Group Title: sun.
Title: The sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075914/00023
 Material Information
Title: The sun
Uniform Title: sun
Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sun Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: April 14, 1906
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tallahassee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Leon County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Leon -- Tallahassee
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.451667 x -84.268533 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 18, 1905)-v. 3, no. 47 (Sept. 12, 1908).
Numbering Peculiarities: Published at Tallahassee, Fla., June 23-Sept. 12, 1908.
General Note: Claude L'Engle, editor.
General Note: "If it's right, we are for it."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075914
Volume ID: VID00023
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33400104
lccn - sn 95047216
 Related Items
Other version: Morning sun (Tallahassee, Fla.)
Succeeded by: Dixie (Jacksonville, Fla.)

Downloads
Full Text


rson B. Browne


Withdraws from


Race


Volume 1-No. 22 JAGKSONVILLE, FLORIDA. APRIL 14, 1906 Single Gopy 5 Gents


VISIONS O SUMMER


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SUN


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A. K. TAYLOR
Cartoonist


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.,' ; >, ; "* ,' .'' : .
l haps ned th the ee truths were manifested in
F si o te A y. Every high hool oy knows that Sir Isaac
S N.ewton awt ppl it and W4rkd out from this accidental
viI i4f aitationf; that Benjamin Franklin
;the to the discovery of electricity by
se an aI alonz hit e string.
it can nItbe C had a (.eta truth manifested to
it4 ners b eat dent,. bes this great truth we are go-
in tell about was known before the accident occurred.
By means of an accident last week we became cOnflrped In the
. posseson of the ireat truth that Sun readers like un and
Ill0 not consent to be deprived of Its liht.
There is nothing that so dulls the appreciation of a great truth as
habit. People llt*1g in the knowledge of great truths become so accus-
tomed to them that they cease to marvel at their greatness. It is the
visitor who stands in wondering awe before Niagara Falls, which the
native passes without a glance.
So it is with us. We became so accustomed to the perception that
The Sun is highly appreciated by the fortunate ones who read it each
week that it took the jar of an accident to awake us from our state of
blissful somnolescence over the soul-satisfying truth that The Sun has
hit the very solar plexus of popularity, and all who get it have taken
the count, leaving The Sun to wear the belt that is buckled around the
midriff of the victor.
Last week an accident occurred in the mailing room of The Sun
office, by which one of forty-odd sacks of mail which we send, full of
Sun's, to the pobtoffice each week, from there to be distributed to
upwards of fourteen thousand intelligent and fortunate people in this
State whose names are on our st of subscribers, wa up -laced.
Result: About one-sixth of a dozen hundreds of b' subscribers
failed to get last week's paper,
Then it was that the confirmation of the great tntb, that people
who once get The 6un must have It constantly amways, hit us
like the blow that all but cause the demise of the ner paternal an-
cestor.
Here are three letters we ieived, and we thought the mail car-
rier would never stop brinfl *M4tr ones to its. We have not
counted them, but we have such a goodly store that we are quite content:

HOLLY HILL, FLA., April 9, 1906.
MR. C. L'ENGLI, Editor Sun,
Jaekuonville, Fla.
Dear br--By oaw mistake The Sun for March 1Sit failed to comr to
our office, and as my neighbor failed to receive his, suppose bundle for Holly
Hill must hav gone astray. I waited to se 11 it would not come to hand
during the following week, but as it did not, and we are gratly IntPnestod
In The Sun and ar filing them, I hope it will not be out of place to ask you
to end me the last Immue-March 31st.
Thanking you in advance, I am, sir,
Y o truly,
I. M. MABBETrB.

EBB, FLA., April 9, 1906.
CLAUDE L'ENGLE.
Jackmnvule, Fla.
I beg to call your aMeSlon to the fast that you paper (The Sun) does
not reachme qularl y. I have received muthlr a copy of the ems of March
24 nor the luast lme, due April7. Kindly sA that It Is sent out gularly, and
aleo please send me the cope| I havemlusd,u I am anzo to read every
copy. YoN trEly,
LLOYD HENDERSON.
.. .. .. .... .. ^,_, Lf s


EDITOR FT. SUNA..
Jacksonville, Fla.
Dear Sir-For some reason no one in Ft. pierce redV4
Sun missed March 31. Did you issue a paper on that dateT? ., pleas
me a copy, for which I enclose flve cent. I like yo paper o well I d
want to miss a copy of it. Yours very truly, ,
J. B. POMEROt

Of course we are sorry for those people who did not get TI un
last week (and alas, there are many such), for we coq*d not to
supply the written requests for them from the scant number had
left. But we can not help feeling glad that the accident did hiAen.
Quite selfish this, we know, but who would not be selfsh when se6uch
contentment is the result?
We have had a practical demonstration of Sun appreciation
that will compel us not to be unmindful of it for many a day.
We will see that the accident does not occur agaln.
So be easy; you'll get your Sun every week from now on as .1ng
as you are in good standing as a subscriber.
While we are in this confidential mood, we will give you just an-
other of our innermost thoughts, and close the confessional.
In the person of Mr. A. K. Taylor The Sun has one of the world's
greatest cartoonists.
His ideas are bold and courageous, his presentation original, his
execution masterly.
With unerring skill does his brain direct his pen, so that the point
of his conceptions stands out for all to see, and to such perfection has
he brought his art that the details necessary to raise a sketch in black
and white to the dignity and power of a cartoon are never lacking.
Slight is the line that divides the artisan from the artist, and few
there are who discover it.
It is perhaps a secret unrevealed to Mr. Taylor himself just how he
puts in that touch, invisible when it's there, but plainly apparent when
it's not, that makes the work of the master cartoonist, but Mr. Taylor
never fails to get this element in his work, and he therefore never fails
to make the living thing-a cartoon-while others who have worked in
this field, lacking his genius, make pictures or illustrations.
Mr. Taylor has done great work for The Sun, which has also been
his record on other papers, but his cartoons of this week, last week and
the week before are his greatest.
Not Carter nor Bush nor Opper nor Rogers nor Davenport has made
a greater cartoon than these three.
It Is in The Sun that Mr. Taylor's cartoons appear, therefore-
Great is The Sun.
If you have not already done so, go at once, forthwith, instanter
and immediately to your nearest neighbor, and if you discover that
The Sun comes not into his home, make him write a letter today, with
proper inclosure, to us, and we will undertake, for one whole yea, to
charm his eye, improve his mind and enlighten his understanding at
the same time that we bring joy and gladness to his soul.
Acquire sunshine. Price, $2 per.

THE SUN is thepaper with will of its
own; is absolutely independent, not being
handicapped by any allegiance to any hu-
man on earth, having only good will to.all;
its mission is to print all the news honestly,
cleanly and without fear or fivor and to print
it in English. In doing this we are only
i lng the obligation that the press is un-
der to the people.


-


, "- f .7* *













April 14, 1906


THE SUN


Third Page


P The Band Played Annie Laurie

But the Jacksonville Gum Bunch Could Not Follow the Tune--A
Harmonious Meeting, Because Sentiment Was Too Strong To Resist


PARADOX-A statement seemingly absurd or
oontradictory.-Webster.
Although THE SUN'S prediction last week that
thee would be stormy aeenes at the meeting of the
tookholders of the Naval Stores Export Company,
held Tuesday of this week, FAILED OF VERIFICA.
TION sad isused the first and only break in THE
SUN'S series of facts printed during the past five
months about the naval stores situation, the fact that
the meeting was harmonious proved beyond a doubt
that THE BUN'S position was ABSOLUTELY COR-
RECT.
Because this story really had to start with a
paradox, it was well to anticipate things a little by
presenting Webster's opinion of what a paradox
really is.
Complete harmony prevailed at the meeting last
Tuesday.
It was that same quality of harmony that mani-
fested itself when Louis XV. graciously agreed to
wear the tri-color of lib-
erty at the request of the
Paris revolutionary mob;
the same that prevailed
between Washington and
Cornwallis at the capit-
ulation of Yorktown;
the same that marked '
the deliberations of the A
Americans and Spaniards
at Paris when Spain was
licked and knew it cer-
tain and sure." -
Oh yes, the spirit of ,
harmony cast its blissful
spell over. the meet- (
ing last Tuesday and
searched out every nook I WAS WROt .
and corner of that ample |
auditorium so that the TO Y 1 T
evil spirits of strife and 'W BUT I
discord could find no c T
place to rest the soles of IHE
their feet. R HOOD TO
The "boys in the = Y MFF T
woods" wre at that PU LY COIFES'
meeting, and they came MY CRIME. j
with that look of deter-
mination in their eyes
which shines forth when
men resolve to work
their will at all hazards.
And the little "Jack.
sonville Gum Bunch"
which had been running
things resinous and tur.
pentinie for a few brief
moths of fancied right
to rule through ftneas
for the role of leaders,
bent before that look
even as the tiny sapling
bows before the March
gale.
With an egotism so
colossal that its very
proportions awed the
average mortal not una-e
qudaint with the prin-
cple of modesty, the
small band of leaders
yoophantedly dubbed
MThe Gumoorntc ," under-
took to dominate the
markets of the world in
the great field of naval
toe and sought not
the eousel of any oie,
outside of the "bueh," in the mngemet of the
million-dollar company intrusted to their direction.
Men whoe long experience had made them wise
in naval store matters, warned the "bunch" to look
out for trouble an the fight for mastery with so
wary, so reoureeful an aemy as Shotter; but the
warning were not heeded and eounel was not sought.
When trouble cme the bunchc" did not hesitate
to exceed their authority as diretors of the com.-
pay, sad made an agreemet with Shotter whieh
the coustitution and by-laws of the company did
not warrant.
At the very frst oppotaity the men who fur-
nished the to carry outhe war prom re-
the 1 os of the bunch and anmule the
It was h oioly dome, as a matter of eaorse
the members of the gum bash" who had bam
treamtesd to a tea of i taes a the pm s e
pled, ald who had p r the euprim at the


expense of their conceit and self-coomplacency were
not so chesty as they were, and were satisfied to
assume the humble position at the council board'
which their mistakes had earned for them.
Where THE SUN made its mistake last week
when it forecasted a row, was in overestimating the
audacity of "the bunch" and underestimating their
good sense.
THE SUN apologies for its assumption that the
nerve of "the bunch" would urge it to fight for its
vonishing prestige, and that common sense had de-
parted from its members when vanity possessed their
souls.
Not a single member of this erstwhile haughty
"bunch" chirped when the boys showed their hands
in the game, by means of the resolution offered by
Mr. John West of Valdosta, Ga., to repudiate the
Shooter contract.
It was carried unanimously.
No speech of protest was made against it.


