Group Title: sun.
Title: The sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075914/00030
 Material Information
Title: The sun
Uniform Title: sun
Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sun Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: June 2, 1906
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tallahassee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Leon County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Leon -- Tallahassee
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.451667 x -84.268533 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 18, 1905)-v. 3, no. 47 (Sept. 12, 1908).
Numbering Peculiarities: Published at Tallahassee, Fla., June 23-Sept. 12, 1908.
General Note: Claude L'Engle, editor.
General Note: "If it's right, we are for it."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075914
Volume ID: VID00030
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33400104
lccn - sn 95047216
 Related Items
Other version: Morning sun (Tallahassee, Fla.)
Succeeded by: Dixie (Jacksonville, Fla.)

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New Stories bY W.


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Jacobs Begin in this Number


Volume 1-No. 29 JAGKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, JUNE 2, 1906 Sinnle Gopy 5 Gents


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CLAUDE L'ENOLE
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U U.Sma WmV ws w A W s n own, Pre m FM uw naF m, I Ti mN Ow1, AT aS wst F TrmSi RE, asimi, FnmA
V me I---No. 29 ( JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, JUNE 2, 1906 5 Cents per Copy, $2 per Year
,*___"___ rEntered at the Poet Office at JactiMMvio, Fla., oond u dwmtter


IN THE SUN'S CHARIOT
Intima te Talks Between Publisher and Reader
IT 18 60 IMPORTANT WC SAY IT AGAIN--
Some folks say that the beet way to eat strawberries is to eat the
littlest first and save the biggest for the last.
The argument in favor of this plan is that the joys of anticipation
ae better than those of realization, and all the time the strawberry
femt lasts the thoughts of the eater are dwelling on the good time
coming when the biggest berries will be eaten.
Other folks, wise in gastronomic lore, say that the best plan to get
all the enjoyment out of a dish of the luscious red berries is to EAT
THE BIGGEST FIRST, and then you will always be eating the biggest.
There is a fascinating appeal contained in this plan, because the
human mind is so constituted that it craves the biggest things in life.
Just because the people are equally divided on this great question
of strawberry eating procedure, we are going to-for once-straddle,
and try both plans in telling of SUN progress this week.
We have two things to say, both of which are "the biggest," and
we will tell the biggest first, and save the biggest for the last.
Here goes for the first-
Commencing this week we begin the presentation of-
TEN HUMOROUS STORIts BY W. W. JAC00.
No bigger announcement than this can be made by ANY PUB-
L ICATION WHATSOEVER.
Not Harper's, nor Collier's, nor McClure's, nor Everybody's, nor
anybody's magazine or periodical can beat it for size or meritorious
interest, because when you say Jacobs," you pronounce the name of
a man SECOND TO NONE on the roll of humorous story writers.
These stories (ten in number) will occupy about two pages of
SUN space each, and will be complete in each number. They will be
illustrated by Will Owen, who is to Jacobs in literary circles what Sul-
livan was to Gilbert in the comic opera.
It would be too much of a shock to the sensitive nerves of our
readers if we were to tell how much we paid for the right to print these
stories, so, we will keep this well-proportioned detail to ourselves.
Our economical principle survived this strain only because--
WeM as Wiio Io ioSUNM reir the but tAo e had.
The other "biggest" thing we have in store for you-
Is a new serial story which we begin in this issue. We have
eliminated all but three from the many offerings, and the trying-out
rocess is now on to determine which one of the three remaining is the
No matter how the choice may fall, our readers can rest easy, for
any one of the three will be found absorbingly interesting, dramatically
woven, charmingly told, and refreshingly pure and sweet.
Have you subscribed?
No? How careless I
Send the order and-the money right now.


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increased 100.000 over what they were four months ago, when it became a pert of the fI-
mous Heerst publishlnir oranisation. The publishers an sparing no effort to secure for It
all that is most deulble In the way of pictures stores and artless. As an example, pie*
tures by Frederio Remington and stories by W. W. Jacobs are now running in the Cosmo.
politan, and an s on new serial by H. Wells.
THE REVIEW OF REVIEWS Substantial American men and women aregoing
Sto keep up wi th the times and they are goin to
take the shortest cut-which Is The Review of Reviewr-a monthly survey of the world's
progress.
WOMAN'S HOME COMPANION 's not oelle b an other home and
family publication in the world. Stories,
fashions, arteles, Illustrations.n
PEARSONIS its ne of the leading fiction magazines of the day, both It. serial and
S N short stories being by authors of world-wide reputation. Pearson's is
considered authority on book reviews.
THE AMERICAN MAGAZINE For thirty years knownuas Led e's Magatne.
s... .... t was late y purchased by a powerful syndi-
ate, and no fund anIre king to ma it one of the but mgsines in America.
TOM WATSON'S MA AZINE o monthly ma ine in America ever before
w----- .- .i.-....... .. reWIet with luch a hearty welcome as did Tom
Wason's by ll cla people, and deservedly so, for Mr. Watson Is at once the foremost
writer and clearest thinker before the public today. It is filled with the best thoughts of
the best mnds on all subjects of ntees to the American people.
THE SUN ,* oilotsown. ,a ndI bso yrt paper in

Grab This Opportunity
If YOu want one magazine with our paer for a year, you cannot do better than to accept
of following ofiers whiletheyAure horoff eo at and before they a withdrawn:
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Fill out coupon, mall it today with Your remittance and be sure of getting
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THE SUN$
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Enclosed please find I..... ................for which enter my name for one year's sub. I
scription to your paper and the following magazines............................................................
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2,1906


ii


Third Page


THE SUN


CAPTAINS ALL w. w. Jacobs


sailorman grumbles about the sea, said the
watchman, thoughtfully. It's human nature
ble, and I s'pose they keep on grumbling and
to it because there ain't much else they can
ere's not many shoregoing berths that a
is fit for, and those that they are--such
night-watchman's, for instance-wants such a
character that there's few as are to equal it.
times they get things to do ashore. I knew
nn that took up butchering, and 'e did very
t it till the police took him up. Another man
w gave up the sea to marry a washerwoman,
hey hadn't been married six months afore she
and back he 'ad to go to sea agin, pore chap.
-man who used to grumble awful about the sea
old Sam Small-a man I've spoke of to you
To hear 'im go on about the sea, arter he
pent four of five months' money in a fortnight,
heartbreaking. He used to ask us wot was going
pen to 'im in his old age, and when we pointed
t he wouldn't be likely to 'ave any old age if
wasn't more careful of himself he used to fly
a temper and call us everything 'e could lay his
e to.
time when 'e was ashore with Peter Russett
Ginger Dick he seemed to 'ave got it on the
n. He started being careful of 'is money instead
ending it, and three mornings running he bought
wspaper and read the advertisements, to see
her there was any comfortable berth for a strong,
-'arted man wot didn't like work.
e actually went arter one situation, and, if it
't ha' been for seventy-nine other men, he said
lived he'd ha' had a good chance of getting it.
it was, all'e got was a black eye for shoving
her man, and or a day or two he was so down-
that 'e was no company at all for the other
or three or four days 'e went out by himself and
,all of a sudden, Ginger Dick and Peter began
otice a great change in him. He seemed to ave
quite cheerful and happy. He answered 'em back
ant when they spoke to 'im, and one night he
in 'is bed whistling comic songs until Ginger
Peter Russell 'ad to get out o' bed to him.
en he bought a new necktie and a smart cap and
hed himselff twice in one day they fust began to
each other wot was up, and then they asked him.
Up!" ses Sam; "nothing."
'He's in love," see Peter Russet.
'You're a liar," ses Sam, without turning round.
He'll 'ave it bad at 'is age," sos Ginger.
m didn't say nothing, but he kept fidgeting
ut as though 'e'd got something on his mind.
t he looked out o' the winder, then he 'ummed a
e, and at last, looking at 'em very fierce, he took
tooth-brush wrapped in paper out of 'is pocket
began to clean 'is teeth.
'He is in love," ses Ginger, as soon as he could
k.
"Or else 'e's gorn mad," ses Peter, watching 'im.
which is it, Sam?"
am made believe that he couldn't answer 'im be-
use o' the tooth-brush, and arter he'd finished he
such a raging toothache that 'e sat in a corner
Hiding 'is face and looking the picture' o' misery.
y couldn't get a word out of him till they asked
to go out with them, and then he said 'e was
lug to bed. Twenty minutes arterwards, when
ager Dick stepped back for 'is pipe, he found he
gorn.
He tried the same game next night, but the other
o wouldn't 'ave it, and they stayed in so long
t at lAst 'e lost 'Is temper, and, arter wondering
t Ginger's father and mother could ha' been
,thinking about, and saying that he believed Peter
t 'ad been changed at birth for a sea-sick
nkey, he put on 'is cap and went out. Both of
followed 'im sharp, but when he led 'em to a
issionary-hall, and actually went inside, they left
and went off on their own.
They talked it over that nignt between themselves,
nd next evening they went out fust and hid them-
Ives round the corner. Ten minutes arterwards
d Sam came out, walking as though 'e was going
c watch a train; and smiling to think 'ow he 'ad
Iaken them off. At the corner of Commercial Road
a stopped and bought himselff a button-hole for 'is
at, and Ginger was so surprised that 'e pinched
hter Russet to make sure that he wasn't dreaming.
Old Sam walked straight on whistling, and every
ow and then looking down at 'is button-hole, until
y-and-by he turned down a street on the right and
rent into a little shop. Ginger Dick and Peter
waited for 'im at the corner, but he was inside for so
oug that at last they got tired o' waiting and crept
p and peeped through the winder.
It was a little tobaoconist's shop, with newspapers
Md penny toys and such-like; but, as far as Ginger
uld see through two rows o' pipes and the Polce
fews, it was empty. They stood there with their
oses pressed against the glass for some time, won-
leing wot had happenedd to Sam, but by-and-by a
little boy went in and then they began to 'ave an
des wot Sam's little game was.
As the shop-bell went tihe door of a Ulittle parlor


at the back of the shop opened, and a stout and un-
common good-looking woman of about forty came out.
her 'ead pushed the Police News out o' the way and
her 'and came groping into the winder carter a toy.
Ginger 'ad a good look at 'er out o' the corner of one
eye, while he pretended to be looking at a tobacco
jar with the other. As the little boy came out 'im
and Peter Russet went in.
"I want a pipe, please," he se, smiling at 'er; "a
clay pape-one o' your beet."
The woman handed 'im down a box to choose from,
and just then Peter, wot 'ad been staring in at the
art-open door at a boot wot wanted lacing up, gave a
big start and sos, "Whyl Halloal"
"Wot's the matter' ses the woman, looking at
'im.
"I'd know that foot aaqwhere," ses Peter, still
staring at it; and the words was hardly out of 'is
mouth afore the foot 'ad moved itself away and
tucked itself under its chair. "Why, that's my dear
old friend Sam Small, ain't it?"
"Do you know the captint" sea the woman, smiling
at 'im.
"Cap--?" se Peter. "Cap--? Oh, yes; why,
he's the biggest friend I've got.
"'Ow strange!'" sea the woman.
"We've been wanting to see 'im for some time,"
ses Ginger. "He was kind enough to lend me art a
crown the other day, and I've been wanting to pay
'im."
Captin Small," sea the woman, pushing open the
door, "here's some old friends o' yours.",
Old Sam turned 'is face round and looked at 'em,
and if looks could ha' killed, as the saying is, they'd
ha' been dead men there and then.
"Oh, yes," he seo, in a choking voice, "'ow are
you?"
o"Pretty well, thank you, captain ses Ginger, grin.
ning at 'im; "and 'ow's yourself arter all this long
time"
He held out 'is hand and Sam shook it, and then
shook 'ands with Peter Russet, who was grinning so
'ard that he couldn't speak.
"These are two old friends o' mine, Mrs. Finch,"
sea old Sam, giving 'em a warning look; "Captin
Dick and Captin Russet, two o' the oldest and oesit
friends a man ever 'ad."
"Cap tin Dick 'as got art a crown for you," ses
Peter Russet, still grinning.
"There now," see Ginger, looking vexed, "if I
ain't been and forgot it; I've on'y got arf a sov-
er n."
I can give you change, sir," ses Mrs. Finch.
"P'r'aps you'd like to sit down for five minutes?"
Ginger thanked 'er, and 'im and Peter Russet took
a chatr apiece in front o' the fire and began asking
old Sam about 'is health and won he'd been doing
since they saw 'im last.
"Fancy your reckernizing his foot," sea Mrs. Finch
coming in with the change.
"I'd know it anywhere," se Peter, who was watch-
ing Ginger pretending to give Sam Small the
'arf-dollar, and Sam pretending in a most lifelike
manner to to take it.
Ginger Dick looked round the room. It was a
comfortable little place, with pictures on the walls
and antimacassars on all the chairs, and a row of
pink vases on the mantelpiece. Then 'e looked at
rs. Finch, and thought wot a nioe-looking woman
she was.
"This is nicer than being aboard ship with a crew
o' nasty, troublesome sailormen to look arter, Cap-
tin Small," he ses.
"It's wonderful the way he manage 'em," seo
Peter Russet to Mrs. Finch. "Like a lion he is."
"A roaring lion," see Ginger, looking at Sam.
"He don't know wot fear is."
Sam began to smile, and Mrs. Finch looked at
'im so pleased that Peter Russet, who 'ad been look.
ing at er and the room, and thinking much the same
way as Ginger, began to think that they were on the
wrong tack.
"Afore 'e got stout and old," he see, shaking his
"ad, "there wasn't a smarter skipper afloat."
"We all 'ave our day," se Ginger, shaking his
sad too.
"I dessay he's good for another year or two afloat,
yet," se Peter Russet, considering.
"With eare," see Ginger.
Old Sam was going to say something, but 'e stopped
himself Just in time. 'They will 'ave their Joke,"
he se, turning to Mrs. Finch and trying to smile.
"1 feel as young as ever I did."
Mrs. Finch said that anybody with art an eye
could see that, and then she looked at a kettle that
was singing on the 'ob.
"I s'pose you gentlemen wouldn't care for a cup of
cocoa" s he see, turning to them.
Ginger Dick and Peter both said that they looked
it better than anything else, and, carter she 'ad got
out the cups and saucers and a tin o' cocoa, Ginger
held the kettle and poured the water in the cups
while she stirred them, and old Sam sat looking on
'elpi .


t do seem funny to see you drinking cocoa,
eaWi m -s OGipr, a old Sam took bo cup.


"Hot" sea Sam, firin, up; "and why, if I might
make so bold as to ask"h
"'Co I've generally seen you drinking something
out of a bottle," sea Ginger.
"Now, look 'ere," ses Sam, starting up and spill-
ing some of the hot cocoa over 'is lap.
"A giner-beer bottle," sas Peter Russet, making
faces at Ginger to keep quiet.
"Yes, o' course, that's wot I meant," hse Ginger.
Old Sam wiped the coooa off 'is knees without sty.
ing a word, but his weskit kept going up and down
till Peter Russet felt quite sorry for Mi.
"There's nothing like it," he see to Mrs. Finch.
"It was by sticking to ginger-beer and milk and uIh-
like that Captin Small 'ad cominand of a ship afore
'e was twenty-five."
"Lor'I" ses Mrs. Finch.
She smiled at old Sam till Peter got uneasy agin,
and began to think p'r'aps 'e'd been praising im too
much.
"Of course, I'm speaking of long ago now," he Mea.
"Years and years afore you was born, ma'am,"
ses Ginger.
Old Sam was going to say something, but Mrs.
Finch looked so pleased that 'e thought better of it.
Some o' the cocoa 'e was drinking went the wrong
way, and then Ginger patted 'im on the back and
told 'im to be careful not to bring on 'in brownchitis
agin. Wot with temper and being afraid to speak
for fear they should let Mrs. Finch know that 'e
wasn't a captain, he could hardlyy bear 'imelf, but lie
very near broke out when Peter Russet advised 'im
to ave his weskit lined with red flannel. They all
stayed on till closing time, and by the time they left
they 'ad made theireelves so pleasant that Mrs.
Finch said she'd be pleased to see them any time
they liked to look in.
alam Small waited till they 'ad turned the corner,
and then he broke out so alarming that they could
'ardly do anything with 'im. Twice policemen spoke
to 'im and advised 'im to go home afore they altered
their minds; and he 'ad to hold himselff in and keep
quiet while Ginger and Peter Russet took 'is arms
and said they were seeing him 'ome.
He started the row agin when they got indoors,
and sat up in 'is bed smacking 'Is lips over the things
he'd like to'ave done to them if he could. And then,
carter saying 'ow he'd like to see Ginger boiled alive
like a lobster, he said he knew that e was a noble-
'arted feller who wouldn't try and cut an old pal
out, and that it was a case of love at first sight on
top of a tram-car.
"She's too young for you," sos Ginger; "and too
good-looking besides."
"It's the nice little bisness he's fallen in love with,
(linger," sos Peter Russet. "I'll toss you who 'as
it."
Ginger, who was sitting on the foot o' Sam's bed,
said "no" at fust, but arter a time he pulled out
art a dollar and spun it in the air. That was the
last 'e see of it, although he 'ad Sam out o' bed and
all the clothes stripped off of it twice. He spent
over art an hour on is 'ands and knees looking for
it, and Sam said when he was tired of playing bers
D'r'sps he'd go to bed and get to sleep like a Chris-
tain.
They 'ad it all over agin next morning, and at last,
as nobody would agree to keep quiet and let the
others 'ave a fair chance, they made up their minds
to let the best man win. Ginger Dick bought a neck-
tie that took all the color out o' Sam's, and Peter
Russet went in for a collar so big that 'e was lost
in it.
They all strolled into the widow's shop separate
that night. Ginger Dick 'ad smashed his pipe and
wanted another; Peter Russet wanted some tobaooo;
and old Sam Small walked in smiling, with a little
silver brooch for 'er, that he said 'e had picked up.
It was a very nice brooch, and Mrs. Finoh was so
pleased with it that Ginger and Peter sat there as
mad ks they cculd be because they hadn'tt thought of
the same thing.
"Captin Small Is very lucky at finding things," see
Ginger, at last.
"He's got the name for it," ses Peter Russet.
"It's a handy 'sbit," see Ginger; "it saves spend-
ing money. Who did you give that gold bracelet to
you picked up the other night, captin ?" he see,
turning to Sam.
"Gold bracelet?" es Sam. "I didn't plek up no
gold bracelet. Wot are you talking about"
"All right, captin; no offense," see Ginger, holding
up his 'and. "1 dreamt I saw one on your mantel-
piece, I s'pose. "P'r'ape 1 oughtn't to ha' said any-
thing about it."
Old Sam looked as though he'd like to eat am,
especially as he noticed Mrs. Finch listening and
pretending not to. '"Oh! tat one," he as, arter a
bit o' hard thinking. "Oh! I found out who it be-
longed to. You wouldn't believe 'ow pleased they
were at getting it back again "
Ginger Dick coughed and began to think as 'ow
old Samn was shaper than he 'ad given 'Is credit for,
but afore he could think of anyth el to ay Mrs.
Fainch looked at old Sam and bepi to talk about 'is


10009h0"d Tbid"Omth PIP)


,'U











Fourth Page


June 2, 1906


THE SUN


Dear Spotta-It's to you I turn with me heart
hivy-laden for comfort, an relative me troubled sowl
by tellin' yer me troubles tru the eurtesie of Uncle
Ham's boys in gray.
It's me for the mourners' binch, Spottsie darlint,
an' be eat surprised if at inny time ye receive an
invite to me wake. As ye know, I've been working'
this great American game of "con" for twinty years,
an' thought 1 should know me business, but I find
that some new beginners have "butted" in, an' have
put me to the sivin times removed.
Here's how it is-
As ye know, I floated down to Jax. for the primary,
an' whin me friend' Fleming Bowden got orders to
run the race for Sheriff over with little Tucky, in
their siaind primary, I surely thought 'twas time
ter it nla th doubag up to me elbows. So I sex
ter Fleming, sea i: "If ye will turn loose a fair
sie piece of money I'll get right out an' work for
ye, and Ian' yer a winner sure."
An' what do yer think Fleming handed me? "Pat,"
ses he, "if you will work for the glory there's in it
I'll be glad to have you start right now, but, money
I have not to spend.L
What do yer think of that for a line of con talk,
Spotted, me boyt It reminded me of Healy's hand-
outs last session of the third house.
Me, work for glory, at my time of life, whin I've
an unbroken record of getting the stuff behind me,
extending' thru the Chiploy campaign.
Next, I saw me friend' Steve, who sold so much
fish that he broke into the Legislature, and got ac-
quainted wid Peter Knight, and who wants to go


THE EVERGLADES.


