and a blessing of the Virgin besides-and
so on without an end! Worst of all was the
frightful bill 'that was still to come from Graicsu-
nas for the beer and liquor that might be con-
sumed.
One could never get in advance more than a
guess as to this from a saloon keeper-and then,
when the time came, he always came to you
scratching his head and saying that he had
guessed too low, but that he had done his best-
your guests had gotten so very drunk. By him
you were sure to be cheated unmercifully, and
that even though you thought yourself the dear-
est of the hundreds of friends he had. He woulJ
begin to serve your guests out of a keg that was
half full, and finish with one that was half empty,
and then you would be charged for two kegs of
beer. He would agree to serve a certain quality
at a certain price, and when the time came yo!'
and your friends would be drinking some horrible
poison that could not be described. You might
ampailn, but you would get nothing for your


pains but a ruined evening; while. I galag to
law about it, you might as well to
once. The saloon keepe alt
big politics men In thq 4sttaet; aSd B
had once found out wat It l Sat t W,
trouble with such people yo wld *64 o ttS4h
to pay what you weat told hoky
What made all th the &re pl
It was so hard on the few that hd
their best. There was poor did 0oE'0 -
for instance-he had already givl l0
and did not evqry one know th J6
vias had just miotgage d hise
for two hundred dollar to meet eVIf* i m* tU
overdue rent? And then there WaW wI0'0Id old
poni Antele-who was a widow ad Std''W
children, and the rheumatism bemidead, ad4,d
washing for the tradespeople on Hal ted StvIg .
prices it would break your heart to 1har
Aniele had given the entire profit of hr
for several months, Eight of them she owned,
and she kept them In a little pleas febotd arWu4
on her back stairs. All day long the hUldrea q1
Aniele were raking in the dump for food for
these chickens; and sometimes, when the oompo.
tuition there was too feroe, you might see them on
Halsted street, walking loa e to thW ttters, and
with their mother following to see that no oae
robbed them of their finds.
Money could not tell the value of these chlokens
to old Mrs. Jqukiene-she valued them diffet*
ently, for she had a feeling that she was getting
something for nothing by means ot them-that
with them she was getting the better of a world
that was getting the better of her in so aiay
other ways. So she watched them ev0ey hour of
the day, and had learned to see like an owl at
night to watch them then. One of them had
been stolen long ago, and not a month
that some one did not try to steal another. As
the frustrating of this one attempt ianolVed a
score of false alarms, it will be undetood wht
a tribute old Mrs. Jukniene brou t, Jut be.ao
Teta Elsbileta had once loaned er ic
for a few days and saved her from
out of her house.
More and more friends gathered round while
the lamentations about these things Was 0 .
Some drew nearer, hoping to overh
versation, who were themselves amount
-and surely that was a thing to try t a
of a saint. Finally there came ur, 06g
some one, and the story was retold .* t
listened in silence, with his great black eyebrows
knitted. Now and then there would come
gleam underneath them and he would d lano
about the room. Perhaps he would hay* liked to
go at some of those fellows with his big, 6lea etd
fists; but then, doubtless, he realisd how little
. good it would do him. No bill would be any 'lo
for turning out any one at this time; and then
there would be the scandal-and JurgiT waatld
nothing except to get away with Ona and let t40
world go its own way. So his hands related d
he merely said quietly: "It is done, and t06
is no use of.weeping, Teta Blsbteta."
Then his look turned toward One, who Aood
close to his side, and he saw the wide look e tr-
ror in her eyes. "Little one." he said, la IS low
voice, do not worry-It will not matter to Ws.
We will pay them all somehow. I will wrk hard*
er." That was always what Jurgis as., OOa
had grown used to it as the solution of di l
ties-"I will work harder!" He had I t, 4n
Lithuania when one official had take d pagse
port from him, and another had a"irqel R
being without it, and the two had dIvided d
of his belongings. He had said it salate W
York, when the smooth-spoken agent d t
them in hand and made them pay muoh high
prices, and almost prevented their lein
place, In spite of their paying. Now hai t
third time, and Ona drew a deep breath wae 1so
wonderful to have a husband, suet lJke ao
woman-and a husband who oul4d W ve a o
lems, and who was so big and strong r
The last sob of little bsetllMas has been
stifled, and the orchestra haa one more bees1 -
minded of its duty. The .evemow bs.ecuae
but there are few .ow Mtto lms.
very soon the collection ts over and pramlsgus8,
dances once more begit. It no qw ater md
night, however, and things are not as they we
before. The daneers are dalU and beavd
of them have been drin hard, and have. log
ago passed the stage of T
in monotonous measure, road r
after hour, with eye a ed upo. aaoo, fA
they were only half eeiop ; c pganhy
tightly, but there will be la.ang boar
when neither will oee the others le s
couples do not care to dese,ad a eM
the corners, where they aitwt tb.ir .
laced. Others, who have beem Ekn, ,Ul
more, wander about the room
everyth ; oame are insroup ( t or -,
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THE~ SUN