THE MEETING WAS HARMONIOUS.
But-
THE SUN has bees VINDICATED. Its story of
conditions sad results have bee SUBSTANTIATED.
The plan of liquidation of the company is to be
carried out on a basis of 0 per oeut of the invest-
meat.
The beginni of the ad of the present Naval
Store Export mpy is born in the doeeiln
reaeed by the stokolders. Nominally the com.
pany ill in existence, but actually aa commer-
cial faster it is dead and the liquidation proceedings
partake of a f a nature, while tmhe ne oier
chaes occupy the positims of paid mourers
To winaup te affair of the eampaay, to dis-
tributet the a ts reaiag from wthe ame, amd theo
to quietly turn the slate as the whole ae the dutle
of teew oeers, sad thm th Naval Stores Export
Compan-y .c jkuomvllle will be but a palnful m*a
or7. a m -


Thus the waves will lose over the financial dere-
lict, wrecked on the rooks of egotism in the straits
of graft
Jacksonville is not the loser, however. In fact,
the prospect for naval stores export business i*
brighter now than under the most favorable exhibits
of the defunct concern.
Jacksonville is a natural point for exportation of
naval stores. Such commodities of the State drift to
this port as the real outlet. In consequence of this
condition naval stores factors of this city have been
able to maintain a satisfactory market here, despite
the deal of the Naval Stores Export Company with
H. P. Shotter.
The Jacksonville market has been reinforced in
another manner, which will enable this port to hold
front rank in the export trade. Deep water assures
prestige. With twenty feet of water now, and twen-
ty-four feet in a year or less, Jacksonville need fear
no rival in the export trade of naval stores.
The "open port" will
be fact, not fancy.
. VIEW OF A WOODS-
ilk MAN.
Jacksonville, Fla.,
IApril 11, 1000.
) / Editor Sun:
The action of the stock-
holders of the Naval
8f Stores Export Company
in repudiating and nulll-
Waying sthe agreement made
B^ by its president and
I board of directors with
the Shotter export com.
I bination, one essential
feature of which was the
maintenance of the min-
imum price of 89 ments
per gallon on spirits of
turpentine, will, in my
o opinion, ultimately prove
of great benefit to Flor-
The canceling of the
agreement releases the
a. 9 Shoott e r combination
from the obligation of
maintaining the min-
Simum price of 52 cents
per gallon, and leaves
them free to handle the
market without restric-
tion.
The action of Mr.
Coachman and associates
-I has had the effect of fore-
^ing prices so high as to
MIr Kincite over-boxing; over-
w M .desire for immediate
u m and immediate dol.-
S ^liars on the part of the
operators, with the re-
sult that the pine forests
are being wantonly de-
stroyed.
With the reduction in
price the incentive to de-
stroy our forests will be
lessened, and while a few
will be curtailed in ex-
travagant expenditures,
the many of the present
and all of the future will
be benefited.
If the action of the
Export Company yesterday can have, the effect of
reducing the price of turpentine to a legitimate,
fair paying figure, ranging, say, from 40 eente to 80
cents per gallon, it will have seared to the people
of Florida and for her generation to come, a bles-
ing beyond description in preserving her forests, her
healthfulness and her climatic inflees.
LOUIS J. BRUSH.


As to prices in the future no one has the temerity
to venture an opinion. The repdlatiop of the Shot-
ter contract leaves him free to pay any price he
ples but Shotter, as a large producer, wilU want
to kep primes up, ad the Jacksoville fators will
ertly work to this ed











HI E SpUNWE 4R f#OR IT


THESUN


am a m~ -V w m me -- m YI 3LOK: T, aM M OW.AT 81 WWl


T"r7TpT


A. K. TAYLOR
Cartoonist


rMYN sIImU, JA-msl -ma


in wi M UM N&w wviaww% i-u~ .wu uuosp W =- ,wrmgw -- -
V 1--U 22I .4E~rd. ACOWMIU4 IRlA, RI N' !6 5Cents pea Copy.$2per Year
t~tsw s d WOt 0 at I*OY1S lL sodd maow __ _


I ~a *
4


h~*rnPOubber and Rosier


S
.' Oha. opened thdt the gretet truths were manifested in
way. Every high school boy knows that Sir Isaac
7 wt ppl6 1 ad worked out from this accidental
vii h o f gravitation; that Benjamin Franklin
t ithe h r to the discovery of electricity by
n a acd tn along his kite string. *
it can n4. be had a great truth manifested to
it4 Wners b ean ent, bhoane this great truth we are go-
in V tell ab&6t was ki n before the accident occurred.
By means of an accident last week we became confirmed In the
possesalon of the great truth that Sun readers like The Sun and
IIIN not consent to be deprived of Its light.
There is nothing that so dulls the appreciation of a great truth as
habit. People living in the knowledge of great truths become so accus-
tomed to them that they cease to marvel at their greatness. It is the
visitor who stands in wondering awe before Niagara Falls, which the
native passes without a glance.
So it is with us. We became so accustomed to the perception that
The Sun is highly appreciated by the fortunate ones who read it each
week that it took the jar of an accident to awake us from our state of
blissful somnolescence over the soul-satisfying truth that The Sun has
hit the very solar plexus of popularity, and all who get it have taken
the count, leaving The Sun to wear the belt that is buckled around the
midriff of the victor.
Last week an accident occurred in the mailing room of The gun
office, by which one of forty-odd sacks of mail which we send, full of
Sun's, to the postoffice each week, from there to be distributed to
upwards of fourteen thousand intelligent and fortunate people in this
State whose names are on our list of subscribers, was misplaced.
Result: About one-sixth of a doen hundreds of 6uI subscribers
failed to get last week's paper, ,
Then it was that the confirmation of the great truth, that people
who once get The un must have It constantly and always, hit us
like the blow that all but caused the demise of the near paternal an-
cestor.
Here are three letters we received, and we thought the mail car-
rier would never stop brintlni im,4 r ones to Us. We have not
counted them, but we have such a goodly store that we are quite content:

HOLLY HILL, FLA., April 9, 1906.
MR. C. L'ENGLp, Editor Sun,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Dear Sir-By soma mistake The Sun for March Slst failed to come to
our office, and a my neighbor failed to receive hi., suppose bundle for Holly
Hill must have one stay. I waited to we if it would not come to hand
during the following week, but a it did not, and we are greatly interested
in The Sun and are filing them, I hope it will not be out of place to ask you
to send me the last issue-March 31st.
Thanking you In advance, I am, air,
Yowu truly,
I. M. MABBETTE.


LAUDE ENGLE.EBB, FLA., April 9,1906.
Jacksonville, Fi..
I beg to call your attetio to the fact that your paper (The Sun) does
not reach me regularly. I have received neither a copy of the inue of March
24 nor the last mue, due April 7. Kindly se that it is sent out regularly, and
also please send me the copies I have mied, as I am anxiou to reed every
copy. Yours truly,
LLOYD HENDERSON.


TO. piMBOE, FLA.44
EDITOR SUN,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Dear Sir-For some reason no one in Ft. ere rna
Sun iflaed Marth 31. Did youlaiue a paperon thatd tA ,plea. M |
me a copy, for which I enclose five centa. I like yoir 1welld I
want to mia copyof it. Yourvery truly,
i. R. POMEROt*

Of course we are sorry for thoeu people who did not get TI un
last week (and alas, there are many such), for we c not b i to
supply the written requests for them from the scant ~imber .had
left. But we can not help feeling glad that the acci t did n.
Quite selfish this, we know, but who would not be sel6fs when sAiuch
contentment is the result?
We have had a practical demonstration of Sun appreciation
that will compel us not to be unmindful of it for many a day.
We will see that the accident does not occur agaln.
So be easy; you'll get your Sun every week from now on as l9ng
as you are in good standing as a subscriber.
While we are in this confidential mood, we will give you just an-
other of our innermost thoughts, and close the confessional.
In the person of Mr. A. K. Taylor The Sun has one of the world's
greatest cartoonists.
His ideas are bold and courageous, his presentation original, his
execution masterly.
With unerring skill does his brain direct his pen, so that the point
of his conceptions stands out for all to see, and to such perfection has
he brought his art that the details necessary to raise a sketch in black
and white to the dignity and power of a cartoon are never lacking.
Slight is the line that divides the artisan from the artist, and few
there are who discover it.
It is perhaps a secret unrevealed to Mr. Taylor himself just how he
puts in that touch, invisible when it's there, but plainly apparent when
it's not, that makes the work of the master cartoonist, but Mr. Taylor
never fails to get this element in his work, and he therefore never fails
to make the living thing-a cartoon-while others who have worked in
this field, lacking his genius, make pictures or illustrations.
Mr. Taylor has done great work for The Sun, which has also been
his record on other papers, but his cartoons of this week, last week and
the week before are his greatest.
Not Carter nor Bush nor Opper nor Rogers nor Davenport has made
a greater cartoon than these three.
It Is in The Sun that Mr. Taylor's cartoons appear, therefore-
Great is The Sun.
If you have not already done so, go at once, forthwith, instanter
and immediately to your nearest neighbor, and if you discover that
The Sun comes not into his home, make him write a letter today, with
proper inclosure, to us, and we will undertake, for one whole year, to
charm his eye, improve his mind and enlighten his understanding at
the same time that we bring joy and gladness to his soul.
Acquire sunshine. Price, $2 per.

THE SUN is the paper with awill of ts
own; is absolutely independent, not being
handicapped by any allegiance to any hu-
man on earth, saving only good will to.all;
its mission is to print all the news honestly,
cleanly and without fear r fvor and to print
it in English. In doing this we are only
fhlfllling the obligation that the press is un-
der to the people.


