Group Title: sun.
Title: The sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075914/00025
 Material Information
Title: The sun
Uniform Title: sun
Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sun Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: April 28, 1906
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tallahassee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Leon County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Leon -- Tallahassee
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.451667 x -84.268533 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 18, 1905)-v. 3, no. 47 (Sept. 12, 1908).
Numbering Peculiarities: Published at Tallahassee, Fla., June 23-Sept. 12, 1908.
General Note: Claude L'Engle, editor.
General Note: "If it's right, we are for it."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075914
Volume ID: VID00025
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33400104
lccn - sn 95047216
 Related Items
Other version: Morning sun (Tallahassee, Fla.)
Succeeded by: Dixie (Jacksonville, Fla.)

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Volume I-No. 24 JAGKSONVILLC, FLORIDA, APRIL 28, 1906 SinIle Gopy 5 Gents


IT'S PCGK, PCGK, PCGULATIONI


I










IF IT'S RIGHT, WE ARE FOR IT-


SUN


K. TAYLOR
Cartoonist


* IUSM~WCULY WINA WILL w 08S UEM mm mVS =PPOW v MUA, ST =NIm UUPooW.aT 81 war UIUSW J3CSVLM


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S:


spe~r !Year


HERE lived some yean ago in one of those towns in Georgia
which grow upOround the well in the court house square a man
whose parents, being compelled by force of circumstances work-
ing the laws of hereditary nomenclature to bestow on their first pledge
of conjugal affection the commonplace name of "Jones," determined
to redeem their fault at the baptismal font, therefore when the circuit.
riding parson paused with dripping fingers and said-
"Name this child-"
The mother answered, '.General George Washington."


For forty years General George Washington
e ht awkward modest bashful product of a vil-


Jones lived the life of


large, and, beyond a reputation for wearing /
the biggest chew of tobacco for miles around, A Fine Su
achieved not distinction.
He wore his jeans pants high upon his
shins; his hickory shirt was fastened with but H TE SUN,
one button; his large red hands protruded far SUN,
through his waitebands; his boots knew nbt the | ela w
swish, swish of the blacking brush, and his hat II WW w
brim flopped over his ears. I lished inaM
If Wash" happened to raise more cotton [ e in
to the acre than any of his neighbors, he mod- ing a long fell
estly withheld the information; if his coon dog -
whelped six fine pups, he failed to mention it; ida Journalisn
if his "yearlin" bull took the prize at the coun-
ty fair, he did not brag about it; when all seven Jwt a1 tdledI
of his children came down with the measels at tra t in A
once and were out in less than a week, no one twted iA
knew it but his wife and himself, and even when ner, and Tay
" Wash" beat a traveling drover on a horse trade, I
it was the bad language of the drover that gave Cartoons illu
the news of the village.
So he was called "Wash," then "Old Imost effeUtiv
Wash," and was regarded by his neighbor as a '- .
good-natured fellow, all right in his way, but no w 0100K 1-k
great shakes when weighing time came. gamd 8m,00
On the fortieth anniversary of his natal day,
Wash took his faithful corn-cob pipe out behind part we hope
the barn and gave himself his fit halt holiday.
After he had smoked away a couple of hours and tinue. Mad
a quarter of a pound of nigger head," he put
his meditations into words, which, for want of a | terprIl8.
better audience, he addressed to "Ole Britidle,". -
the cow, who chewed on them in a mildly med. .
itative manner that was soothing to heot mater's vexed spirit.
"Here I am, rising forty years, and whar am I? I don't seem to
mow much hay in this here village when it comes time to count the
top notchers.
"I know Ih a o upo tetin ta minute than that pompa old windbat,
Dacon Wiggin,, has b*-1 utbe ia amnion when strangs a ,whoIs
the prominent men In to.n aUd I dio't even git among the alma. It's that
rbansty- gged, red-headed, treoklface little Jim Tompkins, what dunno good
rost'n "eM from ,ubbin, who's axed to talk to the rs at the meetings of
the agricultural msoet, while ll IIt h to ban round the drinking gourd.
* "Take that meuiy ltte 19 pon, what's dun nothing but
mind fies off erhesell his da, it' that 'puts up' the parson over
Sunday, NOT MB.
"As for that fleabitten Jon Hightower, evybod0 ought ter know that he's
scairt of his own shadder, yet' I apimteul onth Guvenor's staff, and struts
around with a rooster feather stu' la &l bonnet, an it's Cun'l Hightower-an
me, christened a general, has ter tan er round and blink at him.
"It's as clar ter me as .that r.- tick on the eead of ole Brindle's yer that
I've done myself and this village a rank injotioe all these years by being too all.
fired modest. I'll mark out a new furow right now and see if I can't git folks
to reoeeis me as the reel ripe persmmon. l tackle one of these pms agat
fellers and git some pointers on how to boom =."
The siult of these medltatlon was oom a mt on the hero of this narra.
tive. He became his own boomer. The it i he did was to insist on his
family dropp nthe "par" and "old man" form reference to him, and to call
him 'General. Then he bribed some boys to say, "Here comes the General,"
when beapaedonthe villagteetes .
When h baby cut a toot, he drove right to the posokae ad told about
U. It was the biggest tooth, the whitset toth, the cuest tooth, the agat


M4


r.k

33t


tooth ever cut in Haberham county could bite the hardest, and little Georgie
nevw whimpered while it was oom in lh;rugb. .
In of hauling his cotton the k yard of theteoe where thief
supp the Generalwould dr ,up to tf.rontof each.to In e sand
bra about hi crop-how well It was inned, bow neatly it was baled, ftd he
d tell everboy e met, IN STRI R CONFIDENCE that he had made the
best crop that year that ever was made on a two-honeIW farm.
ne aybe whitewshed hi barnyard fence. He called this an "improve-
MENT," and pent half of the following Saturday telling how nice the whole place
looked, and to d friends he let drop the information (ON THE QUIET)
that next week he was going to put a new sweep to the well.
He got hold of an old magazine cut a page out, and sent for one of those
"complete outfits," including sbows hata, shirt and suit, which ae advertied for
9.365, sent on approval by express 0. D. When the package came everybody
knew about it, for he had told them he expected a package from hi father
__ brother who was rich and in Chicago. When hb ap-
peared the following Sunday at church with the outfit
on, his air was so studiously careless and easy.golng
that his neighbors forgot the time when he wore home
DO B uquet spun, cut and made.
From his telling, his dog caught the fattest coons,
his hens laid the freshest eggs, his geese gabbled loud-
est, and his gouro vines threw more shade than the
laude L'tEn- famed one under which Jonah rested.
au et JL JES- All this had its Impression on the minds of the
,y pape ,i villager you mat be sure. They changed their saluta-
ly paper pUD- tion from "Wash" to GENERAL, and began totalkof
him as a good man to run for Justiceofthe Peace.
Onville, is8 fll But his triumph was not complete until he began
to quote his own wise sayings.
want in Flor- i He would meet a friend, pull him out to the edge
of the sidewalk and open up on him with-"Say, Jim,
IL l ^v ,KUb. you know how modest I am, so I feel safe in telling
e. v ry U you about a bright thing I said yesterday. I know you
y the editor a won't tell it. Itwas like this, etc., etc.
He would slap another friend on the back and
say, "Well Bill, you see I was right about that old
1aSterly man- sorrel of Miss Angel's. You know I told you last week
that horse had the wind colic. She died last night;"
r's excellent To another friend he would recall a prediction he
had made in early spring that it would be an open win-
brate the text iter, to another a warning about potato bugs being bad
that summer.
ly. It begtiw He sant his wife around to her neighbors' houses
,,w u ^t Instructions to talk about his wisdom, to repeat
h a his sayings and to recount tales proving his infallible
!he St a judgment.
and nr Ir Before a year had passed our hero was put on the
a, I school committee, was trustee of the'Pand for Disabled
*t w.ll ( I Widows, and held the following titles in addition:
L. Wll 80 COn- President of the Juvenile Reform Society, chairman of
the Board of Missions, commander of Stonewall Jack-
IOn New En- son Camp No. 1, U. 0. V., honorary member of the
Ladles Tuesday Sewing Society, treasurer of the Satur-
day Night Checker Club foreman of Hook and Ladder
A No. 2 and chief of the Reilatonrs
SHe was selected to deliver the diplomas to the
Graduating clas, and was prominently mentioned as
leader of the local forces in the next inter-villae spelling bee. e was referred
to n the "County Clarion". as one of our prominent citizens," or "our esteemed
fellow townsman, General George Washington Jones."

This history reminds us that we of The Sun have been entirely too
modest about ourselves.
We know that we have the best there is when it comes to-
Bright, ppy Jonaisn, and-
We are toh the people of thist tate know about It.
We are printing a variety of good stuff each week, so that every
one can find the vry kind he or she likes best.
We are going to make some wonderful offers to Sun readers in this
very aces duri qthe next four or five months.
We Oare 1 r 1 the stuff and we mean to have it.
S"the stafd" we mean
&;1. 0 m ubscrlptiUm
But we oetoearnit by-
a best paper.
asM brain can make It
Tell your friends that they had better buy a seat in The Sun's
Peark.,
Price? Well, $2 per.


b JAcMSONVILLE. FORIDA. APRIL 28, 190


gI Entlat the PoetOffict as nvills^ ** p *s **d *us m t*s



Fables for the Unwary

TEE FOOLISH FARMER WHO OOT WISE
II_ ] II 3


V


T H Ewd-











April 28, 1906


THE SUN


Third Page


Deep Water Brings Foreign Line

Berg Line of Steamers Will Make Regular Sailings Between Jacksonville
and Rotterdam-This Port Forging to the Front as a Naval Stores Market


Persistently Jacksonville is forging to the front
in the export of naval stores.
Despite the obstacles placed in the way through
the dominating power of a firmly established rival,
so cherished in the affections of great exporters, Jack-
sonville is coming to its full heritage as an outlet
for the great naval stores producing territory of
which it is the natural gateway.
The work of making Jacksonville a naval stores
market has been slow, but steadily the trend of the
trade is turning to this point, and the day is not
distant when the greater portion of the export trade
will he concentrated here.
As a stream will eventually seek its natural out-
let, so is the naval store trade flowing to this city,
and those exporters who recognize the advantages to
be pined by such movement are doing all in their
power to stimulate and aid such a commercial revolu-
tion as the building of a naval stores market here.
During the past twenty years Savannah has been
considered by the trade-both producers and con-
sumers-as the market fixing the basis of values.
Savannah quotations were the standard, and owing
to thi extent of the foreign trade handled through
that port, its commercial importance in this respect
has been maintained for a long period.
The advantages possessed by Jacksonville and
her port improvements, t her with the develop-
meat of the naval stores industry In Florida has,
however, caused a reaction, and Savannah is no
longI er supreme as a market.
up to the time of the active operation of the
naval storm business in this State, about 1900, con-
dites warranted that Savannah should exercise
market control, as the bulk of the entire crop was
handled through that port.
This o lo r the ease, however, as shipments


formerly made to that point have been diverted to
Jacksonville and Fernandina. In recent years the
receipts at Fernandina and this city have been about
equal to those of Savannah, and prices paid by the
exporters have been uniformly the same as the prices
paid daily in Savannah.
The conditions have been changing from year to
year in favor of this port, and at the present time
Jacksonville is practically an open market. Accord-
ing to the opinion of a naval stores exporter, in
speaking of the advantage of Jacksonville as a naval
stores market, it would appear advisable from the
standpoint of the consumer to operate through Jack-
sonville rather than to throw all of the demand upon
tho Savannah receipts, thus causing great competi-
tion among the exporters and increasing market
prices in proportion to the demand, which then as.
sumes a speculative phase not in harmony with ju.
dicious business methods. Eliminating the chances
for unwise speculation places the business on a sub.
stantial footing that speedily proves more profitable
for both producer and consumer.
In the railway facilities for bringing in this
traffic Jacksonville is especially favored. The con-
nections to all parts of the great naval stores field
arc of the best, and the shipper is the gainer by the
munch shorter distance to point of export, a matter
of great importance, and bne, too, that is not being
overlooked.
Then the port facilities of Jacksonville are im-
proving rapidly is another strong factor in the hp*
building of the market. Insufficient water for deep.
draft vessels will no longer be an impediment to the
trade. Twenty feet of water now, and twenty-four
fe't assured in about eight months, removes all ob-
jections on that score.
That these advantages are appealing to steam-
ship owners is shown by the announcement of the


lI rg Line to its agents here, J. J. Logan & Co.,
that it will soon transfer its sailings from Fernan-
dina to Jacksonville, then to make regular trips
between this port and Rotterdam with cargoes of
naval stores. It is the Intention of this line to make
tilu transfer as soon as contracts at Fernandina are
carried out, probably within a month or six weeks
The transfer is indicative of the inclination of
ocean carriers to seek Jacksonville business, and the
first regular foreign line to enter will open connee-
tion for this city with one of the most important
ports of Europe, as Rotterdam is so considered la the
naval stores trade.
Already the Clyde Line maintains an excellent
service to the principal Northern ports, while the
Southern Steamship Company has recently inaugu-
rated a desirable service between this city and Phil-
adelphia. The Merchants A Miners Transportation
Company has purchased extensive river front prop-
erty here for the purpose of establishing terminals
for service to Baltimore and Philadelphia.
Thus is the coastwise service increasing with the
expansion of the market, and Its future growth will
be nurtured by other lines -of European steamships
which will naturally follow the entrance of the Berg
Line.
The completion of the deep water improvements
will mark the final step giving Jacksonville equal
shipping facilities with Savannah by water, while
these by rail to this point are in great measure
superior for the territory of Florida naval stores.
The future is bright with prosperity for Jack.
sonville as a naval stores market of magnitude, and
naught can mar the prospect as at present indicated,
unless it be lack of co-operation by those whose
difference or disinclination should cause neglect of
the opportunity that is naturally forced upon this
city by reason of its location.


4 Farmers and the Road Tax


Fear of increred taxation is in large measure
possible for arrested development in Florida, as it
i a y otht Stes. specially does this fear
prevail in the country districts where the process
of ood-road making is low, &ad w the t edum
tical fe litis ane retarded for lack of sufficient
The advatages resulting from better roads alone
are overlooked ta considering the slight increase of
tax Ieaassary to build them.
Better methods of education brought about by
more eompet--t teachers and better school buildings
ae disregarded because of effort to keep down the
tax rate
la the atmpt to save a trife a large sum is lost.
There is o doubt about it. The sum total required
froNm ash individual yearly for road building would
be forgotten when the aI out thus spent would be
tAum May fold by eosso of the lessened cost of
haulig, the ter condition of horses ad vehicles,
the time savd, aad not the least of all the increased
valW of real estate uas eUM of a good road.
nla ame1Msatla of thee improvements the farmer
sold st fixet that the we-aty ead-ower, the
"Mn s t ai te -poratie- are obliged to eon-
$ rihawhether h e or met. -


Similar argument can be used for advocacy of
better schools in the rural districts. Small increase
in the tax rate will give the desired result of im.
proved education. With poorly paid and ineompe
tent teachers and miseraUble buildings to bouse the
pupils, there is a waste of public money, an exces-
sive price for the little knowledge imparted to the
children of the farmer.
A little more money for the school and this waste
would be checked Then there would be suffcent
to provide the right kind of quarters and hire good
teachers, and the profit to the community would be
found in the higher standard of intelligence brought
into each home.
As in the case of good roads, the wealthy, the non-
resident and the corporation would each be compelled
to stand its share of the public burden.
There is much wisdom in the following opinion,
offered by Richard H. Wood, in the Parmers' Trib-
une:
-he farmer is noted for being economical, es-
ly when it comes to having something for
dmasf or his family. See how he deprives him*
self of schools sand rad. aIn many of the rural
disuits the. sheapest tenehemare employd, wad
the aehool buildup ase apologies for what


they should be. Yet the farmer, directly or indi-
rectly, helps to build and maintain the best of
schools and colleges for the rich. He says he van-
not-afford good things, conveniences or even neessi-
ties for his own children, because having them would
make a few cents' difference in his taxes. Whenever
he takes a notion to have better teachers and better
schoolhouses, what happens? Why, the agent of
some rich taxpayer comes along ad utters that magi
word, 'taxes.' The mention of this word seems to
paralyze every good intention Inthe mind of maay
a small farmer. He forets that while a better
school for his children willeost the rieh oa.resident
several dollars, it will ea.t him only a few pennies.
and so he deprive his own children of educational
advantages in order that the wealthy non-resident
can save enough on hi taxes to sed his elldren to
the best alad lsti e a the Il And
so with the public sU e r will lug
his tired horse, or baee s o invalid wife over
~reu or mdy roas year after year, wh a few
dibriose it Mhe tasM wMll give him good ria" s
that wil mve oMees, Wamu, time ad ealth. But
the west afewaieMMt ha a wmdsrfe l iMluas
wr gthe e- farw"r










IF IT'S RIOHT, WB ARE FOR IT


CLAUDE L'ENGLE
Editor


M .LUSTIAT WE I


WnT A WILL


THIE


. I


S.UN


. K. TAYLOR
Cartoonist


ITS~ TWPI~ueMi MR[LV MM&UEVA W I I UUNIT AT 8I1 WWPUST WiD AICSMZU.


