Group Title: sun.
Title: The sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075914/00026
 Material Information
Title: The sun
Uniform Title: sun
Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sun Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: May 5, 1906
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tallahassee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Leon County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Leon -- Tallahassee
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.451667 x -84.268533 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 18, 1905)-v. 3, no. 47 (Sept. 12, 1908).
Numbering Peculiarities: Published at Tallahassee, Fla., June 23-Sept. 12, 1908.
General Note: Claude L'Engle, editor.
General Note: "If it's right, we are for it."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075914
Volume ID: VID00026
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33400104
lccn - sn 95047216
 Related Items
Other version: Morning sun (Tallahassee, Fla.)
Succeeded by: Dixie (Jacksonville, Fla.)

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Full Text






THE TRAVELS OF HEALijW THIS ISSUE


Volume 1-No. 25 JAGK6ONVII mm, FUORIA. MAY 5, 1906 in Copy 8 0


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*IF IT'S RIOHT, WE AREB POR IT


CLAUDE L'ENOLE
Editor


THE


SUN


A. K. TAYLOR
, Cartoonist


m =LSI M VW WN hA UUWUISVSnIM FM D FM TillPUWIZ ROM By rII O N Of ATN81 351FU ITUST"MMM UM09. LODA
miumie ~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o IN.2JAKOVLE ORDNY,10Sntper Copy, $2 perYea


F~~nthe Pad b Ps Office at Jai siilJUa, as so~~umte' ~


In the Sun's Chariot

i tato. Talks aween Pubisher and Reader


Confdentially, you know, we are wise to the fact that we are
putting thgs in THE SUN that force people to toes the gladsome
priands at our bulging brow.
We ct*fult eoan every line that goes in THE SUN before commit-
tiag it to the mreihles Mergenthaler, and we go over the finished
product with brutal severity, determined to let no dull or unsanitary
word or phrase escape.
It follows, that when THE SUN is ready for the mail bags, it
comes pretty nigh suiting us, and we figure ourselves the harshest,
most unrelenting, most vigorously determined critics THE SUN can
have.


We are in this attitude toward THE SUN because we are unwilling
for it to be any lesm than the best.
In view of the foregoing, it does not surprise us when people pass
around the information that THE SUN is well liked, much appreciated
and enthusiastically endorsed by them.
When we get letters telling us about SUN excellence we are de-
lightfully pleased and monstrously encouraged.
When we receive a personal visit from a friend who says, as
for example one man did last Saturday: "THE SUN is a grand paper,"
we take no pains to conceal our pleasurable agitations.
Well the letters, their name is legion, and the friends are dropping
in all hours of all the days in the week.
Then we are constantly running accros a comment like this-


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From Live Oak Democrat:


The Pat Marphy letters in the Jacksonville SUN are the
real thing in wit and humor, and whether you agree with his
views or not you must warm to the way in which he presents
them. Pat is an ornament to the sui generis variety in Florida
journalism.
The like of this, being what is known as expert testimony, reaches
our solar plexus of joyful complacency.
Yes, thooe Pat Murphy letters are good.
They are bound to be good-
For Pat is fancy free and knows not responsibility.
He writes just what he feels, and he feels just what he likes.
He, being butterfly dweller among men, can tackle any subject or
go up against any proposition without fear of losing his job.
The only fear that has ever haunted the soul of Pat, was his
when he thought he would not lose a job he had thrust upon him
unawares just after he landed in this country from the Boss of Balligo.
wanted.
Besides the epitle, pf Pat there are other things in THE SUN to
cause you to regret it fou dofi'tget it.
Just run over this li *
Brilliant catchy cartoons.
Absorbing serials.
Fascinating original stories.
Facts not seen' elsewhere.
Live political goaip.
Comment on live subjects.
Then go right off to the pokoffice and
Send $2.00 and get THE SUN for twelve months.


=


WATCH FOR OUR PREMIUM OFFERS TO


BE MADE SOON.


A

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even toI


how much Wrterthi offer rely. Tine o*ly .reao
the people of thi State i became we have iMthem
TM M to It pwe, and wewe!7ill lnorld read 1
Cosmopolitan, one year, -
Woman's Home Oompanio, one y
The Review of Reviews, one year,
Pearson's, one year, -
The American Magazine, one year,
Tom Watson's Magazine, one year,
THE SUN, one year, -
Total, -


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differ
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real


$1.00
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TME COSMOPOUTA N whlech was recently puohaed by Mr. W. B. H"eint, ha
w V UUM been greatly Improved by the new management and 1i
ow the mot'poplar ten.ent llubrated month in the world. Almeady l esn have
lncra d 100,000 ovr what y were four mentt ago,when It became a of t 9 *
006 Hntpublilidh orsmaliatlon. The imblilmnaNipItno ftoM! torIt
al that l mon th way of pictu, storieB and Wrtifeaon. LGn ep pl-
tGre by FteheP4tin and storib b W. W. Jamobs an nowe la tn h mo.
pollta. and a stroa new serial by .Q0.eW .
THRK 1 Ao r eutn Americoa mobd wom on
T MVwW v HVWN toeu With m tge ito
ta t shortest cut-w boch s The Review of evowe-a monthly sr of thworld's
WOMANS HOME COMPANION ". not calledd, by y e bors and
iion family Pubrloaaton n thworld. Storlo,
PKARSON'i oe Of e fiction maain of the day. th and
sbo" Ami n bow by authonn o world-wide 'p Pearson's i
coudded authority n book mie
THE AMERICAN MAUZIPME othir y know" a *le' l Mane.
It w" latefyrchasd by a powerful yndl-
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TOM WATSON'S MMAfA INE ool' magahe In America over before
TOM WATSON"S MAiAZlNK No,., ,,, **,",
W n'an eeiiii*ia.*e ssry so*!'tt i Is at c5sorremosr.t
waea byacla ofpeople.and dee L withe be thouht of
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May 5, 1906


THE SUN


Third Page


Healy Travels WkiloeCOhogt WIII&

A Short History Showing the Mailed Hand of Coachman On Mbre Reaching Out.
By Claude L'Ig1le. *


Major Healy, bold and jolly,
How we love your merry soul;
Youelf and melancholy
Are never cheek by jowl.
'Tin true you're quite a rover,
And have no fed abode;
But we know there's something doing,
When Healy takes the rowt.


Major Haly. fat sad ier.y,
Don't we knowtbow rot4 kyo meT
Your style Is never heaghty,
At mixing you're a iOr.W
Those trips you make quito often,
Your plans don't oftem. al;
We know aome ohews a brewing
When Healy trike the trail.


Major Healy, hale m arty
You can q ta l9ely p* *
A wdkeem tipsrtyx.
Who rumde pouar llfaes
Bo~lome oam muet put up the dlogh,
xpease don't co t a bit;
'Ti a dh te pot' abolng,
Whoi Healy bhits the grit.


Major Healy, rowasad rosy,
Yetagyte 4prbeat,
To x'aote r ep with beildt,
To know whdagsglap o0 ue days,
h n' H d sthertsa


Well, the Major Is gain en tourane
This time be s not looking after political funesu.
On t wingaround the tate, th noble wort of
peruadin the voter bow to Yote jat awtly right,
supgM not tihe tatnon of the Toi"l Mo4r.
A sterner duty mlte him from those pstoral per
mulis In whlob hble boli spirit revels h compels
reluctant mother earth to peld her boadiat fruits at
the putting cof his dimpled hads to the plow.
The blatant blet of the trmpet led to the n-
comprem-iagly Uar lips pof a ptaiq in laduorey,
ditarbed with o dtarton note tn h pes "l imDage o
JafEy (mar Seille); sad, old war bor i hn b ,
th Major ihmd tho umanM de the AmJboumad
pup p tosm a mawuil elmeB to the rlde sad
Lomg bdio thd o Ac of that trmpet ad hbad
thdm ebod fvma the pda aim ddam ailo
Healy b ', t M4or ad uttered ti fatal wed
"flsdool sad Mbiy toeas tooth brd, pN n,
hair osk sadq with w eoim abMm
into bb wo wron A elm, ti Major was oc, as
the farm haadm pamd back op yelate e


As th* rts le m dawiag room
0 ci ve*at ewh wih M swsle a bar er
tw di '-mat "to- -h-i-- tled "I'DS
Loa Te Whi Y W saw No M sy oraI got
Sware%." a t o pe" ads o" II de bb
arm in whn my hawo beem a wink.
Wb the traveler madght
taks. e tbotIrdsn ased Jam e


to art amif memory had galvanised hbl nearvu*nd
plunging his right hand into his breath pdket he
pulled from those myderious depth a letter on
whlh he beat hle march eye.
U was not a dlanty mindve of robin's egg b'e
that boa tree of the scent of violet; it had.
"ggummy" look, and mnieled of a well known co0 .
Smdd ~ e edi y quoted on the Board of Trade a
"water lmts window glaw."
No3hse"iMli epistle was aver penned than the
one d the attention of te Maor. Xot
eMn ame dispat~b wa better pruned of super.
flsuou 'I It ed-
dma to ,. ^*. *


Wewbol has ver bee*n theory of thee who
uean to eos|, r wn nut behold the Majiwor
I ,.tow# e eeto1nge ,
ftgeimd purpem*astes (rom his eesp
at n aii lonk I fto P dm ts-oo Again the uor.ehiog.
who never saak bs isopied.
A imxaem odor ai te tetive noti
w~m m pmd -mo- the in" Ibeake
tei.r blow m th te enk

^jer 5al wml eaplate. W. .Oa"


!ASMOU
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Fourth Page


THE SUN


May S, 1906


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About twenty yea ago the writer,
who a mall boy, visited Peaola and
redWied the Iampeale of a mall vil-
leg with a bigJ ay itsmdAt of ItL
Last week he spin visited Pensools,
and th impression made upon him was
Of large, thriving, enterprising, bust-
ling, business city with a most magnifl-
at harbor and shipping facilities and
th eartain prospect of commroial great-
es, as the development of the resources
of this State and the neighboring States
will demand for them an outlet.
Therew are many things that impress
the visitor to Penaoola-the air of
thrift, tI spirit of enterprise, thea Oa
alflmat blildifgs, the delightful ell-
mat*, ut.-
It is THE HARBOR that makes the
DOMINANT AND MOST LASTING
IMPRESSION upon the mind of tne
visitor.
Penassoola Bay, spread before the city,
three and a half miles wide and thirty.
dight miles long, with from thirty-five
t1 forty-fve feet of water, capable of
eutmmiodaetl the navies and fleets of
the world In safe anchorage, is THE
FEATURE of Pensacola, and Is the
thing that will make it a great city.
With thirty-Ave feet of water at high
tide a the bar, sad with docks only ten
ails from the Gulf, at which ships e a
bI loaded to a depth of twenty-eight feet,
Paenisola is able to asert its supremacy
a porL
STaegaphi od" tis of Pftmolk
dves It o ind of t trade that will
Sb ghw Panama Oanal to thea
arktofo Sieth America and those of
west eait of Central and North
Amri. The doks In Pnasoola are
exactly the same distance from the bar
at New Orleans a the docks i New Or-
leans are from the Now Orlean bar. It
is exactly the same distance from the
bar at Mobile a that city i from its
bar.
It is twtyevea miles nearer the
mouth of the Panama Canal than Mo
bile is, and thirty. lx mile nearer thai
New Orlea. The depth of water on
the Mobile bar Is twaty-one feet, and
the channel from the bar to the dooki
is narrow, is fortythree miles long, anc
of the sam depts The depth of water
oa the New Or bar is twenty'egh
feet, sad the distance from the bar t
the dooks is 110 miles of winding chan
nel.
The Illinois Central Railroad bring
to New Orleans tin products of the vas
territory known as the Middle West, fo
shipment to the markets of the world
The Misalaippi is also a great feed
for New Orieas. eMsaseola is but 80
mile from New Orleas, 00 mike tr
at. LAele, I malla fro Me mphis, 78
miles from mty, and oly 0
miles froi rm
Peeaola has the railroad facili
ties tat its maglaent shipOling faelli
ties antte it to. A trunk to
Louis or Chicago or, Mabla, whie
would eonmnet Penaeol with th gis
railway systems of theM country, would
enable Peaisola to asert i* sueapnow
as a port and draw its share of 4ae so
module that now reaeh the world
through the ports of New Orieans, Mi
bile and Galveaton.
No better terminal faollitie xit I
this country than those at Peasacoli
The mammoth export wharves of tU
Loulrvllle & Nashville Railroad ean a
eommdete eighteen large ships at em
time, which can be loaded to a depth
twamty-eight feet, with addlUetion
berths for sailing veesels drawing twena
feet or les. Tbhee twin docksd are 1,
let long and substantially built. (
one of them, in addition to a track
each side, is an overhead graa eari
emnetlng the elevator at the end of t
docks wih the elevator at the rear


