Group Title: sun.
Title: The sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075914/00031
 Material Information
Title: The sun
Uniform Title: sun
Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sun Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: June 9, 1906
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tallahassee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Leon County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Leon -- Tallahassee
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.451667 x -84.268533 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 18, 1905)-v. 3, no. 47 (Sept. 12, 1908).
Numbering Peculiarities: Published at Tallahassee, Fla., June 23-Sept. 12, 1908.
General Note: Claude L'Engle, editor.
General Note: "If it's right, we are for it."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075914
Volume ID: VID00031
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33400104
lccn - sn 95047216
 Related Items
Other version: Morning sun (Tallahassee, Fla.)
Succeeded by: Dixie (Jacksonville, Fla.)

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Full Text


LEGALIZED,.LAND


GRABBING


IN THIS
NUMBER


Volume 1-No. 30 JAGKSONVILLC, FLORIDA. JUNE 9, 1906 SInile Gopy 5 Gents


We Iae the Keel Cure, and Other Cues. Why ot Vse Our Jls as r4ft Cww ?






,~j,... ~.
. '1


I-- IF

CLAUDE L'ENOLE
Editor


; IT'S RIOHT, WE ARE FOR IT


TIPII


SUN


A. K. TAYLOR
Cartoonist


M U=JmSm WKLY WITN A U,. OF IfS ^WN, P m FM THE iPl OF RAMVA, BY U 8UN 00MPANY, AT 31 WEST FOMM SIPT, JAOMWJU FLRRIDA

Volume I-No. 30 JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, JUNE 9, 1906 5 Cents per Copy, $2 per Year
Entered at the Post Office at Jacksonville, Fla., as scond-clsmmatter


IN THE SUN'S CHARIOT
Intimate Talks Between Publisher and Reader
It would seem, with so many things happening of late-and we
speak only of things that have happened to us-that we might have
had a good excuse for overlooking a bet or two when it came to plans
for polishing up the face of THE SUN so that its brightness may be
made more dazzling.
In fact, so deep rooted is our determination, so strong and lusty
is our purpose, and so painstaking is our effort to make each SUN a
better SUN than any SUN that has gone before, that- '
We keep on a thinking how to do It-
Even if, such things as libel suits, gun plays, and purchases of
fifty thousand dollar printing plants, happen in bunches of three in
the course of a single week's journey toward SUN perfection.
As we were saying, we keep our eye on the ball all the time, and
will here jot down a bit of SUN prophecy as to good things shortly to
come to pass SUNWISE.
Before we proceed to this pleasing enumeration we will clear up a
point that may be a bit foggy to some of our Chariot riders.
We have bought most of the stock of the Capital Publishing Com-
pany of Tallahassee, and will after this week print THE SUN in
Tallahassee.
But THE SUN will be published all over Florida as usual.
Note the distinction between printing and publishing. To illus-
trate-
A beautiful young lady once asked a dignified professor to explain
the difference between printing and publishing.
"Certainly," said he, "I place a kiss on your cheek-that's print-
ing. I tell my friends about it-that's publishing."
"OhI yes," said the blushing miss, "I see. Exquisite printing-
very poor publishing."
It is a mere matter of detail and business convenience that THE
SUN will be printed in Tallahassee.
It will still be published everywhere.
Now, for the announcements that you have been waiting for-
They are two in number-
First-Mr. A. K. Taylor has promised to draw a series of
cartoons, setting forth his own uniquely humorous conception of how
to spend a pleasant summer.
These ideas will not be copyrighted, and the devices shown to
carry them out will not be patented. Any person is at liberty to make
use of any or all of them, provided, he or she can prove innocence of
authorship 6f the expression--"Is it hot enough for you."
The title Mr. Taylor has selected for these cartoons is like the
Taylor cartoon itself-original, bright and snappy. It is-
How to be Happy Tho Hot."
You can't afford to miss any of these cartoons, and they will begin
real soon.
Second-In the old blue back speller there is a picture of a little
boy learning at his father's knee. Charmingly idylic this scene and
strongly has it appealed to all who passed through b-a, ba, k-e-r, ker,
baker, and reached the reading part in the last pages of that blue book
of school days that were also blue.
We will .introduce
Little Aigenon and itW Pa,
Who will enlighten us on all subjects we are in doubt about.
Algenon will ask the questions and Pa will answer them as only
Pa's can.
In the meantime-
Better subiacribe.
Its easy.
The wish, the will
And a two dollar bill.


A Great Half-.Price


Offer


Read every word n this announcement or it is the opportunity of
years. Seven of the greatest mag nep in the country have combined to be
offered together at a greatly reduced rate. Never before was euch an offer
given to the public and it s iafse to say never will it be made again. This
year several mqg nee have increased their subcription prie, which hows
how much greater this offer really is. The only reason we are making It to
the People of this State is because we have increased the subsoDtlon price oSf
THEK M to it per year, and we want all Florida to read THr 8 .
Cosmopolitan, one year, $1.00
Woman's Home Companion, one year, 1.00
The Review of Reviews, one year, 3.00
Peason's, one year, 1.00
The American Magazine, one year, 1.00
Tom Watson's Magazine, one year, 1.00
THE SUN, one year, 2.00
Total, $10.00

Send $5.75 and Get Them All for One Year

THE COSMOPOUTAN which wasrecently purchased byMr.W.R.Het, has
no e mose urUi been ireatly improved by the new management and is
now the mos.tpopular ten.cent illustrated monthly in the world. Already Isle have
Increased 100,000 over what they were four months ago, when it became a part of the fa.
mous Hearst publishing organization. The publishers are sparing no effort to secure for It
all that Is most desirable in the way of pictures stories and articles. As an example, pie.
tures by Frederic Remington and stories by W. W. Jacobs are now running in the Cosmo.
politan, and a strong new serial by H. 0. Wells.
THE REVIEW F REVIEWS ubtantial Amerlean men and women are oing
ni l b m Wi nV 16 i to keepupwiththetlmes and theyanr igoin to
take the shortest cut-which is The Review of ieviews-a monthly survey of the world's
progress.
WO ANS HOM ME COMPANION -' not excelled by an other home and
fashion, arlillustrations. family publication in the world. Stories,
PEARSON'Ss 1one of the leading fiction mangazlne of the day, both its serial and
short or torbeing by authors of world.-wde reputation. Pearson's is
considered authority on book reviews.
THE AMERICAN MAGAZINE For thirty rean known as Leslie's Magazine.
It was lately purchased by a powerful syndl.
cate, and no funds are lacking to make It one of the best inoga-ines in America,
TOM WATSON'S MAGAZINE No monthly magazine in America ever before
met with such a hearty welcome as did Tom
Watson's by all claie of people, and deservedly so, for Mr. Watson is at once the foremost
writer and cleaest thinker before the public today. It is filled with the best thought of
the best minds on all subleots of interest to the American people.
THE SUN Is the aper wth will of its own....and is by far the best paper in
Floridar-Qmmendin all right and ensuring all wrons.

Grab This Opportunity
If you want one magatine with our paper for a year, you cannot do better than to accept
one of following offers, while they are hot off the bat and before they are withdrawn:
COSMOPOLITAN one year ....................................................... 00
THE SUN, one year .................. ........... 00
PEAR8ON'8.one year................... ........$1 00
THE AMERiCAN MAGAZINE, one year ..................................00
THE SUN. one year.... .......................................... ....00
TOM-WATSON'8 MAGAZINE. one year..............................It 00
THE BUN, one year...... L.......................... 200
Fill out coupon, mail it today with your remittance and be sure of getting
the greatest m agaointombination that was ever offered-an opportunity of
years and one it Bsafe to say will never be made again.

TH E IU N, k t ......................................................................:........

Enclosed please find ...............................for which enter my name for one year's sub.
scription to your paper and the following magazines..........................


Nam e......... ........ .................................... .
Address................... ................
.............** ** .**.........................,......


*~..2


Ao-= wmmm -












June 9,1906


THE SUN


Third Page


Oni e upon a time, when fairies, gnomes and gob-
lins d welt among men, and witches rode broomsticks
through the air, there lived a fisherman who was poor
and discontented. It was his habit to shut himself
up in his room at nightfall and spend long hours in
darkness and solitary reflection. Bitterly did he re.
proach fate for dealing so harshly with him, and fer-
vently did call on the good fairies to bring him for-
tune.
One night he returned to his hut more disconsolate
than usual, on mcoount of the utter failure of his
day's fishing. He brought nothing home with him
except his net and a bottle of curious shape, which
had been brought up from the bottom of the lake in
the last cast of his net. He had placed the bottle
back in his net, after examining it, and forgot all
about it until the noise made by its striking the floor
as he cast the net down, called his whole days catch
to his mind. In his anger he picked up the bottle
and dashed it to pieces against the back of his chim-
ney.
Instantly the room was filled with a sulphurous
smoke, which quickly took on human shape, and a
small-sized man of copper-colored complexion, dressed
in Oriental garb, stood revealed before the' aston-
ished eyes of the now thoroughly frightened asher-
man.
The caster of nets stood not upon the order of his
going, but making a dash for the only window the
hut afforded, went forth into the night, leaving the
Oriental gentleman in possession of the field.
After his breath gave out he stopped, and finding
himself alive, took his courage in his hawi and
walked back home. Peeping in the window he saw
his table spread with a snowy cloth, a piping hot
and bountiful supper laid thereon, and his bottle
acquaintance standing calmly by wielding the fly-
brush.
This looked so good to him that he boldly entered
the door, proceeded to the table, and ate the best
supper he ever had. The Oriental gentleman cleared
off the table and, making a deep salaam before the
fisherman, who was too full for utterance, said:
"What commands has my master for his slave ?"
"Put me next to this little game," said the fisher-
man. "I'm all in. Can't figure it out What's the
answer T"
"It's for the master to command and the slave
to obey," answered he of the bottle. "I will ex-
plain-listen:
"I am a genii of great renown and remote an-
tiquity. Lets see, this is the first day of April, is
it not? It is? Well, six or seven thousand years
ago a wicked witch got mad at me because I refused
to tell witch was witch, and catching me one night
just after I had emptied my seventeenth bottle, took
advantage of my helplessness and clapped me into it.
She sealed the bottle with water-proof gum arabic
and a couple of Arabic curses, and threw me into the
lake, with these fatal and truly calabistie words:
'There you must remain until released by a red-
nosed, bow-legged fisherman with a squint in his left
eye' (no offense, I hope. I am repeating the witch's
words) 'sad woen releaed you must act as slave to
this good-for-nothing fisherman, and get him .what-
ever he may wah for.'
"So her I am, and there ou are. It's yours to
ak ad me to wAit for yu. "
WMe thi FWa was hamd tdM nua Just


to test this free-gift distribution business, said: "Go
catch me two bottles of beer and a box of Turkish
cigarettes."
The genii bowed and disappeared on the jump. In
less than ten minutes he returned with an Oriental
smile and the articles asked xor.
Well, after this, life to thit fisherman was a golden
sunset and torchlight procession in joyous con-
junction. He lay back in the morris chair and kept
that genii on the Jump getting things for him. When-
ever he wanted a perfeoto, or a new spring suit, or a
bottle of the oldest and coldst, or a pair of silk sus-
r nders, or a roll of money with a rubber band on
t, he told the genii about it, and the genii produced.
And, as the genii was invisible to every one except
his master, no one knew where the fisherman got the
money he flashed or the fine clothes he wore. Every-
body was anxious to get on the fisherman's side, be-
cause his side looked like the shady side of easy
street. As he had it in plenty and was willing to
blow it, nobody seemed to care WHERE HE GOT IT
or how he got it. He had got it, and that was
enough.
Shortly after that genii began to get busy provid-
ing things for his master, people in the village began
to send in calls for the police to investiite mys-
terious disappearances of personal property. One
would complain of the loss of a turkey, another of the
disappearance of a watch, another would report a
roll of bills gone, a fourth told about a raid on his
wine cellar, and so on, until the whole place was in
an uproar. The chief of police said that a gang of
professional crooks was working the town, and ad-
vised every man to sleep with one eye open. Which
same every man did, but saw nothing.
One day the fisherman called on his genii for coin,
and was handed a fat pocketbook, which the master
recognized as the very one his friend, the crippled
apple woman, kept her savings in. He knew the
pocketbook well, because he had often seen the poor
woman pull it out from behind the clock on her man-
tel shelf and count its contents. He knew that she
was trying to get together a hundred dollars to pay
the expenses of an operation that she hoped would
cure her lameness. He had not heard of the loss of
the poor creature's little fortune, but he began to
suspect something. He called his genii, and asked
hfm point-biank where he got the pocketbook he had
just delivered.
Without a moment's hesitation, and quite as a mat-
ter of course, the genii described the apple woman's
house and the place from which he had taken the
pocketbook.
"Do you mean to tell me that you took away that
poor woman's money and gave it to met" demanded
the horrified fisherman.
"Why certainly," answered the genii. "You asked
for money, didn't you T"
"And did you get all the things you have been
supplying me with the same way "
"Ofeourse," said the genii; ow else was I to get
them? You must have known that somebody HAD
TO BE DEPRIVED of things that you got WITH.
OUT WORKING FOR THEM. You knew that I
had no time to PRODUCE WEALTH, and in order
to procureit for you I took advantage of my em.
peor wisdom and experien to ft it away from
tee who DID PRODUCE it, and were bym sfor.
tum or iporam or aele-sm UNABLE TO MO


TECT IT. There may be some moral way of getting
MUCH for LITTLE, but there is NO RIGHT WAY
of getting SOMETHING for NOTHING."
Upon this, the fisherman, being a moral man, drove
the genii from his house, restored, with explanations,
what property he could, and went fishing again.

This fable has been set forth for the purpose of
bringing home to all who read this journal the oper-
ation of a system, which has been legalized in this
State, by which men may get SOMETHING for
NOTHING, or its practical equivalent.
It is what is known as acquiring land by tax title,
and it has been so successfully worked that the
ownership of lands in Florida has, in a little more
than five years, passed out of the hands of the many
into the hands of the few.
Under the statutes made and provided prior to
1903, the land of any person was sold to the State
for unpaid taxes, and certificates of such sale were
deposited in the State Treasurer's office. These cer-
tificates could be purchased by any one from the
State, after two years from the date of the certifi-
cate, and all that was required to PERFECT THE
TITLE to these lands sold for taxes, was a publica-
tion of a NOTICE OF THE INTENTION of the pur-
chaser of the certificate in SOME NEWSPAPER
that he would apply for a tax deed at the expiration
of sixty days. The owner of the land was given the
privilege of redeeming it at any time before deed
issued. The purchase price of the certificate was the
face of the certificate and 25 per cent interest for the
first two years and 8 per cent thereafter, with sub-
sequent taxes, clerk's fees, etc.
Under the operation of theme laws thousands of
acres of land belonging to the people of this State
were sold for taxes and the certificates were piled up
in Tallahassee by the thousand. Before the rush of
the turpentine operators was made into Florida,
after it became known that the forests of the adjoin-
ing States to the north were exhausted, the appella-
tion of "land poor" was applied to many of the eit-
izens of Florida. The owner of a tract of land
would clear a part of it for cultivation, build his
house and his farm buildings thereon, and eke out a
rather precarious existence on the cleared part. The
part that was uncleared was practically worthless,
and entirely so as far as any good it did, to the
owner. There was no demand for it, as there were
thousands of acre of unoccupied land belonging to
the State which could be bought at from 30 cents
to $1.25 an acre, and taxes on the land became a
great burden to some. There were other who were
careless, and still others who were Ignorant, and the
fact that the land had been sold to the State for
taxes and certificate issued against It did not dis-
turb them, because, either through poverty, ignor-
ance or carelessness, they were le to redeem
the land.
These people were cut off from the means of get-
ting information quickly as to what was happening
in the industrial world They did not dream that
the time was at hand when the land which had been
going begging at $1 an acre would be worth from
$2 to $6 an acre for turpentine purpoMes. But there
were OTHER PEOPLE IN THE STATE, and in
other States, who did have this information, and who
S(OoMla m on Thirteeth Pagep









IF IT'S RIOHT, WE ARE FOR IT-


CLAUDE L'ENGLE
Editor


SUN


A. K. TAYLOR
Cartoonist


al ILLUTRATm WmLY WITH A WUIL O ITS OW, PMITO F THE PRlM OF IM, WB TM UN 00MPANY, AT 31 WET FOMnYTH TIMr. JAMIC, FAIIMA

Volume I-No. 30 JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, JUNE 9, 1906 5 Cents per Copy, $2 per Year
Entered at the Post Office at Jackwonvile, Fla., m eoond-luM matter-


IN THE SUN'S CHARIOT
Intimate Talks Between Publisher and Reader
It would seem, with so many things happening of late-and we
speak only of things that have happened to us-that we might have
had a good excuse for overlooking a bet or two when it came to plans
for polishing up the face of THE SUN so that its brightness may be
made more dazzling.
In fact, so deep rooted is our determination, so strong and lusty
is our purpose, and so painstaking is our effort to make each SUN a
better SUN than any SUN that has gone before, that-
We keep on a thinking how to do It-
Even if, such things as libel suits, gun plays, and purchases of
fifty thousand dollar printing plants, happen in bunches of three in
the course of a single week's journey toward SUN perfection.
As we were saying, we keep our eye on the ball all the time, and
will here jot down a bit of SUN prophecy as to good things shortly to
come to pass SUNWISE.
Before we proceed to this pleasing enumeration we will clear up a
point that may be a bit foggy to some of our Chariot riders.
We have bought most of the stock of the Capital Publishing Com-
pany of Tallahassee, and will after this week print THE SUN in
Tallahassee.
But THE SUN will be published all over Florida as usual.
Note the distinction between printing and publishing. To illus-
trate-
A beautiful young lady once asked a dignified professor to explain
the difference between printing and publishing.
"Certainly," said he, "I place a kiss on your cheek-that's print-
ing. I tell my friends about it-that's publishing."
"Ohl yes," said the blushing miss, "I see. Exquisite printing-
very poor publishing."
It is a mere matter of detail and business convenience that THE
SUN will be printed in Tallahassee.
It will still be published everywhere.
Now, for the announcements that you have been waiting for-
They are two in number-
First-Mr. A. K. Taylor has promised to draw a series of
cartoons, setting forth his own uniquely humorous conception of how
to spend a pleasant summer.
These ideas will not be copyrighted, and the devices shown to
carry them out will not be patented. Any person is at liberty to make
use of any or all of them, provided, he or she can prove innocence of
authorship 6f the expression-"Is it hot enough for you."
The title Mr. Taylor has selected for these cartoons is like the
Taylor cartoon itself-original, bright and snappy. It is-
How to be Happy Tho Hoti"
You can't afford to miss any of these cartoons, and they will begin
real soon.
Second-In the old blue back speller there is a picture of a little
boy learning at his father's knee. Charmingly idylic this scene and
strongly has it appealed to all who passed through b-a, ba, k-e-r, ker,
baker, and reached the reading part in the last pages of that blue book
of school days that were also blue.
We will.introduce
Little Aigenon and His Pa,
Who will enlighten us on all subjects we are in doubt about.
Algenon will ask the questions and Pa will answer them as only
Pa's can.
In the meantime-
Better subscribe.
Its easy.
The wish, the will
And a two dollar bill.