IAMNWIIVLLEMFORDAm AMRL 2A.1906


. 1*C *00 f"ljyYear


Fables for the Unwary

TEE FOOLISH FARMER WHO (OT WISE


V ERE lived some years ago in one of those towns in Georgia
which grow up pound the well in the court house square a man
whose parent, bein compelled by force of circumstances work-
ing the laws of hereditary nomenclature to bestow on their first pledge
of conjugal affection the commonplace name of "Jones," determined
to redeem their fault at the baptismal font, therefore when the circuit.
riding parson paused with dripping fingers and said-
"Name this child-"
The mother answered, "General George Washington."


For forty years General George Washington
the awkward, modest, bashful product of a vil-


Jones lived the life of


large, and, beyond a reputation for wearing r
the biggest chew of tobacco for miles around, A Fine S|
achieved not distinction.
He wore his jeans pants high upon his
shins; his hickory shirt was fastened with but -E rr
one button; his large red hands protruded far Hal BUN,
through his waitsbands; his boots knew not the T 0l'a Wr06
swish, swish of the blacking brush, and his hat A gle w-
brim flopped over his ears. lthedin 3c0
If Wash" happened to raise more cotton
to the acre than any of his neighbors, he mod- ing a long fell
estly withheld the information; if his coon dog .
whelped six fine pups, he failed to mention it; id JOurnalisJI
if his "yearlin" bull took the prize at the coun- ^
ty fair, he did not brag about it; when all seven jW0t -nM M
of his children came down with the measels at treated in a
once and were out in less than a week, no one w ,t AR -
knew it but his wife and himself, and even when ner, and Tay
Wash" beat a traveling drover on a horse trade,
it was the bad language of the drover that gave CartOOnS illu
the news of the villa.
So he was called "Wash," then "Old mOst E00t V
Wash," and was regarded by his neighbors as a ... ,., ,
good-natured fellow, all right in his way, but no 00
great shakes when weighing time came. Ioo,. .,,c
On the fortieth anniversary of his natal day, Su
Wash took his faithful corn-cob pipe out behind pat we hope
the barn and gave himself his first half holiday. -
After he had smoked away a couple of hours and tinue. M-
a quarter of a pound of 'nigger head," he put
his meditations into words, which, for want of a terprise. /
better audience, he addFessed to "Ole Brindle," -
the cow, who chewed on them in a mildly med- .
itative manner that wau soothing to her master's vexed spirit.
"Here I am, rising forty years, and whar am I? I don't seem to
mow much hay in this hee village when it comes time to count the
top notchers.
I" know I1 9( m e 1S0ea mite than that pompas oldwindba,
Deacon Wiggins, bah 0 1.itaa0Seltion whenstrangms
the prominent men la In o iA1 I do even git among the abos. It's that
bandy-legged, red-heeded, rackIei4ace little Jim Tompklns, what dunno good
ron' yers from nubb who s based to talk to the fanmer at the meetings of
the cultural soei, while ll I l t ban round the drinking gourd.
S q'Take that mealy little stKeeeper, BWllyrlimpon, what'. dun nothing but
mind flies offer cheese all his das, an it' IM that 'puts p'the parson over
Sunday, NOT M.
As fr that fleabitten Jo Hightower, e body ought ter know that he's
scairt of his own shadder, yet appitel o e uvenor's staff. and struts
around with a rooster feather itu s bonnet, an it's Cun'l Hightower-an
me, christened a general, has ter stan er round and Mink at him.
"It's as clear ter me as that r. tick on the ead of ole Brindle's yer that
I've done myself and this village a rank Injstiee all these years by being too all.
nad modest. I'll mark out a new frrow right now and we if I can't git folks
to .ea1se me as the reel ripe pedimmon. nr tackle one of these pm agent
felles and ge some pointers on how to bowQmy f.* .
A3M eult of these m tatoms was soo apart on the hero of this narrm.
tive. He became his own boomer. The lrMt he did was to insist on his
drpp the "par" and "old man" form referee to him, and to csl
h1. 'OmU ." Then he bribed some boys to say, "Here comes the General"
whm beap d on the village streets.
Whn his baby cut a tooth, he drove right to the postohoe ad told about
It. U va the bigges tooth, the white tooth, the cutest tooth, the stOn


Lt


tooth ever cut in Habersham conty eod bite the hardest, and Uttle Georgie
never whimpered while it was oa tu, r.ug ..
Instead of hauling his oo.U ino the. bck yard of the where his
supplies, the General would drai up to the front o sf t ach to MC and
brabout his crop-how weUn it wa imned, bow neatly itws baled, and lie
od tell everboy be met, IN 8TRICOr COFIDENC that he had made the
biggest crop th ear that ever was made on a two-horne larm
One da he whitewashed his barnyard fence. He called this an "improve-
MENT," and spent half of the following Saturday telling how nice the whole place
looked, and to iscreet friends he let drop the Information (ON THE QUIET)
that next week he was going to put a new aweep to the well.
He got hold of an old magazine cut a page out, and sent for one of those
"complete outfits," including shoes, hate, shirt and suit, which ae advertised for
$9.35, sent on approval by express 6. 0. D. When the package came everybody
knew about it, for he had told them he expected a package from his father's
brother who was rich and in Chicago. When he
"" pored the following Sunday at church with the utfLt
1 on, his air was so studiouidy careless and easy-going
that his neighbors forgot the time when he wore home
1 BDOuquet spun, cut and made.
From his telling, his dog caught the fattest coons,
his hens laid the freshest eggs, his geese gabbled loud-
est, and his gour vines threw more shade than the
1aude ^ T n. famed one under which Jonah rested.
U a1 JM Iuin* All this had its impression on the minds of the
S ape pu villager you ma be sure. They changed their saluta-
y paper pu tion from "Wash" to GENERAIL, and began totalkof
him as a good man to run for Justice of the Peace.
Onvlle isfill. But his triumph was not complete until he began
to quote his own wise sayings.
wanflt in Flor.- He would meet a friend, pull him out to the edge
of the sidewalk and open up on him with-"Say, Jim,
x. sCub e .. you know how modest I am, so I feel safe in telling
SEver-y bU"- you about a bright thing I said yesterday. I know you
y -the --- .t4 U won't tell it. It was like this," etc., etc.
y ne itM r i8 He would slap another friend on the back and
sa. y, "Well Bill, you see I was right about that old
18sterly MaM sorrel of Miss Angel's. You know I told you last week
__ I that horse had the wind colic. She died last nilht."
Br'8 OXCellent To another friend be would recall a prediction he
had made in early spring that it would be an open win-
brate the text ter, to another a warning about potato bugs being bad
that summer.
ly. It begin He sent his wife around to her neighbors' houses
-j uwithl instructions to talk about his wisdom, to repeat
he SBn i-- a Ihis sayings and to recount tales proving his Infallible
rho I;,Ula judgment.
, and for our Before a ear had passed our hero was put on the
R 0 OU school commit was trustee of the Fund for Disabled
t Wmill i Widows, and held the following titles in addition:
t will so COn- .President of the Juvenile Reform Society, chairman of
S the Board of Missions, commander of Stonewall Jack.
'o New EnI; son Camp No. 1, U. 0. V., honorary member of the
Ladles Tuesday Sewing Society, treasurer of the Satur-
day Night Checker Olub foreman of Hook and Ladder
No. 2, and chief of the RAeulatoms.
:e He was selected to deliver the diplomas to the
Sraduating class, and was prominently mentioned as
leader of the local forces in the next inter-village spelling bee. e was referred
to in the "County Clarion" as "one of our prominent citizens," or "our esteemed
fellow townsman, General George Washington Jones."

This history reminds us that we of The Sun have been entirely too
modest about ourselves.
We know tA t we have the best there is when it comes to-
Drmhg yJowniste, and-
We are to t the people of thi State know about t.
We are printia a variety of good stuff each week, so that every
one can find the very kind he or she likes best.
We are going to make some wonderful offers to Sun readers in this
very pace durn kthe next four or five months.
Weareot rthe tff and we mean to have It.
By the staff we mean
$or. 8w ubsGrlpUon&
But we poie to earn it by-
2pMht118dewr
InIl M 4britht as brains can make It.
Tell your friends that they had better buy a seat in The Sm's
Cbario.
Price? Well, $2 per.


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April 28, 1906


THE SUN


Third Page


Deep Water Brings Foreign Line

Berg Line of Steamers Will Make Regular Sailings Between Jacksonville
and Rotterdam-This Port Forging to the Front as a Naval Stores Market


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Persistently Jacksonville is forging to the front
in the export of naval stores.
Despite the obstacles placed in the way through
the dominating power of a firmly established rival,
so oherished in the affections of great exporters, Jack-
sonville is coming to its full heritage as an outlet
for the great naval stores producing territory of
whieh it Is the natural gateway.
The work of making Jacksonville a naval stores
market has been slow, but steadily the trend of the
trade is turning to this point, and the day is not
distant when the greater portion of the export trade
will be concentrated here.
As a stream will eventually seek its natural out-
let, so is the naval store trade flowing to this city,
and those exporters who recognize the advantages to
be gained by such movement are doing all in their
power to stimulate and aid such a commercial revolu-
tion as he building of a naval stores market here.
Dri the pa twenty years Savannah has been
oonsidee by the trade-both producers and con-
sumers-as the market fixing the basis of values.
Savannah quotations were the standard, and owing
to the extent of the foreign trade handled through
that port, its commercial importance in this respect
has been maintained for a long period.
The advantages possessed by Jacksonville and
her port hipr~teement together with the develop-
meat of the naval stores duty n Florida has,
however, caused a reaction, and Savannah is no
longer supreme as a market.
Up to the time of the active operation of the
naval stores buslaness in this State, about 1900, con-
aditle warranted that Savannah should exercise
market control, a the bulk of the entire crop was
handled through that port.
Th iss no onger the ase, however, as shipments


formerly made to that point have been diverted to
Jacksonville and Fernandina. In recent years the
receipts at Fernandina and this city have been about
equal to those of Savannah, and prices paid by the
exporters have been uniformly the same as the prices
paid daily in Savannah.
The conditions have been changing from year to
year in favor of this port, and at the present time
Jacksonville is practically an open market. Accord-
ing to the opinion of a naval stores exporter, in
speaking of the advantage of Jacksonville as a naval
stores market, it would appear advisable from the
standpoint of the consumer to operate through Jack-
sonville rather than to throw all of the demand upon
tho Savannah receipts, thus causing great competi-
tion among the exporters and increasing market
prices in proportion to the demand, which then as-
sumes a speculative phase not in harmony with ju-
dicious business methods.- Eliminating the chances
for unwise speculation places the business on a sub.
stantial footing that speedily proves more profitable
for both producer and consumer.
In the railway facilities for bringing in this
traffic Jacksonville is especially favored. The con-
noctions to all parts of the great naval stores field
arc of the best, and the shipper is the gainer by the
much shorter distance to point of export, a matter
of great importance, and bne, too, that is not being
overlooked.
Then the port facilities of Jacksonville are Im-
proving rapidly is another strong factor in the hp*
building of the market. Insufficient water for deep-
draft vessels will no longer be an impediment to the
trade. Twenty feet of water now, and twenty-four
feet assured in about eight months, removes all ob-
jections on that score.
That these advantages are appealing to steam-
ship owners is shown by the announcement of the


I erg Line to its agents here, J. J. Logan & Co.,
that it will soon transfer its sailing from Fernan-
dina to Jacksonville, then to make regular trips
between this port and Rotterdam with cargo of
naval storm. It is the intention of this line to make
thlu transfer as soon as contracts at Fernandina are
carried out, probably within a month or six weeks
The transfer is indicative of the inclination of
ocean carriers to seek Jacksonville business, and the
first regular foreign line to enter will open connec-
tion for this city with one of the most important
ports of Europe, as Rotterdam is so considered in the
naval stores trade.
Already the Clyde Line maintains an excellent
Service to the principal Northern ports, while the
tSuthern Steamship Company has recently inaugu-
rated a desirable service between this city and Phil-
adelphia. The Merchants & Miners Transportation
Company has purchased extensive river front prop-
erty here for the purpose of establlhing terminals
for service to Baltimore and Philadelphia.
Thus is the oosatwise service noreasing with the
expansion of the market, and its future growth will
be nurtured by other lines *of European steamships
which will naturally follow the entrance of the Berg
Line.
The completion of the deep water Improvements
will mark the final step giving Jacksonville equal
shipping facilities with Savannah by water, while
these by rail to this point are in great measure
superior for the territory of Florida naval stores.
The future is bright with prosperity for Jack.
sonville as a naval stores market of magnitude, and
naught can mar the prospect as at present indicated,
unless It be lack of co-operation by those whose
difference or disincllnation should aeuse neglect of
the opportunity that is naturally forced upon this
city by reason of ts location.


\ Farmers and the Road Tax


Fear of iaeresed taxation Is in large measure
relpoible for arrested development in Florida, as it
ie is oer_!, t States. Especially does this fear
p il in the country districts whem the progress
of good-road making i. low, Mand where the educa-
Ute-l faelIties a retarded for lack of sufficient
The advance ruling from better roads alone
are overlooked i onadering the slight increase of
tax neememary to build thn
Better Ihod of education brought about by
moe competent teachers and better school building
a di sgarded because of effort to keep down the
tax rate.
In the atteapt to save a trifle a large sum is lost.
Thebe isno doubt about It. The sum total required
from individual yearly for road building would
be fogottep wnm t amount thus pent would be
ntun la fold by reason of thein le sened cost of
heaig, t e r I euaiUlm of hone aad vehiclesm
the thie Mavd, ad mot the leaet of all the increased
vasn of real etate 0 s no a good road.
In euOml iatIM of tiesImprove- -e t0 thefarmer
shold n for 4 t oat te weitby laud4We the
wne.iUmt anRthoe- ati- are obliged to oa-
vian&tS wHethe benit eWnvr


Similar argument can be used for advocacy of
better schools in the rural districts. Small increase
in the tax rate will give the desired result of im-
proved education. With poorly paid and Ineompe.
teachers and miserable build to houe
pupils, there is a waste of public money, an exces-
sive price for the little knowledge imparted to the
children of the farmer.
A little more money for the school and this waste
would be checked. Then there would be sufolent
to provide the right kind of quarters and hire good
teachers, and the profit to the community would be
found in the higher standard of intelligence brought
into each home.
As in the case of good roads, the wealthy, the non-
resident and the corporation would each be compelled
to stand its share of the public burden.
There is much wisdom in the following opinion,
offend by Richard H. Wood, in the Fanrers' Trib-
une:
The farmer is noted for being economical, es-
mhly when it coame to havin something for
f o family. See how depishim.
esiflio elow.e" a 4d anda. -a a0"ofthe rural
tg OWee buflat an amuns epeiiIi fatwhat


they should be. Yet the farmer, directly or indi-
rectly, helps to build and maintain the best of
schools and colleges for the rich. He says he can-
not 'afford good things, oonvenleces or evea ne essi-
tie for his own children, because having them would
make a few ents' difference in his taxem. Whenever
he takes a notion to have better teachers and better
schoolhouses, what happens? Why, the ag of
some rich taxpayer comes along aid utters t magic
word, 'taxes.' The mention of this word esems to
paralyze every good intention in the mind of many
a small farmer. He forgets that while a better
school for his children will- ot the rich noa-mident
several dollars, it will cost him only a few pennies.
and so he deprives his own ehildres of educational
advantages in order that the wealthy om-rmident
can av e ough O hi lmx to Ida didren to
the beut Mad h gmstirl s in tue M io I.aL And
so with the pii hwm. W Ift r wil lug
his tired ho fe, r bei is ivald wife over
S-e 0i is few
A-A _1- _^l,___^.^^__ 4 ^^ -bih* & J ut^^
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Fourth Page


