Group Title: sun.
Title: The sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075914/00024
 Material Information
Title: The sun
Uniform Title: sun
Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sun Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: April 21, 1906
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tallahassee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Leon County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Leon -- Tallahassee
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.451667 x -84.268533 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 18, 1905)-v. 3, no. 47 (Sept. 12, 1908).
Numbering Peculiarities: Published at Tallahassee, Fla., June 23-Sept. 12, 1908.
General Note: Claude L'Engle, editor.
General Note: "If it's right, we are for it."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075914
Volume ID: VID00024
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33400104
lccn - sn 95047216
 Related Items
Other version: Morning sun (Tallahassee, Fla.)
Succeeded by: Dixie (Jacksonville, Fla.)

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IN THIS ISSUE---UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA PLANS


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JA UI0NVILL, FLORIDA, APRIL


21, 1906


SInhIe Gonv S Cnts
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Oh, what's the Use, the nake's Tail Won't Die Anyhow Until the Sun Goe Down


aln*lo(;ODV 3 COntS


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CLAUDE L'ENOLE
Editor


IT'S RIOHT, WE ARE FOR I


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M i WiMLTWiilAWUU.irffSWIPU M i i U IUNA I AT SIMWSTFSTIS,
Volume I-No. 23 JACONVILLE, FLORIDA, APRIL 21,906 5 Cents per Copy. $2 per Year
Entered 4 the Post Offoe at JackMtollie, Fla., M eond-hinmma terU


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In the Sun's Chariot
Intimate Talks Between PubISher and Reder
V INGS are coining our way, as the IKansas man said to his neigh-
bor as they stood in the mouth of the cyclone cellar watching
the houses, hen coops, pip, baby buggies, rubber boots, feather
beds and brick kilns that were borne along by the advancing cyclone.
We always thought they would come our way, and with patience
have possessed our souls while hugging the comforting thought.
Well, as Sally McGilltcuddy, late of the Bowery region, would
put it-


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3,


Do you like the John Henry stuff we have been running of late?
We know what your answer will be, for it is the best of its kind
getatable.
There's more of It
Keep in the sun's rays by insisting on having The Sun
It is a household necessity.
Yours for 12 per year.


Great Half Price


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Cosmopolitan, one year, -
Womap's Home CompDanon, one year,
The Review of Reviews, one year,
Pearson's, one year, -
The American Magazine, one year, -
Tom Watso0's Magazine, one year, -
THE SUN, one year, -


Total,


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$1.00
1.00

1100
1.00
1.00
2.00
$10.00


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Grab This Opportunity
If you wt ow o 'r you cannot do bet than to accept
one of followingO&s wmhe are hot off the t and before they are witrwn:


COSMOPOLITAN, one yoar........................................................it. O
THe SUN. one year............................. .......... 00
sM INs rLY
TEARMS NSoON, ........ya........................................... ... 100......... o
TH E s .,omn .... AI 'Z.............................. o00

TOM WATOI'S MAGAZINE.one year.................................... 00o
MnE m.oon*. .... OT'........................... o


"One of them have cme."
Last Friday morning, as Sun's were being turned from the press
.at the rate of some eighteen hundred an hour, a prominent citizen of
Jacksonville came into the business office and asked:
Is it too late to get an ad. in this week?"
We were really proud of our business manager in this crisis.
As this was the first time in The Sun's life that business sought
The Sun, as The Sun had been compelled to hustle long and hard for
every inch of advertising printed in its columns, a request like this was
calculated to upset the poise of the most phlegmatic of men.
But the business manager's manner was an admirable imitation of
that calmness that marks the man dealing with an every-day affair.
He said:
"Rather late; the paper is being printed now."
"But I must get my ad. in this week's issue," said the now thor--
oughly aroused prominent citizen. "Cant you stop the press?"
Such things have been done," said the B. M., as he whistled to
the pressroom. "How much of an ad. do you want?"
I want a page," was the answer.
Still concealing his agitation, the B. M. went into the pressroom
and returned with the report that half of the entire edition had been
run off.
Well, let the ad. go in the other half. I must have my ad. in
this week's issue of The Sun."
Under this stress of circumstances there was nothing else to do, so
the forms were changed and the ad. set up and printed in the remain-
ing half of the edition.
Still concealing his elation, the B. M. asked the prominent citizen
if he would object to telling why it was he came on so pleasant an er-
rand, and why his determination to get his ad. in the present issue
prompted him to be satisfied with half the edition in which to present it.
"Certainly, 'll tell you," was the answer. I had a half page
ad. in last week's 6un, and I got letters of inquiry which mentioned
The Sun. I want my ad. in the paper that produces results like this."I
Now, we ask you in all confidence, if this isn't the right kind of
proof of the value of Sun space, and if this is not that quality of en-
couragement that warms the heart and enthuses the spirit of the men
who are making The Mut for you?
Rejoice with us, friends, because we are exceedingly glad.
Just in order to show that our brothers are still in the glorious gar-
den of thought, gathering its choice products to form into nosegays for
bestowal on us, we print a couple of the latest:
If Claude L'Engle's Sun can steer
le colum drawn upon it to show that t acv. nille Sun emil .
it has deviated from Its aa Flid i c
bold, brilliant cOUre, it will mit e is certainly doing somevery clever
place on the terry tb) work.--Ocal Banner.
home In Florida.-St Agpsne Me-ner
teor.


TNESIM
hdmwM.ot ML


"


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Enelosed please find $..............................for which enter my name for one year's sob.
riptiUon to your paper and the following maglnes............................................................
.. ".........*..-.. **............... *............................................................... ,......b.................
- -- .......... ........................ 0 ......................... ................................................ ...
N am ..................................... ............................... .................. ......................
S.... be .... ........ ... ........
+*.II~H ol l l.i 11 li oe +I fillelIi* "" e .*o **+ **s ** *********eo** ** s 1 1 ******O el+e *****l le A l... ell ... e ..


A. K. TAYLOR
Cartoonist


Fill out coupon, mail it today with your remittance and be sure of getting
the greatest magae combination that w ever offered-an opportunity of
years and one it I safe to ay will never be made again.


IF.Vw


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Send $5.75 and Get Them All for One Year


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poUtan, and a streo ew srlial by I. 0. Wns.
T REVIEW OF RESubstantial Ameran men and womeareoin
mmwm iw wmto P UP with the time and thd a g oin to
take the shortest eo-whlis The t1 itew offewsa monthly surverey ofle world's
WOMAN'S HOME COMPANION ai to by n other home and
S*WrNIOn i n the world. Store.
fasha, estoNe, moW
PEARtOM'S ,em* fle din tfon marine of the day both Its *rl and
0oo lwderess i br ee w y authors of world-wide repu a on. Peaon'si to
TiE AU ICAIIs lagtgaHnl r strw ,r known as tLeslie's Mxagalne.
a Ims MA wM te purh d by a po di.
cae. and no ftmde mare la g toal kt one of the bet m lneIn Amerila.
TOM WATSON'S MAGAZINE No monthly m ne InAmerica ever before
W"m nkmt with such hearty welcome a sad Tom
waI' by all cladm p eolf*e. sdu wy so. for Mr. WalEr oIs at oncethe formos
writer andcderestthinkubefore public today. It Is filedwith the bet thoughts of
the best minds on mall a let of Dntere to the American people.
THE SUN is w!"h'Will of its own, and I by far the best paper In
o odtadluright and ensuring all wrong.


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April 21, 1906


THE SUN


Third Page


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


GROUNDS OF FLORIDA UNIVERSITY


LAKE~


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EXPLANATION OF DIAGRAM-Curved lines mark boundaries of walks and driveways, Nos. 1 to 9 inclusive are
residences for Faculty, 10 Medicine and Pharmacy, 11 Chapel, 12 Law, 13 Philosophy, 14 Museum, 15 History and Eco-
nomics, 16 School of Mines, 17 Engineering and Architecture, 18 Normal School, IV Library, 20 Languages, 21 Admin-
istration, 22 Mechanics and Art, 23 Electrical Engineering, 24 Agriculture, 26 Chemistry and Physics, 27 Science, 28 In-
firmary, 29 Power House, 30 Horticulture, 31 Biology, 32 Y. M. C. A., 33 Experimental Station, 34 and 36 Dormitories,
36 Fraternal Home, 37 Literary Society, 38 Dining Hall, 39 Dormitory, 40 Fraternal Home, 41 Literary Society, 42 Dor-


mitory, 43 Tennis Court, 44 Dormitory, 45 Gymnasium, 46 Dormitory, 47 Athletic Field.


39 and 44 are now building.


Activity marks the scene of building operations
at the site of the new University of Florida in Gaines-
ville. In order to accommodate students at the fall
term all' haste possible, yet at the same time exer-
cising care that good workmanship shall prevail, is
being employed to complete buildings deemed neces-
aThose now being constructed consist of two dor-
mitories, having capacity for about 260 students; a
machinery hall, two farm cottages, three barns and
other farm buildings.
One of the dormitories will be used for class
rooms until funds are available for additional build-
ings. The dormitory can be so used without adding
to the expense of construction or causing injury to
the building, as the partitions will not be placed
nutil the structure is restored to its original char-
acter. In the meantime, if the other dormitory is
not of sufficient capacity to house the students in
attendance, the overflow will be cared for in Gaines-
ville, citizens of that city having offered to furnish
board at the same price as at the University.
In this connection it is worthy of note that a
gratifying degree of public spirit is being manifested
by the Oaiesville people in behalf of the University.
S offer to board students until seonm..odationa
could be provided at the college is a proposition d


void of pecuniary profit, as the rates established at
the University will be those of actual cost. Then,
too, the Gainesville citizens, in order to provide a
suitable thoroughfare to the University grounds, are
having Liberty Street widened and otherwise im-
proved and brick sidewalks are being laid.
The University grounds consist of 612 acres,
located about one mile from the Courthouse square.
Eighty acres of beautiful high pine land have been
set aside for the campus, an area which will Insure
ample room for all purposes.
The Board of Control has given much time and
study to the matter of laying out the grounds and
providing sites for the prospective buildings and
driveways, that while the scheme of arrangement will
be satisfactory and convenient the beautifying of
the grounds may not be neglected. It is the-intent
to make the approach from any direction one of at-
traction.
The illustration shown is the landscape plan
finally adopted and which it is believed will be fol-
lowed. In considering the needs of the present and
estimates for the future care has been taken to pro-
vide for both. While it may be a number of years
before all of the contemplated buildings are erected,
yet space has been reserved to please weah building as
t is needed, with the view, too, of preserving the
symmetry of the geomneal autlie.


At the extreme eastern end of the campus will
be placed the buildings for the homes of the in.
structors, while at the western ent the dormitories
of the students, dining hall, gymAnasium, athletic
field and parade grounds will be located.
About the administration building will be grouped
the various buildings to be used as instruction halls.
The Tudor gothic architecture, which prevails as the
college type, has been adopted.
Many driveways have been planned that aeoesa
may be given to any portion of the campus. The
front driveways are now being cleared and bordered
with liveoaks and wateroaks, placed alternately,
while other improvements will be made as rapidly as
possible.
Another driveway is being made. This is in the
rear and leads to the horticultural pounds and the
experiment station. The latter will be an important
part of the new University, as Congress, during this
session has increased the appropriation so that in
five years it will amount to P30,000 annually, instead
of $15,000, as at present.
Though the plans for the greater portion of the
work of building the University are but yet in out-
line, the scope of the project indicates the magnificent
realization of the future, and promises facilities for
higher edoastiom of which the Florldian of today
shouM nMidter with pride.


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Fourth Page


THE SUN


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The entries closed last Monday for Congressional
and State offices, but owing to a misunderstanding
of the date on which to file notice of candidacy for
the Legislature, the time has been extended until
April 26, the date for candidates tor county offices
to file notices with the committees.
Perhaps this extension will bring several more
candidates for Senator and Representative into the
race in a number of counties, as in several instances
announcements have been made which do appear in
the list of the State committee.
Seldom have so many Congressional plums been
permitted to ripen without causing an exciting con-
test for their possession. Only in the Third district
will the voters have a chance to choose between two-
Wm. B. Lamar and Jefferson D. Stephens-and from
all indications they will return Mr. Lamar by a
large majority.
The custom of giving the second term will prevail
in the case of Frank Clark, while Stephen M. Spark-
man continues so strongly in the affections of his
constituents that, in spite of attempts by an element
seeking its own political progression to find a can-
didate who would dispute the right of this popular
Congressman to reelection, his nomination will be
unanimous.
The only contest promising any degree of excite-
ment is that for the two vacancies in the Railroad
Commission. For these offices four candidates are
now on the track with Appleyard in the lead. Dur-
ing the time his candidacy ohas been before the public
he has developed great strength and the withdrawal
of Jeff Browne has contributed greatly to this favored
position.
It ia early to forecast the result, but of the other
three Burr appears to have the inside track, although
it is doubtful if his candidacy will meet with the
cordial reception it received four years ago.
Both Mliteh and Bailey have acquired aquaint-
anoeship during their legislative careers which will
prove of value to them in this race, but in this
respect they possess no advantages over the others,
and at this period of the campaign it looks very
much as if Appleyard and Burr would be the choice
of the people.
Chas. B. Parkhill and James B. Whitfleld, who
are candidates for reelection as Justices of the Su-
preme Court, have but one opponent, Thomas L.
Clarke.
Mr. Clarke is a capable lawyer and qualified for
the position in every manner, and undoubtedly would
serve with satisfaction to the people, yet his oppo-
nents who wish another term are equally capale
and have performed their duties with fidelity during
the short time they have been in office.
Both for the service they have rendered and on
account of the short term each has had it would seem
that these are conditions worthy of consideration
by the public in making a choice.

In Volusia County Chris Codrington, who has
been calling for volunteers to lead the Senatorial
tight against Senator Sams, has been obliged to take
command of the forlorn hope himself if the colors
of his faction were to be represented in the fray.
A number were asked to oppose Sams, but the fear
of slaughter brought a negative reply from each, ow-
ing to the knowledge that Senator Bams was strongly
fortlled in the esteem of the people.

Three candidates for the Senate had announced
in Hamilton County, when, owing to the expression
of pubie desire that Hon Frank Adams be again


chosen, all withdrew in his favor. Under these
conditions he consented to become a ,wtndiate. A
cloud has appeared above the horimn, however, in
the person of John High, who dissented from the


opinion that Mr. Adams as a Senator was necessary
to the salvation of that county.
Mr. High wanted a mass meeting to discuss the
subject and select a candidate by popular acclaim, but
this suggestion not being received with noticeable
enthusiasm, he has evidently held a convention with
himself and the result is his announcement for the
job.
The county division fight in DeSoto is full of.
warmth and each faction is putting forth its best
exports for the object each espouses. Arcadia is work-
ing hard against the proposed dissolution and at a
mass meeting $800 were subscribed to carry on the
fight.
The element for division is concentrating its forces
with vigor, urging that division means less taxes
and more offices, the latter suggestion appealing
earnestly to many patriots who desire to work for
the public. The fact that A. P. Jordan, the popular
editor of the Punta Gorda Herald, has been chosen
as the standard-bearer of the movement to make
three counties out of one by selecting him as the
candidate for Representative on such issue.
Alfred St. Clair-Abrams denies that he will seek
the Presidency of the Senate in the event of his elec-
tion as the Senator from the Twenty-third district,
and will be happy in fighting for his pet meakure-
putting the assessment of the railroads in the hands
of the Railroad Commission-from the floor of the
chamber.
John S. Beard, the silver-tongued of Pensaecoa,
finds his path for the Senate cleared by the with-
drawal of Mr. Avery, who as a Representative from
Escambia attracted much attention last session rty
his advocacy of separate accommodations for negros
on street cars. .
Mr. Beard cherishes the ambition of being the pr-
siding officer of the Senate, a feeling which is shared
by Hon. Hunt Harris of Key West, who persists in
the enumeration of the product of the incubator
fore the hatching process is complete.
Another candidate has issued his manifesto
Key West, as Senator from the Twenty-fourth d-
triet-W. F. Maloney-who, if he continues to
finish will split the vote of Monroe County betw
Harris and Semple. The latter, by the way, havi
the support of Lee County in his candidacy.
Hon John Wall, the famous "watchdog" of the
treasury in years past, does not seem to think suffi-
ciently well of his intention to oppose Senator Crill
to have filed notice with the State committee, but he,
too, may consider until April 26 the advisability of 4
leading a forlorn hope in the Twenty-sixth district. '

To hear the calls uttered in man parts of the
State that candidates for the Letslature go on
record for or against the Everglade drainage project
a person would think that the issue was new, Instead
of having been threshed out by Governor Broward in
his campaign, and which was a potent factor causing
his election; in spite of the legislation on the subject,
and finally the work done by the Board of Drainage
Commissioners toward carrying out the law. Yet
the prospect is fair that by their standing on this
matter many candidates wil rise or fall.