y 21,1906


-Wi nn --' .... Ao .b ig..e -



Capt. Henry Writes About age
AAtA f Octo r ..I befre e 's


,o the month of October, I0 oteb We lre 4
Srthe for Oo"ernor entered the head N.
t,6.9 andmtd an rUmawe to



sde on f is f res tdraMl o aath p
4 HI, tti llmgdo n"w. "
many

to the tt
Metrbutede sane artih loto
thio ed m. "Le CouRt Pugt usd
saK t(het tta tthai C<^p




itno .d tt e, eee lt tGesoevear,
idwttm el pots, y U~1616 run for'
Mot pI pl thor fo upfo to.a ro ef puinge.
t tean.its Inth_ 1wasdry aMn
O stiO M P I Tradn ltion pub.


d to 4 tI0 adhbedewt .tt.d of .



rorfd Mla siWata ct bea d emd out of
Ofooverint
wrte t ae hardly any of whom
ev pacedthr foo u ponIts broad epanse. it
tei he Iof as san I The great
st o l 0 o4 9with an ,altitude of
oI fet above w 1urme b aly aenoae of o
t. The p verllades hais ftradual slope or detllae
twr Lthe ke b Okeehbobee overs an
Sdos 1 ,aS e me nrWles. How or under what
olrouastboees tfas formed o one knows One
tlg evwy0 oo l that o w tR the jekt
ftor Pwtersed of many million
0l 1 to the ith et and west
of It. tribury Is uisslt'4lmee river,
County, orer one hundred
Suene into the lake, aIs
1tae IS Course;f .
emoit o f, with $ *U
a lke Okeeobee of 4 fAt This
iwiuee river has may large tributares. so
ee that Ltke Okeehobee Is a receptacle of
o5i|u dmnloni, and lsuppiles the Evor.-
Soer low mary bow and numerous
Iaderle from it to south wicu
water soleat to P Its surface suaberged
ey all the time There s possibly no
p as o the eroe of the gree earth like the
Te of oda so unnaviting, yet so Invtt.
ast e t 1lak md from gve to ten
wilte, a of water from
to other with vegetation aquatic
ture, trely timtabetles except Its south.
Sate to fay m at there Is one thousand
a11les ot s northern part on which there
e a9UD4St te en ough for a turkey
pa. Theesote border of Lake
bow$*t toheae a e with a dea s
i t Mof br. Ctare apple tree (Pond
wle th a oooasal cypu. Unique In
i ela; eu satranelys form
ed, u to s tK4 Igalad tasU
S that happy between e Ame
ofatand mred eand sought
or ad of a lO st fund on thecoatl*
neat of North Amaerea. Xts eastern border ex.
ds with a few t the MAtlantti ocean
~breawihetlthful saline lIut.
ntaly Watt Its Soad sad lon-
St by the ~bleequal In health
toft" o tfeUtsath
It i todS. eatiroly Uihabited
Mis'eaosads sadtola 9U
Ane killed ad skanedt by a
4tw dbak treapm. both I&
and white men. to those who have