THE SUN


April 28, 1906


What's Agitating the People These D&a


The New York Court of Appeals has just ren-
dered a decision that will doubtless serve as a pre-
cedent for many other States, the case being that of
express company claiming that a contract with an
employee absolved it from damages on account of in-
jury received through negligence of the company.
The court decided that such contract was void and
against public policy. A portion of the opinion
handed down by Judge Gray reads: "Contracts are
illegal at common law, as being against public pol-
icy, when they are such as to injuriously affect or
subvert the public interests. The theory
of their invalidity is in the importance to the State
that there shall be no relaxation of the rule of law
which imposes the duty of care on the part of the
employer toward the,employed. The State is inter-
ested in the conservation of the lives ,and of the
healthful vigor of its oitisens, and if employees could
contract away their responsibility at conunon law it
would tend to encourage on their part laxity of con-
duct in, if not indifference to, the maintenance of
proper and reasonable safeguards to human life and
limb. The rule of responsibility at common law is
as just as it is strict, and the interest of the State
in its maintenance must be assumed; for its policy
has in recent years been evidenced in the progressive
enactment of many laws which regulate the employ-
ment of children and the hours of work, and impose
strict conditions with reference to the safety and
healthfulness of the surroundings of" the employed
in the factory or in the shop. It is evi-
dent from the course of legislation framed for the
purpose of affording greater protection to the class
of the employed that the people of this State have
compelled the employer to do many things which at
common law he was not under obligation to do. Such
legislation may be regarded as supplementing the
common law rule of the employer's responsibility,
and is illustrative of the policy of the State. There.
fore it is when an agreement is sought to be enforced
which suspends the operation of the common law rule
of liability and defeats the spirit of existing laws of
the State, because tending to destroy the motive of
the employer to be vigilant in the performance of
his duty to his employees, that it is the duty of the
court to declare it to be invalid and to refuse its en-
forcement." i

At is noticeable that advocacy of State's rights is
being lessened while the demand for Federal super-
vision of many things is increasing. This condition
is productive of bureaucracy and government by com-
mission, and tends to restrain the freedom of indi-
vidual State government, a practice not contemplated
by the Constitution, and a trespass against the wel.
fare of the people. In speaking on this subject Rep.
resentative Sherley of Kentucky said: "What is
happening in every State of the Union today? The
State Legislature, the State government, instead of
being virile and efficient, re becoming anything bul
that. State officials do not Want to use the powei
of their State governments because it means State
taxation to pay for its exercise, which the people
have to pay directly out of their pockets, and so you
find officers of State governments charged with then
matters coming up to the national government to
asc it to do what it is their duty to do, so that they
be relieved of the burden and the States reeved o
the cost. I believe it was intended that the individ
ual states of America should be sovenign State.
keeping at home among the people 90 per cent c
the things that affect life, liberty and property.
believe the safety of the country lies in keeping sue
government at home.
"But it is a modern tendency to come to Was?
ington because it is easier than going to the differed
States; and it has gone so far now that we have t
doctrine proorelmed that whatever is big because J
is big most be solved by the national government
You will swamp your government. You will destrc
a rpsm ttve government in the true sense of tl
tersm it pI inlsist upon going along this mead, as
I have te occasion to make these remarks, not b


cause I have any special objection to this particular
bill-I have not examined it in detail-but because
I know it is not a matter that belongs to the national
government, and because I know in my short ex-
perience here that we cannot undertake to attend
to all the matters that should be subject to the police
powers of the State and keep this government an
intelligent and effective one."

Hon. Chua. Francis Adams of Boston, in an article
he has written for the Century of a recent trip to Africa,
and his impression of the negro in his native jungle,
says: "Looking about me among Africans in Af-
rica-far removed from that American environment
to which I have been accustomed-the scales fell
from my eyes. I found myself most impressed by a
realizing sense of the appalling amount of error and
oant in which we of the United States have indulged
on this topic. We have actually wallowed in a bog
of self-susient ignoranee-epecally we philan-
thropists and theorists of New England. We do so
still. Having eye, we will not see. Even now we
not infrequently hear the suooessor to the abolition-
ist and humanitarian of the ante-lcvil war period-'
the 'Uncle Tom' period-announce that the difference
between the white man and the black man is much
less considerable than is ordinarily supposed, and
that the only real obstacle in the negro's way is that
'He has never been given a chancel' For myself,
after visiting the black man in his own house, I come
back with a decided impression that this is the sheer-
est of delusions, due to pure ignorance of rudiment.
ary facts; yet we built upon it in reconstruction
days as upon a foundation stone-a self-evident
truth I Let those who indulge in such theories go to
the Soudan and pass a week at Omdurman."
Naturally enough, such an expression excites the
editorial wrath of the Boston Herald, which proceeds
to tell Mr. Adams that he has discovered nothing
not known to the uplifters of the negro in his native
lair, and suggests to the traveler "that it would be
quite as educational and much less expensive to
spend a week at Hampton Institute, or, better still,
with Booker Washington at Tuskegee. One would
find at either place a moe trustworthy demonstra-
tion touching the possibilities of development of the
negro race."
Mr. Adams might in turn offer a suggestion to
the Herald, that it send one of its bright young men
incognito to Tuskegee for a visit of a month, and
then to truthfully print the story of conditions as
he found them; possibly the narrative would be an-
other illustration to the well-known saying: "All is
not gold that glistens." 100


If everybody thought that the exposure of evil-
doing by the big insurance companies would deter
them from immoral practice for the present at least,
then everybody was mistaken, as the same old spirit
of subsidizing legislation prevailed at Albany when
the New York Senate was influenced into voting for
an amendment to the insurance bill that would cut
off needed reforms. The insurance lobby succeeded,
but its joy was of short life, as the wave of popular
indignation frightened the guilty Senators into re-
consideration of the vote, and the amendment was
defeated. Of this incident the Philadelphia Record
says: "The people still rule in the United States.
They can have their way whenever they take the
pains to have it. The obstructive gangsters in Coun-
cils who have taken it into their heads to balk the
movement for municipal reform by the attempted
revival of machine rule should make a note of the
Albany fiasco and govern themselves accordingly."
Commenting on the situation after public clamor
had caused the Senate to reconsider, the Chicago
Record-Herald says:
"It is a magnificent victory. With the New York
Legislature what it was, there was much reason to
fear that even the present unexampled might of pub-
lie wrath would fail to obtain the desired legislative
results. New laws were sure, but would they ring
true? The laws do ring true usles their moet keen-


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be


witted advocates are sorely deceived. Practically the
only radical change from the first drafts of the bills
is that which allows a larger expenditure for new
business than was first planned. And even here the
greater liberality falls far below the license of the
past in this direction.
"The new laws will make campaign contributions
a crime not only for insurance companies but for all
corporations except those of purely political char-
acter. Legislative expenditures must be a matter
of public record.' False statements are made crim-
inal under provisions that can be rigidly enforced.
Investments are confined to a safe basis. Subsidiary
companies must go. The amount of now business is
restricted. Rebates cannot survive the new penal-
ties against them. Deferred dividend policies are
forbidden. Standard policy forms are required.
Control by policy-holders is made as easily practicable
as law can make it. And many other good safe-
guards for the policy-holder are established.
"The New York insurance laws set a standard for
all the States, and as well for the Federal Govern.
meant in its proposed District of Columbia law. None
should fall below it."

With more than two-thirds of the city destroyed,
nearly two hundred thousand homeless persons, mil-
lions of dollars of property swept away and many
lives lost-estimates are condlioting, 1,000 at least-
the citizens of San Francisco are recovering from the
shock of disaster and are preparing to restore the
city.


Order is being restored, the ruins are being cleared
and a start made toward rebuilding, while food and
money is being rushed to the stricken sufferers from
all parts of the country.
Realizing, however, that the work of restoration
of the city will be slow, in spite of the hardest work,
the authorities are urging that as many person' as
possible leave and find temporary homes elsewhere,
believing that by such emigration much hardship
and suffering will be prevented.
While shelter is lacking, fortunately there is food
for all, and the health of the inhabitants is excellent;
every precaution possible under the eiroumstalces
nas been taken for good sanitary measures.
The destruction wrought by earthquake and fire
in San Francisco was so terrible that property dam-
age and loss of life by earthquake at other places in
California have attracted but little notice from the
public. Yet many towns suffered severely from the
shock-Ban Jose, Santa Rosa, Hollister and Napa
being much damaged. About 170 persons were killed
by the collapse of the State Insane Asylum at San
Jose, while about thirty were killed at Santa R ea.
All but one of the magnificent buildings of the
Stanford University at Palo Alto were destroyed,
and from here and there along the coast stories are
still being told of disaster. ",

General Funston, in his direction of affairs in San
Francisco and his energetic way of keeping order and
giving relief to the stricken populace, has "made
good." He has replaced himself in the esteem of the
people, which he had lost to a great extent by the
sensational advertising, which was largely repon-
sible for his promotion over the heads of offers
long years his senior in army life. Whether or not
he was responsible for the extravagant press service
that placed him in the public eye during his career
in the Philippines, he certainly was the victim of
hearty criticism on all sides, and the fact that he
proved to be other than a "magazine" soldier and
showed his ability to do the right thing at the right
time, affords his former critics the opportunity of te-
vising their opinion of General Funtton, which no
doubt all will take delight in doing.
In the praise bestowed on Funston the regular of
the United States army also shares, and onee again
he has proved that the pride ain which the country
holds the rank and file of its army is not uaworthily
manifested. The-daily papen of the emtey aMR
(Continued on Next Page









,April28,1906


THE SUN


Fifth Page


Anti-Militarist Wave Sweeps Europe

By VERB CAREWE

London.-King Edward and the Government hear with the paragraph ordering workmen to refuse to army of special rights and privileges during the May
no without quiet satisfaction that the anti-militarist aid in the suppreuion of strikes by military force. elections.
movement is gaining strength in all continental coun- Rusuia: The Russian army and navy-what The French-speaking Swiss as well as the German-
tries. This means', I the end, general disarmament, there is left of them-are in about the same condition speaking, particularly Zurich, Aargau, Tessin and
Sthe agitators. It may mean civil war, growl the with regard to anti-militarism as the Germans, "only other cantons, have formed a strong organisation
iser and the various minor war lords. more so," aq proved by many events that have slnese against militarism. Their organ, the Zurich Vorpon-
King Edward opines that the European Powers become history. That the revolutionists are opposed ten, has a large circulation and local sections are
may be obliged sooner or later, to adopt the English to any form of militarism is too evident to cal for springing up everywhere.
system, i. e., shelve universal service and substitute comment. This organisation sympathizes with Socialism in
an arm of hirelings like Great Britain and the Italy: Situation the same as in France. Dem- some respects, but does not form a part of the
United States, their number fixed in accordance with onstrations against militarism are of frequent oc- Socialistic party. The latter has declared against
the demands of the security of the realm and its pos. currency and large bodies of Italian workmen have every form of militarism, but maintains that "am
sessions, given public notice that they will neither fight long as 8wltarland is surrounded by military states,
England prospered enormously under such a sys- against their "French brethren," nor fight to please she must have an army to defend her independence.
tem for 225 years and more, ever since the Bill of the Kaiser. At Milan and Naples the leading So. if necessary. At the same time the Socialists agitate
Rights went into effect. cialist politicians have declared that the Government against the use of military in case of strikes and
Because the British King is not a war lord in will experience considerable difficulties the next time their manifestos ask Socialist soldiers to refuse
the continental sense, many of his colleagues re. it calls upon army men to suppress strikes. obedience when commanded to interfere "on behalf
guarded him as a military jest, but now it looks as if Austria: Socialism has apparently not yet af- of eapitallits aAtd against their brethren."
the gentlemen sporting a thousand uniforms in their footed the Austrian army, but its war lord, Emperor The anti-mililarists, on the other hand. are pro-
wardrobes might be in the same gunboat with Ed. Francis Joseph, experiences no lesser dilliculties than posing to work in union with the anti-militarists of
ward ere a few more years roll by. The situation, Kaiser William. He hardly knows whether he is still all other countries, democrats. Socialists and others,
as stmnarized by Government agents, is as follows: commander-in-chief of the Hungarian forces, who "to procure disarmament and forestall the very pon-
may completely secede from the union. In that case sibility of war, and the use and manufacture of
MILITARY GREAT POWERS. the anti-militarists may gain the upper hand since articles of war weapons of any kind.
discipline is largely undermined* Furthermore, the anti-militarists maintain that
France: As the recent anti-militarist trials Belgium and Switzerland: Belgium and Switier- the armies of Switzerland, or any other country.
prove, the movement for evading military service by land have joined the ranks of the anti-militarists, durst be ued only to defend the frontiers. The anti-
refusal to enter the army, and for evading military maintaining that the smallest states must set the militarists will oin the Socialists in refusing mili-
dut. by refusal to help put down strikes and enforce example, as, indeed, Sweden and Norway did when tar eredits and forcing the governmentt to guarantee
CIVI law, sa retail Among the workmen of all the Oscar was dethroned. It is now admitted that war tha portions of the army will be no more employed
big ties. ore still the country population is be- between the two countries was averted only because to put down strikes.
comlag bore and more socialized. The anti-military the Swedish Government was afraid that the work- Fund are being colle ted to ren,,r legal aid to
spirit, therefore, is bound to affect the masses and men and the Socialists, in particular, would refuse slners awhorefuse to obey military commands when
classes from which the best French soldiers are re- service. directed ainwho t workmen'on strike
ncrited. The Government showed by the heavy sen- ANTI-MILITARISTS' MANIFESTO. directed against workmen on strike.
tenoes imposed that it is afraid, which eircupistance
helps the anti-militarist agitation. The "Young Guards," that is the Belgium anti- SOCIALISTS AND ANTI-MILITARIITS MAY
Germany i The socializing of the army and militarists' organization, publishes the following JOIN.
peasantry fs an acknowledged fact. The Government manifesto:
press is just now discussing the question whether, "The workmen of Belgium, like the workmen of After all, it looks as if the anti-militarints and
in the event of mobilization, the great mass of indus- all the world, demand disarmament, and until com. the Socialists would become one party in the long
trial workers would refuse service. As a preventive, plete disarmament is achieved in all civilized coun- run.
most draoonio sentences are imposed for the slightest tries, a People's Army, sworn to respect the rights in reflonting upon the anti-militarist situation all
breaches of military discipline, while the Kaiser aid of all the people and maintain the security of the over Europe, it is interesting to note that the Social-
the military authorities, at the same time, wink at country, must be formed., ists have repeatedly denounced the agitation against
brutalities inflicted on soldiers by officers and sub- "As members of the People's Army we swear standing armies as an "anarchistic superstition
officers, though it is openly asserted that these bru- to persevere in our Socialistic ideas and make prop- founded on the wrong idea that force is at the bot-
talities are directly responsible for the army's social- agenda amongst our comrades. The Belgian Minis- tom of all evil." The Socialists declare that economic
izing. ter of War says: 'We must defend our country.' conditions are to blame for the shortcomings of our
The Socialistic party so far has taken no official True, but we will pour lead neither into Belgian, social order. It is a remarkable fact that the anti-
action regarding the anti-militarist movement except French nor German workmen. The People's Army militarists are strongest in the countries where, at
to express sympathy with its principles, particularly is the army of peace and sworn to give battle to the one time or another, the anarchists were strongest.


What's Agitating

People These Days
[Continued from Preceding Page]
unanimous in giving the soldier due credit for his
work, and the following, from the Philadelphia Press,
illustrates the pitch of public opinion:
"The American regular soldier has again proved
his complete efficiency. Every report coming from
the doomed city of San Francisco has added fresh
testimony of the skill with which that crisis was met.
General Funston and his little army of regulars
policed the city, prevented looting, helped the stricken
and fed the hungry. In the midst of unparalleled
confusion and the most dreadful stress the regular
remained cool and did his work.
"Whether it was calmly to shoot to death a slimy
thief or to hand water to a helpless child, the soldier
did his task without emotion and without a halt. He
kept his head and worked all day and all night with-
out rest. And yet it was not his home or his city
that he was aiding. Though called upon to perform
an unlocked for, sudden and unexampled duty, the
regular did it with stoic thoroughness that left noth-
ing lsoted.
"OMers and men alike showed their high train-
ing. It is no wonder that from the first hour they
became the staff upon which a helpless and unhoused
multitude leaned with utmost confidence. In no
country in the world have the people a larger faith in
their regular soldiers than in America. This confi-
dence has been well placed, as has been proved many
a time, but nowhere more gloriously than at San
Francisco."
The railway rate bill is still dragging in the Sen-
ate, and thorough effort has been repeatedly made to
close debate and obtain a vote. the majority show
no inclination to take action. The situation is well
summed up by the Chicago Record-Herald, which
offers the following criticisms and comments:
"When the Hepbutn rate bill went through the
lower house of Congres there was no serious attempt
to amend it, and only seven votes were east agalst t.
"The Senate, rrdisg the House as a bralalee,


boneless thing, has set out to make a record not
merely in that old-fashioned forensic statesmanship
we are hearing so much about, but also in the fer-
tility and ingenuity it shows in devising amendments
for the bill. Thus far the eighty-nine members of
the Senate have produced fifty-eight varieties of
amendments. The leaders of the Senate have to
carry vest pocket diagrams so that they can keep
from losing their way.
"These amendments can be roughly grouped in
three classes.
"First are those we hear the most about, which
aim in more or less direct manner to defeat the pur-
pose of the bill by transferring the real decision on
. rates to the Federal courts, leaving to the Interstate
Commerce Commission little more than doormat
functions.
"Next come the radical amendments in the ex-
treme opposite direction, such as Tillman and La
Follette would like to see adopted, but which in the
present fight would, if pressed, only serve to make
impossible the passage of any bill.
"Finally come the amendments, of which Sen-
ator Long's is chief, which, while explicit on the
question of court review, hold strictly and firmly to
the spirit of the original Hepburn bill.
"The only thing that is worrying the 'safe and
sane' element in the Senate now is the problem
as to whether the power to introduce amendments is
equivalent to the power to amend. If none of the
fifty-eight varieties can be adopted, except the Long
amendment, which, if the truth must be told, is more
the President's than any Senator's, then the founda-
tions of Senatorial government will seem sadly shat-
tered.
"Some of the vent pocket amendment maps are apt
to be thumbed into tatters before the Senators find
out."
Walter Wellman, the noted newspaper writer and
Polar explorer, has begun his voyage in quest of the
North Pole, leaving the United States Wednesday
morning for Europe, going to Paris, where he will
experiment with balloons and airships in preparation
for the last part of his journey to the Pole. Six
hundred ilese is the estimate of the distance he will
travel Ia aa airship in the hal ap4 of the voyage.