an endless, team-driven bucket chain,
o that a ship can be loaded with grain
or disharge of its cargo without the
aid of hand It is at this dook that the
naval stores an handled, the cargoes of
Tennessee phosphate are loaded, and the
cargoes of kainit from foreign ports are
discharged. The other dock has a cov-
ered warehouse its entire length, with a
railroad track running on both sides,
above and below, making four tracks on
this dock.
At this dock Is handled cotton, to-
bacco, phosphate and general merchan-
dise for foreign and domestic shipment,
and it is a discharging place for the mis-
oellaneous cargoes rough by the ships
entering the port.
The facilities for handling lumber are
the best that any city affords. Large
ailing vessels and huge tramp steamers
lie out In the bay and are loaded with
lumber from rafts. At no time in the
year does this work stop.
For two years past Pensacola has been
the rendesvous of the South Atlantic
fleet of the United States Navy. The
battleship, cruisers and torpedoboats
Find ample accommodation In Pensacuola
harbor, and a short ten-mile run takes
them to the Gulf for maneuvers.
Pensacola's fishing fleet, composed of
s. ubstantially-built schooners, is engaged
in a trade that swells the export list of
Pensacola by a considerable amount.
In 1880 Pensacola had about 7,000 peo-
s ple. In 1900 the population is a little
Over 28,000. In 1886 the export busi-
r ness of Pensacola amounted to $2,000,-
t 000. In 1000 these figures will run over
o $20,000,000. A new bond issue of $750,-
1. 00 has been voted and will be expended
inca complete modern system of sewer-
s age, a comprehensive plan of paving, a
t new city hall and a waterworks system.
r Franchises have been granted the Pen-
secola A Memphis Railroad and the Pen-
r easeola & Andalusia (Ala.) Railroad,
0 which give promise of early completion.
SftIS former line will put Pensacola in
8 touch with the great railroad systems of
0 the West, and the latter will open the
iron fields to Pensacola.
I. In 1905 the naval stores receipts at
I. Pensacola amounted to $3,500,000. I
1904 steam and sailing vessels cleared
a from Pensacola with gross tonnage of
it 041,583. The same year $7,500,00(
d worth of cotton was shipped from Pen
y seo. In that year also the lumbei
shibm nts amounted to $2,884,073.
d total exports from Pensacola dur
o. I e calendar year 1904 were $14,
99O,000, and the imports for the same
In year wre $779,24&.
a, The Jobbing houses of Pensacola did a
e busiaes in the year 1905 of $3,500,000.
e- The fish business at Pensacola is the
me larget- r the Gulf of Mexico, and wa
l valued last year at $000,000.
al The territory immediately contiguous
ty to Pea1eol has been exploited of lat
i0 in its agricultural possibilities, and thi
A) bide fali to become a considerable pot
on t"s of the business of Pensacola.
er The Chamber of Commere, of whicl
h Frank L. Mayee is president and W. (
by Joess is secretary, is a live orpuaitil


Pabi x- IN adq ki 60um&M ~Podemu.


which is working for the development of
all the industries of Pensacola and the
making of a great city.
The United States navy yard, at the
Gulf end of Pensacola bay, has a dry
dock of 12,000 tons capacity, and is an
important repair shop for the ships of
the navy. Six hundred men are con-
stantly employed here.
The bay front, to the south of the city,
affords magnificent sites for dwelling
houses, commanding a view of the bay


and within easy .reuh of the city. This
has become a p4 of rapid development,
bay fronts now being quoted at $200 per
front foot. Some of t well-to-do Pen-
acolan have already erected magnifi-
cent homes on the ba front.
There is no faetuo of municipal life
laIckdin I Pen edl to aake it a city
good to live in. i social advantages
are mniy, being peopled by a warm-
hearted citienship. There are churches
and scret socetiee In abundance, and
school advantages a bo excellnt. The
Osceo0a Club,. fablishe thirty years
ago, has a membership wbih contributes
largely to the social enjoyment 9 cit-
traens d visitors; the (ountAy lub is
compoed of 100 member{ ere is a
Jewish Club with a large. embehp,
an Athletic Club well 1:pi1 fa
oiltiies for bodil exerce,ht
and boat club which uw'sa 0a
botho oh e rg mpl opportunity
for th most deliMhtful recreation in the
world. -
All Florldians who have not visited
Pensaola can take the trip with pleas-
ure and profit.
It is a obming city.


a bwlb d- i


C~ss4ahktrbywwgq57..1.J


Pensacola-.Prosperous and Pushi
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FOWh Pop


The Port of Pensacola
and the Painm Canal


W. A. BLOUNT, .
In bnuacola Journal Panama Canal Edition.
Now that the Panama Canal is as.
sured, and the work has already be.
gun, the eyes of the commercial world
are turned towards the South Atlantic
and Gulf ports. Pre-eminent among
the letter :stands Pensacola by virtue
of her g aphical location and unfur.
passed deep water faoflitips.
The de oion that the canal in to be
a sea level one, means that in the dis-
tant future, as well as at the time of its
completion, vessels of the largest size
will find a safe and speedy journey from
ocean to ocean; and guarantees a free-
dom from accidents impossible in a look
type of canal. 1,, .LL
It is estimated' that the coat Ot con*
struction will be $230,000,000, and it is
calculated that from eight to twelve
years will be required to complete the
canal.
What is and what will be the effect
of this wedding of the oceans upon the
commercial growth and prosperity of
Pensacola? Let us look at the map. A
glance will suffice to show the advan-
tageous location of Pensacola, both as
to the canal and as to the producing and
manufacturing centers of the Southern
and Middle Western States. Pensacola
is nearer thq mouth ,of the canal than
any other deep water port either on the
Gulf or South Atlantic coast. Her
docks are modern and commodious, and
her harbor is oQud to none in America.
Draw a circle with Pensacola as its cen-
ter, and a radiu of 750 miles and you
will find that thi tppr half.of this ir.


The lessening of disttanes and coet of
handling goods have always been the
greatest upbulders of commerce. This
Is just what the canal will cpboplisli,
as is evidaeed by the unprecedented
growth of the commerce of Grat Brit.
ain sine the completion of the Sues
Canal, which more than cut in half the
distance between England's manufacture.
ing center nd' India as well as brinq.
ing her 9 olratopoh with the entire
eastern wld&. Taui will we in turn

*' ." ; Ht e .'.. ***.* *


*AW5pe View, W eIti" g Niberee fr"m TWMue iN L AL
ale will Include practically all of the eneflt by being brought so much oloser
greatest agricultural and manufacturing Ifto our island po ions in the Paciic,
enters ha the United States, with the to say nothing of China and Japan,
exception of the grain States of the ex. whose demands for both raw and anished
trene Northwest, and the manufactur- products long ere the canal is completed,
ing centers of New England. The North- will have increase manifold.
western States are tributary to the Pa- Few of us realis that the control of
ciec ports, and their products will con- commerce in the Far Eat really lies
tinue to be handled through them. This with the United States. With the contm-
is also true of that part of the Eastern pleted canal, our AtlpeHle, Gulf and Pa-
States which do not fall within the cir. cilio ports, fed even ow by more miles
cle, and their products and manufac- of railroad than the whole of Europe
turned articles will continue to find out- .
let through the harbors of the North At-
lantile seaboard.
But this vast territory included within
the upper half of the circle will seek an
outlet on the Gulf or South Atlantie.
Pensacols, owing to her exceptional fa-
cilities, nearnes to the Gulf and prox-
Imity to the esad, will certainly drain
a lrge part of this enormous and Inm-
TI. op Ms1 gof the canal will imme
diately tiulate commerce between thU
eastoer ports of the United Sates sn,
eountrie with whom we now have Ist
slight commerelal relations. The west
era coast of out Ameriea, the Philip.
pines, and even Jaisn and China, and
other countries of the Far East will Im-
mediately feel the great effect of the ay-
l tie s and expean wrotght by this
Wateway.. Tes from China,
sal Jap f, ant"t and lMAe
from South Amerisca, sugar frsN Ha-
wall, Msa the varieus products of the
Phil is ft of tihe whole east-
era l d, will edtr our esters aud
Gifet via t m ew eaLN he llo.

rla. Peval.


s, man bettor p1epsred to sup. her proximity to te cotton enters, et
ply the msa' V~ than any a la part of such lPaP Mtsa. sh
of our petitersn a44t the nations, will o get eorinomous um to of pi
From our own Southen bmtaes, where iron, coal, ooke, iron and ad their
now the hum of the loom and ppindle is by-products from Alabam and Tem-
rapidly supplanting the ring of the me. Timber, lumber and saval store
woodman's ax, we will send our cotton Irom several States, tobseao from Ken.
goods already manufactured Into cloth .ucoky, orn, wheat, and oats from the
to those people who are becoming so Middle Wetern States, and manufa-.
rapidly oivilised. tund product. of every description from
Ia 1893 Japan imported from the the great manufacturing State border-
United States only about $300,000 worth I ing on the Ohio river.
Already re the canal well begun,
... .-. -. farsightea business men are tuwn
,, this way. ThWe tieof t of the

lners Id value of feal at the
ln railroad del to,

which will be nessary In thebu
of the ant will be sh rpedth
deA6and for a ha(ioi on the Mex-
lean Gulf, combibing L6e ahorage,
deep channel an rne ie to the 6 lf,
Towards such ptort, k"*ith the a l
egtalat, many rallrolds must of 'M.
eit #* l'" i I/and e6 ole of the list and
a" inM m od" rntbe IfeftA 'hieh th* hal d*
b hb berie sto bMool e wm t* l ll.
of raw cotton. Of this she exported in gla d with It a tmin tl
manufactured goods to Chi about hak ever adhag a Wrtd sea
$P ,000 worth. In 1903 she p d t, e t lrd. With s
about $14,00,000 worth, of which Iout mliS al, them 1 be imea m-
$11*000,000 worth was manufacured and meroial nseeity.
exported to China. This isbt an *. If the ltiMs of P o add to
ample of the oommeroial growth of --e what nature ha deo oealy a little
countries, and pae in the r t enegy, publieo *pilt a tnd e th
will mean vast cotton business t star or ofur eu i p' pI ties
South, all of which will, upon t0 om-m. higher and higbr U s wil be
stion of the onal, pass thru the tt o the prood d sto
gulf ports, and Peneaoola, by N as of of the glat Pt0ity4onh .


A. ~ 1'~r 1


THE SUN


i












M~ Pegs


THE SUN


May 8,1906


Shaking the Old Plum Tree

iB EDWARD FITZOERALD


SPOT HIM- (fT(M HIM mIIND
TA6 HIM -. HE'5 LITTLE:-
6rOOD TO HIMSELF FUID
I1OnE TO THE C(OMUnITY.
.,$%W bU...6% I-< -.. .I. ^


Public indifference ois the chief source of political
evil the principal cause of Impotent or Incompetent
overnment, with its uAual accompAlmeat of graft.
difference or ignorance of the quallAcations of can*
dates or issues at stake are progeniltors of migov-
ernament.
Too often the cry isbheard, "We have too much
polities," and too often it Is heeded for the good of
he common welfare. It i lampossible to have too
much politics of the rist kaind, ad by the riCh6 kind
is meant that the Individual eitiesn should itform
himself of all that may be possible to learn-beth of
candidates and Iaues-that when the day of election
arrives he may have a clear understanding 91of his
duty, which should have been reinforced by prompt
payment of poll tax and egistration.
Naturally better government would follow, better
men would serve the peop le. The person whose rec-
ord was tainted, or one woee Pat wa such that hi
character or intentions would be menas e tos the
welfare of lhi coanstituenasy, would be rejected by the
electors.
This should be the political condition in every
campaign. The good etis en should have as -muche
pride Iad lnteres- in the work of the "off" ar as
when the most important oeffieas are to be lle.
Unfortunately this is not th ease in the present
campaign at least. On the street ear, the corwe or
other place where voters mar be assembled, Opres-
sion will be heard "I don't know any of 'em; I
don't care who I vote for." This feeling is too gen-
eral for public good. Only when the citlwehip
assume proper mpolbility sad exerts neseesmar
enesr am the ta of publi servants be raised.
Tan would aese-holders Qasider not what they
desired, but what the people wated. FrMequently, in
a Legislature, the ammes peased ane at variance
with the welfare or wshes = people, owing
to the l0d4terms0 of the taking par In an
election o mees are the n who have
betrayed public trust are I said time
Matan.m -
Yet when th peop1 0ie to 0W
evil bille t ive Iate tg elted7A1 o
to remove tw cae of pubile
A notable inac of tecent the New
York Senate yielded to the persu-ae ls t isur.
ano lobby and by amaedmeat destel ed th eforms
outlined In the lasureMe bill. Angry priest, hbow-
ever, from all portions of th State, eo owed th be-
trayers of the people that the bill was reesoided
and the offending amenmeast strike hem the bill.
So much for the power of the puble wke" aeoed
to asetion. when an unusual evere blow cause the
laq giant to arouse from umber.