Sfs t tf~lac this
tory. Nature ha part


seldom does It all. I r wld c he
ethIng for man to do, and It is here
case sM he Ites man to out a peat

cesuar equal cto sexces oar
tcans. Tea. here to a field white
and ntered upon will yield not les
Sg for everp one spent Just why


Uncle Sam with his foresatght and while he ts
a ug lpon foreign lands and speding his W
pl m for caught does not le.
Ls own door a4d brine Intoe iV tY t0
places adnrioh and tl e he44t tite Ofhis
ao*te oat ro and save to himself the Import
td of p themes miboallos of products which
can be moeprofitably raised and mapnufacturM
hen under his own eye and uspices is a problem
difficulttoo eolve. And wy the mIndllIonare here
in the United states and elsewhere as well seek-
ag Invete, gladly aoeptung a "small rat of
peiretage, do not grasp this golden opportualty
and place it where It will bless their race and
brtnring noa lesthan one hundred per cedtl s
another problem dliiult to solve.
Today the Trustees theTres of the Internal Improve-
ent of Florida are the custodians of all this
vast area and are more Otan anxious to enter
nto contract with somebody to drain all those
lands. and pay them liberal for such drainage
in lands, possIblyone-half or more for draining
the whole, but that noble board composed -it
Governor Jennings, J. B. Whitfleld, Attorney Gen-
eral; A0. C room, Comptroller; W. V. Knott,
Treasurer; H. Clay Crawford, Secretary of State,
and B. E. MoLin, Commissioner of Lands ana
Agriculture, are terribly handicapped with law
suits now pending In the United States courts,
Instituted by a powerful railroad company who
claim all the land and more for having construct-
ed railroads In West Florida, four hundred miles
from this land. No use to mention the shadow
of claim they set forth,sue It to say the t to say the swamp
and overflowed lands of Florida, including the
great glades in question, was deeded to the State
of tlorida in trust to be used solely for their own
reclamation and drainage. I quote the law:
Chapter LXXXIV, Act of Congress Sept 28,
1860. Be It enacted, etc., "That to enable the
State of Arkansas to construct the necessary
levees and drains to reclaim the swamp and over-
flowed lands therein, the whole of those swamp
and overflowed lands, made unfit thereby for cul-
tivatioe, which shall remain unsold at the past
sage of this act, shall be, and the same are here.
by granted to said State.
SeC. 1. And be it further enacted, That it shakl
be the duty of the Secretary of the Interior, as
soon aS may be practicable after the passage ot
this act, to make out an accurate list and plat of
the lands described as aforesaid, and transmit the
same to the Governor of the State of Arkansas
and at the request of said Governor, cause a
patent to be isued to the State therefore; and on
that patent the fee simple to said lands shall reml
In the Statet of Arkansas subject to the disposal
of .the Legislature thereof. Provided, however,
That the proceeds of said lands whether from
ale or by direct appropriation in kind shall be ap.
plied 'exclusively as far as necessary to the pur-
pose of reclaiming said lands by means of levees
and drains aforesaid.
Sec. S. And be It further enacted, That in mak.
ing out a list and plates of the land aforesaid all
legal subdiv.-on, the greater part of which is
wet and unfit for cultivation, shall be Included in
said Mets and plates; but when the greater part of
a subdivision ti not of that character, the whole
of it shall be excluded therefrom.
Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That the pro-
visLons of this act be extended to, and their bene-
fits be conferred upon each of the other States of
the Union in which swamp and overflowed lands
known and designated as aforesaid, may be sit.
uated.
If there is a word in the above law looking to
the construction of rallroaus your writer falls to
aee It; but nevertheless railroads have gobbled it
nearly all up and searching for more.
When the present suit now pending in the Uni-
ted State Court bearing upon those lands tois de-
cided. no doubt but the way will be clear for the
Board of Trustees of the I. I. Fund to go ahead
and arrange, as it very much desires to do, to en.
ter into a contract to permanently lower Lake'
Okeeohobee by opening a broad and spacious
canal to the Atlantic ocean, suMfficient to practi-
cally drain the Everglades and the surroundings
Of Lake Okeechobee which when done will cause
Lee county and her neighboring counties to bloom
as the rose.
The above lines have been principally confined
to the weste and eastern portion of Lee county
and only lightly touched upon. The great Indus-
try of raising the tomato and other tender vege-
tables along the western coast of Lee county on
P1in Islad, Sanibel Island, Estero and on all the
ilsads. and keys.for a distance of one hundred
milesAtogether.with senlm .ae at (Thath.m Bay
and hokotodd Is of sufficient Importance to
make u1 reliaLey Itis sufficient to av
tions and rapidly on the increase.
..A few ited d to the northern portion ot
eo m _p,_beSinnnt at th
waxen a ue Caloeate e rtve (olalooea *tr