War Preferable to

Damage to the Soul
Berlin.-lan a controversy for and against war, the
Catholic pastor Christallor, in Hohenstaugen, puts
himself on record as follows:
"When we consider the teachings of Jesus Christ
we must ask ourselves: What is worse, a hundred
young men bleeding on the battlefield, or one with
a damaged soul? The hundred young men would
have to die anyhow sooner or later, but what about
the man going to perdition
"It is in times of peace that morals become lax
and sin all-powerful because men live in idleness and
weakness."
Even thq war-lord-papers protest vigorously
against the statement, and the pastor is reminded
that modern battlefields are not strewn with a hun-
dred, but with ten thousands and hundred thousands
of men, also that priests do not go to war.


Nursing Mothers

Shall Have Premiums
Regensburg.-This town, following the example of
several French communities, will offer premiums to
mothers who agree to suckle their own children. This
will be done to reduce the awful mortality among
infants, which may be traced, in part, to artificial
nourishment. The chief of the municipality passing
on the bill said: "Non-nursing mothers may be dl-
vided in three categories-those that do not want to
nurse their babies, those that are physically unable,
and those whose duties prevent from suckling their
children. The premiums -are for the latter class of
women; mothers shall be enabled to give up their
employment for a time in order to Oevote themselves
to their abeWsI"










Sixth Pig.


Aprlf 28,1906


THE SUN


having the Old Plum Tre

By EDWARD FITZGERALD










I

^







f l






1


While the primary campaign is remarkable for its
general lack of animation, yet it is worthy of remark
that seldom have so many issues bearing on future
legislation been brought to public notice.
First, and possibly the most important subject, be-
cause of the many affected by its operation, is the
Buokman law.
That much consideration will be given to this
measure is without dout, though in what form the
attempt at revamping will be tried no person can
guess. It Is not likely, however, that the efforts of the
insurrectioniste will change the mscope of the law.
However much dissatisfaction its enactment may
have caused in certain portions of the State, the satls-
fled majority will rally to its support.
Again, economy is the magic word that will aid
in safeguarding the State's higher educational law.
As far as possible, with the, funds allotted, its pro-
visions will have been carried on to a point from
which there would be no retreat save at great ex-
pense. This, of course, in the preparation of the
new university. While some may regret that Lake
City was not chosen as the location of the university,
and a feeling be expressed that it was not a wise
polley'to abandon the many good buildings and other
improvements of the present university, yet the work
at the new site will be so far advanced that the ques-
tion may be considered settled.

As yet the ladies of the State are backward in
publicly Indorsing the views of their champion, Hon.
Wade Jones, whose plank for female suffrage may be
strong enough to bridge the gulf that at present pre-
vents the fair sex from active participation in the
political harvest.
At least, it is to be expected, however, that such
gallantry will be given its own reward at home and
Mr. Jones be triumphant at the primaries
Naturally, the seqluee of such event would be
unbounded popularity with the feminine visitors
who would crowd into the capital to applaud their
hero as he struggled in their behalf, seeking to sever
the bonds that man's selfsh law has placed on
woman's aspiration for office. Indeed, on the opening
day of the seesion the desk of Mr. Jones will doubt-
less be embowered with floral tributes, as token of
the esteem he will have inspired, and from the fra-
grant point of vantage will he answer the roll call
in a manner to do or die.

The project of State life insurance is by no means
dead, although defeated at the last session. Action
has simply been deferred, and at the session of next
year a measure of this nature will be vigorously
p .. .. ..


Owing to the scandals in the conduct of the lead-
ing life insurance companies doing business in this
State, and which have been brought to public view
since the adjournment of the Legislature, many citi-
zens of Florida appear to be in favor of a law en-
abling the State to engage in life insurance, and the
effect of this sentiment will have its influence in the
selection of members of the Legislature.
Properly conducted, there is no reason why State
life insurance should not be profitable to Florida and
a satisfactory solution of the life insurance problem
for its citizens.
Many things can be said in favor of such a law.
Chief among these is the fact that insurance could
be obtained at much less rate than is now paid. The
State would not conduct the business with the pur-
pose of enriching itself at the expense of its citizens,
but would so base its rates as to cover the real cost
of insurance and no more.
Moreover, money invested with the State would
remain at home, and the financial condition of Flor-
ida strengthened in proportion.
The safety and feasibility of State life insur-
ance is beyond question. Insurance men will concede
these points if divorced from prejudice and self-
interest. An insurance man, discussing the matter,
said: "As far as life insurance is concerned there
is no uncertainty, and from the financial viewpoint
there is no reason why the State could not engage
in the business with every chance for successful oper-
ation. The averages are so carefully made and the
calculations of prospective losses are so exact that
with proper management life insurance is the best
form of business enterprise, and if this is taken up
in Florida I cannot see why the plan should not give
satisfaction from a monetary standpoint at least."

The man with the muckrake is getting busy here
and there, and he was last heard of in Alachua
County, where H. H. MeCreary's Senatorial record
was being pulled over for the enlightenment of the
voters. The charge was made that MeCreary's legis-
lative influence was worth $100 on one occasion,
which he vehemently denies, and as the muck-raker
is shy on proof McCreary seems to have the best of
the argument.

Newton A. Blitch, who is desirous ot serving the
people as Railroad Commissioner, has issued a cir-
cular letter of some length explaining his views and
setting forth his qualifications for the office. He
points out that during his long legislative career he
was active in supporting the bill creating the Rail-
road Commission and advocated every measure tend-
ing to inarea its power and produce mor bemit


to the people. Mr. Blitch emphasizes the fact that
he is familiar with the needs of the farming and
industrial interests in the matter of transportation
rates, and if elected will work along the limnes'that
promise the people relief from injustice and disorimi-
nation.
Mr. Blitch calls attention to one fact that is of
interest to the people, as follows: "I know also that
tor purposes of their own transportation companies
have tried strenuously to discriminate in various
ways against Florida, and to force all burinese pos-
sible to cross the State line, so as to take that busi-
ness from the jurisdiction of the State Commision."
Perhaps the present Commission has attempted
to regulate this injustice by co-operation with the
Interstate Commerce Commission, but if so no re-
sults seem to have followed, and if Mr. Blitch has
a plan for reducing such discrimination then he
would be a valuable public servant.

"Be on Guard" is the caption of an article some
candidate for Railroad Commissioner is now sending
out through his press bureau. It first appeared
editorially in the Wauchula Advocate, one of the
three papers in Florida opposing T. J. Appleyard
for Railroad Commissioner, and consists solely of the
editor's personal opinion, as drawn from the imagi-
nary picture of some person's hearsay muck pile.
Such literature may lose Mr. Appleyard some
votes, but how it will profit the fellow who spemnd-
ing the money for its publication is a mystery.
Really, to have made the article effective with the
public this person should have added his name and
the comment of "I'm all the other feller ain't, vote
for me."

Bye-the-bye, what change has come over the ener-
getic buyer of printers' ink-RB Hudson BwrT The
dash and effusion of four years ago are mised, when
the make-up of no paper was complete without a
story from him telling of the bondage of the people
and how he was called as the Moses of the Railroad
Commission to lead them to the light.
A little more than two weeks to the primaries,
and yet the rhetorical thunder has not been launched
at the ear of the voter. It may be, however, that
the eve of the primary will be celebrated by a display
of literary pyrotechnics surpassing all previous ef-
forts, and if this occurs the people should be on
guard to hear the account Mr. Burr gives of his
stewardship.

A lawyer writing to THE SUN expresses warm
eommeadation of the sgasetei that the law relative
(oainmed m aNut Pa )


THERE ARE N4OYY FOUR Q~E.STIOr15 LOAFING~
AROUND 1D IM6 70 G O OEFO RE TE LE&I5LITURL.


A


II,


, ,7- .,-










THE SUN


Seventh Page


Unpublished Letters of Pat


Dear Spotte-Address me letters to 26 Broad-
way, me temporary business headquarters. Ye know
the place. Everybody knows it now for the hiding
place of the System, since Tom Lawson turned
State's evidence.
What am I doing? 'Tis a secret. I can't tell
ye now, but if oil shoots up a cent a gallon ye may
be sure your old friend Pat touched the button.
But that's a trifle. Me real work-but can I
trust ye to hold your tongue until the job is done
and the glorious wood alcohol industry is preserved?
Whisper, it's keeping me eye on the Senate to see
thai out beloved gasoline product does not get a
knockout drop by the votes of Senators who may be
led into thinking it is their duty to serve the people
instead of working in the interests of the interests
thai put up the stuff at election time.
To be sure, some of our friends in the Senate will
have to look after their own skins in this matter
a find some way to side-step, for the purpose of
epee face," as me laundryman says, but we will
Ielp as long as they play fair.
SThewe boys will be absent when the time comes
for a vote. Sick or on a junket or attending to
1 private" business. Any old thing to keep from vot-
Ing glin u, and we'll have our crowd lined up who
a" never afraid to vote "right."
As I was talking with H. H. Rogers, he says,
Ahi., Pat, ye have the head for details."
"Yes, Hank," I says. It's always Hank and Pat
bw t two. "I have, and without conceit I con-
b it. But it's me training. Get the habit, Hank."
I smt," he says. "I have almost everything
els worth having."
"Have ye seen me yellow dog list, Pat?" he Mys.
!It's a dandy. I showed it to Clark of Montana
day and he identited it as the package oil
vight," and Hank chuckled at his erode wit.
It would surprise ye, Spotts, to see the names on
this eenss report of brindle canines. I dare not

"Do say of them ever fail to tote the goods,
Ha*f' I asked.
"Soeetimes there is a straggle from the ranks,
a *ftknked brother who falls beneath the load,"
k answered. "That's what we call 'The Treason
t Senate,' and ye know the finish of a traitor.
T e nt shooting that turns the lively Senator into
a political corpse, but a more painful death is his
dose. "A Standard Oil wagon runs over the caitiff,"
Hank explained, in fiendish glee.
I am directing me preliminary work from the
Waldorf. 'Tim there I'm keeping open house. Ye


know what that means. Ye mind the open house at
Tallahassee last session, and what a haven of rescue
it was to the thirsty souls coming over the hot sands
with parched tongues.
Joy of St. Peter, but in the shade of the night
meny were full of bliss or old crow or some other
kind of case goods.
But as I was saying, I'm at the Waldorf, and as
I loll around of an evening in the palm room, in 'tie
easy, confidential way, mixing with the Wall Street
buPeh and picking out me material for me work, I
assume the pose of a cosmopolitan who is at home
in any company. That's me, Pat Murphy, C. J.,
P. L.--continent jumper and professor of legislation.
And it's to me the clerks of the hotel salaam, and
it's "Col. Murphy, are ye well tonight?" and "Is
there any way we can serve your honor this even-
ing?" and they overwhelm me with politeness.
But speaking of politeness and accommodating
qualities of a hotel clerk, I am reminded of me old
fiend, Ed Duke of Tallahassee.
Ye know Duke. Sure, everybody knows Duke.
May he run fast enough to win in the race in Leon
for the Legislature.
But as I was saying about accommodating hotel
clerks, one night late in Tallahassee Duke checked
me off to a nice-looking room. Just as I was pre.
paring to sink into sweet slumber i heard a noise
under the bed, and looked, thinking to see a burglar.
'Twas not, only two big rats doing a quick dash into
their hole. I dressed and went down to the office to
kick. I told me tale to Duke, but he was as serene
as ye please.
"I'll fix that, Pat," he says. "'Frontl' he yelled
to the languid lump of darkness acting as bellhop.
"'lake a oat to No. 20 at once."
Did I ever toll ye, Spotts, how I got into the
banking business? Sure it's a fine game, and the
only one I know where ye can eat your cake and still
have it.
'Tim owning to the benevolent system of our great
and good government, Spotta, that such happy finan.
eial conditions is possible.
But to resume. I'll tell ye how I got into the
game. I had six nickels and a deed to a tract of
land in the Everglades. I won't tell ye how I got it.
I might compromise some of me friends. I'll tell ye
how it was located, though, from me beautiful map.
From the center of the south shore of Lake Okeecho-
bee it is a forty-five minute swim and a ten-minute
wade to the boundary of me domain.
Of the kind of soil I can't tell ye. I never saw
it. I understand that improvements are needed, but


there sems to be a difference of opinion as to their
nature. Governor Broward declares that the land
needs draining, while Maj. St. Clair-Abrams is posi-
tive that irrigation is the thing.
But that's neither here nor there. I hypothecated
the land to get capital to start me bank. Sure ye
know what that means. Finding a sucker and giving
him paralysis of the coin purse.
I goes to me banker and says, "Lend me $50,000
on me estate," telling him what I wanted with it.
"Sure," says he, "as long as ye are to be one of us.
Where is it?"
"On me map," I says, "and in the 'Glades. Will
ye take a mortgage I asked.
"Yes," he says, "if the bank examiner don't stop
n.e I'll do anything to oblige a friend."
No I got me $80,000 by giving a mortgage on me
land, and fear of foreclosure causes me no sleep.
I'll never pay the interest.
With me neat nest egg I bought Government
bonds, complied with the requirements of the national
banking laws and opened up, with safe fnd mane
Financial policy outlined.
Ye want to know where me bank im? I won't tell
ye. Ye might deposit, and I don't like to take money
from me friends.
But see what a good thing I have. Me bonds pay
me 4 per cent, and I'm allowed to issue the amount
of me bonds in nice new long green that I loan out
at 6 and 10 per cent, besides having the use of money
deposited wita me.
Ain't it good? The agitators who are kicking
for reform and change in our national banking laws
are a lot of anarchists who ought to be studying
geology on the rook pile.
Russell Sage openly complimented me for me
treatise on this subject, which ye will find in a re-
cent number of the Financial Review, and J. P. Mor-
gan has asked me to prepare a scheme for an elastic
currency that will meet the approval of Secretary
Shaw.
An elastic currency, Spotts, I'll explain, is like
tying a string to a dollar and throwing it to a fellow
who wants it. Ye keep hold of the string, though,
and pull it back when ye think he's had it long
enough to give confidence. He pays ye interest for
the work of throwing and a head of steam is kept
in the confidence boiler. Who cares whether the
boiler has a safety valve.
Ye will excuse me now, Spotts, for I must hasten
to deliver an address to the Mothers' Congress.
PAT MURPHY.


Shaking the

Old Plum Tree
[Continued from Preceding Page]
to publication of legal notices be amended so that it
would be mandatory to publish all notices of legal
character in the newspaper having the largest cir-
culation in the locality where such notices are oper-
ative.
"I find," he states, "that under the present system
that in numerous instances a tendency is shown to
suppress publicity as much as possible by publication
in an obscure paper having but sent circulation. I
believe that every effort should be made to inform
the public in such respect.
"Let me remark, too," he added, "that I heartily
indorse the publication of the Tax Assessor's roll, as
advocated by THE SUN. It would exert a power-
ful influence against the evil of tax dodging, simply
through the plan of putting the assessment in black
and white where all could see. Publicity shames the
tax dodger."