Hon. Newton A. Blitch, who In iAte sofpf the sany
years given to the public Mervs, a:d who is ow thep
poessesor of a welt .paying to tst
o Onrvate-ptil peal the public with6 U -


fled appetite for office, as shown by his candidacy for
the obioe of Railroad Commissioner.
Whether the people will decide that Mr. Bitch's
greed for office is worthy of approval is a mystery
of the primaries, but the matter of how he has served
the pe le i tid ppt can be easily learned.
l re aw e a"y person$ in this tate who are op-
posed to Shaiaig together white and black conlts,
liei that the races should be kept separate under
all dtiomas. In 1901, when a bil prohibiting the
halinig together of white and black prisoners was
being acted on by the Senate, Mr. Bitch voted against
the ill.
The Railroad Commission, of which Mr. Bitch
meeks to become a member, stands for a three-cent
passenger fare, yet as Senator Blitch he voted against
a three-eent fare bill, an action that possibly rill
create suspicion in the minds of the voters whether
he would be active in the work of railway rate re-
form.
The bill providing for a State dispensary of
intoxicating liquors was a measure that, had it be-
come law, would have placed the people of Florida
in political bondage, the victim of a hideous and
merciless machine.
Senator Blitch voted for the dispensary bill.

lion. E. P. Bailey, in defending his candidacy
for Railroad Commissioner from the misrepresenta-
tions made by the Jacksonville Metropolis, has issued
a circular letter of reply that fairly bristles with
oharp points.
Mr. Bailey calls attention to the dop made by the
Metropolis since it cartooned senator Psaco and ap-
plauded Bailey for his share in the Senator's defeat,
and asks:
"Now I wonder why this change of attitude in
the Metropolis, and why they should want to misrep.-
resent facts and injure me? Who told them to do
eso? Was It the Seaboard, the Coast ULine or the East
Coast, or is it the money of Paeem, or the 'friends
of Pasoo? Why should they dy me space ia their
paper to correct -mi eatatFnsaules I 'pay
for it? Do they tandoly for gold, and to the
highest bider? Can they, or ay man, read my ir-
e.nar uaftlly,01 and tn ul that I am due
harsh criticiem? I notie n later iass of Metro
oils as article signed 'Middle Florida Democrat a
vising that any candidate that attacked Blasha.,
Passo adW others 'should he boycotted at the pol0s
claiming that 'asy rte etion ca them is a deetonm
ason the party.' I wder if Pasm Is'Middle Florida
Demorat,' and if he had to 'pay for itf?
The smnerve exhibited byhL B nLsa Barr in asking
1or wee io eemfnwto fully eI aled by hi ig-
-aoe f m tst wer withinU-pwlMse-e1 heW. ee.
A remarkable thing about Burr is that when he
tries to xpiap his elal cod"et he meals hisa
lack of knowledge. Comment oa his att erae


should be sufficient material for any campaign of
opposition to him.
A sample of his familiarity with railway condi-
tions is shown in his recent reply to 0. 1. Brown,
Jr., of Miami, who complained to Mr. Burr of ex-
cessive rates from Jacksonville to Miami a sat-
tresses, Burr stating that on a Walup carload of
mattressest, containtag 24,000 pounds, the Comnts-
sion had saved Mr. Brown $40.80, but as Mr. Burr
was mistaken to the amount of 10,000 pounds that
a car would hold of mattresses, the saving was $8.o0,
or $32.30 less a carload than estimated by tMhe Balil-
road Commissioner.
Most persons would think that after four years of
service Mr. Burr would be cognizant of the quan-
tity of various commodities that a car would hold.
An event, over which Dade County politicians are
still laughing, is the clever way in which George
Currie, ex-Mayor of West Palm Beach, unmasked
some political mischief planned by the artful Guy
Metcalfe. The real point of amusement was when
Guy, in the midst of virtuous denial that he had
ever made the statement. attributed to him by Cur-
rie, was confronted by two witnesses who had been
planted for the purpose of furnishing evidence against
etealfe when Currie was ready to spread the news
of the former's attempt at double-dealing.
It is hardly possible that if State insurance be-
comes a fact that Guy will be lord high commis-
sioner, the old slate having been mashed when the
measure was defeated at the last session.
Without doubt there will be consideration at the
next session of the Legislature of the State assuming
the expense of the primary elections, but that a
measure of such character will be passed is not
likely. The claim that expense etailed by a pri-
mary campaign is a disbarment of the poor a fro
office will form the basis of a m in favor of the
State bearing the burden, and doubted that is a cOn.
testion true In all its bearings, yet it does not fol-
low that the State Treasury can be opened for the
purpe of nominating the candidates ofa poUal
part.
h a course would be equivalent to the State
aying for two elections, a plan not likely to be I&o
dored by taxpayers.
Taxation reform is ans tssue that will also be
brought rather forcibly to the attention of the Lq-o
latureif the various suggestions of that ature as-
sume tangible form..
Pirst, is the bill that will be urged by Alfred St.
Clair-Abrams, itf he is elected to the sa l If
he is ote hboesom other peo will k up the
planlnorder to a fame, ad mthatis ta the
*m-mint of railway over to the toa..Ii and
provide that taxation be made in aecordme wh
(O tinaedm on Next Po)


N


d.











May s, I06


THE SUN


JOHN HENRY ON. BRIDGE WIST

By G=ORG= V. OBAMT '


I received a letter the other day that
put me over the ropes.
rFl paste itluplhere Just to show you
that it's on the level
"Philadelphia, This Week.
"Dear John I have never met you
personally, but Ive heard, my brother,
Teddy, speak of you so often that you
really seem to be one of the family.
(Teddy talks slang something ierce.)
"Dear John, will you please pardon
the liberty I take In grabbing a two.
cent stamp and Jumping so uncere-
moniously at one who Is, after all, a per-
fest. etramaer ... L .
"Dear John, if you look around you
can see on every hand that the glad sea-
sor of the year is here, and if you lis-
ten attentively you may hear the hoarse
cry of the summer report beckoning us
to that bourne from which no traveler
returns without getting his pocketbook
dislocated.
'"Dear John, could you please tell me
how to play bridge whist, so that when
I go to the seashore I will be armed
for defraying expenses,
"Dear John, I am sure that if I could
play brids whist loud enough to win
four dollars every onee In awhile I could
spend a large bunch of the summer at
the seashore.
"Dear John, would you tell a loving
but perfect t r how to play the
game without ha to wear a mask?
"Dear Joh, I played a couple of
games recstly with a wide-faqed young
man who grew very playful and threw
the parlor furniture at me because I
trumped his aee. I fancy I must have
did wrong. The fifth time I trumped
his ace the young man arose, put on his
gum shoees, and skeedaddled out of the
house. Is is not considered a breach of
etiquette to put on gum shoes in the
presence of a lady?
"If you please, dear John, tell me how
to play bridge whist. Yours fondly,
"GLADYS JONES.
"P. 8.-The furniture which he threw
was not his property to dispose of.
"G. J."
When my wife got a flash of this let-
ter she made a kik to the effect that it
was some kind of a cypher, possibly the
beginning.of a secret correspondence.
It waa up to me to hand Glayda the
frosty getbk, so this is what I said:
"R t;d Mdam: I'm a slob on
that bd. whist thing, plain poker be-
ing the only jame with cards that ever
coaxes my dough from the stocking, but
I'll do the advice gag If it chokes me:
"Bridge whist played with cards,
just like plnochble, with the exception
of the beer.
'Not enough cards is a misdeal; too
many cards is a mistake; and cards up


the sleeve is a slap on the front plasa
if they catch you at it.
"You shouldn't get up and danee the
uakentlne dance every time you take
a trick. It looks more genteel and pie.
tu que to do the two-sep.
"When your opponent has not followed
suit It is not wise to pick out a loud tone
of voice and tell him about it. Reach
under the table and kick him on the
shins. If it hurts him he is a cheater;
if it doesn't hurt him always remember
that you are a lady.
"'Don't forget what is trumps more
than eighteen timen dqrdi oneg hand.
The limit used to be twenty-six times,
but since the insurance people have been
playing Hyde and seek the best bridge
whist authorities have put the limit
down to eighteen.
"It Isn't wise to have a conniption fit
every time you lose a trick. othing
looks so bad as a conniption fit wheg it
doesn't match the complexion, and gen-
erally it delays the game.
"When the game i lose don't get ex-
4ited and climb up on the table. It
shows a want of refinement, especially If
you are not a qulck climber.
"Never whistle while waiting for
some one to play. Whistling is not in
qood taste. Go over and bite out a
3ouole of tunes on te* piano.
"When your opponent trumps an ace
don't ever hit his carelessly across the
forehead with the brioae-bra. AWays
remember when you are In soelety that
brio-a-brae is expensive.
"Don't lead the ten of clubs by mls.
take for the ace of trnnpe and then get
mad and jump seventes feet In the air
because they refuse to lt you pull it
back.
"In order to Jump seventeen feet In
the air you would have to go, through
the room upstain, and how 4o you ikow
whose room it Is?
"There Gladys, if you follow
rules I think you ean play the gani of
bridge whist without putting a brilse
on the Monroe doctrine.
"P. 8.--When you play for money al-
ways bite the cona to see if it meam as
much as it looks." ",
The next day, in order to square my-
self with my wife for getting a letter I
hadn't any use for, I went to one of taose
New York department stores to ge ofher
a birthday present.
Say I did you ever get tangled up in
one of those department store mobs and
have a crowd of perfect ladies useou
foi a door mat? I
I got minel I
They certainly taught me the 41o-
jeetvenski glide, all rigtl
At the door of the department store
a nice young man with a pink nestle


and a quick forehead bowed to me.
"What do you wrh Mhbe abked.
"Well" I aid4, "0 down here o get
a birthday present for my wife. wo0ld
like something wMhb wl fford her
great pleaste when I t t and
whioh I could u e asfe w d a pin.
wiper or a fishing rod."
"Second doorI A the right; tale the
elevator mld the ma.
Did you every tryt an l tor
in dertmet to and t ,.
other Ameran ol cities, to
were also trying to take the ae d -
vatort .
How sweat It I to mingle Ia the arms
of. utter strangers ad to feel 'e$ gentle
preoure ofa foot we never hope to meet
agail
I was standing by one the hunter
on the od oor when s hrip oie
erept up over few bales pf dry ods
and said: "An you a buyer or a Dan-
dtorr
"I am looking for a birthday pre t
for my wife," I answerd. want to
get something that will look *sell on
the parlor table and m"ay be ued later
on as a tobacco jar or trouser
stretcher"
"Fourth floor; to the left;s tae the
elevator" said the lad._s voice.
I began to feel sorry for my wife.
Nobody seemed to be very muoh In.
tereeted whether he got a birth* pre.-
eat or not.
9n the fourth floor I stopped at a
counter where a lot of eager dames wetr
pawing over some chinchilla ribbon and
chiffon ovetekirts.
It reminded me of the way oUr dog
dirt up the vegetable in the garden.
I enjoyed the excitement of the ame
for about ten minutes and then I aid
to the lerk behind the scunter o w
refereeing the matebh t 4you el
me where I Gan buy a teling ilve
birthday present for ny wife whdh
I could UN afterwards as a night key or
a bath srmnge s
"Fifth floor; to the rear take the ele.
vatorW" said the clerl ,
On the fifth oorn I w tov to *
table where a ya ng ad *" litg
"The Life and Libraries of AAndrew Car.
negle" at four dollarA f month and S
eente a week, sad In thtee 7etta it
yours if you don't lose the reelpts.
She gave mea glad smile and I felt
a thrill of encouragement.
"Exosue me," I aid, "but I am looking
for a birthday preset for my wife whl<
will Maki all neighbor jealous alt
which I can uee afterwards a an ash.
receiver or a peke flak
The wug eady the r te
ad pointed to the northwest. .
I went over there.