LI'












April 14,1906


THE SUN


Third Page


P The Band Played Annie Laurie P

But the Jacksonville Gum Bunch Could Not Follow the Tune--A
Harmonious Meeting, Because Sentiment Was Too Strong To Resist


PARADOX-A statement seemingly absurd or
contradictory.-Webster.
Although THE SUN'S prediction last week that
there would be stormy seenee at the meeting of the
stowholdWrs of the Naval Stores Export Company,
held Tuesday of this week, FAILED OF VERIFICA.
TION and caused the first and only break in THE
SUNS series of facts printed during the past five
months about the naval stores situation, the fact that
the meeting was harmonious proved beyond a doubt
that THE SUN'S position was ABSOLUTELY COR-
RECT.
Because this story really had to start with a
paradox, it was well to anticipate things a little by
presenting Webster's opinion of what a paradox
really is.
Complete harmony prevailed at the meeting last
Tuesday.
It was that ame quality of harmony that mani-
fested itself when Louis XVI. graciously agreed to
wear the tr-color of lib-
erty at the request of the
Paris revolutionary mob;
the same that prevailed
between Washington and
Cornwallis at the capit-
ulation of Yorktown
the same that marked
the deliberations of the
Americans and Spaniards
at Paris when Spain was
licked and knew it cer-
tain and sure. -
Oh I yes, the spirit of o
harmony cast its blisful
spell over. the meet-
ing last Tuesday and
searched out every nook (j V RO G
and corner of that ample rITO WO OT TH
auditorium so that theC BT
evil spirits of strife and U
discord could find no
place to rest the soles of m oVnT THE
their fee t. RHOODTO
The "boys in the tlRiOOD Tor A
woods" were at that PUDLB LY COt FE5
meeting, and they came MY CRI .
with that look of deter-
mination in their eyes
which shines forth when
men resolve to work
their will at all hazards.
And the little "Jack-
sonville Gum Bunch"
which had been running
things resinous and tur-
pentinie for a few brief
moths of fancied right
to rule through fitness
for the role of leaders,
bent before that look
even as the tiny apling
bows before the March
gale.
With an egotism so
olossal that its very
proportions awed the
average mortal not unas*
quainted with the prin-
ciple of modesty, the
small band of leaders n-
qophantedly dubbed
he GuO. or.a," under-
took to dominate the
markets of the world in
the great field of naval
stone, and sought not
the sounel of any one,
outside of the "bunch," in the management of the
milion-dollar company intrusted to their direction.
Men whose long experience had made them wise
in naval store matters, warned the "bunch" to look
out for trouble in the fight for mastery with so
wary, so resourceful an emy as Shotter hbut the
warnings were not headed and ounsel was not sought.
When trouble em the "bunch" did not hesitate
to exceed their authority as directors of the com.
pay, and made an areemet with Shotter which
costitutiUon and by-laws of the company did
At the very first opportunity the men who fur-
nished the money to carry an the war promptly re-
the action of the bunch and annulled the
It was doemm m as a matter of omUrMe
the members of the bneh" who had bem
eated to a toe of eassrn as the pme Is
played, atd who had pal the empelism at the


expense of their conceit and self-complacenoy, were
not so chesty as they were, and were satisfied to
assume the humble position at the council board'
which their mistakes had earned for them.
Where THE SUN made its mistake last week
when it forecasted a row, was in overestimating the
audacity of "the bunch" and underestimating their
good sense.
THE SUN apologies for its assumption that the
nerve of "the bunch" would urge it to fight for its
vanishing prestige, and that common sense had de-
parted from its members when vanity possessed their
souls.
Not a single member of this erstwhile haughty
"bunch" chirped when the boys showed their hands
in the game, by means of the resolution offered by
Mr. John West of Valdosta, Ga., to repudiate the
Shooter contract.
It was carried unanimously.
No speech of protest was made against it.


THE MEETING WAS HARMONIOUS.
But-
THE SUN has bees VINDICATED. Its story of
conditions Mad results have bees SUBSTANTIATED.
The plan of liquidation of the company is to be
carried out on a basis of 80 per cent of the sinvet
ment.
The beginning f the ad of the parent Naval
Stores Export Compa is bore In the decision
re d by the o de Nominally the com-
pany ie still in existeme, but actually aa commer-
cial factor it i dead ad the liqd on
partake of a fumereal nature, whie the new ces
chases oupy the positiM of paid mourner
To wiMup tsh affairs of the eampsay, to di-
tribute the aeets "emaing from the ASse%, aad then
to quietly turn the slate o the whole a the duties
of the u ew n Aeer, ad the the. Naval Stoei Export
Company of Jakmvlls will be bhot a pailaful mew*


Thus the waves will close over the financial dere-
lict, wrecked on the rocks of egotism in the straits
of graft.
Jacksonville is not the loser, however. In fact,
the prospect for naval stores export business is
brighter now than under the most favorable exhibits
of the defunct concern.
Jacksonville is a natural point for exportation of
naval stores. Such commodities of the State drift to
this port as the real outlet. In consequence of this
condition naval atorem factors of this city have been
able to maintain a satisfactory market here, despite
the deal of the Naval Stores Export Company with
8. P. Shotter.
The Jacksonville market has been reinforced in
another manner, which will enable this port to hold
front rank in the export trade. Deep water assures
prestige. With twenty feet of water now, and twen-
ty-four feet in a year or less, Jacksonville need fear
no rival in the export trade of naval stores.
The "open port" will


be fact, not fancy.
II/ )\ VIEW OF A WOODS-
MAN.
Jacksonville, Fla..,
April 11, 1000.
O/ Editor Sun:
M/ / .j The action of the stock.
/ holders of the Naval
S.S stores Export Company
in repudiating and nulli.
tying the agreement made
,- by its president and
/ board of directors with
the Shotter export com*
Sbination, one essential
feature of which was the
maintenance of the min-
imum price of 52 cents
per gallon on spirits of
turpentine, will, In my
opinion, ultimately prove
of great benefit to Flor.
The canceling of the
agreement releases the
S. Shot e r combination
,s from the obligation of
maintaining the min.
Imump rice of 5 cents
pe rgallon, and leaves
them free to handle the
market without restric-
SThe action of Mr.
Coachman and associates
has had the effect of fore-
ing prices so high as to
Incite over-boxing; over-
desire for Imreaditte
L um and immediate dol-
S- larsan on the part of the
operators, with the re-
sult that the pine forests
are being wantonly de-
stroyed.
With the reduction in
price the incentive to de-
stroy our forests will be
lessened, and while a few
will be curtailed in ex.
travagant expenditures,
the many of the present
and all of the future will
be benefited.
If the action of the
Export Company yesterday an have. the feet of
reducing the price of turpentine to a legitimate,
fair paying figure, raningi, say, from 40 eoate to O0
cents per gallon, it will haw assured to the people
of Florida and for her generatls to eoe, a ble-.
ing beyond description In preserving her forest, her
healthfulness and her elimatie nl.Meaes.
LOUIS J. BRUSH.


As to prices in the future so one has the temerity
to venture an opinik. Them sepdiation of the Shot-
ter contract leaves him Ir to pay any price he
please, but Shotter, as a large producer, will want
to eep pris up, ad the Jacmonvile faeton will
ertaily work to this Md.














Pourtli tpi


THE SUN


April 14, 1906


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Dear Spotte-Tis from Mexico-the city of Mex-
ioo-that I'm sending ye this written token of me
esteem. Ye know Mex. 'Ti that part of Texas
south of the Rio Grande, where Moxie and Greasers
are made-Greasero being' the lingo in which we refer
to the benighted natives of this step-child of the
United States.
Ah, me boy, 'tis the grand country 'tis, and I'm
having the time of me life. What with wining and
dining with the crowd of bounders that's hooks up
like the gum bunch of Jacksonville, I'm burning the
candle at both ends, but can't get the smell of any-
thing but cremated moey.
In looping the loop with theme sports I miss the
perfume of the gasoline, but it is considered vulgar
here for the smart crowd to use the bubble carte.
Only the poor peona-that's what they call the
Crackers here-ride in them as they go to their dally
toll.
Only this morning as I was coming through the
plasa, pusslying me meacal be-fogged brain whether
Bunkman would beat Baker that I got a hearty slap
on the back, and there was me old friend Dial.
President Dies, if ye please, and delighted he was,
tho reproachfully he says: "Pat, Pat Murphy, in
the city of Mexico, and never letting me know. How
could you, Pat?'
Now, Spotta, you know how modest I am, altho
Din and myself drank out of the same pulque bottle
back in the days before he packed the convention and
landed this job of dictator, yet it wasn't the likes of
Pat Murphy who would go up to the Palace and kick
in the front door on that account.
So I saysa "W4l, Porfrio, how's tricks


I


"Come," he saye, "up to the house, and if the
brewery wagon has come yet we will set down in
the patio and absorb the liquid bread of San Antone
while I tell ye how I out the pucker string of the
dough bag. Bring your telescope and stay with me
while ye are in town, and when ye are ready to hit
the rit 'll have a private car backed up for ye."
And it's there I am, and writing with a gold pin
dipped in perfumed ink while me brow is cooled with
f tropical breese from an electric fan. Ye mark me
spelling. Ti a delicate compliment I'm paying me
dear friend ru Carnagee, who is trying to restrict
the alphabetical output.
Wouldn't it Ohill you to know that in the midst
of this glorious splendor I have fits of nostalgia,
which the same i Spanish for hankering for your
old diggings. Indeed I had it and be the same I'm
just rmaurrting from a severe spell. Twas all be-
cause of me greed for knowledge. I picked up a na.
tive paper, nd 'twas such an unholy mudge that
the sight of it threw me memory back to dear old
Tallahaee, and I was overcome with sadness in
thinking of me old haunts.
By tbe be, I'm now wise to good tips on how
to peddle inumace and never et fund out. These
fellows here have a system that's part of their po-
litical birthright. They don't calf it graft either
but write it down as a fee, and consider it a patriotic
principle to annex the 'dobe dollars of the boys who
rush up to do the public servant stunt They have
only one mottos "Git it all," and each patriot
pushes the word down the line.
No more free silver for Mexico Here I could
weep with the great Datto of Lincoln, Neb. I love
eveythig free, and that endeared me to Bill Bryan
and hia theory and tis many the time I have carried
the beamr became I would not seeriflSe me principles
whem I demanded free silver.
I was talking to Bryan the other day about the
m ppims ad oug that w se l the idlande
and buy Ireland*
BiL tNhotuIy studied the s1ee aad said:


"I can see no benefit to be gained by that, Pat. (Xr
foreign relations would not be helped."
"Ha," says I, "if we own Ireland we will not have
to import politicians and policemen, and we can
paralyze the markets of the world with these home
products."
But as I was saying Mexico is a grand country.
And what a place for concessions and franchisee for
a good promiser. Tears drool down me cheeks when
J think of me old friend Jim Barrs and the limited
field he Is plowing. With his ability for getting
something for nothing he wouldn't have to fool with
getting one measley street and a monopoly of the
river, but here his talents would get him a seaport
in ji time.
Ah, me boy, how true 'tie that opportunity makes
the man and lack of it puts us all on the hog.
I had lunch with Sara Bernhardt yesterday.
'Twas a joyful occasion and the divine Sara was in
mood of frolicsome gayety. "Pat," she says, "I love
dear old Jacksonville. My last night there was so
happy, especially after hearing the amount of the
box ofce receipts. But I love Tampa, too," she
pointedly added.
Ye wonder why I'm here. 'Tis no secret now.
Ye read of the big deal of the Standard Oil Co.
'Twas meself that put it through, and now tell me
if your Uncle Henry Rogers doea not know how to
pick hi men when he wants anything done.
It is time for coffee, 1 mut lose.
From where will I next write yout- *
uen awbe?
I m free as a bird. Floating to and fro, seeking
the honey of life, mavoureen.
Maybe ll drop into Panama for a visit of fifteen
or twenty minutes. The New York Independent
wants me to write a sketch of me impreeao on
the isthmus and that will be loog eoug to gather
material. Isn't it funny so few imprsion s have
bee madeNS there for the million speT t
Give my love to your friends.
Adios. PAT MUaruY.