One thing may be said in favor of the primary
system of nomiaAting, and that is the exercise the


candidates get in hustling for votes. Riding the
woods is a favorite occupation now in every county
of the State, sad handshaking is the token that
marks the guild of the office-hunters.
Speaking of the work of canvass, Hon. John High
of Hamilton, who is making the race for the Senate
against Hon. Frank Adams, declares that when he
gets through not one voter in the district will have
been missed, and if he does not win it will not be be-
cause of personal application to his task of canvass.
Hon. C. Fabian Law of Clay County, who has
served in the Senate with distinction, contradicts a
rumor that he is a candidate for Representative, but
states, in order to relieve anxiety concerning his fu-
ture political intentions, that he will be a candidate
for the Senate at the "next go round."
In refuting the charge that he secured the passage
of a bill for personal benefit, Hon. A. T. Cornwell,
who is a candidate for re-election as Representative
from Manatee County, shows that the operation of
the measure has caused perfection of 5,000 titles to
property in that county, of which he was interested
in three small parcels. Sometimes it is easy to
create neuch ado about nothing in a campaign in
order to place an oppoentat disadvantage but few
have the Maue of Judge Cornwell in showing the
mptiae of the sharp.


Smuggled In Wines and
Goods Under Imperial Frank
St. Petersburg.-The relatives of Baroness Stein,
the Russian Mine. Humbert, are trying to prove her
insane. The lady, however, was mane enough to know
that publicity meant ruin, hence she asked Sworjefl,
chief press censor, to forbid the papers mentioning
her eas when exposure came. The prohibition still
prevails. The Baroness for many years miuggled
r wines and other goods through the custom house
under an Imperial frank, claiming that the late Osar
Alexander was her father. The same story enabled
her to live on credit at the rate of 100,000 roubles
per year since 1800. She never paid even a .eent of
rent since then, while her palace was the vendeavous
"for persons of quality."


French Protestants Unite
and QuicklyDisunite
Paris.-After the separation law went nto effect,
the Freaeh Protetants fell p each other's necks,
wept aad formed an orgalatlie anmIg themselves.
And ow they have agreed to disagree, and the or-
pula i hoeh upWl In two.


4~-










THE SUN


arw#.A 28.1906
Setrndsu, April 28, 1906


E


D


IT


The Cowerontf AU Holldi Ware
There is no emotion of the human soul more satisfying than that which
comes to one who finds himself able to agree with the opinions of his neighbors.
The soul is sustained, the heart wanted, and the mand rfresbed by the con-
viction that one is in full accord with the expressed sentiments of good people.
In reaching up to grap igh standard of truth, right and justice, one's
hands are uplifted when one that 4d conception of what constitutes the
proper standards is In line with that of others who have merited and earned the
respect of riht-thinking men.
To all of those mntonus we have added the one of pleasure, in being able to
endorse the position taken by many of our brother of the Stat. press,that-
OARU SHOULD BE TAKEN TO SLrTHE BEST MEN TO FILL THE
PEOPLE'S OF91 FIC
We have Mid it before and we say it gain, that elections In this State have
been divorced from all questions-
EXCEPT THE ONE OF PERSONAL FITNESS OF THE CANDIDATES
OFFERING.
Under the primary system of nominating candidates, legaled In this State
by legislative enactment, each political arty can bold a primary to select can-
didates to stand for the principles of that party in the general election.
Owing to the determination of the LAng Saon race to rule, and the en-
dowment of the men of that race with the necessary mental power to make good
the domination of the rac, the men nominated in the Democratic primary are
CERTAIN TO BE CHOSEN in the ensuing gpeeral election.
This happens beeauM practically all th hbite men in the State belong to
the Democrati party.
As all holders of State, county and municipal ofioes MUST BE DEMO-
CRATS, It follows as a matter of course thono question of PARTY PRINCIPLE
(which being declared by the dominant party becomes a State governmental
policy) is Involved in Florida elections.
The voter, freed from all other questions i called on to solve but one when
he takes his place in the voting booth, with nothing but his God and his con-
science to direct or influence his choice. This sole question is*--
PERSONAL FITNESS OF THE CANDIDATE FOR THE OFFICE HE
SEEKS.
It is the duty of every voter to select by his ballot the men to whom his
judgment, formed by his knowledge of the characters and equipment of the can-
didates, points as the best man.
In order that this judgment of the individual voter may be matured to the
point of a proper selection, inquiry into the past conduct of all the candidates is
NOT ONLY PERMISSIBLE, but OBLIGATORY.
There are other ways to arrive at the seleotiob of proper office-holders, but
the only CERTAIN AND SURE WAY to forecast what a man WILL DO is to
find out what he HAS DONE.
Men who seek office are clearly within their rights, and are properly perform-
Ing a public duty when they invite inspection of their own records end lay bare
the records of their opponents.
And discussion of the characters oft candidates is also in order, for no man
can serve the public well who has not done his full duty to himself, to his fam-
ily and to his neighbor.
But these inquiries and this discussion must be confined to proper and
legitimate channels, and conducted with a due observance of the rules governing
decency and good morals.
Abuse is not argument, and mud-slinging, is offensive to right-thinking men
under all circumstances.
Whenever a man is heard in reckless abuse of another, a look into the facts
of the situation will reveal the attitude of the pot toward the kettle.
Let us be positive, but\ let us be clean, andr keep from ourselves the applica-
tion of Mr. Taylor's cartoon on. this page.
We who make this Journal for tbe people of this State will recognize the
obligation upon us ,o do our part of the work before all good citizens-the selec-
tion of the beat men to hold the people's offices.
WeW reogis personal fitness of the men offering as the only question left
to us to discuss.
We will discuss, as far as we are able, MEN and not party principle.
We will recommend to the voters in the coming primary the men who we
think will BEST SERVE THE PEOPLE, and give what seem to us good rea-
sons for the selections we make, as well as good reasons for opposing others.
As the primaries are near at hand, we propose to devote our editorial space
largely, to this discussion, because we regard the question of whom the people
will choose to serve them as THE MOST IMPORTANT QUESTION that con-
fronts the people of Florida until the primaries are over.

The State Prmarp Campaign
This being what has been termed an "off year" in politics, there are only
seven State offices to fill-three Congressmen, two Judges of the Supreme Court,
and two Railroad Commissioners.

THE ONGh88MEN.
Of the three seats in Congres belonging to the people of Florida two are not
contested for. Congresmen Clark and Sparkman have no opposition. and we
have already congratulated the people that these two servants, W"HO HAVE
DONE WELL, wll be continued In office.
Congreuman Lamal who is now serving his second term as prewresentative
of the Third district, asks the people to allow h4n to occupy THEIR SEAT for a
third term.
Mr. Jefferson D. Stephens of Jackson County has not given his consent to
the third term for Lamar.
He has seven reasons for this withholding, the first of which is that-
HE WANTS THE OFFICE HIMSELF.
And-well, never mind the other six as far. as Mr. Stephens' ambition is con-
cerned, they are personal with him and are not important to the people.
Mr. Stephens represented Jackeon County in the last State Legislature, and
his record there can be properly set forth by the minus sign.
He made some speeches which, no doubt, sounded well to his own favorably
inclined ears. but which smacked too much of the prefervid style of the boy orator
of the country school, to bring conviction to" hish earer..
He assumed the role of constitutional expounder, protector and guardian,
and sounded the call to arms when he thought the citadel of the people's liberties


was approached by the spoilers.
(wIry Legislature has one of these, who are endured by the other members
with that ome spirit of resignation to the inevitable that possesses men with
the meals or mumps.
Mr. Stephens was regarded by those wlp suffered from him aA a nuisance
tolerable during the early day of the aeioa, but lot to be borm wha the life


of the session being abort members were anxious about the fate 'of favorite
seowas squelobed during the last half of the session, and his voloe was heard
He passed no bill of importance during his incumbency, and was not found on
the side of measures that were successfully guided through the uncertain waters
that lead up to and turn the legislative m11i. .
Histletr, to the voters urging his claims, reminds us of the romark-that
Hamlet made to the Queen of Denmark, who was defending her second matri.
monial veture-
ke' doth protest too much.
He promises to do so many things for the people of the Third Congressional
district that his promises fail to carry conviction on account of the extent of them.
People realize that he could not possibly fulfill all his pledges if he were to have
half a dozen terms.
His constituents will compare his promises of results in Congress with the
record of HIS PERFORMANCES IN THE LEGISLATURE, and will lock on
the promises with the eyes of unbelievers.. ,
Mr. Lamar has .talents equal to those of his opponent. He surpasses


1"


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fo '4w
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Training for the work in hand.
Experience as a legislator.
Information on the needs of the district.
Knowledge of the rules of Congressional procedure.
Acquaintanceship with men of influence in Congress.
He has made no mistakes, AND HIS REVOLT FROM THE TYRANNIC
RULE OF MINORITY LEADER WILLIAMS MARKS HIM AS A MAN OF
COURAGE AND INITIATIVE.
He is now in position to do some good work for the people of Florida.
He should be retained as Congressman from the Third district.


JUSTICES OF THE SUPREME COURT.


Without disparaging the equipment of Mr. Thomas L. Clark for the position
he seeks on the Supreme bench-for we can find no fault in him-we have already
declared that Justice Whitfleld and Justice Parkhill should be given another term.
Neither of these gentlemen has served a full term, and both are qualified,
both have done good, honest work.
There is no qualification possessed by Mr. Clark that Justices Parkhlll and
Whitfield DO NOT HAVE IN EQUAL MEASURE, and-
The present incumbents of this high office deserve the reward that should
always be bestowed on faithful servants.
Mr. Clark should wait his turn.
RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS.
As Railroad Commissioner, we are certain that R. Hudson Burr should not
be selected.
We are not quite sure about Messrs. Appleyard and Blitch,
But we anre in so doubt as to E. B. Baley-


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THE SUN


NINTH 'PAGE


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Saturday, April28, 1906


as
oed
lge


The people should elect Bailey.
Mr. ]ui s entirely too small a man to occupy a position as important
that of Railroad Comminioner.
He is narrow-minded, he is NOT WELL INFORMED, and he is preudi
ainst everything that his lack of mental broadness, and his want of knowla
p o beyond his understanding.
Mr. Burr did take up the thre-cent passenger fare proposition, and by
election on that platform prompted THE RAITTROAD8 to make the rate.
But this great victory is robbed of its laurel by the fact that all but one
the railroads wee READY FOR THE RATE as a matter of businew policy i
expediency. Thilis shown by the well-known fact that the L. & N. R. 1L
still charging four oents per mile for passengers carried in FloridA, IN SPI
OF THE ORD O W OF THE COMMISSION, and the other lines could h
resisted the three-cent rate JUST AS JiFrvriJALLY as the L. & N. has do
if the inclination of their managers had prompted them to do so.
M1. Burr has done nothing since he has been on the Oommisslon but ca
it to waste its time in considering trifling matters, such as claims for lost true
eta., which he insisted on taking up, and with which the Commission has no
ing to do, and would not accomplish much for all the people if it got them
settled to suit the ideas of the claimants.


p


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Lacking broadness of mind, he lacks initiative, and his want of information
unfits him to carry out a suggestion given him by others, so that the courts will
not intervene to prevent its application.
Mr. Burr should not be again elected to the important position he now
AILS TO FILL HmOPkRLY.
There are smaller positions in the gift of the people to which Mr. Burr can
be called .. the people wish to gratify his ambition to serve them.
We have not had sufficient time since the announement of the candidacy
of N. A. Bliteh to weigh his qualifications against those of T. J. Appleyard, so
we will withhold the discussion of these two men until another issue.
We have considered E. B. Bailey as a candidate for Railroad Commlslomer,
AND WE HEARTILY INDORSE HIM.
If Diogenes had postponed his lantern-lighted seareh foran bomet man a
couple of tIouand ofyears or so, he would not have bee obliged totravl so
far mad fare so Ill.
He would have discovered E. B. Bailey, smashed his lantern and died happy.
That Mr. Bailey is honest is known to all who know him or have heard him
spoken of by others.
Honesty is a attribute of ALL THE MEN in tihe race for Rairoad om
missioner, but Mr. Balileys honesty is the kind that makes one feel o safe and
secure that it impresses itself on one with RiNjdCWIOd ORCE each time this
name is called.
Mr. Bailey is quick to see the REAL MEAT of a proposition, and in spite of
thi leathy, sad at times apparently diconneeted, style adopts to express his
views, NO-ONE CAN FOOL ED BAILEY.
known in the Senate as thew as who always votes ,"ghtas well as
the Wn who as to be convinced that it is right before he will vote.
hsad s whi i p les his esr s rses sa d4 his aum of heart
and sM N mb Ak impossible for him to WWNG THo ADS Or


nesearly burden them, and his lofty patriotiOm will prompt hbi to GUARD
THE PEOPLE IN THEIR RIGHTS.
E. B. Bailey should be selected in the first primary as Democratic candidate
for Railroad Commissioner.


The Senator From Duoa


Sof. In choosing a Senator from Duval County If the people wish ability sad
mand proper representation the problem of selecting offers no perplexity.
- 11 The situation is as clear as sunlight. The records of each candidate are
[TE shown in bold and imposing relief.
ave One is that OF THE MAN WHO DOES; the other is that of the man who
ne, does NOT.
If Hon. H. H. Buckman had done nothing more than to represent Duval
use County in the tireless, faithful manner in which he performed his duties he would
iks, have a claim upon the people for support as long as he cared to have a seat in
ith- the Legislature.
all But if additional reason for his election be asked the noted uocirmon bill is
a full and sufAient answer.
It is a monument to his ability as a legislator, an imperishable testimonial to
> his knowledge of law, and a most useful bit of statecraft for the people.
His opponent, Mr. Baker, the man WHO DOES NOT-in the interest of
the people, at least-possesw no distinction whatever, except his agility as
chairman of the law and rules committee of the City Council, ia reporting
favorably bills for grabbing the streets of Jacksonville for the benefit of corpor-
ations.
Bigoted and narrow-minded, his mental powers dwarfed by gotim sad
partisanship, he would serve the little faction that made him politically promi-
nent FIRST, and then, if time permitted, consider legislation for the benefit of
Florida.
As we have said, the situation is clear.
It is the question of WHETHER THE PEOPLE WANT THE MAN WHO
'DOES, and who measures up to the standard demanded by the foremost district
of Florida.
For the honor and advancement of Duval County we trust that they do.


The Senator From Nassau


In seeking the best material for the Senate the voter of Nassau County is
earnestly considering the candidacy of Hon. John MeGiffn, and weighing him
against Hon. Thomas S. Davis, who is trying to convince the people that he
should be re-elected.
Mr. MoGiflin, however, bright and capable, embraoes the desirable qualities
sought in a man who will represent all the people all the time, and if wisdom
prevails inr the primary the people of that district will have no occasion to regret
the election of Mr. MoGiffin.
His record in the Legislature of 1901 proved him to be a wise and satissfc-
tory legislator. His acquaintance with the laws of the State, and his intimate
knowledge of parliamentary law make him effective.


The Senator From Alachua


The eltlmns of Alachua County are to be congratulated on the excellent
opportunity they have of doing themselves a benefit and rendering the State a
service by cutting off a political derelict and substituting a sound piese of timber
in the choosing of a Senator.
Col. John B. Dell, morally and mentally fitted for the position, would reflect
honor on the intelligent voter of Alachua County, and in every way contribute
to wise and benefient legislation. On the contrary, H. H. MoCreary's election
would be a matter of political stupidity to be resented by all Florida, or at least
that portion desiring to see the best men in office. Mr. McCreary's negligence
of duty and his personal habits should alone constitute cause for his rejection,
if the fact that his vote has not often been cat nla the Interest of the people
was forgotten.


The Senator From Putnam


A most necessary part of legislative machinery is THE MAN WHO KNOWS.
One who is familiar with the work of previous sessions and acquainted with
the statute book. A member who is able to call attention to bills that if passed
would duplicate laws or nullify those to which no objection is made, is extremely
valuable to the public service. When in addition to thib qualification sueh a man
is possessed of a brilliant mind and the bearer of high character it is a fatal
mistake to exclude him from the council of the State's lawmakers. Snob a man
is Hon. E. S. Crill of Palatka, who is a candidate for reelection as Senator
from Putnam County. We trust, and have reason to believe, that his ion-
stitueny hold him at theme value In whioh he is recognized throughout the
State, and will offer ample testimony of approval at the polls.


The Senator From Volula


It is not likely, In view of his long record of public service during which
he has so well looked after the Interest of his district, that Hon. Frank sams
will be displaced In the affections of the people of Volusla County, and his return
to the Senate may be confidently expected That this should be the ase is a mat-
ter of important s outelde of his drit. He bhas proved his worth as a legislator,
and his lose to the Senate would be a State misfortune.
His alert mind enables him to ee a strike bill or a foolish bill, and woe
be unto them when they appear in the Senate, for Sams is always in ha seat,
and his friends stand by him when he alls on them.