While the Independent is a stranger
comparatively, to Florida, it has been
here long enough to come to the conclu-
sion that the most important question
before the people of this State is the
drainage of the Everglades for the pur-
pose of reclaiming the millions of acres
cf swamp and overflowed lands in the
southern part of the peninsula. The
question involves great possibilities.
Either the wasting of hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars in chasing a will-of-the-
wisp, or else the best expenditure of
money the State has ever made, and one
returning a hundred fold for every dol-
lar spent
The State of Florida now has 3,000,.
(00 acres of overflowed lands in the vast
* xpanae men call the Everglades, from
which our State is known sometimes as
the "Everglade State." Seventeen mil-
lions of acres, here and elsewhere in the
Ntate, have been given to the various
railroad companies for constructing their
linos In the State. They are suing for
minot of the rest. The swamp and over-
ikewed lands were deeded to the State
half a century ago by the Federal Gov-
ernment, for the express purpose of
draining and reclaiming them. This has
never been done. Though discussed at
various times, it was never brought to a
focus until Governor Broward was
elected on his platform pledging the
drainage of the Everglade.
Napoleon Bonaparte Broward-he is
not responsible for his namse-is no ordi-
nary man. If he was, he never would
have risen from the depths of poverty O
a dilapidated farm in Middle Florids-
left an orphan early in life-to the more
exalted and emuerative posltlie of


again an' hold down his same old chair in Peter's
room at the Leon. I say, it was the same story
with Steve when I approached him with the up-
turned palm. Steve said that he was conducting
a campaign on high moral grounds, and he didn't
think it right to use money.
Now, wouldn't that stifle you? "He did not think
it right to spend money!" Such language as this
to the Past Grand Master of the Ancient and Hon-
orable Clan of Con Throwers. It made me sick, and
so vexed me buoyant Gallic spirit that I passed a
free lunch place and withheld me patronage, as I
made me way to the telegraph office to sind a mes-
sage to somebody asking for a pass to somewhere.
Baking of Steve, Spotts, I1 put yer on to a
dead-sure way to daze him. When you approach a
crowd in which he in doing' a bass solo, just wait till
Uncle Steve spars a second for wind and say, in a
pinetratin' whisper, "Say, Uncle Steve, I know Peter
will be glad to see you back in Tallahassee." If this
throws him in a trance for a few moments thin you
can put it down for a fact that Steve has learned ter
forget the kind words (and nothing else) that Peter
handed him whin the third house closed its doors
last June.
Say, Spotts, do you recall the race I made for
janitor of the House last session, and session before
that, and the one before that, and was beaten eaeh
time by a wan-legged man? Well, I started in the
day after the primary to canvass for me old job I
never got yet, and phwat do yer think I ran against?
Nothing but an even half-dozen old Confederate vet-
erans out for that selfsame job. My chances look as
bad as the rate bill as it passed the U S. Sinnit.
Next time I hear of a country that's never had a war,


cook on a river steamboat, then to
Sheriff of the leading county of the
State, and after a meteoric career as
captain of the filibustering steamer
Three Friends in the Cuban War of in-
dependence, latest-not last perhaps--
(jovernor of his native State.
This much by way of introduction of
Florida's Governor to the outside world.
lie introduced himself to his own peo-
ple two years ago when he mailed to
every voter of the State a map of the
Everglades, his ideas in regard thereto,
his own life story, and other equally in-
teresting matter. He appealed direct to
the people, without a corporal's guard
of newspapers behind him, and now he
lives at Tallahassee.
So much for Napoleon B. Broward,
Governor of Florida. As for the Ever-
glades drainage scheme: This was gen-
erally approved a few years ago, and
heartily abused when Captain Broward
surprised his friends on the other side
ly getting into the second primary in
1904, and then into the Governor's chair.
Then the situation was accepted grace-
fully, and some who threw the most mud
into the Everglades began urging the
Governor to go ahead and throw enough
niud out of the Everglades to make the
drainage possible. Then all of a sud-
en they reversed themselves again, and
are now bitterly denouncing the Gover-
r.or and the Internal Improvement Board
of the State for every crime and imbe-
cility under the sun, in attempting to
carry out the great work.
Everything has a reason for it. Some
don't like it because the Governor re-
prieved Cooper, a DeSoto County man
Sconvited of a foul murder on cireum.
stantial evidence, and have gotten the
SCooper case and the drainage scheme
Sopelesly mixed up in abusing the Gov-


it's me for it as soon as I can get a pass.
I met me old friend Jawn ColTins of Tallahassee on
the state just before I left Jacksonville, and rignt
glad I was to see him. Ler know Jawn is running
one of those "somethings up" journals in the Capital
city. He calls it the "True Dimmicrat," an' this
gives him the fine chance ter work off all those owld
gags about Jeffersonian conceptions, and Jacksonian
executions of governmental policies in the greatest
example of a republican form of government, demo-
cratically administered, known to the world since
the days when democratic simplicity ran riot among
the fig leaves.
Jawn got this off on me, just after I had borrowed
a quarter off of him, and not suspecting the devilish
ingenuity of the words I memoried them before 1
had a chance to spind the quarter. Jawn confldel
to me quite confidential, an' I tell it to you the same,
so that you will not repeat it to more than wan
hundred and sivinteen discreet friends-you know the
rule-that he was in a fair way to discover some-
thing real wicked that might have happened if some
of those reckless officials who make up the present
administration had thought of it, and that he would
ruthlessly lay bare all the hideous story if his pipe
didn't go out.
A fine fellow Jawn is, and if he kapes on the way
he started, for ninety or ninety-two years, he'll have
a collection of innuendoes and dark hints that will
be worth going all the way to Omaha to see.
I write this from Spitsbergen, where me and Wal-
ter Wellman will balloon to the pole. After the
cowld reception I got in Jax. last visit, the land of
perpetual snow and ice is the place for Yrs,
PAT MURPHY.


ernor for both. The Independent has
only the friendliest feeling for the State
press, which has welcomed us with a cor-
diality that shows true Southern hospi-
tality, but we would suggest in all good
will that some of them should exercise
a little more logic in their editorials.
Recently a "news bureau" has been
established in Jacksonville to dissiminpte
information (?) through the State press
relative to the Everglades drainage. The
manager is Mr. Chas. A. Choate. Per-
haps he is right in his attitude, and
Governor Broward and the people who
elected him to office are wrong. But the
question naturally arises: Why should
Cbas. A. Choate go to so much trouble
and expense to fight the Governor's
drainage scheme, or if not Mr. Choate,
who is putting up the money t
At present the State must sell a por-
tion of its lands, the comparatively pal-
try 3,000,000 seres left, in order to drain
the rest, and with them, the immensely
greater tracts that in times past it
deeded to the railroads. Therefore the
last Legislature adopted a constitutional
amendment, to be ratified or rejected at
the general election next November, cre-
ating a drainage district in the Ever.
glades, and authorizing a tax of 5 cents
per acre on the lands there, for drainage
purposes.
Railroads are only human, and while
they would be glad to see their lands
drained, they would rather have the
State do it than to do it themselves-
just like all of us. Now, the man who
owns ten or twenty or a hundred acres
does not particularly dread 5 cents an
acre tax. But the corporation that
countsa its lands by the millions of acres
naturally gets nervous. It must "come
across" with $50,000 per year per mil-
lion acres, or else let the lands revert to
the State, where the rest of us would be
very much pleased to have them. So,
it is not possible that the railroad or
land grant companies may be behind the
"Florida News Bureau;? They have a
perfectright to be if they so desire, and
Sthe drained scheme is a mare's et,


they will do the State invaluable ser-
vice in making it known.
"Gentlemen of the jury, you are the
sole judges of the evidence, the weight
ot the evidence, and the credibility of
the witnesses. The defendant has the
right to testify in his own behalf, and
when he does so testify, it is your duty
to consider his testimony in the same
manner as that of any other witness,
bearing in mind at all times the interest
any witness may have in the cause, as
tc whether he is testifying truthfully
or not."
Is there any better principle of law
,r logic that the voters of Florida could
apply to the question under discussion?
Gentlemen, it is up to you l-St.
Petersburg Independent


MEASLES


AND THE
SERUM.


MEASLES


St. Petersburg.-At the children's
clinic of the Military-Medico Academy
some interesting experiments with a new
measles serum have been conducted.
Twenty children suffering from bad
cases of measles were inoculated with
the serum in quantities of from 10 to
12 square centimeters. Of the patients
three died and seventeen recovered. Be-
tween two and six hours after the in-
noculation the temperature of the chil-
dren slightly increased; after from ten
to twelve hours it began to decrease. At
the end of twenty-four hours it had de-
creased from 15 to 20 degrees of Cel-
sius. As the fever decreased the pa-
tients' condition steadily improved.
There were no dangerous consequences.

GERMAN MANEUVERS.
Berlin.-Count Moltke, the new chief
of staff, ays this year's German ma-
Unver will not abound in as many sham
battles as usual. Instead, he proposes
to institute real warlike operations last-
S ve days, on march, reeonnoitering
tle, pursuit and retreat.


State Press on Broward's

Plan to Drain the 'Glades









June 2, 1906


THE SUN


Fifth Page


Shaking the Old Plum Tree

By Edward Fitzgerald

One of those curious and interesting things that the members. His well-balanced mind and logical In the meantime, Governor Napoleon B. Broward
often occur in politics is what is known as the presentation of his convictions have made him a is swinging round the circle and making drainage
"cracker seat" on the bench of the Supreme Court of power in Democratic conventions past and gone, and speeches in the doubtful counties, and, as I said be-
the interest he has always taken in matters political fore, I say again, it almost a foregone conclusion
this State. Justice Charles B. Parkhill was nomi- has given him an acquaintance through the State that the next House will be strongly pro-drainage.
nated in the primaries for a six-year term on the that will add greatly to his chances for the Speaker* Some political writer in some paper quoted by the
Supreme Court beach, will be duly elected, and Jan- ship. If no one enters the race except Mr. Mathews Times-Union, has said that the majority of the Sen-
uary let will commence a six-year term as Justice. and Mr. Carter, the contest will not lack vim and ate is against drainage. I should like to count noses
Mr. Parkhill now occupies a seat on the Supreme spirit, with this gentleman and invite him to the enumer-
bench, filling the unexpired term of Justice Carter. action. I don't think there is any doubt on thin
Justice Carter succeeded the Hon. B. F. Liddon. I said last week that John Henderson MIGHT BE question. I see no reason to change my figures of
Justice Liddon succeeded Hon. George P. Raney. a candidate for President of the Senate; that Hunt last week, which gave but 1ve Senators ABRO-
Justice Raney succeeded J. D. Westcott. Justice Harris WOULD BE, that Frank Adams MIGHT BE, LUTELY COMMITTED AGAINST THE ADMINIS-
Westcott was the first of the chain of native-born and that Harry Buckman and Dr. Crill WOULD TRATION and seventeen SURELY WITH IT.
Floridians who have occupied this particular seat, PROBABLY NOT BE. The only change I wish to -
and this is the only seat on the Supreme Court bench make in this arrangement this week is to take The pension of the State Democratic Executive
that, during more than a score of years, has been Harry Buckman out of the list of "might-not-be's" Committee, which promised to be lively, turned out
filled by a native-born Floridian. All the other Jus- and put him in the list of "might-be's." It would to be rather a tame affair. This was due, I think,
tices who have sat on the bench during that time not surprise me at any time to see the announcement to the motion put by Wm. J. Bryan of this city.
have been Floridians by adoption. This curious cir- of Mr. Buckman's candidacy for Presi4ent of the which was carried. Those on the inside knew that
cumstance gave rise to the dubbing of this seat on Senate. I may add further that the chances that what, for want of a better term I will call the non-
the Supreme bench, now occupied by Justice Park. John Henderson will be a candidate have somewhat corporation crowd, had an overwhelming 'majority
hill, the "cracker seat." improved during the past week, and I am able to of the State committee, and could have put through
Another curious circumstance about this seat is come out more strongly about the candidacy of Mr. any proposition which they considered favorable to
that all of the Justices who have occupied it have Henderson and say that it is quite certain that he them. There were votes enough to declare Thoman
been born and reared almost within "whooping dis- will be a candidate. S. Davis nominated candidate for Senator from Nan-
tance" of the red clay hills of Leon. Whenever the Presidency of the Senate is discussed sau County and Chris 0. Coddrington nominated
--- y any group of men gathered in any old place, what candidate for Senator from Volunia County, thus g't-
A little interest was injected into the discussion Frank Adams might do, is a very important part of ting rid of John G. Mefliffin and Captain Frank
as to who may be Speaker of the House by the con- the discussion. Mr. Adams is, like the tar baby, Samse, who might be classed as against them. This
session of Mr. Eugene Mathews of Bradford County "keeping on saying nothing," but those who know makes the motion made by Will Bryan stand out as-
that he will be a candidate. Mr. Mathews is var- his strength, his generalship in this kind of cam- a striking example of a fair proposition. lsi m<>-
iously known as "Major Mathews," "Editor Math- paign, and his force, vim and vigor, never allow tion was that, the committee having gone on record
ews," and the "Hon. Mr. Mathews." He served with themselves to make up a slate without figuring Mr. that Senators and Representatives were county of.
distinction in the lower house during the last ses- Adams as a possible breaker of this same slate. ficers, the protests from Nassau and Volusia be sent
sion; he has made the Bradford County Telegraph John Beard might have done much better for him. back to the gentlemen making them, because the con-
one of the brightest and best of the State weeklies, self as a possible claimant before the next Legisla- tenteen were declared the nominees by the Executive
and as a military man his record has shed luster ture for money claimed to be due for collecting the Committees of their respective counties. When Mr.
on this branch of the State service. The wide ac- Indian War Claim, by keeping his mouth shut on Bryan made this motion he knew that his friends
quaintance and personal popularity of Mr. Mathews, drainage. Mr. Beard has announced that he knows were in the majority, and he also knew that the
in addition to his eminent fitness for the position, all about drainage, and has been widely quoted by carrying of this motion would seat Same as well as
will make him a candidate to be reckoned with by all such papers as are waiting for any announcement in Davis. This iN why I have pronounced the motion
aspirants for this honor. opposition. I cannot state positively that Mr. Beard of Mr. Bryan an exceedingly fair one which did him
John W. Watson, who will represent Dade County knows nothing about drainage, but I can say that great credit. As soon as tne motion was carried
this time in the lower house, admitted to me the Mr. Beard has never before displayed any knowledge the contestant from Volusia County, Mr. Coddring-
other day when he was in Jacksonville in attendance of the subject, and I do not think his studies have ton, very gracefully withdrew his contest, and Same
upon the deliberations of the State Democratic ever been along this line. Yet it is quite remarkable and Davis will be the Senators from their respective
Executive Committee, that he would NOT BE A to note the authority with which Mr. Beard speaks counties. The decision of the State committee that
CANDIDATE FOR SPEAKER. Mr. Watson, who on this proposition. This illustrates to my mind the members of the Legislature are State officers, and
was formerly known as "the gentleman from Osce- truth of that aphorism which goes something like contests for these positions must be settled by the
ola," has established himself as a wise, careful, cap- this: "Those who want to believe a thing can read- State Executive Committee, is the correct one.
able legislator and splendid parliamentarian. His ily find reasons for their belief." Mr. Beard has de- While the members of the lower house represent, in a
decision to be on the floor of the House will add flared that he wants to be on the floor of the Senate. large measure, their respective counties, and the
greatly to the interest of the deliberations of that I predict that Mr. Beard will not only want to be Senators their respective districts, they also repre-
body. on the floor of the Senate, but will want "the floor" sent the entire State in general legislation. Some
Hon. Syd L. Carter of Alachua County pleads all the time. Personally, I like John Beard, but political writer predicts that this will cause dissen-
guilty to cherishing an ambition to wield the gavel John has not the guarded tongue that is essential sion. I cannot see how so correct and proper a (lo-
in the House. He has actively begun his canvass of to the accomplishment of projects in legislativecraft. cision can give rise to any dissension.