Gulf of Me4o. Tl w +Iries tn theof

South sxty mllo to PUnt 1a-aa gpore of geat


twenty mile wide s with nameru little rivers,
creeks and branche. the II_,one of which
is Orange river, upon the hi situa
ted the finest farm and r to be und al
#lorida. Thi salley o the Oalooaana ohle river
is very fertile, and All= t Oe i ut com-
mon to this latitude are aese rated. It
is navigable for a &1isano ofo *Ixtylvo nlea, and
dally mail steamers ply Ia wstors l far up as
,tre little post village of 'e oflm

The Trail of the Serpent.
(Continued from Page .)
pas against Hentf He wan o tll l the logging
business, supplying the mlls at Carrabelle and
giving employment at good wages to a large num-
ber of men. He went among the people and told
them if Hents was elected hA would have to close
out his business. Heots wa elected and Graham
did close out his business shortly aftrwards.
Numerous suits for trespass were brought
against him. It is said tuat he would go to a
man who had owned a piece of la" all his life,
often his father had ownea It before him, aud
would say: "My friend you are on at land, L've
got a deed to it, but I don't Intend to give you any
trouble about It. You can have the land. ALL I
WANT IS THE TIMBER, I'LL TAKB THAT
and give you a quit claim deed to the LAND."
Sometimes it was only a oase of nerve and audac-
ity, but it worked among the Ignorant Occasion-
ally he met his match and a little SHOT GUN
PRESSURE caused him to try his game eso-
where.
There can be cited an instance where he met a
Gadsden County man on the train and pulled out
of his pocket a deed to some property belonging to
him. The man examined it and looked him in the
eye and said: "John raham, itf that deed is ever
recorded or I ever hear of It again, I will kill
you." To this day THAT DEED 18 NOT ON
RECORD.
In addition to being strongly suspected of mak-
ing way with the record books, Graham is believ-
ed by many citizens living their. now to have
STOLEN FROM THE CLuRK'S OFFICE an old
seal that had been replaced by a new one because
the old one was broken. This he had mended, so
he was able at any time TO ADD THE OFFICIAL
SEAL OF LIBERTY COUNTY to any papers.
This seal disappeared about the time Graham wai
making his headquarters at the clerk's ofoe, ani
with record books D and 19, has not aince been
found.
"So John is coming to the Legislature," said
one man who speaks from experience. "Well I
wonder what he intends to steal now. You may
be sure he is after some big game."
Such in brief is the record of John A. Graham
tn Liberty County as shown by the county ree
ords and the evidence of living witnesses. In
his operations he regarded neither man nor law.
He went among the people of that county wn)
treated him with kindness, and repaid them with
deceit and treachery.
The loss of the records is irreparable, and will
he a source of contergion in the county for years
to come.
The shame and ruin he brought upon Harrell,
the clerk, who frittered away his hoeor and
steeped his brain and understanding In whiskel,
and blunted his perceptions of decency and hor
esty alone should be suScient to damn him.