The Senator From Columbia


Columbia County In Dr. Julian has a candidate for the Senate who should be
kept at home. Let him dose his patient instead of practicing legislative suery
at Tallabasese. One action of his past service should be sufient to condemn
his candidsey in the minds of intelligent persons, and that was his work against
a more liberal libel law for Florida newspapers, ad his delaratilo thae "the
press had too much liberty now." Of different stamp is his oppoaet, Fred P.
Cet, a lawyer of ability and of more liberal turn of mind thea his medical an-
taolst Coe is a man, too, who knows his people ad their eeds, ad if be is
elated Columbia County an ret ssunrd t ts entributios to the uaste
wlM be prodstUve of neult.


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THE V~"


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The Czar's Spy ....
p'Chevlier Willa Le Qteux
*BBB' ~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ rB ^ ^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^


Faint and hungry, yet we kept eour.
age. Fortunatel we found a little
spring, ad 11 thrie of us drank eagerly
with our hands. But of food we had
nothing, sae a small piece of hard rye
bread which the Finn bad in his pocket,
the remains of his evening meal; and
this we gave to Elms, who, half fam-
ished, ate It quickly. We knew quite
well that It wouldIe an easy matter to
die of starvation n that great trackless
forest, therefore we kept on undaunted,
while the yellow autumn sun struggled
throw h the dark pines, glinting on the
straw t gray trunks and reflecting a
golden light in that dead unbroken
silems.


I


How many miles we trudged I have no
idea. It was a consolation to know that
we now had no punuers, yet what fate
lay before us we knew not. If we could
ony find that forest road we might come
ores some woodcutters hut, where we
could obtain rough food of some sort, yet
our guide, used as he was to those
enormous woods of central Finland, was
utterly out of his bearings, and no mark
of elvilisation attracted his quick, ex-
perienced eye. The light above grad-
ually faded, and over a sharp stone
Elim stumbled and ripped her shoe.
I looked at my watch and found that
it was already five o'clock. In an hour
it would be dark, the beginning of the
long northern night. Elma, who was
wary and footeore, asked by signs to be
perltted to lay down and rest. There-
fore we gathered a bed of dried leaves
for her, and she lay down, and while we
watched she was soon asleep. The Finn,
who declared that he did not suffer from
the cold, removed his coat and placed it
tenderly upon her shoulders.
While there was still a ray of light I
watched her white refined features as
she slept, and was sorely tempted to
bend and Imprint a kiss upon that soft
inviting cheek. Yet I had no right to
do so-no right to take such an ad-
vantage.
The long cold night passed wearily,
and the howling of the wolves caused
me to grip my revolver, yet at daybreak
we are refreebed and notwithstanding
the terrible pangs of hunger now gnaw-
lag at our vitals, we were prepared to ro-
new our desperate dash for liberty.
Althoh Ilhad paper, I posessed no
peall with which to write, therefore I
would only communicate by signs with
the mysterious prisoner of KaJana, the
beautiful dark-eyed girl who held me
Irrevocably beneath the spell of her
beauty. All the little rote of homge I
was able to perform she accepted with
a quiet, I dinIty, while in her deep
lAlous e, read an unfathomable
mytery.
The mist had not cleared, for It was
Won after dfat when we aOain moved
slog, hungry, hill, and yet hopeful. At
a spring we obtained some water, and
then In silent procession, pressed for-
ward n searh of the rough track of
the woodcutters.
ElmA's torn shoe gave her consider-
able trouble, and noticing her limping, I
induced her to sit down while I took it
off, hoping to be able Ais nd It, but,
haing unlaed It, I aw that upon her
stocking wa a a r m a tea of eu-aled
blood, where her foot CeHlf bad also been
out. I managed to beat the adils of the
shoe with a stone, o that its sole should
not be lost, and readuted t, allow-
ing me to aee it up for hr and smiling
the while.
Forward we trudged, ever forward,
aoroes that enormous forest where the
myriad treetrunks presented the same
dismal scone everywhere, a forest un-
trodden save by wild, half-savage lum.-
bermen. Throughout that dull gray day
we marched onward, faint with hunger,
yet suffering but little pain, for the firt
a weoe now past, and were succeeded
"I gt d light- hededness. My only fear
was that we should be compelled to spend
another aight without shelter, and what
itsee ffedte might be upon the delicately-
eNred girl wNoem hand I held tenderly
a ine. Surely my position was a
IUIaqe me. Her terrible aS lietiom


It

I


S4


woed to ause her to be entirely de- "The pole> ,What on thy want of W reis the womsa' he handed.
pendent UponMe. moT" .. ...."
euddl, jut as the yellow' suni ht "Openm In utp th horsemen outside. I7 o knowi" wU ,
o.,h.iri^l tthe. otr eimht 0!^ be ,
werhead begun to fade, the t ',t n i the nam of his Male-tyI o w'i -tt he sa
facedFinn, whoseanmehehadtoldme eix and sprang up a.ng ach .turningC the old wodi ,with a
was lix tladercried o, Inister rion u his face. Re-
"Polushaty-gre trtuLook, ExellencThy, ur The ld iar ntiap1ed" e r a are found In
The road at laong, we found ouelvIn an Instant or upon a olln made a r houscried, di amazed continuedd o are liabln Fifteenth Parrest
And as we glanced before us we saw dash for the de roorm whe Inner roon un don't know-Indd I stpro
hat his quick, well-tra utted eyes had det where Elua had. ted tdnext second t sted the old fllow, tre meat
fellted awaytrunk th twilight, at somwer e dragged i he along it appear ussie open.an ce threat. Like, y cla
tance, a path traversing our vista among lne, thisopore n th e
thel gray-green treetrunks. Then, hur- The lady dhad gone I dren h ad. th i c a
trying alon, we found ourselves upon a "Gone!" I cried, dismayed, rushing (Continued on Fifteenth Pg)
track, on wtich we turned to thieh wtd Into the little room, where I found the
a track, rough and deoeplyty for the ght. d Ited themi Two hig, hulkig. I W
felled trunks that were dragged along it outside wide open. She had actually
to the nearest river, sapeared l the Read Future in
Elmh made a gesture of renewed hope, T police again battered at the opo-R
and all three of us redoubled our ed pac oue, door, threatening loudly to break it
expecting eve r moment to come upon i~"f itwere not opened at onee, where-
some hut, heower, aof whalkih would n the old wood-utter drw the boltA
sunearly four hospitality for the night. d admitted them. Two big, hulking TiII
utrdaforknesscame on quickly, and yet allows in heavy riding costs and swords
we still push forward. Poor hertm udwas rode inre, while two others rema wed
nly i and I knw that eing befnjured u a mounted outside, holding the horses. e 18 TN KU i
was pai her, even though she "Your names ?" demanded one of the



light shining in a window, and tuve man- ,," ,, .... -- .- and nlomwns
could tell wa nonoi n g g.t the Ilows, reglanoing at s as we stood. to-
doorAt last, however, after walking for other n expectation.




to give hospitaity to ad loat i the .....Ouo t;ldthe--,me
nearly four hours in the almost im n-4 Our host told them his name, sa
etrabe forest gloom, always fearing est .ed why they w.hed to enter..
impre motion wissthin our hearts ud- ,We are searching for a woman wh
ended quicthere klytood uposeen before us a Ns esca d from KXJana," was the A- t
dirty regh shinirt, withn a w bigdow, and fiver mhin- TN ae you seen any woman ere
utes later elix was knocking at the "No," responded the wood-cutte. "We 4ID
door, and aski in Finnish the occupant u ver see any woman out i' thee.
to gied hospithaty towe wealadyre lost inthieves, .
forest. in while Felix The police of the er
We heard a low growl like a muttered l tn dom~ .J Dy, ET EuIRVf-
imprecation within, and when the d6or in no one iado
opened thee stood uo the threshold a returning t 'it are
tall, bearded mausculn rold fo plow ia .. 3u", tune Will aa1. I n
dirty red shirt, with a bi revolver shin- ,"hat is he sweed. ..
in in his hand. A qui glance at us e our office
sa ourised him that we were not thieves, eed to
and he up invited us inWho while Felix ex- d o u e u y
gained that we had landed from that dde n though
nkes and our boat havin drifted away LrMr So!he' o -
we biad been compIled take to the r hae s .Tl om r l f
woods. The man ea mrd the Piln's expla- I III l l e In-Ih o






Sthatiour hthe e olean uood t er in the iNoeH tt what. Wdiensureen*tee doo i .
turesque story, anr d then ed a something, FourI e ydntoIi -? qurs of ou r offce
to a pme wh hFelix translated n Gm n without h y ur o oi
sian. blormanwith"
"Your Exce lleny is welcome to all the dolree tp f t ao
poor fare he has. He gives up his bed "b.Who is your chfI df g Y" as a
i the room yonder to the lady so that dde thought occurred to n a. ...
she may rest. Heis honored by your Melnikoffe at Helsigfors.
eixcelleny's presence." a"Then this is note inthe district of I I it) t m
And while he was soaking this expla. -I go
nation the herculean wood-cutter In the c"No. Put what difference does it
red shirt stirred the red embers whee ke? Who are you?"
upon a big pot was simmeripg, and send-. "Gordon Greggs British subject," I re-
Ing forth an appetisi odor, and in ive iled. F rP opt
ate Mwe were all re sitting down And you an the drosky-driver' from
to a stew of caperoalls e, with afoam-ing Io," remarked the fllow, turning to
light beer as waiting ver We i. "' as I hogh. Yo are
ity that our host boiled us a number of dsuoo r essi the insure the hsale of
egg which, I fear, denuded his larder. man In the name of 0e Cuar, Iar- yours if you place them
oheo lace was a poor one of two low t you t e
rooms, built of rough log plam, with saThe old wood-cutter turned pale as in our hands
double windows for the winter and a M..*.W.e.u& '.rn wen 1awp
high brick stove. Clealles as not for I foresaw the danger ofaling Into
exactly its characteristic, nevertheless the hands of Baron Oberg, the Strangler Ot at d084M EdIM f to Us
we Al pass a very comfortable hour, of Fialand. Yet we adsa sati sfailon ___
and resolved a warm welcome from the In knowing that, we the mystery what a
lonel old fellow who passed his life so mlt, Elms had esaped. trW hie
far beyond European civilization, and 'And on what charge, pray, do you mau IPh.
whose hoe, he told us, was often pume to arrest me inquired as
snowed up andut of from all the world cool as I couenm- am inte in r pro
for three or four months at a time. "For aiding a prisoner to escape."POsalto seetiber lands and fam poet.
asked the sturdy old fellow for a pencil, have no power o a me a t e ndl corrpond with me on these.
but the nearst thing he nwas a odly, that if yeo wish me to give you
stiek of cha eoal, and w th sar ...was satisfaction, I am perfectly willing to
fair coanion. Therefore she rose, down to y __o ..........
ave tehe ha ,bowe smilingly, and "It Is outside my district, gwled nII I n lI
bsrpaslsed inoo the inaer room and tIe fellow, but I aw that his hesitanc
The old wood-cutter gave us some [al dmit bey 1s o o
coare tobacco, and after smoking and "I esire y to take




thoritative shout.In Russian. The old I drew it from m pok et, saying-


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"2lt89, 1066


THE SUN


Eleventh Page


Been Thinking CHARLES BAEL LOOMIS


I have given up my early, trusting love for you, for
now I am almost a man and I do not need love.*
And the mother eried out in horror for she did
not wish to believe that this hobbledehoy was her
little boy.
And, sobbing, she leaned her head on the table,
and in a few moments she woke up and saw her
little boy coming in at the door lugging the muddy
hoe behind him.
And she hugged him to her, hoe and all, and said,
"Live youY life with me and grow from babyhood
to boyhood, for I want to live it all with you."

Murder of Empress Elizabeth
Not Crazy, But Well Fed
Geneva.-The goaler of the state prison where
Leuchoni, the murderer of Empress Elisabeth, is in-
caroerated, showed your correspondent an open letter
which the assassin addressed "to the public," protest-
ing against the newspaper story saying he had gone
mad.
"On the contrary," writes the assassin, "I am
in better health than ever, and far from looking the
ragged outcast I used to be. I am comfortably
clothed and housed. To mention only one thing: I
have learned to wear socks. When a free man I
knew their use only from hearsay, and I do not think
that any Italian laboring man receives such good and
sufficient food as I. Certainly I never did when free,
not even on high days and holidays. Not even when


Some wedded couples never quarrel at all I I
have heard people who had lived together for eighty
or nnty or a hundred years say:
"WUhavenever let a hard word pass between us,"
and -I have thought it must have seemed like a hun-
SSome oouples never quarrel in public sand they are
supposed to get along beautifully and are noted
"among their neighbors as being devoted. I haven't
a doubt that they are devoted. But if they are
devoted I haven't a doubt that they have their
,healthy little tiffs every now and then.
Y Now it seems to me that a suburban community
'where gossip is kindly and there Is "nothing doing,"
it would be a good thing if married would
quarrel in public every now and then. That is sup-
posing they quarrel picturesquely. I know people
so dull that even a quarrel in their hands would
not attract the attention of a bystander.
W But if a fairly young husband and wife have
,the gift of stinging repartee and they feel that they
have been on good terms too long it would be a
boon to their neighbors if they would call them up
-.by telephone and say, "Come round at once. Jenny
,and I are boiling over."
Depend upon It, all who called themselves friends
would come instanter and would take up comforta-
ble situations where they could hear the verbal
set-to without difficulty.
Then let Jenny say something she will regret and
let Jack follow it up with a caustic retort and the
`fun would have begun.
In such a case as this, if Jack is afraid of going
rtoo far be eaL have a trusted friend call time on
-him, or if *h.fersa that the vituperative powers of
Jenny a- Milply to lead her far afield he can have
the searte fid call time on her; but do let the bat-
tle go on until one feels mentally stimulated.
And when the last guest has gone Jenny can fall
weeping on Jasi neck and say she never meant a
word of it.
The only-trouble is that she did mean it.
That's what uats.
The other tday you said you wished little Ethel
:was grown up; that you were tired of the anxieties
that come to the motr of a three-year-old.
4 My goodness, woman, you know not what you
wish.
There was a mother had a little boy of three, a
tiny, prattling, affectionate, tiring child, and many
times she said, "Oh, if he could only grow up In a
minute. Thene is so much to do for him and 1 My
not do it right, and there is no telling what sickness
Mmay come to him. I wish he was elghtme n
As he spoke she heard the flutter of wings and
a presence semed to leave the room, and the bo
who had b Jaying out of doors, trying to guide
a big hoe wieth Z baby hands, came running into the
.house. And hiUs ep was heavy.
She looked up and saw an awkward, homely,
ooksre boy in plae of the rosy, loquacious, loving
S"Wh. are you?" said she, seeing in him a likeness
to his father, yet not knowing her own son.
S"I am your by. I have skipped all the years of
chidhood. I have left unsaid the wie little a g
atwould ias" comforted =ave lft be
_2A il.


I got drunk did I feel so well as I feel now as a reg-
ular thing. As to mental food, the prison library
affords better stimulators to thought than any
soclalistio society I know of. Just think of it, I am
reading Montesquieu and Voltaire--ust like Cather.
ine the Great."