A Great Half-Price Offer

Read every word in this announcement, for It a the opportunity of
year. Sevenofthegrtest in the country have combined to be
of ered together at a grea X reduced rate. Never before wUsuch anoffer
given to the public, and Ita e to ynverwil it be madeaT~ 'This
ear several wagines have increased their subscription price, wch shows
how much greater this offer really is. The onlyreason we as maskingIt to
the people of this State is because we have increased the subscription price of
THIE lUto t pWr yar, and we want all Florida to read Ti UE
Cosmopolitan, one year, $1.0
Wnman's Home Companion, one year, 1.00
The Review of Reviews, one year, 3.00
Pearson's, one year, 1.00
The American Magazine, one year, 1.00
Tom Watson's Magazine, one year, 1.00
THE SUN, one year, 2.00
Total, $10.00

Send $5.75 and Get Them All for One Year

THE COSMOPOLITAN which recently purchased by Mr. W. R. H ,ha
,era w m~ me. ,m ,, been greatly improved by the new ma nagement nan 1
now the mot'popular ten.cent illustrated monthly in the world. Already its ales have
increased 100,000 over what they were four months ago, when it became a part of the fa.
mo u Heart publishinI organiation. The publishers an sparing no effort to secure for It
all that is most delrable in the way of pictures, stores and artcles. As an example, pic-
tures by Frederic Remlngton and stories b W. W. Jacobs are now running in the Cosmo.
polltan, and a strong new serial by H. 0. Wells.
THE REVIEW OF REVIEWS Subtantial American men and women are going
en& etenwVIK vr wl6,9 to keep up with the times and they are going to
take the shortest cut-which is The Review of RevTew-s monthly survey of the world's-
progres.
WOMA S OME COMPANION ,not excelled by any other home and
M AN S HOME COMPANION lly publication In the world. 8tore.
fashion, articles, Illustrations.
PEARSONi I one of the leading fiction magainee of the day. both Its serial and
short torl a being by authors of worldwide reputation. Pearson's is
considered authority on book reviews.
THE AMERICAN MAATINE For thirty Years known as Leslie's Magazine.
-- -nHof santa m aki It was lately purchased by a powerful syndi.
cate, and no funds are lackit to make it one of the best tagu lnes in America,
TOM WATSON'S MAGAZINE No monthly magazine In America ever before
Wvwn VbyallW ofpeomnd "et with such a hearty welcome as did Tom
Watson's by all classes of people, and deservedly so, for Mr. Watson is at once the foremost
writer and clearest thinker before the public today. It is filled with the beet thoughts of
the best minds on all subject of interest to the American people.
THE SUN "a the p.r with will of its own. and Is by far the best paper in
Flqorida oQtuendl all right and oensuring all wrong.

Grab This Opportunity
If you want one magazine with our paper for a year, you cannot do better than to accept
one of following offers. while they are hot off the bat and before they are withdrawn:
COSMOPOLITAN, one year ....................................... ................ 00
THE SUN, one year............. ............................................... 200
PEAR80N'8. one year................................................. ........... 1 ..... 00
THE BUN, one year................................................................... 2 00
Im m ,.. ...2
THE UNAM oneCANMAGAZINE.one year ......................... 2 00
TOM WATSON'S MAGAZINE, one year.................................... 00
THE SUN, one year......... .. 20................... 00
Fill out coupon, mail it today with your remittance and be sure of getting
the greatet magazsincombinatlon that was ever odered-an opportunity of
years and one it is safe to say will never be made again.


THi SUN,
AshsuUk ft


Enclosed please find $............................for which enter my name for one year's sub.
scription to your paper and the following magaines........................................................


N a me................................................................ .......
Address ............................................................................
"" ""e"" "" "e"ee ""*oeo "ee "eee ee "ee "eeee "ee


k m ...................... ........... :


T H Emd,










June 9,1006


THE SUN


Third Page


Ono e upon a time, when fairies, gnomes and gob-
lins d welt among men, and witches rode broomsticks
through the air, there lived a fisherman who was poor
and discontented. It was his habit to shut himself
up in his room at nightfall and spend long hours in
darkness and solitary reflection. Bitterly did he re.
proach fate for dealing so harshly with him, and fer-
vently did call on the good fairies to bring him for-
tune.
One night he returned to his hut more disconsolate
than usual, on account of the utter failure of his
day's fishing. He brought nothing home with him
except his net and a bottle of curious shape, which
had been brought up from the bottom of the lake in
the last cast of his net. He had placed the bottle
back in his net, after examining it, and forgot all
about it until the nnise made by Its striking the floor
as he cast the net down, called his whole day's catch
to his mind. In his anger he picked up the bottle
and dashed it to pieces against the back of his chim-
ney.
Instantly the room was filled with a sulphurous
smoke, which quickly took on human shape, and a
small-sized man of copper-colored complexion, dressed
in Oriental garb, stood revealed before the' aston-
ished eyes of the now thoroughly frightened fsher-
man.
The caster of nets stood not upon the order of his
going, but making a dash for the only window the
hut afforded, wont forth into the night, leaving the
Oriental gentleman in possession of the field.
After his breath gave out he stopped, and finding
himself alive, took his courage in his haWl and
walked" back home. Peeping in the window he saw
his table spread with a snowy cloth, a piping hot
and bountiful supper laid thereon, and his bottle
acquaintance standing calmly by wielding the fly-
brush.
This looked so good to him that he boldly entered
the door, proceeded to the table, and ate the best
supper he ever had. The Oriental gentleman cleared
off the table and, making a deep salaam before the
fisherman, who was too full for utterance, said:
"What command has my master for his slave?"
"Put me next to this little game," said the fisher-
man. "I'm all in. Can't figure it out. What's the
answer?"
"It's for the master to command and the slave
to obey," answered he of the bottle. "I will ex-
plain-listen
"I am a genii of great renown and remote an-
tiquity. Let's see, thfs is the first day of April, is
it not? It is? Well, six or seven thousand years
ago a wicked witch got mad at me because I refused
to tell witch was witch, and catching me one night
just after I had emptied my seventeenth bottle, took
advantage of my helplessness and clapped me into it.
She sealed the bottle with water-proof gum arabic
and a couple of Arabic curses, and threw me into the
lake, with these fatal and truly calabistic words:
'There you must remain until released by a red-
nosed, bow-legged fisherman with a squint in his left
eye' (no offense, I hope. I am repeating the witch's
words) 'and women released you must act as slave to
this food-for-anothing fisherman, and get him .what-
ever be may wish for.'
"So hen I a, and there you are. It's yours to
ask and me to is for ymou
WbM this 61m a was o L the shermda Just


to test this free-gift distribution business, said: "Go
catch me two bottles of beer and a box of Turkish
cigarettes."
The genii bowed and disappeared on the jump. In
less than ten minutes he returned with an Oriental
smile and the articles asked sor.
Well, after this, life to thit fisherman was a golden
sunset and torchlight procession in joyous con-
junction. He lay back in the morris chair and kept
that genii on the jump getting things for him. When-
ever he wanted a perfect, of a new spring suit, or a
bottle of the oldest and ooldest, or a pair of silk sus-
penders, or a roll of money with a rubber band on
it, he told the genii about it, and the genii produced.
And, as the genii was invisible to every one except
his master, no one knew where the fisherman got the
money he flashed or the fine clothes he wore. Every-
body was anxious to get on the fisherman's side, be-
cause his side looked like the shady side of easy
street. As he had it in plenty and was willing to
blow it, nobody seemed to care WHERE HE GOT IT
or how he got it. He had got it, and that was
enough.
Shortly after that genii began to get busy provid-
ing things for his master, people in the village began
to send in calls for the police to investigate mys-
terious disappearances of personal property. One
would complain of the loss of a turkey, another of the
disappearance of a watch, another would report a
roll of bills gone, a fourth told about a raid on his
wine cellar, and so on, until the whole place was in
an uproar. The chief of police said that a gang of
professional crooks was working the town, and ad-
vised every man to sleep with one eye open. Which
same every man did, but saw nothing.
One day the fisherman called on his genii for coin,
and was handed a fat pocketbook, which the master
recognized as the very one his friend, the crippled
apple woman, kept her savings in. He knew the
pocketbook well, because he had often sen the poor
woman pull it out from behind the clock on her man-
tel shelf and count its contents. He knew that she
was trying to get together a hundred dollars to pay
the expenses of an operation that she hoped would
cure her lameness. He had not heard of the loss of
the poor creature's little fortune, but he began to
suspect something. He called his genii, and asked
hfm point-biank where he got the pocketbook he had
just delivered.
Without a moment's hesitation, and quite as a mat-
ter of course, the genii described the apple woman's
house and the place from which he had taken the
pocketbook.
"Do you mean to tell me that you took away that
poor woman's money and gave it to me ?" demanded
the horrified fisherman.
"Why certainly," answered the genii. "You asked
for money, didn't you?"
"And did you get all the things you have been
supplying me with the same wa t?"
VO course," said the genii; '7ow else was I to get
them? You must have known that somebody HAD
TO BE DEPRIVED of things that you got WITH-
OUT WORKING FOR THEM. You knew that I
had no time to PRODUCE WEALTH, and in order
to proure it for you I took advantage of my su-
perior wisdom and experience to get it away from
those who DID PRODUCE it, and won by miafor-
ture or ignorance or aresse-ness UNABLE TO PRO


TECT IT. There may be some moral ways of getting
MUCH for LITTLE, but there is NO RIGHT WAY
of getting SOMETHING for NOTHING."
Upon this, the fisherman, being a moral man, drove
the genii from his house, restored, with explanations,
what property he could, and went fishing again.

This fable has been set forth for the purpose of
bringing home to all who read this Journal the oper-
ation of a system, which has been legalized in this
State, by which men may get SOMETHING for
NOTHING, or its practical equivalent.
It is what is known as acquiring land by tax title,
and it has been so successfully worked that the
ownership of lands in Florida has, in a little more
than five years, passed out of the hands of the many
into the hands of the few.
Under the statutes made and provided prior to
1903, the land of any person was sold to the State
for unpaid taxes,. and certlfloates of such sale were
deposited in the State Treasurer's office. These cer-
tificates could be purchased by any one from the
State, after two years from the date of the certifi-
cats, and all that was required to PERFECT THE
TITLE to these lands sold for taxes, was a publica-
tion of a NOTICE OF THE INTENTION of the pur-
chaser of the certificate in SOME NEWSPAPER
that he would apply for a tax deed at the expiration
of sixty days. The owner of the land was given the
privilege of redeeming it at any time before deed
issued. The purchase price of the certificate was the
face of the certificate and 25 per cent interest for the
first two years and 8 per cent thereafter, with sub-
sequent taxes, clerk's fees, etc.
Under the operation of these laws thousands of
acres of land belonging to the people of this State
were sold for taxes and the certificates were piled up
in Tallahassee by the thousand. Before the rush of
the turpentine operators was made into Florida,
after it became known that the forests of the adjoin-
ing States to the north were exhausted, the appella-.
tion of "land poor" was applied to many of the cit-
izens of Florida. The owner of a tract of land
would clear a part of it for cultivation, build his
houe and his farm buildings thereon, and eke out a
rather precarious existence on the cleared part. The
part that was uncleared was practically worthless,
and entirely so as far as any good it did, to the
owner. There was no demand for it, as there were
thousands of acres of unoccupied land belonging to
the State which could be bought at from 30 events
to $1.25 an acre, and taxes on the land became a
great burden to some. There were others who were
careless, and still others who were ignorant, and the
fact that the land had been sold to t8e State for
taxes and certificate issued against it did not dis-
turb them, because, either through poverty, ignor-
ance or carelessness, they were unable to redeem
the land.
These people were cut off from the means of get-
ting information quickly as to what was happenng
in the industrial world. They did not dream that
the time was at hand when the land which had been
going begging at $1 an acre would be worth from
$2 to $5 an acre for turpentine purposes. But there
were OTHER PEOPLE IN THE STATE, and in
other State, who did hae this information, and who
[(otasnMd oM Thirteeth Page)










June 9, 1906


THE SUN


What's Agitating the People


These Days


The Hon. John Temple Graves of Georgia seems to
be a never-ending source of amusement to the New
York Sun, which in a recent issue prints the following
letter addressed to it by an admirer of Mr. Graves:
"To the Editor of the Sun-Sir: We are watch-
ing with peculiar joy the several compliments you are
paying opr distinguished friend, the Hon. John Tem-
ple Graves. We note with satisfaction that your
opinion of this 'great and good man' is most correct.
He is actually pure, noble and almost divine in his
innocence and eloquence. There are two everlast-
ingly monumental men in Georgia, both of whom is
the Hon. John Temple Graves, the talking flower and
honey bee of Georgia. GATE CITY.
"Atlanta, Ga., May 30."
And elsewhere in the same issue, publishes an edi-
torial on the Georgian under the title "In Arcadia,"
which we here reproduce:
"The Hon. John Temple (raves, the statesminn,
orator, prose poet and true lanier, swinlburne and
watts of Crackerdom, sings sadly in hi4 gilded cage
in the Atlanta Georgian:
"'The Sodom apples crumble on the lips; the
mirage melts into the desert's burning sands.. The
thorny holly comes to bind the forehead of the jocund
year. The sunlit skies are overcast with winter's
scudding clouds, and in the shivering blasts we pause
to say, 'I, too, once lived in Arcadia.'
"The brutal and melancholy truth," cries the gifted
editor-bard, "is that there are no Arcadias."
"No Arcadias? Turn, gifted one, if you have the
heart to turn, to the pages of your rival, the Atlanta
News, whence you were extruded by wicked men. In
those editorial coumns, once burning with your elo-
quence, read this idyll:
"'The fish fry given by Dr. Joseph Jacobs yester-
day to twenty or more friends was an outing that
will be long remembered by those in attendance.
Enough rain nad fallen to quiet the dust and to cool
the air, and the congenial party that gathered in the
pavilion at the river was in perfect temperamental
condition.
"'It was an old-fashioned meeting of men with an
appreciation for old-time hospitality-and this royal
host who blends so beautifully the old and the new
in the graces of his dispensations, was in his usual
whole-souled mood. A graphophone had been pro-
vided with an infinite variety of music, vocal and in-
strumental, of the long ago. Not a modern piece
was played or sung. It was glorious-this occasion
of beautiful companionship and sweet melodies.'
"'There was a bountiful spread. The fish was a
part of the menu, as a matter of course-but there
were other dishes-and other refreshments.'
"Fish fry and musiol Atlanta is Arcadia. Mr.
Graves should cheer up."

A peculiarly sensational trial, resulting in the ac-
quittal of the defendant, was that of Josephine Ter-
ranova for the murder of her aunt and uncle, re-
cently occurring in New York. One of the most sen-
sational features of this case, as reported by the
press, was the torturing of the girl in an effort to
test her sanity. So conflicting are these reports,
however, that, in the absence of further information,
judgment must be withheld, but should these stories
prove true no condemnation is too severe for the
court official or officials under whose direction these
tortures were inflicted. The Atlanta News comments
thus on the reported "tests:"
"The brutal tests that were applied to Josephine
Terranova, the Italian girl, under trial for the mur-
der of an uncle who had betrayed her, in qrder to
ascertain whether she was sane, are on a par with the
most fiendish tortures of the Dark Ages. Nothing
in Russia is worse, and yet the brutes who figured
in the atrocious display have the assurance to claim
that they are a part of a high civilization.
"District Attorney Jerome, in visiting the punish-
ment, is far more detestable, in consequence of the
utter lack of humanity shown, than the poor brain-
tacked victim that he is prosecuting.
"Think I This girl was given, according to press
reports, volt after volt of electricity. While in the
chair of torture steel spikes were driven into her
anikles, heavy iron weights were dropped upon her
hare toes, puins were stuck into her cheeks. For
h.urs this cruelty was continued, until the poor oresa-
ture was hysterical with pain. And to what end?
IMerely to ascertain whether she was erasy.
"It sane in the beginning,, the chances are that
.he will be crazy by the time Jerome, with his inqui-
sition methods gets through with her.
"It is inconceivable that such things could happen
in America. In all the cruelties that are being per.
petrated in Russia, under a system of impassioned
rule, we can think of nothing so replete with horror
as the dispassionate treatment of this helpless girl,
uwder the direction of a high court official in Amer-
ica's metropolis," which the following editorial from
the New York Sun directly contradicts:
"The verdict of the jury acquitting the Terranova
girl of the charge of murdering her aunt, Mrs. Reg-
gio, is the natural outcome of the evidence adduced
at the trial. Although, technically, the teStimoy


was not such as would have justified a trial Judge C
in directing a verdict of acquitaal, the case belon
to that great class in which a jury will never send
the prisoner to death. l
"T he punishment of the slain woman would seem
almost to have been justified, if murder can ever be
justified, by her wicked participation in the horrible e
indignities to which the Terranova girl had been c
subjected. b
"The verdict of acquittal was not due, in any sense, t
to the counsel for the prisoner, nor to the sensational 4
accounts of the trial published in various newspa-
pers, but simply to that sLern sense of primitive us-
tice which is at times enunciated by the verdict ot an
American jury.
"Through misrepresentations it has been made to t
appear that the Terranova girl was subjected to tor-
ture and to cruel tests during her examination by the
doctors who wene experts on insanity. Such state- (
ments are absolutely false. No stones were dropped
on her feet; neither the needle nor electricity nor a
anything else was used to torture her. These stories b
were fabricated by persons desiring to mak e trial
spectacular. 11
"The accused has been remanded to jail until the
District Attorney shall determine what course to
take in reference to the indictment against her for
the murder of her uncle. There can be no doubt
about the proper course. She should never be
brought to trial for the other concurrent murder.
All the testimony and all the evidence which re-
sulted in her speedy acquittal on the charge of mur-
dering her aunt would apply, with even more force,
to the trial for murdering her uncle, and the result
would inevitably be the same. The county should
not be subjected to this unnecessary additional ex.
pense. The District Attorney, in view of these facts,
is warranted in applying to the court for the dis-
missal of the indictment. The accused girl should be
discharged from custody. While it may have been
unnecessary to kill the aunt, the verdict of the jury
has disposed of that question forever; and if the
killing of the aunt was justified, the slaying of the
uncle was even more justifiable, for he was the
principal villain, whose crime demanded condign
punishment."
The whole press is agreed, however, that the ver-
dict was a proper one. "The jury that acquitted
Josephine Terranova of the charge of murder within
sixteen minutes after the Judge had charged them,
did right," says the New Orleans Item, and con-
tinues: "If a tithe of the testimony given by this
defendant is true, she was justifiable in taking the
lives of her kinspeople and ought to have been cen-
sured for not adopting this means of putting them
out of the way long before she committed the deed.
A poor, ignorant foreign girl was made to slave for
her uncle and aunt for years, performing the most
abject drudgery even while she was ill enough to be
in bed and attended by a physician. But the worst
part of this horrible affair is unfit for publication,
and it is sufficient to say that those who should have
protected their niece conspired and did disgrace her
and make of her an outcast. After her marriage
they were demons enough to poison the mind of her
husband against her and caused him to abandon her,
with hopes she would lead a life of shame. If ever
the taking of human life was commendable and right,
we think the present case presented the most perfect
provocation conceivable. These foreigners should
learn that American citizens will not tolerate their
devilish machinations, and if they resort to unmen-
tionable crimes, 'upon whose brow shame would be
ashamed to sit,' they will not punish the victims who
take the law in their own hands for their own vindi-
cation and protection. The opinions of alienists
differed as to the sanity of the poor, maltreated
young woman; but sane or insane, she did right in
wielding the bloody dagger with such telling effect
upon those who had assassinated her character."