"For Tricks that Are Valn."
As a sample of the methods of the Insurance
Companies and of the trickery to which they will
resort if left to themselvea we publish the follow-
ing telegram, which was received at the xecu-
tire office July 19th.
Dated New York. July 18. 1906.
To Governor N. B. Broward. Tallahassee, ula.
The placing of Gray, TrMay, Shook and Higgin-
botham on Mutual ticket as reported in morning
papers is a trick to confuse tae policy bolder1.
Tese men knew nothing of it and refuee to set.
Letter follows.
(Signed) SEYMOUR BATON, Sec.
Mr. Raton is secretary of the International
Policy Holders Association composed Of Oovramof
of States and other men p inanst to the
words afairn, which orgaised last week ,o New
York.


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July 4,i066


9

fl, SUN
AN'
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44 '';:"'W


r W. I. BRYAN, Couny Solictor for Dwld Cour* Fo
SProcuted theIce trust and Who Has Infomned gdbw the
Meat T nut


.OVERFLOW EDITORIAL

ANOTHER TRIP FOR A SECRETARY.
All believers in municipal ownership were no doubt very much edified by
the perual of the interviews with Sir Joseph 0. Ward, Premier of NOew Se
land, whioh were printed in the New York papers last week.
When asked what the experience of New Zealand had been relative to
State control of public utility departments, he said:
"A*or pwqrd of thirty years the government has controlled the railways.
This system has kept rates DOWN TO THE LOWEST POINT to lare the
greater ladvatage and the all important one of assisting ta the develop
meant of a country wherever railways traverse.
"We Ipe UgMhteen lines in course of construction. The people would ass
gie a fthdity for the sale of the railways EVEN Ib THRNB TIMES HT=
VALUE OF CONSTRUCTION, OR ANY SUM, were offered.
"Ther t UNIPORILTY OF CHARGE tor every section; there is NO
CONCESSION FOR THE LARGEST USERS as against the smaller; we
hate a publicly gaetted tariff and NO REBATES ARE ADMITTED."
Our atUlodean brothers have surely approached the ideal In read to
transportation matter. ..
We have much to learn from them. Now that Secretary Root has gopa
a trI p to tady conditions in Mouth America and Secretary Taft is aspa
be 6t on a trip to Panama, and as we have a few more secretary
with plenty of rouer on which to float them, we suggest that a taip to New
Zealand as the next number on the Information-seeking program of the Cabi-
net at Washiagtoa.
We belon that the trip of Secretary Root to South America will result in
great good t the people. We believe that the trip of Secretary Taft to
Panama will b equally as beneficial.
14 we believe that the trip of Secretary Somebodrelse to New Zeatla
will, for direct practical results tending towards the achievement of
libertle by the people, ECLIPSE BOTH OF THE OTHER TRIPS IuIr.
PORTANWO
We think, by the way, that using the navy ap a ans os loeat'Q Is b8
laiautloo hunting officlsa, Is about the bet we that the as y 4


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THea W


Temp ttion of Mr. Burge.


(Continued from Page 10.)
"So there is," said the Jeweller, try.
g to look cheerful. "You've ot a
uA lGeA f Oalb ltaur am,-md w, vql


fr1m the


than f low moaninl from the next
ropm, thI e v frghted jewseli
to start from hs chair and place hli
ar apalt t he wall. Two or three hol
low groas, came through the plaster
followed by ejaculations which show
ed clearly that Brother Burge was a'
that moment engaged In a terrified
combat with the Powers of Darkneu
to decide whether he should; or should
not, rifle his het'es hop. His hand
clenched and his ear pressed close t
the wall, the Jeweller listened to a
monologue tech ibremed in later
eat with every word,
"I tell yo0 t won't," said the ,vole
in the ext':room with a groan, "
won't. Get thee behind me.-G-
thee-1o, and don't shove me ove
tthe do6rt it- you can't get behind
me without, doing hat, stay when
ou a, re. ?e A kow it's a fortune a
we" as what out do; but it ain
The listener caught his breath pain