Queen Asked To Pay Coal Bill
Rome.-Queen Marguerite has a special wire run.
ning to the royal and when her bell ring
expects either to hear from her son the King or
Qveen Helene. Imagine her surpri when called to
the 'phone the other day, a gruff voie inquired:
"When, in three devils' name, are you going to pay
for that load of coal,"
The Queen, anticipating a Joke, replied In a coax.
ing voice "What ooal"
"What ooal ?" roared the rufian on the other end
"the coal you have been cooking your polenta on all
winter, you swindler. Unless you pay before to-
morrow morning I will break every bone in your
body." Followed a long list of referenees to various
domestic animals. When the man was calling the
Queen a pig for the thirteenth time the connection
suddenly broke The telephone operator had noticed
his mistake, and was effusive n apologies.
"Not at all," 'phoned the Queen. "You caused
me a good laugh, and besides enabled me to do a
good turn to the poor woman who neglected to pay
her coal bill. Find out her name so I can pay the
ruffian before he executes his treat of bodily violence "


Ridpath's History of the World
SMasive Royal Octavo Volumes 4,000 double-column page.,
2,000 superb illustrations. Brand new, latest edition, down to
date, beautifully bound in half Morocco. Wsil Pui.
AT LESS THAN EVEN DAMAGED SETS WERE EVER SOLD
We will name our price only ina I re to those sending us the O M below. Thr ofN
Wmil Wim a siss V'me m N wI Lm kri i.
Dr. Ridpath is dead, his work is done, but his famy derive an income from his History, and i pf
w plalmgdk l for the sake of more quickly selling these few seta, would cause PMt l


Ild

IBo I ho sF(d.lillrCl









.Tdfth Page


THE SUN


April 28, 1906


JOHN HENRY ON RACE TIPSTERS

By GEORGE V. HOBART


One day last week I was beating the
ballet up dWy when Pete, the
de, Mf in and began to
chaer t a em he at the track.
"Get thea w, Pete, and out it,"' I said;
"it's may a long day sine I've been a
Patey for the peals. Onse they stung
me so hard that for months my bank ac-
oWant l)ooed Ie'sa porous plaster so I
took 6te e loroform treatment and now
you aM your tips to the. discards, my
to th disardis!"
Pete isn't really a native of Dope-ville-
on-th-s.eac, but he likes to have peo-
S think he knows the racing game
And he does-backwards.
In real life he's a theatrical manager
and his name on the three-sheets is Peter
J. Badtims, the Human Salary Spoiler.
In theatrical eoirles they call him the
impreario with the sawdust koko and
the splitesoond appetite.
Every tim Pete poses a an angel for
a troupe if you listen hard you can hear
the fue blow out somewhere between
Alby and Sohenectady.
From time to time over 2,197 actors
have had to walk home on account of
Pete's cold feet.
Pete ean develop a severe ease of
frosted pave pounders quicker than any
angel that ever had to dig for the oat-
maas money.
/ Pete is an Ace all right-the Ace of
6 s lon suit when he isn't dishing out
this topography is to staed around
a race track and bark at the bookmak-
Pete is what I would call a plunger
with the lid on.
SHe never bets more than two dollars
a oe, and vae then he keeps wish-
it
.a l d a the eomeriof
iBidIy aind Fortysecond Street for
about ten minutes when fortunately
Buneh Jefferson rolled up in his new
kerosene cart and I needed no second
Invitation to hop aboard and give Pete
the ha 4y4y yday
. r away, Bunch?" I asked, as
the Wubbe began to do a Togo through
bejao ttt streets in the town..
S ought '1d4 run up and get the
iandtk 'emfor a spin out to the
elmont Park races," Bunch eame back.
"Did you telephone them" I in-
qui but toldrednor
" "No, but I told Alice this moriun


today Tm toall otie n ---
afbe*.44llar Wll."
B dls, ahIike4 Butoa
and ea eo g at were on our
way to after iaiWg nt otes
to outr ie bst
'kt us ht oe of u ouif but
if Wh t heo As-
torat p. WLe a th oer.
nncl.' M t ke l d ba o e to a
tre hattan wabite a set of
giving t a long #oool drink of oline
and ome cracked oats, when Flaih Har-
vey bore on us and made a touch for the
turn-out.
"Say, BuOaebhl" chirped Flash, "lend
me the choo-choo for half an hour, will
you? I hav my sister ad a dream
ounsin of ours from Hartford ban erthis
aft, and Im eagr to show them inow
an pound a public road with a rowdy*.
art. 'lr take good care of the machine
and be back in two hours, honest,
. BuMht"
Flash being an old friend of ours
mBash had to fall for the spiel and
tlaaed him the Bubble forthwith.
S Tea minutes later we were so busy
listening to the sure-things falling from
the eag tongunes of the various friends
Sthat we quite forgot all about
thei, busy barouchel.


I

I


The first cinch-builder we fell over
was Harry MoDonough, the inventor of
the stingless mosquito now in use on
his Jersey farm.
Harry has -the mosquito game down
so fine that he's going to take a double
sextette of them into vaudeville next
season.
He has trained these twelve skeets to
sing "Zobla Grassa," and Al Holbrook
has promised to teach them a Venetian
dance.
Harry offered us four winners in the
first race and two cigars.
He told us if we lost to smoke the
cigars carefully and we'd forget our
troubles and our names,' but if we won
we could use the cigars as firecrackers.
Then we ran across Jeff D'Angelis,
the composer of the new tune now
played on the automobile horns.
Jeff hadn't picked out a horse to win
any race because his loyalty to sneeze-
wagons is so intense that he won't even
drink a horse's neck.'
He explained that he only came to the
race track to show the horses his smoke-
buggy and make them shiver.
George Yates, the inventor of the ma-
chinery for removing sunburn from
pickles, was there and he tried to pre-
sent us with a sure winner in the third
race.
A little later on we discovered that
the horse Yates was doing a rave over
had been dead for four yea sand that
the card from which he was lifting his
dope was the program of the mset at
Sheepshead in 1890.
Some kind and thoughtful stranger
had lifted 10 cents from Georgp' sur-
plus and in return had stung him with
an ancient echo of the pittypats.
Our next adventure was with Joe
Miron, the famous horse trainer aid idn
venter of the only blue mare in capl
tivity at Elmhurst.
"Say, why didn't I see you guys be-
fore the first race; I had a plush-cov-
ered pipe I" yelled Joe.
"I had that race beat to a stage wait,"
Joe went on, enthusiastically. "Why,
all you had to do was play 'The Goblin
Man' to win and 'Murderallo' for a
place-it was just like getting money
from the patent medicine business."
"How much did you win, Joe?" I in-
quired.
"Who, met" Joe came back. "Why I
didn't get here in time to place a bet.
I drove over from Elmhurst and the blue
mare burst a tire. But, say, I've got
a mother's darling in the third raoel
Oh, it's a ladybug for certain I You
guy pl Perhaps' to win and you'll
o ho ookin lke Pierp Morgan after
a busy day. It can't lose, thi clam
antt Say, that horse *Phaps' wears
Igold-plateI overshoes and It can kick
ore traek behind it than any ostrich
you ever maw! Why, it's got ball-bear.
cast eato on the feet and it wears a
naphtha emglae in the forward turret.
(et nokle with the coain, boys, sa a
the limit, and if the track lMhappo o
ave in and it does lose, I'll a you
down to Elmhurst behind the blue mare
and make the suction pump in the back.
yard do an imitation of Walter Jones
sn 'Captain Kidd' with the bum
pipes.
Joe was so much in earnest about it
that Bunch and I put up fifty on 'Per.
hape and waited.
e are still waiting.
*Perhaps' may have been a good horse
but he had a bad memory and never
could resollect which end of the track
was the proper place to finish.
Joe must have left for Elmhurst im-
mediately after the race because he failed
to answer roll call.
Then we ran across Dave Torrence
the famous inventor of the disappearing
trump so much used by pinochle players.
When Dave began to dope 'em out for
us Bunch and I hid our pocketbooks in
our shoes.
"Here's a od one," Dave sua ted;
"listen to this one, 'Easy Mone out of
'Life Iqisurnee' by 'Dlretor_' And
hen's a good one, "Chauffeur' ou-'


'Automnbild by 'Policeman 1' Do you
care for those f"
There were tears in Bunch's eyes, but
I was busy looking for a rock.
"Here are some more peaoherin.r&*
Dave went o, relentlely, here is 'Golf
Player' out of 'Business by 'Mosquito,'
and here's another good one, 'Eternal
Daylight' out 'of 'Russia' by 'Japan'-
like 'em?"
Bunch and I handed Dave the. re-
proachful face and fled for our lives.
Then we got down to business and be-
gan to lose our money with more system
and less noise.
At the end of the fifth race we hadn't
the price of a leather sandwich between
Us.
Every dog we had mentioned to the
bookies proved to be a false alarm.
Every turtle we plunged on carried
our money to the bonfire and dumped
it in.
"My little black man is whimpering,
Bunch," I said. "I'm cured."
"One hundred and sixty bucks to the
bad for mine," laughed Bunch. "I gu
that will hold me temporarily.
on, John! let's hop in the Bubble nd
dash back to the Hotel Astor; the giris
will be waiting for us." "
We hurried to the spot where Flsh
Harvey was to leave the gas-hopper, but
there was no .sign of..Flash or the ma-
chine. '
Seven o'clock came +ad still no sign
of Flash or the Bubble, and there we sat,


two sad boys without a baubee in the
jeuas, hungry to the limit aid with an
el-present vision of our two worried
Ae- displacing a bunch of expensive
eace ib a restaurant while they waited
for us to show.
It w, pitiful.
Eight o'clock came, no Flash, no ma-
chine, while there we waited and
watched our hair as it slowly wuned
tray. .t'i
I had gone through my poohetA till I
wore holes in them withoutloati ay-
thing in tre shape of money, but finally
on about the nine hundred and nine-
teenth lp Bunch discovered a dollar bill
tucked away in a corner, whereupon we
turned our faces to every point of the
ompass and called down maledictions
on the head of Flash Harvey, wherever
4*0 might be, and then ducked for the
trolley.
When we finally reached the Hotel
Astor it was a quarter past ten, so we
decided it was too late for dinner and
we didn't go in.
At home-but what's the use?
The war is over now and a treaty of
peace has been signed.
We are even with Flash Harvey,
though.
He got speed-foolish in the Bubble and
tried to give an imitation of a torpedo
destroyer, with the reeuit that a Reub
constable pinched him and the whole out-
fit and threw him in a rural bastile for
the night. That's what delayed him.











April 28,1906


THE SUN


Thirteenth Page


Sttt Press on Browards

an to Drain the 'Glades


IS FULFILLING HIS PLEDGE.
Journal, one of the most



"Since Governor Broward has pro-
gresed far enough in his nvergpade
drange plan to demonstrate that he
actualy means business, a great hue and
cry is raised among certain of the State
press in opposition to the scheme. The
noise comes mostly from those State pa.
pers which opposed Governor Broward
previous to his election and which have
had few, if any, kind words for him since,
and its effect is therefore not u potent
as it w4lltcre Iit't eame from a source
whese ailsu was le apparent.
"The Journal has never definitely made
up its own mind as to the value to the
State of carrying into effect Governor
Broward's scheme. It has never been
able to decide whether the same amount
of money applied to the building of good
roads would not be worth more to the
State than the drainage of the Ever-
glades. But these are all questions of
im trial daceter at this time. T
ldst. Board was elected to of-
flee s ad drainage issue, and
th for him, knowing that
that was thd chief plank in his platform.
The famous 'map' which he circulated
over the State and carried with him in
his eanvass left no doubt In the minds of
any one as to what Governor Broward's
tpet heo U !ox what he would proceed
to do if elected to office.
"Governor Broward is now simply
carrying out his pre-election pledges. He
is attempting to do ust what he prom
ised the people he would do and just
what any honest man would do under
similar circumstances. He is at work
on a plan iwhlh the people indorsed
when they elected him and which he is
in duty bound to, as far as possible,
carry out.
"If Governor Broward had made no at-
tempt to fulfill his platform pledges,
the same papers which are opposing him
for doing so would have ridlluled him
for not doing so. They would have
pointed to his drainage scheme as a
clever campaign eonoletion by which a
clever ampaigner was enabled to climb
iisto *e, tmhd ( would have lam-
bted hi, amroiefully for abandoning
te shemo after he got the oice.
h"It would seem that instead of attack-
Iw Governor Broward for doing what
pple elected hm to do, it would be
e be part of good judgment to at-
tmpt to sere a reversal of the poPular
ae67ct st Ai e future election. I the
iverglades drainage scheme is not a good
thing for the St8t, let the people reverse
themselves on that proposition. But
util s ibh p ar eversal is made Gov-
ernor nwoir hold ,nd probably will,
ntite to do his duty bya loyal at-
mpt to orryt to ffet the chiif plank
it the platform upon which he was
The Metropoli heartily indorses every.
thin tid Penueoha Jenral utters above,
and regrets time are not more papers
in the Btate conduetd upon the nes of
justaess and fairnme t all men and
M i a there are.
4 not support Gover.
i fact, it opposed hlm,'u in an hon-
orable eaonr. The plank in his plat-
forn tlt w gbe t mot wmas w-a
olde Drlua*"i. The people were in-
te rtad t project, and he wat
eted with their approval of the drain-
age pHonotic he promised to put in

a falsifier sad a seundre had he never
eor' I om t with himself and the
heee repreent. by endeavoring to
nup to the letter of the plan that
fliade m Governor, he ie now being as-
and re t peaeen e not m few
M%5n-rrmr 1WO fiami


The Metropolis has refrained from dis-
cussing the merits or demerits of Gover-
nor Broward's drainage scheme, and it
does not do so now. The task may be
feasible and practicable, or it may not.
Until the question has been settled, and
even though the public becomes convinced
that the drainage of the Everglades is
impossible, it must commend the honesty
and manhood of the chief executive in
endeavoring to do and fulfill the pledges
he made the people before he became Gov-
etnor of Florida. By doing so he proves
to be a man of his word-a quality so
often found lacking in men in public
office.-Miami Metropolis.
n
A HOT TIME AHEAD.
(St. Augustine Meteor.)
It is evident from the clatter-splatter
of the State press, that there will yet
be a hot time in the old State before
the ensuing Democratic primaries are
brought to a close, and all on account
of a little ditch which Governor Brow.
ard purposes digging for the express
purpose of opening up a good big plan-
,tation for the production of sugar to
supplant, to some extent the saccharine
article which: we have to import from
sections foreign to Uncle Sam's domain.
Governor Broward is a level-headed,
practical man, who has fooled wise
acorns before, and if they don't look
out they will have to eat more crow.
Mind what we tell you.
(Wauchula Advocate.)
Governor Broward's scheme of drain-
ing the Everglades is receiving its full
share of attention these days, and every
editor, cattleman and 'gator hunter in
the State seems ready to give expert
opinions on this little engineering prob-
lem. Just how far selfishness and preju-
dice go to make up these opinions is
another question.
(Tampa Tribune.)
Governor Broward made no mistake
in'his remarks on the Everglades drain*
age question. There are corns growing
on some of the editors of the State press
who have been riding on passes. The
Governor may have stepped on some of
these corns and now the owners are
squealing.
(Gainesville Sun.)
That boomerang sent out by the two
Jacksonville dailies accusing Governor
Broward of jumping onto the State
press with both feet, is now on the re-
turn trip, and the editors of the Times-
Union and Metropolis are ducking.
(Monticello News.)
Governor Broward quotes trom Times-
Union editorials supporting drainage-
but isn't it an editorial, as well as a
feminine prerogative to change one's
mind?


Anarchists


The enforcement of law is not a pleas-
ant or a palatable dose for law-breakern.
Violators of the liquor laws have had
to swallow an unpalatable dose.
.Beme of those, who have been defying
the law.have offered pleas of guilty in
Mundlpal Cdourt and paid their flnea.
There are several still unpunished
who, though trembling with fear, hope
yet to escape.
One of the means by which they hope
to avoid conviction and consequent pun-
ishment is through the intimidation of
alleged negro witnesses.
Threats of violence are said to have
been made against negroes who are sup-
posed to be able or willing to give testi-
mony against the white men who have
been selling liquor in Monticello in de-
fiance of law.
This is anarchy.
It is also mostly "bluff."
The editor of this paper offers the
protection of his premises to any per-
sons tbhretea d ad feels assured that
there is not one, nor is there any half-
rf~ttr ernlulkii pOwarM who
%rj* one lfylinuW vmid
pw-de 1 0 o anyquest of l e


They might screw up the courage to stick
a match in dead of night or hire a cheap
assassin, but they would not face danger
to themselves.
Hiding behind negro "peddlers" and
"sack" men who have made their stink-
ing business pay, the white lawbreakers
now evidently hope to intimidate the
negroes into silence, and thereby escape
punishment themselves.
It is time that the people of Jefferson
County were getting posted as to the
characters of the lawless ruffians who are
defying the laws of State and munici-
pality.
If you want to take sides with lawless-
ness you can do so so by signing the peti-
tion for a local option election and
voting "wet."
If you are in sympathy with anarchy,
now is your chance.
Line up -Monticello News.

Parcels Post Question
As with the shield the two knights
of old fought over regarding the material
of which It was composed, the one seeing
its silvered surface, the other its golden
gloss, so witn the parcel post problem.
There are two points of view, and out
in Colorado, as no doubt elsewhere, there
are those who question the expediency
of the postal department going into the
business. The Boulder Commercial As.
sociation recently sent the Colorado Sen-
ators and Congressmen a set of resolu-
tions reading as follows:
"Whereas, The proposed parcels post
bill, now pending before Congress, s a
measure which is impracticable, against
the general welfare of the United States,
and will undoubtedly become, if en-
acted, a great burden upon the tax-pay-
ing public and,
"Whereas, The general trend of this
measure is to concentrate the commer-
cial interests of the United States in
the hands of a few in the large cities as
against the smaller merchants of the
country; therefore, be it
"Resolved, That we, the Boulder Com.
mercial Association, composed of about
300 of the business people of Boulder,
regard the proposed parcels post meas-
ure as one against the welfare of the
masses of the people, and that we
urgently request our Senators and Con-
gressmen to use every effort to defeat
this proposed measure."
The DeLand and Daytona people have
been hoping for years for a railroad di-
rectly connecting the two places, and this
hope it about to be realized, and with a
road that will be a novelty in railroad
circles in this country-a road whom
motive power will be gasoline, with a
standard gauge track and standard pas-
senger coaches.-Volusia County Record.