The Buckman Law is also sharing in public in-
terest, but as a matter of fact those who are in
favor of the new system of higher education appear
(Continued on Twelfth Page)


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April 21, 1906


Shaking the Old Plum Tree

By EDWARD FITZGERALD


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April 21, 1906


THE SUN


Fifth Page


What's Agitating the People These Days


Although the late John J. Ingalls was the author
of many brilliant sayings and enjoyed a long and
notable career as a United States Senator, yet all
seems to be forgotten with the exception of the poem
"Opportunity," which through extensive quotation,
constitutes his only memorial in the public mind.
But the iconoclast has risen in the person of Robert
L. Cherry of Estill Springs, Tenn., who says: "It
is a fact, not generally known, perhaps, that Ingalls
did not write 'Opportunity,' and that it is a transla-
tion of a poem entitled 'II/ Fato,' which appeared in
La Sveglia, a newspaper of Naples, Italy, in 1887.
The author is Dr. Nicol Gigliotti, A. M., LL.D., M.
D., of Erie, Pa., Italian poet, literary critic and
philosopher."
Perhaps no recent call to the rank and file of the
Democratic party has been more clearly uttered than
that of Gov. Folk of Missouri, when at a dinner
given in honor of the birthday of Thomas Jefferson,
he said: "Jefferson announced the cardinal doctrine
of true Democracy when he declared for 'equal rights
to all; special privileges to none.' This maxim
expresses every essential element of true Democracy.
It embraces every essential element of good govern-
ment. The phrase sounds simple, but it has taken
generations for men to attain a practical understand-
ing of its wisdom and justice. It comes to us today
as a message from the past, for it applies to the
conditions today with even greater force than when
it was first announced by the father of Democracy."
Gov. Folk, in calling attention to such principle
as a safeguard against corruption, declared, "That
was one of the first declarations against what is
known in modern times as graft. Graft in its last
analysis, is a special privilege, either exercised con-
trary to law or one the law itself may give. Some
special privilege is at the bottom of every graft.
No one ever heard of an official being corrupted in
order to give equal rights to all. It is always for
the purpose of obtaining some special privilege for a
few."
The spirit of Jefferson is sought, but it is the
substance of the Hamilton doctrine that prevails. To
the mind ruled by custom a change to the princi-
ples declared by Thomas Jefferson as the basis of
Democratic government would be considered ex-
tremely radical. A political unrest exists in the
country, and the plain people, who possess no special
privileges, but who find taxation and living expenses
increase yearly without corresponding increase of
income and who lack the energy or intelligence to
concentrate on an effective measure of relief in bear-
ing the public burden, form the audience from which
Socialism is gaining its converts.
Of the progress of this movement and its imprac-
ticability, the Philadelphia Record offers the follow-
ing clear-cut opinion:
"The most careless observer cannot fail to witness
the renewed activity of the Socialist propaganda in
this country, while it appears to languish in Europe.
What the advocates of Socialism lack in numbers
they more than make up in zeal and self-advertise-
ment. The local columns of the daily newspapers
give proof of their untiring labors on the platform,
in interviews and in literary contributions. But
while some view the movement with undue concern,
others treat it perhaps with too much indifference,
in the conviction that Socialism is never so harmless
as when attempts are seriously made to put it in
practice. These enemies of the movement overlook
the fact, however, that it is making advances here
and there toward its goal in municipal ownership
and Government control of business operations and
utilities.
"Love' of personal liberty and the irresistible
striving for inequality, however, war most effectu-
ally against the scheme of universal equality. None
but the servile and frivolous wish to imitate other
men. Besides the inequalities in which humanity
participates with all the rest of nature, there are
acquired inequalities toward which men of spirit
Sand courage are constantly aspiring in every field
human effort. To attempt to suppress this im-
Sand to put men on the same dead level, reward-
all alike according to their needs, and not their
SWts, is iniquitous and absurd.
ocialism, if it could be realized in the State,
i be the end not only of progress in drying up
Ibrce in the impulse of inequality, but of per-
J liberty. In spite of the doctrine that men
S k ~for the pleasure of working, there is a-very
,:. rdderable number of repulsive, irksome and dan-
.'Il employment which are necessary for the
7 and sanitation of every community. The lazy
thriftless will not voluntarily undertake these
*| 1 ~on any terms, whilst the willing, industrious
urageous engage in them only for their rewards.
e economic state of which the Socialists dream
'^:,K d be necessary to draft citizens for these
~''"'" i employments, and in the vast organization
.4 .pt labor the man of science, the artist and
-'^.w cleaner would be put on the same dead


level of equality with the same rewards. For tne
old system of slavery would be substituted a new
and far more intolerable system of servitude, if men
should be wanting in the spirit to time in stern insur-
recotion against it Such an organisation of society,
could it be accomplished, would be a lowering of all
heads rising above the uniform level, paralysis of
all general ambitions and universal stagnation.
Great men could not exist in such a State, for they
would be without the hope of fortune or glory or
even the opportunity of serving their fellows to the
extent of their will. Happily only on the smallest
of scales, and with failure as the certain end, the
Utopia of the Socialists has never passed the domain
of an experiment, beautiful as are the illusions that
surround it."
Investigation by Representative Rainey of Illinois
into the foreign business of the Watch Trust has
caused that combination much embarrassment. Mr.
Rainey showed the injustice caused citizens of this
country by reason of the high tariff by pointing out
how watches were sold abroad for but a fraction of
the price charged the American retailer.



In the Name of Our Loss


THO' life may bring to me its weight of tra-
vail and despair, tho' days may bring their
burden of disaster and defeat, and silent
nights may hold for me naught of the holy calm
that soothes the weariness of day, yet in this
little spasm of mystery that men call Life, if I
shall know tLe tenderness of love, tho' it may
wound me in the end to death-if from the har.
vest of Life's ruined hopes I shall glean one
sheaf of childhood's sweet affection, if in the
| night of blighted dreams the star of one friend's
I faith shall steadfast burn and true, then shall I
know indeed *hat I have not lived in vain.
But better still, if failure in the busy marts
of life prove but the price of helping some weak
brother on his way, if dishonor anddisgrace be
the talisman that led some other from the
depths, if in the end I come to naught, but
have read the heart of that great force that
guides the reetlens worlds-the Infinite power of
kindness-then I know a victory that ne'er
earth's monarch knew.
Nay, nor shall I be poor, for every dawn shall
pour its flood of burnished gold across the east-
ern hills until the purple peaks grow radiant
beneath the mantle of the morn, and every
night the firmament of heaven, like a dome of
ebony, diamond-studded, shall bend above me
I like a benediction from my God-and I shall
know the secrets of the birds, the language of
the winds, the sorrows of lamenting seas, the
shame that lnrks within the popPya crimson
blush, and maybe I shall know the hearts of
men and see these ins that wear the crown of
virtue, but never again shall I know the gleam
of white innocence and the glamour of purity
that knoweth not guile-and for this one thing
that has forever gone out of our lives and our
hearts, like the ghost of dead dreams long for.
gotten, oh, brothers mine, on the day of our
coming, may God pity us in the name of our
losel-George's Weekly.


The proof was so direct that no denial by the
manufacturers is possible, but excuse is offered by
them that the low price abroad was a concession to
introduce goods. Of this condition the Philadelphia
Record says: "It has been introducing Its goods
for a long time. The novelty of its foreign business
cannot be offered as a reason for selling abroad at
about half its domestic prices. The fasts are these:
A certain grade of watch which is listed at $75
and which retailers are not allowed to sell below
$60, is sold for export so low that it can be reim-
ported and sold at a profit for $42.30. Will the
Waltham Company say it Is loosing money on this
watch? If it Is making a fair profit on the watches
it exports, it is certainly making an extortionate
profit on the watches sold at home at from $60 to
75, and the tariff is the means by which it Is ex-
torting such prices from Amerleans."
If it was the purpose of President Roosevelt to
stir up public feeling along a new line of thought
he has succeeded to the fullmst extent, when in his
speech last Saturday, when he declared "that we shall
ultimately have to consider the adoption of some such
scheme as that of a progrseive tax on all fortunes,
beyond a certain amount, either given in life or
devised or bequeathed upon death to any individual-


a tax so framed as to put it out of the power of
the owner of one of these enormous fortunes to hand
more than a certain amount to any one individual;
the tax, of course, to be imposed by the national
and not the State government. Such taxation should,
of course, be aimed merely at the inheritance or trans-
mission in their entirety of those fortunes swollen
beyond all healthy limits."
In commenting on this suggestion, the Boston
Herald thinks that "the cardinal idea of the scheme
is 'to make it practically impoipible for any section
of the community to remain indefinitely outside the
circle of workers and producers.' But President
Roosevelt's scheme is broader and deeper than this.
He would tax active and invested capital alike-the
'quick and the dead'-when it passed a certain
point. He would tax it beyond a certain amount,
'either given in life or bequeathed or devised upon
death to any individuals' so as to 'put it out of the
power of the owner of one of these enormous for-
tunes to hand on more than a certain amount to any
one individual.' Under this scheme Marshall Field
would not have been permitted to bequeath $100,000,-
000 to his two little grandsons, nor could Mr. Rooke-
feller give $100,000 houses to his grandchildren, or
distribute his billion among his children. It is
I certainly a very radical proposition, and it will be
interesting to observe how it is received by some of
the President's supporters."
The Philadelphia Record in discussing the subject,
objects to imposition of such tax by the Federal
Government. It believes that "the confiscatory tax
on incomes, if needed at all, might be applied by
the States to many objects of expenditure, including
education. But in the hands of the Federal admin-
istration the vast revenues would afford additional
temptations for extravagant expenditure."
The Chicago Record-Herald Ia of the opinion that
"in the present temper of the public such a declara-
tion must result in pronounced efforts to establish
the tax that is proposed. The qualifications sug-
gested by the reference to a 'matter of personal con-
viction' only, and by the use of the word 'ultimately,'
will exercise no very great restraint. For thg feeling
of millions upon this subject of swollen fortunes is
much that definite schemes will be devised in plenty,
and 'now' will be substituted for 'ultimately.' It
will be very interesting to watch the developments,
to see how far the popular desire for numerous re-
strictions upon wealth may be gratified in a practi-
cal political campaign and legislation of the sort
that is indicated.'
Intimate friends of President Roosevelt assert
that he is sincere in his declaration that he will not
again be a candidate for the Presidency, but he de-
sires to remain in public life as a Senator from New
York, and it is believed that he will attempt to secure
the seat of Senator Platt, whose term expires March
4, 1000, the date that Roosevelt will retire from the
Executive chair.
Congressman Blackburn, Republican, of the
Eighth district of North Carolina, has been placed
on trial, charged with receiving money in exchange
for his official influence.

The bill providing for the abolition of tax on
grain alcohol when denaturised to prevent its use an
a beverage, passed the House by a vote of
224 to 7.
Congressman Champ Clark of Missouri, in advo-
cating the measure, said: "If the roseate predic-
tions of its most enthusiastic advocates are
fulfilled, we will witness a veritable Aladdin's lamp
working its myriad wonders before our eyes In this
prosaic age. if even half of them are reallaed, we
will see a revolution in lighting, heating and motor
power."
The battle ground of free alcohol will be in the
Senate, however, where mighty influences will rally
in opposition to its passage.

A far-reaching decision has been made by the
United States Supreme Court in declaring that a
divorce to be beyond legal attack must be obtained
in the State in which both parties to the suit reside.
According to this decision divorce obtained in
States which do not have jurisdiction over both par-
ties to the marriage are not enforceable outside the
State granting the divorce. A divor., to have legal
standing, must be obtained in the State of which
both parties are residents.

Gold Pens To Be Succeeded
by Tantal Pens, the New Metal
Berlin.-The Carnegies of Germany, Siemens &
Halske, have taken out a patent for making writing
pens oat of tmhe'new hard metal, tantal. Tantal pens
are to be as heap as steel pens, while the highest
grade will be as expensive as gold pens.










THE SUN April 21, 1906


Mr. Buchman Answers Critics


Editor Sun:
Dear Sir-I notice an article cut from the Jasper
News, entitled "The Buckman Law in a Nutshell,"
an attack upon that measure, which is entirely mis-
leading as to its statements, and is evidently an en-
deavor to prejudice the public mind against the
law which, as it has become more thoroughly under-
stood and the effect of its operation more apparent,
is being accepted generally throughout the State
even by most of the counties which opposed its pas-
sage, as a most salutory measure and one which must
tend to the lasting benefit of the State's educational
system.
This article styles the law as a means of "oppres-
sion and robbery," claiming that its sole object is to
"lay burdens on the industrial classes for the benefit
of the rich," and "a system whereby millionaires'
sons may be educated at the expense of the poor."*
Such a statement as the above must have emanated
from a very warped judgment, as it could hardly
have been reached from a perusal of the law itself or
an understanding of the conditions which existed be-
fore its enactment.
In the first place, the act did NOT abolish any
HIGH schools in the State. The article states that,
but it is not a fact. The high schools are a part of
the common school system of education which the
State established, and which belong to each county.
The institutions which were abolished were a set of
so-called colleges which did not belong to any county,
but which were supported by .the State at an enor-
mous expense. If there is any OPPRESSION in an
EDUCATIONAL SYSTES, it was under the old sys-
tem, as there WAS no equality of taxation for their
support for the reason that many of the counties in
which these colleges happened to be located paid no
tax, had no high schools of their own, as they could
send their children to these institutions while the
other counties paid for their support.
The article further states that the object of the


old Agricultural College was "to promote the liberal
and practical education of the industrial classes in
the several pursuits of life."
This language is copied verbatim into the Buck-
man law, yet the writer probably never read that law,
as he seeks to infer that that provision and purpose
was abrogated with the abolition of the Agricultural
College. It is true, however, that the Buckman law
intended to create a university and a girls' college,
and to prohibit the entrance into these institutions
of children in the kindergarten departments who had
not properly fitted themselves by previous study to
enter upon a collegiate or university course, and this,
instead of being an injustice, is an advantage. The
State already has a system of public schools which
consists of the primary department and the high
school. The high school teaches to the twelfth grade.
After that pupils may enter the university, and after
going through the eleventh grade, pupils may enter
the girls' college. It would be just as reasonable to
assert that a child who is learning its A B C's was
entitled to enter the high school as it would be to
claim that a boy who was not prepared by previous
course of studies should enter the higher branches
which the university is intended to teach. There
would be no necessity for a university, a girls' col-
lege, nor was there any necessity for the institutions
which were abolished, if it was not intended to make
them institutions of HIGHER learning. If it is the
purpose of the State to cut off our boys and girls
from an education above the high school education,
then there is no use at all in having anything above
the high school, but as it was the purpose, as ex-
pressed in our Constitution, to create a system of
higher education, higher than the individual counties
could give through the high school system already
established, then the proper way to accomplish it was
to concentrate funds and efforts to that end in one
or two good institutions where these objects could be
practically carried out, than it was to scatter them
among eight or nine, as has been the case heretofore,


Unpublished Lettel


Dear Spotte-Responding to a wireless from Wal-
ter Wellman, who invited me to be his companion du
voyage in his dash to the pole, 'tis meself that's in
Washington, the guest of the National Geographical
Society.
Walter wants me to furnish hot air for the balloon
on the trip. I have not decided. I'm not much on
the dash. I dashed behind a telegraph pole in men-
tal anguish once at Tallahassee, and I may dash into
Poland during me summer outing, but on the whole
I prefer to travel on the railroads with me trusty pass.
But at that I'm a rough rider, and that ye know
i"surs me social standing at the White Houms.
But me old comrade Roosevelt broke precedent in
greeting me. He did not say "dee-lighted."'
'Til a hard job he has to be sure. What with
bossing the House and Senate and keeping tab on the
census report of the birthrate and many other things,
like his model, Bill of Germany, he has taken up ag-
riculture, and last Saturday be addressed the farmers
on the use of the muckrake.
'Tim not the job I'd have, and as I told Tom Reed
one day-he's dead and gone now, is Tom-"Tom,"
says I, "I'd rather be right than Preaident."
"Hush, Pat," he says, "you'll niver be either."
But, Spotte, I'm not betraying a confidence when
I tell ye that Theodore asked me to help him dress
his speech and throw in a few epigrams for him. And
I did. Indeed it was easy for me, having listened
many times to Frank Clark and Jim Alexander and
Albert Gilchrist and Nat Walker.
So I says, "Theodore, pardon me familiarity, but
does this touch the case of the muckraker? 'Expose
the crime and then hunt down the criminal.' "
"Bully, Pat," he says. "Ye roped a bunch of
words that stampeded from me. Throw out your
ameo again," he says.
I did, and this is what I cut out of the language
head: "No good whatever will come from that
wpedand mock morality which deneunes the mis-
Sof man of wealth and forget the mideeds prac-
S their expense; which denounces bribery, but
bf to blackmail; which foams with nrp if a


corporation secures favors by improper methods, and
merely leers with hideous mirth if the corporation is
itself wronged."
That staggered him, but he found wind enough
to say, "Fire once more, Pat," and I came back at
him with this: "The only public servant who can be
trusted honestly to protect the rights of the public
against the misdeed of a corporation is that public
man who will just as surely protect the corporation
itself from wrongful aggression."
Now, Spotts, ye needn't take me word for it, but
read his speech, and ye'll find it there word for word.
"My dear man," says I, "as a reformer meself
let me put ye wise to a point or two on this muck-
rake proposition, and that is that the reform that
counts is that which comes through steady, con-
tinuous growth. Don't throw a fit until the crook
gets away with the goods, and then yell for the po-
lice."
"Spoken like the Department of Justice," ex-
claimed the hero of Kettle Hill, who then allows his
affection for me by an invitation to put on the mitts
for a three-round go before luncheon in the Booker
Washington room.
At a little dinner the other evening with some
members of the Cabinet, I was teasing Theodore about
a third term, and winking at Bill Taft, I says:
"Rosy, me boy, how do ye think ye'll stack up against
Bryan in the next race?"
"Pat," he says, "I shall not be a candidate for
the Presidency again, but I'll be delighted to accept
a place in the Cabinet of any of ye."
"Tut," says I. "Ye remind me of me good friend,
Frank Adams, who retired, and pon me soul public
clamor for him was so loud that ye couldn't hear
the noise made by the other candidates as they
dropped down. It will be so in your case.," I says.
"The very idea, Pat," he says, "when I'm trying
to smother the boom harder than Othello pushed the
pillow down on Desdamona."
"True for ye," says I. "but ye have air holes in
ye smothering apparatus.."
As Joe Cannon blew a mouthful of Tampa cigar
smoke over the scene I could hear Bill Taft mutter
to himself, "If I could only find the air holes and
plug 'eni."
Wandering into the marble room at the Capitol
I run up on Jim Taliaferro. lie didn't see me in
time to get away, Spotts, and I fairly hugged him in
me delight.
"Pat, ye have been me friend in many a hard-


at a much greater expense and with no appreciative
result.
As the funds with which these old institutions
are supported was derived from the same source as
the funds with which to support the new institutions,
namely, taxation, and the man who owns the largest
amount of property must usually pay the largest
amount of tax, it would seem a soufcient answer to
the article in the Jasper News to say that if higher
education was a luxury that only those who paid for
it should be entitled to it, but notwithstanding the
fact that the support of these institutions must come
from taxation, a student can be admitted to either
the girls' college or the university at an approximate
less cost than he could under the old institutions,
the cost of such admission being the very minimum
at which the institute can be maintained and the
system perfected.
When the State gets to a position where it is
either advisable or it is able to afford to give all its
children absolutely free education in every branch
of learning from the primary department to a thor-
ough collegiate or university education, including
their board, clothing, books and expenses while at-
tending upon them, then all such institutions can be
operated free of charge to the pupil; but until that
is done the criticism is most inappropriate.
The result of the operation of the Buckman law
will have this effect: It will REQUIRE EACH
COUNTY to have a HIGH SCHOOL of its own,
which high schools, in addition to the money raised
by taxation in the county, are supported in part by *
the State. At present a large number of counties
have no high schools, and the children in them can-
not get an education above the primary grade. As
an example of what this law has already accom-
plished, Leon County has bonded itself for $100,000
to erect and maintain a high school. Previous to this
time it sent its children, at the expense of the State,
to the so-called college located in Tallahassee which
the Buckman law abrogated to give place to a better.