HUNGER STRIKE

IN RUSSIAN PRISON

St. Petersburg.-Forty political prisoners starved
themselves to death and into straight-jackets re-
spectively, for love of a comrade without benefiting
that poor unfortunate. It happened at the Moscow
political prisoners' depot, and the Czar, Government
and society are no less exercised over the dreadful
occurrence as the people and the revolutionists. The
prisoner whom his comrades tried to succor was a
sixteen-year-old boy named Iven Zarpoff, a con-
sumptive. When his comrades learned that he was
dying and wanted his mother, they sent word to the
Governor that Ivan must be released lest all starve
themselves to death l A hunger strike, the last re-
sort of the victims of Russian political tyranny.
Governor's Promises.-The Governor tried to
argue with the prisoners. He would lay the request
before the court; he would even see that the appeal
was sent to the Czar. "Meanwhile," replied the pris-
oners, "you can save money by pocketing the appro-
priations for our food. We will not eat or drink
until Ivan is with his mother."
The ultimatum was communicated to all inter-
ested by the system of knocks, which every prisoner
learns by heart during the first month of his incar-
ceration. The strike started on ApAril 20, at 10
a. m., and for six days afterward, night and day,
the cells and corridors rang every ten minutes with
the legend: "Liberate Ivan or we will starve to
death." The Governor happened to be a humane
man, and tried his utmost to pacify his charges. He
offered to take some of the leaders into Ivan's cell
to show that the sick boy was cared for in the best
possible manner; that he had milk and medicine and
a good bed, but the prisoner's wouldn't have it
"Liberate Ivan or our blood on your head."
Prisoners Would Not Eat or Diak-T ee tla


daily the guards brought food to the prisoners. Espe-
cially appetizing dishes were offered to the men and
women. For once they got real tea, not the poison-
ous substitute ordinarily doled out. "Is Ivan with
his mother? If not take this truck away." And so
it went on for three, for four days. On the fourth
day most of the prisoners shouted, as soon as they
heard the provisioners in the corridor: "Keep away,
or we will strangle you. We won't have any of your
food. We will neither smell nor taste it."
When the Governor and overseer came tney
found the prisoners holding their noses. "Send home
Ivan, Little Father, or bury us with him."
The Governor asked for additional doctors, priests
and nurses. He invaded the cells at night, trying to
exhort the men, argue with them. The prisoners con-
fessed they were unable to sleep from hunger, but
refused food. They were agreed to die unless Ivan
was sent to his mother. On the morning of the sixth
day of voluntary starvation the Governor ordered a
drum and fife corps to march through the corridors
in order to drown the knocks, that is the prisoners'
telegraph. Perhaps the drum and fife came too late;
at any rate the prisoners were more firm than ever
in their demand for Ivan's liberation. The doctors
found a most miserable lot of unwilling patients.
Not one was able to walk. They lay on their cots,
knees drawn up, haggard hands, groping in the air.
Some experienced great difficulty in breathing. Their
hands were icy and covered with cold sweat. "Fingers
like bat's wings," says the medical report.
How Hunger Affected Prisoners.-The report of
the fifth day reads as follows: "Yellow, dried up,
bags of bones, eyes glisten like fire; nerves in a ter-
rible condition-the least noise makes them jump.
One prisoner had to be put in a straight-jacket; the
buzzing of a fly had turned him into a raving ma-
nice. In other cells men and women were found
to walk about in a circle, knocking their head
angojst the wall. Ten or more were crying aloud.
h'e Governor had them all brought to the chapel.
Home ease on stretchers, others leaning on the
shoulder of tI guards. He called them by their


real names, for once forgetting their numbers. "Gen-
tlemen," he said, "and you, ladies, you must under-
stand, of course, that I am not the judge. Like your-
self, I am here simply to do my duty, and my uuty
is--"
"Liberate Ivan or bury us with him."
It was a wild, long drawn-out cry. Theos were
not human voices. It sounded like the howling of
wild animals. "Send Ivan to his mother." A hun-
dred skinny arms are stretched forth to grab the
Governor and choke him, throttle him into compli-
ance. The Governor is a brave man, but the expres-
aion of hatred and fury he saw drove him to flight.
The medical report of the sixth day says: "The
prisoners are lying on their cots like logs. Few, if
any, can raise a finger. Their eyes are gued on
the ceiling. The guards reported in a dosen or
more cases that prisoner Number So and So must
be dead. The doctors spoke of food, delicacies, of
greater freedom, forgiveness, of the right to send
letters and to receive them. "Liberate Ivan." an-
swers one, and "Liberate Ivan" echoes a dozen hoarse
voices. The physicians told the Governor he would
have a hundred corpses on his hands lest he gave in.
His Excellency ran to the leader's cell and assured
him, upon his word of honor, that Ivan would be
sent home.
"We want to see him walk through the courtyard;
we want to see the gate open for him. Then we will
eat." The Governor went away to consult with the
Minister of the Interior by 'phone. In the evening
the guards brought most toothsome dishes, tea and
wotka. "Why torture us? Don't you see that we
are dying, that the walls are suffocating us?" Many
prisoners cried for air; all insisted that Ivan be
liberated.
Strike a Failure, Ivan Dead.--On the evening of
the sixth day the Governor came in with a telegram.
"His Excellency, the Minister of the Interior, or-
dered me to inform you tht your strike is a failure.
Ivan died yesterday." Since then twenty-three of
the hunger strikers have died, while seventeen are
inssas.










Sxth Page


June 2,1906


THE SUN


I


I COMPOSITE PICTURE.
OF FIFTY OF OUR
k HACK HORSES


THE CRUELTY TO i[IMAL 50CIETY OF
J1CK50NVILLE 15 A PITIFUL FARCE-...


"Experience Is a dear school," say the old proverb,
and we have often to pay for our knowledge not only
with money but with tears. It were well, then, that
wisdom gained in this hard school should be used
to the best and most practical advantage, and the
following, from the Birmingham Age-Herald, might
well be taken as timely advices
"New Orleans iv getting rid of its mosquitoes of all
sorts. It is filling in low places and screening cis-
terns and drains and receptacles of water. By the
middle of April that city has in past years been
fully infested by the troublesome insects, and yet to-
day, says the Tmes-Democrat, 'the greater part of
New Orrles is entirely free from mosquitoes of any
kind, and brs' ordinarily 'up' at this time of the
year, are unknown. In some sections where care-
lessness and disobedience to the law has prevailed
there are some moequfoes, but they are far scarcer
than ever before. It Is proposed hereafter to do the
work thoroughly. and to make the cost of it a lien
on the property treated.
"This country has two great and important bat-
ties to fight-the one against the mosquito, and the
other against tuberculosis. The latter is the more
difficult of the two. The former is a matter of detail
and work in cities and the lesser towns. But the
preventing of the 'great white plague' is full of diffi-
culties. The education of the people seems to be
all-needful as a first step. Old ideas must be rooted
out, and the new and better ideas inculcated. 'It is,'
say the New Vork Nerald, 'the question of being
able to resist infection at the beginning and to over-
come it in the end by sheer vital resistance of the
victim. It is a doctrine that every one can under-
stand and apply. It eliminates to a great extent
the senseless scare concerning the subtle, insidious
and nm steriously diagerous tubercle bacillus by
placing its conquest on a rational and practical basis.
The microbe on one side and the strong man on the
other. Plenty of gooa food, abundance of fresh air
and sunshine answer all fundamental conditions of
ultimate victorI over the unseen and otherwise for-
midable enemy. Eal individual is to fight the bat-
tle on his own account. Every case of disease should
be considered a souree of infection, and then should
be begun the fight against the disease. A generous
diet and h surroundings will be aids in the
struggle, f o sese and courage are thrown
on t scals the fighter will suredly win.
The two battles touch our national life at almost
every point, and our success in them will show bet.
ter than words can what our boasted civilization is
good for. We must at all hauards drive out the
germ-bearing mosquito-all mosquitoes-and the
dread disease that all fear but no one fights against."

By a surprisingly unanimous vote the Senate has
passed the free ascobol bill, which is the bill removing
the internal revenue tax from denaturised grain
alcohol, and has incidentally shown that it can trans-
act business with neatness and dispatesi when it is
disposed to do so. Commenting dpon this bill the
Boston Herald says:
"The bill removing the internal revenue tax from
denaturimwd grain alohol was passed by the Senate
I record time and without a singl vote being re.
corded in the ptnegative. It was sio tim in the com.
mitte, but wki the eom itte trWed it over with


their stamp of approval it had a clear road. As the
amendments adopted in the Senate were not radical
ones, it is probable that the Houe will agree to them,
thus securing the adoption of this much needed and
very valuable legislation in the present session. The
bill, as it passed the Senate provides that the law
shall not go into effect until January 1, 1907. That
is not too remote a date, for the intervening seven
months will give those interested in the wood alco-
hol business a chance to prepare themselves for the
new conditions that will rule when grain alcohol, to
be used as a source of power or in the arts, will be
freed from the prohibitive tax now assessed upon it."
No other questions are occupying so much of the
attention of the pres and public at the present time
as those connected with the troubles, the successes
and the struggles of labor. So largely are these ques-
tions matters of public concern that no newspaper
is complete without its editorial on the subject, and
every day brings fresh volumes from the press on
some related topic. "To all who would like to ob-
tain a comprehensive summary knowledge of the con-
ditions and phases of the long contest of labor to
secure its just rewards," says the Boston Herald,
"the little volume entitled 'The Battles of Labor,'
by Carrol D. Wright, may be recommended. This
volume contains four lectures delivered by him this
year before the Philadelphia Divinity School, and
entitled 'The Background,' 'In 'Mediaeval and Mod-
ern Industry,' 'Great Modern Battles,' and 'How
Modern Battles of Labor Are Treated. After com-
menting at pome length upon the first part of the
book the Herald proceeds:
"The peculiar and notable feature of modern labor
battles is that the laborer has become intelligent.
He cannot be compared with the ignorant and en-
slaved laborers of past ages. He is one of the sov-
ereigns of the land. He is a political factor, and is
becoming a social factor. 'He is certainly an impor.
tant economical factor, and his intelligence leads
him to the conclusion that he should have an influence
in shaping economical conditions.' Mr. Wright
thinks this to be a reasonable aspiration, and
throughout his consideration of the modern phases
of labor battles he treats the laborers as in the
main intelligent, amenable to reason and entitled to
the respectful consideration of a candid hearing. He
has little patience with men woh take the ground
that there is 'nothing to arbitrate,' that all right and
justice are on their side.
"In the third lecture the great strikes of the last
half-century are critically reviewed as to their
causes, their methods, the ways in which they were
met, their results, their costs and their lessons. Of
course, he could not in a single lecture treat these
battles in deail and with completeness, but the reader
will find here an intelligent and competent review of
their salient features, their errors and their sue.
eesses, presented by one who is able to understand
tie iamues and to sumn up the ease with broad wisdom
and in a charitable spirit. lie presents many facts
of great value not generally known. For example,
it in commonly assumed that the President impers.a-
tively commanded the arbitration by which the great
strike of the anthracite miners was settled in 1902.
Mr. Wright, who ought to be well informed, says that
the President, in appointing the commission, ated
on aeUpress sad um= pee request of the Oper


ators, who reversed the policy they had formerly
pursued, and that the powerful cause of their change,
of mind was their fear of the storm of public liws-
tility that had been provoked by the suffering of the
people which threatened their possession of their
property. The President, he avers, took no definite
action until this appeal to him to arrange an arbi-
tration was made.
"The views of Mr. Wright as to means of settling
labor battles, and especially as to means of avoiding
them, are pretty generally known to the country.
tie recognizes the fundamental psychological element
that is involved in the warfare, and he believes that
the laborers, and the better class of their leaders,
understand that a strike is uneconomical in every
aspect. He has great faith in the trades agreement
as an efficient preventive of strikes. He holds, fur-
ther, that a&, our present questions are phases of an
evolutionary movement that has been in progress for
centuries, and will continue for generations to come.
When present issues are settled new ones will arise,
but this is not to be regretted. 'We must recognim
the struggle in all its phases as inspiration itself,
and that with every new development we find con-
fronting us the great wall of human elements. Who-
ever, therefore, aids the struggle, to soften, to reduce
its asperities in all rational ways, is the friend of
humanity. We must not be pessimistic.
We must recognize the intelligence that is coming to
the workers, the hewers of wood and the drawers of
water, and tnat with intelligence and its increase,
there must be new problems, there must be new .tc-
mands, or civilization retrogrades.'"

And the Philadelphia Record, under the heading
"Injuctions and Labor Strikes," says:
"In spite of angry and threatening apeals, the
Judiciary Committee of the House still bravely re
the United States to issue injunctions in quarrel'
ebtween labor unions and employers. There is the
same repugnance in the House to tamper with the
great preventive and protective writ in this case that
the Senate has manifested in considering the question
of a preliminary injunction in the rate bill. When
the power of the judiciary to restrain threatened
assaults upon the rights of persons and property is
destroyed in one instance there is no predicting where'
such a reaction against the soundest prinoples of the
law will end.
"In fact, after all the eulogiums upon the writ of
injunction in its restraints upon menaced violations
of the laws, it reaches but a little way in the direc-
tion in which it is proposed that Congress shall
wholly prohibit its exerese. We highly boast as an
inalienable right of an American oitien that the
workngman or employer shall not be molested in his
labor or industry. We proclaim that the right of one
non-union labor man to work as he desires to work
is equal to the rights of all others to go on a strike.
This sounds very well as an abstract proposition of
human liberty in Fourth of July orations; but how
illusory is it often found in its application to many
a labor strike!
"When a strike is organized the first effort is to
coerce the workingmen who consent to assist the em-
ployers in preventing a closure of their mines or
mills. A committee is organized near the mouth of
the mine or in the very yard of the factory to watcl
[O(Continued on Thitmeth Pap]


These Days


What's Agitating the People


y









June 2, 1906


THE SUN


fINTH #PAGk


John Henry on Summer
By GLORGI V. HOBART


Re2,1906

qur


Me for that summer resort gag- -'hl
fine!
I fell for a Saratoga set-back this
summer, but never no more for mine.
At night I used to sit up with the
rest of the social push and drink high-
balls to make me sick, so I could drink
Saratoga water in the morning to make
me well.
That's what is called reciprocity, be-
cause it works both ways against the
middle.
Isn't it the limit the way people from
all over the country will rush to these
fashionable summer resorts with wide-
open pocketbooks and with their bank
accounts frothing at the mouth I
The most popular fad at every sum.
mer resort I've ever climbed into is to
watch the landlord reaching out for the
coin.
Husbands make bets with their wives
whether the landlord of the hotel will get
all their money in an hour or an hour
and a half.
Both husband and wife loose; because
the landlord generally gets it in ten
minutes.
At some of the hotel dining rooms it
costs six dollars to peep in, eight dol-
lars to walk in and fifteen dollars to get
near enough to a waiter to talk soup.
You can see lots of swell guys in the
dining rooms who are now using a fork
in public for the first time.
This reminds me of an experience I
had in a certain summer resort dining
room not long ago.
At a table near me sat Ike Goose-
heimer.
Ike is a self-made man, and he made
a quick job of it.
Ike was eating with his knife and
doing it so recklessly that I felt like
yelling for the sticking plaster.


After I had watched him for about
Fve minutes trying to juggle the new
p-.as on a knife, it got on my nerves,
so I spoke to him.
"Ike," I said, thinking possibly I
might cure him with a bit of sarcasm,
"aren't you afraid you will cut yourself
with the sword ?"
"Ohl no, no," Ike answered, looking
at the knife with contempt; "there is
no danger at all. But at the Palmer
House in Chicago-Ahl there they have
sharp knives!"
Ike is beyond the breakers for mine.
The races at Saratoga were extremely
exciting.
A friend of mine volunteered to pick
out the winners for me, but after I lost
eight dollars I decided that it would be
cheaper to pick out a new friend.
But I do love to mingle with society
at the summer resorts.
It isn't generally known, but one of
my great-grandfathers was present when
the original 400 landed at Plymouth
Rock.
My great-grandfather owned the rock.
A couple of nights after the original
400 landed on Plymouth Rock the leader
of the smart set, Mrs. Von Tweedledum,
gave a full-dress ball.
My great-grandfather looked in at the
full-dress ball and was so shocked that
hI went and opened a clothing store next
day.
Society never forgave him for this in-
sinuation.
But say, isn't it immense the way the
doings of these society dubs are clron-
icled in the society tapers?
In case you haven't noticed them I
would like to put you wise to a few:
SOCIAL GLINTS FROM TIHE SUM-
MER RESORTS.
Among the smart setters now present


at Saratoga is John J. Sousebuilder, the
well-known millionaire from Cincinnati.
He is here to follow the races, but he
seems to have an idea that the horses
live in the hotel barroom, because that
ii where he does most of his following.
Cornelius Sudshifter, the well-known
inventor of the patent ohowless chow-
chow, is paying deep attention to Esmer-
aida Ganderface, the brilliant daughter
of old man Tightflst Ganderface, the
millionaire inventor of a system of open-
ing clams by steam. Cornelius and
Eameralda make a sweet and beautiful
picture as they stroll arm in arm to the
rtofmlce, where Cornelius mails a check
or the week's alimony to his former
wife, who is visiting lawyers in South
Dakota.
Hector J. Roobernik, well known in so-
clety, is spending the summer at Atlan-
tic City. Hector was formerly a Bo-
hemian glass blower, but he is now rich
enough to leave off the last part of his
occupation, so he calls himself just a
bohemian-which is different. Hector
is paying deep attention to Phyllin
Kurdsheimer, the daughter of Mike
Kurdsheimer, the millionaire inventor of
tht slippery elm shoe horn.
Gus Beanhoister, the widely known
bunion broker and society man of South
Newark, is summering at Cape May,
where he mingles with the other pets of
fashion. Gus finds it very hard to re-
frain from looking at people's feet dur-
ing the bathing hours, but otherwise he
is doing quite well.
Hank Schmitpickle nnd his latest
wife from Chicago sailed on the steam-
ship Minnehaha last week to spend the
season in the British capital. The
Schmitpickles will occupy the villa at
No. 714 Cottagocheese place, Blithering-
haim Park, near Speakeasy Towers, on


the Old Kent road, Bayswa.
from Shoreditch-God save the .
Mercedes Cauliflower Is summer.
Nnrragansett Pier, and her fiance, m
Peter Cuckoobird, is dancing attendance
u Mn her. It will be remembered that
Mercedes is the daughter and heiress of
Jacob Cauliflower, the millionaire man-
ufacturer of boneless tripe, which has
become quite a fad in society since the
beef trust got chesty. Peter Cuckoo-
bird is a rising young bricklayer on his
father's side, but on account of the for-
tune left him by his mother, he is now
butterflying through life in a gasoline
barouche with diamond settings in the
tires.
Hank )Dobbs and his daughter, Crye-
taline, sailed on the Oceanic yesterday
for the Riviera. Before the steamship
pulled out Hank admitted that he didn't
know whether the Riviera was a city or
a new kind of cheese, but if money could
do the trick he intended to know the
truth.
Mr. and Mrs. James Hhine von Shine
were divorced yesterday at the home of
the bride's parents in Newport. The
c remiony was very simple but expensive
to the ex-husband. Considerable all-
an'ny changed hands.
The private cottage of Mrs. Offiurich
Swellswell at Bar Harbor has been beau-
tifully decorated in honor of the ap-
proaching divorce of their daughter,
(Iladys, from her husband, Percy Skid-
doo. Percy in the well-known manufac-
turer of the reversible two-step so much
used by society.
Cards are all out for a divorce in the
family of the Von Guzzles, but owing to
a typographical error in the cards it is
impossible to say whether it is the old
man or the son. Both employ blonde
typewriters.