To ay,srpri I foud aothe oun-
tar. '
, A yle woman wae boeb It.
I jut u to ak he t. (tal
qumto when a young m wring A
ragtile apiqeslos on hl* faSe flh~w
ual ,snld thi dt y IhWind
ti+ trt "I mt nT for a .ult-
Sp oMei r iF fried of
mtlo with golden b& rb 0ould
yous plee *lst wmotbi r
tlin, h et,,a ot 9d iablP if sole,


wi It y n m
to i a t box for
S tpIfe litlett, boy, alddie, If you
is sl 4 Ihowed her tuth
ad the old Ift for foe.
After abo' f people ad ed up
to the salelady uad It, away
agin, I wn ovea r mand oe to
"I am 16oking,"' I said, or a birthday
pmeat for wife, I w at t4 gBt seie-
tnf that will if her 6t gret Aiount
of p asn &ad which I aa1 6atr on
as a pipe .leaet o r 1 r of a ien-
The saleslady faintedl, so I mor over.
At another counter another rtuna


ouIt i ptoae.
out a priest.


Shaking the

Old Plum Tree
(Continued fom Preceding Page]
,aW ~m tio a plan, i adopted, would lighten the
burden of othei taxpaiyei In Florida.
National banks have been mentioned, too, as an-
other ease where taxes should be paid on the amount
of capital stock issued.
Here and there nla the State the question of text-
book uniformity Is being stirred with a demand that
candidates for the L tue declare their position
on this subject, ad whether they will aid la relerv.
log the people of the monoply that now oppresses
them.
That is the language of the plea, whether monop-
oly is practiced, should be a matter of legislative in-
vestiti and relief afforded If poeible.
LmisfaM MMisesil and other nearby States
have adopted the y of uniform ehool books,
and it should be an easy matter to severe ialorms-
tion for guidance of our own Legislatum. If it is
found to be a good pla the Florida ugt to have
it, bit if it to beel a1wi nA the pa pin lbeta ld
be In readiness to pret the State from belug aso*
died with a b.rsamsm momar.
"U ia Cf .p~Thealses ia the apties.f the


circular that L. S. eight is distributing In behalf
of his candidacy for epresetative from Marion
County, and the voter who reads it will be well re-
paid for the trouble.
Among other things, Mr. Light calls attention to
the alleged extra In minateane of theI fate
garment, sayl ut "or depart te n do
publ Ishteme d eteme as a rles an d we tod
S Itam .Iupb e to a lInformtdem n tis
line. We hav pa aI rert from our edge
funds and judiciary, and if the bale are lke these
twoo it plas why the 4oet o1 m ateliut O ear
State goerment Ie four times as sh as mt ws
twety ago."
M. peaks of txdgg by the railroads,
decatMa "the entire c stek and boded
e at.wr, wnUJrdft ea about $00M00k,
and the assessed valuation at ame time NOWO0, 000
"The State Oomissloner's eMprt for 10 shews
a adt earng four railroads nerly $,000,000,
which will give the rallro sebeut per asent later.
per ent m the a ssed valutin of the ds.
"The ItMela Oomrese em wim report
that 44 per saet of toe n ita t he .
son t Unied wStates a interest, or adrly
0 per cMnt. ,A Florida reta py 3 r eNt ea
evs'ytg, Mil-k.4 water. U31 ais ad m


Why"neouldte ourseeds be inknwltnUed
. .-Aother fMtteMr takan up b &I tgt
will pviode work I Plenty for the Leglatre
s f to t mst l, hi. mbition and eed tee
onuadi for %" fi w oor of the Houe.


'1"


A
iii


I1


i I 1


"Aft-












THESUN


SOMUTEING ABORT THE LAND TRUST.
In a recent issue we had something to say about Literary Bureus.
Among other things, we said that the Literary Bureau was the strictly mod
ern way to shape public sentiment. that the shaping was ALWAYS in the in-
terest of somebody who had private interests dearer to his heart t*a4 the inter-
eat of the public; that only those who had money to spend without pausing to
count it could maintain literary bureaus.
At that time we were referring to National Literary Bureaus. _
Well, we now rise to repeat what we have said about literary bureaus in
general, and-
To loIaliM the question, we will discuss THE FLORIDA LITERARY BU-
ItKAU IN PARTICULAR.
As this Florida brand of the article has an attachment that appears to be
now, we will include the attachment within the scope of our comment, and get
,ome new propositions ihto our presentation.
This new attachment is a TRAVELING AGENT, which, as we have said,
has BEEN FIRST EXPLOITED in FIbrida.
It seems as if fate has determined to favor us with equipment to deal, with
some Intelligence, with this question, for as sponsor, patron and guide of the
Florida Literary Bureau, with traveling agent attachment, we meet the twin
brother of "OLD TURPS," with whom we became so well acquainted.
In our story, on page 8 of this issue, we have told of the Healy tour through
the State BEARING -OR, J TIALS. We have'told of the arguments used in
"EXPLAINING" to the people things as seen by the interests. We have pre-
sented STRONG, and to us, CONVINCING circumstantial evidence to connect*
the travels of Healy with the writing of Cheate.
* We know that this campaign of education now being waged in Florida by
Coachman, acting for the Consolidated Land Trust, by means of the tongue of
Healy and the pen of Choate (not pronounced shoat), has been placed under the
friendly and plausible designation of "Protection of Our Interests;" but WE
have another name for it-
81IDlION.
Webster defines sedition as "the raising of a commotion in a State not
amounting to insurrection."
Any attempt to. change the expressed will of the people to suit the views of
a few persons whose private interests, lying contrary to the public interest,
prompt them to make the attempt, can consistently be classed as sedition.
Let us examine the facts in the case.
The people of this State have repeatedly declared themselves in favor of drain-
ing the Everglade.
They declared their will in favor of drainage when their chosen representa-
tives, in the General Assembly, passed the resolution in 1845 asking Congress to
grant the overflowed lands to the State "FOR THE PURPOSE OF DRAINAGE
AND RECLAMATION."
They again declared their will when, in 1855, their representatives created
the Internal Improvement Fund Trustees.
The popular will was registered again when the people elected Bloxham to a
second term as Governor, after he had made the Disaton land sale.
Again was the popular will manifested whqn Bloxham was not censured for
makiaga contract with ehumaker Rose, Parrtt sand others, acting as a corpor-
ation, TO DRAIN THE ENTIRE EVERGTAnS.
Broward made "verglade drainage his paramount issue in his Gubernatorial
campaign, and the ope AGAIN ICL A PD, THIS TIME DIRECTLY, for
drainage by e tin Broward over others who 8MRMED to outclass him in equal.
floations for the oce, sand one of whom certainly topped the tugboat captain in
powerful financial backing.
Last spring the people a n declared for drainage when they sent men to
the Leglature to represent tm who were known to be in favor of it, and who
reorded the will of their constituents in the drainage acts which they passed.
EVERY TIME THE PEOPLE HAVE HAD THE CHANCE OFFERED
THEM during a p4rio of sixty years THEY HAVE DROLARIP THAT THE
And mow by an at betrl the credentials of its chief-this small collec-
tion of individuals attsapt to *tr up a commotion in the State by which the
WILL OF THE PEOPLE WILL BE OVERCOME.
If this is not sedition-
What's YOUR NAME for it?
Listed to the argumet-
"We have lad to 11a, sand we must not allow land to become cheap.
"We must defeat this sheme that will put three million acres of land on
the market, because this land, being RICH LAND, will be bought by the people,
and OUR land, which is not so richly, will go begging.
"We must take from the people the chance to get RICH land at the price
fixed by themselves, through their servants, so that they will HAVE TO BUY our
POOR LAND at prices FIXED BY US."
Oht ye hosts who bear the names of Landless and Lackland, we know this
argument will touch your souls
And we know that the words of scripture will be fulfilled-
"For many there be who will hear, and few will be convinced."

APPLEYARD FOR RAILROAD COMMISSIONER.
Iu a private conversation the editor of this journal intimated that his ticket
for Railroad Oaumlsep-or caught be marked for Bailey and Blitch.
No promuedm was givenA simply an intimation as to what might happen.
We have mentioned this in order that our position may be subject to no crit.
icism now that we have detertmled to advocate--
APPLEYARD instead of Blitch.
We have gone into th records of Bliteh and Appleyard, and have become con-
vinced that Apployard would better aerve the people than Bliteh.
Both are free from suspicion of betrayal of the people's interest, but Apple-
yard shows up better than Blitehb when their public services are compared.
Mr. Bliteh's long service i the Legislature has LEFT NO MARK on the
statute books that could be considered as a positive help to the eause of good
government.
He has ORIGINATED no legislation general in character that is distnctnpp
marked as beneficial to the peop. V
He has been a negative, rath than a positive, force in legislative work, ot.
inl acurding to his ligllhts and his eonselence, but not directing remedial legs.
He was lined up oan the side of the Jenings' administration in the Legisla-
turn of 190_1 and 1903, and voted wtth Sherman Jennings when that gentleman
laid aside the role of Executive and assumed the role of lobbyist. g
As, in our oi iton, most of the bills for which Governor Jeing lobbied
were BAD BIL we m ant aof th votes cast for them, sad Senator
Bliteh's vote was ALWAYS one or these


Mhista i sle d m i ut past performances do notjustify
is entry into a widar eid Is u ,
Be.bhas aposiantha fr~he L 1is wweqmv&Usi amd asbe maow n &a dmlr.


ED


IT


III


I\tRINBEA OTHERI
Oi NE upl
Tit 0 ES L06 a
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I.M VATh

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THE SENATOR FROM DUVAL.
thA peculiar circumstance about W. H. Baker's candidacy for the Senate is
that he represents the last remain effort of Stockton and Barns to bear their
tattered color in a political campaign.
This warped and shrunken remnant of the faction schemed and worked and
sweater in caucus after caucus to find a candidate, but one after another declined,
amon them f ling Telfair Stockton the mesent senator.
Sent was that Baker was brought out-the man of putty who will obey
his creators in all the automaton who will move in the narrow rut Indi-
Clinging to the wrecked bark of factionalism, the leading survivors of the
political ship battered by contact with the sharp rocks of public sentiment-
Stockton and Barr--set to work to build a raft from the wreckage that covered
the waves, catching up a plank here and there and fastenin g the whole with
Baker as the able of their political salvation.
ThowIn g themselves upon this life raft tockton and Barr are now trust-
lg that the tical tide will foat them to safety ad power, and enable them
I pikig Baer as their life preserver they se ed fast InB
sdub 1in a a"a o1 straw before the peaph of thad 0- w0y as the 5a


alInspector of coovet' it would be aanst the good of the service to remove
. Un i Promotion.
J Appleyard has traveled far and seen much.
His miid has been developed along broad lines by his contact with big men.
He possess more than average intelligence, and his stock of information has
beea so added to by his opportunity for observation that it has assumed ample
proportions. ...- *
His work as Secretary of the Senate has been so good that everybody knows
about it, and his training at this post will be useful to-him in handling the detail
work of the office he seeks.
We have seen the literature that Mr. Burr is sending out under his per-
sonally marked envelope, which suggests that Appleyard is the railroad candidate
for Commissioner.
But this carries no conviction to our mind, because even a bald assertion
without proof is not convincing, and much less credible is a surmise with no cir-
eumstances cited in corroboration.
The people have tried Blitch as a servant, and he has done pretty well, but
not so much that you could notice it.
Appleyard cannot do less than Bliteh.
He may do more.
Let's try Appleyard.