rs of Pat


fought skirmish, where the dollars were flying faster
than bullets on a battlefield. Will ye have a pass to
Jacksonville?"
"No, Senator," I says, "Tom Ryan has fixed me.
I am waiting for him now, with Augie Belmont.
They want me to do a little missionary work in the
South for their favorite son, Joe Bailey."
"He's a grand and noble man," says Taliaferro,
"and I hope, Pat, ye'll do your best to keep rude fel-
lows from telling the people that the same old crowd
that tried to land Parker have picked out Bailey to
carry their colors in the Presidential handicap of
1908.
"What do ye think of the Senate, Pat? Isn't it
- an awe-inspiring sight to gaze on the iridescent gal-
axy of the nation's brightest minds, laboring faith-
fully to preserve the interests?"
'It would," says I, "shock me beyond speech to
contemplate such greatness, if I meself hadn't handled
the clay of which Senators do be made."
"Ah, Pat, ye will have your joke. What would
the country do without the Senate?"
"Faith," says I, "what good does it do anyhow,
except to polish off the crude labors of the House
and consent to things the President wants done."
"I see," says Jim. "The air is full of treason,
and even me old friend Pat, has a load of it under
his belt. Let me quote to you, Pat, from the mem-
oirs of Sir John McDonald:
"On his return from France, Jefferson called
Washington to account for having agreed to a sec-
ond chamber. 'Of what use is a Senate he asked,
as he stood before the fire with a cup of tea in his
hand, pouring the tea into his saucer as he spoke.
'You have answered your own question,' replied
Washington. 'What do you mean? asked Jefferson.
'Why do you pour that tea into your saucer?' 'To
cool it,' said Jefferson. 'Even so, said Washington,
'the Senate is the saucer into which we pour legisla-
tion to cool.'"
"And there it is, Pat. Ye see Jefferson was mis-
taken. Although we are Jeffersonian Democrats, yet
we cannot indorse all his theories, especially when
they conflict with us personally."
"I know now," I says, "why the Senate is called
the cold store of legislation. Ye have made it plain
to me. Now I see what the trusts mean when they
speak of re-icing."
Au revoir, Spotts, I must cut it out now, as I
have an engagement with the French Ambassador,
who wants me opinion of the conference at Algeiras.
PAT MURPHY.


Sixth Page


. v










'AI 121,1906


THE SUN


Seventh Pap


John Henry Plays Progressive Euchre


By GORGE V. HOBART


ONE OF THOSE PROGRESSIVE EUCHRE FIGHTS.


One night recently I went out with
Clara Jane to one of those progressive
euchre fights.
It was my first time up before the
judge, and I felt as nervous as a new
servant girl.
Clara Jane introduced me to the
bunch, and I drew a tall lady who had
lived in Chicago for many years and
didn't know what to do about it.
I saw that I was out to get bumped
it I didn't forget my fears and talk fast,
so I braced and began to cut grass.


WROTE POETRY AND TALKED
ABOUT IT.
"Lovely weather we're having, ain't
it ?" I observed. "What's the trump ?"
My partner was one of those old things
that never speak a line without throwing
a con goo-goo with the eye.


I was next in a minute.
She was one of the kind that's anxious
to lead you away from your own tootsie
wootsie, in the hope that you may have
a spare bunch of sweet talk you can
hand her on the quiet.
Then she raises the window and yells
tor a cheap minister.
I was anxious to have my sentence ex-
pire with that dame, so I played a swift
game.
I ducked to my corner quick when the
gong sounded, but I'm afraid the round
was against me.
I'm not stuck on myself-believe me.
I consider myself about an eight to
live shot, and I feel that I can come
down the stretch with the rest of the
bunch without the whip.
So when r noticed that every time I
looked around the room I'd catch that
old fairy giving me the far-away gaze
I didn't know whether to puff up and
get chesty, or hustle for my coat and my
top-piece and go home.
My next partner was a giggler.
Say, boys, those giggling dames are
beyond the breakers, aren't they?
I used to think that a girl giggled be-
cause she was off her feed, but I've since
decided that they hand out those chopped
laughs because their brains bounce
around and they get a kink in their con-
versational powers.
They have a motto which reads:
"When in doubt, giggle!"
The beauty bright who sat opposite me
in the second round giggled by note.
Every time she played a card she gig-
gled, and when she wasn't playing she
was fixing her valves for another out-
burst.
The bell found me groggy at the end
of the second round.
The old hen with the languishing
lamps was still on my trail.
The next time I went to the center I
was matched with a married lady who
talked about her husband all the while.
Every time she opened her mouth she
cooked up a fresh batch of hot air about
Gus.


"Ohl my Gus is just the loveliest fel-
low that ever lived -whose play is it,"
Minel Don't you know, Gus bought me
the sweetest side-oombs yesterday, pure
tortoise shell with real rhinestones-is
it my play? What's trumps? Ous is
always so thoughtful; he never comes
home from business without bringing me
a box of candy or something-is it really
m) play?"
Wouldn't it make you worse?
Her Gust I'll bet he's an old shrimp
with billy-goat whiskers, and every time
she goes near him he says "Me-ya-aa !"
and kicks her on the shin.
I was hugging the ropes when the bell
sounded.
My next partner was a dark-eyed dam-
sel who was engaged to marry a long.
legged shadow at the tabie behind her,
and she almost cracked her throat trying
to rubber at him and play cards at the
same time.
This round was tame.
I went in for the fifth round with a
lady who wrote poetry and talked about
it for a living.


WHEN IN DOUBT, GIGGLE.


She put us wise co the fact that
Tennyson couldn't play in her yard, and
that Edgar Allen Poe was a piker com-
pared with her.
She said she had done a little tid-bit,


entitled "Papa's Tide is Rising Slowly,
and the Gas Bill's Overdue," that was
destined to wake the world.
I asked her if she couldn't please let
the world sleep, and play cards, and she
stung me with her cruel eyes.
The round ended with me on my
knees, but the bell saved me.
The old canary was still hunting me
up with eyes ablaze with love.
Ohl scold met scold met I'm such a
devil among the has-beens.
For the next round 1 led out a coy
lassie who lisped.
She was good company till she talked,
then the chain broke.
I hate to have a girl plant her plead.
ing ppers on me and say: "Wath
trum th, spadeth or clubth!?
Don't you?
In the next I met a lady who dealt out
a bunch of remarks about her baby boy,
Jim.
.Jim, she said, was now only 22 years
old, and was going through Harvard.
I'll bet four dollars he was going
through her money most of the time.
At the finish of this round the old
relic with the sad lamps came up to me
and tapped me on the shoulder with her
fan.
"Oh! you naughty, naughty boy I" she
proped, "can't you see I m awfully
angry at you ?'
'"I don't know," I said; "I'm from
Minsouri-no you ll have to show met"
"I haven't enjoyed any game this even-
ing one-half as much as that first one,"
she said.
Then it all flashed over me, and I was
off the griddle in a minute.
She was Pat Crowe in disguise, and I
was on the list to be kidnapped.
I side-stepped and found Clara Jane.
"Take me home," I said; "this society
life is killing me."
Clara Jane is a wise guyine.
She could tell from the startled fawn
eye I gave her that I wanted to pull out
of the siding and hit the main line for
home.
She crawled into her wraps and we
left the mob just as all hands were pad-
dling off to the lee cream trough.
No more progressive things for me.
1 know when the clock strikes 12.
Hereafter when they say society I'll
duck. Met to the housetopes Me to the
dense forest!
When I feel that it's up to me to dis
sipate I'll sit up with a long black bot-
tle till I see and hear things that I can
throw the chairs at without being called
impolite.
Yours, in a spirit of brotherly love-
believe mel
JOHN HENRY.


Isolation and Insanity W.EBOR


Is the solitude of country life con-
ducive to dimentia? Does the strain
and stress of city life render people in-
sane? "How sweet, how passing sweet,
is solitude," writes Cowper, and yet he
wanted one friend to whom he could
whisper that solitude was sweet. If
we, like Trovean, love to be alone with
our thoughts for company, solitude has
in it the charms that only poets see and
feel and utter in son.
One cannot always control his or her
environments. Out in Nebraska, under
what is known as the Kincaid law, a man
is allowed to take up a mile square of
lind as a homestead. And it is now
stated that these big farms have filled
the insane asylum with demented pa-
tients and additions cannot be built fast
enough to ae~.tUeAodate the insane people
sent to the institutions by the county
board&.


One man on 640 acres of land! At
first, novelty of situation; then a sense
of loneliness; then a touch of melan-
choly; then a mind unbalanced; then a
cell in an insane asylum. Was the land
worth the oset
*
In one county regular trips are made
to pick up those who have become un-
balanced since the last trip was made.
"If thee were only more women in
the territory," aid a physician, "we
should not have this insanity. It is lack
of companionship that is driving thews
men wild; it is women that will hold
them down to calm minds. Women drive
men to lunacy in the cities sometimes,
but they are needed here to keep the.
men sane."
But the women go insane, as well.
The lonesomnes of farm life keeps the
women's ward ia NebasktS asylum as


full as those of the men. In the coun-
try touching which details are had from
one of the Western journals where apart-
ments were provided for fifty men and
one hundred women, the latter had its
full quota, furnishing proof, as well,
that it is held by the authorities that
more women than men are apt to be*
come demented, mainly through lone-
someness.
Is it any better in the great cities of
the country TA statement in the Chris-
tian Herald of late date says there are
over 38,000 insane persons in New York,
one out of every 300 of the population.
it costs over four millions of dollars
annually to care for them and the dis-
quieting fact is that the ratio to popu-
lation is increasing. The figures given
do not include those in private innsttu-
tions. The grievous fact is that the
tendency to insanity, due to the strain
amd sm of city Me is iMa aaNd


no remedy in medicine can be found
for it.

Note the significance of the last lines
just quoted. The strain and stress of
city life. Though not so stated, evident-
ly the larger per cent come from the
cities and towns. And in medical skill
there is only failure. "Can you minister
to a mind diseased ?" asked Shake-
speare; and up to this day efforts have
been made, but seldom wholly suceoms-
ful.

We read about, we talk of, we try to
emulate, the strenuous life advocated
by men and women high in public sta-
tion and social position. But what says
Sternef In solitude the mind gain'
strength; in the world it selks or ac.
cepts of a few treacherous support--tlhe
(Oonamd on Tbhirtmnth Pa)









Saud&. April 21. /906


I s


THE


SUN


s,


ED'


I T 0


Taatim -The Poor Man's M burden
A NY system that abridges the liberty of the people should be sur-
rounded with safeguards as strong and reliable as is possible for
the human mind to conceive of.
In all civilized communities thq people voluntarily consent to sur-
render absolute freedom of individual action in order that the people
as a whole may enjoy more liberty thafnl*ould be possible if every per-
son exercised his own will without reqad to the rights of his neighbors.
Arcadias are rare and Utopias have lto existence save in the fanci-
ful brain of a poet.
Such perfect systems of life, where every person's delight is in the
fulfillment of other persons' desires can not exist until selfishness is
eliminated from the human heart.
From the earliest times man has gathered in communities, and
some system being necessary to guide the individuals forming these
communities, each person has been content to surrender part of his
personal will to secure the companionship and protection of his fellows.
There must of necessity be some depository for these surrendered
individual rights, and this is called The State, whether it be a despot-
ism controlled by one man or a republic, wherein the directing power
is wielded by servants to whom the people have delegated their inher-
ent power to rule.
If the State acts for the individuals forming it, means must be pro-
vided to carry on its delegated functions of government.
The State must have money.
A small assessment on each individual has always been recognized
as the only practical means of raising revenue for the State.
This is called taxation.
When the people consent to be taxed they surrender part of their
freedom of action, and if the people are called on to make this sacri-
flee, they have a right to expect and the power to demand that it
should not affect one more than another, but be borne equally by all.
Taxation must be uniform.
This has been the cry of all people who have lived through all the
ages.
We shall not trouble ourselves with the recital of the struggles of
other peoples to divide this burden equally, but shall treat of the sub-
ject as it has affected the people of this country.
When the burden of unequal taxation so galled the shoulders of
the colonists that they threw it off by force, they set up a government
for themselves, in which the foundation stone was-
Equal distribution of the burdens of government.
Uniform taxation was the very keystone of the arch which spanned
the people's liberties under the constitution formed by the people for
their guidance, and all the laws that were passed had for their object
the keeping of this stone firm in its place.
But this was before the dawn of the day of special privilege; this
was before the birth of those giant combinations which concentration of
interests has made all powerful; this was before the line which divides
wealth and poverty had become so broad.
By special privileges secured by legislative enactment, the power
to combine has been granted to the few, and the wealth of the nation
has been gathered in by the few so favored.
So complete has the control of legislative bodies passed into the
hands of the few who possess the wealth of the country, that taxes have
become the poor man's burden and the rich man's jest.
In direct proportion to the unequal distribution of wealth is
the distribution of taxes, but in reverse ratio.
So unequal is the present distribution of the burdens of gov-
ernment that the keystone-uniform taxation-has become loose
in the arch of human liberty and the'structure is about to fall.
Passing up the inequalities of national taxation in the shape
of tariff and internal duties, which the proper limitation to the
length of this editorial will not permit us to take up, we will con-
sider the question of State and municipal taxation, as levied in
this particular State.
We do not admit that Florida taxation inequalities are any
more glaring than those of other States, but as this journal places
Florida first and all other States second in consideration, we will
discuss Florida conditions in this treatment of our subject.
It is a fact, suspected by all, known to a few, but which can
be demonstrated to any one who will take the time and trouble to
investigate, that-
The poor people of florida pay much more than their just pro-
portlon of the taxes.


The man who owns forty acres of land, for which he paid four
hundred dollars, sees it figure on the. tax books at a valuation of
from two to three hundred dollars, according to the whim of the
tax assessor.
The man who owns forty thousand acres of land, for which


he paid one hundred thousand dollars makes It his busaeto see
that it tis assessed at five thousand dollars, when ffty thousand
would be his just proportion. .
The man who owns and lives in a home, in a city, worth fif-
teen hundred dollars, pays taxes on a valuation of nine hundred.
The man who erects for his personal use a twenty-thousand-
dollar house on a ten-thousand-dollar lot induces the assessor to
put it on the tax books at ten thousand dollars or less, when eigh-
teen thousand would be the correct figure, according to the valu-
ation placed on the fiteen-hundred-dollar home. % 1
The man who owns the fifteen-hundred-dollar home feels his
burden of taxation, while the man who owns the thirty-thousand-
dollar home is not troubled in the least by.his.
These are not figures evolved from our inner consciousness.
They are actual Agurs, the like of which can be seen in any tax
office in the State.


(4


004l


F


Corporations whose holdings run into the hundred thousands
enjoy an immunity from their just proportion of the tax burden
greater than individuals in proportion to the extent which their
possessions exceed those of individuals.
For this condition of things, the people who suffer most from
it are solely responsible.
They are in the majority.
It is entirely in their power to change it.
They can send men to the Legislature who will change the
whole system of taxation.
In every Legislature which has convened during the past two
decades a bill has been introduced which would have bettered
conditions.
The bill has always been killed, or has died of neglect
Yet the people who suffer are In the majority
We regard the tax question asIthe very greatest, the most im-
ortnn andthe one most in need of reform now before the peo
ple ofshall have more to saFlobout rida.
We shall have more to say.%bout it,


I










RI


A


LS


THE SUN


NINTH PAGE


s,


Saturday, April 21, 1906


Those Letters From the Major
In the old dark days of radicalism, when Republican conventions
were held in Redwood Hall in this city, the negro statesman was in his
glory, as, reeking with sweat and oratory, he proclaimed the virtues of
the glorious party that knocked the shackles off three millions of human
beings.
Cato Lee, John Nattiel and Ed. Wright being equipped with the
most leathery lungs, easily dominated the howling hubbub that marked
the deliberations of these conventions.
There was a small "ginger-bread" nigger called Mack always pres-
ent, apd who always tried to shut off Cato Lee in the midst of this ora-
torA most frenzied phraseology.
"Mack" would jump upon his seat and shout, "Mr. Chairmun, I
rises to a pint of order!"