D'Alemcourt's Auto Tour of Italy

The Last 400 Miles Without an Accident, but Changing from Hot Valley to
Cool Mountain Heights Caused Many Tires to Burst


Rome.-In Verona I climbed into the
automobile, an Eagle, Mercedes pattern,
24-horsepower, stationary roof, open at
the sides, seats for six and plenty of
room for baggage. Before this I "did"
Italy five times-on foot, by wheel, car-
riage, rail and water, but only today,
after reaching the Eternal City, I can
truthfully claim to have seen Italy as a
whole, rot merely as a collection of
fragments. Travel by rail, in this coun-
try, is little short of martyrdom. They
pickle you in an airless, comfortless,
dirty carriage, and drag you slowly
through a succession of tunnels and over
tedious highways and byways. The
wheel re-etsablished individual liberty,
but also imposed work; you had to keep
an eye on the road, besides on the land-
cape, while if one goes by hired coach
one is forever contending with the driver
to curb his passion for maltreating the
animals.
ADVANTAGES OF AUTO.
A commodious seat in a well-regulated
auto makes me feel as if I were on
horseback. I am in motion, I breathe
deeply and the landscape is mine as far
me the eyes travel-the dust and the
fumes are for others.
VERONA-MANTUA.
On the way to Mantua, where the
faithful Hofer suffered for the faithless
Austrian, battlefield after battlefield.
We cross Marengo, where the great Na-
poleon proclaimed himself god of war;
whirl through Villafranea. where his
melancholy nephew celebrated his proud-
est triumph by humbling Francis Joseph
and-preparing his own Sedan.
All Italy is on the go, it seems, travel-
ing by thousand and one sorts of ve-
)Jides, drawn by bony horses, mules or


donkeys. In and about the wagons
men, women and children dangle like
grapes in a vineyard. The quadrupeds
regard the auto with suspicion, and
must be severely taken in hand when we
pass, but their owners are highly
pleased with the new plaything. Win-
dows, doorsteps, sidewalks, fences are
black with sightseers; young girls kiss
tleir hands to us, boys whistle, imi-
tating the shriek of a locomotive; chil-
dren cry, dogs bark, and if but the tip
of a single female nose shows the na-
tives' admiration knows no bounds. "Oh,
che belle, belle!" (Oh, what beauties.)
An amusing, easily amused, dirty lot,
these Italians, and what angelic looking
children they have.
EVERYBODY STRIKING.
In Mantua City Hall Square we ran
into a great open-air meeting; Soeialists
busy teaching agricultural laborers how
to tyrannize over their barons by the
strike weapon. Everybody strikes in
Italy, it's a fad like automobiling at
home. We stopped at Del Te Palace
before the southern gate. In architec-
ture this graceful pile was by several
hundred years ahead of Frederick the
Great's ansoucl and his sister Wil-
helmina's Eremitage, of which Mark
Twain is so fond. Thus early princes
tired of their enormous, hideous castles,
and longed for a cottage, where their
A.tty bodies and souls should not be
lost. We examined Romano's giants
decorating the walls. Very interesting.
the only ones of their kind. but Morgan
can't carry them off unless he move the
whole house across the Alps.
MODENA-BOLOGNA.
The first, a well-fed town in a fat
country. WO have ish in oil, obickM


in oil, macaroni in oil. potatoes in oil.
Above the Apennines hangs a thunder-
storm magnificently threatening. We
finished the twenty-two and a half miles
to Bologna in forty-five minutes with
ease. This city, in whose honor the most
execrable American sausages were
named, is esteemed the "most Italian."
It is certainly well built and progres-
sive. The streets, not the sidewalks,
were full of people standing about in
groups to discuss the latest scandal. We
followed the example of the native cab.
bies, and carefully circumnavigated the
babblers. "Murrl," "Linda," "Tulllo,"
we heard at intervals.
"The evening papers must have some
racy details from Turin, opined the
guide." The Bonmartini murder trial
again-it follows or precedes us wher-
ever we go. An unfaithful wife and a
licentious man, her brother, offspring
of the famous Bologna professor, Murri,
conspired to slaughter Count Bonmar-
tini, because he proved tiresome, bigoted,
in the way. "They all helped to do
away with him," said a lawyer of inter-
national reputation whom we met at the
hotel. "In our country," added an Ital-
ian woman proudly, "interesting mur-
derers always get off." And Linda and
Tullio are interesting.
MOTORING UPON THE SPINE OF
ITALY.
Over the Apennines, the backbone of
the peninsula, some 800 miles long.. We
follow Goethe's historic trail, now
climbing, again running down the moun-
tain side like an avalanche. First blood
for the mechanic. The valley was blas-
ing hot, on the heights it's cool and the
air is thin. Woe to the autoist without
reserve wheels along. Tires burst and
shriek like Togo's shells. It happened


once as we passed through a village. In-
stantly some 500 women and children as-
sembled. "I don't see any men, where
are your fathers, husbands, grandfath-
ers?'
"At work in Germania, of course.
When you go back give them our love."
The male Italian works everywhere ex-
cept in Italy.
FLORENCE.
The old Signora still sits there like a
lansquenoL in rusty armor, the Campa-
nile her spear. Florence continues the
paradise of dilettanti, the purgatory of
budding artists, who find out to their
horror that everything has been done be.
fore, that nothing can be done better or
as well again. Behind each inestimable
canvas and statue, methinks I hear the
laughter of demons of derision.
PERUGIA.
We whirl along the banks of the
Arno; strike talk on all sides. "Rail-
ways for the railway men." "No, mal-
edetto, the railways for the public."
Cavalry at the crossings, Bersaglieri act
as track-walkers, the few trains passing
by carry only soldiers-nothinq but
fight and strife, war in the nation's very
intestines. Yonder the battlefield of
Tranimenus, where Hannibal's African
elephants stamped into the ground the
Roman legions. But away with histor-
ical reminiscence. Umbria is the gar-
den spot of Italy. We slow down; no
more desire to devour space. My coun-
trymen, like others, are wont to hunt up
Perugine and Rapheal. his pupil, in the
museums, those greenhouses of art, but
if they really want to know these eternal
masters, they ought to turn to Umbria's
flower-strewn fields, to her beautiful
(o Ail on Fifteenth Pes)













Satrda June 2, 1906


s,


THE SUN
-" "


sr


E


D


ITO


John A. Graham has threatened to prosecute all persons circulat-
ing copies of this paper containing what he terms libelous statements
about himself. Mr. Graham is bluffing, as usual. This paper has not
libeled Mr. Graham. It has printed the truth about him, and the
trh Iublished with good motives is not legally, ethically nor morally

J Any person interested who may wish to know what THE SUN has
printed about Mr. Graham, will be supplied with copies of the paper
upon request made of us by mail or in person.

Wanted.--A New System of Land Tramnsfe
Once upon a time there lived a man who was very fond of cats. He had a big
cat and a little oat, and wishing the cats to have easy mode of ingress and egress
to his home, he had a carpenter out two holes on the bottom of his back door--a
big hole and a little hole. When one of his friends asked him why the holes
were there he explained that they were for the oats to come in and out. When
asked why he made two holes he said the big hole was for the big cat and the
little hole was for the little cat. When his attention was called to the fact that
the little oat and the big cat would both be able to go through the big hole, he
replied that this was the way his father did it and he saw no reason to do other-
This is all right for a man fond of cats, but when it comes to a matter of
public business we should always be ready to improve upon the methods of our
fathers and INAUGURATE NEW SYSTEMS as fast as they are presented an
PROVEN BETrTE SYSTEMS.
For a long time the people of this State have been burdened with the cum-
bersome methods of preserving the records of land titles. Whenever a person
wishes to sell a piece of property, or mortgage a piece of property,'or lease a
plece of property, he Is compelled to furnish an abstract.
In the early settlement of the State this was a comparatively easy matter.
There being few transfers or changes in the title, it was very simple to go to the
office where the public records were kept and in a few minutes make up proof
of title but, as the State grew older and the transfers became more frequent
the showing of a good title became a very difficult matter.
This gave rise to abstract companies, and the evolution of abstract compani,!i
has developed a system that is EXTREMELY BURDENSOME on land owners.
The fees of the abstract company are regulated by law, but the legislators.
not being familiar with the subject, have passed these laws at the suggestion OF
THE MANAGERS OF THE ABSTRACT COMPANIES, and regular chargoie ar,
made for each entry on the abstract of any transaction that involves the prop-
erty.
For instance, a man may give a mortgage and pay it off the next year, and
one year later desire to sell the property. The abstractor will make an entry of
the mortgage and charge for it, and right underneath it an entry of the satisfaction
and charge for it, although the one offsets the other and neither were necessary to
show a clear tide. These entries, multiplied by years, amount to a considerable
sum, and the abstract business is a fine business for the abstractors, but nut so
very fine for the abstractees.
The Torrens system of land transfers, or a close imitation of it, has been
adopted by thirty States in the Union, and it appears to us as a great improve-
ment over the system in use in this State.
By this system the record of land titles and transfers is GREATLY 8IMPIlI-
FIED and the requirentent of producing an abstract IS ENTIRELY D]'NE
AWAY WITH.
A man's holdings of land are put upon a parity with his personalty and a
certificate of title is issued by the proper officer, which can be transferred in the
same manner as a certificate of stock. Some months ago the Miami Record pub.
lished an excellent synopsis of the Torrens system, which we reproduce:
"Briefly, the system is this:
"1. A title is examined once officially, and affirmed by order of court. That
S. ends the matter, and cuts out the endless examinations of titles now necessary.
Your title is registered.
"2. You are then given a certificate of title, which guarantees to all the
world that you have such title as is set forth therein to the lands therein
described-for example, in whole or in part, free from encumbrances or subject
to such encumbrances as are mentioned in the certificate.
"83. You can deal with this certificate of title almost as freely as with a
certificate of stock, because everybody can see from the certificate exactly what
your title is.
"4. When a transfer of land is made, instead of giving a deed and furnish-
ing an abstract, the old certificate is surrendered to the court and a new one
issued to the purchaser, and that is all there is to it.
"This will put your real estate on a footing with your personalty, and will
add millions to the business capital of the State.
"The Torrens act will help the farmers and everybody who owns real estate
in the country, as well as in the city.
"It will enable the State to collect her taxes promptly and no man's land,
when registered, can be sold for delinquent taxes without his knowledge.
S"It will help everybody who deals in real estate.
"It will lessen the cost of transactions in real estate, stimulate and enlarge
the market, and thus increase values; and when a poor man buys a home he will
get a odtitle to it and no one can take it way from him.
"It will promote development of the whole State by nettling titles. And it
will invite immigration, because strangers will not hesitate to buy such guaran.-
teed titles."
We recommend to the Governor a study of the Torrens system of land titlesh
so that he may incorporate in his message, if he deems it advisable, a suggestion
to the Legislature along this line. ,
We also suggest that the members of the next legislature look into this
question, as we are informed that several bills affecting abstract companies aren
now in preparation for submission to the Legislature.
We call the attention of both the Governor and the Ilgilature to Mr. Tay.
lor's otartoon on this page, which pictures the situation as it is and the relief
that is needed.


Not Democuuqp. taut


Common Hones8 I


We invite our readers to go with us again down to Manatee.
We are conscious that perhaps we have given Manatee County undue promi-
Oence in the last few issues, but Manatee County is a very important part of
Florida.
It is richly endowed by Nature, and is growing rapidly and being settled
by a very superior class of Intelligent people engaged in agricultural pursuits.


The products of the soil of Manatee County are commanding more and more atten-
tion each year.
But therenis another reason why the affairs of Manatee County should engage
our attention, and weregard this as a more important reason than any of those
given above, important as they are.
Down in Manatee County there will be fought out In the next five months
one of the tn cardinal propositions given to the world amid the thunders of Mt.
Sinai. It is this:
"Thou shalt not steal."
The Socialists of Manatee County have met in county convention and have
nominated a full county ticket. We are not interested in the county officers, but
we notethatMr. A. .Pettigrew will make the race on the Socialist platform
in the general election against Mr. John A. Graham, nominee of the Democratic
party by 27 votes over his Democratic opponent.
We opposed Mr. Graham's nomination in the Democratic primary because
we know him to be a common swindler, and this knowledge is shared by us with
a very considerable number of the people of Florida, which number includes ALL
THOSE who have ever had any business dealings with Mr. Graham during the
past twenty years in this State.


*~'1~


'If


/4


*^


Let Us Hope This Eclipse W

We will not enter into a discussion of the Socialist platform. We do not
care what planks the platform on which Mr. A. J. Pettigrew stands contains.
Our limited opportunity to acquire information has permitted us to look
somewhat into the doctrines of Socialism. It attracts by its high ideals and
repels by its contradictions and seeming impossibilities. Save as a good influence
we do not think that Socialism is of much use in the world. But it is quite
certain that more can be expected of people who THINK OUT NEW PLANS
than trom those who drift along with the current, content with bad things.
The principles of Democracy, which we have steadily maintained as long
,s we have been able to think independently, are still regarded by us as the best
for this country. Locally, Democracy means white supremacy, and this is of
such paramount importance that all other considerations sink into insignificance.
But the fight down in Manatee IS NOT A QUESTION OF PARTY PRIN-
CIPLE.
The Socialist candidate, if elected, will find a majority of 100 against him.
It would not be possible for him to inject into the governmental poli of this
,tate any of the principles of Socialism.
ofowever one may doubt the wisdom of the Socialist tenets, one is convinced
of the honesty of the Socialists in Manatee County. A large majority of them
are native Floridians, and have adpoted Socialism b ause they honestly believed
it is best for their native State. m ue hone
The fight in Manatee County IS ONE OF COMMON HONESTY.
We know abel.that the democratic arty HA NOMINATED A DISHONEST
MAN, and we believe (a&d we say thi because we have no personal acluaiatance


j


1-0













4 LS


THE SUN


NINTH PAGE


s,


Sar uday June 2, 1906


gentleman) that the Socialists have nominated AN HONEST MAN to
Manatee County in the Legislature.
re the primary election was held we warned the people of Manatee
that Mr. John A. Graham's career in this State has been one of fraud
hit, and that he was generally known as an unscrupulous swindler.
ere our announcement was made it was freely predicted that Mr. Graham
treep Manatee County by a majority of two, or even three, to one. Unfor.
r we have only about 150 subscribers in Manatee County out of a regis-
)te of over 800. We therefore could not get our warning against Mr.
to ENOUGH PEOPLE to defeat him.
confidently believe that if we could have reached a FEW MORE PEO-
r. Graham would have been defeated, because, as we have said before,
r that the people of Manatee County are good people and DO NOT WANT
fNDREL like Graham to represent them.
hope the people of that county will rebuke Mr. Graham, even though he
nominee of the Democratic party, by electing in the general election the
Candidate, Mr. Pettigrew, provided Mr. Pettigrew fills the specifications
Honest man, which we have no doubt he does.
D of the papers printed in Manatee County, in editorial comments, have


WVYHAT CRMI YIE DO)
T0 BEMIEFIT ThL.
PEOPLE YINO KAYE


LOOK-THIS15OE
IR D15TRE35E5-

5 ECLIP5E'. j


? Visible in Florida.


ked us for our criticism of Mr. Graham, and Mr. Graham himself has rebuked
y filing a suit for libel.
Mr. Graham further attempted to rebuke us by invading our offie with a
id, a big stick and a pistol. We expected this visit from Mr. Graham, and,
ring his record of shooting people whom he caught at a disadvantae, we pre-
d ourselves to receive him. The writer held his pistol on him, forced him to
up his stick and his gun, passed all three of the weapons to a third party,
allowed Mr. Graham to sit down and state his grievance. The writer then,
esenting THE SUN and himself, gave Mr. Graham his bill of particulars
ilnt him by reciting to his face, in the presence of the friend he brought with
and two other persons, the full particulars promised in a former issue to be
coming whenever Mr. Graham should demand them. In this recital we did
forget to mention any of Mr. Graham's rascality of which we had the proof.
might not have satisfied Mr. Graham's mind, but he gave no evidence of his
agreement with our presentation of his character.
We did satisfy his friend from Tampa, who came up to our office a stranger
left it after exchanging the warm handclasp of friendship.

We Make a Good Moo.
When the first issue of THE SUN was printed last November, it contained
announcement that we desired to make a paper for Florida, that would be
wn as THE State paper.
We have held steadfast to the purpose born of this desire, and Aid ourselves


today, if possible, more wedded to it than before.
After six months of effort put forth with all our strength, with all our
heart, and with all our soul, we find that in the main essential of our object we
have succeeded far beyond our hopes.
We have made our motto, "If it's right, we are for it," a pulsating proof of
our freedom and independence as a public journal, and fortified by a strict
adherence to its letter and spirit we are, save from the attacks of those who may
be hurt by its application.
We have made THE SUN THE State paper.
It is more widely read, more carefully read, oftener quoted, and wields more
influence than any other publication whatsoever, that is circulated among
Floridians.
We have ever been on the watch for opportunities to improve THE SUN, and
have seized them as fast as we saw them.
We believe we now have hold of the biggest one that has come within our
reach.
We will move THE SUN to Tallahassee, and from our vantage ground at the
Capital we will make a State paper that some day will be called-
THE GREAT STATE PAPER.
The Sun Company has bought four hundred of the four hundred and eighty-
five issued shares of the Capital Publishing Company of Tallahassee, and will
carry out the contract for State printing, and print THE SUN in Tallahassee.