Henry Wattemron's Paper
(TIM We"My M1 nW l)


It's Different When You Drink
BEERINE


Tuss Uio km
Leek. Uk. her
INhm l hR
It's CERINE


JACKSONVILLE, FLA., COCACOLA
BOTTLING CO.





Automobiles'

Before buying, t y list of
Second-fland achmnea. It
will save you money. LIST
your Auto with me-I cash get
the bWt price poslble for it


H. V. ARNAU
lew kurs i ,


AN


THE SUN


Sohu One Year for Only $&SO
w people In the United States have not
heard of the ouerJournal. Democratic
in all thin fair In a thind Cean In
all thInrlt Is e-matkilh a family news.
paper. By a ngement we are
enabled to offer the W Cely e uler4our.
nal one ya and this paper for the rie
named abova, fend your wbscifption
for the con aon to e-no othe


strong m i endure
OLD UICORY and
WITEMBCKOY WAGONS
T uWmr a g nM
-- Wg


When Iw Jcifostt
....Do s OtheaiDe


"O OILRCATH'S
223 W. Day 6t.


Jae~ueFlrla FO~Ra" skdf



WMIJRIA&BMERTHE SUN, $2 PER YE'At










P~~.nth Pag


THE SUN


AprA
1


28,1906


V




~i I~








Ii

Ii I

It
II,
I ii
'I ..










*1
4

I


RNO. FRANK ADAMS


The poent has always entertained
a slanerse and onest admiration for Hon.
Prank Adsa u Strong, capable, per-
sistent, courageous and conmolentious,
put td whbi yo% will, he stands, like
Ial Eh aong his brethren, a
had Iad shoulders" above them all.
Of all or polituans-uslng the term
li its better ense-he has taken the
greatest Interest In, and been most active
Spromoti thbe educational affaire of
the Stat. We are therefore especially
that he has remselded
t at to reti- from publlo
u ad has oW nated to return to
ta 9 Senat eUbe isn the past h
leuh&a pros at avre and has
r-a I aMeriesto t0 Sa1e".
If ~ a stteapt is made to
t e Buokma law In the mnt
a presence In th Senate
of ean t wha materful leader
M whoeM earnest eloquence in Iti
State s s kaM d for its en
will be talei by the people at
a- whoep blIator with hiM sue
ahtj the measure aa
iailI u-t that the scheme t1
df i aes our reneatly a.
t~iW i d tle policy, will
d a i dpoemt of t nBw .
*b on willud their Waterlo
wjt la in the Sestes iti
Wtd .n-f am- e


Thinks "
SHOULD THUER B ANY PARDON ?
Neat to the amsli thought of a
Divi Pardo s Mna's self
instituted N oi Of Pard
Ma pr ts adofttme the
ilT spirit u y dominates, sad
be become r
Shau l th i hW eae of pardon
here or b Ite
Ie 84 publise ntiment
ofim 4deallifg with follow
er MahopUe f tbat na tM sentiment
m"1 bfRi o1 heitou eases vhoih
an W u fro te h any of man, but
whoM petition so high IforlnMe? And
anre we ot led to tiem holy writ
that whm r those h a true penitence
there will Ibe raleMsion of sints? Well,
If we for pwe4o tin tahen*
after w my th intent
no a ma', eht, M mans
fonrgiat
to :asituttoa of ac sgoa' eniment
smas ok asri soul ad mjutly of His
tau g as a paroni board and he
hold not ps Mon its sets who
eranot fully tuit oito to the oath and
rpnhie eitn whioh surround a mem.
r of ash board.
No reponsiMity, we dare say, rets
more thly upon th shoulders of Flor
ida's Stlte o ul who constitute the
Board of Pardons thao the matter of
passinfl upon th various petitions prew
Wt to tun to commute or absole
te *ie of some poor winter who has
paid thJ penalty ten thousand times
otr for a reon of the law of
muti d of Ood.
Porlda's Ba4d of Pardones is co*m
Me of mm of souls-honorable men-
roifeag sen-and to condemn them
for doi wht they oneaider to be their
s*ora d ism to t it Oen a being
ee as- tO wh offtee they oon-
done.-St. Augustin Meteor.


I
Il
|


S o trenmat the rpmaMt opW
pgd to the radicMal ad weeping revolu-
ion proposed in the Uuchmen Bill, and
we are not yet convinced that its enact-
ment was not a mistake; but we recog
alas the fact that any attempt to r-ee-
talish the old order or to materially
ebne the new, would at this ume he a
far sk seriouss and fatal blunder.
'Ile paint decide whether the step
was a wise or unwise one; but one thing
is sure, to Msettle the now established
policy of the State with re rd to higher
edutetion would be the height of folly.
Thl Is why thi Exponent is glad Mr.
Ad m a Mr. Buckman will be in the
State Senate.-Florida School Ex-
... I t great compliment to Senator
ftao W. %amn, to his sterling worth,
l) ty his devotion to his
WI O to his State, that no eitim


Try


"Green

Tennessee

TIMrs



RobLW.
I chl mi


PARTIAL PCE LIST OF


Brier"o T UMP VTn
vlmS 44% 6CfUI
Fbmev ......... i s 450
RE '



Simms~

1.0WAMII


es, Beer and Malt


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mMMANf immmm STV.bn LI e MEW.IVO-


3a~m~Uh.
I..


a BrethrenR U On our Ust
that could command a pectable ote A U
in the coming primary will o er to run
against him. And he is strongest
among the e who have known him
Slongefteiutl.eas of Volusis all their *
lives.-Volusa County Record. $15 0
PRODUCING TOMATOES S.A NI
From all indications the growers of QS d 4M f te
Dade County have solved the problem of
suoesful sad profitable tomato growing. For M.7 we wasi if .f,,-,3.l i4 fnll Kid
A few years ago, and up to the preIent, wemIo-i -.
the majority of growers tried to asee how 9jl we wlM n alM l,4 fu lf
many rates they could put on the mar- ft r am we will ---nd peelsd. ,4 f -l
ket This, too, with very little know* qam rt olf
f the andurs ., i- .
rofisult ws ttet thyield dd not r n we -"-lS re.. 4 fltnt
mature monrethan half, thet the product ibad for ti wone. I I
was Inferior in most part, that there was .
not euflolent labor to gather and ship at F9*WI wepwill mad
the right time, and causing the fruit to IqiM Sof i*. u lThe | J -rvO Co.
reach the market in bad condition and Fr we will m nWai ld.4 fu l .
destroying all profits, the shipments at -qurt of --- W. My
times being a total loss. nr tst we will 9Pdi, ell p fid. 4 ull
This year the growing of tomatoes has Qarts of .. |i
been based on a more scientific and .WI d we will d m ald 4 full
profitable plan. No grower planted more quaFrtsof I in o I I
than one-third the acreage he put out
in ret years; he selected the best seed
anwas abto by the small average to s 7, ---U/F
S the vine and fruit better attention, ,
hu siding the plans in developing and C I 1 4,1
reducing heavy yields. In this way the g U
ruit is made a better quality than ever N UJ I
before, the crop can be gathered and M e sl eI,. i im.
whipped at the right time, and the profits
delved highly satisfactory, as the mar- lM IT r TMM -
ket at no time has been glutted. JaksnvI 's Finest
All growers throughout the county are___________
highly satisfied at the results, both in
producing and marketing their cropJOSEPH ZAP and Flo s ear "" t
and all have made handsomely upon JO E H D
their investments. The time is now here JM M RIA. and Best Year-Round
when the raising of tomatoes will in the
future be conducted upon scientific lines, Hotel
and all engaged in the business can not
help but be seucessful.
More money will be realized on the
easI coast this year from the tomato DO D & GULLE
orop than ever before, though the total
acreage under cultivation is lee than Owners and MIanai e
two-thirds as great as a year ago--Mi-
ami Metropolis. !_,,_. ,,


Sole str1buon of the as_ _
SANN VI Dras u ---

f Aoi w hoanleflable Gds. It waoit TILLr 3 3m BSL...

If Its Drugs m -..
S Dear Dad-I arrived in Jacksonville It
nearly blind, and was tken#A to the optd-t1l- t2 MWd5L.Pck es
Scdan's, whem I was teatedby a Mnerlo. The i
Sgit, who proecribed diet, and put me oL M b M F UN TI INi
. a fig for brekf at,no lunch, and a pecan
t nut for dinner, and after s days' treat. a AA nl
* meant I would ee a loal of hM ft9S 9 M
ah**m* NBDUg DtOre Au IPe r PiSuMr
D. NE.AN P -1 Pit PON 'IN M AP
. V S.-TtWs b ra&d like another sed to O* --- A_ J .. FM.IM
"p"


i *;


0
.21aghe umamirsto










Aprti 26i ,"90


THE! SUN


Piftesath Pap


"Where b the wo aTab inabed oan a
O "lher of the d o wtGa. d ........*d*** w,** .. fmP. ""............. .... .
"Still at liMberty, rtled the aa who 8tay away fr amy ae paysoat
held s as pris o ers. hidia g two t ,e ... ... ................................................ ..
wrt bak, I think., --
"Ah, we shall lad her before
hNs we shall have ueaehe the whole W iU P Iu '
foda .30 Uo .e. -9w wM


( .


Th Czarls Spy Mh& -Burlbridge T
"I c ~ sp skirtinj ar mwsiea1S 601ed
( onaed from enth Page) N s vh ,woo6e !shore o .
"Ah; which we alk the whole a I.g
su I oppose" ,until, a tsuadown, wem to a p
he smild. NW ll perhaps yur memory turesque little log-built town facing the
will be refresh e b~ aS t or wo water called Filp ula. Here we o.I


piror. yo uoo, oda a armet"Agoa As soos thed C hMief of Pdo a
S"ut, Yourte s eEngli an t rain down toAbo, when e wemunle oarr*e d, ond lo p m
"Eoh 1_ ne b xt orningf, u e a very, neoaporI I"

"You havgies rto. ble- and sleepless journey. iaa r elh
Yu know S penalty in fnlanor Atine o'clock r stoodI n the big bare 17M
that, surely? office of Michaeol Boramki, where ol a,.
"But this e M uS ay rnot fewd aysbefore woe adb sehad e
sie jo the poor ole everyhinpro- andrgument. As soon as the Chef. ie f of Po..


pried evrywherehs*gha listened to the oer'e tory of uney earteet t


WYou may f usd paper or letters eaid without uayir a word. a
the oier. "Searh thoroughly." rest, and dnd smisoner myour Excellenrd with a l eJa, hA te lli1 >z



Wetaklg up a number of board in the taken to H fo. H aid you o h w
ner room wh turning Elm had oupie would be awarouht me there. fact." lu we i t






But they found nothl.
A dohsn time, wa e oldm woodeeutte r (ONTINUE d the old wood- er were.) *
quest bhut e tbborlly reu Mon another room, therefore I stood alone




pried everywhere o on stened to the al filers story of iy i 1Ar
Ytou ay .a rl w the he ofPo le Coune (18th. OU d .e,
oun m lAo a_.nd eapre or letters, aid without saying a word. uI cOWNI|* O J
tew offer. ".oua ar thoroughly." And "The prisoner, your Excellency, desired
1 eTver corner they rumma d, even to to be brought here to you before being


tIdeadl the uA numrof oirda in the 1t ken to Heh singofTHisdy A i |B
Inner room whih Elma had occupield. would be aware ofthe facts." $wme1 i Mt Ol ueIo
But they found nothi r .1 .
admit that he h ad ever e eyNon h
questioned, but heo st f bb n refused to oe voed foratle e i
dmiot that eu d ties e inf es uPon cIepr ofID ... o
return to eAe and see Boraniki. Io IUII I .4 IV of lUhe vhwYums **IUwIIs m o l ~
knew, ofhcourseo, by wht we had over .. 1 O ,Q ..



heard mid by the prison guards that e ar O on e yeT a
the Governor general was extremely Mes ,d" ,Ol lIe, one year,
aiious torme apturethegirl withwhom, To the Voters of Duval Oount (18th m ^r ilatmM a e,one ^,year,
fallen in love. And It appeared that no I hereby a ounce y f aa adi- oUN, one ye. -
effort was be sred to search for ue. date for te State SWa NfrOMthit



fntr e e r hanye t who lthe polro aI e Inhe18th, Senatoriy lDr*tl.
provela of Abo and of Helnsgo r gor,+s obv.frati M a l e e i o -
me woud to be actively making a house-o H. H. .B C -. No I A o







pdeed. th ew o e o the poice inin t. wat Senato tri Dval tB o
house me oth., a'--r--_ 13(T liU 131 li
But what could be the truth of Elma's n a ^



tahe r p acspor whe a isedTiofherown it. T1I I94717 y I b y L 5
amord, or had she once more fallen a "" rk.-, .&,.*.3 .*,
victim to some indnious and dastardly bihb tfoutnc e of timed s of uval f
plot. That gray d ress of hers might, I that I will be apc y I e.. ....
reollecte ad, betray her if she dared to m aenomn IA. W i glj n ol| !
venture near an town, while her a -ff lic- w o, iq* to ly aCOWh
ion would, o telf, oe plain evidence t Doom, oa te
of identification. Al I hoped waseethatMd polatfr. may belon t i Utr ,. .W .e atnt. w
she had gop and hidden herself the b yt Tvoth voice Meinrgyand workf 6 eC tbholht*hsih m-I onthly .**IM llima*W
fest somewhere in the vicinity to wait urer thati ect idle me t i



until the edan er ooforecapturehadpss&d 1the -to iSofit
For nearly wf an hour I arguoned with eniwfterably opposed o en Dw
the poli e for whaoe in rtion e it was ior fAnd anuT..fmr* I nll waII
to take me under arrest ,t ,to Helsngfors.the oaum-- _....--.-........-. ....
Once there, however, I knew too well ticul questions tajmy in '"Anlon




faor ever. Whatever w s the Baron'smo g ae onn tu and to ay u aea..ad 8. ... .... ............l...for., w a a
openly o teo present my=iaws uopeon we _e__ sdall -a i eat 1 s= 1 0- W
tive in holding the poor girl a prisoners, uety* -1- -_im-*o.
it would also be his motie to silence .my d y. I::rN WA1u omhiiS-- ";Non
ne. I knew too much for his likin gi.Is
"I' refuse to go to Helsingforsf IT maid !OR T "'m' "
defantly.1 e, amaBritish subaet, anda the bestIL E ^walB


him that I really had a right to be taken myma mad ,e eledP 4 *w v 0. .l i
to Abo, and to seek the aid of the Brt-ofo a faithful performanceo61 the dutles of the of. went yr .one .
ish Vice Consul If necessary. iheD5slciingth loom of5 all In bgatopJ dwafI eo
For as long as possible I succeeded I a, .ve om l. w m. o fol i- -i-SS
playing our departure, to buttle, at.A.M... BA IIN.-M No.. .m Is ..a.r.t.,+,.,..... ..........................
t the yellow sun begh a to onstUem l(
+"the e oe we- we wmn alld nn ---,-, 1 i ni.

pae to ram .a ,ei ehat t hate si outy I d oneta ie .. liari!e.i2.i. ...................w.................. ,
lmle o fln eto ithe orhawds rofte-.a ee I *'n' 0yR
liBes.; s s ti, vhot e hat Ithe o 1n!e yikftQ.'AE., ftL' MS ^ ?",... v










Look back and o the wondeirtl advane in Roeal state. Why not look fbr-
d Mand make an invetment in the ooming re'iderce suburb of JacksonvilleP

RIN We have often truly heard say: Thre
rf -' Iis a piece of ld
Stime ago for wMat was then considered a high price, but the same piece of prop-
i ~ I not be bought today for five times the price The same will apply to

A EW SPloFI Lt in this new suburb will increase in
value every year, improved or inimmproved.
i toIs not a safer or better investment around Jacksonville than a lot in
SFor nstance: A lot purchased onMain
SStreet over oneyear ago could not be pur-
Mhaed today fo r less than 80 percent advance of purchase price. The same will apply on lot
on Main Street in


RV investment, in a home, or on speculation,
Sethat Pwill work while you alepIEL lstigate

SW SP II LWe e in the rea estate businewe i
NEW hJRU E 2)ave the property for sale, and if you e
intee d in your were and prosperity, we want toonsell you a lot in

SiWT SPRT TIhI LDo t extends along Main Street
SPRIIIGFLULD the yeaboard Air Line crossng to
Twenty t Street It is now only fbur blocks fom Main Street Oar Line, which will be
extended in one yar.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, SEE OR WRITE
HjIttrse nyu e~r n rseiy ewatt elyualti


_, STOCKTON BUDD
127 West Forsyth St Jacksonmvlle, Fla.




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