Deep Water Is Here Now


Twenty feet of water is now ffed vessels com. The principal points whee dredging will have to sufficient water at the docks and for fitting anchor-
ing up to the wharves of Jacksonville. be done to get a twenty-four foot depth are at Dames age.
Twenty-four feet of water for this port will soon Point and Trout creek. While two or three other Through the enjoyment of this maritime advan-
Srea"insed. places in the channel will need attention, yet the tage Jacksonville will, in every sense, be the gateway
Within eight months the channel in the St. Johns real work of getting twenty-four feet will be at those foi the larger portion of Florida. But as this oty is
river leading to the ocean will have such depth at mentioned. benefited, o will other towns of the State hare in
lowet point. A matter of much satisfaction to the Government Just proportion. Increase the commerce of Jack-
Constant dripping of water will wear away stone engineers superintending the river improvement is sonville means corresponding increase for the places
and persistent dredging will make a deep-water chan- that where the dredging has been done there is no of which it is the distributing point for merchandise.
nel. So it is with the pathway for deep-draft ves- indication of the channel refilling. When after all Moreover it affords an outlet for many of the prod-
selI in the St. Johns river from Jacksonville to the is done to cut the channel to the desired depth some ucts of the State.
sea. dredging will probably be necessary from time to 'A drawback to the development of Florida has
The many years of effort to make Jacksonville a time that uniformity may be maintained, yet judg- been the lack of a deep water port on the Atlantic
deep water port is fast nearing attainment, and in ing from the present condition of those portions of side; one that was possessed of adequate railway
Ises than a year the long struggle toward this end the channel dug eighteen months ago the labor of connections to the vast territory of export products.
will be rewarded by successful completion of the keeping the course clear will be light. Jacksonville had the railway facilities, but the
work. The same favorable condition of work done is re- port advantages were deficient, and although her
Already twenty feet of water have been obtained, pKrted of the jetties at the mouth of the river. While commercial growth has been remarkable, yet the han-
the dredging at Trout creek, the last point in the these jetties have not been completed to full height dicap of insufficient water to permit large vessels
work of making the twenty-foot channel, being fin- to prevent overflow caused by the high tide, yet there to enter has been a retarding source and preventing
ished this week. is sufficient water on the bar-twenty-five feet at low the full, vigorous industrial life that is the right of
This alone, can be considered a great work, but tide. It is stated that no Government work has this city by virtue of its location.
operations will not stop at twenty feet. Dredging proved more satisfactory than these jetties, and so The obstacles hindering its development as a deep
will continue until the shoal places in the channel well have they been built, that although two years water port have been nearly removed. Now, with
have a .depth of twenty-four feet. since completion no repairs have been needed. twenty feet of water, and next year twenty-four feet
That this can be done within eight months is The most difficult part of the work of improve- to offer big ocean carriers, the time has arrived when
the gratifying assurance of Lieutenant-Colonel ment was ended with the completion of the twenty- vessels of large capacity will come here for cargo,
BSckett of the engineer's office in charge of the work. foot channel. While this was going on, however, and the products of the State will be shipped here
At least it is possible to complete the dredging in everything possible that would tend to hasten the for transport.
that time if the work is not hampered by lack of twenty-four foot depth in prospect was aided. Jacksonville will be the natural outlet for naval
funds or in not getting reasonable bids from private After the completion of the twenty-four foot chan- stores and lumber, of which such quantities are man-
contractors. Should this be the case a year might nel leading to the ocean some improvement of the ufactured in Florida. Phosphate shipments should
be required in which to finish the work, but delay water front of Jacksonville will be necessary in order also be large, while more cotton will find its way
is not apprehended. to accommodate the increased sea traffic. While the here.
Congress will appropriate sufficient money to course from the sea will be opened in satisfactory On the whole, the future prospects of Jackson-
carry out the improvement, but it is not likely that manner, yet the need for additional harbor room ville, with deep water in the foreground, present an
the fund will be available until June. Meantime, will be pressing. From Ocean Street to Liberty outline of commercial importance so great that esti-
bids will be asked for portions of the work, and if Street deep water Is oloes to the shore line, but from nation of results cannot be placed.
satisfactory, those receiving the award will be per. Ocean Street to the railroad bridge, and from Liberty It is, however, safe to state, that with all ad-
mitted to immediately begin on the contracts. Then Street east deep water is at some distance from t thus far in the ndtrial life of the city,
as soon as the appropriation becomes available the land. Along those portions of the river front some mercialism of the future as but a step in the making
Government dredges will also be put into operation, dredging will have to be done in order to provide of the city that Jacksonville is destined to become.




Unpublished Letters of Pat












April 14, 1906


THE SUN


Fifth Page


What's Agitating the People These Days


All efforts of leaders of the Republican party to
keep the question of tariff reform in the background
are unavailing. Sidetracking the issue by the rail-
way rate bill, and the campaign of the Administra-
tiM against the trusts have failed to turn the public
c.^ from the tariff, or to remove the desire of the
people that Congress take steps to relieve the burden
put upon the masses under the mask of protection.
Noteworthy, too, is the fact that the rank and
file of the Republican party are becoming aroused
over the matter, and are not inclined to longer
blindly accept the doctrine that a high tariff is a
benefit. A significant token of such feeling is ex-
hibited when Congressman Grosvenor of Ohio is
moved to state that he will investigate the charge
that American products can be purchased abroad for
less than is paid in the United States.
Democratic newspapers are not alone in discus-
sion of the necessity for tariff reform. Republican
journals, in response to public sentiment, are becom-
ing more outspoken in favor of such legislation.
The feeling in Pennsylvania is defined by the
Phoenixville Republican in the following language:
"The protected industries of this country are ab-
normally profitable and at the expense of the whole
body of consumers. When great corporations are
forced to double up their stocks in order to hide the
enormous size of their dividends, it is an evidence
that the consumers are not getting a square death,
and inquiry is bound to be made and with unplea.,-
ant results."
On the Pacific Coast similar expression is found.
A Republican paper of California declares that: "The
country demands a revision of the tariff. Tho
American consumer sees no good reason why he
should be compelled to pay more for American-mad'e
goods in the markets at home than the Englishman,
the German and the Russian pay for the same good,
three thousand miles away."
The New York Times, independent and conserva-
tive, renders the following summary: "The present
movement hinges on three general facts: First, that
our manufacturers are hampered by a needless tax
on materials; second, that American buyers are pac-
ing a good deal more for protected goods than for-
eign buyers; third, that the profits of those oppres-
sive conditions go to practical monopolies. See what
this means. It means that the manufacturers them-
selves, the natural supporters because the beneflciarit
of the tariff, are divided; it means that numbers of
the people are becoming convinced that foreignerA
are really favored by the tariff and not Americans,
and it means that the present intense and logical ani-
mosity toward the monopolies is being directed
toward monopolies buttressed, if not created, by the
protective tariff. These are facts wholly in conflict
with the patriotic pretensions of the Protectionist4-
The American people will stand a good deal for what
they believe to be patriotic; they are liable to kick
like Texas steers at patriotism discovered to be but
a cloak for selfish greed."
The Philadelphia Record declares that "the tariff
is the underlying base upon which is built the whole
superstructure of corrupt monopolistic combinations
which now menace the peace of the country through
the incitement of class jealousies and hatreds."

In maintaining a high protective tariff the plea of
aiding the interests of the country has gradually been
shifted from its real meaning. The interests as now
represented are of the few and not of the masses.
The effort to remove the tax on grain alcohol,
and the fight that is being made in Congress to re-
sist the public demand is an instance of private in.
terest attempting to continue its career of monopoly
and extortion.
Free grain alcohol would mean that manufactur-
ers of the poisonous wood alcohol would be put out
of business. Gasoline as a fuel for motors woul.4
be superseded by alcohol, therefore the Standard Oil
Company is a foe of the measure; turpentine oper-
ators protest.
Secretary Wilson, in a report on the production
of alcohol and its value to the farmer, estimates
that on an sore of land that produces fify bushels
of corn there can be made from its corn 140 and frona
its cornstalks 170 gallons of commercial alcohol. At
the rate of 50 cents a gallon that would be $155
worth. He calculated that from an acre of such
potatoes as are grown abroad for cattle feed there
might be made 00 gallons of alcohol, or, at the rate
of 50 cents, $250 worth.
In commenting on these figures the Philadelphia
Record says: "These figures indicate how largely,
If by the removal of the tax the market for alcohol
were allowed to grow, the profits of agriculture might
he ineressed. The farmers would also find untaxed
alcohol both cheaper than and a marked improvement
over kerosene for lighting purposes, and over gasoline
as a motor fuel for the internal combustion engines
which, in recent years, have come into wide use on
American farms. German manufacturers, unorip-
pld a tax on alcohol, make $o30 000 000 worth of
rt adyes saUly, and are eabe to export


$50,000,000 worth of fine chemicals. We put a tax
of 2500 to 3000 per oent on grain alcohol, and thus
put ourselves out of business. But we give magnifi-
cent protection to the poisonous wood alcohol indus.
try. Great is protection I"
Little progress is being made in the Senate toward
passage of the Hepburn railway rate bill. Debate
continues, but the situation becomes more compli-
cated, neither being able to agree on amendments
proposed. Predictions are made that if the bill
passes it will be without amendment. As the bill
in that form is admitted by all as imperfect and of
faulty construction such legislation would prove un-
satisfactory.
Senator Morgan of Alabama is leader of the few
Democrats who consider that the scope of the rail-
way rate bill is an encroachment on State's rights.
Mr. Morgan holds that the States create the corpor-
ations and should exercise control. As to the matter of
checking exorbitant railway rates, he said: "If
Congress would do its duty in the improvements of
tne water courses and place the river and harbor bill
on the same footing as the postoffloe bill, then the
railways would cease to do evil and learn to do good,
and the people could snap their fingers at them."