The Legslature Can Rx


T'hk Qv~ick.


There seems to be some doubt or uncertainty as to what the next Legislature
will have to do in order to readjust the apportionment of the counties for repre-
sentation in the lower house on account of the creation, last session, of the new
county of St. Lucie. We have seen it printed and have had some folks tell us
that a constitutional amendment will have to be offered and adopted, either
increasing the membership of the House or readjusting the representation from
the several counties.
The Constitution does not fix the membership of the Legislature.
The apportionment of the members of the House of Representatives is fixed
by act of Legislature, approved June 7, 1887, and la known as Section 65 of the
Revised Statutes. This section provides that there shall be 68 members of the
House of Representatives, and goes on to give the apportionment among the sev-
eral counties.
When the now county of St. Lucie was created last session there was no new
apportionment made, so that the next House will have 60 members, which is con-
trary to law now made and provided; but all that the Legislature of 1907 will
have to do will be to pass a bill increasing the membership of the House to 09
members, or re-apportioning the present membership among the 40 counties.
NO CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT WILL BE REQUIRED, and the gen-
tleman who has been elected to represent the new county of St. Lucie can occupy
a prominent place in the gallery until the passage of the bill which will let him
on the floor according to law, as a full-fledged member of the lower house of the
Florida Legislature.
We put forth this little primary lesson in order to relieve the minds and
quiet the fears of gentlemen who have predicted that there might be a question
raised that all the acts of the next Legislature would be illegal on account of the
extra member. The Legislature in supreme in all matters WHICH ARE NOT
DIRECTLY PROHIBITED by the Constitution, and as soon as the gavel falls
calling the House in regular session the 68 members, about whose title to seats
there is no question, can pass a bill, as indicated above, which will legalize the
title of the 69th member to his seat.
This bill can be passed by both houses and signed by the Governor in two
days.


The Sun's Prediction Comes


True.


Months before any other newspaper had announced it THE SUN said that
cargoes of naval stores would be shipped from this port to foreign points.
It announced that two naval stores export houses had been established in
this city, the Patterson Export Company and the Atlantic Naval Stores Company.
We predicted that as soon as deep water came this port, on account of its domi-
nant geographical position, would at once take rank as a LEADING PORT OF
EXPORT.
We called attention to the fact that the contract made with Shotter by the
Consolidated Naval Stores Company would not prevent the port of Jacksonville
from reaping the advantages of its proximity to the producing points, and that
other naval stores factors were working to this end.
The Board of Trade resolution declaring Jacksonville to be an open port for
naval stores followed the line of our prediction. The first ship will clear from
Jacksonville for foreign ports in a few days, and as the shipping facilities grow
better other export houses will come, and before the year ends a regular line of
steamers plying to foreign ports will be established.
In spite of all that the people of Savannah can do Jacksonville is bound to
become in a short time the NAVAL STORES MARKET OF THE WORLD.
It required no great powers of prophecy for us to predict this result, but it is
none the less a source of gratification that we should have been the first to pro-
claim it, even when some foolish persons were trying to make it appear that
THE SUN was favoring Savannah to the disadvantage of Jacksonville.


Good To All, Harm


To None.


We note with pleasure that what is known as the free alcohol bill passed
the Senate by a surprisingly large vote this week.
We do not believe that the spread and growth of this industry of making
alcohol for use in the industrial arts will affect disastrously, or even disadvan-
tageously, the turpentine industry.
The growth of the South, which has been so phenomenal during the past ten
years, HAS BARELY COMMENCED.
As the country develops new demands will be made for cheap fuel, and the
!rpat benefits that will accrue to the agricultural classes by the removal of the
internal revenue tax on alcohol for industrial purposes, will in no wise accrue
to them to the consequent disadvantage of their neighbors, the turpentine oper-
ators.
We do not share the fears of people who think that alcohol sold at 20 cents
per gallon will lower the price of turpentine. We believe the demand for both
will be so great that the price of each will be kept at a figure that will make the
manufacture of these two products of the South a source of proAt and wealth.
We regard the passage of the free alcohol bill as the most important measure
that has ever passed the Congress for the betterment of the lot of the great
producing class of this country; and as it is seldom that a bill of this mature
passe Congress we regard it as a hopeful sign.


L I


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tQA~ PAW
SafatuA~, Jun.2, 1906


sf


THE SUN


sr


ED


IT


John A. Qrm ai Jsa threatened to prosecute all persons circulat-
ing copies of this paper containing what he terms libelous statements
about himself. Mr. Graham is bluffing, as usual. This paper has not
libeled Mr. Graham. It has printed the truth about him, and the
Snb8shed with good motives Is not legally, ethically nor morally

Any pemon interested who may wish to know what THE SUN has
printed about Mr. Graham, will be supplied with copies of the paper
upon request made of us by mail or in person.

Wanted.-A New System of Land Transfenr
On" upon a time there lived a man who was very fond of cats. He had a big
at and a little oat, and wishing the cats to have easy mode of ingress and egress
to his home, he had a carpenter cut two holes on the bottom of his back door---a
big hole and a little hole. When one of his friends asked him why the holes
were there he explained that they were for the oats to come in and out. When
asked why he made two holes he said the big hole was for the big cat and the
little hole was for the little eat. When his attention was called to the fact that
the little oat and the big cat would both be able to go through the big hole, he
replied that this was the way his father did it and he saw no reason to do other-
This is all right for a man fond of cats, but when it comes to a matter of
public business we should always be ready to improve upon the methods of our
father and INAUGURATE NEW SYSTEMS as fast as they are presented ani
PROVEN BETTER SYSTEMS.
For a long time the people of this State have been burdened with the cum-
bersome methods of preserving the records of land titles. Whenever a person
wishes to sell a piece of property, or mortgage a piece of property, or lease a
piece of property, he is compelled to furnish an abstract.
In the early settlement of the State this was a comparatively easy matter.
There being few transfers or changes in the title, it was very simple to go to the
office where the public records were kept and in a few minutes make up proof
of title; but, as the State grew older and the transfers became more frequent
the showing of a good title became a very difficult matter.
This gave rise to abstract companies, and the evolution of abstract companies
has developed a system that is EXTREMELY BURDENSOME on land owners.
The fees of the abstract company are regulated by law, but the legislators,
not being familiar with the subject, have passed these laws at the sugaestio'i OF
THE MANAGERS OF THE ABSTRACT COMPANIES, and regular charge tore
made for each entry on the abstract of any transaction that involves the prop-
erty.
For instance, a man may give a mortgage and pay it off the next year, and
one year later desire to sell the property. The abstractor will make an entry of
the mortgage and charge for it, and right underneath it an entry of the satisfaction
and charge for it, although the one offsets the other and neither were necessary to
show a clear title. These entries, multiplied by years, amount to a considerable
sum, and the abstract business is a fine business for the abstractors, but nut (o
very fine for the abstractees.
The Torrens system of land transfers, or a close imitation of it, has been
adopted by thirty States in the Union, and it appears to us as a great improve-
ment over the system in use in this State.
By this system the record of land titles and transfers is GREATLY SIMPLI-
FIED and the requirement of producing an abstract IS ENTIRELY )DONE
AWAY WITH.
A man's holdings of land are put upon a parity with his personalty and a
certificate of title is issued by the proper officer, which can be transferred in the
same manner as a certificate of stock. Some months ago the Miami Record pub-
lished an excellent synopsis of the Torrens system, which we reproduce:
"Briefly, the system'is this:
"I. A title is examined once officially, and affirmed by order of court. That
ends the matter, and cuts out the endless examinations of titles now necessary.
Your title is registered.
"I. You are then given a certificate of title, which guarantees to all the
world that you have such title as is set forth therein to the lands therein
described-for example, in whole or in part, free from encumbrances or subject
to such encumbrances as are mentioned in the certificate.
"3. You can deal with this certificate of title almost as freely as with a
certificate of stock, because everybody can see from the certificate exactly what
your title is.
"4. When a transfer of land is made, instead of giving a deed and furnish-
nlg an abstract, the old certificate is surrendered to the court and a new one
issued to the purchaser, and that is all there is to it.
"This will put your real estate on a footing with your personalty, and will
add millions to the business capital of the State.
"The Torrens act will help the farmers and everybody who owns real estate
in the country, as well as in the city.
"It will enable the State to collect her taxes promptly and no man's land,
when registered, can be sold for delinquent taxes without his knowledge.
"It will help everybody who deals in real estate.
"It will lessen the cot of transactions in real estate, stimulate and enlarge
the market, and thus increase values; and when a poor man buys a home he will
get a good title to it and no one can take it way from him.
"It will promote development of the whole State by settling titles. And it
will invite immigration, because strangers will not heasi tate to buy such guaran-
teed titles."
We recommend to the Governor a study of the Torrene system of land titles
so that he may incorporate in his message, if he deems it advisable, a suggestions
to the Legislature aloan this line.
We also suggest that the members of the next Legislature look into this
question, as we are informed that several bills affecting abstract companies are
now in preparation for submission to the Legislature.
We call the attention of both the Governor and the Legislature to Mr. T'ay-
lor's etartoon on this page, which pictures the situation as it is and the relief
that is needed.

Not Democraty iu Common Honef a .


L


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! '


The products of the soil of Manatee County are commanding more and more atten-
tion there is another reason why the affair of Manatee County should engage
our attention, and we regard this as a more important reason than any of t ho
given above, important as they are.htthe n e nths
Down in Manatee County there will be fought out in the next five months
one of the ten cardinal propositions given to the world amid the thunders of Mt
Sinai. It is this:
"Thou shalt not steal."
The Soeialists of Manatee County have metrin countycovention and have
nominated a full county ticket. We are not interested in the county officers, but
we note that-Mr. A. Pettigrew will make the race on the Socialist platform
in the general election against Mr. John A. Graham, nominee of the Democratico
party by 27 votes over his Democratic opponent.
-We opposed Mr. Graham's nomination in the Democratic primary because
we know ifm to bea common swindler, and this knowledge is shared by us with
a very considerable number of the people of Florida, which number includes ALL
THO who have ever had any business dealings with Mr. Graham during the
past twenty years in this State.


r TIIL1


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Let Vs Hope This Eclipse WIL

We will not enter into a discussion of the Socialist platform. We do not
care what planks the platform on which Mr. A. J. Pettigrew stands contains.
Our limited opportunity to acquire information has permitted us to look
omoewhat into the doctrines of Socialism. It attracts by its high ideals and
retlws by its contradictions and seeming impossibilities. Save as a good influence
we do not think that Socialism is of much use in the world. But it is quite
certain that more can be expected of people who THINK OUT NEW PLANS
than from those who drift along with the current, content with bad things.
The principles of Democracy, which we have steadily maintained as long
ant we have been able to think independently, are still regarded by us as the best
for this country. Locally, Democracy means white supremacy, and this is of
such amount importance that all other considerations sink into insigniflcance.
CIPLt the fight down in Manatee IS NOT A QUESTION OF PARfY PRIN-
The Socialist candidate, if elected, will find a majority of 100 against him.
It would not be possible for him to inject into the governmental policy of this
State any of the principles of Socialism.
Ilowever one may doubt the wisdom of the Socialist tenets, one is convinced
of the honesty of the Socialists in Manatee County. A large majority of them
are native Floridians, and have adpoted Socialism because they honestly believed
it is best for their native State.
The fight in Manatee County IS ONE OF COMMON HONESTY
We know that the Democratic party HAS NOMINATED A DISHONEST
MAN, and we believe (and we say this became we have no person altane


0


We invite our readers to go with us again down to Manatee.
We are conscious that perhaps we have given Manatee County undue promi-
nnce in the last few issues, but Manatee County is a very important part of
Florlda.
It is richly endowed by Nature, and is growing rapidly and being settled
by a very superior class of intelligent people agreed ia agricultural pursuits.


W,
F.4














LS


s,


THE SUN


NINTH PAGE


s,


Saturday June. 2. 1906


h the gentleman) that the Socialists have nominated AN HONEST MAN to
resent Manatee County in the Legislature.
Before the primary election was held we warned the people of Manatee
Mty that Mr. John A. Graham's career in this State has been one of fraud
deceit, and that he was generally known as an unscrupulous swindler.
Before our announcement was made it was freely predicted that Mr. Graham
ald sweep Manatee County by a majority of two, or even three, to one. Unfor-
itely we have only about 150 subscribers in Manatee County out of a regis-
d vote of over 800. We therefore could not get our warning against Mr.
ham to ENOUGH PEOPLE to defeat him.
We confidently believe that if we could have reached a FEW MORE PEO.
R, Mr. Graham would have been defeated, because, as we have said before,
know that the people of Manatee County are good people and DO NOT WANT
COUNDREL like Graham to represent them.
We hope the people of that county will rebuke Mr. Graham, even though he
he nominee of the Democratic party, by electing in the general election the
list candidate, Mr. Pettigrew, provided Mr. Pettigrew fills the specifications
an honest man, which we have no doubt he does.
Two of the papers printed in Manatee County, in editorial comments, have


IE LOOK-THIS 15 OnE'
)UR DITRESSE,5-


? Visible in Florida.


iked us for our criticism of Mr. Graham, and Mr. Graham himself has rebuked
>y filing a suit for libel.
Mr. Graham further attempted to rebuke us by invading our offoe with a
nd, a big stick and a pistol. We expected this visit from Mr. Graham, and,
wing his record of shooting people whom he caught at a disadvantage, we pre-
ed ourselves to receive him. The writer held his pistol on him, forced him to
up his stick and his gun, passed all three of the weapons to a third party,
allowed Mr. Graham to sit down and state his grievance. The writer then,
resenting THE SUN and himself, gave Mr. Graham his bill of particulars
nst him by reciting to his face, in the presence of the friend he brought with
and two other persons, the full particulars promised in a former issue to be
coming whenever Mr. Graham should demand them. In this recital we did
forget to mention any of Mr. Graham's rascality of which we bad the proof.
might not have satisfied Mr. Graham's mind, but he gave no evidence of his
agreement with our presentation of his character.
We did satisfy his friend from Tampa, who came up to our office a stranger
left it after exchanging the warm handclasp of friendship.

We Make a Good Mooe.
When the first issue of THE SUN was printed last November, it contained
announcement that we desired to make & paper for Florida, that would be
wn as THE State paper.
We have held steadfst to the purpose bora of this desire, and find ourselves


today, if possible, more wedded to it than before.
After six months of effort put forth with all our strength, with all our
heart, and with all our soul, we find that in the main essential of our object we
have succeeded far beyond our hopes.
We have made our motto, "If it's right, we are for it," a pulsating proof of
our freedom and independence as a public journal, and fortified by a strict
adherence to its letter and spirit we are, save from the attacks of those who may
be hurt by its application.
We have made THE SUN THE State paper.
It is more widely read, more carefully read, oftener quoted, and wields more
influence than any other publication whatsoever, that is circulated among
Floridians.
We have ever been on the watch for opportunities to improve THE SUN, and
have seized them as fast as we saw them.
We believe we now have hold of the biggest one that has come within our
reach.
We will move THE SUN to Tallahassee, and from our vantage ground at the
Capital we will make a State paper that some day will be called-
THE GREAT STATE PAPER
The Sun Company has bought four hundred of the four hundred and eighty-
five issued shares of the Capital Publishing Company of Tallahassee, and will
carry out the contract for State printing, and print THE SUN in Tallahassee.


The Legislature Can Rx


There seems to be some doubt or uncertainty as to what the next Legislature
will have to do in order to readjust the apportionment of the counties for repro.-
sentation in the lower house on account of the creation, last session, of the new
county of St. Lucie. We have seen it printed and have had some folks tell us
that a constitutional amendment will have to be offered and adopted, either
increasing the membership of the House or readjusting the representation from
the several counties.
The Constitution does not fix the membership of the Legislature.
The apportionment of the members of the House of Representatives is fixed
by act of Legislature, approved June 7, 1887, and is known as Section 65 of the
Revised Statutes. This section provides that there shall be 68 members of the
House of Representatives, and goes on to give the apportionment among the sev-
eral counties.
When the now county of St. Lucie was created last session there was no new
apportionment made, so that the next House will have 69 members, which is con-
trary to law now made and provided; but all that the Legislature of 1907 will
have to do will be to pass a bill increasing the membership of the House to U09
members, or re-apportioning the present membership among the 40 counties.
NO CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT WILL BE REQUIRED, and the gen-
tleman who has been elected to represent the new county of St. Lucie can occupy
a prominent place in the gallery until the passage of the bill which will let him
on the floor according to law, as a full-fledged member of the lower house of the
Florida Legislature.
We put forth this little primary lesson in order to relieve the minds and
quiet the fears of gentlemen who have predicted that there might be a question
raised that all the acts of the next Legislature would be illegal on account of the
extra member. The Legislature is supreme in all matters WHICH ARE NOT
DIRECTLY PROHIBITED by the Constitution, and as soon as the gavel falls
calling the House in regular session the 68 members, about whose title to seats
there is no question, can pass a bill, as indicated above, which will legalize the
title of the 69th member to his seat.
This bill can be passed by both houses and signed by the Governor in two
days.


'Ube Sun's


Prediction Comes


True.


Months before any other newspaper had announced it THE SUN said that
cargoes of naval stores would be shipped from this port to foreign points.
It announced that two naval stores export houses had been established in
this city, the Patterson Export Company and the Atlantic Naval Stores Company.
We predicted that as soon as deep water came this port, on account of its domi-
nant geographical position, would at once take rank as a LEADING PORT OF
EXPORT.
We called attention to the fact that the contract made with Shotter by the
Consolidated Naval Stores Company would not prevent the port of Jacksonville
from reaping the advantages of its proximity to the producing points, and that
other naval stores factors were working to this end.
The Board of Trade resolution declaring Jacksonville to be an open port for
naval stores followed the line of our prediction. The first ship will clear from
Jacksonville for foreign ports in a few days, and as the shipping facilities grow
better other export houses will come, and before the year ends a regular line of
steamers plying to foreign ports will be established.
In spite of all that the people of Savannah can do Jacksonville is bound to
become in a short time the NAVAL STORES MARKET OF THE WORLD.
It required no great powers of prophecy for us to predict this result, but it is
none the less a source of gratification that we should have been the first to pro-
claim it, even when some foolish persons were trying to make it appear that
THE SUN was favoring Savannah to the disadvantage of Jacksonville.


Good To All, Harm


To None.