Saturday, May 5, 1906


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WITH tlltE- KIKK AGA=T T

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Saturday, May 5, 1906


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SOMETHING ADBO, THE LAND .RUfq.
In a recent issue we had something to say about Literary Bureuts
Among other things, we said that the Literary Bureau was the strictly mod-
ern way to shape public sentiments that the shaping was ALWAYS in the in-
terest of somebody who had private interests dearer to his heart than the inter-
est of the public; that only those who had money to spend without pausing to
count it could maintain literary bureaus.
At that time we were referring to National Literary Bureaus.
Well, we now rise to repeat what we have said about literary bureaus in
gnperal, and-
To lKqaliae the question, we will discuss THE FLORIDA LITERARY BU-
HKAU IN PARTICULAR.
As this Florida brand of the article has an attachment that appears to be
mnw, we will include the attachment within the scope of our comment, and get
ijme new propolt/ions into our presentation.
This new attachment is a TRAVELING AGENT, which, as we have said,
has BEEN FIRST EXPLOITED in Fibrida.
It seems as if fate has determined to favor us with equipment to deal, with
Rome intelligence, with this question, for as sponsor, patron and guide of the
Florida Literary Bureau, with traveling agent attachment, we meet the twin
brother of "OLD TURPS," with whom we became Ms well acquainted.
In our story, on page 8 of this issue, we have told of the Healy tour through
the State BEARING CREDENTIALS. We have'told of the arguments used in
"EXPLAINING" to the people things as seen by the interests. We have pre-
semted STRONG, and to us, CONVINCING circumstantial evidence to connect*
the travels of Healy with the writings of Choate.
* We know that this campaign of education now being waged in Florida by
Coachman, acting for the Consolidated Land Trust, by means of the tongue of
Healy and the pen of Choate (not pronounced shoat), has been placed under the
friendly and plausible designation of "Protection of Our Interests;" but WE
have another name for it-
S8ODITION.
Webster defines sedition as "the raising of a commotion in a State not
amounting to insurrection."
Any attempt to. change the expressed will of the people to suit the views of
a few persons whose private interests, lytpg contrary to the public interest,
prompt them to make the attempt, can consistently be classed as sedition.
Let us examine the faset in the case.
The people of this State have repeatedly declared themselves in favor of drain-
ing the Everglades.
They declared their will In favor of drainage when their chosen representa-
tives, in the General Assembly, passed the resolution in 1845 asking Congress to
grant the overflowed lands to the State "FOR THE PURPOSE OF DRAINAGE
AND RECLAMATION."
They again declared their will when, in 1855, their representatives created
the Internal Improvement Fund Trustees.
The popular will was registered again when the people elected Bloxham to a
second term as Governor, after he had made the Disston land sale.
Again was the popular will manifested when Bloxham was not censured for
making a contract with Sehumaker, Roe, Parr6tt and others, acting as a corpor.
action, TO DRAIN THE ENTIRE EVERGTAn.S.
Broward made Evrlade drainage his paramount issue in his Gubernatorial
campaign, and the people AGAIN DECLARED, THIS TIME DIRECTLY, for
drainage by electi Broward over others who W)CMED to outclass him in equali.-
floations for the oLe, and one of whom certainly topped the tugboat captain in
powerful financial beeacking.
Last spring the people again declared for drainage when they sent men to
the Lagislatue to reprement them who were known to be in favor of it, and who
recorded the will of their constituents in the drainage acts which they passed.
EVERY TIME THE PEOPLE HAVE HAD THE CHANCE OFFERED
THEM during a period of ize ar THEY HAVE nlECLARID THAT THE
EVVROT-ATnR SHOULD BE DRAIlNED.
And now by a agent bearing the credentials of its chief-this small collec-
tion of Individuals attempt to stir up a commotion in the State by which the
WILL OF THE PEOPLE WILL BE OVERCOME.
If this is not sedition-
What's YOUR NAME for it?
Listen to the argumret-
"We have lad to sell, and we must not allow land to become cheap.
"We must defeat this scheme that will put three million acres of land on
the market, because this land, being RICH LAND, will be bought by the people,
and OUR land, which is not so rich, will go begging.
'"We must take from the people the chance to get RICH land at the price
fixed by themselves, through their servants, so that they will HAVE TO BUY our
POOR LAND at prices FIXED BY US."
Oh! ye hosts who bear the names of Landless and Lackland, we know this
argument will touch your souls
And we know that the words of scripture will be fulfilled-
"For many there be who will hear, and few will be convinced."

APPLEYARD FOR RAILROAD COMMISSIONER.
ua a private conversation the editor of this journal intimated that his ticket
for Railroad Oo mieileap dight be marked for Bailey and Blitch.
No premise was gives, siply an intimation as to what might happen.
We have menticmed this in order that our position may be subject to no crit-
icism now that we have terminted to advocate-
APPLEYARD instead of Blttch.
We have lgone into the records of Bliteh and Appleyard, and have become con-
vinced that Appleyard would better eems the people than Blitch.
Both are free from usplcio of betrayal of the people's interest, but Apple-
yard shows up better than Bliteb whon their public service are compared.
Mr. Bliteh's long service in the Legislature has LEPT NO MARK on the
statute books that could be considered as a positive help to the cause of good
government.
He has ORIGINATED no legislation general in character that is distinctJl
marked as beneficial to the people.
He has beewn a negative, rather than a positiw, force in legislative workvot-.
Ing according to his lights and his conscience, but not directing remedial legis-
He was lined up on the side of the Jennin a' administration in the Le ala-.
turn of 1901 and 1903, and voted with 8Serman Jennings when that gentleman
laid aside the role of Executive and assumed the role of lobbyist.
As, in our opnlion, most of the bills for which Governor Jeaning lobbied
wee BAD BILL, we cannot ap of the votes east for them, and Benator
Blitch's vote was ALWAYS on thee


Mr. Blitoh is ad e"am but hi s past performances do not justify
H hms a stam or saheip l kO J andU a m hm imaks am i.


e inspector of et t it would be against the good of t& service to remove
Ap aleyrd has rabeled far and soen much.
His midhas been developed along broad lines by his contact with big men.
He Posss more than average intelligence, and his stock of information has
bo o added to by his opportunity for observation that it has assumed ample
proportions. .... ..
His work as Secretary of the Senate has been so good that everybody knows
about it, and his training at this post will be useful to him in handling the detail
work of the office he 0i.
We have maen the literature that Mr. Burr is sending out under his per-
sonally marked envelope, which suggests that Appleyard is the railroad candidate
for Commissioner.
But this carries no conviction to our mind, because even a bald assertion
without proof is not convincing, and much loe credible is a surmise with no cir-
cumstances cited in corroboration.
The people have tried Blitch as a servant, and he has done pretty well, but
not so much that you could notice it.
Appleyard cannot do les than Blitch.
He may do more.
Let's try Appleyard.
MIN


II

~


Aft! Ha!


THE SENATOR FROM DUVAL.
A peculiar circumstance about W. H. Baker's candidacy for the Senate is
that he represents the last remaining effort of Stockton and Barn to bear their
tattered colon in a political campaign.
This warped and shrunken remnant of the faction schemed and worked and
sweated in caucus after caucus to find a candidate, but one after another declined,
among thmn Hng Telfair Stockton the present Senator.
.. n It was that Baker was brought out-the man of putty who will obey
his creators in all thin -the automaton who will move in the narrow rut indi-
anited by the makers of his candidacy.
CiinIg to the wrecked bark of factionalism, the leading survivors of the
political hip battered by contact with the sharp rocks of public csetimMet-
Stock ton snd arr-set to work to build a raft from the wreckage that covered
the weves cate ing u'p a plank here and there and fastenlngtio whole with
Baker a the cable of their political salvation.
h ieowig themselves upon this life raft 8tockton and Bamr are ow trust-
iag that the political tide will Scat them to afety -ad power, and enable them
to t erial for the edr of ther craft.
Is n ple Baker as their life preserver they have a d ptma fast in
the gr as tlma" Lbondage. g sof the qualities of wi ir mrit he
steas 1M6 a maa 01 straw boWo eth pembs of F~va1 O y aiMy aa #th exn


Old


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ALS


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THE SUN


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praeson of usefulaess in the Senate to Scktot, Barre ad ti little hanful that
still believe lanthem.
Not of Ue, pop nor for tepeop but as -do I eWdat soeINS-
tative of a wrethoed atom of a feiwho- whos e pe0iod o -Uebtee bhbeea a
soume of dieord in this county, Baker hold Meeive o hevw at the poU...
Iat the people who want A npreetatlon for thmeP sad not for a foles
Mad who wih lity insta4d of in4 oert ail 'a Ma ista a ow
ballots that will onee more teaohJo Stoke that ene t d to whi wk ll
llU an ofoe of importance. _
THE SENATOR FROM HAMILTON.
In osMiderinf the, andidacy of the two men who wbih to emre Hao
County inthe Smnate, Frank Adanm and John High, w have no deire to d' er
a dis anin word of the latter.
We believe that be is an honest and capable man and one who wld faith-
fully work for the bet Intents of the people.
We believe the name of Mr. Ie-m@ and were mis the oaly gruad.
which to consider the fltnes of each We feel that per al ard would dab
influence the voters of Hamilton Oounty.
But aside from the characteristics possessed by each in common, Mr. Adams
rims superior in worth to the people: by reason of his loag service in the& Seate,


!'o


sm ra ca--
6atv 'sa' lnh s teis
iifWORMIft'ww p"

WoA A. Gahamhassad e I; atn
Iistodokai dintkemojhstup
as~~f k pulcJunl aeti omete wA dvasded
tobiginorbl c stsiassol di4 I~


TEN GNNTLNM3Xtaw.2I


theAt

ae why AV. dshota

heAst have so rggdpies *


yP DRfRIIMIN THE EVERGLADES
V WILL PUT R LOT OF GOOD LAND
/ 0N THE MtARKET IN (tOPETITIO
/WITH MINE-KICK AGAMlST IT!


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uUB auaisawi. A, 3V
-Ba T ; 4,,
Tax BloATOl tlOa OADAXN:
'A maanwho is entitled to the sot heu seka beoame he has sedhe wrth,
his honesty and his deotion to Deeraey ain the dak heW o adal eb ulm
tion and carpetba sway, when 1o ds wee few sad te mao y w his
James B. Broise of Gadedea County, who is a OaNldat 1tfor ate % rf
the 8lth distrtit.
J. Baxter Oampbell, who is eontesti$ n with Mr. BnMi for tM wes, a
be duerviag ad capable, but e have o s eha sem in ay th-at if wve a
poumes unwritten dtai tompi e't aseat of past sNises&, Jamsa n BrewM
Ilk the bill in a complte andoitiee aa mmi.
T93 earasuAx roo( DAU
-ade Countj has as e*XMU-t hase to obai Sren ee Nseues- lm Is


e
h~tbe
vs law.