A Song of Cheer


(The following poem wa written by Prof. (kGrge W.
Chase of eolumbus. Ga., father of Mr. Frank Chaue of
Jacksonville.)

Oh why should we grieve as the yearn go by
For the joys of which time has bereft us,
Or ever send up from our hearts a sigh
When blessings so sweet are left ise?

The sun's golden rays, the beauty of flowers,
The song of the birds so clear
With the joys of lovers and friends are ours,
And the smiles of the children so dear.
Then the power to each one of us always in given
Of doing the kindly deed,
And with the love like that of our Father in
heaven
Relieving the sufferer's need.

Ere the leaf of our days is yellow and w re,
When our farewell of earth we shall take,
If we shun every evil and sin en drear,
And this for the Lord's dear sake.
With the stream of His providence gently we'll
flow,
As it drawn us on up to our rest,
And with songs in our hearts rejoicing we'll go
To the mansions of peace so blest.

Then why should we grieve as the years go by
For the joys of which time has bereft up,
Nor thank our dear Father, the Christ on high,
For the bleasinge so sweet that are left tine?


President Roosevelt is preparing an address "On
the Man with the Muckrake," in which he will at-
tack the n mgsine writers who have dared to assail
the Senate. Julian Hawthorne, writing of this new
fad of Roosevelt, says: "The Senate has been visibly
disquieted by the onalaughts made upon their disin-
terestedness and integrity, and symptom are appar-
ent, in the local press and elsewhere, of an effort to
stem the tide and put another light upon the matter.
"As must Inevitably happen, these efforts, being
conceived in iniquity, must be entrusted to creatures
of corresponding personal character; and their jour.
nalistle ability ii quite of a piece with their char-
aster; sine, happily, it is sfill one of the rarest
events In our current history that a newspaper man
or magasinist of any worth and ability has ever been
found to abase himself to the service of predatory
corporations. They are almost always poor, but they
are even more almost always honet.
"The mark of the beast, therefore, is always read-
ily recognizable in the disquisitions of the corpor-
ation seribes, and whatever statements they make
are discounted.
"What more opportune juncture, then, could be
taken by a President who take all business to be his
to swoop dowa with open mouth upon the
daof the A ***-ato-i whoe -mbers


Aldrich, Kean and others of that conclave have not
been and are not to be the least sufferers--and bodily
devour them ?
"Nay, his appetite may be sharpened by certain
insinuations made here and there against his own
august person.
"And, having devoured them, will not Aldrich,
Kean and their brethren arlae and call him blessed
and extend the glad hand of forgiveness? To a
deeply-plotting Executive it may seem not unplaus-
ible."
The nation's attention is attracted to Idaho,
where the authorities of that State seem determined
to fasten upon the three officials of the Western Fed-
eration of Miners-Ilaywood, Moyer and Pettibone-
the charge of having been responsible for the murder
of Governor Steunenberg of Idaho. A confession is
said to have been made by Orchard, a miner, impli-
cating these men, who were dragged from their
homes in Colorado to Idaho for trial. The manner
in which the case is being conducted and the treat-
ment accorded the prisoners has aroused in many
minds suspicion that they are victims of conspiracy.
Their work as leaders of the miners has rendered
them obnoxious to the Mine Owners' Association,
and their friends declare the charge of murder is but
a pretext to hang them, so that the obstruction in
the way of the owners would be forever removed.
Governor Gooding of Idaho and those who are
handling the State's side of the case are charged
with being tools of the Mine Owners' Association.
8igniflcant color is given to such claim by the inso-
lence displayed by the authorities.
Governor Gooding was interviewed by a newspaper
correspondent, who asked: "But suppose union
labor, and the working people of Ada County strenu-
ously object to these men being hung?"
"To hell with the people. What do I care for the
people? If any of these unionites try to raise
trouble I will call out the military," replied Governor
Gooding.
In view of expressed disregard of the people it
would seem that justice has but slight chance of get-
ting an inning. Executive despotism will construe
the law to its own desires.


Mr. Browne Withdraws
The many eitisens of Florida who admire the
career of Hon. Jefferson B. Browne ain the position
of Railroad Commissioner, will regret that he has
decided to withdraw his candidacy. Mr. Browne has
been a most active factor in promoting the efficiency
of the Commission, and its standard of usfulness has
been greatly increased during his service. His finely
trained legal mind and his ability to grasp the ques-
tions which confronted the Commission, were sources
of rest strength to that bureau. Mr. Browne's ree-
ordas Railroad Commissioner has been so satisfae-
tory that the prospect of his reelection was ex-
tremely bright.
Mr. Browne's letter of withdrawal follows:

To the Democratic People of Florida:
When I became a candidate for Railroad Commi-.
sioner four years ago it was not my intention to
stand for reelection, and I was steadfast in that de-
termination until a few months ago, when I began
receiving letters from a number of fair-minded and
conservative men who knew of my intention, setting
forth reasons why I should again run. Then the
Democratic Executive Committee of my own county,
for whom I have the highest esteem, passed a resolu-
tion unanimously urging me to be a candidate. This,
and the letters received, caused me for a time to
waver in my purpose, but after mature deliberation
I am convinced that I am right in not agaspin being
a candidate for the office which I now hold.
I believe in the sound old Democratic doctrine
of rotation in office, and I have followed it all .
through my political career, never having been a
candidate for reelection to any public office.
I am fully in accord with the principles enun-
ciated by President Andrew Jackson in his first an-
nual message to Congress,. in which he says:
"The duties of all public officers are, or at least
are capable of being made, so lain and simple that
men of intelligence may readily qualify themse|ve.
for their performance; and 1 cannot but believe that
more is lost by the long continuance of men in office
than is generally to be gained by their experience."
I have served the State as Railroad Commissioner
at conslderablle pecuniary sacrifce, having given up
a lucnerative law pIracticee, which I now feel that justice
to myself call. upon nme to resume, and in retiring
from office I wish to thank the people of the State
for the very handsome vote which they have always
given me whoever I have been a candidate for oakie.
and for the flattering assurance of support which I
have received from al l othe Stat.
NB. BBOWNL












$dh thP*g


THE SUN


April 14,* 1906


Shaking the Old Plum Tree

By EDWARD FITZGERALD
-am


The Senatorial situati I Hamilton County is
condensing Into sentiment for return of Hon. Frank
Adams. Those who had announced for the ofiee
have withdrawn, with oe exception, yielding to the
demand publicly pressed that Mr. Adams become
a candidate.
Seldom has there been such popular demonstra-
tion of the oce seeking the man as in this instance,
and it is remarkable proof of the esteem in which
Mr. Adams is held by his fellow-eitisens.
That he will be compelled to grant their en-
treaties cannot be doubted, despite his retirement
from polities, and as one of the balance wheels of
the Senate he will contribute much to the usefulness
of that body.

Those who thint for oaoe will not have much
longer to deliberate on the question of submitting
their candidacy to the action of the peoples as the
entries close on Tuesday, April 10. If all who had
spoken of the likelihood of contesting for each office,
both county and State, had put their intentions into
action the list would have been long, indeed. As it
is, with the elimination of the faint-hearted, the peo-
ple have a large range of choice.
Whether it is the 'best" men who are appealing
to the voter is a matter for the people to decide.
There is the usual tll for purity in polities and a
demand that only thb best be chosen, but it is to be
expected that the older of the past will prevail.
The people are lacking in energy when confronted
with the task of separating the shep from the goats
-in distinguishing the yellow dog from the collie.
Perhaps a reason for such political conditions is
refusal to absorb information. Print the record of
a politician, showing his betrayal of the people and
ninety-nine times out of one hundred it produces no
effect on the masses. Instead of listening to such
recital, to be followed by investigation, the history
of bribery and corruption and graft and disregard
of the interests of the people is quite apt to be char-
acterised as "persecution," sad more often than not
such exposure gains votes for the candidate thus de-
nounced.
Yet in the same breath that calls for political
morality praise can be heard for the man who is
politically rotten. Let his evil deeds be mentioned,
however, and at once he is declared the victim of per-
secution. As long As the people refuse to credit the
truth so long will political immorality flourish.

There is a sameies in the platforms of many
candidates for the legislature that gives the voter
no chance to form an opinion on that score, but E.
8. Light of Marion County has illuminated the sit-
uation in that province by the production of the fol-
lowing: "I am a candidate for Representative, and
I want the. Job. 1ll abide by the rules of the coming
primaries, and I promise if nominated not to amase
the world by my statesmanship, nor be the biggest
fool in Tallahassee. 1 am meaing loaded and, can-
didates, positively nto infringement on my campaign
thunder. Patent applied for." No doubt Mr. Light
would carry as mnuch weight at Tallahasee as many
of those whose every plank is a promise. At any
rate, he offers to perform nothing that is impossible,
and his candor is worthy of reward.