We note with pleasure that what is known as the free alcohol bill passed
the Senate by a surprisingly large vote this week.
We do not believe that the spread and growth of this industry of making
alcohol for use in the industrial arts will affect disastrously, or even disadvan-
tageously, the turpentine industry.
The growth of the South, which has been so phenomenal during the past ten
years, HAS BARELY COMMENCED.
As the country develops new demands will be made for cheap fuel, and the
wrest benefits that will accrue to the agricultural classes by the removal of the
internal revenue tax on alcohol for industrial purposes, will in no wise accrue
to them to the consequent disadvantage of their neighbors, the turpentine oper-
ators.
We do not share the fears of people who think that alcohol sold at 20 cents
per gallon will lower the price of turpentine. We believe the demand for both
will be so great that the price of each will be kept at a figure that will make the
manufacture of these two products of the South a source of profit and wealth.
We regard the passage of the free alcohol bill as the most important measure
that has ever passed the Congress for the betterment of the lot of the great
producing class of this country; and as it is seldom that a bill of this nature
paseve Congress we regard it as a hopeful sign.


A


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THE SUN


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The Czar's Spy


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beTh
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Th

t


Chevalier William Le Queu


"When I rst met hi he rave me th
name of Hornb;," I sald. "It was im
Lqhorn, where be wa on board a yach
called the Lola, of which he represent
himself as owner."
"He ft Rannoch very suddenly," re
marked Bartlett. "We understood tha
he was eagged to marry Muriel. If so
I'm sorry for her, poor girl."
"WhafI" cried Duruford, starting u
"That man to marry Muriel Leith
court ?"
"Yes," I said. "Why?"
But his countenance had turned pale
and he gave no answer to my question.
"If these same Leithoourts are really
friends of yours, Durnford, old fellow
I'm sorry I've said anything against
them," the Major exclaimed in an apolo
getio tone. "Only the end of my vilsi
was so abrupt and so extraordinary, an<
the company such a mixed one, that-
well, to toll you the truth, the people
are a mysterious lot altogether,"
"Perhaps our Leitheourts are not th(
same as those Jack knows," I remarked
in order to escape from a rather difflcull
situation; whereupon Durnford, an
though eager to conceal his surprise
said with a forced laugh, "Oh! probably
not," and reseated himself at table. Their
the Major quickly changed the topic o
conversation, and afterwards he and hii
friend passed along to their table am
sat down to eat.
I could not help noticing that Jaci
Durnford was upset at what he had
learnt, yet I hesitated just then to put
any question to him. I resolved to ap
proach the subject later, so as to allow
him time to question me if he wished to
do so.
After smoking an hour we went across
to the Empire, where we spent the even
lag In the grand circle, meeting many
men we knew and having a rather pleas
ant time among old acquaintances. II
a man who had lived the club life ol
London returns from abroad, he can al
ways run across someone he knows in
the circle of the Empire about 10 o'clock
at night. Jack was, however, not his
old self that he had been before dinner.
His brow was now heavy and thought-
ful, and he appeared deeply immersed in
some intricate problem, for his eyes were
fixed vacantly when opportunity was af-
forded him to think, and he appeared to
desire to avoid his friends rather than
to greet them.
After the theater I induced him to
come round to tne Ceeil, and in the
wicker chair in the big portico before
the entrance we sat to smoke our final
cigars. It is a favorite spot of mine
when in London, for at afternoon, when
the string band plays and the Americans
and other cosmopolitans drink tea, there
is a continual coming and going, a little
panorama of life that to a student of
men like myself is intensely Interesting.
And at night it is just as amusing to sit
there in the shadow and watch the peo-
ple returning from the theaters or
danes and to speculate as to whom and
what they ar. At that one little corner
of Loando just off the Strand you see
more variety of men and women than
perhaps at any other spot. All grades
pass before you, from the pushful Amer.
. ran commercial man interested in a pat-
ent medicine, to the proud Indian Rajah
with his turbaned suite; from the va.
riety actress to the daughter of a peer,
or the wife of a millionair pork-butcher
doing Eu-rope.
"You've been a bit down in the mouth
to-night, Jack," I said presently, after
we had been watching the eahe coming
up, depositing the home-coming revelers
from the Savoy or the Carlton.
"Ye," he sighed. "And surely I have
enough to cause me-after what I've
heard from Bartlett."
"What Did the facts he told us con-
vey any bad news to your' I inquired
with pretended ignorance.
"Ye," he said hoarsely, after a brief
pause. Then he added: "Bartlett said
you could toll me what happened up In
Scotland where Leitheourt bad shooting.
Tell me everything," he added with the
atlrofamaln whom all hope dead.
'We.l," I began. "the Lthcourts took


underlying it"
"She wrote a letter from her isl,
prison to an old schoolmate named Ly
Moreton, asking her to see Woondrofe
his rooms in Cork Street, and tell h
that through all she was sufl'rini
had kept her promise to him, uai l t
the secret was still safe."
"Exactly. And now the fellhm fN
that ma you are so actively searchiin,'g
the truth, she may yield to your
mands and explain. He therefore
tends to silence her."
"Whati to kill her, you niman?"
gasped, in quick apprehension.
"Well, he might do so, in order
save himself, you see, Jack r'pli
adding: "He certainly would have
compunction If he thought that it uw0
not be brought home to him. Only
no doubt, fears you, because you lu
"fcund her, and are in love with heir."
I admitted the force of his argtune
but recollected that my dear one I
safe in concealment, and that the Pi
cess was our friend, even though I, as
Englishman, had no sympathy with i
doctrine of the bomb and the knife.


e Rannoch Castle, close to my uncle's
m place, near Dumfries. I got to know
t them, of course, and often shot with his
d prty. One day, however, I was amand
to notice in one of the rooms the photo-
graph of a lady, the exact counterpart of
t that picture which, I recollect, I told
you when in Leghorn I had found torn
up on board the Lola. You recollect
what I narrated about my strange ad-
i- venture, don't you?"
"I remember every word," was his an-
swer. "Go on. What did you do?"
1, "Nothing. I held my tongue. But
when I discovered that the fellow who
Y called himself Woodroffe-the man who
r, had represented himself as the owner of
t the Lola, and who, no doubt, had had a
* hand in breaking open Huteheson's safe
t in the Consulate-was engaged to
d Muriel, I became full of suspicion."
- "Well ?"
e "Woodroffe, after meeting me, disap-
peared-went to Hamburg, they said, on
e business. Then other things occurred.
, A man and woman were found murdered
t up in the wood about a mile and a half
s from the castle. The man was made up
, to represent my man Olinto-I believe
y you've seen'him in Leghorn?"
n "Whatl They've killed Olinto?" he
f gasped, starting from his chair.
' "No. The fellow was made up very
d much like him. But his wife Armida
was killed."
k "They killed the woman, and believed
I they had also killed her husband, eh?" he
t said bitterly through his teeth, and I
- saw that his strong hands grasped the
v arms of his chair firmly. "And Martin
D Woodroffe is engaged to Muriel Leith-
court. Are you certain of this?"
s "Yes; quite certain."
* "And is there no suspicion as to who
Sis the assassin of the woman Santini and
* this mysterious man who posed as her
f husbandt"
f "None whatever."
* For some time Jack Durnford smoked
in silence, and I could just distinguish
his white, hard face in the faint light,
for it was now late, and the big electric
. lamps had been turned out and we were
Sin semi-darkness.
"That fellow shall never marry Mu-
riel," he declared in a fierce, hoarse
voice. "What you have just told me re-
veals the truth. Did you meet Chater?"
I "He appeared suddenly at Rannoch,
and the Leitheourts fled precipitately
and have not since been heard of."
"Ah, no wonder!" he remarked with a
dry laugh. "No wonder! But look here,
Gordon, I'm not going to stand by and
let that scoundrel Woodroffe marry
Muriel."
I "You love her, perhaps?" I hazarded.
"Yes, I do love her," he admitted.
"And, by heaven!" he cried, "I will tell
I the truth and crush the whole of toeir
ingenious plot. Have you met Elma
Heath?" he asked.
"Yes," I said in quick anxiety.
"Then listen," he said in a low, earnest
voice. "Listen, and I'll tell you some-
thi1."
'Lere is a greater mystery surround-
ing that yacht, the Lola, than you have
ever imagined, my dear old chap," de.
lared Jack Durnford, looking me
straight in the face. "When you told
me about it on the quarter-deck that i
day outside Leghorn, I was half a mind
to tell you what I knew. Only one fact I
prevented me-my disinclination to re-
veal my own secrets. I loved Muriel
Ilithcourt, yet, afloat as I was, I could
never see her-I could not obtain from I
her own lips the explanation I desired.
Yet I would not prejudge her-no, and
I won't now!" he added with a fierce a
resolution. 4
"I love her," he went on, "and she re- (
ciprocates my love. Ours is a secret t
el.gagement made in Malta two years I
ago. and yet you tell me that she has
pledged herself to that fellow Wood- c
roffe-the man known here in London
a. Dick Archer. I can't believe it-I w
really can't, old fellow. She could never
write to me as she has done, urg pa- i
tlence and secrecy until my return. -
inlemss cor, she edred to gain f
time," I sun sed


But my friend was silent; his brows
were deep knit.
"Woodroffe is at the present moment
in Petersburg," I said. "I've just come
back from there."
"In St. Petersburg!" he gasped sur-
prised. "Then he is with that villain-
ous official, Baron Oberg, the Governor-
General of Finland."
"No; Oberg is living shut up in his
palace at Helsingfors, fearing to go out
lest he shall be assassinated," was my
answer.
"And Elmat What has become of
her?"
"She is in hiding in Petersburg, await-
ing such time as I can get her safely out
of Russia," and then, continuing, I ex-
plained how she had been maimed and
rendered deaf and dumb.
"What!" he cried fiercely. "Have they
actually done that to the poor girl?
Then they feared she would reveal the
nature of their plot, for she had seen
and heard."
"Seen and heard what ?"
"Be patient; we will elucidate this
mystery, and the motive of this terrible
iiflietion upon her. Muriel wrote to
mc. saying that poor Elma, her friend,
had disappeared, and she feared that
scme evil had also happened to her. So
Oberg had sent her to his fortress-his
own private Bastile-the place to which
or pretended charges of conspiracy
against Russia, he sends those who
thwart him to a living tomb."
"I have seen him, and I have defied
him," I said.
"You have! Man alive! be careful.
He's not a fellow who sticks at trifles,"
said Jack warningly.
"I don't fear," I replied. "Elma's en-
emies are also mine."
"Then I take it, old fellow, that not-
withstanding her affliction, you are
actually in love with her?"
"I intend to rescue, and to marry her,"
I answered quite frankly.
"But first we must tear aside this veil
of mystery and ascertain all the facts
concerning her," he said. "At present I
only know one or two very vague .de-
tails. The baron is certainly not her
uncle, as he represents himself to be, but
it seems certain that she is the daughter
of Anglo-Russian parents, and was born
in Russia and brought to England when
a child."
"But from whom do you expect I can
obtain the true facts concerning her, and
the reason of the baron's desire to keep
her silent ?"
"Ah!" he said, twisting his mustache
thoughtfully. "That's just the question.
For a solution of the problem we must
first fathom the motive of the Leith-
courts and the reason they fled in fear
before that fellow Chater. That Muriel
in innocent of any complicity in their
plot, whatever it may be, I feel con-
vinced. She may be the victim of that
blackleg Woodrofe, who, as Bartlett has
told you, is one of the most expert
swindlers in London, and who has al-
ready done two terms of penal servi-
tude."
"But what was the motive in breaking
open the Cosul's safe, if not to obtain
the Foreig Office or Admiralty ciphers?
Perhap they wanted to steal them and
sell them to a foreign government?"
"No; that was not their object I've
thouht over it many, many times since
you told me, and I feel convinced that
Woodroffe is too shrewd a fellow not to
have known that no Consul goes away on
leave and allows his ciphers to remain
bhind. When he leave s his post he al-
ways deposits those precious books either
It the Foreign Office here or with his
Jonsul-General, or with a Consul at an-
therportTh ot ey'd surely ascertain 1
hat before they made the raid, you bet.
rhe affair was a risky one. and Dick
Archer is known as a man of many pnre-
autions."
iBt hel s on extremely friendly terms
ndingi her in Finlanl, nd taking hr
yond Oerg's sphere of Influence t,,

rThen Is certainly onl an afted
rendrp, with some sinister motive


0 0 e


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June 2,19


(Continued


on Fifteente Page.)


*** ( ,* '


I









June 2, 1906


THE SUN


Eleventh Pap


WHAT


AILS


THE


MILITIA


A SYMPOSIUM ON THIS SUBJECT For the Purpose of Finding the Cause
TO BE CONDUCTED IN THE SUN W and Prescribing Remedy for Conditions


Believing that local military companies are
necessary in order that the people may have that
sense of security in their lives and property that is
essential to the pursuit of happiness, THE SUN has
inaugarated this symposium for the purpose of im-
proving the militia organizations in this State.
THE SUN has addressed a letter to each military
man in the State, requesting an article on the sub-
ject.
This symposium began three weeks ago with a
very interesting paper from Brigadier-General J. W.
Sackett, commanding First Brigade, Florida State
Troops; the second paper was from Capt. W. II.
Lyle of Live Oak, formerly in command of the Live
Oak Company, but now retired.
The third paper follows:
BY COL. JOHN S. MAXWELL.
Jacksonville, Fla., May 29, 1096.
Editor Sun:
In reply to your request for my views upon the
condition of the militia in Florida, I herein set them
forth:
In the first place, permit me to say that I think
the fears expressed for the militia as a whole are
not only exaggerated, but unfounded. I have been
connected with' the militia in Florida for nearly
fourteen years continuously; and, from a military
point of view, I must say I have never known the
militia as a whole to be in as good condition as now,
nor the standard of efficiency as high as now.
Prior to 1899, the Florida State Troops consisted
of twenty infantry companies and two light artillery
batteries, organized into five battalions. The min-
imum number of enlisted men forming a company or
battery was thirty-two, and many companies had on
the roll but few more than the required minimum,
and some less. A company of more than forty-five
rank and tile was the exception io the rule. At
drills, if sixteen or twenty enlisted men were in at-
tendance, it was considered hardly short of miracu-
lous, and the average attendance, I may venture to
say, was twelve to fourteen men.
Today, as I am advised, the Second Infantry con-
sists of twelve companies, all with the fall comple-
ment of men, that is sixty-five rank and file, except
.aytona and Starke, and tnese are each above the
minimum of forty-five enlisted men. It is true that
companyy "D," Second Infantry (Falatki), has re-
cently been disbanded; but I am advisedthat three
new companies have recently been accepted with full
muster rolls, that is sixty-five enlisted men and three
officers. I am also advised that some companies are
""available in South Florida.
The First Infantry consists of ten companies, there
..-_eing two vacancies in the regiment which may be
Illed in the near future. The reports for the last
quarter, ending March 31, 1906, show that the three
Jacksonville companies and the companies at St.
--Augustine, Fernandina and Lake City are below the
minimum strength, and must either be recruited or
mustered out of the service. The discouraging fea-
ture about the present condition of> the militia 1-
that the largest city in the State, the city which dur-
ing the time I have been connected with the troops,
has had more need, more urgent need, for the troops
than any other point in Florida, does not support the
militia as it should. In fact, Jacksonville does not
seem to realize the situation. Let it chance, for any
reason, that the military companies here and at St.
Augustine, Fernandina and Lake City should be dis-
banded, Jacksonville would be without adequate mill-
tary protection; for, with the exception of Starke,
there would be no company of the militia located
nearer to Jacksonville than eighty-two miles-the
Live Oak company.
This feature of the military situation in this State
stands forth prominently-the strength of the militia
is Indisputably in South Florida. The first regimen-
tal district extends westward from Jacksonville,
along the line of the Seaboard Air Line, to Pensacola;
and in all that territory tnere are but three compa-
nies that approach the maximum strength. This fact
does not mean, necessarily, that the First Regiment
will be disbanded; but it does strongly indicate that
the State must be redistricted, and that the military
strength of South Florida will be increased and
Jacksonville will become more dependent than ever
upon local militia for adequate protection in time of
necessity. It therefore be ooves us here to keep the
local infantry not only up to the maximum -rength
and the highest standard of efficiencybut also that
we maintain a well-drilled, efficieent artillery organ-
ization.
What is the reason for this tendency, strongly
marked, for the military strength to drift south-
wards, I cannot say. It may be that the increasing
population of that section of the State is the most
potent factor. Or, agian. it may be the people of
that section feel the need of protection o euse
of the turpentine idustry mpi iagee


numbers, and because of the turbulent character t
this class of labor. I know that such a feeling did
exist among the officers in that secotion of the State
a year or two ago. I cannot undertake, with the in-
formation now in my possession, to say what is the
cause of this tendency. I can only urge the citizens
of Jacksonville to see to it that the local companies
are maintained, s that we may not become dependent
for protection upon militia located miles away.
I have not called attention to the conditions set
forth above merely as a cry of "Wolf, wolf." I have
done so in the.hope that our citizens will study the
military situation calmly for themselves; will re-
member that the presence of efficient militia is not
only an assurance of protection in ease of neesity,
but also deters, or at least discourages, outbreaks of
violence; and will bethink themselves of our needs.
Jacksonville has too much valuable property, too
many leading enterprises, to say nothing of the lives
that may be endangered, to trust to luck. Permit me
to say, however, that information received since the
quarterly reports referred to gives me flattering as-
suranoe that the three Jacksonville companies and
the companies at St. Augustine and Fernandina at
least may be kept in the service, and Lake City
gives promise of retaining its company. I also hope
that Jacksonville will soon number an efficient artil.
lery organization among its defenders in time of
trouble.
I cannot subscribe to the theory that the Dick bill
has injuriously affected the militia in Florida. In


the first place, it has certainly not decimated the
Second RegimentI nor has it affected the ardor of
the citizens of South Florida, since more places in
that section are seeking representation in the Flor.
ida State Troops. Nor has it imposed more labor
upon the enlisted men. It only requires twenty-four
drills a year and at least ave days' encampment.
it does require the attendance at drill of two-thirds
of the strength of each company. Surely this not an
onerous requirements Less attendance than this
would be destructive of efficiency and disciplitae and
an inefficient company is worse than none at all, be-
cause it engendenrs a feeling of security and protection
only to prove to be a delusion when the emergency
arises.
it is true that the labors of officers are more ard-
uous. But this arises not so much from the require-
ments of the Dick bill as from the fact that the
standard of efloiency has been raised by the present
capable Adjutant General of the State. Officer
must know more now than formerly. They cannot
simply content themselves with a knowledge of eolese
order drill in company and a smattering of battalion
drill in close order-the usual drill prior to the
Spanish-American War. Offers must be profiaent
in these exercises, and they must know the extended
order drill, the normal attack and defense; must
know, and appreciate the importance of, guard
duty; must understand something of the serve of
security and informations something about advance
(Continued on Thirteenth Page)


ticy 1, 111
Illid
Bake, F(dllllrC-1]


o ,












Page THE SUN June 2, 1906



The Story of a Fish-Fry in Florida


Contributed to


The ot temple Nature hathi fair Florida, 'tie
AdwI4atLh edI orange blossoms, stands the pride
of Southern ma.
MIajeete are thy forests, as when Ponce de Leon's
Beeld hy lngleaved pines and palms wave o'er
the *flvery and.
Thy old St. Jobhns, with shaded banks, is just as deep
tad blue
As when the redskins paddled forth in dugout and
eanoe.
So, when amerry-maknlg crowd sought on a summer
A vita for a grand fish-fry, we sailed without delay
Far up the same cerulean stream, where many moons
ago
Brave Oeeols flung his net, or reeled his line in tow.
And iere the party went ashore, and in the billowy
Greel
The pettloosted comrades sat beneath magnolia trees;
And while awaiting for the haul, as culprits wait
their dooms
We draped our hate with Spanish moss, like waving
curlew plume.
Now. soon a sprightly maiden, who, more venturesome
was found,
Sought to explore the secrets of a curloum-lo-king
mound.
Bo *ith united forces, our combined bone and musel,,
Prepared, at men would dig for gold, to make the
mighty tussle.
What rich rewards our efforts proved, when moqt to
TI 'ay a few old chalky bones and some quaint
.tarow-heads.
But soon great waves of laughter came, for without
shoes or hose,
While wading in to cast the net, a 'gator caught one's
toes.
Undaunted, the encircling seine was stretched where
dragion fly
l at, darts from lily pads, and fish in ambush