) YYT(H THE AOR6IE5
)R LITTLE DEVIL EVERY
EY LOAD HIM DOYIN
)BLI6ATIO5- BftH!
E GOOD FOR BUT TO
ORK AND PAY TAXES.


-a


F,,S .--


F


- .1


- -'lm


"State yo pint."
"I moves we hears from Jedge Archibald."
"Sit down, you fool nigger, yo pint ain't no good."
We do not know why we have told this story, but as we have told
it we will let it pass.
What we really wanted to say is this-
As far back as our young memory carries us along the political his-
tory of this State, somebody has always been MOVING THAT WE
HEAR FROM MAJOR ALEXANDER ST. CLAIR-ABRAMS.
And the gentleman with the hyphenated patronimic who bears the
reputation of being equally mighty with the sword and the pen,
"GIVES HIS VIEWS" on all subjects and on all occasions with a
readiness that leads the inquiring mind TO SUSPECT HIM OF IN-
SPIRING THE CALL FOR THEM.
So hard and fast has this "View'giv lu habit cinched this Alex-


ander that he can not refrain from rushing into print even when his
valuable services are retained in a legal controversy.
"WHAT MAJOR ALEXANDER ST. CLAIR-ABRAMS THINKS"
has been for years kept as a standing head in at least one, perhaps two,
newspaper offices in this city.
He is said to carry an immune certificate from writer's cramp.
He is thought to be the proud possssor of a diploma from the Col-
lege of Flapdoole, whose graduates can say a whole lot without convey-
ing an idea.
This Major of ours is without doubt equal in knowledge to the mil-
itary gentleman in a certain comic opera who sang-
"For I'm the very model of a moden major-general;
I've information vegetable, animal and mineral."
It matters not to the full-stocked Major, who, as we have hinted,
is LONG ON INFORMATION, that others have not dreamed of the
things known only to his philosophy; recks not he of the startled gasp
that may greet a statement upsetting all preconceived ideas of learned
men of ages hoary and past that emanates from his prolix pen.
As a mental jolter, the Major is not a thing but "the mustard;"
as an upsetter of cherished notions, he is the true Archimedian lever;
as a vomiter of things hitherto unknown, he makes Vesuvius look like
a ten-cent roman candle, and as a sure-enough thriller, the Major is all
that is left us since the sad demise of the lamented Captain Kidd.
Every one who has heard of the Florida Everglades has pictured
them as a wilderness of waters in which huge alligators lashed their
tails, and through which long-legged cranes waded in search of the full-
throated bull frog.
For years and years and years all the people of the earth have
thought of water at the bare mention of the word "everglades."
Alkali Ike, traveling the dusty plains of the arid West, has let his
parched fancy roam to that region in the far South where, as he thought,
water succeeded water as far as the eye could reach.
But all this has been changed-in the twinkling of an eye, IN
THE SPLUTTERING OF A PEN.
Major St. Clair-Abrains has written the fateful words that have
done this.
In Letter No. 1, written to his clients the perpetrators of the Me-
tropolis, the Major has declared that for miles and miles of his journey
through the "glades" the nostrils of his trusty steed were irritated by
the dust raised by his plodding hoofs, and that his own eagle eye was
dimmed by the dust clouds that circled around him as he rode.
From this date all persons will provide themselves with SPRINK-
LING POTS when preparing for a dash into the "glades."
Governor Broward will no doubt abandon his dredges and order a
car load of dust blowers for the work he has undertaken.
Let's Look Into This.
We want the members of the City Council of this city to know-
That last week the Board of Public Works let a contract for filling in a park
site in East Jacksonville to R. O. Scott;
That this was done upon motion of Member R. D. Knight;
That R. C. Scott was for many years a confidential employee of R. D. Knight;
That R. C. Scott was a political protege of It. D. Knight and held office through
his favor;
That Scott has no knowledge of the work required to be done under the con-
tract awarded him;
That Scott is not a responsible person financially or otherwise
That his former dealings with the city were not approved by all of the citizens;
That if the contract ii really with Mr. Scott, he is not a proper person to be
entrusted with public work;
That if it Is really Mr. Knight, as it looks to us, Mr. Knight should not be
allowed to let a contract to himself.
We ask the Council to look into this contract between the city and It. C. Scott.
It lookR bad to us in view of the facts herein presented, and-
They are facts well worthy of consideration by the Council.

The Council a Bad Debt Collector.
Many strange things have come out of the Conneil chamber of cities in this free
country of ours, but the City of Jacksonville deserves the palm for pomssmeon of the
latest novelty in thisparticular line.
At the last regular meeting of the Jacksonville Council an ordinance granting
certain persons the right to hold a carnival next fall came up for the usual railroad
through.
Mr. Carter was there to watch the course of the scheme for fooling the people
with fake fhows for personal profit under the guise of benefitting the town, which he
and his accomplices, Hollomon and Wilson, pull off as often as they think the peo-
ple will stand for it
Mr. William Ingram, Councilman from the Fourth Ward, was also there. Mr.
Ingram was present because duty called him, but he was none the leI alive to the
"main chance.
As the carnival bill was slipping through like a greaMed pig through a crowd of
bow-legged men, Mr. Ingram aroee and aid:
"'Walt a minutes Before we pass this bill I want the carnival people to pay a
little bill which I have against them. This bill has been standing for some time,
and Mr. Hollomon hau not kept his promise to pay it. I do not believe that people
who will not pay their debts should have an privile noted to them." p
poAnother Councilman arose e and asked at Mr.W.. Carter be allowed 1o ex-
plain.
Mr. Carter explained by telling of his reputation a a payer of bills, and by cit-
ing the excellence of his personal credit. Incidentally he promised to pay the bill
held by Mr. Ingram.
Thereupion Mr. Ingram removed hid objection, and the carnival scheme went


throuA
Uf ~episode would not be particularly interesting if it were not for the moral
attached to it, which is-
Never stand off a debt owned or controlled b a member of a lawmaking body
from which you expect specialprivileges. the other fellow.


PFP'


. .*










Vo* ~pop


THE SUJN


i A l 21, 116
N


T Spy



a f L


bk a mthe stme corridor until I
10 2-2sd athe fdooSO thMe Mela to wh0
sI fert e 4 All w aswe
eM a da se at along on tiptoe
~twte ormd an my Arm, a p
that to m tt placed her fa
min er d erwer.*
I own that it wa a rash and head-
est at, for bend the lake how
Into rmhable inhospitable forests, so far
fnO ay hidiapa e. Yt Io t it my
d" 1a 1ot 6er marvelous beauty eon-
mn se lt had I not felt by ome un-
alesn te~bntkm at the fst meo-
meat we had met that our lvt were
linbd In the future? 9he lung to me
u thoub (earf ul of discovery, as we
wnt fward in silence alongdo that dark,
low erldor where I knew the 'strong
door in the tower oped upon the lake.
Once in the boat, ad we could row back
to who the hons awaited us, and then
away. The woman had not arrested our
rress or raised an alarm, after all.
O i had ietutedmistrusted her but I now
saw that her heart was really filled with
pity for the poor girl now at my side.
Without a sound we crept forward
until within a few yards from that une
looked door where the boat awaited us
below, when, of a sudden, the uncertain
light of the lantern fell upon something
that shone and 'deer voice cried out of
the darkness In Russan-
"Haiti or I firel"
And, startled, we found ourselves look.
ing down the muzzle of a loaded carbine.
A huge sentry stood with his baok to
the secret exit, his dark eyes shining be-
neath his peaked cap, as he held- his
weapon to is shoulder within six feet
of us.
The big, bearded fellow demanded
Aealy who I was.
My tart sank within me, I had acted
recklessly, and bad fallen into the hands
of tes fxsllenry, the Baron Xavier
Oberg, the tsaupulous Overnor.oen.
era~-fallen into trap which, it seemed,
had been very cleverly prepared for me.
I was a prisoner In the tarible fort
rss whence no ingle person save .th
guards had ever been known to emerge-
he Bastile of The Strangler of Fin.
land!"
I saw I was lost
The muale of the sentry's carbine wa
within two feet of my chest.
"Speak!" cried the fellow. "Who an
youth---I
At a glaneH I took in the peril of th
situato, nd without a second's hesi
ttlom made a dive for the man bensat
his wapon. He lowered itbutit, but w
too laW or Ip 1 pped him around til
waist, rendering hi gun useless. I
as the work of an Insta nt, for I ke
that to lose with him was my onlm
chance.
Yet if the boat was not in waiting be
low that closed door If my Finn drive
was not there in adiness, then I wO
lost The unfortunate girlwhom I wa
there to rescue drew in frig
against the wall for a single Instani
tem, seing that I bad dood with th
ulking flow, he sprang forward, an
tempted to wreat it from hm Hisnl
mn had lost the t bend mhe
ryin vto renan it to-Mre and so nal
th alarm. I saw this, and with an el4
trick learned at Upplngha I tripped
him, so that he staged and aft4
An oath escaped him, yet In that m
meant Elma succeeded In twisting tl
gun from his sinew hands, which I no
held with st begotten of aknowl
edgs of my inent peril. My who]
future, as well as hers, depended upo
my succs in that desperate eneountes
He was huge and powerful, with
strength far exceeding my own, yet I ha
been reckoned a good wrestler at Uppinf
ham, and now my knowledge of thi
meet anciet form of combat held me i
The mi duted for help, his dee]
corridors. If tesr4 by his wamrausi


arms, then the alarm would at onos be P
0"11. ni
We stlMuled deperatly sw. sayI to
and tug to aloo W Iei, t.
at every turn, practed upon him the L
tricks learned in my youth. Itseemed t
an mm matoh howv, for be kept his g
feet by dheer brute fore, ad his mu 0
holes seemed hard and unbending as steel t
Suddenly, however, as we wer striv. ti
ing so vigorouly and deperatelh, the b
Enlish gihrl slipped past us with the
carbe ine her hand, and with a quick
movement dragged open the heavy door u
that ga xit to the lake. t
At that instant I unfortunately made
a fanlse move, and his hand eloed upon
my throat like a band of steel. I fouht
and struggled to loose m exerting
every muscle, but slasi be gained the 0
advantage. I heard a splash, and saw
that Elms no longer held the sentry's t
weapon in her hands, having thrown it t
into the water.
Then at the same moment I heard a
voice outside cry in a low tone: "Cour-
age, Excelleny t Courage! I will comeI
and help you."
It was the faithful Finn, who had i
been awaiting me in the deep shadow, m
and with a ew strokes pulled his boat
up to the narrow rickety ledge outside
the door. n
"Take the lady!" I succeeded in gasp-t
lng in Russian. "Never mind me," and
I saw to my satisfaction that he guided i
Elms to step into the boat, which at
that moment drifted past the little plat- .
form.
I struggled valiantly, but against such
a mn of brute strength I was powerless.
He held my throat, causing me excruci-
ating pain, and each moment I felt my I
chance of victory grow smaller. My
strength was failing. While I held his g
arms at his sides, I could keep him se-
cure without much effort, but now with
Shis fingers pressing in my windpipe I
could not breathe.I
I was slowly being strangled.
S To be vanquished meant Imprisonment
there, perhaps even death. Victory
meant Elma's life, as well as my own.
Mine was therefore a fight for life. A
Sudden idea flashed across my mind, and
I continued to struggle, at thmeame time
gradually forcing my enemy backward
toward the door. He shouted for help,
I but was unheard. He cursed and swore
and shouted until, with a sudden and
a almost superhuman effort, I tripped him,
bringing his head into such violent con-
G tact with e stone lintel of the door
i that the sound could surely be heard a
h considerable distance. For a moment he
a was stunned, and in that brief second I
Sreleased his grip from my throat and
t hurled him backwards beyond the door.
w There was the sound of the crashing
y of wood as the rotten platform gave
way, a loud splash, and next instant the
,. dark waters closed over the big, bearded
r fellow who would have snatched Elma
i Heath from me, and have held me pris-
a owner in that castle of terrors. He sank
like a stone, for although I stood watch-
t, in for him to rise, I could only distin-
0 gumIla the woodwork floating away with
4the current.
to. In a moment, however, even as I stood
N- there In horror at my deed of self-de-
Sfense, the place suddenly resounded with
* shout of larm, and in the tower above
d me the great old rusty hell began to
d swing, ringing its brawn note across the
y broad expanse of waters.
The fair-bearded Finn again shot the
a. boat aros to where I stood, crying-
* "Jump, Excellency! For your life,
w juptpl The guards will be upon us!"
|. JPhind me in the passage I a light
e and the litter of arms. A shot rangs
a out, and a bullet whined past me, but I
r. stood unharmed. Then I jumped, and
a nearly upeet the boat, but taking an
d oar l began to row for life, and a. we'
p- drew away from those grim, blaek walls
,t the fire belched forth front. thrw rieie.
n "Rowl" I shrieked, turnJin to Iw if
my fair companion had bees ki.
p, "Keep cool, Exelfley," ur/ed the
i- shadow. We might trick time, for th


patrol boat will be at the head of the
ver waiting to eut ius off."
Again the guard fired upon us, but
Sthe darkness their aim was faulty.
ghto appears d the high windows of
he castle, and we could see that the
re test commotion had been caused by
hc escape of the prisoner. The men at
ie door in the tower wore shouting to
he patrol boats, which were nowhere to
Seen, calling them to row us down and
spture us, but by plying our oars
rapidly we shot .straight across the lake
rtil we got under the deep shadow of
he oppite shore, and then crept grad-
lewraloe t n the difreiom ertiadonmen
A'df we meet the boats, Excellency, we
aust run ashore and take to the woods,"
plainedd the Finn. "It is our only
*i&ce."
.Scarcely had he spoken when out in
the center of the lake lake could just uis-
Inguish a long boat with three rowers
going swiftly towards the entrance to
te river, which we so desired to gain.
"Look," cried our guide, backing
mater, and bringing the boat to a stand-
till "They are in search of us! If
wo are discovered they will fire. It is
their orders. No boat is allowed upon
his lake."
.lnma sat watching our pursuers, but
still calm and silent. She seemed to in-
trust herself entirely to me.
The guards were rowing rapidly, the
ars sounding in the rowlocks, evidently
ia the belief that we had made for the
river. But the Finlander had appar-
ently foreseen this, and for that reason
we were lying safe from observation in
tho deep shadow of an overhanging tree.
A gray mist was slowly rising from
the water, and the Finn, noticing it,
hoped that it might favor us. In Fin-
land in late autumn the mists are often
as thick as our proverbial London fogs,
only whiter, denser, and more frosty.
"It we disembark we shall be com-
pelled to make a detour of fully four
dayI in the forest, in order to pass the
marshes," he pointed out in a low whisk.
per "But if we can enter the river we
can go ashore anywhere and get by foot
to some place where the lady can lie in
hiding."
"What do you advise? We are en
timely in your hands. The Chief of P
lies told me he could trust youd"
"I think it will be best to risk it," hi
said in Russian after a brief pause. "W
will tie up the boat, and I will go alone
the bank and see what the guards ar
doing. You will remain here, and ]
shll not be seen. The rushes and un
dergrowth are higher further along. Bu
if there is danger while I am absent ge,
out and go straight westward until yoi
flnd the marsh, then keep along its bank
due south," and drawing up the boat t4
the bank the shrewd, big-boned fellow
diappeared into the dark undergrowth
There were no signs yet of the real
of day. Indeed, the stars were nov
hidden, and the great plane of water w
every moment growing more indistine
as we both sat In silent. My ears wer
strained to catch the dipping of an os
or a voice, but beyond the lapping o
the water beneath the boat there wa
no other sound I took the hand ofth
fair faced gfrl at my sle and pressed ii
In return she presed mine.
It was the only means 1y which w
could express confidences. Ml whom
had soungt through all those months us
at my sid, yet powerless to utter on
sliamle word.
oWn I friDpe~them to show h.r that
intwnst to be her ehammpiom, while sh
hapw' t It snhl4 he so. What,


j l .mwt^ b0 thus ,rwtally mitm an
mutilate h, saw afterward sA hr t
thi irriwm, trril. f',rr, that stil


s,.tr mpoyd to mewer her sifr^
apffeseiM s4d amt mmst a is


voice spoke which I recogfiWd as that
of our friend, the nm. "
"There o dangere is daelleneey-t gsve
danger! he said in a low half whisper.
"Tise boats are in atroh oef u."
And scarcely had he uttered thoe
words when there was the flash of rifle
from the ha, a loud report, and again
a bullet whined past just behind my
head. In an instant the truth became
aprurent, for I saw the dark shadow of
a boat rapidly rowed, bearing full upon
[Continued on Fourteenth Pape

OARPENTERS
Stay away from Tampa. Ppy no at-
tention to advertiements.
For further information, address Car-
penter Union 696, or Building Tades
Council, Tampa Fla
Secretary Building Trades Council.

Mixed Accounts Trouble
Lou of Fire Insuranie, for lntane, eor
any other trouble with your books.
HAVE THEM ADJ UTED.

*-
FRED, E, RANKIN
Phone 862. JACKBONVISLE, FLA. Box 672


Political Advertisements

FOR THE S6ENATr
To the Voters of Duval County (18th
Senatorial District):
I hereby announce myself as a candi-
date for the State Senae from this, the
18th Senatorial District, Duval County,
to be voted for at the o.mingp e.