The demolition of the old part of the famous
Hoffman House, in New York, for the purpose of re-
building it on a larger and finer plan, has given rise
to a report that the Hoffman House would be closed,
and thus would disappear from New York a land-
mark that will hold a place all its own in local his-
tory. Its fame had penetrated the farthest recesses
of America, and no male visitor from any part of the
country was allowed to depart without being shown
the Hoffman House "art gallery." The report of the
closing of the hotel, however, is erroneous, as the
improvements now under construction interfere in no
way with the business of the house or the convenience
of its guests.

The revelations we have had in connection with the
Western meat-packing concerns horrify and astound
the American people. For many days these revela-
tions have been the all-important topic of discussion,
and every paper in the country i filled with such
headlines as this: "Roosevelt Urges Congress to
Remedy Revolting Evils Disclosed in Beef Scandal:"


"Beef Scandal Report Shows Filth and Dirt as Part
of Products;" "Special Report of Experts Bent to


(Continued on Next Page)


Fourth Page


I 1


Congress Shows Ghastly Conditions in Packing
[ouses-Tuberoulosis Germs Mingle with Filth-
)irt and Grime and Grease from the Floors Are
Made into Product Labeled 'Government Inspected;,'"
Packers Furnish Powder to Color Tainted Meat;"
Packers Force Dealers to 'Dope' Diseased Meat,"
to. Under these headings are related stories of the
conditions in the packing-houses that show the utter
Disregard for common decency by the mighty "beef
barons," and much of the information gained by
agents sent to the plants for the purpose is so bad
is to be unsuitable for public prints. The Louisville
Courier-Journal says:
"A man who accompanied Mr. James B. Reynolds
luring his examination of the Chicago packing-houses
ells this story to a correspondent of the New York
Tribune:
"'Early in the morning, unknown to the employees
of the plant, Mr. Reynolds examined the cattle in the
pens. Signs of a hasty attempt to 'clean up' were
apparent. All the inspectors in the city, State and
Federal, were present in their best clothes, but Mr.
Reynolds, who had been forewarned, was attired like
a stranger.
"'When he visited the pens there were thirty-one
diseased cattle there, all showing evidence of 'lump
jaw.' He watched these cattle until they were
slaughtered. Afterward he asked a city inspector
how many had been condemned on post-mortem in-
spection, and was told that seven had been held up-
twenty-four had been passed as healthy.
"'When Mr. Reynolds asked what was done with
the product of the vats, tne manager of the slaugh-
terhouse said the fats went to the butterine man and
the solids to the fertilizer factory.
"'Mr. Reynolds was informed that two firms in
Chicago made a business of buying the diseased meat
that was 'passed' and selling it to certain restaurants
and hotels. Mr. Reynolds declared that in the bunch
of thirty-one cattle there were not a dozen that
should have been passed.'
"It is not very wonderful that the packers should
desire this sort of thing to be suppressed. Some-
how, it is getting published anyway, and it must be
interesting to the patrons of the restaurants that
buy this meat."
And the Memphis Commercial-Appeal, having
noted that the charges of dirt and filth were brought
against the product intended for home consumption
while that for export is handled in a fairly sanitary
manner, says:
"Although the Government is supposed to have
the meat packers on the hip, nevertheless we find the
following in the Kansas City Post of three days ago:
"'Worst of all, perhaps, we force a rigid inspec-
tion of the meats our packing-houses dress for sale
abroad, and at the same time permit the packing-
houses to palm off on us, as has been charged hun-
dreds of times, meats which have decayed and have
been 'doped' with acids until they are presentable.
'Dr. W. P. Cutler, city food inspector, in an inter-
view in the Kansas City Post yesterday, declared
that Government inspection of meats intended for
domestic consumption is a tarce. In another column
appeared a declaration from Mrs. Richard Bloor, a
special agent who made an inspection of Chicago
packing-houses, that 'when chickens came in large
quantities many of them would be dead and spoiled.
When they were so far decomposed that they could
not be handled without dropping apart, they were
taken to the refrigerating plant and frozen solid.
Then they were deodorized and turned out as canned
chicken-not potted chicken, but chicken in pieces.
Formaldyhde and other stuff was used to 'take the
smell away.'
"And the American people say and really think
they are smart. They believe themselves to be sharp
in a bargain and not to be 'taken in' when they are
swapping horses or dollars with anybody on earth.
Pshaw, there are only a few of us who are 'up to
snuff' after all. The great bulk of the people, as
demonstrated by the foregoing clipping, and the daily
robbery of the tariff law, are, in street vernacular,
among the noblest suckers of this green globe.
"Why, Europeans are overreaching us and laughing
at us while tickling our fancied business capacity by
calling us those 'cute Americans,' but the quality of
astuteness, if we ever had any, certainly does not
appear characteristic of the nation today. Our best
meats are purchasable by aliens in foreign markets
for less than we give for the tainted stuff described
by the specialists in Kensas City.
"Nor is food the only medium of fraud against
the American people. Their clothing, their building
material, their implements, in fact nearly everything
that is turned out by the American manufacturer,
is offered in its best quality to the foreigner at a
price less than the home man is forced to pay for
the inferior grade.
"When we, possessing the power to put an end to
such conditions, permit them to exist, is it not
questionable whether we are possessed even of com-
mon sense?
"We submit to a levy, a robbery, which strips our











June 9, 19o6


THE SUN


Fifth Page


Those


Unpub-



lished


Letters


of PatricK



Murphy


My Dear Major: 'Tis miny months since I have
taken your honest tho' pudgy hand in mine-not, as
I recall it, since we exchanged the fervint pressure as
fellow-sufferers in the dafate of the State insurance
bill that raised our hopes so high and fell so hard on
account of that mane trick of Sinnitor Harris, who
got a strangle howldt on the flure and wud not turn
it loose that last sad day of the last sad (fer you and
me) session. It is, I say, a long time now since I
have looked into the rotund but inscrutable face of me
owld find Major Healy, but sure I've not forgot
you, Major dear, nor have I forgot the times we ve
had at that dear owld Tallahassee chasing the holder
of the dough bag, and trying ter throw our hooks
inter it fer the price of a wake's board at the Con-
stantine House.
I'm writing yer this, Major, me boy, because that
divil may-care Spotts has wan of two things, an' a
bad attack at that. He has paralysis of the mim-
mory organ or writers' cramp-maybe both; for
tho' minys their illigent letters I've written him,
divil a wan has he answered. Now, Major, well it is
yer know me literary facility, as well as me epistolary
proclivity, an' these two, combined with me tropical
enthoosiasm fer telling the things I know and the
things I guess at, an fer the matter of that, the
things I think might be going to happen, or should
happen; so-in words of that blonde sextette song-
"As I must write sum wan, it may as well be you."
I say, Major, why can't you let me in on that little
graft ye be after getting from the gummers who are
so patriotically trying ter persuade the Guvncr to
stop using the muck rake on nLe great weather dissert
of our beloved but fillibusted State, by knocking him
on his popularity with their bulgin' pocketbooks?
Well acquainted as you are with me condition of long
continued faithfully prosecuted search after the aisy
money, it should not be necessary fer me to drop ye
this reminder. I'm no hog, but I think I'm as good
as Choate, an' 'tis meself that knows that Choate has
both feet in der trough.


What's Agitating the
People These Days

fContinued from Fourth Page]
home people for the purpose of cheapening essential
articless to strangers and aliens. We protect the
health of foreigners most vigorously from impurities
in food prepared in this country, and turn to the
trough and eat up the rotten scraps ourselves.
"Honestly, is such conduct consistent with sanity?
is it not enough to condemn us either as a nation of
dupes or as being non compos mentis in our inter-
national business transactions?"
And yet these conditions have been known to many
for several years.. No less a person than Gen. Nelson
A. Miles said, in answer to a question on the subject:
"The disclosures about the packing-house products
now being exploited are no news to me. I knew it
several years ago. I told what I knew then, and
had the matter been taken up at that time thousands
of lives would have been saved.
"I believe 3,000 United States soldiers during the
Spanish-American War lost their lives because of
adulterated, impure, poisonous meat. There is no
way of estimating the number of soldiers whose
health was ruined by eating impure food.
"I have a barrel of testimony on the subject in
the way of affidavits which I collected in my inves-
tigation seven years ago. The investigating commit-
tee closed the case and refused to hear the 2,000 wit-
nesses whom I had ready. At that time I could
have secured the testimony of 100,000 men that the
canned beef sold to the army was impure, adulter-
ated and unwholesome.".

Christlansborg To Be Rebuilt.
Copenhagen.-Seadin-vians from the United
States, paying their customary yearly visit to the old
country this summer, will find half a thousand work-
men busy tearing down the ruins of Christisaborg


By the Piper that played before Moses, I swear
that I received the shock of me hitherto misspint
life when 1 read in the wakely edishum of Tipperary
Telltale (which follows me everywhere I roam) and
which notis I see copied in Frank Mayes's Pensacola
paper, that our owld friend J. Piper follivur is a
myllunear. Whin I recall the hours I have spint
talking to Jhames about woes of the pollytariat
whilst I might have been talking about a piece of
that millun applied to your's truly, where it would
do the most good, I wape the bitter tears that scald
me Gallic cheeks, already burned by exposure to tne
suns of many climes.
Whin I remember their times I've struck the Sinni-
tor for a couple of dollars to make a trip to Mexico,
an' was trimmed down to a dollar sivinty-five, me
honest Irish heart 'tis broke entirely by the thought
that I might have asked for a hundred and got eighty-
wan fifty-five.
And then, Major darlint, think of how chesty I
could have been whin in company with Pierre Morgan
and Jimmy Stillman, by the menshun of me find
Jeemes Piper, the only myllunear Sinnitor the South
can call her own. They say he mode it logginim. an'
why not? 'Tis known that he is a log-roller of the
first class, but divil a bit do I care how he made it.
the nixt time I see him I mane to make up for lost
time by asking for all he owes me.
You may smile at me statement that the Sinnitor
owes me, but lie does that same. I have made a cal-
culation since I read the news, an' I have it in black
and whie. 'Tis not a brand of booze I mane, out a
financial statement.
Here's how 1 flgger it:
Struck the Sinnitor 812 times for the loan of two
dollars enduring the last sixteen years.
Should have asked for wan hundred each time n had
I known the truth about his millun.
He owes me the difference.
Plaze accept congratulations, Major, me boy, on
living in a State that puts them all on their blink


which, for twenty-two years, appealed to Dannih pa-
triots, an immense picturesque pile.
When the question of rebuilding came up in
Parliament, only the extreme Socialists opposed it.
and henceforth a goodly sum will be appropriated
annually for a decade or longer to re-erect the great
royal palace according to the plans laid down by
Christian VI. Whether the castle will be used as
a royal residence has not been decided; probably
King Frederick will prefer to live in Amalienborg
Palace. In that case the new pile will be turned
over to one of the ministries. Christianshorg. by
the way, was twice destroyed by fire. Built in 1733
to 1740, fire wiped it out in 1794 and again in 1S84.

Cage Cowardly Army Officer.
Paris.-The Revue des Mondas correspondent in
Japan, investigating one of the big prisons, noticed
in a basement a cage such as menagerie-keepers use
for a moderate-sized ferocious beast. The goaler
rapped on the floor, and from the cage's dark back-
ground issued two men in acrouching position. They
were dressed in yellow, and seeing the goaler, bowed
to the ground, knocking their heads against th-,
wooden floor.
"These two rascals," said the goaler, "dishonored
our army in the guise of captain and major of in-
fantry respectively. When those miserable Russians
threatened Formosa, they gave leg bail. Yet the
scoundrels belong to the nobility. Because they are
aristocrats we gave them a chance, after they were
caught, to commit hari-karl, but they refused. They
preferred to go to prison. Of course under the cir-
cumstances we do not feel bound to make it pleasant
for them."
COFFEE RESPONSIBLE FOR REl) NOSES AND)
PIMPLES.
Paris.-The publication by Dr. Isaak of Berlin of
a scientific article, saying that coffee is responsible
for the majority of red noses in females and for


whin it comes to springing new enterprises. I have
heard the latest news about me friend Hollomon. It
came in a letter from him asking me to take a block
of stock in the Perpetual Profit-Producing Pecan and
Pony Farm of Olustee, Florida, Unlimited. I wired
back at once for a reservashun of five thousand shares
and expect to pay for them in ponies for the farm.
I sailed at wance for the Shetland Islands, and 'tis
from there that I am writing this. I have closed the
deal for tin tnousand ponies, and as soon as Hiollo-
mon sinds me the stock I will swap it for the ponies,
at the rate of one full-size share of stock for two
ponies, because the ponies are only half-size, as ycr
well know, and this is a fair rate of exchange.
Whin everything is ready I will run over to Cork,
me old home, get some jackets for the ponies, and
right back to the islands will I go to start the ponies
on their swim to the "Land of Flowers and Fakirs."
'Tis Admiral Murphy, yer will have to call me whin
next we mate, for I will have earned the title by conm-
manding the biggest fleet of seahorses since Dewey
put the Spanish Manila fleet hors do combat.
'Tis an illigint schame of Jeemes A., this last, and
well do I know that it can't fail. If inny won gits
dissatisfied with his stock in this pecan and pony
company, no matter how nutty he gets, he can't say:
"it's a horse on me."
Although minny men have known that the equine
and the nut families are closely related, and for proof
of this it is only necessary to mention the horse
chestnut, Ilollomon was the first to put this knowl-
edge to practical use.
Think of the fine tayth the little ponies will have,
and oh I the strong jaws av thim, developed by crack-
ing the wycans for their daily sustinenee. Ye can
put me down for a commercial failure if I am mis-
taken in me sizing up of this great and only Per-
petual Profit Producing Pecan and Pony Farm iigan
me friend lholoman has kindly consinted ter let ime
into. I will soon be known to Newport Msoiety as
the Nutty Pony Myllunear. Till thin, and Iwfore, I
am, Yrs, PAT.


Kaiser Interested In
Bank for Central America

Berlin.-It is an open secret in financial circles
that the Kaiser acquired a good sli.e in the Bank
for Central America, which of late opened its doors
in Guntemiula. If the bank is a success, similar
financial institutions will he opened by German
capitalists in Costa Rica and San Salvador. At the
same time the Prussian authorities are renewing
their efforts to send emigrants to Central America,
and the official papers print glowing accounts of
good times, fine harvests and high prices, "which
must not become a monopoly for the Yankees."
The new bank will devote its main energies to
the cultivation and introduction of German ma-
chinery. In this latter branch competition with
American importers promises to be very keen. Ger-
man firms will try to introduce electrical devices to
take the place of the more cumbersome steam ma-
chinery. The official papers insist with rather
clumsy eloquence that the undertaking is not only
promising as a financial investment, but that its
support is a patriotic duty. Hence the clamor
against the "Yankees."
millions of pimples on both males and females, has
caused much excitement among the beauty doctors,
who fear that their occupation is half gone if the
women believe what Dr. Isaak says and act accord-
ingly. Your correspondent interviewed several Paris
medical authorities, all of whom agree that Dr.
Isaak's "discovery" was not exactly new.
"Medicine has always maintained that coffee is
not only a menace to health if taken immoderately,
but that it also muddles the complexion of the habit-
ual drinker," said one expert.
Another said: "It behooves pretty women who
value their complexion, and especially that of their
nose, to give cohee a wide berth. They should not
drink it more than once a week."










June 9, 1906


THE SUN


Sixth Page.