And, as in pristine agee, our bright skillet was
brought out,
And rat n on three uprights, was soon filled witai
ape o.k trout,
Which eiWaled o'er a crackling flame till fried all
S e dl) ad rown,
And with awihes and salads fine, and cakes
whish ame from town,
And oofe with raspberry shrub, Oh I we spread a
banqaet ftoe.
We stAufed them all with "goodies good" and filled
them al with wine.
Each one partook of Bluebeard's fame, in appetite
at least,

22,000 School Children Who
Cannot Get a Warm Dinner
Vienna.-Among the school children of Vienna
are 11,000 who never knew the benefit of a hot meal
at home. In their homes hot meals are cooked only
on Sunday and holidays. Several years ago a num-
ber of eooletses formed to supply one hot meal a day
to these poor youngeteres, and the charity was so
well managed that It can be done at the rate of $10
per head and per year. Now It is reported that sev-
efil of the Children's kitchens have funds only until
January 1st, as the rich people that supported them
uatil now refuse to renew their subscriptions. The
pitais so incensed against these heartleMss perI.no
ihat several papers threaten to place their names in
tlpillory lest they save the poor youngstdrn frontm
starvation in the awful winter months.

Where Was St. Peter Crucified.
I oae.-Monalore de Weal, rector of the Ger-
man Ompo hasa, behind anlat Peter's, caused a


Twelfth

F--


unky gambler fell forward-dead.


W. "


BY MARION TAYLOR HOLT.
The Sun's Prize Poem Contest for Florida Poets,

And soon was not a fragment left of this grand To almost see the camp-fire light and hear the jokes
woodland feaot. pass round,
woodland feuat. As we roamed o'er the selfsame spot, their happy
While serving of this rich repast, all seated on the hunting ground.
ground,
gr'Twas noticed an unbidden guest was at the fish-fry Oh! strange anomaly of fate this fish-fry did decree,
Twas noticed ano swell some hearts with pleasure keen, and some
ground. wring painfully.
For all unseen, without a sound, except a fluttering **----
wing
Dear little Cupid had arrived, his loving darts to
fling.
lie shyly touched one fisher's heart, and whispered
secretly
To angle neathh these shaded boughs for such a
"catch" as she, E7BS, IT WRITES underneath the
Who was the fairest of the fair, a vision in pale platen, called "blind writer" and
blues, "out-of-date' '-but that doesn't
With wealth of glorious Titian hair, and Oh the prove anything.
sweetest shoes. If you had a well of fine water and
couldn't get it out, you'd want a pump.
And with a form of Venus-like, she thus to glory Now, if ten different kinds of pumps
rose; were offered and you could try them
A clover blossom seemed her mouth, with fascinating all, wouldn't you choose the one that
nstrolled beneath palmetto tall; their heads would bring up the most water with
They strolled beneath palmettos tall; their heads the least effort, quickly? It's the water
were well together,
And scarce betwixt their faces was there room for you want; you wouldn't care whether
e'en a feather. the pump had a crooked handle or a
straight nozzle.
Such love-lore as he prated, while she flushed with You have writing to do, that's why
tender pride, you need a typewriter. Of course, you
And though he kissed each fragrant flower, she tossed can still write with a pen or pencil,
them all aside, and so can water be brought up by a
bucket and chain; but few do it that
iler heart, at first coquettish, now was softened, I'llbucket way and chain; but few do V valuable.
confess, way any more-time is too valuable.
And with eyes that spoke adoring, returned him a A pump, then, is valuable for the
caress. water it will bring up; a mill, for the
grain it will grind; and a typewriter,
In fact, she dazzled him so much the fisher lost his for the writing it will produce. It
head, doesn't make any difference whether
And the coming of nocturnal gloom now filled the the typewriter is visible, or whether
scene with dread; its writing is in sight or underneath
For the etiquette of lovers thus demanded that they the platen; whether it's an old-timer
esoonor a new-comer. What you want is
Return and wait the future for a further honeymoon, the typewriter that will turn out the
most good work in the shortest time
But how to reach the sailing craft, their minds were with the least effort, and keep on doing
sore perplexed, it year in and year out-it's the results
For well they knew without a plank, a rolling log that count.
came next. Any salesman can say his is the
"best" typewriter; the copyright has
And as the "Vision" stepped thereon in almost faint- run out on "best." But the
ing state,
She turned her pretty toes too far, and thus vetoed
her fate.
For never was Prince Charming born, it tortures me Fa y Ole
to say,
Who'd with a dripping maiden wed, e'en in dearly
Florida.
Now, little Cupid was nonplussed, to find his plans
thus nipped, wi turn out more good, cean-cut work of a
For by the turn of Fortune's wheel, his luck from him kinds in a given tmme than s possible on any
had slipped, other typewriter built. More still, do it with
less effort, and continue to do it longer.
Tie wounded heart some solace found; 'twas worth th e tastet, e mut theyre not. If nted to
the game, you know, Fay-Sbol- wouldn't have won fifteen times
To fish where seeola fished one hundred years ago. ot s sixteen In publiccontests.tory
These things are all history, and history
_____r.c_________ reords facts. The FayShols won because
SIt Is the fastest and easiest machine to oper-
ate ani can be depended upon.
tablet to be raised at the front of the institute, say. we ask of you s to ge one our ale
g that on this spot Saint Peter was crucified men fifteen minutes of your time, If you are nla
The Pope ordered the removal of the tablet "un- arnaSolSany Tmprtant ci tyto expalao how a
til such a time when historical investigation has your ole yin mtrWlve to e teen nth
absolutely proved that the claim is true." ad satisfy you and your stenoarapher with
This will probably take much time. In Rome ml roof by furnishfM g a a for a
half a dozen spots are pointed out as the place where conced after y Oeno lt to
the Prince of the Apostles was executed. One is the onvmed that the, wyl8holes de aii
Church of Saint Peter in Monterio, another the Pi- vt we lamt will do, our man will re.
ama San Peter. In Mentor the monks exhibit a hole at our expense.
in the ground where the cross was planted. If you are leoca t h
no selling agen-
Won 10,000 Francs, Died of Joy. raneltbymll
ann Remno.-A.t the casino here an elderly French- safely easily and
man neml P'errot won 10,000 francs at baccarat. withasfmac sa
Ilis face lit up. then hisi right hand sought his heart. Isfaction as it
The croupier ,lo,.ved a heap of gold towards him. our office.
the winner's hand dropped, but he failed to raise it A
to take the money. FAY- i
"Please collect so the game may proceed," said SHOLESO..
one of the gamblers impatiently. Perrot did not re. '" Malesi Blds.
ply. Someone shook him, shouted in his ear. The I CHICAGO U VIOMUs


JU


*











June 2, 1906


THE SUN


Thirteenth Page


CAPTAINS ALL

(Continued from Third Page)
ship, and to say 'ow much she should like to see
over it.
"I wish I could take you," sea Sam, looking at the
other two out o' the corner of his eye, "but my ship's
over at Dunkirk, in France. I've just run over to
London for a week or two to look around."
"And mine's there too,' ses Peter Russet, speaking
a'most afore old Sam 'ad finished; "side by side they
lay in the harbor."
"Oh, dear," sea Mrs. Finch, folding her 'ands and
shaking her 'ead. I should loke to go over a ship
one afternoon. I'd quite made up my mind to it,
knowing three captins."
She smiled and looked at Ginger; and Sam and
Peter looked at 'im, too, wondering whether he was
going to berth his ship at Dunkirk alongside o'
theirs.
"Ah, I wish I 'ad met you a fortnight ago," ses
Ginger, very sad. "I gave up my ship, the High-
flyer, then, and I'm waiting for one my owners are
havingg built for me at Newcastle. They said the
Highflyer wasn't big enough for me. She was a nice
little ship, though. I believe I've got 'er picture
somewhere about me."
He felt in 'is pocket and pulled out a little
crumpled-up photograph of a ship he'd been fireman
aboard of some years afore, and showed it to 'er.
"That's me standing on the bridge," se sea, point-
ing out a little dot with the stem of 'is pipe.
"It's your bigger," sea Mrs. Finch, straining her'
eyes. "I should know it anywhere."
"You've got wonderful eyes, ma'am," sea old Sam,
choking with 'is pipe.
"Anybody can see that," see Ginger. "They're the
largest and the bluest I've ever seen."
Mrs. Finch told 'im not to talk nonsense, but both
Sam and Peter Russet could see 'ow pleased she was.
"Truth is truth," ses Ginger. "I'm a plain man,
and I speak my mind."
"Blue is my fav'rit color," ses old Sam, in a ten-
der voice. "True blue."
Peter Russet began to feel out of it. "I thought
brown was," he see.
"To!l" ses Sam, turning on 'im; "and why?"
"I 'ad my reasons," see Peter, nodding, and shut-
ting 'is mouth very firm.
"I thought brown was 'is fav'rit' color too," ses
Ginger. "I don't know why. It's no use asking
me; because if you did I couldn't tell you."
"Brown's a very nice color," ses Mrs. Finch, won-
dering wot was the matter with old Sam.
"Blue," ses Ginger; "big blue eyes-they're the
ones for me. Other people may 'ave their blacks
and their browns," he see, looking at Sam and Peter
Russet, "but give me blue."
They went on like that all the evening, and every
time the shop-bell went and the widow 'ad to go out
to serve a customer they said in w'ispers wot they
thought of each other; and once when she came back
rather sudden Ginger 'ad to explain to 'er that 'e
was showing Peter Russet a scratch on his knuckle,.
Ginger Dick was the fust their next night, and
took 'er a little chiney teapot he 'ad picked up dirt~'
cheap because it was cracked right across the middle;
but, as he explained that he 'ad dropped it in hurry-
ing to see 'er, she was just as pleased. She stuck it
upon the mantelpiece, and the things she said about
Ginger's kindness and generosity made Peter Russet
spend good money that he wanted for himselff on a
painted flower-pot next evening.
With three men all courtin' 'er at the same time
Mrs. Finch 'ad her hands full, but she took to it
wonderful considering. She was so nice and kind
to 'em all that even arter a week's 'ard work none
of 'em was really certain which she liked best.
They took to going in at odd times o' the day for
tobacco and sueh-like. They used to go alone then,
hut they all met and did the polite to each other
there of an evening, and then quarreled all the way
'ome.
Then all of a sudden, without any warning, Ginger
Dl)ick and Peter Russet left off going there. The fust
evening Sam sat expecting them every minute, and
was so surprised that he couldn't take any advantage
of it; but on the second, beginning by squeezing Mrs.
Finch's 'and at ha'-past seven, he 'ad got best part
of his arm around 'er waist by a quarter to ten. He
didn't do more that night because she told him to
be'ave himself and threatened to scream if he didn't
leave off.
Hlie was art-way home afore 'e thought of the rea-
son for Ginger Dick and Peter Russet giving up, and
then he went along smiling to himselff to such an ex-
tent that people thought 'e was mad. He went off
to sleep with the smile still on 'is lips, and when
Peter and Ginger came in soon arter closing time
and 'e woke up and asked them where they'd been,
'e was still smiling.


"I didn't 'ave the pleasure oa seeing you at Mrs.
Finch's tonight," he ses.
"No," seo Ginger, very short. "We got tired
of it."
"So un'ealthy sitting in that stuffy little room
every evening," ses Peter.
Old Sam put his 'ead under the bedclothes and
laughed till the bed shook; and every now and then


he'd put his 'ead out and look at Peter and Ginger
and laugh agin till he choked.
"I see 'ow it is," he ses, "sitting up and wiping his
eyes on the street. "Well, we can't all win.'
"Wot you meant" see Ginger, very disagreeable.
"She wouldn't 'ave you," ws Sam, "that's wot I
mean. And I don't wonder at it. I wouldn't 'ave
you if I was a gal."
"You're dreaming," sea Peter Russet, sneering at
'im.
"That flower-pot o' yours'll come in handy," sea
Sam, thinking low he 'ad put his arm around the
widow's waist; "and I thank you kindly for the tea-
pot, Ginger."
"You don't mean to say as you've asked 'er to
marry you?" sea Ginger, looking at Peter Russet.
"Not quite; but I'm going to," sea Sam, "and I'll
bet you even. arfo.rowns she ses 'yes.'"
Ginger wouldn't take 'im, and no more would
Peter, not even when he raised it to five shillings;
and the vain way old Sam lay there boasting and
talking about 'is way with the gals made 'em both
feel ill.
"I wouldn't 'ave her if she asked me on 'er bonded
knees," sea Ginger, holding up his 'ead.
"Nor me," sea Peter. "You're welcome to 'or,
Sam. When I think of the evenings I've wasted
over a fat old woman I feel--"
"That'll do," ses old Sam, very shap; "that ain't
the way to speak of a lady, even if she 'as said
'no.'"
"All right, Sam," sea Ginger. "You go in and
win if you think you're so precious clever.
Old Sam said that that was wot 'e was going to do,
and he spent so much time next morning making
himselff look pretty that the other two could 'ardly
be civil to him.
He went off a'most direckly arter breakfast, and
they didn't see 'im agin till twelve o'clock that night.
lie 'ad brought a bottle o' whisky in with 'im, and he
was so happyy that they see plain wot had happened .
"She said 'yes' at two o'clock in the afternoon,"
sea old Sam, smiling, after they had 'ad a glass
apiece. "I'd nearly done the trick at one o'clock,
and then the shop-bell went, and I 'ad to begin all
over agin. Still, it wasn't unpleasant."
"Do you mean to tell us you've asked 'er to marry
you sea Ginger, holdingg out 'is glass to be filled
agin.
"I do," se8 Sam; "but I 'ope there's no ill-feeling.
You never 'ad a chance, neither of you; she told me
so."
Ginger Dick and Peter Russet stared at each other.
"She said she 'ad been in love with me all along,"
ses Sam, filling their glasses agin to cheer 'em up.
"We went out arter tea and bought the engagement-
ring, and then she got somebody to mind the shop
and we went to the Pagoda music-'all."
"I 'ope you didn't pay much for the ring, Sam,"
ses Ginger, who always got very kind-'earted arter
two or three glasses o' whisky. "If I'd known you
was going to be in such a hurry I might ha' told you
before."
"We ought to ha' done," sea Peter, shaking his
'ead.
"Told me?" sea Sam, staring at 'em. "Told me
wot?" ".
"Why me and Peter gave it up," se Ginger; "but,
o' course, p'r'aps you don't mind."
"Mind wot?" sea Sam.
"It's wonderful 'ow quiet she kept it," ses Peter.
Old Sam stared at 'em agin, and then he asked 'em
to speak in plain English wot they'd got to say, and
not to go taking away the character of a woman wot
wasn't there to speak up for herself.
"It's nothing agin 'er character," ses Ginger.
"It's a credit to her, looked at properly," sea Peter
Russet.
"And Sam'll 'ave the pleasure of bringing of 'em
up," sea Ginger.
"Bringing of 'em up?" ses Sam, in a trembling
voice and turning pale; "bringing who up?"
"Why 'er children," ses Ginger. "Didn't she tell
you? She's got nine of 'em."
Sam pretended not to believe 'em at fast, and said
they was jealous; but next day he crept down to
the greengrocer's shop in the same street, where
Ginger had happenedd to buy some oranges one day,
and found that it was only too true. Nine children,
the eldest of 'em only fifteen, was staying with differ-
ent relations owing to scarlet fever next door.
Old Sam crept back 'ome like a man in a dream,
with a bag of oranges he didn't want, and, arter
making a present of the engagement ring to Ginger-
if 'e could get it-he took the fust train to Tilbury
and signed on for a v'y'ge to China.

What Alia the Militia

[Continued from Eleventh Page]
ana rear guard and outpost work; must know some-
thing about intrenching, map drawing and reading,
etc.; must know something about camp hygiene;
must understand how to draw rations, know what


are the constituents of the ration, their relative value
as food, and how the ration should be cooked, etc.
This knowledge is imperative for an officer, is essen-
tial for his eare of the man under his command. The
position of an offer in the Florida State Troops is
being looked upon more and more as an honor, as it


should be; and those who give of their time sad
means (for to be an offer is more or less expensive)
should be commended for the eaeriboes they freely
and cheerfully make for the honor, and should be
aided by the citizens at large in their endeavors to
upbuild and make more proficient the eitiaenmoldiery
of the State.
We need more social features connected with our
military organizations, subordinate, of course, to the
military requirements." The armories should be large
enough to serve not only the military neeassitle,
but also give space for social pleasures, such as read-
ing rooms, gymnasiums, etc. The citizens should not
merely give of their means and permit their em-
ployees to belong to military organizations, but they
should also make frequent inquris as to the oondi-
tion of the military organization in their home city
or town; should know who are the officers, should
inquire into their efficiency, their knowledge of local
danger points, etc., and should, by active interest in
the militia, encourage those who voluntarily perform
the military duties imposed by the Oonstitution upon
all able-bodied men between the ages of eighteen and
forty-five.
The State and the officers of the militia should
recognize the spirit of good-will towards the militia
when shown by the citizens generally outside of the
militia, and should make military duty conflict with
business interests as little as possible consistent with
having an efficient citisen-soldiery. Respectfully,
JOHN S. MAXWELL,
Colonel, First Infantry, Florida State Troope.