John m 0 J. P. 1,
Romse fromt sa W urt
do klaw Nat Marion, sad t

to -usehoev Ina .t, esa
NoW e,* or eoem hath, but


A man with s
o otherwe wold
with the em4sda*L


TEN-
sow'M


web sa4 he maditbi a


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where1 ti"e and his ability and energy has pressed forward for emse
ary a, 0 I "4
He h l d t a follow; an or ator eI- lati, ot a
colorle to tsral in the wake wit feeble, M emlet. *
9thisecie moasse, sad in s minuf tho Hsit of all wh
are Vim tbe, we reget to otato t here i a preimpet
of over a e t at lt.
Therefore, mqetk tht rW. Adams d be elbeted. The State, as wel a
Hamllton Cou nW hk O Im the sestes .
.tJOH A. GRAHAM--CANDIDATL.
Some thr M or four'weeks a we O or p a hlat
John A. Gramwli

dit i aB rersthtoa JbS- A.raham's *


Th .ltF~ E~h3 m.mis .O M 4 ja w
afraidAW .I o mlwe we w1s
1smwwb We m a
wreIt shoAL w0s inta


W. it.'hae
a*thwe" be
houmseosesof eru


0.G. L1W",3l*ma'
wante to Owet heJcb OW th
d"her resented iabtseof w tI&
at thie mt semi
Who *d'vwam -to his
tacti pe WMn lhmoad to do
his w. hNoth
shoI sie""he- esa S
ntw Xhdldmotbut
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-~ M~91906


The Czar's Spy


Chevalier Willim eux


.T t~ 1t4.,. t I ~~ii *~ ~ 'A


,k&7 201.1or tisto31sgfo.T

Wd Isuch blana


SAh, pia. I see from the dispatehh
that rward Is offered for her rocap-.
tura .,
"TI nOqnor General is d5termlne4
that "Ih ll not 0oapeo" remarlol the
"She is probably hidden in. the forest,
somewhere or other." '
"Of course. hey are making a thor-
+ough earh over every virst of It. If
shi l thire, she will most certainly be
found.*
QNo doubt, remarked Boranski, leasn.
ing haek i. his l qd chair an look-
ia at *e eantlt e aros the littered
table. '"AMd now wih to speak to this
Snglishman privately, so please leave us.
Also Inform the other two prisoners that
they are at liberty."
," It your BaOellenoy does this upon
his own esponllUty,' he sai aix.
Imlly. aiieme tat I brought them
to du_, w a "ret" 1
'"And I tleas them entirely at my
own diatlIss" lhe seld. "AW htef of
Meol~, i this peoviae, I am permitted
toa my;iurildlotloim, and I exercise it
in this matter. You are at liberty to re.
port that at Helslngfors, if you so de.
sire, but I should aug Mt that:you say
nothjll unless absolutey obliged-you
*Thia'ltaer Inis whlA onslki spoke
appilU* dlded m captor, for after
a molnmat'slhiatiop he said, saluting:
I'thit 1 your wish, then I
will Me. And h left.
"Excellency exclaimed the Chief of
Polloe, riling quickly, aid' walking
towards me as soon as the idor was
loiadand w were aes l om ye have had
a nV artow seape'- very. 4I did my
bat asidt p. I ames d in bribe
ng th watei urds at Kajana in order
n u al mghM thtiM U release.
tj J ,seeme th .at justli tWi v wr me-
meat when y0wasW about 4_ et away
one of the guards tuned informer and
roused the vuor tr Ue mtl% with
Tour s. P".41 "M'. Jot
torow p toterke;. sanmaa
with a gri mln -my an a now
__1 it why a ro trem'ly
anixous to aptur Mis athr

to armat ebr A, IP A
dued."n t
^ ll V. d* d,
Si mea, sth a th- art
slot nr~if she
in lapoon to wh lit' i t
affirmative '
I told him of th fithful arisMi l
YAll, the Finlander, *hereupon he said
dmlyt I ,',.
ttold you that you might trust him
'But now that you have shown your-
blftmy friend," I said, "vou will assist
Mis Heath to sesape this man, who de.
srlwito hold her primer in that awful
pma. !They are driving her maid." ..
"I will do my best," he answered, but
a g Mhi head dubouIly. "But
ma collect that Baron Oberl i is
a Oinwal of island, witl all the
ou the ar himself.'
rm U lma uHeath eag gs ls .bts


aT The aU tion was possible, but I turned saying: a in fivemiles.
feared imprelp Ie. 'The Colonel will see you if you will
Anf'e*r very curious feature in the pleai4 step this way," and following him P. S.-It's bread li
.ffair wa the sudden manner in which be oAducted me into the richly fur. make.
MIhael Boranski had exerted his power ni private apartments of the palace,
and Influence in order to render me that scro a great hall filled with ine paint-
orfie Bh had actually bribed the ig, t nU loghk Ar.
ot~d o Kbe had instructed the pi"ed SM^ g o TM
t lit, he had provided our boat, where t1 bald-headed man in mili
he had ordered the un to open the tary uniform stood awaiting me.
*atr ate to me. Why? "Your name is M'sleur Gr he ex- '
*Tb wa, I felt convinced, some hid- claimed ia vry good Fr-en "and I Grm
dllltive In all that sudden and understand you disit audience of his
as i fn sadlie es. That he really Exolleny, the Governor OGeneral. I re- T nM
i*ad the iih I had seenplallny great hower, that he never giveaudl i
wihIe* d nAn t met, and I hadcom ence to strangers."
l him to serve me _b presenting the "The matter upon which L desire to see
adea i uald by the Emperor, which his Excellency is of a purel private and
mae as guest within the Russian eoafduatral nature," Isal or u-sed as. r
domsimI l S.iothatdoeument did not I was to the ways of foreign officialdom, THATS
seount for the length he had gow toe I spoke with the sams lrm courtesy
eare thM release of the woman I now himself.
led inte sret The more I thought it "I am very sorry, m'sieur, but I fear
v*wr, the more anxious did I beooome. I it will be neeaSMUeary in that oase for you r W
uM lddiserso motive forhis friendly. to write to his alel y d ma your
nea, and. truth, to tell, I always dine letter personal. It wI then to into
trust 4 w are too frisdly. Whatthe Go m enor owen l Na ." SOLE
st at .ot an eid-d line ef aeti should ".W at I have to uy cannot be som. -
twat?, M I( t I west over all nh mittdt .4 ._1,." _w"-_ my reply. i
satm vosta tt -ad happened in mut m Bar Obeg I a matter ,W
tghs. and whie anxiuas to obteaU whbmh ateetW himhS uah.d isb | N1 num iq


Yours, N.
NEe mD.
ke mother bml to


Whiy

IRE
SURE


Simiis
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t e" b I* t :
Mhs uusscrupuloqshands, she will die," I some so o ft4blIthn fb
"Abl" hei gd lookhlg me, straight nland idalo A i ,L .Ifall in i n e a id~~l*ll a con
w. o Ue r e holds sis tntl s ought her end ,No I wZould sip j .ro
*Ueneea aiIHin ,.r. at hol f l hHisque sties on Istent i!to me
some which h e the th it handsomee to tohimI t andfac t Bahim. Iron eron.
v. wisCHAPTER XII. or tee wh a nSr6 a to "Hau the plot imid ati itntive ob.



rch fer st hnr belied Je-or olt" he aket pointedlfo.


w rill--w al-,- h. O ded wI.n Wof m .y. .ot for the rewidenhe of his Ex. only.
dm-well-r-"e added i. Wa lw. tton, aleei of Ferinor lid. era he r' (Conth nAd on sfteenth Page)
norr to close her ps.It ud not a me We I .kft Ab, and traveld by me i t t he
be & Li. time tohat Moel ve been rail up to great buiM ding oppo., then si-.d s tot i--e li-II1 ,the
silenced n secre at rrival, a omfortable a t a of itusho I resumedrby bolt in ls e"t "As spoken
smidente take place in 6tfoxt ress, you slow joubn y to elsl fo5 ._I put .up into- m Is sh ltWe am poen
know Both th in a, anelegant elotheo itohisi f.
my hot e wood-tter, had eved the pporte mommuch I aked. the. lone ,
their do HAPur d left, but to the found the Baron itever le s tha ome l at I, must pern.
named I had given intrutioand o qareto eto bepo the plot asiMieuI,"o poen.ts o
turn home at once and report by t had believed. jec-or revolt" he asd poldl
graph any new of my lot one. with a grin. IIt l il tht Itl i' ron
Where w as at in tWhat crowded t for the residence ofb hi x- only "
coon of her inexplicable disappearance oellene, the Governor General, he re- (Continud on Fiftleenth Pieg)
an the gloomy forewi t wa ile w hing rowdd of "Perap me with some surprise, I re
the commercial men o. Abo. I had I arki"T n aron lives up at the laee-
retognied, now t o deal with the m 'st ated-thoult great building opposite ithe
srayed on my arrival, a comfortable Salutg. The driver of your drosky
powerful ma n in that country, an d I A t itoon I de ded fom ."k e
suffered a done oth disadvFelanFelixtae by bein ren, and 6ng, gray, xellea in Helsingor at
myn ignorance the woodreouter held re hateived the posent moment a la asked. m
t heir daoueuardly mannleft, inut to the last- T Baron goever leavend the pal,
named gibeen ven il nstrutonsfully mamed toused my ser, stpod there maid, hlal IL
turn home at once and report by tele. itrange country, ybu kn.oir., 'he.addedIJl
graph any news ofwithin m lost one.ver with ge in livery of bright blue sd *-
A thousand onfl vilieng thoughtswe arose leny is e f orwarly feet me, ing in <
within metry as I sathin that c crowded sa Rulle ssian. :
.Michmanler fll n with a givbben hi pledgeof "Perhom ps ot you with ot eefu, I ,
the commercial men had Abmo. pl had I mark in a low voloe.et, t:h he rnor Gen. tT
rplaind, now to dhi fea with the most ated s should and
powerful man In that country and I wo At oon I deeended foa HAS. LUM iCO.
auffered, stint diadvnee taoedge by being ore xcelleng, gray, mseve no b wito,
n depnorancived of the reh and hearing? held n atment, the mandoorway of W l
sw e et English girl a prisoner. The trek .escu *n n. .fh4e R u s i msi a s .
y of the dastardly manner victim to she in what in g ol, a. on enteng e, '








famouM scheming? "I n not h0re on public business, but
had been Wilfully maimed caused my i sentry stood.on either. si, icols .hl.
blood to boil within were. I had never bnei onc e in iver o," Ight explained.
ev that n twere smoking a zed twentietheir rw me forward to meet me, asking in
century but Ih thin no mould be. Rus ou wi but I repeat tn:t hi Ex
Mtiohael Bonly thought wad in of s pledge "Wom do you wish out a e pre" f
to Whyist me, yet he disappeared mot pnly x- "H w the quithe Govern or nh Gen,- (
would to um hise that her flight haon was e unapproachable as the C hi
Ient touplor. Sominge women pntohis "Hif. Following the directiou the










a iyaterious~aae of intuition, a curious aoncia however, I crossed agreat baren Da- Arrived in avill
anwer Wriba e faculthis orders, k won urtrd" and, aend awide
whene that t e ,sweeta ed gir l had been nH*f xcellency sees no o ba weont, nr h ASd t n
deprived of speech and hearingblem t o our who, intentt" hearing my inquiry tol ok ebrolo
*be fallen an Innocent vicabletim to his in to what waiting room and left with my gi, who prrb et afl pt e
famous scheming? "Ia a marked md o Col onel bli buswhom he nss buta '" for b ,,aka n,. a- n n.a n
degAboutee. Wa men wereforeating strand forme me wa the on private matr, I explained.
dishes and talking in Finnish, while "Perhl#p .may see his E 6's sec.
others ere smoking and drinking their retary?. n or er, and ater d tre
vodka; h ut I was in no mood for obser. ing Afu wish, but I repeat ttman h i- anE I xo. e a loa'f o'
vItIon. My only thought was of she who millen y sees no one without a prViftUs
w naf now lost to me. app 1tment."-.n
Why had she disappeared without fkiew this quite well, for the "Stra'ng V
warning I was at loss to imagine, yet I ler ot Finland,' fearful of assauination,
mould only surmise that her flight had was unapproachable as the Ciar him.
1000 compulsory. Borne women potsessuself. Following the directioajs,,,f the
a !yteriou Isnsa of intuition, a curious 0nle01 however, I crossed ao eait'bare l I) pvm.WI In Jloksonv.lh
on ,151 floUltYLof knowing ourt rd, na seendln w e_ _u_, ..
whEn vlts tha es thm at presents ,talr se, was confronted by a servants uW5Y W, J andwmtJlbe opg-
& s1tra eAnd sling problem to our who, bn hearing my inquiry took aaile ifi's, 'A**I *N, M**d byikO
ml.,iltt, It is unac.ountable, and .et into. waiting room, and left with my gist, who proscibed i a put i Oa
m1"y womn possess It in a verve marked card o Colonel Luganski, whom he In- a fig for breakfat, tul and putape vo
IdAes. Ito therefore, possible that formi me was the Baron's private mee- nut for dinner a nd af.e.I r .I. it
I0m1. bad awakewed, and being warned retary.s-n--f" --,.,
' of her peril had God without arousing Afar ten minutes or so the man re.* 60 ould le a loa "of


I

I
I
5











May '., 6


THE SUN


eIW'6lotb. Pon!