The Boatswain's Mate


By
W. W. JACOBS


Mr. George Bean, retired boatswain, sighed noisily,
and with a despondent gesture, turned to the door
and stood with the handle in his hand; Mrs. Waters,
sitting behind the tiny bar in a tall Windsor-chair,
eyed him with smee heat.
"My feelinS'll never change," said the boatswain.
"Nor mine either," said the landlady, sharply.
"It's a strange thing, Mr. Bonn, but you always ask
me to marry you after the third mug.'
"It's only to geb my courage up," pleaded the boat-
swain. "Next time I'll do it afore I 'ave a drop;
that'll prove to you I'm in earnest."
He stepped outside and closed the door before the
landlady could make a selection from the many re-
torts that crowded to her lips. After the cool bar,
with its smell of damp sawdust, the road seemed hot
and dusty; but the boatswain, a prey to gloom nat-
ural to a man whose hand had been refused five times
in a fortnight, walked on unheeding. His steps
lagged, but hAs brain was active.
He walked for two miles deep in thought, and then
coming to a shady bank took a seat upon an inviting
piece of turf and lit his pipe. The heat and the
drowsy hum of bees made him nod; his pipe hung
from the corner of his mouth, and his eyes closed.
He opened them at the sound of approaching foot-
steps, and, feeling in his pocket for matches, gazed
lazily at the intruder. He saw a tall man carrying
a small bundle over his shoulder, and in the erect
carriage, the keen eyes, and bronsed face had litt'lf
difficulty in detecting the old soldier.
The stranger stopped as he reached the seated boat-
swain and eyed him pleasantly.
"Got a pipe o' baecy, mate?" he inquired.
The boatswain handed him the small metal box in
which he kept that luxury.
"Lobster, ain't you?" he said, affably.
The tall man nodded. "Was," he replied. "Now
I'm my own commander-in-chief."
"Padding it?" suggested the boatswain, taking the
box from him and refilling his pipe.
The other nodded, and with the air of one disposed
to conversation dropped his bundle in the ditch and,
took a seat beside him. "I've got plenty of time," he
remarked.
Mr. Benn nodded, and for a while smoked on in
silence. A dim idea which had been in his mind for
some time began to clarify. He stole a glance at his
companion-a man of about thirty-eight, clear eyes,
with humorous wrinkles at the corners, a heavy mus-
tache, and a cheerful expression more than tinged
with recklessness.
Ain't over and above fond o' work?" suggested
the boatswain, when he had finished his inspection.
"I love it," said the other, blowing a cloud of smoke
in the air, "but we can't have all we want in this
world; it wouldn't be good for us."
The boatswain thought of Mrs. Waters, and sighed.
Then he rattled his pocket.
"Would art a quid be any good to you?" he in-
quired.
"Look here," began the soldier; "just 'because I
asked you for a pipe o' bacey--"
"No offense," said the other, quickly. "I meant if
you earned it?"
The soldier nodded and took his pipe from his
mouth. "Gardening and windows?" he hazarded,
with a shrug of his shoulders.
the boatswain shook his head.
"Scrubbing, p'r'apst" said the soldier, with a sigh
of resignation." Last house I scrubbed out I did
it so thoroughly they accused me of pouching the
soap. Hang emat"
"And you didn't?" queried the boatswain, eyeing
him keenly.
The soldier rose and, knocking the ashes out of his
pipe, gased at him darkly. "I can't give it back to
you," he said, slowly, "because I've smoked some of
it, and I can't pay you for it because I've only got
twopence, and that I want for myself. So long,
matey, and next time a poor wretch asks you for a
pipe, be civil."
"I never see such a man for taking offense in .all
my born days," expostulated the boatswain. "I 'ad
my reasons for that remark, mate. Good reason
they was."
The soldier grunted and, stooping, picked up hit
bundle.
"I spoke of arf a sovereign just now," continued
the boatswain, impressively, "and when I tell yoi
t..at I offer it to you to do a bit o' burgling, you'll
see 'ow neeseusary It is for me to be certain of you;
honesty."
"Burgling?" gasped the astonished soldier. "Hon
esty? 'Struth; are you drunk or am I ?"
"Meaning." said the boatswain, waving the impute
tion away with his hand, "for you to pretend to be i
burglar."
"We're both drunk, that's what it is," said th
other, resignedly.
The boitswain fidgeted. "If you don't agree, mum
the word and no 'arm done," he said, holding out hi
hand.
"Mum's the word," said the so dler, taking ti


"My name's Ned Travers, and, barring cells for a
pree now and again, there's nothing against it.
Ivi that."
"Might happenn to anybody," said Mr. Benn, sooth-
ingly. -"You ll your pipe, and don't go chucking
__tobacco away again '
Mr. Travers took the offered box and, with econ-
omy born of adversity, stooped and filled up first with
the plug he had thrown away. Then he resumed his
seat and, leaning back luxuriously, bade the other
"fire awa ."
"I ain't got it all ship-shape and proper yet," said
Mr. Benn, slowly, "but it's in my mind's eye. It's
been there off and on like for some time.
He lit his pipe again and gaed fixedly at the op.
site hedge. 'Two miles from here, where I live,"
he said, after several vigorous puffs, "there's a little
public-'ouse called the Beehive, kept by a lady wot
I've got my eye on."
The soldier sat up.
"She won't 'ave me," said the boatswain, with an
air of mild surprise.
The soldier leaned back again.
"She's a lone widder," continued Mr. Benn, shak-
ng his head, "and the Beehive is in a lonely place.
Its right through the village, and the nearest house
is arf a mile off."
"Silly place for a pub," commented Mr. Travers.
"I've been telling her 'ow unsafe it is," said the
boatswain. "I've been telling her that she wants a
man to protect her, and she only laughs at me. She


don't believe it; d'ye see? Likewise I'm a small
man-small, but stiff. She likes tall men." .
"Most women do," said Mr. Travers, sitting up-
right and instinctively twisting his mustache. "When
I was in the ranks--"
"My idea is," continued the boatswain, slightly
raising his voice, "to kill two birds with one stone--
prove to her that she does want being protected, and
that I'm the man to protect her. D'ye take my mean-
ing, mate?"
The soldier reached out a hand and felt the other's
biceps. "Like a lump o' wood," he said, approv-
My opinion is," said the boatswain, with a faint
smirk, "that she loves me without knowing it."
"They often do," said Mr. Travers, with a grave
shake of his head.
"Consequently I don't want 'er to be disappointed,"
said the other.
"It does you credit," remarked Mr. Travers.
"I've got a good head," said Mr. Bonn, "else I
shouldn't 'ave got my rating as boatswain as soon as
i uad; and I've been turning it over in my mind, over
and over agin. till my brain-pan fair aches with it.
Now, if you do what I want you to tonight and it
comes off all right, damme I'll make it a quid."
"Go on, Vanderbilt," said Mr. Travers, "I'm listen-
ing.
The boatswain gased at him fixedly. "You meet
me 'ere in this spot at eleven o'clock tonight," he
said, solemnly; "and I'll take you to her housee and
put you through a little winder I know of. You goes


(Ontinued on Twelfth Pt)


upstairs and alarms her, and she screams for help.
rm watching the house, faithful-like, and hear 'er
cream. I dashes in at the winder, knocks you down,
snd rescues her. DVye see?"
"I bear," oorrecteMr. Travers, coldly.
"She clings to me," continued the boatswain, within
a rapt expression of .face, "in her gratitood, and,
roundd of my strength and pluck, she marries me."
"An' I get a five years' honeymoon," said the sol-
dier.
The boatswain shook his head and patted the
other's shoulder. "In the excitement of the moment
you spring up and escape," he said, with a kindly
mile. "Ive thought it it ll out. You can run much
faster than I can; anyways, you will. The nearest
housee is arf a mile off, as I said, and her servant is
staying till tomorrow at 'er mother's, ten miles
Mr. Travers rose to his feet and stretched himself.
"Time I was toddling," he said, with a yawn.
"Thanks for amusing me, mate."
"You won't do it?" said the boatswain, eyeing him
with much concern.
"I'm hanged if I do," said the soldier, emphatically.
"Accidents will happen, and then where should I be ?"
"If they did," said the boatswain, "I'd own up and
clear you."
"You might," said Mr. Travers, "and then again
you mightn't. So long, mate."
"I-I'll make it two quid," said the boatswain,
trembling with eagerness. "I've took a fancy to you;
you're just the man for the job."
The soldier, adjusting hAs bundle, glanced at hin
over his shoulder. "Thankee," he said, with mock
gratitude.
"Look 'ere," said the boatswain, springing up and
catching him by the sleeve; "I'll give it to you in
writing. Come, you ain't faint-hearted? Why, a
bluejacket 'ud do it for the fun o' the thing. If I
give it to you in writing, and there should be an
accident, it's worse for me than it is for you,
ain't it?"
Mr. Travers hesitated and, pushing his cap back,
scratched his head.
"I gives you the two quid afore you go into the
house," continued the boatswain, hastily following up
the impression he had made. "I'd give 'em to you
now if I'd got 'em with me. That's my confidence
in you; I likes the look of you. Soldier or sailor,
when there is a man's work to be done, give 'em to
me afore anybody.
The soldier seated himself again and let his bun-
dle fall to the ground. "Go on," he said, slowly.
"Write it out fair and square and sign it, and I'm
your man."
The boatswain clapped him on the shoulder and
produced a bundle of papers from his pocket. "There's
letters there with my name and address on 'em," he
said. "It's all fair, square and above-board. When
you've cast your eyes over them I'll give you the
writing."
Mr. Travers took them and, relighting his pipe,
smoked in silence, with various side glances at his
companion as that enthusist sucked his pencil and
sat twisting ih the agonies of composition. The doc-
ument finished-after several failures had been re-
trieved and burnt by the careful Mr. Travers-the
boatswain heaved a sigh of relief, and handing it over
to him, leaned back with a complacent air while he
read it.
"Seems all right," said the soldier, folding it up
and putting it in his waistcoat-pocket. "I'll be here
at eleven tonight."
"Eleven it is," said the boatswain, briskly, "and,
between pals-here's arf a dollar to go on with."
He patted him on the shoulder again, and with a
caption to keep out of sight as much as possible
till night walked slowly home. His step was light,
but he carried a face in which care and exultation
were strangely mingled.
By ten o'clock that night care was in the ascend-
ant, and by eleven, when he diserned the red glow
of Mr. Traver's pipe set as a beacon against a dark
background of hedge, the boatswain was ready to
curse his inventive powers. Mr. Travers greeted
him cheerily and, honestly attributing the fact to
good food and a couple of pints of beer he had had
since the boatswain left him, said that he was
ready for any..Jnag.
Mr. Bonn grunted and led the way in silence.
Themr was no moon, but the night was clear, and Mr.
Travers, after one or two light-hearted attempts it
conversation, abandoned the effort and fell to whist-
ling softly instead.
Except for one lighted window the village slept in
darkness, but the boatswain, who had been walking
with the stealth of a red Indian on the war-path,
breathed more freely after they had left it behind.
A renewal of his antics a little farther on apprised
Mr. Travers that they were approaching their desti-
nation, and a minute or two later they came to a
small inn standing just on the road. "All shut up
and Mrs. Waters abed, bless her." whispered the


m


. '. i q


z


v










June 9, 1906


THE SUN


Seventh Page


John Henry on Great Men

By GtORGI V. HOBART


Uncle Peter is one of the games lit-
tle chunks of humanity that ever looked
the world in the eye, but when he heard
the edict put forth by Dr. Osler the old
man went overboard with a splash.
He was under water a long time.
He though the Bogey Man had him for
sure.
Uncle Peter felt that it would no
longer be possible for him to pass a
drug store without some young fellow
rushing out with a handkerchief full of
chloroform and yelling: "Here, you old
chestnut t here's where you get it in the
nose I"
In the dark watches of the night
Uncle Peter used to wake up covered
with cold perspiration, because he had
dreamed that Doe Osler was pounding
him on the bald spot with a baseball
bat after having poured hair dye all over
his breakfast food.
At last Uncle Peter got so nervous I
advised him to write to the doctor.
"Ask him if he won't commute your
sentence because you live in the country
and are a commuter," I suggested.
The doctor replied to Uncle Peter at
once, and I will try to translate his let-
ter from Johns Hopkins into pure Eng-
lish, as near as I can remember:
"Johns Hopkins, Today.
"Dear Uncle Peter: When I cut
loose with the observation that men
were all in at 40 and rauss mittim at
60 I kept several exceptions up my
sleeve.
"The exceptions include you, Uncle
Peter, and myself also.
"It could not apply in your case,
Uncle Peter, because I have known you
since we lived together in Baltimore
many moons ago, and I realize that the
years have only improved you, Uncle
Peter, and that today you are a bigger
shine than you ever were.
"One point about my observation
which seems to have escaped the eyes of
the general public, but which you sug-
gest so delicately in your letter, Uncle
Peter, will be found in the beautiful
words of the poet who said:
"'Some advertisement now and then
Is needed by the greatest men '
"Don't mention it, Uncle Peter, for
what I tell you is confidential, but do
you know that my little bunch of re-
marks, which cost me nothing anyway
because I was invited to the banquet,
have given me more widespread adver-
tisement than Andy Carnegie can get
for eighteen public libraries?
"You know, Uncle Peter, there is noth-
ing in the world so easy to make stand
up on its hind legs as the general public
if you just go after it right.
"But the trick is, Uncle Peter, to
know what to say and when to say it.
"Look at my case and then tell me
if it wasn't up to me to emit a rave.
"There I was, just about to leave my
native land to go to Oxford and become
the squeegee professor in the Knowledge


Factory and be all swallowed up in the
London fog, but nobody seemed to miss
me before I went away.
"I began to feel lost, lonely and for-
gotten, like a Vice-President of the
United States.
"Then came the banquet, Uncle Peter,
and like a flash the inspiration came to
me and I arose in my seat and said:
'Ladies and gentlemen, after a man
reaches the age of forty he is a seldom-
happener, and after he gets to the age
of sixty he is a dead rabbit and it's the
woods for his.'
"What was the result, Uncle Peter?
"Every man in the world felt that I
was his personal insult.
"Every man over forty listened to
what I said and began to yell for the
police; and every man under forty real-
ized that he would be over forty some
day; so he began to look for a rock to
throw at me.
"I had them, going and coming.
"Then the newspapers heard about it
and where formerly in their columns
was nothing but dull and harmless war
news, my picture began to blossom forth
like the flowers that bloom in the spring,
tra la I
"Pretty soon, Uncle Peter, every man,
woman and child in the world began
to know me and I couldn't walk out in
the public streets without being snap-
shotted or bowed to, or barked at, an-
cording to the age of those present.
"Of course, we all know, Uncle Peter,
that my theory has wormholes all over
it, but didn't I make good?
"We do not need a book of history to
tell us that Julius Caesar was over forty
before he ever saw the base of Pompey's
statue; that Brutus and Cassius were
over forty before they saw a chance to
carve their initials on Caesar's wishbone;
that Cleopatra was over forty before
she saw snakes; that Carrie Nation was
over forty before she could hatchet a
barroom and put the boots to the rum
demon; that Mrs. Chadwick was over
forty before she opened a bank account;
that Jonah was over forty before he saw
a whale; that President Roosevelt wais
over forty before he saw a self-folding
lion; that Kuropatkin was over forty
before he learned to make five retreats
grow where only one retreat grew before;
that George Washington was over forty
before he was struck with the idea of
making Valley Forge a winter resort;
and so forth, and so forth, world without
end.
"But these suggestions only prove the
rule, Uncle Peter, and the rule is this:
"'Some advertisement now and then
Is relished by the greatest menI'
"Don't worry, Uncle Peter, because
you are getting to be a has-was.
"You may do something in your old
age which will make people think le*4
of you than they do now-you never can
tell.
"With these few words I will lcavr


you, Uncle Peter, wishing you as mushl
age in the future as you have had in
the past. Yours with love,
"WILLIAM OSLER."
After getting this letter Uncle Petor
began to breathe easier and two dayi
later he was quite able to resist the
desire to crawl under the bed every
time a bottle of soothing syrup arrived
from the drug store.
Uncle Peter got very gay the day after
Admiral Togo won the battle of the SeAt
of Japan.
Fifteen minutes after the last Rus.
sian battleship had been clapped on tihe
cross-trees Uncle Peter had a letter writ-
ten to Togo.
I am going to show you a copy of it,
if I get pinched in the act:
"New York, This Morning.
"To Admiral William Duffy Togo, the
Japanese Crackerjack:
"Dear Togie-Please forgive mnt for
writing you these few lines, but T h .ve
been through several wars myself aild
I have witnessed how easy it i. for 't
hero to take the wrong road andl vnilk
unexpectedly into the cold storage de-
partment of the public's estimation.
That is the reason I wish to give you a
few points on the etiquette of being a
hero, which I have studied froin olibsera-
tion in this country.
Brave Togie-When you get home in
Tokio or Yokohama, or Communipaw,
or wherever it is, keep the face closed,
more especially in the region of the
mouth, because the moment a hero tb-.
gins to speak somebody will misconstrue
what he says and get him talking [moll-
tics when he only meant to say: 'Drink
hearty '
"Clever Togie-Don't ever talk with
an ambitious reporter unless you have
a baseball mask over the face and a
mosquito netting over the vocabulary;
because if you only say to him: low's
the health? you will find in the morning
paper a column interview, in which you
have decided to run for Mikado on the
Democratic ticket.
"Good Togie-When you arrive at the
depot in your home town you will find
lined up in front of the baggage room
about 67 young ladies, all with their
lips puckered up in the most kissifac.
tory manner-but don't do it, Togie.
"Friend Togie-Resist the awful
temptation to go down the line and plant
burning kisses on the front teeth of
these beautiful maidens, because after
planting these kisses the harvest will be
the long grass of oblivion, and you will
find yourself rushing madly through the
comic papers trying to bite all the fair
ladies therein.
"Fine Togie-When you meet this
awful situation, as meet it you will,
sneer gently at the puckered lips and
repeat over and over the old proverb:
'Osculation is the thief of reputation.'
"Then with a haughty glance at the
lady kissing bugs jump quickly into


your ginrickeyshaw and gallop swiftly
home to the loving arms of your wife.
"If the kissing bugettas should follow
you to the sacred precincts of the home
circle send your mother-in-law out with
the broomstick, and may a kind heaven
help those who cannot run fast enough.
"Beloved Togie-Now listen with all
your ears. This advice I give you from
the heart. Don't let any committee pre-
sent you with a house.
"Handsome Togie-Avoid this house
proposition as you would a creditor.
"Remember, Togie, that the public
likes to honor a hero by giving him
something expensive, and then dishonor
him afterwards by watching what he
does with it.
"Noble Togle-There are only two
ways a hero can remain a hero in this
strange world of ours. One way is to
die just after he has heroed, and the
other way is to get in a glass case and
stay there-but he must buy the glass
case himself.
Unbeatable Togie-When the public
gets a jag of joy from the intoxication
of your success they will surely rush
up to you with the plans and specifl-
cations of a fine bungalow with hot and
cold gas and running servants, but when
they do so just place the left hand in
the apex of the waistcoat and say to
them with a cold glitter in the lamps:
'I thank you, public, for this display of
generosity, but I would prefer that you
keep the bungalow and I will keep my
own little flat on One Hundred and Ninth
Street, because I know the Janitor there
and he never steals the milk.'
"Nice Togie-Republies and any old
kind of publics are always grateful while
the jag of joy lasts. They are dead
anxious to give a hero more than is
coming to him, but after the jag of joy
wears off then comes the bitter morning
after, when they wake up with the head
full of third-rail microbes and the
tongue like a bridge with the draw
open, and they keep saying to them-
selves: 'Why did I give that hero such
a nice house, because, to save my soul,
I can't remember just what kind of
heroin he did to deserve it.'
"My Dear Togie-Avoid the kissing
buggettas and don't pay any attention
to the house committee and possibly
you will be able to keep on your
heroesque way to the bitter end.
"I have never been a hero myself,
Togie, with the exception of one after-
noon when I sunk an armored cruiser
cook in our kitchen after she had swal-
lowed a bottle of vodka and was bom-
barding the gas stove with our best set
of china dishes, but I love all the heroes,
and if any little advice of mine could
help a hero to keep busy at the job
of heroing I would be pleased and
tickled internally. Yours with love,
"UNCLE PETER."
Togo hasn't replied as yet, but Uncle
Peter expects a postal card or a hand-
painted fan in every mail.