What's Agitating the
People These Days

(Continued from Sixth Page)
the 'scabs' and 'traitors,' and when persuasion will
not serve they are menaced with vengeance. When
the danger to persons and property becomes imminent
the much-abused writ of Injunetlon is invoked, and
this has sometimes proved effacious in suppressing
public demonstrations of lawlessness. But of what
avail is the writ of injunction to the non-union
laborer when he leaves the mine or the mill and is
stealthily followed to his home by has striking com-
rades and subjected to insults, often to wounds, when
they cannot dissuade him from returning to work?
The most resolute at last weary of the struggle and
abandon their right.
Yet it is proposed to Congress to cripple the writ
of the equity courts, which has proved of so little
efficacy in protecting the right of the individual
workingman to labor when and for whom he pleases.
The House judiciary committee refuses to report
the anti-injunction bill, and memebrs are thus saved
from the vengeance of the labor leaders upon such
as should refuse to give it their support. Whether
Congress possesses the constitutional power to destroy
or enfeeble this great writ for the merciful preven-
tion of wrong is another question."

Apropos of the announcement that Senator Clark
of Montana will not again be a candidate for election
to the Senate, the Daily 4,ewe of St. Paul, Mina.,
grows facetious and in such umor, in which yet the
grain of truth is plainly evident, puts forth this
paragraph:
"What a flinty heart beaten in the breast of Senator
Money-Bags Clark of Montana and other places.
"He is a member of the United States Senate. He
has hobnobbed with greatness. He has lived where
the epaulets grow. On Sunday afternoons he might
even stroll past the White House and compare that
ornate structure with his palace, which Thomas Law.
son named the 'bulliest and brassiest home in New
York.' He has had spread before him the fact that
money will buy almost everything-excet real pop
ularity, thm confidence of the people, a the ability
to wear one's clothes as if they we made for him.
"Mr. Clark refuses to be a candidate for reelection.
Fame does not seem to have satisofled the gawing in
his breast. Notoriety and his picture in a thousand
ppaers has not warmed ias heart. He is through,
done, finished. disgusted with public life.
"Does Senator Clark realize the hardship to he in-
flicted on a community by his relentless decision
Why, it is asserted that during his candidacy, money
was so plenty that it often flated into hotel tran-
some that had carelesly been left open, and a ma
might wake up any morning and fid $1,000 in his
pants pocket, and have no knowledge of the trans-
action.
"Scores of able men too strong to work have looked
on Mr. Clark as the Great American Meal Ticket!
lie kept money in circulation. It is asserted that he
seldom allowed his right hand to know what his left
hand was doing. He was liberal to a fault-several
of them.


"And now that procession of thirsty-looking men
is headed for the poorhouse. 'Tis a pitiful sight
Credit gone at the bar and no helping hand ear.
"A padlock on the Clark poe tbook and a watch-
man in front. God help the poor. The rich are
looking out for temsaelvem.
"It doesn't seem possible that Clark would be"
the heart to do it."





I.


poumtaisth Pan


THE SUN


- -w
- -h 6 U ~ ~d**L. -.


Short Sermon for

Non-Church Goers


"THE SPIRIT OF THE AOE."


By Rev. T. Henry Blenus, Pastor Church Street
Christian Church


In any period of elvillmatoa we may
diseer, beneath all the diversities of
the life individual, a sort of eompoelte
ptue to wlAe we apply the asna
Spirit of t Ahe. t German
all it the "2841" This spirit is
not the ame In every age. In Uro a
certain period is forever embalmed in
history as the.age of "'*enal ane," an-
other as the age of the "Reformation."
In the evolution of the complexity of
our mddern elvilisation it is an extremely
difficulWt thing to haracterias our age by
any single word. We require almost as
many words as there a phases to pub-
lie life.
The spiritual prophet of Princeton has
spoken of it in the following manner:
"From the material side we might call
this age the age of progress; from the
intellectual side the age of scelones from
the medical side the age of hysteria;
from the political side the age of democ-
racy; from the commercial side the age
of advertising; and from the social side
the age of publo-mania. But looking
at it from the spiritual side, beyond a
doubt it stands confessedly the doubting
age."
In America this is our age of demon-
racy. The evolution of human govern-
ment has led us a long way from the
throne upon which Kingp sit septered
and crowned. Education, scene, art,
liberty and religion, have all descended
to the many, and in government the
common people rple.
The common people today are deter
mining our art, our literature, our news-
papers, and our public schools. All the
great developing, fmative influences of
the nation are the hands of the de-
mocracey. *
The origin Qf true, genuine, demo*
eratic pivncples, not the principles
underlying the actions of so many of
the doings or mqipge of political dem.
agog ut 4h dmoMracy which came
a the carol o tg of the nativity of
Jesus Christ, mw be traced to the re-
ligion of Chr ty. The Nasarene
was the origi true democrat. The
commonn people heard him gladly." His
twelve ohoeen ea were from the com-
mon people. Chrittianity went from its


SEVEN CUPS OF TEA, THEIR SYM-
BOLISM IN JAP LORB.
Parls.-Judith Gautier, daughter of
the great romancer, and herself a con-
noieseur nla Japanee and Chinese lore
and art, tells of the seven eups of tea
every Jap'daily has for breakfast.
The sups are very small, of course.
The first ise drunk "to perfume the
mouth sad wet the throat." The second
"1- drive away any melaneholy felingl"
The third "to stir the heart and awaen
the intellet." The fourth "to open the
pom and mause 111-feeln to evaporate."
The ixtk "to elevate te drinker among
the gods." The seventh "to make him
feel as if he had wings to his shoulders."
TAFrS RIVAL. WEIGHT 5W LB
Wouldn't Go Bating Like American
Secretary of War, and Bad to Die.


birthplace appealing to the poor. From
the hour of the inception of the religion
of the Christ, the great religious move
ments have been "upbeavals from be-
neath." The Reformation begun among
the peasant lass of Germany. It was
led I the son of a peasant. Puritan-
mm in England claimed a tew men of
high station, but in the main it was a
soovement among the lower and middle
classes. Cromwell's army was correctly
characterized by the sneer "tapsters and
serving men." In our day all the great
forward movements of the church have
their rise among, and gather their re-
cruits from the common people. In all
heathen lands devoted and consecrated
generals are leading cohorts and bat.
talions against the strongholds of Idol-
atry, superstition and sin, but scarcely
any one of them is high born. In the
home field the same phenomenon is to be
observed.
That church must meet the realization
of America's hope, the dream of true
democracy, which is of the people, for
the people and by the people.
Unprecedented growth and expansion,
marvelous conquests of a far-reaching in-
fluence will come to that church which,
following the guiding footsteps of the
"Carpenter's Son," has as its inspiration
the development of the masses along the
lines of the true spirit and genius of
the Master's teaching, and apostolic prac-
tice and precedent.
The church of our Lord is, and must be
its nature ever continue to be, a move-
ment upwards. Not many mighty, not
many noble are seemingly called into its
ranks, but it can and will ever possess
the potency and the promise of the right
hand of the Almighty, and the power of
an endless life.
Our American government is supposed
to have within its Constitution the ideals
and the forms laid down by the Pales-
tine Master, aiming to be the complement
and satisfaction of democracy. Whatever
contributions may have come to us from
other religions, it is not extravagant to
claim for the true faith of a Christian
democracy, by virtue of its ideals, its
genius, its founder, its character and its
equipment, the only faith that meets the
demands of the age.


great difficulty in moving about, he mel-
oom left his abode, keeping to a room
on the ground floor, propped up by extra
beams. For occasional outings he used
a furniture van and two strong horses.
An event like that was always adver-
tised beforehand, and brought hundreds
of sightseers to the village. Up to the
day of his death Fromm retained an ex-
cellent appetite. He became champion
heavy-weight of Europe two years ago,
when cancer killed Tom Langley of
Dover. Tom weighed 584 pounds, and
ueed to travel about the country in a
car specially constructed tor his bulk.
HAWAIIAN PICTURES.
The publisher of "Paradise of the Pa.
cite," Honolulu, Hawaii, has recently
issued a portfolio of camera views taken
on the various islands of the Hawaii
group, with relief maps-in all one hun-
dred views with accomnanvinm dewrin.


Berlin.-The Kaiaer is much laterested tive text. The portfol-o-
in Secretary Taft's banting cure, as he paid for $1, and all interest
oeteems him not only a capable oicer, nation's far-away possessions
but especially as a friend and adviser eifc should own one. Publishl
ol President Roosevelt. When Taft's M. Langton, Honolulu, Hawaii
oee was discussed at the Palace the the same time, for a sample o
other evening, the Kaiser showed e Interesting monthly, "Paradis
American Ambassador a dispatch from Pacific," mentioning the littlel
Elbaing, just received, recording the death per" when ordering.
of the weightiest man in Europe, Hans
fromm, a road-house keeer in Eastern A YEAR PENITENTIARY F(
rrussia. Fromm we5ighe 25 pounds, QUARTER OF A CENT TA
and steadfastly refused to beat or do
aythln elS to rsdue his ht. He Gotha. A professional
was S foot 7 in height, meurd nAramed Stutx, was sentenced to
6 Weet arUn dh t aSnd6 1?-2 feet Penitentiry for stealing five
"M b hib wat. As he experienced one and one-half center, from al


sent poet.
ed in the
in the Pa-
id b Wm.
. Ask, at
opy of his
e of the
e pink pa-

)R EACH
AKEN.
criminal
five years
pfennige,
ittleboy.


Dear Dad-I arrived In Jacksonville
nearly blind, and was taken to the opti-
clan'*, where I was treated by a neurolo-
gist, who proscribed diet, and put me on
a fig for breakfast, nolunch, and a pecan
nut for dinner, and after six days' treat-
ment I could me a loaf of hP hbime's
hd five miles. Yours,
NED.
P. 8.-It's bread like mother used to
w~i i


TlM w le er


IT'S BEERIN.

JACKSON FLLA. COCACOLA
NG CO.
SL L NAUMIC


Try

"Green Brier"

Tennessee Whisky

Sirs PURE
THA'S SURE


Robt.W.Simms
SOLE AGENT
Jacksonville, FIL
wl PM NmL P mUSTw

TIL Ownke Chocolate
*lll..J..and Bon ons.....
*m** I aB B.... .

mm g

In 1-2. I. 2 and 5 Lb. Packages


25, 40,60 S
I% m fm -OI i to
MKm wmm


Strg ad tdrg


When In Jacksville
**** as Others Do...


(0% GILREATI'S
223 W. Bay St.



qmlit gl Ikm*g To



Henry Watterson's Paper


(The We"~~OusrJml


m


THE SUN


BeI Onm Year for Ony $2.50
jpopIe in the United States have not
ed of te OurieJo l. Dmocrtie
in thl, far in all tlnM dmea In
au t, ton Y, Ii emnlally a Mlly news.
m By a speci arr an mennt we are
OUnled to oflr the WeeklyourierJour.
nal oe ear and paper for te price
named above. Send your aubeription
for te omblnaton to aw-n-o to the
OBOmi"a!4m(nil.


OLD ICKOR and If
WHITE HICKORY WAGONS


The tomb$

Columbus Buggies
&V In *Mpwo^


nmft


w


N'MURRAY& BAKER


Has h


Fi Lin d Ti dhb66
bpd W NW on

u~m


It's Different When You urmI
BECRINE


June 2, 1906


4












jemcourtsAuto


Tour of Italy
tintedd from Seventh Page.)
noeadows, forests, towns and vil-
ather than to the Sistine chapel
it Kensington Museum.


ROMAN OAMPAGNA.


.THE SUN


After Severe Illness W

when the bodily forces are low, and
you are weak and feeble


laboriously climbing a melan.
rock plateau, almost devoid of
ion, we descended at last into the
na flat lands, dominated in the
stance by the snow4lad SorMate.
ad, true to Rome' war-like tra-
follows the natural elevation,
human settlements shun. On our
e or six miles we met but few sa-
nd we saw less of them the nearer
to Rome. Here and there strag-
herds of horses, pigs, goats and
ruarded by a solitary shepherd on
ek, but no human habitations, no
agricultural, economical or indus-
ife. The whole landscape was
I in deep silence as If to prepare
sity travelers from the United
for our visit to the ancient city,
of the world. And we were im-
I, despite our somewhat bolster-
tirits. It's one thing to enter
between coal-pookets, freight
and barracks, through smoke and
s of all sorts; one thing to make
way through hordes of baggage-
rs, hotel-runners, eabbies and buss
tors; another to keep the eye on
) between the rows of hills where,
or later, the cupola of St. Peter's
appear. And when suddenly it
ito sight, out of the gray mists,
se in our seats and cried with one
"Rome," "Rome," as if we were
it for the first time. The auto-
is not only a splendid scene prom
it also excel as a scene shifter.


IN ROME.


ss Pontemolle bridge, between the
os of Piazza del Popolo, via the
to our hotel. What contrasts
hie extended lonely spell in the
gna! The prairie and upper
vay on an opera night, a New
id village and Piccadillyf
we proud of our trip? We are of
nutteur, American brand, if you
Not a minute's delay since leav-
e Apennines, 400 miles to the
C(MTESSE D'ALEMOOURT.


he Czar's Spy
Continued from Tenth Page)
ied to get from him all that he
oneerning Elms, but he seemed,
ti( curious reason, disinclined to
U 1 I could gather was that Leith-
was in league with Chater and
*fie, and that Muriel had acted
entirely innocent agent. What
piracyy was, or what was its mo-
could not discern. I was as far
solution of the problem as ever.
must first find Muriel," he de.
when I pressed him to tell me
ing he knew. "There are facts
, told me which negative my own
o. and only from her can we ob-
li, real truth."
Surely you know where she is?
rit"N to you," I ajd.
l at letter, which I received at
,'t hvs ago, was from the Hotel
I. t lBotzen, in the Tyrol, yet Bart-
' sihe has been seen down at East-
I you have an address where you
write to her, I supposed"
', a secret one. have written
I(E1. an appointment, but she has
pt it. She has been prevented, of
S Ie may be with her parents,
Ible to come to London."
I' lid not know that they fled, and
" hiding?"
*"urse not. What rIve heard to-
SPnews to me--masi ng news."
:i ,ls it not convey to you the
1 ghastly truth oncerning
l 'rth," he evwered in a low
Stlho)ughspei to himself.
r('rythbb ea m snfMr. Who


Mott, Jr's, Reminder

Many people would trade with you that don't if they thought of you when they
needed the article. That's exactly what my bulletins are for-to keep your
name and goods before them every day, day after day, so you will be thought
of when they need anything in your line.
We are I ua*s uilldldrN We paint anything you wish on our
DAdsigns" in bright, attractive colors.
Many a good business has been built up by attractive bulletins.

Prices $2, $3 and $4 Per Month
(Includes Everything.)


The Mott, Jr., Bulletin System
1i sCdow Seot.


PARTIAL PRICE LIST OF

Wines, Whiskies, Beer and Malt


0INPN PPAD
ftnft~u~j*............I205 64006$7
maog e ........... 20 456 6
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D e .~........ ........4 50 6$50 12
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........... .. 5 00 9
W =Os o ....... f ...... '25 7
Gin ........... ......~... 15 600 9

NOWIMB20 m 00 9
Vo ii I ... a..........n..... 250 -%S50 7
...m......... ... .*. 8 75 00 9
Gaersd'.......... 0....... 75 6 00 1
KIv = Q U~kBmUbou 87'5600 1
buidWdinsim6IiPW


I I
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NLK 1110 M NONFK-WST WO

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, ,m,, HANNE BROS.


is that fellow Obergt"
"Her enemy. She, by mere accident,
learned his secret and Woodroffe's, and
they now both live in deadly fear of her."
"And for that reason she was taken
to Siena, where some villanlous Italian
doctor was bribed to render her deaf and
dumb."
He nodded in the affirmative.
"ButChater? "
(OO1rXNUzD) NBXT WEEK) I


oRecently- Enlarged
WITH
25,000 New Words
New Oasetteer of the World
with more than.oO ttiMA, ibed On the
latest oonsus rturs
New BDogsaphloal Dictlonasy
oontaini? tbejames ,f over 100 noted
Edted intyW.t.o HATlIlT fPrh.D LL.D.,
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93860 Quarto Pagse
Ne, edked i n vurust y u om 3hIe,
Needed In Every Home
Also Webster'oCoeesgsteo DttenUMry

Mg, Ssuudtion Isxlimahm. Ititdfr

0.6 C. MERRIAM CO..
PbllSahees. SprsteIld.Mae.



JAM BAS, lA


Jachueavlie*


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RAL ESTATE


Barains
Property


in Improved and Unimproved
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Fifteenth Pape


GLT THE BEST


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THE


HOUSE


OF


Is as well known in Florida Musical Circles


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CABLE


as


the House of Seven Gables is in Literary Circles


Organs and Piano


Sold by Us


lasting in quality that


as well


as


/10 West HE
Bay St.


Players


respected


CO.


Jacksonville,
Florida


When you think about Musical Instruments


TILL'S
ToE HANDSOMEST-
Till COOST-
THE BEST-IN TOWN
For Drinks
S TIhat Ar, Soft
For D)rinks
That A r. (Cool
For Drinks
That Are lefr'sliing
0 TO TILL'S
Foy Chocolhte8
That Av F'relh
For Candies
That Are Pure
GO TO TILL'S


To spend a delightful hour in conversation with your friends,
fanned by electric made breezes and charmed by cleanliness and


artistic environment


Go to TILL'S WVBaya
Jac7 onvllla fi


* a


Su YOUR Ce CRaAM nu OM TILLI Phm, 4 Pm vy Anywh4 i M Quuw.


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g


Pianos,


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are so high in grade and so


we are known If t sf It if


we are


Call on or write to


CABLE


1.1




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