All is not too smooth in Volusla County. Sec-
Fonal squalls are rife and harmony will not be vis-
ible during the campaign. A current of opposition
in manifested toward Senator Frank Sams, who is
a candidate for reelection. Chris O. Codrington, the
well-known editor of the Deland News, in an open
letter states that he believes Mr. Scams "is not a fit
person" for the office of Senator. Mr. Codrlngton,
who appears to have assumed the leadership of the
faction which desires to reward Senator Sams' past
labors by keeping him at home, does not specify the
reasons therefore, but says the people know them
and discuslon "is unmoesary." Meanwhile he is


'I

i [ ;


hustling about to find a awpdidste, but those avail-
able seem to be shy birds, timid of entering the pri-
mary cage. E. W. Bond was thought to be the patriot
to step into the breach, but he has declined to be a
victim, and now the lasso is being thrown at Prof.
0. P. Carson, one of the instructors at Stetson. The
latter exhibits no signs of haste, however, to take up
the standard of the insurgents, in spite of the assur-
ance that he "would get the vote of the best people."
Perhaps this outburst against the popular Sams
has its being in the ill-feeling aroused over the re-
moval from office of J. W. Perkins by the Governor.
Whatever the merits of the case, it looks as if the
reason for such executive action was based on fact,
else why should Governor Broward exercise his au-
thority in the case? The friends of Perkins, however,
declare that he was the victim of injustice, and ex-
pect that Senator Sms will air the matter in the
Senate in an attempt to "undo the wrong." If this
is to be done the faction that got Perkins out of
office naturally would want one of their own kind in
the Senate.

County division it the issue in DeSoto, and if
nothing else is accor..plished a political split will
endure. The plan is to make three counties out of
the present territory, of which Punts Gorda would
be the capital of the lower county; Arcadia the seat
of the middle, while Wauchula would have the court-
house of the third.
Naturally this scheme has brought a howl from
Arcadia, and the citizens of that section are prepar-
ing to resist the proposed division, and although
having two candidates for the Legislature in the
field, a third, W. H. Hooker, has announced. Mr.
Hooker, who is one of the cattle magnates of South
Florida, is popular a nd were it not for the issue of
county division, to which he is opposed, would have
very good chance of election, but in this case it is not
likely that "Uncle Billy" will get the plum.
Especially are the candidates from the vicinity of
Arcadia in a tight place for votes, as the northern
and lower portions of the county will be arrayed
against them, and to make the task still harder the
brilliant A. P. Jordan, editor of the Punta Gorda
Herald, has been chosen to lead the fight for the tri-
division of the county, and as candidate for Repre-
sentative will have all the support the advocates
of the plan can give, and they appear to be in the
majority. "

If all the county divisions mentioned at present
are brought before the Legislature much time will
be consumed in consideration of these bills, cutting
short discussion of other matters. Many will see
no harm in this, as it will tend to curtail the man.
ufacture of laws perhaps unnecessary and undesir-
able. It is seldom that a member of either branch of
the Legislature does not think that his value is en.
hanced by his ability to introduce bills, and only a
few days elapse after the opening of a session until
the calendars are overloaded with all sorts of meas-
ures supposed to be for the public good.

Newton A. Blitch, State Inspector of Convicts,
has joined the raee for Railroad Commissioner. Mr.
Blitch, who succeeded L. F. Rogers in the position
he now holds, has represented Levy County many
terms in the Legislature, serving in both houses,
and making a afine record. He has served as Inspec-
tor of Conviets with satisfaction to the people, and
in all respects he will be a strong candidate for Rail-
road Commissioner. With the entry of Mr. Blitch
the list now embraces five who want the two jobs,
the others being Jefferson B. Browne, R. Hudson
Burr, T. J. Appleyard and E. B. Bailey.
Only three appear to be in the race for the
two vacancies on the Supreme Court bench--J. B.
Whitfield, Chas. B. Parkhill and Thomas L. Clark.
W. W. Flournoy of DeFuniak, who had been re-
ported as going after one of the plums, has not de-
dared his intetion of entering the contest


No opposition is now in sight for the three Con-
gressmen, and Sparkman, Clark and Lamar will have
the pleasure of a campaign free from the annyance
of debating with an opponent.

Wade H. Jones is candidate for Representative
from Brevard, and has formulated a lengthy platform
explaining his position on many questions, among
them being the following: "I believe that the Btate
primary law should be amended so as to allow wo-
men to become candidates for office, became I believe
in the fairness of it and because I further believe
that an infusion of the purity of womanhood into
the principle of office-holding would add to the dig*
nity and cleanliness of the public service."
Mr. Wade's chivalric belief may win him ad-
mirers, but it can hardly get him votes if his con-
stituency is better informed than he. Mr. Jones,
perhaps, thinks he wants such -mendmant, but he
could obtain his desire more quickly by demanding
a Constitutional Convention to which he could carry
a female suffrage plank. Evidently study of the
Constitution of Florida is a form of education much
neglected.

W. N. Sheats is a candidate for Representative
from Alachua County. So are four other eitisens
of that county striving for the honor, among them
* being Syd L. Carter. While all are doubtless quali-
fled, and any one of the number would be an improve-
ment on Rivers, whose never-ending flow of talk was
a source of boredom to the House, yet Sheats and
Carter would be as good a selection as the voters of
Alachua could make. Mr. Sheets, especially, would
be a strong member, and one well trained to advance
the interests of education. His long service as State
Superintendent of Instruction places him in a pool-
'tion where he could more clearly see the proper
steps to take for beneficial legislation relating to
education.

Herbert C. Davis, State Secretary of the Socialist
party, has issued a call from the headquarters at
Cary for a State convention of that party to be held
in Tampa, saturday, April 28, when a State and
Congressional ticket will be nominated and a plat-
form promulgated.

Capt. W. H. Towles of Fort Myers declines to be
a Senatorial candidate from Lee County, so that the
Aight in that district will continue as before between
W. Hunt Harris and 5, M. Semple, both of Key
West. Mr. Semple said, however, that should a Lee
County man become a candidate that he would with-
draw, believing that county was entitled to the Sen-
ator. Should he receive the office this year, though,
four years later he would support a Lee County can.
didate. This seems to have smoothed the troubled
waters in Lee, and as it seems to be the best bargain
that could be made the support of that county will be
given Semple against Harris, who is charged with
having broken the promise made the Lee County
people when seeking his first term.

Drainage of the Everglades is fast getting to be
A c paVTi isue,u in many portions of the State, at
least. While some candidates proest against the
plan in their announcement cards, yet thee are
others who will make the rae on the ground of
favoring the project. Among them is eore A.
Worley, candidate for Representative from Dade
County, who is speaking to the voters on the sub-
ject, and declaring that it should be done. Mr. Wor-
iey states that if it is the will of the people that
such improvement be made and the present legisla-
tion is faulty, that if he is chosen he will aert all
effort to remove defects in the present law.

In Nassau County John 0. McGiffin, who is oppos-
ing Thomas S. Davis for the Senate, is making Eer-
glade drainage an issue. Mr. MoGiffia has chal-
lenged Senator Davis to a Joint debate on this and
other subjects, promising to "dissect" the record of
his opponent in a thorough manner. Those who
know Mr. McGiffin cannot doubt his ability to do all
that he promises, and if his rival shows up at the
appointed place on April 16 the ealtisms of renran-
da and Nassau will have opoiaity of harin
a talk full of interest and ltnetiL --













Apil 14, 906


THE IJN,


Seventh Page


John Henry on Would-Be Actors

By GEORGE V. HOBART


WOULD-BE ACTORS


Tommy Harper isn't a bad sort, but
he has a bug that he was put in this
world for the purpose of elevating the
stage.
Tommy thinks lie could rush on and
play Richard the Third to such an ex-
tent that the audience would rise up
and carry him on their shoulders.
Perhaps they would-dead.
Tommy thinks that with his voice he
could make Jean de Reszke's notes look
like a bunch of bad money.
He's out to bet a couple of seven-dol-
lar bills that he has Herbert Kelcey
fanned to a finish, and that when it
comes to comedy Francis Wilson and
Jeff D'Angelis aren't visible on the shell
road.


HE'LL


Every time a new book comes out
Tommy wants to get it dramatized and
star in it.
He tried to get "Janioe Meredith," but
Frank McKee cut across lota and
headed him off.
Tommy had an idea that if the part
of Washington crossing the Delaware in
"Janice Meredith" could be fattened up
with a couple of tropical songs and a
comedy bit, he's be aces for the road.
He says that if he had seen "David
Harum" first he would have made Billy
Crane look like a plate of cold potatoes.
Tommy told me once that if he could
play the opposite part to Marie Dressier
the public would have to bite its way
into the theater.
He thinks he haw Pete Dailey down
with both shoulders on the carpet, and
the stake-holder is ladling out the gate
money.
Tommy has an idea that it would be
like finding money to dramatize Maj.
Pond's "Eccentricities of Genius" and
let him play all the people from Ann
Eliza Young to Bill Nye.
Tommy has been after me to get Dave
Belasco to write him a play, but I've
stood him off by telling him that I
thought Sardou could fit him better.
Every day he drives up to my ranch
in a hansom to find out if Sardou has
cabled yet.
I've just punched out a parcel of par-
agraphs which I shall turn in to
Tommy.
I think it will do him good:
"My Dear Tommy: I have at last
secured a play for you.


FLASH THE INTELLIGENCE
ON ME.


lle says that if ever he can break into
a play with Mrs. Leslie Carter he'll
turn such a warm pair of goo-goo eyes
on her that somebody will have to get
up and yell for the fire department.
But Tommy can't make good with his
shape.
he's as broad across the bosom as Col.
Jack Carter.
In the love passages his embonpoint
would set him back about three feet.
He can wear a full dress suit all right,
but after it's set he looks like a load of
new-mown hay.
Tommy belongs to the Ancient and
Honorable Order of Tack Hammers.
He always knocks in a lady-like way,
and his remarks don't register once in
ten.
He likes to go to a theater and squirt
verbal seltzer water all over the place.
His language Is all fine and dafsy,
but when he turns on the loud pedal he
sounds like a dog locked up in the barn.
He is one of those dubs who thinks
he's missed his calling, and, no doubt,
his calling has been shaking hands with
itself ever since because he missed the
boat.
rve known Tommy for a long time, so
he feels free to 4d his dope to me


"The author wanted P0,000 for it, but
we compromised. He took 80 cents in
cash, and I promiMd him the rest.
"In the fr et at you some in with
an ax i each hand, and you play the
piano with the other. Thm yos go out


and borrow a golf suit and some Sootch
dialect, and you come on the stage look*
ing like an Irishman. In this act you
have four songs, two solos, a oake-walk
and six months in Jail if the audience
catches you.
"In the second act you will be com-
pelled to disguise yourself and look like
a gentleman. You'll need a lot of re-
hearsals for this second act.
"In the third act you'll play an ele-
phant. The scene is in a boarding
house. You'll have to leave your trunk
there. This act will be very funny if
anyone laughs at it.
"The fourth act is a dramatization
of the Pennsylvania railroad time tables.
You should cut quite a figure in this
act.
"The fifth act is at the bottom of a
well. You play the pump. You ought
to be a great success if you handle it
with care.
"In the sixth act you play the races
with real money. You'll have to furnish
it yourself. I'm only your manager-
I'm not a bank.
"The scene of the seventh act is laid
on top of a mountain. You are discov-
ered standing on top of the mountain.
Then somebody moves the mountain.
"In the eighth act you will appear
as The Pride of Jennico, if you don't
break your leg when you fall off the
mountain.
"In the ninth act you play the hose.