*:" .-.'b l sh; ....d o f ..... -, ; r,',' i ,";
V-blislIhded Lettersf' ",,

. .., .. .

out a body to kick or a soul to damn. Out with ye.
Ye say it Is the law that we make the rarads give
ye the Oars. Ye're full of prunes The Bailtof
* Commiualo knows no law, or mighty little. Bek
to the ill and start y own row, and may the under
dor rt the worst of it. Ill promise to rferee the
Well, Spottb, me boy, I may ye soon la Jak-
moeville for a few days I fel that t r is too mueh
e pouti the and it is me duty to
spring me theory of pur t I may put the al-
mal uneader iso uence ana prserve our
fair aBtsh
I may not h with y lon. I'm conderlaf an


p oWd to 0t, uMh, ~Of Wat, *b
urn ofthe am", u A. hem, ufi"
on' tW ehie, aa",ba *thes f ead

wl, 'be in tbi
vntila am w oWpoU* s cam be a.


41 7W f#ef* he handed
me the l.in eavefope with 281S3 Inside he says:
"Pat jewel, 'ti a package we hand the dear peow
ple" tb'd4M" and t'IL hornhanded stilltust
won't put us outdt buelness with his littlSe I Just
Met Bll t SInnit, it knows who will pay Its
fee d b illba ff .. '
But to return to my old friend Jll Taft, the same
old jolly Bill who u.ed to send a striker to prison
with the addi esy roe that a corporation will
lam a Florida Cracker in the neck. I'lltell ye about
his talk. 'Twaa an able effort; what else could yo
expect from a man who sits at the feet of our Theo.
dore, andsots asu his phonog ph when Rosy is busy
trying.. throw. the S. down and put h
braudIb Iron n their hide
tiy as possible for a man of his bulk-450 pounds-
a0d the second generation from the job of having to
te his own dinner pail.
I One point in Bills speeh I want to bring to your
notice, Spotte, and that was when be denounced the
ptnss for holding up to criticism sooaeay of our
prominent citiuns. It's a shamz It2 Nelson
Rich and Tom Platt and Arnmor and
Jhn D. Rockefeller and Depew and*Wal-
SCoachmnanmhnld be rid ad censured, and
nmde the vietie of what m ar old Julep-mlxer,
I nry Wattrseno, ealle .
I don't blame, Bill for :, a Things
a coming toa prett pae w a man with money
no more Oha ibas eape ppure than a poor
d l to keep from paying ful a on everything he
o*ns.
STaft has had a bunch of mud ua, g at him from
t rude muoak*raker. Ye see, ; Spott, ti ill de-
ibes the situation at as he thli snk ouht
be %nd not what it i ma a ,e mucker


they


Itackl. were
were between


are still
Uay that
the rail-
the devil


ad the deep sea.
* I says to Bl; "lay, Bill, that don't go
orid, because ee railroads tbee ate between
Iapson Burr efrlVf sad the Gulf of Meaioe."
? Bill opined that he did not kuow R. hadi
rr, and pits ignce, t says: W
't yOe :as 70f Floridp woa't *(ti
I r the prola"M
S"But BII,'11'l tel..e. about him.
for* opmrati To the beohs Ifl
l tPlat pia -epe demand that No. 78 be"9
OlustM wh-(Itis i* at, or a thirt""'"t.1m a


In
IL


Sthe carelesi a of a ranl*
otts, wboe eampqa onat a
Sday eould get m arm,. A
ays be; "it will rask the
*nr by eason of tI law
m, for suh ease made and
Shis ease to the ladividual
pmp s to the coverie of the


tb em," eries the great man. m m b"sy
SMs at ae worUt as mnsh as a dollar
Wts, d aan trylag to rst a little after
ly WE r| f to weeks Ia reeverlag a
O f;eW I theat- t6 put the r


invits"tcc zarry .m to ip eand thie 1h __ "
him In NewyL a~rry hassa gwd'mesiiGM be s'mea u iip~e
g. o W& Spotte. Everye'er devoted re'& v
PAT kWY V rkwht.~at~.pit

Bucherast CraftBewats Now York ~.~ fi-sq bs he~m
anid Chic oVarietyi. di" is the p aok UIIAAM
Buaohpet.-theAM! Wepolo.and poliosane bom d.4'mOUs rom ~ -~-=7
d~tootl, obrpeof (AsM.workedfor yoans &m 4in TVe paptients. toll boftt bissww 4wui~ue~
hand with the crimnalsof tattut n.sot n O' nm, whiob law their l
per mert of the proosed, of theft. bu a.g. point amSL&I%
wihes" a", robbirles asoompan"emor up alive. 1
Whesntb he inerl dida w14st "shell o*tV at Pa"- eeto pray"I h~weeI~wo
lowe& a4 th were kept in prison vaOIN tiatf"Eq
64caugbed up.00 bard iease. eretvanto a r.~i
ture Siwhhappe to a cracksma wbogaeP" 28%.I),, 1*








Wodto




our HidyofthOW Is~f


for aim low Iwor Sm





,LAMM "P A1










40ff44 ~0All



%qIA *V~Vae~i





ONm A'


- hAL 'er-'


".4


4.


Z


.' "'^










THE~ SUN


May 8, 1906


Broward's Plan to Drain the Everglades.
XMANU!AI URBD B MINTIMINT. 0o the opposition to the great improve.
U thm A W A4 ess of purely From time hae spun a k and
augtttetmp-to order se* a.rimfeiO- diessles- 6 wh the
*m t thatwhiGovewr or is roundly abused for what is,
t.,s sp b ... o after all, an attempt to carry out the
S l quare, ut the dralag elaw. -
(ii t&& Pr p tIi o~ntraliaed soured come
w! ys .ote oa i ration to n1ua mber fps-
l aa M ,h him to a begin o hby their words that their
W 0-(wir6*rk. Idmis ro obtaied from the one and
iMl tht pepl twio origin re, and are not the out.-
thoroughly im of wujeeotr upon wIo they have
tSw u 11M 0 c the studied will. *tre ad juJgment.
.hle of f d4 4 tlUlt Mr. Biw rd The sent lh.'.t is manufactured, and
o'i esoila, 4 in4 great dt M., to -..o factory i~ lnted in Jacksonlvlle.-
tle sksispg ea l he took on the Miami Eveniig. Record.
important quegtio during his eam. I ,
SIr that not one of It' Different When You Drink

erWd his attuds on the drainage
nwloMo wem to bae forgotten that
thgod", o!laws, te anfor1ement of
wM has been i~poarily aeaMd,
weo aot tho work of Qov r roward,
awr ., s adtmllinitlom. Thq were
oa th satt boeal when be took of. -
e. 1h, hbad pldpmd himself to carry
out tih laws a- he found them, and was
Si p o to he t le pl to Aorry
ar a possible te w which
tood to drainage of the Eveyrglae.
S m a mn reWied his order d
nelT from the people on any given ques-
twes 1oWat ma wm i 3S Broward, o.
whn he was -nominated and elected Gov-.
from 'atIlob ftot by ..popI- who in


Poitical Adverdtisments
FOR TIIC &6NAT9

I hereb nnoansmyselfmasdi
dafte for teSaeent rmtithe
16th .*t~ Dist~rP otkDuval 000t71
to be Yoted foi at theep

-FOR. THC,. ?IOUSC
Ibsie sp fie. o betiin0SDU5IA
krum toDe SUGJ el b p

myln my tht mi y ex %md~dG t psii

o~pL;houtbwithout

to doto* uvl-unvsn ~as to10r
ttuaquUous thtimayar*ui~ ntecuseo
be~~16 ImPitwll b won ureto dimsu
U U~~O U *1Uy. saGt 1,madey and
opanl* piusu my *Iows eAmMS.
I I ipeU ttuIYi. i


Dbstictol Dug OoCunt~ lv ilda, sub.
Jedt to the oiminngprimytany&d shall
~rooatdohe mppmoftm 1 he dtiensof


Aw U0V OUmiUdoner of
69 Few~ut Nmbs o CMe amigDeo.i
entle"W, MUse V Niu~SIOISMtends
I so" Ow"0100 D1 OW 00MIOI this
W Pgo perfom
Ito thebgeat.


S )'4


VA 0- KILLR


* a a i ao .


PT


M. Wabliving us imwhent. h
A," mob ethe bwA sulcI In th

4*106 to b In II*m


U 4

k


Page


11


NNW












May s8, 106


TH'naSUN


Thfr~b Pag&


top toM." S .L'o 41,
The above is a editorial-.-rhtapM aBt pit btm I hate to to
editorial would be i b tWm-ar r.a brother editor run down'aother Steat*
agraph from the Ta lsehe Ospia of ad ome that has made far better rwe
nreet date. As I read I wodred if ord for plre thiM his F1drids.
the writer of it had evewr mn Corado. About 1iNM,4N t Olerao land
t also wmoded that the edtorf s were sold or lead lst year, and there


xI
ii


excellent (in a general way) daily pa an 18,000 ac00 res available for ieto grew the beet. received _,70,000 for
wr should be so- arrow*-nded sas to meant ore ra tt their rop. The syrup and eugar madi
ag such a seer at a omm eth from cam foots up lewM than oat million
ho rowtbhae. b mas of dollre,
at of iforldh. W* Yet the editor of the dally paper pub.
"As low a thee eer g.I Nwaytoi o Ii lihed at the capital of the Satee can
to." Do they ome to lo In and culture, ad bid t homeeer ser at a sister State and er that th
i80 Colorado a d a little les than come and welcome, fact it heralds abroad s to ts ability
10,000 ilnabitantL 7orid had o0, Color4 rm* y than to support en time i pre pop


4.


to th latter
IWPM"


hEALY TR AVELS
WHILE CHOATE WRITES


Ip I t Trut, the Oil Trust, the Cool Trust, the
(Continued from Third P) SeelNMt" the Supr Trust, the Mateh Tr, the
WILL BE THR 3) O THI8 DMRAIB BUS.- s Trumt, and all the other trsts that eer

SYous m tWork A edlet men .....o* a.ee ,l del t ii e ea e try


make the dra law ettie. to mm al Ae reT Onow
Thboe anw the eed of e tion that an bei C ti eod f(et ro oun.c
w, i-te th Statae byW. YF. e0 tIwS .soIhm to vi Mr.

This eempi, wh I i ow a mill i i i tr p wh e
mseme oflora, has called theatre o syU t theliTy fe .

y a bee We thi nNAVAL N WI l TRU Ih bac wit wich= t.a i st f r
StheUT .. l....m.a t- Oti nO R mOr m-u me IaSreee -f 4 ai -A o


be doleW4 Oibl o ...1, 1 oin t es.w
t*4 ama WJ'__b' e',AA I till=416 ----ent.A


Trst, and m es Co a t d
Oboate a. weA s eay,.

eb* to, 0er5 nta 14sea"
A. Choate *- the M
placd ieharge. *
U F ales bo mberedB
Md~au'n wase exmetiv..ev o& 4*
PoUiial Trust. hut bu tw~ ujMl
braise of it &Wd It dits etlag aw
While Mr. Coachman was
rst saMd reoreatimoms wMA
hav interviewed his gra
the 8p*fatMsI. Chaite **
A e Oand bt i
tion fw John bs lw^ITMw.
With tired hbfeaIlW 014
&Wd with brawt ltupt
best tha i P iee%-b m

frm cig ndulgemh.Newm *m
of Imd--A .,r -
ofd 1-tea


of


* :~, ~
-f
p


At 4Jm^p.f


"PA,


I I II I I I I


Alb


' ..K
1
f',^





-NAM


. l


THE SUN


-wqwp vpvpqlmpqwqw a- -..w 1


Thinks 715 Brethren we, wise
ITATU LIE INSUVANO. The abo ve ry amusing cartoon ap-
Speared p la l. t week's issue of the Jack.
iiA AeOtly 1 ,rASl by th wie Sun. Mr. Alfred St. Clair. M4....1S (
t^ .wS 2 Abramsm. ,at while the pieture of t.o. 4.-.too 33 1-
NOWAS yS*e MUShandsome and letting
duri thA a sist at the pit"re of his homrs ............... o ,"
whS w lthe tdSi5e does .ot do the steed justice. He says $a S***************
Sof* 7060" 1 0 166