"-'amoln rlngm continued Broth
Wr B-rg14a a" ifbattl -vote. "Stop
tell y V !o, I won't just go an
look at .m1 "
;,, slIee ot groans which the
wllbleo noticed 1 hi s horror go
weakert and .weahw tield to th
gresea of the teip 1o. He heard
Brother Bos rfli an% then a su
tot o a""a s. beomed t
I ato a 'ft bodily b-ounter.
Sdon't-want to totk ,- isal
wter Burge tI an exau voin
"Wht's--the good ot a
* ,.It's like you, eou hu"w di%
oNds are my weakee. What dos
iitr if he is asiept Whata m
got to do with youth"
ter Higgsa reeled and a il
before his eyes He came t
f at the sound of a door opem
lug. and impelled with a vague Ide
1.1u11mfng his property, snatched
'inhl candle and looked out on t
U t ell on Brother Bumr
kw L a holding his boa
r a momet they aN
i. lf iPdwin, siluece:; the the
lShis voice.
'{ egt you were ill. Brother


he altered.
An ugly scowl lit up the other's
features. "Don't you tell me any of
your liesO" he said fiercely. "You're
watching me; that's what you're do-
lau Wain on me."
"I thought that you were being
tempted," confessed the trembling
Mr. Higgs.
An expression of satisfaction which
he strove to suppress appeared on Mr.
Bur's faoe.
"So I was," he said sternly. "So
I was; but that's my business. I
don't want your assistance; I can
fight my own battles. You go to bed-
I'm going to tell the congregation i
won the fight slnle-'anded."
"8o you have, Brother," said the
other eagerly; "but it's doing me good
to s0 it. It's a lesson to me; a lesson
to all of us the way you wrestled."
"I thought you was asleep," growled
Brother Burge, turning back to his
room and speaking over his shoulder.
"You get back to bed; the fight ain't
half over yet. Get back to bed and
STe door closed behind him, and
Mr. Higgs, still trembling, regained
his room and looked in agony at the
c lo0k. It was only half-past twelve
I and the sun did not rise until six. He
@at and shivered until a second in-
stalment of groans in the next room
brought him In desperation to his
k Brother Burge was in the toils
I again, and the jeweller despite his
fears could not help realizing what a
Sensation the story of his temptation
would create. Brother Burge was
Snow got .rolgnd and round his room
I like an animal in a cagp, and ;sounds
as of a soLl wrought almost beyond
Senduranee smote upon the listener's
i quivering ea. .Then there was a
I long silence more alarming even than
the noise of the oonfliet. Had Brother
r Burg won, and -was-he now sleeping
I the sleep of the righteous, or- Mr
SHISgg shivered and put his other ear
I to the wall. Then he heard his guesi
move stealthily across the floor; the
boards creaked and the handle of the
door turned.
t Mr. Higgs started, and with a sud
I den flash of courage born of angei
I and desperation seised a small brasi
d poker from the ure-place, and taking
I the candle in his other hand wen
o out on to the landing again. Brother
a BaJge was closing his door softly
r an his face when he turned it upon
the Jeweller was terrible in its
i wrath. His small eyes snapped witl
I fury, and his huge hands opened and
t shut convulsively.
r *'What, again he said in a low
d growl. "After all I told you!"
' Mr. Higgs backed slowly as he ad
s vanced.
t "No noise," said Mr. Burge in i
dreadful whisper. "One scream an
i- I'-- What were you going to de
with that poker?'
I- He took a stealthy step forward.
p "I-I," began the Jeweller. Hi
d voice failed him. "Burglars." n
mouthed, "downstairs."
e "What?" said he other, pausing.
't Mr. Higgs threw truth to the whid-
e "I heard them in the shop," he sali
'd reovering, "that's way I took up th
o- poker. ant you hear them?
o Mr. B rge IIstened for the fractto
of a second. "Nonsense," he said'hus
d. "I heard them talking," ~sld th
t other recklesly. "Let's go dowi ran
i- callI the police."
t "Call 'em from the winder." sal
y Brother Burge. backing with som
haste, "they alght 'ave pistols 11
it something, and they're ugly customer
o when they're disturbed."
i* He stood with strained face liata


a Ing.
d "Here they come," whispered th
o Jeweller with a sudden movement o
alarm.
0. Brother Burge turned, and boltin
ts Into his room clapped the door to ant
m- locked it. The Jeweller stood dumi
ke founded on the landing: then h
heard the window go up and th
." voice of Brother Burge, mucl