If the audience hasn't gone home by this
time you'll have to go out and give an
imitation of Edwin Booth. If that
doesn't send them home we'll call for
the police.
"I m sure you will like the play. Your
salary will be $200 a week-some weeks.
"Call and see me at your earliest
convenience. Take the elevator. There
isn't anything else in the building to
offer you. Yours with love,
"JOHN HENRY."
You'd think that would detain Tommy
temporarily, wouldn't you?
But it won't.
He'll fort it, and day after to-mor-
row he'll flash the intelligence on me
that he has invented a strangle-hold line
of business that will put Loosy Harri-
son on the blink; and that when it
comes to low comedy he has Dan Me-
Avoy going over the hills and away to
the woodshed.
You know, when a guy like Tommy
once gets the worm in his noodle that
he's cut out for an actor you couldn't
coax it away with a mallet.
Vienna.-According to the Imperial
statistical bureau, the fortunes of the
Catholic Church in Austria amount to
nearly 125 million dollars, while the an-
nual income is more than eleven mil-
lion dollars. The state contributes in
salaries to the Catholic Church nearly
two million dollars per annum.












Sixth Pape


THE SUN


April 14,1906


Shaking the Old Plum Tree

By EDWARD FITZGERALD


The Senatorial situation in Hamilton County is
condensing into sentiment for return of Hon. Frank
Adams. Those who had announced for the office
have withdrawn, with one exception, yielding to the
demand publicly expressed that Mr. Adams become
a candidate.
Seldom has there been such popular demonstra-
tion of the office seeking the man as in this instance,
and it is remarkable proof of the esteem in which
Mr. Adams is held by his fellow-citizens.
That he will be compelled to grant their en-
treaties cannot be doubted, despite his retirement
from polities, and as one of the balance wheels of
the Senate he will contribute much to the usefulness
of that body.

Those who thirst for office will not have much
longer to deliberate on the question of submitting
their candidacy to the action of the people, as the
entries close on Tuesday, April 10. If all who had
spoken of the likelihood of contesting for each office,
both county and State, had put their intentions into
action the list would have been long, indeed. As it
is, with the elimination of the faint-hparted, the peo-
ple have a large range of choice.
Whether it is the "best" men who are appealing
to the voter is a matter for the people to decide.
There is the usual call for purity in politics and a
demand that only tbi best be chosen, but it is to be
expected that the older of the past will prevail.
The people are lacking in energy when confronted
with the task of separating the sheep from the goats
-in distinguishing the yellow dog from the collie.
Perhaps a reason for such political conditions is
refusal to absorb information. Print the record of
a politician, showing his betrayal of the people and
ninety-nine times out of one hundred it produces no
effect on the masses. Instead of listening to such
recital, to be followed by investigation, the history
of bribery and corruption and graft and disregard
of the interests of the people is quite apt to be char-
acterised as "persecution," and more often than not
such exposure gains votes for the candidate thus de-
nounced.
Yet in the same breath that calls for political
morality praise can be heard for the man who is
politically rotten. Let his evil deeds be mentioned,
however, and at once he is declared the victim of per-
secution. As long as the people refuse to credit the
truth so long will political immorality flourish.

There is a sameness in the platforms of many
candidates for the legislature that gives the voter
no chance to form an opinion on that score, but E.
8. Light of Marion County has illuminated the sit-
uation in that province by the production of the fol-
lowing: "I am a candidate for Representative, and
I want the. Job. I'll abide by the rules of the coming
primaries, and I promise if nominated not to amase
the world by my statesmanship, nor be the biggest
fool in Tallahassee. 1 am coming loaded and, can-
didates, positively to infringement on my campaign
thunder. Patent applied for." No doubt Mr. Light
would carry as much weight at Tallahassee as many
of those whose every plank is a promise. At any
rate, he offers to perform nothing that is impossible,
and his candor is worthy of reward.

All is not too smooth in Volusis County. See-
ronal squalls are rite and harmony will not be vis-
ible during the camleniign. A current of opposition
is manifested toward Senator Frank Sams, who is
a candidate for reelection. Chris O. Codrington, the
well-known editor of the DeLand News, in an open
letter states that he believes Mr. Sams "is not a fit
person" for the ofkce of Senator. Mr. Codrington,
who appears to have assumed the leadership of the
faction which desire's to reward Senator Sams' past
labors by keeping hin at home, does not specify the
reasons therefore, but says the people know them
and discuasson "Is unaossary." Meanwhile he is


hustling' about to find a wndidate, but those avail-
able seem to be shy birds, timid of entering the pri-
mary cage. E. W. Bond was thought to be the patriot
to step into the breach, but he has declined to be a
victim, and now the lasso is being thrown at Prof.
G. P. Carson, one of the instructors at Stetson. The
latter exhibits no signs of haste, however, to take up
the standard of the insurgents, in spite of the assur-
ance that he "would get the vote of the best people."
Perhaps this outburst against the popular Sams
has its being in the ill-feeling aroused over the re-
moval from office of J. W. Perkins by the Governor.
Whatever the merits of the case, it looks as if the
reason for such executive action was based on fact,
else why should Governor Broward exercise his au-
thority in the case? The friends of Perkins, however,
declare that he was the victim of injustice, and ex-
pect that Senator Sams will air the matter in the
Senate in an attempt to "undo the wrong." If this
is to be done the faction that got Perkins out of
office naturally would want one of their own kind in
the Senate.
County division is the issue in DeSoto, and if
nothing else is accor.plished a political split will
endure. The plan is to make three counties out of
the present territory, of which Punta Gorda would
be the capital of the lower county; Arcadia the seat
of the middle, while Wauchula would have the court-
house of the third.
Naturally this scheme has brought a howl from
Arcadia, and the citizens of that section are prepar-
ing to resist the proposed division, and although
having two candidates for the Legislature in the
field, a third, W. H. Hooker, has announced. Mr.
Hooker, who is one of the cattle magnates of South
Florida, is popular ind were it not for the issue of
county division, to which he is opposed, would have
very good chance of election, but in this case it is not
likely that "Uncle Billy" will get the plum.
Especially are the candidates from the vicinity of
Arcadia in a tight place for votes, as the northern
and lower portions of the county will be arrayed
against them, and to make the task still harder the
brilliant A. P. Jordan, editor of the Punta Gorda
Herald, has been chosen to lead the fight for the tri-
division of the county, and as candidate for Repre-
sentative will have all the support the advocates
of the plan can give, and they appear to be in the
majority. "

If all the county divisions mentioned at present
are brought before the Legislature much time will
be consumed in consideration of these bills, cutting
short discussion of other matters. Many will see
no harm in this, as it will tend to curtail the man-
ufacture of laws perhaps unnecessary and undesir-
able. It is seldom that a member of either branch of
the Legislature does not think that his value is en-
hanced by his ability to introduce bills, and only a
few days elapse after the opening of a session until
the calendars are overloaded with all sorts of meas-
ures supposed to be for the public good.

Newton A. Blitch, State Inspector of Convicts,
has joined the race for Railroad Commissioner. Mr.
*Blitch, who succeeded R. F. Rogers in the position
he now holds, has represented Levy County many
terms in the Legislature, serving in both houses,
and making a fine record. He has served as Inspec-
tor of Convicts with satisfaction to the people, and
in all respects he will be a strong candidate for Rail-
road Commissioner. With the entry of Mr. Blitch
the list now embraces five who want the two jobs,
the others being Jefferson B. Browne, R. Hudson
Burr, T. J. Appleyard and E. B. Bailey.
Only three appear to be in the race for the
two vacancies on the Supreme Court bench-J. B.
Whitfield, Chas. B. Parkhill and Thomas L. Clark.
W. W. Flournoy of De uniak, who had been re-
ported as going after one of the plums, has not de-
clared his intention of entering the contest.


No opposition is now in sight for the three Con-
gressmen, and Sparkman, Clark and Lamar will have
the pleasure of a campaign free from the apnolance
of debating with an opponent.

Wade H. Jones is candidate for Repreemtative
from Brevard, and has formulated a lengthy platform
explaining his position on many questions, among
them being the following: "I believe that the State
primary law should be amended so as to allow wo-
men to become candidates for office, because I believe
in the fairness of it and because I further believe
that an infusion of the purity of womanhood into
the principle of office-holding would add to the dig-
nity and cleanliness of the public service."
Mr. Wade's chivalric belief may win him ad.
mirers, but it can hardly get him votes if his con-
stituency is better informed than he. Mr. Jones,
perhaps, thinks he wants such amendment, but he
could obtain his desire more quickly by demanding
a Constitutional Convention to which he could carry
a female suffrage plank. Evidently study of the
Constitution of Florida is a form of education much
neglected.

W. N. Sheats is a candidate for Representative
from Alachua County. So are four other eitiens
of that county striving for the honor, among them
* being Syd L. Carter. While all are doubtless quali-
fied, and any one of the number would be an improve-
ment on Rivers, whose never-ending flow of talk was
a source of boredom to the House, yet Sheats and
Carter would be as good a selection as the voters of
Alachua could make. Mr. Sheets, especially, would
be a strong member, and one well trained to advance
the interests of education. His long service as State
Superintendent of Instruction places him in a posi-
'tion where he could more clearly see the proper
steps to take for beneficial legislation relating to
education.

Herbert C. Davis, State Secretary of the Socialist
party, has issued a call from the headquarters at
(Aary for a State convention of that party to be held
in Tampa, Saturday, April 28, when a State and
Congressional ticket will be nominatedand an plat-
form promulgated.

Capt. W. H. Towles of Fort Myers declines to be
a Senatorial candidate from Lee County, so that the
light in that district will continue as before between
W. Hunt Harris and U, M. Simple, both of Key
West. Mr. Semple said, however, that should a Lee
County man become a candidate that he would with-
draw, believing that county was entitled to the Sen-
ator. Should he receive the office this year, though,
four years later he would support a Lee County can-
didate. This seems to have smoothed the troubled
waters in Lee, and as it seems to be the best bargain
that could be made the support of that county will be
given Semple against Harris, who is charged with
having broken the promise made the Lee County
people when seeking his first term.