FOR THE HOUSE


To the Public:
I hereby an
Count tbat I


FOR TRIEASURCR


To the Democratic Votors of Duval County:
I am a candidate for renomination by the Dem.
ocracy of Duval County for the offie of County
Treasurer. My services are known to all. and If
my record is endowed, I promise a continuance
of a faithful performance of the duties of the of.
Ace. olicltlng the support of all in the primary.
I am.very mrpectfuIy .,
A. W. BARBS.

For County Gommissioner
I wish to announce my candidacy for
County Commislioner for the Fourth
District of Duval County, Florida, sub-
ject to the coming primary, and shall
appreciate the support of the cities of


tile County.


T. L. AcOOOA.


To the Iemocratle Voters of Duval County:
I ao a candidate for County Oommilssoner of
Uws VFnrth district. subect to the coming Demo.
eaUr trtinary. Upon the requestot many Mends
sI eimw aiore the people of Dval County for this
$*Mr, I and for the greatest ood to the great-
at neumhr, and It elected I promise to perform
tho 44 a of that ofe faithfully and to the best
FRANK 0. MILLIB.








'Apil 21, 1906


THE SUN


Eleventh Page


I've Been Thinking CHARLES BABTEL LOOMIS


Of course an afternoon tea is not to be taken She nods her head, bows to an quaintan
seriously, and I hold that any kind of conversation distant part of the room, and murmurs in musical,
gos as long as it is properTy vacuous and irrele- EDDED TO MYA Rsy- mpthaeptc tones:
rant. YE U "That' aan adorable age."
One meets many kinds at afternoon teas-the ~ .R EN ". "What, ntlt e .ge?"
bored, the bashful, the intense, and once in a while DE "Yes. Did you sar it was a girl?"
the interesting, but for pure delight there is nothing s "Yes. his name's thel. lie's great help to he
quite equals the gusher. She is generally very pretty. CP / mother." grea help to
Nature insists upon compensations. J "Little darling."
When you meet a realgusher-one born to gush- I tell them there may be city advantages
you can ulst throw all bounds of probability aside tHg R(# ,, "Yes; I tell them there may be city advantages,
you candy ay the st thing tha t ound of probability aside but I think they're much better off where they are."
and say the first thing that comes into your head, "Where did you say you were?"
sure that it will meet with an appreciative burst ofJ"O t"Where did you ay you were"
enthusiasm, for your true gusher is nothing if she is tBe" "On the Connecticut shore. You see, having only
not enthusiastic. There are those who listen to every. the one chl d, Mr s.ow Smith is very anxious that it
thing you say and punctuate it with "Yes-a-s, yes-8-s, \ tive should grow p healthy" (absent-minded nods indie-
yes *-s," until the sibilance gets on your nerves; but / tive of full attention "and so little Ronald never
the attention of the Simon-pure gusher is purely /H \ "PDFfTIY i comes to the city at all. He plays with tihe Asher.
subconscious. She could not repeat a thing of what manE' child nd eL grfleat drafts of fresh air."
you have told her a half minute after hearing it. Her LY "Oh, how perfetly entrancing You're quite a
real attention is on something else all the while- t poet."
perhaps on the gowns of her neighbors, perhaps on a "No; I'm a painter."
the reflection of her rett face-but never on the Now she is really attentive. She thought you
conversation. And why should it be? Is a te a were just an ordinary beast, and she finds that you
place for tie exercise of concentration? Perish the may be a lion. Smith? Perhaps you're Hopkinson
thought. Smith.
You are presented to her as "Mr Mmmm," and \"Oh, do you paint? How perfectly adorable
she is "delighted," and smiles so ravishingly that 1 \ What do you paint-landscapes or portraits?"
you wish you were twenty years younger. You do Again the eye wanders and she inventories a
not yet know that she is a gusher. But her first dress, and you say:
remark labels her. Just to test her, for there is I "Oils."
something in the animation of her face and the far- "Do you ever allow visitors to come to your
awa ness of the eye that makes you suspect her sin- studio ?" your
happen to have six children-y: "Why, I never prevent them, but I'm so afraid
"Oh, hapow p rfectly dee-arv How old are they" / it will bore them that 1 never ask them."
She scans the gown of a woman who has just en- "h, how could e anybody be bored at anything?"
tered the room and, being quite sure that she is en- 1 ( But in tt oe henMt yao e enthusiasm. My stu-
gaged in a mental valuation of it, you say: i in the top of the Madison Square tower, and
"They In a mental valuation of it, you say: I never see a soul from week's aend to week's end."
"They're all of them six." "Oh, then you're not married."
"Oh, how lovely" Her unseeing eyes look you in "Oh, then y ou're not marriedded to his ."
the face. "Just the right age to be companions." Dear, no: a man who is wedded to his art
"Yes, all but one." mustn't commit bigamy."
The eye has wandered to another gown, but the "Oh, how clever. So you're a bachelor ?"
sympathetic voice says: "Oh, how charming! How many children have "Yes, but I have my wife for a chaperon, and I'd
0Oh, what pi-ityl" you be delighted to have you come and take tea with us
"Yes, isn't it? But he's quite healthy." "Only seven. The oldest is five and the youngest some Saturday from six until three."
It's a gme now-fair game-and you re glad you is six." "Perfectly delighted" Her eye now catches sight
came to the tea! "Just the interesting age. Don't you think chil- of an acquaintance just coming in, and as you pre-
"Healthy, you say? How nice. It's perfectly dren fascinating?" pare to leave her you say:
lovely. Do you live in the country ?" Again the roaming eye and the vivacious smile. u
"Not exactly the country. We live in Madison "Yes, indeed. My o destMhe's fourteen and quite v Hope you don't mind a little artistic uncon"
Square, under the trees." original. He says that when he grows up he doesn't served wonality. We and lemons, have beer at fashion."
"Oh, how peetly idyllic" know what he' .served with sur and lemons, the Russian fashion."
"Oh, how perfectly idylliel" know what he'll be." "Oh, I think it's much better than cream. I adore
"Yes; we have all the advantages of the city and "Really? t ow cutely i mu bettr th r I do
the delights of the country. I got a permit from "Yes, he says it every morning, a half hour before unconventionality.
the Board of Education to put up a little bungalow breakfast." "You're very glad you met me, I'm sure."
alongside the Worth monument, and the children "Fancyl How old did you say he was?" "Awfully good of you to say so."
bathe in the fountain every morning when the "Just seventeen, but perfectly girlike and mascu- Anything goes at an afternoon tea. But it's
weather is cold enough." line." better not to go.




THE STATE PRESS ON BROWARD


Governor Broward has addressed an
open letter to the public regarding his
drainage plan for the Everglades.
While it is a very lengthy document,
yet it is a plain and straightforward
statement of the facts in the case as Gov-
ernor Broward sees them.
Governor Broward, 'personally, is a
plain, straightforward man and those
who know him appreciate him for this
very reason.
they also realize that the present con-
certed attack upon him and his drainage
plans Are not merely opposition to the
drainage of the Everglades, but a politi-
cal attack from those who see in him the
future strong man of the State, who will
be in the way of the advancement of
their political Interests.
In his open letter, Governor Broward
quotes a number of editorials from the
Florida Times-Union, edited at that time
by the same gentleman who presides over
its destinies now. These editorials,
given in full in the letter, show the paper
to be a strong advocate of the drainage
of the Everglades at that time. They
present many strong arguments of the
benefits to be obtained from the drain-
age.
But. the plan to drain the Everglades
then was through an auxiliary of the
East Coast Railway, and not through
Governor Broward, by the people of tWo


State and for the benefit of the people.
The private monopolistic corporation was
then to be the beneficiary.
Governor Broward asks what has
caused this change in the attitude of the
Times-Union. The Times-Union has cer-
tainly seen the letter and question, but it
has. not answered.
The people might now well ask why it
has not answered.
A natural conclusion would be the
change in attitude was caused by the
change in the beneficiary of the drainage
seneme.
This time the benefit is for the peo-
ple of the State.
Before it was for a private corpor-
ation, which controls the Times-Union
even as the sun and the moon control the
tides of the ocean.
This is the manner in which Governor
Broward has made himself dangerous to
the interests of certain people, and there-
fore undesirable as a strong political
man. For this reason the attack is be-
ing made upon him politically.
The Herald is not prepared to declare
that the drainage plan is practical or
feasible, because it has not had the
means of thoroughly investigating the
question.
But, ina reality, it can see nothing in
the preat fight beyond the political
pec aad the fact that originally it was


planned that a private corporation
should obtain the benefits from the drain-
age which Governor Broward now pro-
poses to do for the benefit of the people
of the entire State.-Tampa Herald.
THE DRAINAGE QUESTION.
Governor Broward has addressed an
open letter to the people of Florida, in
which he discusses at length the subject
of the drainage of the Fverglades. It is
a strong paper, and settles conclusively
the fact that he is only performing a
plain duty under the law in going for-
ward with the drainage work. That
the scheme is practicable, is also shown
by reasoning which ought to satisfy every
unbiased reader, and which cannot be
controverted except in one way, and that
is, if the drainage canals, when con-
structed, should fail to perform their
work, that is, by actual test. As to the
value of the lands, should they be sue.
cessfully drained, there may be some
question, but the great preponderance of
evidence in in Wfaor of their being im-
mensely valuable. The great fertility
of such portions of the land as have been
drained by private enterprise, and the
analysis of the soil from other portions
of the Ilverglades, have settled this ques-
tion beyond a reasonable doubt.


Governor Broward's views have a
strong supporter in the person of Capt.
F. A. Hendry of Lee County, who is well
known throughout the State as a man of
calm Judgment,' sound, practical sense
and acute observation. Captain Hendry
has spent what would usually be eonsid-
ered an ordinary lifetime, fifty-six years,
in this section of the State. We know
him well, as do numbers of our readers,
and would accept his judgment in this
matter before that of any man in Flor-
ida. In a recent letter to the Times-
Union Captain Hendry answers in a
plain, practical, forcible and convinaibg
way all of the arguments against the
drainage scheme and stands squarely by
Governor Broward in his contest with
his opponents.
After weighing carefully and without
prejudice all the arguments on both
sides, we are forced to the conclusion
that the proposed drainage is practi-
cable; that the lands drained will be
very valuable, and that Governor Brow-
ard is strictly in the line of duty in
carrying on the work. There is, to our
mind, but one question to be answered:
Is Lake Okeeekobl fed by underground
streams? And this cas only eC o -
swered by ans exhaustive selentif sur-
vey, or by the actual digi of theint
canal and mtO its iet-Bartow
Courier-Informaat.










V400 R~p


THE SUN


w By
SChevalier William Le Queux


back aong the store corridor until I
rIow the oor wa athe rshom d towhich
Ils b" t=64 All was
*Ueak a we Soept along on tiptoe
i teirl #6 p on my arm, a p
that MIA M that s1e placed her tio Ie
me as her deliverer.
I own that It was a rash and head.
strong acst, for ea beyond the lake how
could we ev op to penetrate those
Interminable inhoptable forests, so far
from amy hiding-place. Yet I felt it my
duty to attempt the rescue. And be.
de, ad not her marvelous beauty en
m led ml had I not felt by some un-
ecotable intuition at the frst me.
meat we had met that our live were
liabd in the future? She lung to me
as thouh fearful of discovery, as we
wet foar in silence along that dark,
low corridor where I knew the strong
door in the tower opened upon the lake.
Once in theboat,d we would row back
to where the horse awaited us, and then
away. The woman had not arrested our
press or raised an alarm, after all.
On had mistrusted her but I now
saw that her heart was really filled with
pity for the poor girl now at my side.
Without a sound we crept forward
until within a few yards from that un,
looked door where the boat awaited us
below, when, of a sudden, the uncertain
light of the lantern fell upon something
that shone and a deep voice cried out of
the darkness in Russian-
"HaltI or I fire !"
Aad, startled, we found ourselves look.
lng down the muscle of a loaded carbine,
A huge sentry stood with his back to
the secret exit, lis dark eyes shining be.
a4sth his peaked cap, as he held him
weapon to his shoulder within six feet
of us.
The big, bearded fellow demanded
fierely who I was.
My heart sank within me. I had acted
reoklessly, and had fallen into the hand
of his elleany, the Baron Xaviei
Oberg, the uscrupulous Governor-Gen
Oral-fallen into a trap which, it seemed
had been very cleverly prepared for me.
I was a prisoner in the terrible fort
ress whence no single person save .thi
rards had ever been known to emee-
h Bastile of "The Strangler of Fin
land!"
I saw I was lost.
The munsle of the sentry's carbine wa
within two feet of my chest.
"Bpakl" cried the fellow. "Who ar
you ?
At a glance I took in the peril of th
situation, and without a second's bes
tatios made a dive for the man beneat
his weapon. He lowered it, but it wa
too late, for I gripped him around th
waist, rendering his gun useless. I
Vwa the work of an instant, for I kne
that to close with him was my onl
chance.
Yet if the boat was not in waiting b
low that closed door? If my Finn dri
was not there in readiness, then I we
lot, The unfortunate girl whom I w
there to resoue drew ak in frig
against the wall for a single instant
thea, ine that I had closed with ti
hulking allow, she sprag forward, an
with both hands sid the gun and a
tempted to wrest it fro him. His Ml
gen had lost the tr4im sad he wl
trying to regain it to ie and so rl
the alarm. I saw this, and with an o
trick learned at Upplagham I tripp
him, so that he staggered sad Bear
An oath eesped him, yet in that m
meant Elma succeeded in twisting tl
gun from his sinewy hands, whikh I no
held with a strength begotten of a kaow
edge of my Imminent peril. My who
future, as well as hers, depended up
my snomees in that desperate eneounh
He was huge and powerful, with
strength far exceeding my own, yet I ha
been reckoned a good wrestler at Uppln
ham, and now my knowledge of th
most saeiet form of combat held me :
The asa shouted for help, his dee
hoarse voies soundiag along the sto
corridos. If based lar his eominn<*


arms, then the alarm would at once be
We strugged desperately, swaying to
and fo, heitrying to throw e, whmileI,
at every turn, practiced upon him the
tricks learned in my youth. Itseemed
an even mat, however, for he kept his
feet by sheer brute force, and his mus.
les seemed hard and unbending as steel.
Suddenly, however, as we were striv-
ing so vigorously and desperately, the
English girl slipped past us with e
carbine in her hand, and with a quick
movement dragged open the heavy door
that gave exit to the lake.
At that instant I unfortunately made
a false move, and his hand closed upon
my throat like a band of steel. I fought
and struggled to loose myself, exertng
every muscle, but alasl he gained the
advantage. I heard a splash, and saw
that Elma no longer held the sentry's
weapon in her hands, having thrown it
into the water.
Then at the same moment I heard a
voice outside cry in a low tone: "Cour-
age, Excelleneyl Courage I will come
and help you.
It was the faithful Finn, who had
been awaiting me in the deep shadow,
and with a few strokes pulled his boat
up to the narrow rickety ledge outside
the door.
i "Take the lady!" I succeeded in asp.
ing in Russian. "Never mind me," and
I saw to my satisfaction that he guided
Elms to step into the boat, which al
that moment drifted past the little plat
f' orm.
I struggled valiantly, but against such
I a man of brute strength I was powerless
t He held my throat, causing me excruci
sting pain, and each moment I felt m]
I chance of victory grow smaller. M]
strength was failing. While I held him
arms at his sides, I could keep him se
cure without much effort, but now witl
his fingers pressing in my windpipe I
r could not breathe.
1. I was slowly being strangled.
To be vanquished meant imprisonmen
there, perhaps even death. Victor]
meant Elma's life, as well as my own
e Mine was therefore a fight for life. .
M sudden idea flashed across my mind, an
t I continued to struggle, at the same tim
gradually forcing my enemy backward
toward the door. He shouted for help
A but was unheard. He cursed and swor
and shouted until, with a sudden an
e almost superhuman effort, I tripped him
bringing his head into such violent coi
Ie tact with the stone lintel of the doo
I- that the sound could surely be heard
h considerable distance. For a moment h
s was stunned, and in that brief second
% released his grip from my throat an
It hurled him backwards beyond the doo
w There was the sound of the crashing
y of wood as the rotten platform gav
way, a loud splash, and next instant tl
0. dark waters closed over the big, bearded
er fellow who would have snatched Elm
u Heath from me, and have held me pri
as owner in that castle of terrors. He san
ht like a stone, for although I stood watel
t, ing for him to rise, I could only distill
Sguiiih the woodwork floating away wil
id the current.
4t In a moment, however, even as I stood
3- there in horror at my deed of self-d
as fense, the place suddenly resounded wil
8 shouts of alarm, and in the tower abo'
Id me the great old rusty bell began
d swing, ringing its brazen note across tl
ly broad expanse of waters.
The fair-bearded Finn again shot tl
o. boat aeroes to where I stood, crying-
he "Jump, Excellency! For your lil
w jump!I The guards will be upon us!"
l. Itehind me in the passage I saw a ligl
le and the glitter of arms. A shot rai
Mn out. and a bullet whizzed past me, but
r. stood unharmed. Then I jumped, ai
a nearly upset the boat, but taking
Md oar I began to row for life, and as
g. drew away from those grim, black wal
it the fire belched forth from. three rifles
in "Row!l" I shrieked, turning to see
my fair companion had been hit.
p, *Keep cool, Excellency," urged tl
M Finn. 'See, right away there in tl
a- shadow. We might trick them, for t