Thinks BY THBrethren


THE SECOND PRIMARY.
Under the rules of the present pri-
mary system, when no candidate receives
a majority of all the votes cast, the two
ceiving the largest number are required
to run again in a second primary called
for that purpose, and the one receiving
the majority of the votes cast in the sec-
ond primary is declared the nominee.
Fortunately for our people a second
primary is unnecessary in Hernando
County. Nominations were made for all
the State offices contested for in the first
primary. For the county offices only
one office had two candidates running
for it, and, of course, was decided in
that primary.
We hay some fault to And with the
second primary. Interest in the elec-
tion is reatl7 reduced before the second


is held. The number of voters is not as
large, and the voters are not always the
same. But the greatest objection is the
temptation to bribery, purchasing votes
and other corruption held out to the
candidates by the second primary. In
the first all the candidates are more or
less confident of success. This confidence
restrains to a certain extent those who
would if they thought it necessary re-
sort to questionable means. Few men
care to load their consciences and jeopar-
dize their reputations more than is neces-
sary. In the second primary each candi-
date knows how many votes he must se-
cure to win out. Purchasable voters
know how.much their votes are needed
by either candidate, and who is most
likely to give them their price. In the
second the honest man is at a greater
disadvantage than he was in the Arst


Honest men vote as they did before ex-
cept in the case of those dropped, and
the unprincipled vote is cast where there
is the most shady influence. The honest
candidate is sorely tempted to approach
this vote, and the dishonest one pro-
ceeds to make himself solid with it, and
more frequently than otherwise the bal-
ance of power is in the hands of this
vote. We believe that the man who gets
the most votes honestly in the first pri-
mary should receive the nomination.-
Southern Argus.

NEWS BUREAU SAYS IT ENJOYS
THE ADVERTISING.
The last letter from the Florida News
Bureau contains the following:
"The Florida News Bureau is getting
a whole lot of splendid free advertising
from the efforts of the Pensacola Journal
to put it in a hole by demanding a list
of the names of the land owners in the
drainage district, through whose instru-
mentality and public spirit the bureau


is enabled to aid the press of the State
in warning the people against the danger
of writing the discredited drainage act
into the Constitution by the adoption of
the Drainage Amendment. The Ocala
Banner, the Tallahassee True Democrat
and the St. Augustine Record have sug-
gested that the bureau will probably be
quite willing to furnish a list of the
drainage tax payers whenever Governor
Broward answers the numerous demands
which have been made upon him for in-
formation concerning the source of the
fund from which he is paying the ex-
penses of his drainage campaign. As
the bureau does not wish to lose the ben-
efit of any further publicity the drainage
advocates are disposed to give it in the
premises, its intentions will not be dis-
clomed for the present."
If this is the kind of free advertising
and publicity which Colonel Choate's
public sentiment mill is hankering after.
it ought of course to be satisfied. The
general public, however, sees little to
(Continued on Fftteete Page.)










SaGH 9, P 906
Saturday. Jues 9a 1906


s,


THE SUN


s,


ED


ITO


V'ax aurdem Should Fall dqually On All.
In the wonderful progress that the whole State of Florida is making in every
line of human endeavor its cities are growing fast. We note that there are
propositions in several Florida cities looking to the development of what is
known as public utility service. These include electric lights, sewerage, paving,
waterworks and street transportation.
We think this is a MOST OPPORTUNE TIME to call the attention of the
cities of the State to the importance of establishing these public utility service
improvements on a basis that will BEST SERVE THE INTERESTS OF THE
PEOPLE living in those cities.
Private corporations have been securing public utility franchises in cities
for many generations. Before the public mind was awakened to the value of
these franchises it was the custom to grant them without cost to these corpor-
ations. So much has this custom been observed that cities in the North have
found their public utility franchises in the grasp of private corporations, so that
now when the public mind IS AROUSED TO THE GREAT VALUE OF THESE
FRANCHISES, they find it difficult to shake them off.
For confirmation of this it is only necessary to point to the failure of
Mayor Dunne of Chicago to carry out the municipal ownership idea on which he
was elected to office by anything practical after some months in office.
The Washington Post of May 24 contains a very interesting article on this
question, which we will use to bring home our warning to the cities of Florida.
The Senate Committee of the District of Columbia was considering the bill
to tax public utility corporations of the District 12 per cent of their net earnings,
in addition to the tax of 4 per cent of their gross earnings, now levied and col-
lected.
A statement of the six traction companies and of the gas light company and
telephone company doing business in Washington showed that after paying the
tax of 4 per cent on the gross earnings these eight public utility corporations had
a net earning of more than $2,500,000.
Statistics were given to the committee showing the amount of taxes paid by
the corporations in various cities. Particular attention was called to the prac-
tice of Baltimore, where the company controlling the street railways pays 20 per
cent of its gross earnings, besides taxes on its real and personal property, and is
still able to show SATISFACTORY NET EARNINGS ON THE CAPITAL
INVESTED.
The Census Office report shows that the average gross taxes paid by the street
railways in a group of fifteen cities is 5.7 per cent. In some of the cities these
corporations PAID SUBSTANTIAL AMOUNTS FOR THEIR FRANCHISES.
The sworn statement of the street railways and leading companies in the
District prove that if they were to pay 4 per cent on their gross earnings and 12
per cent on their net earnings they would still be taxed $115.000 LESS THAN IF
THE RATE APPLIED TO OTHER PROPERTY IN THE DISTRICT WAS AP-
PLIED TO THE PROPERTY OF THE PUBLIC SERVICE CORPORATIONS.
Abundant proof of the enormous value of public utility franchises was fur-
nished by the showing that the stock of the Capital Traction Compnny was sell-
ing on the market at $144 and $150 per share, the par value being $100 per share.
We are not sufficiently informed of conditions to be able at this time to say
that the figures proposed as a tax on the franchises of the District of Columbia
could be, with justice, applied by the cities of Florida to similar corporations.
We desire in this editorial to call the attention of the cities to the fact that the
BERT TIME to decide as to whether it would be MORE BENEFICIAL TO THE
PEOPLE to stand put for municipal ownership, or in case the local option as
exercised should declare it to be best for any particular city to give the public
utility franchise to a public utility corporation, TO INSIST THAT A JUST
COMPENSATION be paid by the companies getting this valuable privilege.
We believe that the public utility corporation and all other corporations
should pay taxes equal to the tax paid by private citizens on their real and per-
sonal property, AND NO MORE; but we do insist that these corporations should
bear their JUST SHARE of the burden of taxation.
There was a time when we considered that in States like Florida, which
were in need of exploitation and development, it would be proper to favor oorpor.
nations which were bringing this development to the State. A more extended
study of the question, however, has convinced us that it is an entirely fair prop-
osition to tAx public utility corporations their just proportion FROM THE
START.
Any corporation which would be unwilling to bear its just burden of tax-
ation would be, in the end, bad for the city, because their exploitation would i
for the sole benefit of the pockets of their stockholders by gaining for themselves
SUPERIOR RIGHTS which the private citizen does not enjoy, and the laws of
a democracy RECOGNIZE NO SUCH THING AS A SUPERIOR RIGHT of one
individual, whether artificial or not, over another.
It so happens that the train of thought leading up to this editorial came to
us at a particular fortuitous time. In the chief city of Florida there are two
propositions before the City Council asking for grants of franchises to use the
streets of the city for transportation of passengers.
We do not think it is necessary to call the attention of the Laws and Rules
Committee of the City of Jacksonville to the fact that the committee HAS
PLACED ITSELF ON RECORD AGAINST THE GRANTING OF PUBLIC
UTILITY FRANCHISES TO PRIVATE CORPORATIONS.
Messrs. Baker and Bettes, two of the members of this committee, were mem-
bers of the same committee when it rejected a proposal for a franchise to use
the streets of Jacksonville for a street railway about a year ago, on the ground
that it (the committee) FAVORED MUNICIPAL OWNERSHIP, and that the
city government was elected on that platform. The warning contained in this
editorial is not, therefore, directed to the city of Jacksonville, because we are
quite sure that a majority of the Laws and Rules Committee WILL NOT RE-
VERSE ITSELF.
Our warning i9 directed to the other cities in the State whose Councils may
not have declared on this question, so that they may be perhaps better able to
deal with it when the question of granting franchises for public utilities comes
before them in the near future.
Our artist, Mr. Taylor, has drawn a cartoon illustrating the point we wish
to convey, and we commend the study of it to those who may honor us by reading
this editorial.

Ringworm and Watermelon.
We have read, in the form of a letter from a member who was present.
which letter we have on file and are able to produce if necessary, that Mr. W. R.
Carter introduced a resolution at the meeting of the Florida State Press Associa*
tion at Ocala last week, of which the following is a copy:


"Whereas, It is a matter of common report that the State printing has bwtn
irregularly given into the hands of parties who are not practical printers; and,
"Whereas, There are in the State of Florida today job printing establishments
of capacity and repute whose proprietors are practical men; and,
"Whereas, These practical printers who pay their taxes into the State
treasury should be given an opportunity to make bids for the 8tate printing; and,


"Whereas, It is currently reported that at a meeting held to open bids a few
days ago at Tallahassee, no bidd ers complied with the regulations as laid down;
therefore, be it
"Resolved, That the State Press Assoelation, composed of the leading papers
in Florida, in meeting assembled, hereby recommend that the State administra.
tion readvertise for bids, putting as few burdens upon the bidders as possible,
requiring only a sufficient bond or proper fulfillment of contract.
"Resolved, further, That these resolutions, officially signed, be sent to the
Governor immediately."
In advocating the adoption of this resolution, Mr. Carter, who was aided and
abetted by Mr. J. W. Whito, dwelt upon the bad printing that had been done by
the State printer, and reflected severely upon the Governor and the Cabinet, with
the exepton of Attorney-General Ellis, and closed his remarks by saying that the
printing was now about to fall into the hands of parties who knew nothing of
printing. When asked to whom he referred when he said that the printing was
about to fall into the hands of people who did not know an thing about printing,
le was forced to utter, with a grimace, the name "Claude L'Engle," which "let the
cat out of the bag" and showed to all those present the personal malice that was
behind the resolution.
After Carter, pressed to the wall, offered to modify the resolution, which


SHE SEEMS


offer was, refused by those who wanted to see justice done to an absent member,
the resolution was finally referred to the Committee on Resolutions, which com-
mittee unanimously voted to take no action upon it further than to return it to
the secretary.
We will not attempt to enlighten Mr. Carter nor to inform Mr. White;
because, neither of these gentlemen has given any evidence of being possessed of
a place in which to store information. One is known as "Willie RINGWORM
Carter, wearer of boys' size hats," and the other as "J. WATERMELON White,
wind-jammer extraordinary," and these appellations, which have stuck to them
for several years, fully demonstrate the estimate that the public has placed upon
their importance in public affairs.
We will also not mention the unimportant fact that after an interval of some
months of "silence when we met" on the part of J. Watermelon White, he hailed
the writer from across the street about two months ago, and consumed about an
hour telling him of his desire to live up to the principles of the various fraternal
orders in which he is so persistent an office-seeker, by doing good to all men, and
declared his wish to commence speaking again. The writer' told White to arrange
the matter to suit himself.
But, for the benefit of the INTELLIGENT MEMBERS of the Florida Press
Association we will say that Carter's resolution is like Carter himself, PON-
DEROUSLY UNIMPORTANT and SATURATED WITH ERROR.
His resolution says that "it is currently reported that at a meeting held to
open bids a few days ago at Tallahassee no bidders complied with the regulations
Th laid dow NO MEETING HELD in Tn."
Tbhre was NO MEETING HELD in Tallahasseea few days &o to open bids










NINTH PAGE


THE SUN


for the State printing, because there was no necessity for such a meeting, as the
Capital Publishing Company, at Tallahassee, holds a contract with the Board of
State Institutions to do the State printing for a period beginning October 1, 1905,
and ending October 1, 1907, and the Capital Publishing Company IS STILL DO-
ING BUSINESS AND ABLE TO CARRY OUT ALL ITS CONTRACTS.
We have explained before that THE SUN COMPANY has bought 400 of the
485 issued shares of the Capital Publishing Company, and that Claude L'Engle,
President of THE SUN COMPANY, has been elected President of the Capital
Publishing Company.
We are inclined to agree with any person who says that the printing done by
the Capftal Publishing Company prior to May 28, 1906, was bad. We ask our
brethren of the Florida State Press Association to suspend their judgment upon
the printing done by the State printers subsequent to May 28, 1000. UNTIL A
SPECIMEN OF IT COMES BEFORE THEM FOR CRITICISM.
While their judgment is suspended, and as they are all, with the exception of
Messrs. Carter and White, intelligent and fair-mindpd men, we take the liberty
of calling their attention to the fact that although the President of THE SUN
COMPANY and the President of the Capital Publishing Company Is not, and
makes no claim to be, a PRACTICAL printer, the printing done under his direc-
tion as President of THE SUN COMPANY, FAVORABLY COMPARES IN


iKE HIM.


TYPOGRAPHICAL EXCELLENCE, with any printing done by any practical
printer in this State.
If any one should be disposed to question the accuracy of the statement, we
call his attention to the fact that THE SUN has earned and deserves the reputa-
tion of being as near perfection, typographically, as it is possible for any Florida
printer to attain.

All Di eame Is Preentable
We note with much satisfaction that the city of Pensacola has commenced
this early to wage war on the mosquito and to prosecute a general plan of
CLEANING UP FOR THE SUMMER in the interest of the preservation of the
public health.
We congratulate the city of Pensacola upon taking this wise and timely and
patriotic step, and we commend the example of Pensacola to all the cities of
Florida.
We are of the opinion that there would be no sickness in Florida if its cit-
izens would adhere strictly to the principles of cleanliness, proper diet and rea-
sonable exercise.
It is an established fact that every disease that flesh is heir to is PREVENT-
ABLE by a system of hydropathy and dietetics.
We note, with some satisfaction, also that the City Physician of Jacksonville
i: paying attention to cleaning up. But we know that the area of Jacksonville
is large and the attention of the City Health O iler is needed in so many places
that he might be emoused if he eertloeks ea, _.


Saturday, June 9, 1906


We will, therefore, again call the attention of the City Health Officer of
Jacksonville to the condition of McCoys creek.
Some time ago, when the writer was editing the Daily Florida Sun, a reporter
of that paper took a trip up McCoys creek and described the stagnant condition
of its waters AND THE ACCUMULATION OF FILTH AND DEBRIS of all
kinds along its banks. In conversations with the City Health Officer on several
occasions the writer has been assured by him that he would take immediate steps
to abate this menace to the health of the city. He went so far as to say that he
had taken the matter up with the United States Government and asked for its aid
in compelling the railroads, which have stopped the waters of that creek to such
an extent that the refuse thrown into it can find no escape, to clear It out.
He did not hesitate to declare that if the railroads did not do something
IMMEDIATELY he, the City Health Officer, would, by virtue of his authority
as protector of the public health, TEAR UP THE TRACKS of the railroads lead-
ing across that creek and clean it out with his own force.
This declaration was made some time ago, and McCoys creek IS STILL
STOPPED UP.
With proper allowances made for the demands upon the time of the City
Health Officer, we suggest that NOW IS A GOOD TIME TO COMMENCE this
long-delayed work so that McCoy's creek may be put in sanitary condition before
the midsummer is upon us.

'he Way to Kill Blind Tigers.
As a believer in the good Democratic doctrine that the governmental affairs
of a community should be left as far as possible to the will of a majority of those
making up that community, we are firm believers in the doctrine of local option.
Applied to the liquor traffic, we believe that the present law, which gives the
election to the citizens of each county on the question of liquor or no liquor, IS
THE BEST LAW THAT CAN BE DEVISED regulating this traffic. Under its
operation all Florida is divided into two parts-"dry" Florida and "wet" Florida.
There are twenty-eight "dry" counties, and the people of these counties, hav-
ing voted "dry," are entitled to have their wishes respected.
So, also, are the people of the "wet" counties entitled to have their wishes
respected.
It is a matter of common notoriety that "blind tigers," which is a colloquial-
ism for the places where whisky is sold illegally in "dry" counties, flourish in
many of the counties whose citizens have voted to exclude the sale of liquor.
This condition was particularly bad in the county of Leon. So much so that
those who had favored prohibition were loud in their complaints, and some went
so far as to say that they would vote at the next election "wet" instead of "dry"
rather than have "blind tigers."
But, once in a while, we are thankful to say, when public conditions get had
there are public officials who not only desire to do their duty, but KNOW HOW
TO DO IT.
At a recent term of the Circuit Court held in Leon County, Judge Malone
presiding and State's Attorney Walker prosecuting, two white men and six
negoes were convicted of running "blind tigers."
The evidence showed flagrant disregard of the law on the part of these
violators, and little care being used to conceal the illegal traffic, one man in par-
ticular being possessed of a large amount of "wet" goods, some of it even being
stored in the city market, where it was dispensed to all thirsty souls who applied.
A fine of $1,000 or an alternative imprisonment of six months was assessed
against each of these convicted "blind tiger" keepers.
We regard this as a CONSPICUOUS EXAMPLE of justice, promptly AND
PROPERLY ADMINISTERED, and we predict that it will be effective in break-
ing up "blind tigers" in Leon County, as well as a warning to all other keepers
of "blind tigers" in the State.

A Bully Motto.
We are indebted to Collier's Weekly of recent issue for an expression which
appeals to us strongly.
Comptroller Metz of the city of New York, when remonstrated with by some
clerk in his office for taking so much time looking over the details of the Comp-
troller's office, forcibly exclaimed, "I'm no damned rubber stampl"
This expression would be good in anybody's mouth, but coming from a pub-
lic official it strikes us as a fine example of devotion to duty, for which we thank
both Comptroller Metz in saying it, and Collier's Weekly in presenting it to us.
We would not commend it as a motto for a Dorcas Society or a young ladies'
guild, but as a motto to hang on the walls of public buildings where the people's
servants work, IT COULD NOT BE IMPROVED UPON.
The expression, "I am no damned rubber stamp," when used by Comptroller
Metz, meant that he was determined not to affix his signature to any public docu-
ment until he HAD EXAMINED IT CAREFULLY and considered whether or not
it was FOR THE PUBLIC GOOD.
This is a very healthy frame of mind for a public official to be in, and we
hope that all public officials, everywhere, will not be above taking a lesson from
Comptroller Mets of New York.

We do not know Mr. Justice David J. Brewer of the United States Supreme
Court, and we regard this as a distinct loss. We should like to extend the circle
of our acquaintance so as to include ALL sensible men.
In an address before the International Arbitration Council June 1, Justice
Brewer said that the United States could stop armament with absolute safety and
set an example to the world.
"No nation," said he, "will attack us. Many foreign diplomats, I know,
believe that this is a nation that it is not safe to attack. If we eliminated our
armament we could go to The Hague and say 'We are doing it; follow our foot-
steps.' "
How much better a statement of this kind sounds than those put forth by the
blustering, vain, reckless-talking Roosevelt when he advocates the policy of the
"big stick," and, carrying it out, has lately succeeded in getting through Con-
gress a bill authorizing the expenditure of more than ten millions of dollars to
build the biggest battleship in the world.
In commenting on Justice Brewer's remarks, Bishop MoVicker of Rhode
Island said: "I confess that peace once seemed to me associated with weakness.
I have learned that the demand for peace, rightly understood, comes from the
strongest and the best."