Xtr a sfl Mm of, ly dtance allt ein1 te .... I
heGmaWerm lower house and was oenly bl a th ..S-- 4 i
A Senate y the arrow argin of -the-- 1
votes. as iays tat bhi "Bill has 'ji" *
ftfi fgso ,e"rystag aM *eA*t since 10 l3,e peele
i\w9.lL, idrOLt, a Ur d -- M every wof tge o. I tIs doubtless s v m



S2 e tt upaelto of S al ist rig EV. T. ENBt aboutLNUS
f It .ols .uotb lq eon e d iS o ltr h Poi" t in Ptor C1hWrc SL. hristll hurch.
."ohand to, tit llift j t to
geu_ t. e. tat. 3stse o for oC, e Willbein the i wh

"t l!A I si *bo o*s-no ottrit, as thBt bmt he neWer ex.elh o
thIelred Odor im Mb te ts oS inther diretiortutn.hs CONo sef.
ar eooh t smosm- bad to ou r deminig perity astIe supreme
be i el y sthllanwill0 h ter.t t Taheo jMe Of truth and hop ad love ande
N, tsr the supervIs of Su -M gt s I naovr din T. A BLE ,
I IlM ra l nitusayr o p Twe Mao th a Abr 1 a Pastor arh St. HRtlaN Churh.
to the .detr.... of monthO o for either t President of there











11 people oa fanor of a of thit ese t"e for v le an average
of .Mt a day. mds that fora has never
Sma aste lafn ra p esa this M ae amoth iaon either directions
.Eut...amkedies, .too U U onl e





assey sawl hom, wre w oa kep ablli t bune of thaet two
of the insurance to te lpople who The dIspsItion to "smoke out" legls,
it* The l arg is u OmpaN native canddaes 4andc ompel them to
Mven eased e am if elp lthea ome aonth opena will b n far a ex e of their
pMeope. Th.de. radly throu t.-t the Com eand thI
hvown61"s- up sf.Sta.It. Itis-acheering t g -.of.0whole
.' Wputso thO m10o0 eautuTlsentiment.-$30M
Used m4 for OIMPA amtlSt. S-. qwie--- ,
0 wastsoamof Itredlto
isn. .Wlalatures in pass: The bank of this place has, during the
M .II o f otlhe btOlWadt of mouth of Aopil, paid out to the farmersso
of 4340 a day. This"m ans that for
_. cnatnleastI"eep ourthis eomnvnty $106000. In a.llprob. all
W ,m h over -itsezpendlitur e-mon- thwill be far i nexce of thisnad
-Medhemmle--w..nmaat-Plant Oity Courier. M.


SIiortSc
~ 41


7H TEASPECT OF 1101


Whil6 th good ews of human n m
dfa si n gives to the go a
iii Mtaha Ad enals to it a aAtoh.
Iess wi"lae is 4vlnt at the Same
td the heart with an In-
1foIaobe maen utterly hopeleem
humanalty lefh to telb. It k the
o f lasse *a that an manlfold,
remlttmt and deoa s aeoa to
Self- mnedomels o weah s under In.
mraMh laws, ntftg us al-lay or
palliate the dread nealsimes d huma
Hie. *
The I mof a'a rmdem
to*afrtetwtM hh fw teaashl
made sa d mu asse ne o
the eIf W disasters the deegle.
tion attWkIf all lg psdsh*
40 on,*mb

sasoo by



8L this propettso apowwerto
go vlue fof th e Bs N it
SOmkiwo f tha eIe of itwee s o


Isledhotope nt the so wt
bhida y of .hoso l sWBistomr of
Am tearle, ofpateepr etenolodty,
estursd sler. t last
bt N and at peace In the arms of
this prosbaWt no with


tho alu oft~eoa-Its aaI
10 Irttemso* in the hughtees of It.
yitos to allure the soul?
*tfco history of hope Is the history of
|l~iy-taction.
hqim.a. In ti~es, In eMTi.-
'Nap In4 me orals terwovn with


'V.
'4


Patent


rikin bki 0% l m Ws~s NABAmO


ft INI UUK KUXlIUIuF'
s, Pastor Church Street .
0 Church
Is te a diameter m demon-R .
stratod it to b tim most potent factor
In all intellwtual, domeastl a ind Iivid.
al lifse Ithasga d aboutI W in it
as a warment The = InbhWsl
asem4d tih realt of ita soompli.h* l
m t spleador sof its m sU M" hae
Wbroi Mher la the pla o.f iony,
au4 det in t p. or .. J iacksonville a rinest B o
The In the power of Almlthty
God to ne brightast.up um wi and florlda's LaOet wI.l
the brighmtes &ad eMuUelst sabbiUrn
o th Vim We glry a might and O Be Year-Round
fait enndemid by ss h lov, sam we
als-to y l ti t visle "whie- O II
o to la a iu hopH This oel
needs ao d moxustretimos at our hunds. It
s1 ds Iteslf i a thouBsadanle msta-.
tons ary d It lift s bum DODOGE & GULLENS
life tat of the amo Mlai d erown
It witl ma ip aMitieam. It mIOw nd Na -er
sweep away every barrier, and carries
usa theo eurewt of its mighty sweep, _____
"Mm am d omwamd to tk mqi6mmmt == = ==I
dm of mortal -rit. To the o f 0 "oti
hMlf Godboeto is a of towensand ft
deftm. Itar to whTo l_ tm -h __ .______
di i n &Mtroublehs at. Hs but tem. FREE
eravs HiM the aWry mrsbeli waves i ,
of thM North Atatme& dMashe agt the ln 1a pe n
aboa M to aly mo he hured ,Wm. urbrid e .
Rep smer gwa ry batting CAi OA
wl"a nar, a"", a"M comt"* W BTA_ _a
samd asulreslhe opro. mm e
M e v omemseas" to a- It tIthnUto

*om wertdN or te i.a. 0 4 er aloft A
ftMMnoe ie~lsl M.tshmithepsuwn( in-. ftleML fls,


CCUP





U~250

g9559..... .lo

RIF 10







TILLV~~e



in 1-2z, 5L.Packages


-m259,40, 60 jz
AUIft w Pm helupft





(IMhei*W t Li Luie)


THESUN-,


-F aaa


Acc~ai


inlTr&ubl


ftme sn fj~j~; erW

A~5OWIN boIal m M
~PAm*~,



y Plin.


I1


J~A190jp6


hrmon for T-h, arh, .*Y '.R' o.

Non-Church Goers iw. amnrj., n0 i.oin


omobiles
+ i igg 1t4 of
we you ,mo. I T
Auto with m. i can s
Mt price podbles for it

!V ARINAU
^^J&^M ^^^L^^^^l^- l!
*^wwy *--- i r-


4


I











Mtay WO6


...- -- a.- ., 0'~**.. .. .- -* *~NO-


-. or


'a


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The Czar's Spy
(Continued from Tenth Page)
"But I tell you he will not me yeou.
We have so many peronas hiere with
et information conerning rFinnlash
oupn.ran e against our 'Ru-ian rue.
Wh, if his xellen aw everyone who
de Od to Tee him, he would he aem-
to ti veudleo the whbob twpa
tfour bud n roui"




the Our. The latew wM In fea of
the dagper the pinuel* o bombe md
ocHvqum nu hedm him-f ain by
ions of the Colomel' sU
dlploma*U but utterlyubmld Am
mm fthe argusfut, I a
in a firm tone:
"I wish to impress upon you the .
trem importance of theinformstion I
have to Impart, and oan only repaint
that it is a matter concerning his i.
ctlleny privately. Will you therefore
do me the faVor to take y ahnemA 46
him?"
"His Excellency refuses to be troubled
with the names of strangers," was his
old reply, as he turned over my card
in his MY&d.
"But if I write upon it the nature of
my business and .iobee it lna a" ,t-*j


lag his mustache, reple d i*i
great reluctancee
"Well, if you are so determined, you -
may. write your business upon your [ saw that his thin, o
1 therefore took out one, and on pale, while his s Ou
back wrote In Preich tho Ae W
I knew must have the effect of obtaining I
an audience for me:j V 3 "AWtto
"To give Information regarding Missustant little stout m
ima Heath." appeared as th out by
This I enclosed in the envelope he
handed to me, when, ringing a bll, he secret door hide
handed it to the footes who Appeared, of the ai.
with order' to tp h a hiLr
and await a y
in a a t,. 54 *T..2
"His Excel will give aiiience to Uto We*I
the English m'seur," ..... te 'tliUrli-
Then I rose and followed the footman to is
through several wide corridors AlWi 2jJ!
with palms and flowers, which formed p i
kind of winter-garden, until we crossed e E sman
a red-carpeted ante-room, where two "Ahl" I oried, stand
statuesque entries stood on guard, and tbin.faoed oa .b of th
the man conducting me rapped at, the nrunouwi man wb
great polisbhe tsahowy room beyond who, b hilin alleat
oen e mndIou UA a s-l or wa h hw, .l
opened, ad I found myself in a high. nhtal VnY ouintn


'Pefore baby comes and during the
l.. nothing quite
li!*id-folldbW f predigested
liquid-food


ill


vital forces duriuag;ii8
ad the natural tonic
s insure placid nerves

creases the flow and richnoea
Sftbti* aklig baby Healthy,


Sold by all Druggit and Grocers.


^"wIr


v ALU.


A New Bible with a Mare


TN.


rIAN


NIW GRICATI


1e 4 *'


-w


ow Ton w gsdoutby Iwo


a'
Id


VM--


m-f


Qmgmjpft~rA istlwfl
"Search the fellow.
there in hie hlp-poi


U4


I fill


wverur GemnerIasaa n t msasusthe
iort~hm~e mani" had runmhis
smJm Aom on, aftA W& io m-


The apartment was splendidly dior-. a wwUa s me A iCs sy waSpon.
ated, 4. in the center of the i Mqu I drew it forth and haded It to him,
floor,. indthecente r f t. the n:


which showed the red dyelloir rbb _. ... a
aj the Order of Saint A snne. BHis h s e Dta lUllsMiibir l.#zehy
were behind his bak, and be stood par. -rum" the Bares h
posely in sobe a portion that when I "And ed
entered I could not at frst he his faee
But wh the footma had bowed andm d Ud
te and wew alone, he turned tj
eiht nad I them saw that his boy aconfne to the e
th high hk it r "T mad woman, you mean I" be
lde.whI-ers, hard mouth de blla-k lehed. "* ,
s ft closely together, was one that "B in -i not -mad I eied, tW s
thei mark of &il upon It-the sai* ane as Ow)II
iter eoutentse of me who could sat tended that the horrors the a
without say eoma and without shoul4 drive her iaias, and thus eYs
Trly e ote to meeeret hb be kepttl .
at ay east, d0Utardly0
i man with Meh a
T be snapped in do
highpbehe" s ose". "Yoad
Watputusq e 1do yw u I. to vo me hel to
il h w so f tl o tlliai usr mEe"

IrmethoP Fdu 4eQUent We b-Wf tor "
aft, J im~dheu~U^ ^^ ~
Adi* a^_ ^ ^w* ^* -^^ y ^.i


WAeui.~m


JOSiPH ZAPaCo,
-WW UHA


itl


oil


4.
~>'.,: '4.


"22 Wo ty oto


~. 'a'
~ ''4


.~ ~14. .~.
'V


.4 4.:


qv.y mrip mvwvr


Who b


1


I


Ti>


....M..M.mm


ow
be 10.


I


4 V




1*,


H's


YOU


Among the purchus of Lo in


- 6


A


I,
49,


SPRINGFIEL

SSuburb,?


If you are not, then get into line. For an in mentor for home a lot here wil
be a souroe of profitor Joy.


SPRII NGPI ELD


OFFERS A CHANCE to the homeaeeker, or the man who wants an investment.
and the bet part of it ts that are so eay to get.


15 Per Cent Ninety Da


and the balance One Two and Three Years.


No bette hane to own yr oUr home. Embrace it now. THINK TWICE-Ca
you abrd to throw this chaoe away? Let us show you thee magnificent lots, o
write us and we will send map by which you can make your own selection froi
those that are let.


all are sold, for


the Lotare


Lots.


I 9


For further inf rmaton all or write


STOCKTON


BUDD,


,Fh.


1
Ii


NEW


II


That Beautifu


ft


NEW


SP er Cent Cash,


I


Good Lots left


41k


4


I...ood


RD


0 .


S. i



1







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m


jAdismqv




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