patrol boat will be at the head of the
river waiting to cut us off."
A ina the guarde fired upon us, but
in the darkness their aim was faulty.
ights appeared In the high window of
th castle, and we could see that the
greatest commotion had been caused by
the escape of the prisoner. The men at
the door in the tower were shouting to
the patrol boats, which were nowhere to
be seen, calling them them to row us down and
capture us, but by plying our oarn
rapidly we shot straight across the lake
until we got under the deep shadow of
the opposite shore, and then crept grad-
ually along n the direotiot 4had come.'
"I1 we meet the boats, Excellency, we
must run ashore and take to the woods,"
explained the Finn. "It is our only
chlakce."
Scarcely had he spoken when out in
the center of the lake we could just ia-s
tinguish a long boat with three rowers
thing swiftly towards the entrance to
thw river, which we so desired to gain.
S "Look," cried our guide, backing
water, and bringing the boat to a stand-
still "They are in search of us! If
we are discovered they will fire. It is
their orders. No boat is allowed upon
this lake."
E Fma sat watching our pursuers, but
tiMll calm and silent. She seemed to in-
trust herself entirely to me.
The guards were rowing rapidly, the
oars sounding in the rowlocks, evidently
in the belief that we had madehad made for the
river. But the Finlander had appear.
gently foreseen this, and for that reason
we were lying safe from observation in
d the deep shadow of an overhanging tree.
A gray mist was slowly rising from
the water, and the Finn, noticing it,
F hoped that it might favor us. In Fin.
F land in la the mists are often
5 as thick as our proverbial London fogs,
onli whiter, denser, and more frosty.
S '"it we disembark we shall be comr
a pulled to make a detour of fully four
dayp in the forest, in order to pass the
marshes," he pointed out in a low whis
t per "But if we can enter the river we
y can go ashore anywhere and get by fool
e' to some place where the lady can lie in
A hiding."
d "What do you advise? We are en
e tirely in your hands. The Chief of Po
d lice told me he could trust you."
P, "I think it will be best to risk it," he
e said in Russian after a brief pause. 'W
d will tie up the boat, and I will go along
n, the bank and see what the guards are
m- doing. You will remain here, and I
)r shell not be seen. The rushe rushes and un
a dergrowth are higher further along. Bu
e if there is danger while I am absent ge
I out and go straight westward until yoi
id find the marsh, then keep along its bank
r. due south," and drawing up the boat t
1g the bank the shrewd, big-boned fellow
ve disappeared into the dark undergrowth
he There were no signs yet of the breal
e of day. Indeed, the stars were noM
U hidden, and the great plane of water wa
5* every moment growing more indistinc
k as we both sat in silence. My ears wer
h- strained to catch the dipping of an oa
n- or a voice, but beyond the lapping c
h the water beater beneath the boat there wa
no other sound. I took the hand of th
od fair faced girl at my side and pressed it
th It was the only means by which w

he at my side, yet powerless to utter on
single word.
te Still holding her hands in both m
own I gripped them to show her that
e, intended to be her champion, while sli
turned to me in confidence as though
ht happy that it should.be so. What,
ng wondered, was her history? What wa
I the mystery surrounding her? Wha
nd could be that secret which had cause
in her enemies to thus brutally maim an
ye mutilate her, and afterward send her t
Is that grim, terrible fortress that sti
loomed up before us in the gloom ? Surel
if her secret must affect some person ver
seriously, or such drastic means woul
he never be employed to secure her silent
he Suddenly I heard a stealthy footste
he approachinga and next moment a lo'


the county.


T. L. ACOSTA.


To the Democratic Voters of Duval County:
I am a candidate for County Comminasoner of
the Fourth District, subject to the coming Demo.
critic primary. Upon the request of many friends
I come before the people of Dval Coonty for this
office. I stand for thereatestgood to the eat.
est number, and if elected I promise to perfomn
the duties of that omoe faithfully and to the beset
of my ability.0.
fLANK 0. MULXR.


The Czar's Spy


/


Apr#219 106


I


voice spoke which I roognised M that
of our friend, the Finn.
"There is danger, Excellency--a grave
danger" he Mid in a low half whiper.
"Thiee boats are in earoh' f us."
And scarcely had he uttered thnse
words when there was the flash of a rifle
from the hase, a loud report, and again
a bullet whizzed past jut behind my
head. In an instant the truth became
apfprent, for I saw the dark shadow of
a boat rapidly rowed, bearing full. upon
[Continued on Fourteenth Page]

CARPENTERS
Stay away from Tampa. Ppy no at-
tention to advertidwents.
For further information, address Car-
penters Union 696, or Building Trades
council, Tampa Fla.
TV. R. O. PHILLIPS,
Secretary Building Trades Council.

Mixed Accounts Trouble
Loss of Fire Insumae. for instant., or
any other trouble with your books.
HAVE THEM ADJUSTED.
FRED. E. RANKIN
I0= T MOuI iN
Phone 862. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. Box 572


Political Advertisements

FOR THE SENATE
To the Voters of Duval County (18th
Senatorial District):
I hereby announce mnmlf ia a candi-
date for the State Senate from thi, the
18th Senatorial District, Duval County,
to be voted for at the m.ingp arieB.
H. H. BUCIA.

ohFOR THE HOUSC
STo the Public:
I hereby announce to the citizens of IDual
SCount that I wilbea candidate bfre the ap
pchin Democratic novlwt1t prmMls 0orf
epentie in their Leulata of the
from Duval County *and I respectulAy sk ,f
su. port of the people.
MY platform may be coocanty expreed;^
saying that I sh expect, ielet. to Wo
e by my vo voice, energy and work -evryo
Sure that wlltend to the advtof be heul
to the people of Duval Counsty, Florida wtt
9 injury to other portions of the State; t I. ; lI
e be unalterably opposed to and will flht ith
I vigor and energy all measures coming up be.or
1 e t featuree tha shall in y way be hurtfl
to the interest of Duval County; and a Uto par.
t ticular questions that may rise in the ours of
t the campaln it will be my pleasure to discuss
same upon the stump. and to fairly, squarely and
Openly present my views upon them. '
R Respectfully,
SW. MoL. DANCY.
1. fOR TREASURER
k
w To the Democratic Voters of Duval County:
a I am a candidate for renomination by the Dem.
t ocracy of Duval County for the office of County
e Treasurer. My services are known to all, and if
r my record Is endorsed, I promise a continuance
)f of a faithful performance of the duties of the of.
s flee. Soliciting the support of all in the primary,.
i I am, very respectuAlly. ,
b. A. W. BARBS,
e For county Gommissioner
t I wish to announce my candidacy for
County Commissioner for the Fourth
District of Duval County, Florida, sub-
e ject to the coming primary, and shall
h appreciate the support of the citizenas of









Apil 21, 1906


THE SUN


Eleventh Page


ve Been T in in CHARLES B
I've Been Thinking CHARLES BATEiL LOOMIS


Of course an afternoon tea is not to be taken
seriously, and I hold that any kind of conversation
go, as long as it is properly vacuous and Irrele-
vnt.
One meets many kinds at afternoon teas-the
bored, the bashful, the intense, and once in a while
the interesting, but for pure delight there is nothing
quite equals the gusher. She is generally very pretty.
Nature insists upon compensations.
When you meet a real gusher-one born to gush-
you can usat throw all bounds of probability aside
and say the first thing that comes into your head,
sure that it will meet with an appreciative burst of
enthusiasm, for your true gusher is nothing if she is
not enthusiastic. There are those who listen to every-
thing you say and punctuate it with "Yes--s, yes-s-s,
yes s-s," until the sibilance gets on your nerves; but
the attention of the Simon-pure gusher is purely
subconscious. She could not repeat a thing of what
you have told her a half minute after hearing it. Her
real attention is on something else all the While-
perhaps on the gowns of her neighbors, perhaps on
the reflection of her pretty face-but never on the
conversation. And why should it be? Is a tea a
place for the exercise of concentration? Perish the
thought.
You are presented to her as "Mr Mmmm," and
she is "delighted," and smiles so ravishingly that
you wish you were twenty years younger. You do
not yet know that she is a gusher. But her first
remark labels her. Just to test her, for there is
something in the animation of her face and the far-
awaynese of the eye that makes you suspect her sin-
cerity, you say:
"I happen to have six children--"
"Oh, liow perfectly dee-ar I How old are they t"
She scans the gown of a woman who has just en-
tered the room and, being quite sure that she is en-
gaged in a mental valuation of it, you say:
"They're all of them six."
"Oh, how lovely!" Her unseeing eyes look you in
the face. "Just the right age to be companions."
"Yes, all but one."
The eye has wandered to another gown, but the
sympathetic voice say:
'Oh, what a pi-ity!"
"Yes, isn't it? But he's quite healthy."
It's a game now-fair game-and you re glad you
came to the tea!
"Healthy, you say? How nice. It's perfectly
lovely. Do you live in the country?"
"Not exactly the country. We live in Madison
Square, under the trees."
"Oh, how perfectly idyllic!"
"Yes; we have all the advantages of the city and
the delights of the country. I got a permit from
the Board of Education to put up a little bungalow
alongside the Worth monument, and the children
bathe in the fountain every morning when the
weather is cold enough."


"Oh, how charming How many children have
you ?"
"Only seven. The oldest is five and the youngest
is six."
"Just the interesting age. Don't you think chil-
dren fascinating ?"
Again the roaming eye and the vivacious smile.
"Yes, indeed. My oldestMhe's fourteen and quite
original. He says that when he grows up he doesn't
know what he'll be."
"Really? how cute!"
"Yes, he says it every morning, a half hour before
breakfast."
"Fancy I How old did you say he was?"
"Just seventeen, but perfectly girlike and mascu-
line."


She nods her head, bows to an acquaintance in a
distant part of the room, and murmurs in musical,
sympathetic tones:
"That's an adorable age."
"What, thirteen "
"Yes. Did you say it was a girl?"
"Yes, his name's Ethel. Ho's a great help to her
mother."
"Little darling."
"Yes; I tell them there may be city advantages,
but I think they're much better off where they are."
"Where did you say you were?"
"On the Connecticut shore. You see, having only
the one child, Mrs. Smith is very anxious that it
should grow up healthy" (absent-minded nods indica-
tive of full attention), "and so little Ronald never
comes to the city at all. He plays with the fisher-
man's child and gets great drafts of fresh air."
"Oh, how perfectly entrancing! You're quite a
poet."
"No; I'm a painter."
Now she is really attentive. She thought you
were just an ordinary beast, and she finds that you
may be a lion. Smith? Perhaps you're Hopkinson
Smith.
"Oh, do you paint? How perfectly adorablel
What do you paint-landscapes or portraitsT"
Again the eye wanders and she inventories a
dress, and you say:
"Oills."
"Do you ever allow visitors to come to your
studio?"
"Why, I never prevent them, but I'm so afraid
it will bore them that 1 never ask them."
"Oh, how could anybody be bored at anything?"
"But every one hasn't your enthusiasm. My stu-
dio is in the top of the Madison Square tower, and
I never see a soul from week's end to week's end."
"Oh, then you're not married."
Dear, no: a man who is wedded to his art
mustn't commit bigamy."
"Oh, how clever. So you're a bachelor ?"
"Yes, but I have my wife for a chaperon, and I'd
he delighted to have you come and take tea with us
some Saturday from six until three."
"Perfectly delighted I" Her eye now catches sight
of an acquaintance just coming in, and as you pre-
pare to leave her you say:
"Hope you don't mind a little artistic uncon-
vqptionality. We always have beer at our teas
served with sugar and lemons, the Russian fashion."
"Oh, I think it's much better than cream. I adore
unconventionality."
"You're very glad you met me, I'm sure."
"Awfully good of you to say so."


Anything goes at an afternoon tea.
bettor not to go.


But it's


THE STATE PRESS ON BROWARD


Governor Broward has addressed an
open letter to the public regarding his
drainage plan for the Everglades.
While it is a very lengthy document,
yet it is a plain and straightforward
statement of the facts in the case as Gov-
ernor Broward sees them.
Governor Broward, 'personally, is a
plain, straightforward man and those
who know him appreciate him for this
very reason.
They also realize that the present con-
certed attack upon him and his drainage
plans are not merely opposition to the
drainage of the Everglades, but a politi-
cal attack from those who see in him the
future strong man of the State, who will
be in the way of the advancement of
their political interests.
In his open letter, Governor Broward
quotes a number of editorials from the
Florida Times-Union, edited at that time
by the same gentleman who presides over
its destinies now. Tbese editorials,
given in full in the letter, show the paper
to be a strong advocate of the draInage
of the Everglades at that time. They
present many strong arguments of tihe
benefits to be obtained from the drain-
age.
But, the plan to drain the Everglades
then was through aa auxiliary of the
IEast Coast Railway, d not through
Governor Broward, by th people of ti


State and for the benefit of the people.
The private monopolistic corporation was
then to be the beneficiary.
Governor Broward asks what has
caused this change in the attitude of the
Times-Union. The Times-Union has cer-
tainly seen the letter and question, but it
has not answered.
The people might now well ask why it
has not answered.
A natural conclusion would be the
change in attitude was caused by the
change in the beneficiary of the drainage
seneme.
This time, the benefit is for the peo-
ple of the State.
Before it was for a private corpor-
ation, which controls the Times-Union
even as the sun and the moon control the
tides of the ocean.
This is the manner in which Governor
Broward has made himself dangerous to
the interests of certain people, and there-
fore undesirable as a strong political
man. For this reason the attack is be-
ing made upon him politically.
The Herald is not prepared to declare
that the drainage plan is practical or
feasible, because it has not had the
means of thoroughly investigating the
question.
But, in reality, t can see nothing in
the Pr t t beyond the .Ui


planned that a private corporation
should obtain the benefits from the drain-
age which Governor Broward now pro-
poses to do for the benefit of the people
of the entire State.-Tampa Herald.
THE DRAINAGE QUESTION.
Governor Broward has addressed an
open letter to the people of Florida, in
which he discusses at length the subject
of the drainage of the Fverglades. It is
a strong paper, and settles conclusively
the fact that he is only performing a
plain duty under the law in going for-
ward with the drainage work. That
the scheme is practicable, is also shown
by reasoning which ought to satisfy every
unbiased reader, and which cannot be
controverted except in oue way, and that
is, if the drainage canals, when con-
structed, should fail to perform their
work, that is, by actual test. As to the
value of the lands, should they be sue-
cessfully drained, there may be some
question, but the great preponderance of
evidence is in favor of their being im-
mensely valuable. The great fertility
of such portions of the land as have been
drained by private enterprise, and the
analysis of the soil from other portions
of Ut.verglades, have settled thi ques-
tion beyod a reasonable doubt.


Governor Broward's views have a
strong supporter in the person of Capt.
F. A. Hendry of Lee County, who is well
known throughout the State as a man of
calm judgment, sound, practical sense
and acute observation. Captain Hendry
has spent what would usually be sonsid.
ered an ordinary lifetime, fifty-six years,
in this section of the State. We know
him well, as do numbers of our readers,
and would accept his judgment in this
matter before that of any man in Flor-
ida. In a recent letter to the Times-
Union Captain Hendry answers in a
plain, practical, forcible and convincing
way all of the arguments against the
drainage scheme and stands squarely by
Governor Broward in his contest with
his opponents.
After weighing carefully and without
prejudice all the arguments on both
sides, we are forced to the conclusion
that the proposed drainage is practi-
cable; that the lands drained will be
very valuable, and that Governor Brow-
ard is strictly in the line of duty in
carrying on th work. There is, to our
mind, but oe question to be answred:
Is Lake Okeishob W led by u-derround
streams? Aand this e y be a
swwed by an 0$eo *Mti&e sur
vey, or the 1* II "W the
Oswri5en .