What a howl Carter is raising because some two hundred and fifty business
men of Jacksonville propose, by giving a carnival next fall, to free themselves
from the annual tribute levied upon them by Carter, Wilson and Hollomon, and
incidentally to put a dent into Carter and his pals' private graft.
The City Council will not be affected by Carter's wailing; it will pass the
ordinance asked for by the two hundred and fifty business men, granting them
equal rights and privileges enjoyed by the Big Threem


I


A


LS


mmmmwmm










Tinth Ppag


June 9, 1906


THE SUN


The


Czar's Spy


BY
Chevalier William Le Quoux


"I know very little concerning him.
He may have inspired with them, or he
any be innonat. It seems as though
he wen amntgoistie to their schemes, if
Lthefonrt sad his family fled from
"And he was on board the Lola.
Indeed, m have helped to commit
the burglary a the Consulate," I said.
"Qte likely" he answered. "But
our first object must be to rediscover
Muriel. Page says she is in Eastbourne.
If she is there, we shall easily find her.
They publish visitors' lists in the pa-
pers, don't they, like they do at Hast-
ings?" Then he added: "Visitors' lists
are most annoying when you find your
name printed in them when you are sup-
posed offilally to be somewhere else. I
was had once like that by the Bourne.
mouth papers, when I was supposed to
be on duty over at Queenstown. I nar-
rowly escaped a terrible wigging."
"Shall we go to Eastbourne?" I sug-
gsted eagerly. "I'll go there with you
n the morning."
"Or would t not be best to send an
urgent wire to the address where I al-
ways write? She would then reply here,
no doubt. If she's in Eastbourne, there
may be reasons why she cannot come up
to town. If her people are in hiding, of
course ahe won't come. But she'll make
an appointment with me, no doubt."
"Very well. Send a wire," I said.
"And make it urgent. It will then be
forwarded. But as regards Olinto?
Would you like to see him? He might
tell you more than he has told me."
"No; by no means. He must not
know that I have returned to London,"
declared my friend quickly. "You had
better not see him-you understand."
"Then his interests are-well, not ex-
actly our own?"
"No."
"But why don't you tell me more about
Elmat" I urged, for I was eager to learn
all he knew. "Come, do tell me!" I im-
plonred.
"I've told you practically everything,
my dear old fellow," was his response,
"The revelation of the true facts of the
affair can be made only by Muriel. I
tell you, we must ind her."
"Yes, we must-at all hazards," I
said. "Let's go across to the telegraph
obee opposite Charing Cross. It's open
always" And we rose and walked out
along the Strand, now nearly deserted
and dispatched an urgent message to Mu
riel at an address in Hurlingham Road
Fulham.
Afterwards we stood outside on the
curb, still talking, I loth to part from
him, when there passed by in the shadow
two men in dark overcoats, who crossed
the road behind us to the front of Char
lug Crose station, and then continued on
towards Trafalgar Square.
As the light of the street lamp fel
upon them, I thought I recognized thi
face of one as that of a person I had
seen before, yet I was not at all certain
and my failure to remember whom the
pasAr-by resembled prevented me front
saying anything further to Jack than:
"A fellow I know has just gone by, I
think."
"We seem to be meeting hosts o
friends tonight," he laughed. "After all
old ehap, it does one foodto come bac
to our dear, dirty old town again. We
abuse it when we are here, and talk o
the life in Paris, and Vienna, and Brus
sels, but when we are away there is
place on earth so dear to us, for it ii
'home.' But there!" he laughed, "I'n
actually growing romantic. AhI if w<
could only find Muriel I But we music
tomorrow. Ta-tal I shall go around ti
the elub and sleep, for I haven't fixed om
my diggings yet. Come in at ten to
morrow, and we will decide upon some
plan. One thing is plainly certain
EIlms must be got out of Ruuia. She'i
in deadly peril of her life there."
"Yes," I said. "And you will hell
me?"
"With all my heart, old fellow," an
swered my friend, warmly grasping inn
hand, ad then w arted, e stro lin
slg towards the ational Gallery o!


his way back to the "Junior," while I re-
turned to the Cecil alone.
CHAPTER XVI.
MAIlD MKN.
"Captain Durnford?" I inquired of the
hall porter of the club next morning.
"Not here, sir."
"But he slept here last night," I re-
marked. "I have an appointment with
him."
The man consulted the big book before
him, and answered:
"Captain Durnford went out at 9:27
last night, sir, but has not returned."
Strange, I thought, but although I
waited in the club nearly an hour, he did
not put in an appearance. I called again
at two o'clock, but he had not even then
made his appearance. Then I began to
be anxious. I returned to the hotel, re-
solved to wait for a few hours longer.
He might have altered his mind and
gone to Eastbourne in search of Muriel;
yet, had he done so, he would surely have
telegraphed to me.
About four o'clock, as I was passing
through the big hall of the hotel, I heard
a voice behind me utter a greeting in
Italian, and turning in surprise, found
Olinto, dressed in his best suit of black,
standing hat in hand.
In an instant I recollected what Jack
had told me, and regarded him with some
I suspleion.
"Signor Commendatore," lie said in a
low voice, as though fearing to be over-
heard, "may I be permitted to speak in
private with you?"
"Certainly," I said, and I took him in
the lift up to my room.
"I have come to warn you, signore,"
h said, when I had given him a seat.
"Your enemies mean harm to you."
"And who are they, pray?" I asked,
biting my lips. "The same, I suppose,
who prepared that ingenious trap in
Lambeth r
"I am not here to reveal to you who
they are, signore, only to warn you to
have a care of yourself," was the Ital-
E ian's reply.
"Look here, Olintol" I exclaimed de.
l terminedly, "I've had enough of this
confounded mystery. Tell me the truth
i regarding the assassination of your pool
Wife up in Scotland."
, "Ah, signorel" he answered sadly in
a changed voice, "I do not know. It was
, a plot. Someone represented me-bul
he was killed also. They believed they
e had struck me down," he added, with a
a bitter laugh. "Poor Armida's body wai
r found concealed behind a rock on the
I opposite side of the wood. I saw it-
. al.l" he cried shuddering.
n "Then you are ignorant of the identity
of your wife's assassin?"
I "Entirely."
e "Tell me one thing," I said. "Did Ar
A mida possess any trinket in the form o
, a little enameled cross-like a miniature
e cross of eavaliere?"
n "Yes; I gave it to her. I found it on
the floor of the Mansion House, where 1
I was engaged as odd waiter for a ban
quet. I know I ought to have given it
f up to the Lord Mayor's servants, but it
, was such a pretty little thing that I
c was tempted to keep it. It probably had
e fallen from the coat of one of the diplo
f mate dining there."
. I was silent. The faint suspicion thai
o Oberg had been at that spot was now en
s tirely removed. The only clue I ha
a was satisfactorily accounted for.
B "Why do you ask, Signor Commanda
b tore?" he added.
o "Iecause the cross was found at th,
Spot, and was believed to have been
* dropped by the assassinn" I maid.
e The police had, it seemed, succeeded ii
, discovering the unfortunate woman after
s all, and had found that she wa his wife
"You know a man named Leithcourt?'
i I asked a few moments later. "Now
tell the truth. In this affair, Olinto
* our interests are mutual, are they not?'
t He nodded, after a moment's hesita
Slion.
i "And you know also a man name,


Archer-who is sometimes known as
Hornby, or Woodroffe-as well as a
friend of his called Chater."
"Si, signore," he said. "I have met
them all-to my regret."
"And have you ever met a Russian-a
certain Baron Oberg-and his niece,
Elma Heath?"
"His niece? She isn't his niece."
"Then who is she?" I demanded.
"How do I know? I have seen her
once or twice. But she's dead, isn't she?
She knew the secret of those men, and
they intended to kill her. I tried to pre-
vent them taking her away on the yacht,
and I would have gone to the police-
only I dare not."
"WhyV"
"Well, because my own hands were not
quite clean," he answered after a pause,
his eyes fixed upon mine the while. "I
krew they intended to silence her, but I
was powerless to save her, poor young
lady. They took her on board Leith-
court's yacht, the Iris, and they sailed
for the Mediterranean, I believe."
"Then the name and appearance of the
yacht was altered on the voyage, and it
became the Lola," I said.
"No doubt," he smiled. "The Iris was
a steamer of many names, and had, I be-
lieve, been painted nearly all the colors
of the rainbow at various times. It was
a mysterious vessel, but she exists no
more. They scuttled her somewhere up
in the Baltic, I've heard."
"And who is this Oberg?" I inquired,
urging him to reveal to me all he knew
concerning him.
"He stands in great fear of the poor
young lady, I believe, for it was at his
instigation that Leithcourt and his
friends took her on that fatal aching
cruise."
"And what was your connection with
them?"
"Well, I was Leithcourt's servant,"
was his reply. "I was steward on the
Iris for a year, until I suppose they
thought that I began to see too much,
and then I was placed in a position
ashore."
"And what did you see "
"More than I care to tell, signore. II
. they were arrested I should be arrested
, too, you see."
"But I mean to solve this mystery
r Olinto," I said fiercely, for I was in n(
trifling mood. "I'll fathom it if it costs
me my life."
"If the signore solves it himself, thex
t I cannot be charged with revealing the
r truth," was the man's diplomatic reply
L "But I fear they are far too wary."
s "Armida has lost her life. Surely that
e is sufficient incentive for you to bring
them all to justice?"
"Of course. But if the law falls upon
V them, it will also fall upon me."
I explained the terrible affliction to
which my love had been subjected by
* those heartless brutes, whereupon he
f cried enthusiastically:
e "Then she is not deadI She can tel
u.i everything "
i "But cannot you tell us?"
I "No; not all. The secret she know
- has never been revealed. They feared
t she might be incautious, and for tha
t reason Oberg made the villainous sug
I gestion of the yachting trip. She wa
d to be drowned- identally, of course.
* "She is in St. Petersburg now. I lef
her a week ago."
b "In Russia! Ah, signore, for her sak
* don't allow the young lady to remain
1 there. The Baron is all-powerfgul. H
does what he wishes in Russia, and th
* more merciless he is to the people h
governs, the greater rewards he receive
e from the Czar. I have never been ii
a Russia, but surely it must be a strange
country, signore I"
S"Well," I said, sitting upon the edg
r of the bed and looking at him. "Ar
you prepared to denounce them if I bring
th, Signorina Heath here, to England?
S "Bu what is the use, if we have n
clear proof?" was his evasive reply.
ceuld see plainly that he feared hein1
Shimself implicated in some extraordi
nary plot, the e nature of which h
So steadfastly refused to reveal to me.


We talked on for fully half an hlir,
and from his conversation I gathered
that he was well acquainted with Elnin.
"Ah, signore, she was such a plasa nt
and kind-hearted young lady. always
felt very sorry for her. She was in
deadly fear of them."
aBecause they were thieves," I lin.
arded.
"Ah, worse"
"But why did they induce you to en-
tice me to that house in Lambeth? Why
did they so evidently desire that 'I1
should be killed?"
"By sacident," he interrupted, correct-
ing me. "Always by accident," and he
smiled mly.
"Surely you know their secret mio-
tive?" I remarked.
"At the time I did not," he declared.
"I acted on their instructions, being
compelled to, for they hold my future
in their hands. Therefore I could not
disobey. You knew too much, therefore
you were marked down for death-just
as you are now."
"And who is it who is now seeking nmy
[Continued on Fourteenth Page]


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June 9,1906


THE SUN


Eleventh Page


Comments on May Agricultural Bulletin

By W. e. PABOR


The Florida Quarterly Bulletin, issued
by the Department of Agriculture, an-
nounces some changes in the division of
the State by counties, by which the num-
ber is increased to five as against four,
the number recognized by the climate
and crop service of the Weather Bureau,
which divides the State into Northern,
Central, Southern and Western; while
Commissioner MoLin's five are Northern,
Western, Northeastern, Central and
Southern, with eleven, seven, nine, nine
and ten counties in them in the order
written. There may be some good rea-
son for the change not apparent on the
surface of the bulletin's report, but it
would seem as if some confusion would
likely arise because of the non-uniform-
ity of national and State division.
The statistics in connection with the
acreage and condition of crops as com-
pared with those of last year are inter-
esting, and can be studied to advantage
by the fruit and vegetable growers, ai
they show the sections in which partic-
ular lines of soil products.
Taking the orange as the leading fruit
product, it is to be noticed that, in the
Northern division only one county-that
of Lafayette, bordering on Alachua in
the Northeaster division-reports any
trees. Calhoun County, in the Western
division, is the only one also. In the
Northeastern division Alachua, Clay and
Columbia Counties appear. In passing
it may be stated that in these .rop
tables only four counties are set down
though nine are credited to it elsewhere.
In this division are Duval, Nassau, Put-
nam, St. Johns and Bradford that do
not seem to grow-or at least report to
the Commissioner any farm, fruit or
vegetables-a condition that would
seem to need some explanation from
some one.
The Central and Southern divisions
are, of course, the citrus sections of
Florida, and there is no county in either
unrepresented, either as to pomelos or
oranges, save Levy, that reports none of
the first named fruit.
In the pineapple line one county, that
of Orange, in the Central division, is
represented, and only one in the South-
ern that does not---on the authority of
this bulletin-grow them. According to
it DeSoto County either does not grow
pines, bananas and guavas, or the de-
partment's correspondents do not think
them of sufficient importance to report
them. How about Punta Gorda, Avon
Park, Pabor Lake, Bowling Green? Pine-
apples go North every season by the car-
load from the first named town; but, if
one reads aright the blank space in De-
Soto's place, there are none this year, or
if there are pineries their condition is
not worthy of report.
The same is to be said of St. Lucie
County, where a similar blank is shown
in the table, and yet this is said now to
be the banner county on the east coat
for our delicious open field-grown pine-
apple. There may be some good and
sufficient explanation of these vacancies;
if so they should have been given in
bracketed or starred paragraphs at t, o
bottom of the tables. For the genern]
reader at home or abroad, who gpvM
careful study to what should be a reliable
report, who is familiar with the section,
will wonder why conditions are not rw
ported. These comments are made witl
no desire to disparage the Commission
er's bulletin, but to call attention, it
behalf of the growers in these counties
to the omission.
As to conditions as compared witl
those existing at a similar period lasi
year-May-in nearly every instance, ai
to the two fruits touched upon in this
article, there is a high percentage o
betterment reported. Therre are ,om,
exceptions, however; in oranes, pomelo
and pineapples the range is from 16 ti
25 per cent below that of 1905. In Or
ange County, in which Orlando-once
and still, probably-a famous pineapple
district, the percent of condition indi
cates only half a crop this season. Ih
HilUlbro 10 per sent lower seem o Drq


vail, while, as to oranges, limes, pomelos
and banas, a 25 per cent higher better-
ment is reported.
DeSoto County shows up well, and is
likely to be, this year, as in years past,
the banner county of the State for or-
anges and pomelos, their condition rating
25 per cent above the 100 mark.
In the notes from correspondents the
following paragraphs are selected to give
the reader a general idea of the status
or the products of the soil in the month
ot April, it is to be presumed, as the
report is issued early in May:
"Northern Division-There is quite an
increase in the acreage of cotton and
corn. The fruit crop will be short, on
an average, though in some localities the
crop will be fair."
A study of the tabulated report shows
this refers to peaches and pears.
"Western Division-A notable increase
in the acreage of general field crops over
1P05. Prospects for a fine crop excel-
lent. The fruit crops at time of report-
ing flattering as to yield, being in fair
shape. Peaches in better condition than
at same period last year.
"Northern Division-In this di-


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vision correspondents report increase of
acreage being planted in the main field
crops as well as in the vegetable crops,
the condition of all growing crops are re-
ported an excellent acreage, and if no
untoward event happens, and the sea--
sons remain propitious the result of
orops generally will be fine. In some in-
stances the acreages are unusually large.
The acreage in melons is large and the
condition of both melons and strawber-
ries are very fine. Peaches and pears
are also in fine shape. Altogether, the
crop situation in this division is flat-
tering.
"Central Division-In this division a
large acreage has been planted to all
crops, and all are doing well, though
rain has been much needed; over the en-
tire district the weather has been dry
and cool, and in localities some crops
have suffered considerably, the vegetable
crops showing the effects of drouth more
than field crops. Fruit trees
are in most excellent condition, and a
large crop of oranges is to be expected.
"Southern Division-Few field crops
comparatively are grown in this division
of the State, the bulk of the farming


being mostly confined to vegetable ana
fruit growing; the field crops grown are
generally in fine condition, and the veg-
etable crops being marketed. From all
counties in this division come good re-
ports of the condition of the fruit trees,
and the prospect of large crops of fruit,
the rain of the past winter, and the ab-
sence of frost, adding much to the
growth and healthy condition of the
trees; in all the counties of this division
the orange trees are reported as show-
ing the most remarkable growth of any
year since the great freeze. A peculiar
feature of these rains has been the fact
that while they were exceedingly ben-
eficial to the fruit trees, they were the
source of much damage to a number of
vegetable crops, the tomato crop in
numerous localities being practically de-
stroyed."
Taken as a whole, this number of the
bulletin gives much general information
regarding climatology, fertilizers, com-
mercial feeding stuffs, etc. Any reader
of THE SUN not receiving this bulletin
can obtain a copy by addressing Hon. B.
MeLin, Commissioner of Agriculture,
Tallahassee, Fla.


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~4


"True as I stand here," asseverated Mr. Travers.
"Here, here's my instructions. I'11 put 'em under the
door, and if you go to the back window you'll see him
in the garden waiting."
He rustled the paper under the door, and it was
at once snatched from his fingers. He regained an
upright position and stood listening to the startled
and indignant exclamations of his goaler as she read
th beatmWln's permits


THE SUN


The Boatswain's Mate.