I


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le
"Io

re


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kI
A


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L.gIm4ibiheSSiS Lam&


vv~ ~u ruu 5


strengthened* by the religious eaer-
cisee of the past six monthsbellow-
ing lustily for the police.-
For a few seconds Mr. Higgs stood
listening and wondering what expa-*
nation he should sgive Stil thinking,
he ran downstair, and, throwing open
the pantry window, ual8UAkd tho
door leading into the shop and scat-
tered a few of his htrished posse'
slons about the floor. By the tite lie
jad done this, people were already
eating upon the streetdoor and .ax
changing hurried remarks with Mr.
Burge at the window above. The Jew-
eller shot back the bolts, and half-a-
dosen neighbours, headed by the
butcher opposite, clad ain his night-
gown and armed with a cleaver, hurst
Into the passage. A constable (ante
running up just as the pallid face of
Brother Burge peered over the balu.
term. The constable went upstairs
three at a time, and twisting his hand
in the ex-burglar's neck-cloth bore
him backwards.
"I've got one," he shouted. "Come
,up and hold him wh.le I look round."
The butcher was beside him in a
moment; Brother Burge struggling
wildly, called loudly upon the name
of Brother Higgs.
"That's all right, constable," sall
the latter, "that's a friend of mine.'
"Friend o' yours, sir?" said the di-.
appointed officer, still holding him.
The Jeweller nodded. "Mr. Samuel
Burge the Converted Burglar," he
said mechanically.
S "Cover--" gasped the astonished
constable. "Converted burglar? Hore:
"He is a preacher now," added Mr.
Higgs.
"Preacher?" retorted the constable.
"Why it's as plain as a pikeetaff. Con-
federates: his part was to go down
and let 'em in."
Mr. Burge raised a piteous outcry.
"I hope you may be forgiven for them
words," he cried piously.
"What time did you go up to bed?"
r pursued the constable.'
"About half-past eleven',' replied
. Mr. Higgs.
r The other grunted with satisfaction.
t "And he's fully dressed,-with- his boots
9 off," he remarked. "Did you hear him
e go out of his room at all?"
"He did go out," said the Jeweller
. truthfully, "but- "
r "I thought so," said the constable,
s turning to his prisoner with affec-
tionate solicitude. "N)w you come
t along o' me. Come quietly, because
r it'll be the best for you in the end."
, "You won't get your skull split open
n then," added the butcher, toying with
a his cleaver.
f The Jeweller hesitated. He had ho
d desire to be left alone with Mr. Burge
again; and a sense of humor, which
r many years' association with the
Primitive Apostles had not quite erad.
I. icated, strove for hearing.
"Think of the sermon it'll make,.
a he said encouragingly to the frantic
d Mr. Burge, "think of the congrega.
o tion!"
Brother Burge replied in language
which he had not used in public since
s he had joined the Apostles. The
e butcher and another man stood guard
over him while the constable search
ed the premises and made all secunr
s. again. Then with a final appeal to Mr
, Higgs who was keeping in the back
. ground, he was pitched to the police


.. July;lt, 166
station by Athe I ic constable and
five zqulouu ausitanm.
A difidece., Maturl in the circus.
stances, prevented him from narrat-
ing the story of his temptation to the
masl etrasta saE.lBa., and Mr.
S ,p4p U ; uoieat. He was
E apollee communi-
ted ith16'AId In the mean-
tE -roeri. O 'ib ld a, band of
ApoUstles fl downM to his support.
On his MoOed .appeance before
the asi ta hi iW- o confronted
with his p,"t; ,- his past to the
great aston ~hment of the Brethren
being free fro, all bl ntMsh with the
solitary exC@ptAj of fourten days for
steeling milkeai, he was discharged
with a caution. The disillusionedt
Primitive Apostle ao gave him his
freedom.