*1:'.-^ *,.(<,.';<.*. ,... *










Twelfth Page


THE SUN


April 21, 1906


Fallieres of France an Athlete

By COMTESSE D'ALEMCOURT


Paris.-Everything quiet at the Elysee
despite the brand new occupant. Fal-
liers has not and will not, change life at
the palace of the republic, except that
he allows his people one hour more of
beauty sleep. Loubet, peasant's son, was
at his desk at 6. Fallieres, descended
from artisans and small townspeople,
makes it a point to be dressed at 7. For
the rest, the incoming and outgoing Pres-
identS, always good friends, resemble one
another in their traits, foibles, mental
caliber, good citizenship and habits like
two eggs from the same chick.
Between 7 and 8 the President looks
over the leading papers and early re-
ports from the ministries and high offi-
cials while munching one or two rolls
with unsalted butter and sipping a very
small pot of coffee. At 8 sharp two
persons appear on the threshold of the
waiting room, Mollard, chief of the pro-
toool, i. e., master of ceremony of the
Elysee and back of him Baptiste, the
old valet. The latter carries on his arm
the overeat the President is going to
wear, according to the thermometer, and
under it his umbrella. No good French-
man ever thinks of going out without an
umbrella, you know! Fallieres and
Mollard walk for one tour through the
parks and avenues, looking into show
windows stopping at the Kiosks, not un-
frequently to buy papers jiot usually
found in a President's mail bag. During
these sixty minutes the chief of the pro-
toool informs the President of the social
and other duties in store and asks in-
structions as to invitations, the stables,
the country houses and "Madame." Offi-
cially the French republic knows Mrs.
Fall eres no more than the United States
knows Mrs. Roosevelt, but the President
being completely occupied by official
duties, must needs ask the master of
mremony to look after his wife by at-
tending to her receptions, correspond.
nces, audiences, charities, etc.
"That morning walk keeps me in good
condition and prevents me from getting
too fat," says fallieres. Returned to the
Xlysee, the President goes to his wife's
breakfast room, where he finds madame,
his son and daughter over their coffee
and rolls. They have letters from mem-.
bers of the family and friends, from the
administrator of their little estate, and
from artists and scientists with whom
Fallieree keeps up correspondence. An
hour passes pleasantly, then appears
Batiste again, this time with a frock
Audlences-Genrals, prefects, judi.
ciary presidents, diplomats, army offi
rs, officials of all kinds sent to distant
posts or retiring. Fallieres, like Lou
bet, knows most of the persons whom he
reeilves. If he doesn't the chiefs of his


military and civil households and their
secretaries post him. They also record
the promises made and the reports de-
livered.
Fallieres' Mr. Loeb is the rising poet,
Marc Varenne, an amiable young man ofI
tact and ability. He served the Presi-
dent faithfully wnile the latter was head
of the French Senate, and like his elder
colleagues, Dupre and Lares, has never
given offense or embroiled himself with
the newspapers.
At 12 o clock sharp luncheon in the
small dining room. Invariable partici-
pants: All members of the family in
Paris, the chiefs of the military and
civil households and some friends of the
family. The repast is light and short,
and within three-quarters of an hour
everybody is sipping his or her coffee in
a comfortable armchair. Desk work be-
tween 1 and 2:30 o'clock. Then a drive
into the park. The President's return is
telephoned to the Ministers and the
houses of Parliament and chiefs of offices
or deputies desiring to see M. Fallieres
'phone for an appointment.
Punctually at 7 o'clock dinner is
served at the Elysee. Loubet's dinners
were good, wholesome and pleasant.
Fallieres' are better and still more joy-
ous, for Fallieres loves good eating and
dotes on fine wines, while no one drinks
less in excess than he does. He is his
own vintner and his cellar is the best
stocked belonging to any Frenchman in
moderate circumstances. His principal
vineyard, called Loupillon, has been in
the Fallieres family for years. As mnit
honors and monetary rewards increased
he added more and more land, extending
his domains and used each foot of ground
to grow more and better wines. There
are always from twelve to twenty men
and women at dinner, and conversation
is unrestrained by etiquette until 10
o'clock, when the President retires. At
12 o'clock sharp all lights must be out
in the palace, save in the guard room be-
low. Such are Fallieres' strictest or-
ders. He wants plenty of rest and com-
pels his family and officials to take same
whether they want to or not.
While Loubet delights in a game of
whist, cards are now forbidden in the
klysee, and the numerous card tables in
use for many years, some for centuries,
have all been sent to the official store-
house, where the republic keeps its fur-
niture, the inheritance of many Kings
and Emperors. Unlike Loubet, too, Fa
I lieres does not smoke, but he keeps the
t best of cigars on hand for his friends and
delights in seeing them puff. The only
" small vice to which he owns is a passion
" for hunting.
t Fallieres has been the most prominent
* French politician for the last quarter of
a century without becoming known be
i yond the frontiers of his own country


lhe is about 05 years of age, the picture
of health, hale and hearty, thoughtful
and wise. His father was a b mth
and one-horse farmer, but his appetite
and muscles were more prominent than
his business qualities, it is aid, and
whenever his wife warns him to take
better care of nis digestive apparatus
allieres says "Pshaw, father once ate
a sausage as long as the Gelis is broad."
The GeiMs is a little river skirting the
President's native village. And as to
drinking: "At our vintner's festivals,
father used to take a ten-gallon cask In
his arm and drank out of the spigot. It
was so much easier."
Other members of the family, too, were
famous for their bellies and muscles.
Uncle Jean was the village blacksmith
and made a specialty of taming wild
horses that were brought to him from all
over the province. Before the animal
knew it, Uncle Jean had hold of one of
his feet and held it in an iron grasp.
"Now kick if you can," he used to say,
and proceeded to hold on until the brute
was thoroughly tame.
Young Fallieres was the reverse of a
good scholar. He fell through more ex-
aminations than he passed, and never
passed with "flying colors" He was 18
before he entered the Paris college, and
then devoted himself more to the grisette
and wine shops than to law. Thoroughly
disgusted, papa took him away from
Paris and sent him to Toulouse to con-
tinue his studies. At Toulouse, in or-
der to get permission to return to Paris,
Armand "worked like a horse, passed
examinations by hook or crook, and went
back to the Quartier Latin. He began
practicing law in a small town, and soon
bamboozled everybody by his eloquence.
He became alderman, mayor, general
council, a benedict and politician.


MADAME FALLIERES.


Madame Fallieres also comes from a
small family and is proud of the fact.
Her father was a grocer, I believe, but
though she has a son of 30 and a daugh-
ter not much younger she'is still a very
handsome matron with her coal-black
hair. Her charities are innumerable
and she has the good grace to attend to
them herself. As intimated, the repub-
lic does not know her officially. At the
Elysee the Presidential couple is desig-
nated: "M. le President de la Repub-
lique et Madame Fallieres," yet, strange
contradiction, Fallieres could not be
President but for his wife, so says the
unwritten law of the republic. When can-
didates for the Presidency are discussed
the Senate committee politely inquires
into the family history ere their politics
are taken up. Unless the candidate has

a wife, he cannot be considered at all.
Madame Fallierem is as hospitable as her


rental husband, and such scenes as oc-
urred under President Thiere (1871 to
1873) will not happen in the Elysee
while Fallieres rule. Madame Thiers
was as penurious as her husband was
liberal with his money. One day at
luncheon the President espied some very
fine peaches on the centerpiece of the
table, and turned to his neighdpr, the
Times correspondent, Blowit, asking
him to have one.
The pache are Intended for dinner,"
said Madame Thiers sharply. The Pres-
ident selected the best one for himself,
another one for Blowits and rolled a
third across the table to his secretary.
"I am quite sure they won't give us in-
digestion at noon," he said, smiling at
his wife.
Royalist politicians, such as Boni
Castlellane, like to assert that the Pres-
ident of the French republic, like the
Postmaster General ot the United States,
has nothing to do but to sign papers.
This is a stupid falsehood. Above all it is
his duty to cooperate with Senate and
Chambers in legislation and to see that
the laws are carried out. He has the
right of pardon in all civil and military
matters, is like Roosevelt, supreme com-
mander on land and sea, and nominates
all military and civil officers.
He represents France to the foreign
powers, exchanges visits with sovereigns
and foreign ambassadors and ministers
are accredited to him personally.
His salary is $20,000 per month, and
the Government pays for the mainte-
nanoe of the Jlysee and the various sum-
mer houses and palaces at the Presi-
dent's disposal. There have been various
attempts by Paris tailors to impose a
uniform on the President of the repub-
lic, and the unhappy Faure had the
weakness to accept one modeled after the
style of the state dress worn by the
Presidents of negro republics. But be-
fore he could don it some illustrated pa-
per gave a picture of the gorgeus gar-
ments on the shirtless and soklees body
of a cannibal island king. Paris held Its
sides with laughter, and the French Pres-
idents have been content with swallow
tails ever since. Loubet's and Fallieres'
swallow tail architect, by the way, is a
gentleman who also built the same kind
of clothes for Napoleon the Third.
Not even the Kaiser has as big a
bodyguard as the President of the French
republic-a whole battalion of infantry
-fife and drum corps and a flag drawn
up in line every time he leaves or ar-
rives at the palace. On festive occasions
his carriage is escorted by a squadron
of cuirasslers. A general of division is
the head of the military household, and
while William has but six adjutants,
Fallieres has eight. The civil household
consists of six persons, headed by Mol.
lard.


Shaking the

Old Plum Tree
(Continued from Fourth Page]
to outnumber the antoniste of the law by large
majority. While it is likely that bills will be intro-
duced providing amendment or seeking the repeal of
the measure, it is doubtful if radical opposition will
prevail. Too many persons are satisfied with the
present conditions and too much work will have been
done on the new University buildings and grounds to
permit of changing the general soope of the law.
MR. JONES EXPLAINS.
Titusville, Fla., April 14, 1006.
Editor THE SUN:
I- Deal Sir-I notice your comment on my plank
in favor of the holding of office by women. The
proposition you have shaken from "the old plum
Iee" this time is not good. Under the PRESENT
ODNSTITUTION, my father, as Circuit Judge and
under the advice of many good lawyers, appointed
. Dearborn to fill the place of Clerk of Dade
002tV on the death of her husband, and the Gov-


ernor, acting advisedly, ratified and confirmed this
appointment. So, you ee, it is only necessary to
affirmatively amend the primary law to insure this
right against the silence or dubiousness of the law
as it stands.
Let THE SUN be to the faults of my candidacy "a
little blind" since I am one of its friends, and since
my stand in favor of women is offensive to many of
the he politicians, so that I shall need all the
"silence" on the subject among the editors that I
can get. WADE H. JONES.
A CARD TO THE PUBLIC.
Citizens who favor a reform in government and
the initiative and referendum as a means of restor-
ing sovereignty over the powers of government to the
people qualified under a capable electorate are in-
vited to send their name and address to me and
join in appointing committees to organize movements
to carry these measures into practical effect by re-
quiring candidates for office to pledge themselves to
their support.
Missouri,. Colorado, California, North Dakota
Massachusetts and Illinois, by a majority vote, have
recommended these measures. Nine Congressmen
from Missouri and Illinois, with their four United
States Senators, have been pledged to their support
All the labor organizations i the United Stat, all


non-partisan independent organizations are united
in their support; William Randolph Hearst, with his
four great newspapersand the Independent Citizenn
League, are earnest in the advocacy for a reform rep-
resentative government.
Resolutions have been introduced in the support
of the these measures in the Legislature of Florida,
but failed to pass. If the people of Florida desire to
take part with the great army of citlens arrayed to
restore sovereignty to the people it should be made
known to their fellow-citians, who are enthusiat-
tically engaged in this work.
WILKINSON CALL,
General Delivery, Postoffloe Jacksonville, Fla.

A Blind Man Invents an
Automatic Electric Switch
Wittenberg.--Machnist Nodek, blind since birth,
invented a most ingenious automatic electric time
switch which may be used with any electrical appt-
ratus whatever. It is heralded by expert as a long-
felt want. This blind man learned nothing until he
was thirteen, then he visited for three years a blind
school. For several years he made a living anu ng
chair seat, then persuaded a relative to teach him
the trade of a machinit In thi he ha beenvery
succesaful, as his invention proves.












April 21, 1906


THE SUN


Thirteenth Page


Short Sei


THE


rmoin for

Non=Church (Goers

SOCIAL IN i RELI ION


Dr. Lyman Abbott says: 'Religion has
become In It. object philanthropic. Do
justice 'tad Judgment that is your Bible
order. That is the service of God, not
simply praying and pealm-singing. Pray-
ing ee kin strength for service,
pgalm_-singingl giving thanks for the
privilege of service, but the service is in
mission schools, churches, college settle-
meats, boys' clubs, girls' clubs, political
and sooal reforms, a thousand philan-
thropies, some ,material, some intellec-
tual, some spiritual, but all seeking one
great end-the promotion of human wel-
fare and the advancement of human hap-
pines. The modern conception of Chris-
tianity seems to me more Christian than
tae one it is immediately supplanting."
The Savior has said: "If ye will do
my will y shall know my doctrine."
We learn much by doing. The old idea
was tolearn and then do. It is the do-
ing the will of the Father that brings to
us the right knowledge and true concep-
tion of the true inwardness of His doc-
trine. The systematic statement of the
attributes or the exact definition of the
theories about God do not aid so much
in the daily life and in the elucidation


of its problems as the clear and definite
statement which show how the Creator
of all men and the Disposer of all hu.
man events is working out His divine
plan through the daily conflicts of hu-
manity.
God's influence is certainly limited to
but few, when the power of that influ-
ence upon the soul is found solely in an
inward experience, or in certain extreme
emotions. Still the theology of much of
the past looked for these inward emo-
tions as the best evidences and the best
interpretations of God.
When our theology is so full and so
complete that it will take in all the prob-
lemp of life as God himself does, when
it defines justice and righteousness so
clearly that the rich and the poor, the
high and the low come to the same stand-
ards, then, and not till then, will the
gospel of Christ and the teachings and
example of the Nazarene be clothed in
new power, and then there will not be
likely any separation of the masses from
the church, so much deplored to-day.
The arguments of religion which are
calculated to move men to-day are social
and moral, rather than mystical and
metaphysical.


Thinks FY THBrethren


honest in his position as any of them
are in theirs. And we shall continue to
do so until it is clearly shown that he,
and we, are wrong in so doing.-Braden-
town Herald.


Isolation and

1b Insanity
[Continued from Seventh Page]
feigned compassion of one, the flattery
of a second, the civility of a third,.the
friendship of a fourth-they all deceive
and bring the mind back to retirement,
reflection and books."

In Nebraska "the fact that the farms
are so far apart and women so scarce,
is accredited as the cause for the unu-
sual phenomena" in the country In New
York City the struggle for bread, for
wealth, for fame, for what you will, fills
the asylums. Causes as far apart as the
poles, bring about the same result-mad-
ness. An unbalanced mind: and mind,
says Schiller, is the eye of the soul,
though Joubert calls it the atmosphere
of it. Alas I for those who have to cry
out with Fielding:
"Oh, this poor brain I
Ten thousand shapes of fury whirling
there
And reason is no more."
*
No remedy in medicine can be found
for it." Herbs, whether bitter or sweet,
have effect only on the diseased body, not
the diseased mind. The physician who
declares he can cure, is himself a mad-
man, laboring under a delusion as fatal
as any entertained by his patients. Is
Alpha Lyra, toward which the sun is


whirling our world at so rapid a rate,
the Star of Madness?
*
We can never go back to the "simple
life" of our forefathers. The luxuries of
modern life are to us as the leaves of
the lotus to those who taste--we forget
the teachings of the pest and look and
press eagerly forward for what too
often is unattainable. The middle
ground is the plane of calm content, but
few care to stand upon it.

Famine in Andalusia
Madrid.-The Governor of Sevilla
telegraphs: "For weeks I have kept
open house for the famine victims, divid-
ing my bread with them, but my re-
sources are at an end, or almost at an
end, while the starvation grows worse all
the time. I haven't the heart to use
the police against the hungry how can
I uphold the lawT Storekepers are
forced to barricade themselves and to
guard their goods, rifle in hand."
All Andalusia, the garden of Spain,
whose land is owned by a few grandee,
is on the point of starvation, famine
stalking in the country districts. The
authorities, like the Governor of Se-
villa, refuse to slaughter the hungry.
At Osuna they allowed the markets and
stores to be plundered of eatables.
Yet King Alfonso gave only a paltry
few thousand dollars for his starving
people so far, and intends to use millions
for the celebration of his marriage.


King Fined $3


With the distinct understanding that
this is not participating in the discussion
about the Everglades drainage scheme,
or taking sides on the merits of the gen-
eral proposition, we are again regaled
with the apeetale of the rich man weep-
ing over the poor man's taxes. It is al-
ways so. The man who is so rich that
his taxes amount to two thousand dol-
lars a year can go into the Federal Court
for relief, and it is noticed that he is
moved Invariably by the injustice that
is attempted upon the poor man or the
lone widow whose taxes are only three
dollars and seventy cents. We give no-
tice right now that when we get to be
rich we will let the poor man do his own
bellering, and we have no doubt that in
this case, as in most others, the poor men
interested would rather do their own
cries and tears than have them done by
volunteer proxies. We move to strike
out the flood of sympathetic lachrymal
flow.-Tampa Times.

We take pleasure in calling attention
to the address "To the Democratic Voters
of Florida" of T. J. Appleyard, who is so
well known to the people of the State
that we think when hfs name is men-
tioned that every citizen can place him
at once. For any cltizen of Florida who
has not been brought in debt to T. J.
Appleyard for some courteous attention
or favor, must be a recluse indeed. He
may reasonably claim the title of Nes-
tor ox the Press, the father of the Press
Association, the ever-popular secretary
of the Senate and all-round good fellow,
a brainy, well-beloved man, capable of
filling any State offioe from Governor
down. He only meeks a place on the
Board of Railroad Commissioners.--
Bradentown Herald.

Every voter should read and ponder
the address of Col. Those. J. AppIeyard,
which appears in this paper. It is a
manly, straightforward presentation of
hisa laims, and should win him many
votes. Being well acquainted with Col.
Appleyard ad greatly attached to him,
this editor feels a sincere interest in his
candidacy and hope that he may win.
indeed, is prospects are very flattering,
as he has warm friends in every county
of the State,and the will do all they
can for hin.L-Peuta erda Herald.
Since the State papers have learned
the truth about Governor Broward's
Jacksonvil address there has been a


most pronounced change of feeling. The
average editor does not like to be made
a fool of, and generally resents any at-
tempt to do so.-DeLand News.

We notice a few of our exchanges are
demanding that legislative candidates
declare their position on the proposition
of restricting the Pardoning Board and
upon the drainage proposition. The first
proposition is one in reference to which
the agitation is purely local. There are
a few papers in the State that have been
making a determined and persistent ef-
fort to make political capital out of the,
actions of the Pardoning Board. The
people of Florida have sense enough to
know that if there is any wrong being
done by the Pardoning Board it is the
fault of the board itself, and not the
fault of the law, And if the people of
Florida are dissatisfied they can change
the personal of the board. The restrict-
ions governing the granting of pardons
are similar to that of other States. The
difference of our law and that of some
other States being that in some of tne
others the pardoning power is left en-
tirely in the hands of the Governor.
As to the drainage matter no man
need be afraid to declare his position on
that proposition. The people of Florida
have already declared themselves on the
question. That was the platform on
which Mr. Broward made the race for
Governor. All the arguments that are
now being presented, and more, too, were
urged before that election, and the peo-
ple voted for Broward against one of
the State's best known and most popular
men.-Plant City Courier.