(Continued from Sixth Page)
boatswain, after walking carefully round the house.
"How do you feel?"
"I'm all right," said Mr. Travers. "I feel as if I'd
been burgling all my life. How do you feel?"
"Narvous," said Mr. Boenn, pausing under a small
window at the rear of the house. "This is the one."
Mr. Travers stoppedp back a few paces and gazed
up at the house. All was still. For a few moments
he stood listening and then rejoined the boatswaii.
"Goodby, mate," he said, hoisihng himself on to the
sill. "Dath or victory."
The boatswain whispered and thrust a couple of
sovereigns into his hand. "Take your time; thero,'i
no hurry," he muttered. "I want to pull myself to-
gether. Frighten 'er enough, but not too much.
When she soreams I'll come in."
Mr. Travers slipped inside and then thrust his
head out of the window. "Won't she think it funny
you should be so handy ?" he inquired.
"No; it's my faithful 'art," said the boatswain,
"keeping watch over her every night, that's Car
ticket She won't know no better."
Mr. Travers grinned, and removing his boots
passed them out to the other. "We don't want her to
near me till I'm upstairs," he whispered. "Put 'oum
outside, handy for me to pick up."
The boatswain obeyed, and Mr. Travers-who was
by no means a good hand at darning socks-shivered
as he trod lightly over a stone floor. Then, following
the Instructions of Mr. Benn, he made his way to
the stairs and mounted noiselessly.
But for a light stumble half-way up his progress
was very creditable for an amateur. He paused sind
listened and, all being silent, made his way to the
landing and stopped outside a door. Despite himself
his heart was besting faster than usual.
He pushed the door open slowly and started as it
creaked. Nothing happening, he pushed again, and
standing just Anside saw, by a small ewer silhouetted
against the casement, that he was in a bedroom. He
listened for the sound of breathing, but in vain.
"Quiet sleeper," he reflected; "or perhaps it is an
empty room. Now, I wonder wehther- "
The sound of an opening door made him start vio-
lently, and he stood still, scarcely breathing, with his
ears on the alert. A light shone on the landing, and
peeping round the door he saw a woman coming along
the corridor-a younger and better-looking woman
than he had expected to see. In one hand she held
aloft a candle, in the other she bore a double-barreled
gun. Mr. Travers withdrew into the room and, as
the light came nearer, slipped into a big cupboard
by the side of the fireplace and, standing bolt upright,
waited. The light came into the room.
"Must have been my fancy," said a pleasant voice.
"Bless her," smiled Mr. Travers.
His trained ear recognized the sound of cocking
triggers. The next moment a heavy body bumped
against the door of the cupboard and the key turned
in the lock.
"Got you!" said the voice, triumphantly. "Keep
still; if you try to break out I shall shoot you."
"All right," said Mr. Travers, hastily; "I won't
move."
"Better not," said the voice. "Mind, I've got a gun
pointing straight at you."
"Point it downwards, there's a good girl," said Mr.
Travers, earnestly; "and taKe your finger off the
trigger. If anything happened to me you'd never for-
give yourself."
"It s all right so long as you don't move," said the
voice; "and I'm not a girl," it added, sternly.
"Yes, you are," said the prisoner. "I saw you.
I thought it was an angel at tirst. I saw your little
bare feet and--"
A faint scream interrupted him.
"You'll catch cold," urged Mr. Travers.
"Don't you trouble about ime," said the voice,
tartly.
"I won't give any trouble," said Mr. Travers, who
began to think it time for the boatswain to appear on
the scene. "Why don't you call for help? I'11 go
like a lamb."
"I don't want your advice," was the reply. "I
know what to do. Now, don't you try and break out.
I'm going to fire one barrel out of the window, but
ve got the other one for you if you move."
"My dear girl," protete the horrified Mr. Travers,
you'll alarm the neighborhood."
"Just what I want to do," said the voice. "Keep
still, mind."
Mr. Travers hesitated. The game was up, and it
was clear that in any case the stratagem of the in-
genious Mr. Benn would have to be disclosed.
"Stop!" he said, earnestly. "Don't do anything
rash. I'm not a burglar; I'm doing this for a friend
of yours-Mr. Benn.'
"What said an amazed voice.


I am familiar with the mer.
its of Rldpath's History of the
World, and commend It to the
scholar as well as to the plain
people generally.V .
-* -^|


Rid


June 9, 1906


"This is to give notice that I, George Bonn, being
of sound mina and body, have told Ned Travers to
pretend to be a burglar at Mrs. Waters's. He ain't
a burglar, and I shall be outside all the time. It's
all above-board and ship-shape.
S(Signed) GEORGE BENN."
"Sound mind-above board-ship-shape," repeated
a dazed voice. "Where is he?"
"Out at the back," replied Mr. Travers. "If you
go to the window you can see him. Now, do put
something round your shoulders, there's a good girl."
There was no reply, but a board creaked. He
waited for what seemed a long time, and then the
board creaked again.
"Did you see him?" he inquired.
"I did," wa the harpreply. "You both ought to
be ashamed of yourselves. pou ought to be pun-
ished."
"There is a clothes-peg sticking into the back of
my head," remarked Mr. Travers. "What are you
going to do?"
There was no reply.
"What are you going to do?" repeated Mr. Travers,
somewhat uneasily. "You look too nice to do any-
thing hard; leastways, so far as I can judge through
this crack."
There was a smothered exclamation, and then
sounds of somebody moving hastily about the room
and the swish of clothing hastily donned.
"You ought to have done it before," commented the
thoughtful Mr. Travers. "It's enough to give you
your death of cold."
"Mind your business," said the voice, sharply.
Now, if I let you out, will you promise to do exactly
as I tell you?"
"Honor bright," said Mr. Travers, fervently.
"I'm going to give Mr. Benn a lesson he won't for-
get," proceeded the other, grimly. "I'm going to fire
off this gun, and then run down and tell him I've
killed you."
"Eh?" said the amazed Mr. Travers. "Oh, Lord!"


I esteem Ridpath's History
of the World of very great
value, and hope it will find a
place generally in the libraries
of our schools as well as upon
the shelves of readers in every
walk of life. jetrs mdto


PuM Ii Or uew eNo* Ve lal d Ther Ias et PiMubeh


the's History of the-World
9 Massive Royal Octavo Volumes 4,000 double-column page,
2,000 superb Illustrations. Brand new, latest edition down to
date, beautifully bound in half Morocco. W1els N Pemis.


AT LESS THAN EVEN DAMAGED SETS WERE EVER SOLD
We will name our price only in dret t tn to those sending us the oMpe below. Ter d te OiupOn,
wibt ma md l ee ptaINy fd ma il b ame ew hel-s yeS erget i.
Dr. Ridpath is dead, his work is done, but his family derive an income from his History, and t pifNl
Mrot pta eeetl for the sake of more quickly selling these few sets, would cause peIt ijry l fuure sates.


thm takes you back to the dawn of histo .ong before
e Pyramids' of pt wer ,built; down through the roman.
tic troubled times of Chaldea's grandeur and Asyrla's mag.
nioscene; of Babylo nia's wealth and luxury- of Greek-and
Roman splendor; ofMohammedan culture an refinement; of
Frenh eleganceand British power, to the rise of the Western
He throws the mantle of per alitr over the old heroes of
history. Alexander is there-patrot. warror, statesman, dip.
lomat-crowning the glory of Orecian histo.
S. r. Xerxes from his mountain platform sees
S hemistocles. with three hundred and fifty
G reek ships, smash his Persian fleet of over a
thousand sail and help to mould the language
In which this paragraph Is written. Rome
perches Nero upon the greatest throne on
_i Ses earth, and sets up a poor madman's name
MId to stand for countless centuries aa synonrm
S of save cruelty. Napoleon fi WAaterco
I- again under your very eyes, an reels before
the iron fae that at last the end of his gilded
dream has come. Bismarck is there-4ruff.
.. overbearing., a giat ulistin the diplomat.
Ce rins-l.ughin wlt gnm4diaIn Franes, which sas:
wind rave, thoughtful proof a the wl of British


s t and the sned darts of false friends; cleas4eeinl
ove M hads o hism fellow.-countrymen, and on Into another
cen the most colossal world-figure of his time.
He covers me u m a. and holds you
spellbound b bhis waonderhd eloquene. Nothing more Inter
estl absorbin'and Ispiring was eva written by man.
, shouldl be in your.home. It is work thatyou will
value sm on am you live and read over and over again.
I m AmiaM Sm madi l0ms OM Sa amS tO deW


FUKl"M UE T, AM m


WtNMr kIsppI AsAulemit. Mail Coupon Today-4-28-6
S24 Dearborn Street, Chicago.
Please mail. without cost to me. Ridpath Sample Pages
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The Sun, Jacksonville, Fla.


A


I


"H'shl Stop that l ,ighln," commanded the voice.
"He'll hear you. Be quietly
The key turned in the look, and Mr. Travers, step.
ping forth, clapped his hand over his mouth and en-
aeavored to obey. Mrs. Waters, stepping back with
the gun ready, scrutinized him closely.
"tome on to the landing," said Mrs. Waters,
eagerly. "We don't want anybody else to hear.
Fire into this."
He snatched a patchwork rug from the floor and
stuck it up %gainet the balusters.
"You stay here," said Mrs. Waters.
He nodded.
She pointed the gun at the hearth-rug, the walls
shook with the explosion, and, with a shriek that set
Mr. Travers's teeth on edge, she rushed downstairs
and, drawing back the bolts of the back door, tottered
outside and into the arms of the agitated boatswain.
"Oh! ohl oh" she cried.
"What-what's the matter?" gasped the boatswain.
The widow struggled in his arms. "A burglar,"
she said, in a tense whisper. "But it's all right;
I ve killed him."
"Kill-- stuttered the other. "Kill- Killed
him?"
Mrs. Waters nodded and released herself. "First
shot," she said, with a satisfied air.
The boatswain wrung his hands. "Good heavens!"
he said, moving slowly towards the door. "Poor fel-
low !"
"Come back," said the widow, tugging at his coat.
"I was-was going to see-whether I could do any.
thing for 'im," quavered the boatswain. "Poor fel-
lowl
"You stay where you are," commanded Mrs. Wat-
ers. "I don't want any witnesses. I don't want this
house to have a bad name. I'm going to keep it
quiet."
"Quiet?" said the shaking boatswain. "How?"
(Continued on Next Page)


Nevy-ill Im
alld
BAci s F dl Ur(l
I ( I I


1\


I


16,


,son/


A


*












THE SUN-


The Boatswain's Mate.

[Continued from Preceding Page]
"First thing to do," said the widow, thoughtfully,
"is to et rid of the body. I'll bury him in the gar-
den, I think. There's a very good bit of ground be-
hand those potatoes. You'll find the spade in the
tool-house."
T'he horrified Mr. Benn stood stock-still regarding
her.
"While you're digging the grave," continued Mrs.
Waters, calmly, "I'll go in and clean up the mess."
The boatswain reeled and then fumbled with tremb-
ling fingers at his collar.
Like a man in a dream he stood watching as she
ran to the tool-house and returned with a spade
and pick; like a man in a dream he followed her on
to the garden.
"Be careful," she said, sharply; "you're treading
down my potatoes."
The boatswain stopped dead and stared at her.
Apparently unconscious of his gaze, she began to
pace out the measurements and then, placing the
tools in his hands, urged him to lose no time.
"I'll bring him down when you're gone," she said,
looking towards the house.
The boatswain wiped his damp brow with the back
of his hand. "How are you going to get it down-
stairs?" he breathed.
"Drag it," said Mrs. Waters, briefly.
"Suppose he isn't dead ?" said the boatswain, with
a gleam of hope.
'Fiddlesticks I" said Mrs. Waters. "Do you think
I don't know? Now, don't waste time talking; and
mind you dig it deep. I'll put a few cabbages on top
afterwards-I've got more than I want."
She re-entered the house and ran lightly upstairs.
The candle was still alight and the gun was leaning
against the bed-post; but the visitor had disappeared.
Conscious of an odd feeling of disappointment, she
looked round the empty room.
"Come and look at him," entreated a voice, and
she turned and beheld the amused countenance of
her late prisoner at the door.
"I've been watching from the back window," he
said, nodding. "You're a wonder; that's what you
are. Come and look at him."
Mrs. Waters followed, and leaning out of the
window watched with simple pleasure the efforts of
the amateur sexton. Mr. Benn was digging like one
possessed, only pausing at intervals to straghten his
back and to cast a fearsome glance around him. The
only thing that marred her pleasure was the behavior
o01 Mr. Travers, who was struggling for a place with
all the fervor of a citizen at the Lord Mayor's show.
"Get back," she said, in a fierce whisper. "He'll
see ou."
Mr. Travers with obvious reluctance obeyed, just
as the victim looked up.
"Is that you, Mrs. Waters?" inquired the boat-
swain, fearfully.
"Yes, of course it is," snapped the widow. "Who
else should it be, do you think? Go on! What are
you stopping for?"
Mr. iBnn s breathing as he bent to his task again
was distinctly audible. The head of. Mr. Travers
ranged itself once more alongside the widow's. For
a long time they watched in silence.
"Won't you come down here, Mrs. Waters ?" called
the boatswain, looking up so suddenly that Mr.
Travers's head bumped painfully against the side of
the window. "It's a bit creepy, all alone."
"I'm all right," said Mrs. Waters.
"I keep fancying there's something dodging behind
them currant bushes," pursued the unfortunate Mr.
Benn, hoarsely. "How you can stay there alone I
can't think. I thought I saw something looking over
your shoulder just now. Fancy if it came creeping
up behind ana caught hold of you!"
The widow gave a sudden faint scream.
"if you do that again- she said, turning
fiercely on Mr. Travers.
"He put it into my head," said the culprit,
humbly; "I should never have thought of such a thing
by myself. I'm one of the quietest and best-be-
haved--."
"Make haste, Mr. Benn," said the widow, turning
to the window, again; "I've got a lot to do when
you've finished."
Tne boatswain groaned and fell to digging again,
and Mrs. Waters, after watching a little while longer,
gave Mr. Travers some pointed Instructions about the
window and went down to the garden again.
"That will do, I think," she said, stepping into the
hole and regarding it critically. "Now you'd better
go straight off home, and, mind, not a word to a soul
about this."
She put her hand on his shoulder, and noticing with
pleasure that he shuddered at her touch led the way
to the gate. The boatswain paused for a moment,
as though about to speak, and hen, apparently think-
ing better of it. bade her goodby in a hoarse voice


and walked feebly up the road.- Mrs. Waters stood
watching until his steps died away in the distance,
and then, returning to the garden, took up the spade
and stood regarding with some dismay the mountain-
ous result of his industry. Mr. Travers, who was
standing just inside the back door, joined ner.
"Let me," he aid, gallantly.
The day was breaking as be vanished his teak. The


clean, sweet air and the exercise had given him an
appetite to which the smell of cooking bacon and hot
coffee that proceeded from the house had set a
sharper edge. He took his coat from a bush and put
it on. Mrs. Waters appeared at the door.
"You had better come in and have some breakfast
before you go," she said, brusquely; "there's no more
sleep for me now."
Mr. Travers obeyed with alacrity, and after a
satisfying wash in the scullery came into the big
kitchen with his face shining and took a seat at the
table. The cloth was neatly laid, and Mrs. Waters,
fresh and cool, with a smile upon her pleasant face,
sat behind the tray. She looked at her guest curi-
ously, Mr. Travers's spirits being somewhat higher
than the state of his wardrobe appeared to justify.
"Why don't you get some settled work?" she in.
quired, with gentle severity, as he imparted snatches
of his history between bites.
"Easier said than done," said Mr. Travers, se-
renely. "But don't you run away with the idea that
I'm a beggar, because I'm not. I pay my way, such
as it is. And, by-the-by, I s'pose I haven't earned
that two pounds Benn gave me ?"
His face lengthened, and he felt uneasily in his
pocket.
"I'll give them to him when I'm tired of the joke,"
said the widow, holding out her hand and watching
him closely.
Mr. Travers passed the coins over to her. "Soft
hand you've got,' he said, musingly. "I don't won-
der Benn was desperate. I dare say I should have
done the same in his place."
Mrs. Waters bit her lip and looked out at the win-
dow; Mr. Travers resumed his breakfast.
"There's only one job that I'm really fit for, now
that I'm too old for the army," he said, confidentially,
as, breakfast finished, he stood at the door ready to
depart.
"Playing at burglars?" hazarded Mrs. Waters.
"Landlord of a little country public-house," said
Mr. Waters, simply.
Mrs. Waters fell back and regarded him with open-
eyed amazement.
"Good morning," she said, as soon as she could
trust her voice.
"Goodby," said Mr. Travers, reluctantly. "I
should like to hear how old Benn takes this joke,
though."
Mrs. Waters retreated into the house and stood re-
garding him. "If you're passing this way again and
like to look in-I'll tell you," she said, after a long
pause. "Goodby."
"I'll look in i a week's time," said Mr. Travers.
He took the proffered hand and shook it warmly.
"it would be the best joke of all," he said, turning
away.
"What would t"
The soldier confronted her again.
"For old Bonn to come round here one evening and
find me landlord. Think it over."
Mrs. Waters met his gaze soberly. "I'll think it
over when you have gone/' she said, softly. "Now
go."

Legalized Land Orabbing.
(Continued from Third Page)
took advantage of the opportunity afforded them by
the legalized system of tax sale certification, and as
soon as the rush commenced these men took the
shortest route to Tallahassee.
They spent days in the- office of the State Treas-
urer examining the tax sale certificates. They
bought them by the thousand and advertised the in-
tention to apply for a deed under the law, in SOME
NEWSPAPER published in the county in which the
land was situated. Great care was exercised to
select the newspaper having the smallest number of
subscribers, and which was the least widely circu-
lated, and after the legal term of sixty days had
passed these men became possessed of a gilt-edged
title to the lands which had been sold for taxes.
It is doubtful if the owner of the land ever saw
the paper in which the application of the man who
had purchased the certificate issued against his lands
from the State, was printed, and even if he did see
the paper, not knowing anything about what was
going on in Tallahassee, he would not have been in-
terested in reading the advertisements; so that the
owners of the land WERE DISPOSICI8IO OF
THEIIR HOLDINGS, in a great many eases, without
any knowledge on their part that such a process was
Now to apply the fable of the fisherman and the
genii to this condition:
The legalized system of the acquisition of tax titles
to land represents the genii, the crowd of hungry
land speculators stands for the fisherman, and the
poor land owners, the ignorant land owners, or the
careless land owners, as the case may be, stand for
the people who were preyed upon by the genii to
satisfy the wants of the fisherman.
This condition of things explains why a few men


in this State BECAME SUDDENLY RICH, and why
the ownership of the timber lands in this State
passed from the hands of the many into the hands of
the few.
This process of snatching a man's farm from under
him is illustrated by Artist Taylor at the top of this
pap, and I commend the picture, as well as the


Thirteenth age


fable, to the careful consideration of those eitiuens
who have respect for the equitable rights of their
neighbors.
This is the first of a series of articles on this land
tax title question. In the others to follow I purpose
to publish a list of those who purchased tax oertifi
states from the State Treasurer in large blocks and
became owners of thousands of acres of land by pay-
ing at the rate of a few cents per acre. After the
story of the changing of the ownership of the lands
in this State has been printed, I purpose to give the
views of the public-spirited citizens of Florida as to
the proper remedy, and THE SUN will advocate such
changes in the present tax laws as will preserve to
the citizens of Florida the possession of their prop-
erty and relieve them of the danger of being de-
prived of it without due notice or process of law
based on right and equity.