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BWRINC


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JACKSQNVILLE, A. C04COLA
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P. IN ad L M jaimu_ Ft.
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A "Brighton" Sfods Apparatus Fixt,
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I PBAX u9 f %AN hLA.


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was married, and her husband had
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TOa cTOKTMang.


""Tmo QUICKY


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I'

;*' ^ '


THE JUNGLE.
(Continued from Page 11.)
rija, sobbing loudly; and then there
is only the silent night, with the stars
beginning to pale a little In the ea.
Jurgis, without a word, lifts Ona lI
his arms, and strides out with her,
and she sinks her head upon him
shoulder witn a moan. When be
reaches home he is not sure whether
she has fainted or is asleep, but when
he has to hold her with one hand
while he unlocks the door he sees that
she has opened her eyes.
"'You shall not so to Brown's today,
little one," he wipers as he llmbs
the stairs; and she catches his arm
In terror, gasping: 'Not Not I dare
not! It will ruin us!"
But he answers her again: "Leave
it to me; leave it to me. I will earn
more money-I will work harder."
CHAPTER II.
Jurgis talked lightly about work,
because he was young. They told
'him stories about the breaking down
of men, there in the stockyards of
Chicago, and of what had happened
to them afterward-stories to make
your flesh creep-but Jurgis would
only laugh. He had only been there
four months, and he was young, and a
giant besides. There was too much
health in him. He could not even
Imagine how it would feel to be beach.
en. "That Is well enough for men
like you," he would say, "silpnas,
puny fellows-but my back Is broad."
Jurgis was like a boy, a boy from
the country. He was the sort of min
the bosses like to get hold of, the sort
they make it a grievance they cannot
get hold of. When he was told to go
to a certain place he would go there
on the run. When he had nothing to
do for the moment he would stand
around fidgeting, dancing, with the
overflow of energy that was in him.
If hew ere working in a line of men
the line always moved too slowly for
him, and you could pick him out by
his impatience and restleuness. That
was why he had been picked out on
one important occasion; for Jurgis
had stood outside of Brown & Co.'s
"Central Time Station" not more than
half an hour, the second day of his
arrival in Chicago, before he had been
beckoned by one of the bosses. Of
this he was very proud, and it made
him more disposed than ever to laugh
at the pessimists. In vain would they
all tel him tnat there were men in
that crowd from which he had been
chosen who had stood there a month
-yes, many months-and not been
chosen yet. "Yes," he would may, "but
what sort of men? Broken.down
tramps and good-for-nothlnge, fellows
who have spent all their money
drinking, and want to get more for
it. Do you want me to believe that
with these arms"-and he would
clench his fists and hold them up to
the air, so that you might see the
rolling muscles-"that with these
arms people will ever let me starve?"
"It is plain," they would answer to
this, "that you have come from the
country, and from very far in the
country." And this was the fact, for
jurgis had never seen a city, aad
scarcely even a fair-sised town, until
he had set out to make his fortune
in the world and earn his rIlht to
Ona. HIs father, and his father's
father before him, and as many an*
cestore back as legend ooule go, had
lived in that part of UIthuania known
as Brelovlcs, the Imperial 1rqt.
This is a great tract at a hundred
thousand acres, which frgo time mi. -
memorial as been a hunting preaerre
of the nobility. There are a very few
peasants settled in It, holding title
from ancient times; and one of these
was Antanas Rudkus, who had been
reared himself, and had reared his
children in turn, upon half a dosewn
acres of cleared land in the midst of
a wilderness. There had been one
son besides Jurgias, and one saiter.
The former had been drafted Into the
army; that had been over ten years
ago, but since that day nothing bad
ever been heard of him. The sister


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