It is with pleasure that we note that
Governor Broward and Board of Drain-
age Commissioners have decided to recall
the order for the collection of assess-
ments, and the people are to be allowed
to pay their annual taxes without pay-
ing the drainage assessment until the
suits that are entered have been adjudi-
cated and the title to the Evergades
land are settled. We suggested this
course in an editorial two weeks ago,
feeling that such a course would be the
safest to the people and the Governor,
and do no harm to any one. Therefore
we are well pleased at this disposition
of the matter for the time being. We
have stood firm in our support of the
Governor a against all the dirty lile
igs thathae been made by a tought-
les press, being assured that he is as


By Rev. T. Henry Blenus, Pastor Church Street
Christian Church










PoAurtmnth Pare


ww* wwImage.*U WWW .


April 21, 1906


The Czar's Spy
(Continued from Tenth Page)
us. The shot bad been fired as a signal
that we had been sighted, and were pur
suid, Other shots rang out, mingled
with the wild exultant Shout of the
guars Ma wathoybo down full U 1
and ow that,
out oa 'aWe wee n" w et
we tood- upo t o Odmit of 6ud.
in the. The prl we ad dreaded ad
fal The Inn.11' pwo .. th blank
had evidently be deted by a boat
draW p at the te and bse had been
followed to where wead la i what
we ad so foolshl bd -vA to be asafe
hidig pMa Va Nought else was to be
de=W to a4 the vtble. Three
ti!s the fire of a rile belched
a ilyl ian our e, and yet, by god
t nei, nther of us was strulck.L -Yet
wS W (too well that the intention of
our pursuers was to kill us.
"Q k Exelleqi Flyl while there
is yet timeI" gaped the F, rasping
my nd had Calf &r me from the
bat whe In tun, pla mM upon
SIdal Thiswqyl S8wiftlyl" Hred
our guide, and the tree of us, heedless
of ts conseqees, plunged forward
into the penetrable darkness, just as
our fier pusoers came alongside where
we had only a moment ago been sated.
They shouted wildly as they sprang to
land after us, but our guide, who had
been born and bred in these forests,
knew well how to travel in a semi-circle,
and how t6 conceal himself. It was a
race for freedom-nay, for very life.
So dark that we could m before us
hardly a foot we were compelled to place
our hand 'in front of us to avoid col-
lisio with the big tree trunks, while
ever and anon we found ourselves en-
tangled in the mass of dead creepers and
e Wal parasites that formed the dense
u-nd er..wth. Around us on every side
we rd ithe bots and earmss of our
p uers, while above the rest we heard
authoritative voice, evidently that of
a frgant of the gurd, cry-
s8oot the man, but pare the woman
Colonel wants hero bak. Don't let
escape I We shall be well rewarded
t keep on, comrades Mene edem-
ut the trembling girl beside me heard
na hing, and perhaps indeed it was best
tt she oould not hear. My only fear
wO that our ursuers, of whom then
seemed to be a doeen, had extended,
w|h the Itention of encircling us. They,
no doubt, knew every inch of that giant
fost with its numerous hbgs and
m rshes, and if they could not daover
would no doubt drive us into o or
oe bof the bogs, where escape was im-
pqsible.
Our gallant guide, on the other hand,
semed to uttey disregard the danger
kept on, evry now and then stretoh.
South his hand ad helping along the
aickted girl we had rescue from that
living tomb. Headlong we went in a
straight line, until suddenly we began to
feAl our fiqt slaking into the soft
irund and then he Finlander turned
to Je left, at rgt angle, and we found
o eves in a denser undeprgrowth,
w re n the darkness our hands and
became badly soratobed.
Another gun was fired as signal, eho-
is through the wood, but the sound
cade from the opposite direction to that
we were traveling therefore we hoped
that we had eludd those whose earnest
dIre was to capture us for the reward.
Sitdenly, however, a second gun, an
answering signal, was fired from straight
bfre us, and that revealed the truth.
were actually between the two
p ties and they were closing in upon
u They had already driven us to t'e
Sof the bog. The Finlander recog-
an our peril as quickly as I did, ad
Let us turn straight back," he urged
b atbliesly. "We may yet elude them."
ad then we again turned off at right
a lee, traveling as quickly as we were
a b hack toward the lake shore. It was


a exciting chase in the darkness, for
knew not Whither we were going, nor
ia what pitfall or ravine or treacher-
marsh we might fall. Once we saw
throh the trne the light of a lan-
t hel as rd, and already the
faed girl eide me wsenemed tired
terribly fatigued. But we hurried


IT


DWEISER
^^ is fermented in Glass-Enameled Vats.
After the process of fermentation it is lagered
(aged) from four to five months in Glass-
Lined Steel Tanks, from which it is drawn
into bottles. Thus it is
In Glass from Kettle to Lip


The result is an exquisite taste and
distinctively its own, which accounts
sale of


flavor,
for the


137,722,150 Bottles

of Budweiser in 1905
exceeding that of all other bottled beers.
Anheuser-Ruch Brewlnd Ass'n
W ?St. SLouis. U. &. A.


JOS. ZAPF & CO., Distributors.
Jacksonville.


on and on, striving to make no noise, and
yet the crackling of wood beneath our
feet seemed to us to sound like the noise
of thunder.
At last, breathless, we halted to listen.
We were already in sight of the gray
mist where lay the silent lake that held
so many secrets. There was not a sound.
The guards had gone straight on, be-
lieving they had driven us into that
deadly bog wherein, if we had entered,
we must have been slowly sucked down
and engulfed. They were surrounding
it, no doubt, feeling certain of their
prey.
But we crept along the water's edge,
until in the gray light we could distin-
guish two empty boats-that of the
guards and our own. We were again
at the spot where we had disembarked.
"Let us row to the head of the lake,"
suggested the Finn. "We may then land
and escape them." And a moment later
we were all three in the guards' boat,
rowing with all our might under the
deep shadow of the bank northward, in
the opposite direction to the town of
Nytad.
We kept a sharp lookout for any other
boat, but saw none. The signals ashore
bad attracted all the guards to that spot
to join in the search, and now, having
doubled back and again embarked, we
were every moment increasing the dis-
tance between ourselves and our pur-
suers. I think we must have rowed sev-
eral miles, for ere we landed again, upon
a low, flat and barren snore, the first
gry streak of day was showing in the
Elma noticed it, and kept her great
brown eyes fixed upon it thoughtfully.
It was the dawn for her-the dawn of
a new life. Our eyes met; she smiled
at me, and then gazed again eastward,
full of silent meaning.
Having landed, we drew the boat up
and concealed it in the undergrowth so
that the guards, on searching, should
not know the direction we had taken,
and then we went straight on north-
ward across the low-lying lands, to where
the forest showed dark against the morn
if& gray. The mist had now somewhat
cleared, but the air was keen and frosty.
This wood, we found, was of tall nigh
pines, where walking was not difficult, a
wide wilderness of trees which, hour
afterr hour, we traversed in the vain en-
deavor to find the rough path which our
guide told us led for a hundred miles
from Alavo down to Tammerfors, the
manufacturing center of the country.
But to discover a path in a forest forty
miles wide is a matter of considerable
difficulty, and for hours we wandered on
and o, but alas always in vain.
(CONTICN D NUXT WEEK)


If It's Drugs
Bettes Has It
Thei MgtM
Fi IU.K od Teller MimMN
Agel for Huers Candy
SgImal hmlmiul
Bettes Drug Store
CfU. ALlay OM W, Jeu Fl
JgT W t A IiM


Swvlb0w


Windsor Hotel


Jacksonville's Finest
and Florida's Largest
and Best Year-Round
Hotel


DODGE & 6ULLENS
Owners and Managers


Dear Dad-I arrived in Jacksonville
nearly blind, and was taken to the opti-
cian's, where I was treated by a neurolo-
gist, who proscribed diet, and put me OL
a fig for breakfast, no lunch, and a pecan
nut for dinner, and after six days' treat-
ment I could see a loaf of Pvslhd&a's
Bed five miles. Yours,
NED.
P. S.-It's bread like mother used to
make.


Try

"Green Brier"

Tennessee Whisky

ITS PURE
THATS SURE

RobtWak Simms
SOLE AGENT
Jacksonville, FRa.,
KMj m OIU PM
-i ,* ? 2 i


ii iii


MARCUS CONANT

Funeral Director
AM
Embalmer
per ttpplnces forrequiste attention.
Tele or e seve pmel pt attenon.
1 L FamagL,,

When In Jacksmvlle

....Do as Others Do....

% GILLIATU'S

22 aWBay St

FOR- *"
VrlI Lnuche..
UL(' WIMrt'l htu ^


,THE SUN










April 21, 1006


Wm. Burbridge

AL ESTATE
Bargain. in Improved and Unimproved
operty Correspondence olicited.



JOSEPH ZAPF a CO.
~WALon uL


Sole Ditributon of the Celebrated
ANHIUVSRUSCH RS, K o of AN
Also Wholesale Wines, Liquors,
Mineral Waters Eto.
If you want Pure and Reliable Goods, if you want
the Bet in Every Rescect. call on us.



I'R U On Our List


CHAS. BLUM I CO.
hisI P1


PRELUDE.


Accuse not Nature. She has done her
part. Do thou but thine.
-Milton.
*


Nature, like a
mother, lends itself
cherishes our fancies


kind and smiling
to our dreams and


-Victor Hugo.
I
Nature is just to all mankind, and re-
pays them for their industry. She re-
wards the industrious by annexing re-
wards in proportion to their labors.
-Montesquien.
And nowhere in our broad land does
she show her loving kindness as in the
South-I might truthfully say as in
Florida. Leaf and bud and blossom tes-
tify to it from the shores of Lt Marys
stream to where the waves wash the
shores of Key West. She frowns some-
times, sometimes punishes; so do the
most loving mothers. But the smile that
follows repays for all the frowns.
A recently published Farmer's Bulle-
tin, of interest to the citrus fruit grow-
ers of Florida, is by P. H. Rolfs, lately
in charge of the sub-tropical experiment
station at Miami, now director of the ex-
periment station at Lake City. It is a
very concise and complete manual of in-
formation on the methods employed in
growing oranges and other citrus fruits
in the Gulf States; but, of course, it can-
not supersede Mr. Hume's exhaustive
book upon tne same subject. The num-
ber of the Bulletin is 238, and readers
of THE SUN who desire a sopy eaa get
it on application to Secretary Wilson of
the Department of Agriculture, Wash-
ington City.


A writer in one of our exchanges says
that over eight million dollars annually
go towards saving the apple trees of this
country from insects. Isn't it cheaper
to have the birds do the work? One
man in Florida this year planted pep-
pers, peas and sunflowers throughout
his grove in corners, to attract the birds;
now his neighbors are asking him why
hia trees remained free from insects, and
are surprised to hear he spent nothing
for insecticides from the drugstore.
There is a pepper that seems to be a
perennial, at least In South Florida,
classed in the catalogues as the Kaleido-
scopic pepper, on account of the variety
of colors-yellow, red, grey and black
shown in the fruit. I hve plants on
the home place three years old, showing
blossoms and fruit in various stages of
growth. There is also a pepper we
know only as the Tabasco pepper that
also seems to flourish year by year in
the warm, generous sands of Florida.
But it seems to me that peppers are
rather hot stuff for birds.
THIRD DIVISION A. C. L.
The new feature of the Atlantic Coast
Line Railway Company, establishing a
division department, with headquarters
at Jacksonville, is of interest to all the
rural readers of THE SUN along its
main line and branches. Heretofore its
Florida business has been handled at Sa-
vannah; and, while the division agent
there, Mr. To C. White, formerly of
Tampa, has looked after affairs to gen-
eral satisfaction, still the Florida busi-
ness of the railway has increased so
largely in the last year or two that the
directors have wisely crested a new di-
vision, with H. A. Ford, formerly agent
at Gainesville, at the head as superin-
tendent.
The Atlantic Coast Line Railway has
been exploding a vast amount of money
in Florida lately, especially in Jackson-
vifle, and the establhmlots of this new
division la Jacksonville ,ill bring the
iilroad 4oeials and 'sns in gen ial
In closer touch. But not Jacksonville
alone will be benefited by this move.
Shippers all along the line down to Fort
Myers will 60 #iB tr mea headquarters
quicker, ~h a dtwgl wrong w"
uen am ,l^St% Mr. Hwd
homes to hs more responsible pitiom
with Ituks eemiisdaom frno
tbos who havo dons busmlMse with hi


in Gainesvillle, and I feel sure will not
lower his record under promotion.
The Bureau Of Entomology, in Cir-
cular No. discusses the Tobaooo
Thrips and Remedies to Prevent
"White Veins in Wrapper Tobaooo,"
rewommndling t, clean cultivation of
the field between crops; second, the
planting of other than cereal crops in
bordering fields; third, the application
of kerosene emulsion (1 part to10 parts
of water) twice a week regularly while
the plants are in the seedbed. The
spraying to be done toward sunset to
avoid sun burning of leaves.

strong and enduring
OLD HICKORY and
WHITE HICKORY WAGONS


Columbus Buies

Jaokmvtel, Fbloda

M'MURRAY&BAKER


Wines,


1Pitteenth Para


Only


$3


Alyk

KMd
Call


M MaM N

The Marvin Shoe Co.
i3 W. ay Stms, Ja-is Flu.

...CONSIGN YOUL..
Fruits and Produce

W. H. Christopher
PRONOKe ANl
COMMSION MERCHANT
10. sL Ist. JMaksvll, Fa.
Prompt Attention.. Best Prices
Returns Day of a&h
Reference, National Bank of Jadson vi le


The West End Cafe


FM LAM MA-0NLEIMU


Ul Wed goy SL


JOHN MENm, PlEpi

THE SUN, $2 PER YEAR


0 1 0


Unle Sams' Printery
IarestM"


JMKOSIone"


0 -


Whiskies, Beer and Malt


EMM PWAs
M b INMS 41 t 1 tlls Is
Han bOCubAs..............s 00 7 00
Nelm oun tyr Bye............ so 4 7 60
............... 4 o a o 1soo
M aog.r ... ................. 50 00
I J 6u001..................... ) s e0 1 00
It. ................... 5s 0 0 50
jgg.................... ISO 4 M i
O I! I ..*, .................. 4 8S 0 800
I l.......87 500 90
-.....75 70 90

$7r1 5 bo o95
n p i -gl


Ry. Gin, Corn. good gade...........................1 M8
Rye. in, Oorn. .am. e eta t................ I
e Gin, Oon Rum, beet i t o y...... t
"A Ry. PMeh and Apple Bady, mea ow.
S ed r ble. *...... ......................... **
Victoria e. Bosl D al einal
quality ................................... ...... 4 N


ramn..................................................... 1 o
i atiaT dark ........................................ oM
Ma. ..lapo.. rte....................................... 1 1
mo tas...................................


W.2s 2It.AN BROS.
W. Adam HAN RS


ft~


TH1E SUN


Agricultural Department
Conducted by W. E. Pabor


OF SATISFIED CUSTOMERS?


E. A. RIGKER
WHOLUMALE UQUOR DALR
I
Special 4sQuart Offer
Fa SITS we will send pres prepaid, 4 full
quarts of A MRke
1u' .SU we will send express prepaid, 4 full
W U.00 we will send express prepaid, 4 full
quart of i le
fer 4.w w will send, express prepad,4 full
quarts of iLabM li-the best goods to
be had for the money.
n S SLT we will send. sexre paid, 4 full
quEarts of = IC
FW $S.1 we will send. express prepaid. 4 full
quarts of -lIMiedui
FW SM.8 we will send. express prepad. 4 full
quarts of kpuINlu S
F SwI w will snd p prepad. 4 full
quarts of Uh0mi 0hi .


E. A. RIGKER
Wholesale Uquor Dealer
Ow., MIrp mif k hkuvni, Fla
me Sa mm WHA MN


TII Own Make Chocolates
SI J.....and Bon Bons.....

VTY FM *

In 1.2, I, 2 and 5 Lb. Packages


-- 25,40, 60O
A- il wphr iPes h Rgs
m -L -


UNM flems 11


We want to be the "Tiffany" In
...Jacksonvile of !nM Printing..


IPATIA -iI I Of


PARTIAL PRICE LIST OF


AOP


0 0 left i ift ft


r









NEW


S


PRINOIFIELD


Stocktoin


&


B udd,


Agents


JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


*


,The


S


Sale of Lots Now On. No Auction Sale. Prices of
Lots Are Marked Plainly on Each Lot as Shown
on Large Plat in Office. No City Taxes To Pay


Terms, 10 Per Cent Cash, 15 Per Cent in 90 Days, Balance 1, 2 and 3 Years


Never has a more advantageous offer been made to secure the most desirable
building lots in the coming residence suburb of Jacksonviller Streets have been
opened throughout this tract of 750 lots to correspond to streets of Springfield.
Sidewalks of hexagonal stone blocks are being laid along those streets. Shade
trees are being planted, water pipes will be laid, and more improvements are
under way than in many of the most thickly populated sections of the city. New
Springfield extends from Main Street on the west to the Seaboard Belt Line on
the east. New Springfield extends from Twelfth Street on the south to Twenty-
first Street on the north. Hubbard, Market, Liberty, Walnut and lona Streets
run through New Springfield. New Springfield fronts on Main Street for eight
blocks. New Springfield has an alley in the rear of every lot fronting to the
east and to the west. There have been so many inquiries for this most desira-
ble property that the indications are the great rush which started when the sale
began will continue. No auction; no basket picnic; no prizes as inducements.
The lots themselves are prizes. Each lot in the tract is a prize. The prize win-
ners will be the wise buyers. No promises are made that will not be carried
out. The work now in progress in New Springfield will be carried to comple-
tion as rapidly as possible. No better bargain was ever offered. The lots in
New Springfield are of a uniform size. That prices at which they are offered
put them in the reach of all. No one can afford to pay high rent when such an
advantageous offer is made and the chance afforded to own your lot.


[-U-


-s


TOCKTON-


BUDD=


JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


uburb


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C(C)M n(




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