Y" ES, IT WRITES underneath the
platen, called "blind writer" and
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If you had a well of fine water and
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Now, if ten different kinds of pumps
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all, wouldn't you choose the one that
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You have writing to do, that's why
you need a typewriter. Of course, you
can still write with a pen or pencil,
and so can water be brought up by a
bucket and chain; but few do it that
way any more-time is too valuable.
A pump, then, is valuable for the
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grain it will grind; and a typewriter,
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with the least effort, and keep on doing
it year in and year out-it's the results
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Any salesman can say his is the
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run out on "best." But the



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Other typewriters may be tensated to be
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These things are all hJstQry. and history
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Al we ask of you Is to iwv one of our sale
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If you are locat-


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with as much sat-


June 9, 1906


Nwome a-tnwws
Isfacdon as U
you csHod at
our office.
FAY.
SHOLES
OWAGO RLMM













June 9, 1906


THE SUN


Pou tdth Page


The Czar's Spy

(Oontinued from Tenth Page)
life?" I inquired gravely. "I only re-
turned from Russia yesterday."
"Your movements are well known," an-
swered the young ItalL. "You cannot
be too carefu. Woodroffe has been in
Russia with you, has he not?'
I replied in the affmative, whereupon
he said:
"I thought o, but was not quite sure."
"And hhtert" I inquired; "where is
he?"
"In London."
"And the Leithoourts?"
He shrugged his shoulders with a ges-
ture of ignorance, adding: "The Sig-
norinm Muriel returned to London from
Eastbourne this morning."
"Where can I find her?" I inquired
eagerly. "It is of the utmost importance
that I should see her."
"She is with a relation, a cousin, I
think, at Bassett Road, Notting Hill.
The house is called 'Holmwood.'"
"You have seen her?"
"No. I heard she had returned."
"And her father is still in hiding
from Chater f"
"He Is still in hiding, but Chater is
his best friend."
"That is curious," I remarked, reool-
leeting the hurried departure from Ran-
noch. "They've made it up, I suppose?"
"They never quarreled, to my knowl-
adge "o
"Then why did Leitheourt leave Scot-
land .o hurriedly on Chater's arrival?
You know all about the affair, of
course?"
He nodded, saying with a grim smile,
"Yes; I know. The party up there must
have been a very interesting one. If
the police could have made a raid on the
place they would have found among the
guests certain persons long 'wanted.'
But the arrival of Chater and the flight
of Leitheourt had an ulterior object.
Chater had never been Leitheourt's en-
emy."
f"But 1 can't understand that," I said.
"Why should Lekthcourt have attacked
Chater, rendering him unconscious, and
shut him up in the cupboard in the
library?"
"Was it Leitheourt who did that?" he
asked dubiously. "I think not. It was
another of the guests who was Chater's
bitterest enemy. But Philip Leithcourt
took advantage of the fracas in order to
make believe that he had fled because of
Chater's arrival. Ahl" he added, "you
haven't any idea of their ruses. They
are amazing"
"So it seems," I said, nevertheless only
'halt convinced that the Italian was telf-
ing me the truth. If it was really as
he had said, that the arrival of Chater
and the flight was merely a "blind," then
the mystery was again deepened.
"Then who was the man who attacked
Chater t" I asked.
"Only Chater himself knows. It was
one of the guests, that is quite evident."
"And you say that the flight had been
prearranged?" I remarked.
"Yes, with a distinct motive," he said;
then, after a pause, he added, with a
strange, earnest look in his dark eyes,
"Pardon me, Signor Commendatore, if I
presume to sugget something, will you
aot ?"
"Certainly. What do you suggest?"
"That you remain here, in this hotel,
and not venture out."
"For fear of something unfortunate
really not afraid, Ollnto," I added. "You
know I carry this," and I drew out my
revolver from my hip-pocket.
"I know, *ignore," he said anxiously.
"But you might not be afforded oppor-
tunity for uaing it. When they lay a
trap they bait it well."
ta know. They're a set of the most
Ingenious coundrels in London, it ii
very evident. Yet I don't fear them in
the least," I declared. "I must rescue
the Signorina Heath."
"But, signore, have a care for your-
self," cried the Italian, laying his hand
uion my arm. "You are a marked man.


A^ uo i not know," he exclaimed
breathlessly. ,"If you go out you may
run right rnto--well, the fatal accident."
"Never fear, Olinto," I said reassur-
ingly.. "I shall keep my eyes well o
Here, in London, one's life Js safer than
anywhere else in the world, perhape-


certainly safer than in some places I
could name in your own country, eh"
at which he grinned.
The next moment he grew serious
again, and said:
"I only warn the signore that if he
goes out it is at his own peril."
"Then let it be so," I laughed, feeling
self-confident that no one could lead me
into any trap. I was neither.a foreigner
nor a country cousin. I knew London
too well. He was silent and shook his
head; then, after telling me that he was
still at the same restaurant in West-
bourne Grove, he took his departure,
warning me once more not to go forth.
Half an hour later, disregarding his
words, I strode out into the Strand, and
again walked to the "Junior." The short
wintry day had ended, the gas lamps
were lit, and the darkness of night was
gradually creeping on.
Jack had not been to the club, and I
began now to grow thoroughly uneasy.
He had parted from me at the corner of
the Strand with only a five minutes'
walk before him, and yet he had appar-
ently disappeared. My first impulse
was to drive to Notting Hill to inquire
of Muriel if she had news of him, but
somehow the Italian's warning words
made me wonder if he had met with foul
I suddenly recollected those two men
who had passed by as we had talked, and
how that the features of one had seemed
strangely familiar. Therefore I took a
3ab to the police station down at White-
hall, and made inquiry of the inspector
on duty in the big bare office with its
daring gas jets in wire globes. He heard
me to the end, then turning back the
book of "occurrences" before him, glanced
through the ruled entries.
"I should think this is the gentleman,
dr," he said. And he read me the entry
as follows:
"P. 0. 462A reports that at 2:07 a.
m., while on duty outside the National
Gallery, he heard a revolver shot, fol-
lowed by a man's cry. He ran to the
corner of Suffolk Street, where he found
i gentleman lying upon the pavement
suffering from a serious shot-wound in
the chest and quite unconscious. He ob-
tained the assistance of P. C.'s 218A
and 343A, and the gentleman, who was
not identified, was taken to the Charing
Cross Hospital, where the house surgeon
expressed a doubt whether he could live.
Neither P. C.'s recollect having noticed
my suspicious-looking person in the vi-
inity. JOHN PERCIVAL,
"Inspector."
I waited for no more, but rushed round
to the hospital in the cab, and was, five
minutes later, taken along the ward,
where I identified poor Jack lying in
bed, white-faced and unconscious.
"The doctor was here a quarter of an
hour ago," whispered the sister. "And
he fears he is sinking."
"He has uttered no words?" I asked
anxiously. "Made no statement?"
"None. He has never regained con-
sciousness, and I fear, sir, he never will.
It is a case of deliberate murder, the
police told me early this morning."
I clenched my tists and swore a fierce
revenge for that dastardly act. And as
I stood beside the narrow bed, I realized
that what Olinto had said regarding my
own peril was the actual truth. I was
a marked man. Was I never to pene-
trate that inscrutable and ever-increas-
ing mystery?


CHAPTER XVII.


TEB TRUTH ABOUT THE LOLA.


Throughout the long night I called
many times at the hospital, but the re-
ply was always the same. Jack had not
regained consciousness, and the doctor
regarded his case as hopeless.
In the morning I drove in hot haste to
Bassett Road, Netting Hill, and at the
address Olinto had given me found Mu-
riel. When she entered the room with
folding doors into which I had been
shown, I saw that she was pale and ap.
prehensive, for we had not met since her
flight, and she was, no doubt, at a loss
for an explanation. But I did not press
nor for one. I merely told her thai the
Italian Santini had given me her ad-
dress, and that I came as bearer of un-
fortunate news.
"What Ia it?" she gasped quickly.
(Continued on anet Pop)


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June 0, 1966


THE SUN


Pit tmnth P46


The Czar's Spy
(Continued from preceding page.
"It concerns Captain Durnford," I re-
plied. "He has been injured in the
street, and is in Charing Cross Hos-
pital."
"Ah I" she cried. "I see. You do not
explain the truth. By your face I can
tell there is something more. He's dead
Tell me the worst."
"No, Miss Leithcourt," I said gravely,
"not dead, but the doctors fear that he
may not recover. :His wound is danger-
ous. He has been shot by some unknown
person."
"Shot!" she echoed, bursting into
tears. "Then they have followed him,
after all I They have deceived me, and
now, as they intend to take him from
me, I will myself protect him. You, ar.
Gregg, have been in peril of your life,
that I know, but Jack's enemies are
yours, and they snall not go unpunished.
May I see himt"
'I fear not, but we will ask at the
hospital." And after the exchange of
some further explanations, we took a
hansom back to Charing Cross.
At first the sister refused to allow Mu-
riel to see the patient, but she implored
so earnestly that at last she consented,
and the distressed girl in the black coat
and hat crept on tiptoe to the bedside.
"He was conscious for a quarter of an
hour or so," whispered the nurse who
sat there. "He asked after some lady
named Muriel."
The girl at my side burst into low sob-
bing.
"Tell him," she said, "that Muriel is
here-that she has seen him, and is
waiting for him to recover."
We were not allowed to linger there,
and on leaving the hospital I took her
back again to Netting Hill, promising to
keep her well informed of Jack's condi-
tion. He had returned to consciousness,
therefore there was now a faint hope for
his recovery.
Day succeeded day, and although I was .
not allowed to visit my friend, I was
told that he was ve slowly progressing.
I idled at the Hotel Cecil longing daily
for news of Elma. Only once did a let-
ter come from her, a brief, well-written
note from which it appeared that she
was quite well and happy, although she
longed to be able to go out. The Prin-
cess was very kindness to her, and, she
added, was making secret arrangements
for her escape across the Russian fron-
tier into Germany.
I knew what that meant. Use was to
be made of certain Russian officials who
were secretly allied with the Revolution-
ists in order to secure her safe conduct
beyond the power of that order of exile
of the tyrant de Plehve. I wrote to her
under cover to the Princess, but there
had been no time yet for a reply.
I saw Muriel many times, but never
did she refer to Rannoch or their sud-
den departure. Her only thought was
of the man she loved.
"I always believed that you were en-
gaged to Mr. Woodroffe," I said one day,
when I called to tell her of Jack's latest
bulletin.
"It is true that he asked me to marry
him," she responded. "But there were
reasons why I did not accept."
"Reasons connected with his past, eh ?"
She smiled and then said:
"Ah, Mr. Gregg, it is all a strange and
very tragic story. I must see Jack.
When do you think they will allow me
to go to him?"
I explained that the doctor feared to
cause the patient any undue excitement,
but that in two or three days there was
hope of her being allowed to visit him.
Several times the police made inquiry of
me, but I could tell them nothing. I
could not for the life of me recollect
where I had before seen the face of that
man who had passed in the darkness.
One afternoon, ten days after the at-
tempt upon Jack, I was allowed to sit by
his bedside and question him.


"Ah, Gordon, old fellow" he said
faintly, "I've had a narrow escape-by
Jove l After I left you I walked quickly
on towards the club, when, all of a sud-
den, two scoundrels sprang out of Suf-
folk Street, and one of them fired a re-
volver full at me. Then I knew no
more."
"But who were the men? Did you
recogniae them1"


"No,
it.",


not at all.


That's the worst of


"But Muriel knows who they were! I
said.
"Ah, yes t Bring her here, won't
you t" the poor fellow implored. "I'm
dying to see her once again."
Then I told him how she had looked
upon him while unconscious, and how I
had taken the daily bulletin to her. For
an hour I talked with him, urging him
to get well sodn, so that we could unite
in probing the mystery, and bringing to
justice those responsible for the das-
tardly act.
"Muriel knows, and if she loves you
she will no doubt assist us," I said.
"Oh, she loves me, Gordon, I know
that," said the prostrate man, smiling
contentedly, and when I left I promised
to bring her there on the morrow.
This I did, but having conducted her
to the bed at the end of the ward I
discreetly withdrew. What she said to
him I am not, of course, aware. All I
know is that an hour later when I re-
turned I found them the happiest pair
possible to conceive, and I clearly saw
that Jack's trust in her was not ill-
placed.
But of ElmaT No further word had
come from her, and I began to grow un-
easy. The days went on. I wrote twice,
but no reply was forthcoming. At last
[ could bear the suspense no longer, and
began to contemplate returning to Rus-
sia.
Jack, when at last discharged from
the hospital, came across to the Cecil
and lived with me in preference to the
"Junior." He was very weak at first,
and I looked after him, while every day
Muriel came and ate with us, brighten-
ing our lives by her smart and merry
chatter. She knew that I loved Mhlma
and was also aware of the exciting events
in Russia, Jack having told her of them
during their long drives in hansoms
when he went out with her to take the
air.
One day I received a brief note from
the Princess in Petersburg, urging me to
remain patient and saying Elma was
quite safe and well. There were rea-
sons, however, why she was unable to
write, she added. What were they, I
wondered? Yet I could only wait until
I received word to travel back to Rus-
sia and tetch her home. The Princess
had promised to arrange everything.
December came, and we stilf remained
on at the hotel. Once Olinto had writ-
ten me repeating his warning, but I did
not heed it. I somehow distrusted the
fellow.
Jack, now thoroughly recovered, called
almost daily at Bassett Road, and would
often bring Muriel to the Cecil to tea or
to luncheon. Often I inquired ..ae
whereabouts of her father and of Hylton
Chater, but she declared herself in en-
tire ignorance, and believed they were
abroad.
(CONTINUED NEXT WEEK)

Thinks of the Brethren.
(Continued from Seventh Page.)
commend in the subsidized opinion fac-
tory which the Journal's free advertis-
ing has shown to exist in this same
"news bureau," and the press of the
State is making mighty little use of the
stuff which it grinds out.-Pensacola
Journal.

THE PRIMARY CANDIDATE.
He cometh up like a flower and re-
ureth from the race busted. His friends
fill him with false hope and atmosphere.
He swelleth like a toad and thlnketh
the world is his'n. He smileth upon
mankind and aloppeth over with humor.
He kisseth the children and scattereth
his microbes among innocent babes. He
privily cheweth a clove when he meet-
eth a preacher, and as he converseth with
him he standeth to the leeward and
curbeth his breath as with a strong bit.
He goeth home to his weary wife late
at night with beery breath and cold feet.
He riseth up between times and hiketh


forth without his breakfast, saying, "I
go to see a man. The deadbeat lieth
in wait and pulleth his leg to a queen's
taste. He naileth a lie, but before elem-
tion time he runneth short on nails. He
giveth liberally to the church, he sub-
srilbeth a good sumn to the band, con-
tributth to te poor whoe bars wu


burned, he sendeth a small keg hither
and a large keg thither, he yieldeth up
his substance with apparent alacrity.
After the election he goeth behind the
barn and kicketh himself and teareth his
hair and and calleth himself a Rotter-
dam fool.--Ocala Banner.
Governor Broward has placed the
drainage issue clearly betore the peo-
ple. If they reverse themselves on it,
it is their own affair. The people will
not take seriously the platitudinous and
smug advice so abundantly offered by
the railroad organs. They will remem-
ber the masters they serve, and decide
that, since the railroads are so earnestly
against the scheme it might not be so
bad after all. What is bad for the rail-
road is not necessarily good for the peo-
pie, but it is well to search diligently
for the nigger in the woodpile.-Monti.
cello News.
With the orange industry back to pay-
ing crops, the peach industry a source
of fine revenue to those engaged in it,
the truckers getting good money for
their outputs, the number of winter vis-
itors continually increasing, the naval
stores and lumber business Immense, Vo-
lusia County is indeed enjoying a great
prosperity; coming with this prosperity,
too, are fine schools, as fine a class of
citizenship as can be found in the coun-
try, the best and healthiest climate on
earth, and a population happy and con-
tented.-Volusia County Record.
The next Legislature would act wisely
if they could create an Immigration Bu-
reau and appropriate ample means for
its maintenance. The Legislature could
at least appropriate several thousand
dollars to be used equally in advertising
the counties, provided each county would
invest an equal sum for the same pur-
pose as received by them from the State.
-Tropical Breeze.
The Florida News Bureau, which was
organized for the purpose of opposing
Everglade drainage, has issued a circular
in which it intimated that Messrs. T. A.

STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING.

Jacksonville, June 1, 1906.
Notice is hereby given that a
special meeting of the stockholders
of THE SUN COMPANY will be
held at 10 A. M., Friday, the 6th
day of July 1906, at the office of
the company in the city of Jack-
sonville, Fla., for the purpose of
voting an increase of the capital
stock of said company from $5000.00
common stock and $5000.00 pre.
ferred stock, total $10,000.00, to
$25,000.00 common stock and $25,-
000.00 preferred stock, total $50,-
000.00.
Signed, A. K. TAYLOR,


CLAUDE


L'ENGLE,
President.


Secretary.


CHAS. BLUM A CO.
'mnmltBIw,


King, J. King, W. W. Longford, R. E.
Whidden and other are paying the al-
ary of the management of te aid news
bureau and other large expense of col-
lecting data and printing. These are all
well known iotisens of Arcadia, and we
do not believe they have contributed a
cent for such a purpose. At the Afst
opportunity we expect to ask them gen-
tiemen. Ten the truth will be known.
-De Soto County Advertiser.


WILL NOT
AND


ADMIT WASH-LADIES
HOUnzazsrsaB.


Nurmberg.-The Servant Girls' Union
has decided against the admittance of
washerwomen and housekeepers. The
secretary refused to name the reason for
the discrimination.

It's Different When You Drink
BCERINE


TftM UmMw
k IM"
IT'S BEERINE


JACKSONVILLE, FA, COCACOLA
BOTTLING CO.
L A. MOL, MMUl


Henry Watterson's Paper

(The WeMk-y erlJon)



THE SUN

thM On Yearw r OI nlU S
People in the United tad have
edoftrhe .Ounad Demoa
In all th air In th m f, I IIn
all thilnast Is eustn ly a ly news-
paper. y aasp i e a aastwa
enabled to offer the Weekly w ouir
nal one year and this paper for the
named above. Send yoeur msubsptio
for the combination to us-ot to the
Courler.Journal.



TI */ Own Hike Cbibt





In 1-2,I,2 and 5 L2 LPac i|s



-25,40,60S
N-
I1g 1Ipw VIWmlp





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2 ,/ i


1Iv~


' '"


HOME


WITHOUT


PIANO


,Tot many years ago the Pianoforte was looked on by


the great majority of people


it is regarded


as a


necessity.


And it


is


so easy,


Today
too, to


BUY A PIANO FROM US, and ESPECIALLY


NOW THAT


WE


ARE


OFFERING


SUCH


GREAT BARGAINS.


Call and


see the instruments


we are offering.


Get in on the ground floor.


THE


CABLE


COMPANY


110


West Bay St.


Those Jacobs Stories


That Tax Title Series


Pat Murphy Letters


Snappy Political Talks


Taylor's Famous Cartoons


And those L'Engle Editorials


MAKE


TH1E


SUN


An Indispensable Library Table Article of Use and Pleasure, a
'Journal of Merit, a Paper With a Will of Its Own


THOROUGHLY SANITZdRY


SCRUPULOUSLY ACCURATE


WITHOUT A BOSS


IT'S


SUN


FOR


YOU


Subscrike Today


V


i


as a luxury.


I


$2.00 Per Year


16--


MOM


"4 *'' "i


I




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