Drainage of the Everglades is fast getting to be
a campaign issue, in many portions of the State, at
least. While some Andidate protest against the
plan in their announcement cards, yet there are
others who will make the race on the rd of
favoring the project. Among them is seorge A.
Worley, candidate for Represtative from Dade
County, who is speaking to the voters on the sub-
ject, and declaring that It should be done. Mr. Wor-
ley states that if it is the will of the people that
such improvement be made and the present legisla-
tion is faulty, that if he is chosen hea will exert all
effort to remove defects in the present law.

In Nassau County John 0. MoGiffin, who is oppos-
ing Thomas S. Davis for the Senate, is making er-
glade drainage an issue. Mr. McGiomn has dhal-
lenged Senator Davis to a Joint debate on this and
other subjects, promising to "dissect" the record of
his opponent in a thorough manner. Those who
know Mr. McGiffin cannot doubt his ability to do all
that bhe promises, and if his rival shows up at the
appointed la on April 16 the eitis of raan-
da and Nassau w have oppou t, of arin
a talk ful of interest and instrooemt


I
V


A .~I.












THE SUN
< i


Seventh Page


John Henry on Would-Be Actors

By GEORGE V. HOBART


Tommy Harper isn't a bad sort, but
he has a bug that he was put In this
world for the purpose of elevating the
stage.
Tommy thinks lie could rush on and
play Richard the Third to such an ex-
tent that the audience would rise up
and carry him on their shoulders.
Perhaps they would-dead.
Tommy thinks that with his voice he
could make Jean de Reszke's notes look
like a bunch of bad money.
He's out to bet a couple of seven-dol-
lar bills that he has Herbert Kelcey
fanned to a finish, and that when it
comes to comedy Francis Wilson and
Jeff D'Angelis aren't visible on the shell
road.


HE'LL


Every time a new book comes out
Tommy wants to get it dramatized and
star in it.
He tried to get "Janioe Meredith," but
Frank McKee cut across lots and
headed him off.
Tommy had an idea that if the part
of Washington crossing the Delaware in
"Janice Meredith" could be fattened up
with a couple of tropical songs and a
comedy bit, he's be aces for the road.
He says that if he had seen "David
Harum" first he would have made Billy
Crane look like a plate of cold potatoes.
Tommy told me once that if he could
play the opposite part to Marie Dressier
the public would have to bite its way
into the theater.
He thinks he her Pete Dailey down
with both shoulders on the carpet, and
the stake-holder is ladling out the gate
money.
Tommy has an idea that it would be
like finding money to dramatize Maj.
Pond's "Eccentricities of Genius" and
let him play all the people from Ann
Eliza Young to Bill Nye.
Tommy has been after me to get Dave
Belasco to write him a play, but I've
stood him off by telling him that I
thought Sardou could At him better.
Every day he drives up to my ranch
in a hansom to find out if Sardou has
cabled yet.
I've just punched out a parcel of par-
agraphs which I shall turn in to
Tommy.
I think it will do him good:
"My Dear Tommy: I have at last
secured a play for you.


FLASH THE INTELLIGENCE
ON ME.


lie says that if ever he can break into
a play with Mrs. Leslie Carter he'll
turn such a warm pair of goo-goo eyes
on her that somebody will have to get
up and yell for the fire department.
But Tommy can't make good with his
Shape.
He's as broad across the bosom as Col.
Jack Carter.
In the love passages his embonpoint
would set him back about three feet.
He can wear a full dress suit all right,
but after it's set he looks like a load of
new-mown hay.
Tommy welongs to the Ancient and
Honorable Order of Tack Hammers.
He always knocks in a lady-like way,
and his remarks don't register once in
ten.
He likes to go to a theater and squirt
verbal seltzer water all over the place.
His language is all fine and dainy,
but when he turns on the loud pedal he
sounds like a dog locked up in the barn.
He is one of those dubs who thinks
he's missed his calling, and, no doubt,
his calling has been shaking hands with
itself ever since because he missed the
boat.
've known Tommy for a long time, so
he feels free to read his dope to me.


IN THE LOVE IDPAAGE8.


"The author wanted $ 0,000 for it, but
we compromised. He took 80 senat in
easf, and I proml hd im the rest.
"In the first et you some in with
an ax In esch hand, sad you play the
plan with the other. Tbes you go out


and borrow a golf suit and some Sootch
dialect, and you come on the stage look.
ing like an Irishman. In this act you
have four songs, two solos, a oake-walk
and six months in jail if the audience
catches you.
"In the second act you will be com-
pelled to disguise yourself and look like
a gentleman. You'll need a lot of re-
hearsals for this second act.
"In the third act you'll play an ele-
phant. The scene is in a boarding
house. You'll have to leave your trunk
there. This act will be very funny if
anyone laughs at it.
"The fourth act is a dramatization
of the Pennsylvania railroad time tables.
You should out quite a figure in this
act.
"The fifth act is at the bottom of a
well. You play the pump. You ought
to be a great success if you handle it
with care.
"In the sixth act you play the races
with real money. You'll have to furnish
it yourself. I'm only your manager-
I'm not a bank.
"The scene of the seventh act is laid
on top of a mountain. You are discov-
ered standing on top of the mountain.
Then somebody moves the mountain.
"In the eighth act you will appear
as The Pride of Jennico, if you don't
break your leg when you fall off the
mountain.
"In the ninth act you play the how.


If the audience hasn't gone home by this
time you'll have to go out and give an
imitation of Edwin Booth. If that
doesn't send them home we'll call for
the police.
"I'm sure you will like the play. Your
salary will be $200 a week-some weeks.
"Call and see me at your earliest
convenience. Take the elevator. There
isn't anything else in the building to
offer you. Yours with love,
"JOHN HENRY."
You'd think that would detain Tommy
temporarily, wouldn't you?
But it won't.
He'll forget it, and day after to-mor.
row he'll fash the intelligence on me
that he has invented a strangle-hold line
of business that will put Looey Harri-
son on the blink; and that when it
comes to low comedy he has Dan Me-
Avoy going over the hills and away to
the woodshed.
You know, when a guy like Tommy
once gets the worm in his noodle that
he's cut out for an actor you couldn't
coax it away with a mallet.
Vienna.-According to the Imperial
statistical bureau, the fortunes of the
Catholic Church in Austria amount to
nearly 125 million dollars, while the an-
nual income is more than eleven mil-
lion dollars. The state contributes in
salaries to the Catholic Church nearly
two million dollars per annum.


rl14, 9Q


WOULD-BE ACTORS












SaGHH, 14, 906
Saturday, April 14, 1906


THE SUN


.ED


IT(


Adims, Dear Buncb
With this issue THE SUN says to the Jacksonville Gum Bunch "Vale,"
which means "Farewell."
We are determined to handle none but live topics in this paper, and the
'Bunch" cannot longer qualify for space in our columns.
Some months ago we dared to print the news about the doings of a few gen-
tlemen who live in Jacksonville, and from there sought to run the business of the
State. They formed the Consolidated Naval Stores Company, which was a trust
to take charge of things pertaining to the products of the juice of the pine tree;
they formed the Consolidated Grocery Company, which qualified immediately for
the trust to take charge of the grocery business of the State; they formed the
Consolidated Land Company, which was created to grab all the timber land in
the State. These trusts were legally authorized to do business, and they were
carrying out the objects of their creators.
Then there came into existence the Consolidated Political Trust, which was
a combination of the three other trusts. It had no legal existence, but it had
the money and was willing to spend it to get the right men in office.
This story annoyed these few gentlemen so much that they thoughtlessly per-
mitted their temper to warp their judgment, and they waded into THE SUN with
a determination to destroy it.
Well, they did not succeed.
THE SUN IS. And-
"The Bunch" IS NOT.
We know we would not be believed if we were to say that we did not feel the
blows that "the bunch" dealt us. We have felt them. They have afflicted us
sore, and caused us many hours of unrest and apprehension, because of our fear
that we would furnish another shining example of "truth crushed to earth," and
we were not able to get sufficient comfort out of the reflection that "truth crushed
to earth shall rise again," to keep us in buoyant spirits while we were so griev-
ously assailed by the immense power and influence which "the bunch" had sue-
oceded in gathering unto itself in the commercial affairs of this community.
No newspaper story ever printed has had more complete corroboration and
verification than this story which THE SUN printed about the doings of the
"gum bunch" had. The history of the past five months has proven that the
position taken by THE SUN was correct, and that the obligation upon THE SUN
to publish the truth about things that interested the people of this State was not
only a binding obligation BUT MET WITH PUBLIC APPROVAL.
Since that story and the subsequent stories were printed in THE SUN we
have seen the number o( our friends ADDED TO DAILY, AND THE INFLU-
ENCE OF THE SUN WAXING WEEK BY WEEK. We have also seen the
fi lends of the "gum bunch" diminish and their power and influence wane.
They no longer dominate in naval stores affairs, either in this city or the
State. Other people have wrested this dominion from them. The operators, at
the meeting last Tuesday REFUSED TO SANCTION THE CONTRACT made
at the dictation of "the bunch" with Shotter, by which the interests of Jackson.
ville as a naval stores port were placed at the mercy of Shotter, who thinks of
Savannah first and Jacksonville last.
We said five months ago that this was sq, and at the same time predicted
that the operators would not consent to be "bossed" by a few men who lived in
Jacksonville, and THAT ON THEM DEPENDED THE FUTURE OF JACK-
SONVILLE AS A NAVAL STORES PORT.
Our position has been completely vindicated. The only mistake we have
made in writing about the naval stores situation was the prediction we made last
Saturday that there would be some acrimonious debates at the meeting of the
stockholders of the Naval Stores Company. We did not then know how badly
"the bunch" was whipped. We thought there was some fight left in it.
We were mistaken. They made ABJECT SURRENDER of their prestige,
their influence and their power.
With this exception all that we have said about the naval stores situation
has been amply verified by events which have occurred.
We say again-"Farewell."
With this vindication of our position and with the complete discomfiture of
"the gum bunch," we will drop them from the list of things which engage our
attention.
We have a suit for W$0,000 damages pending against some individuals who be-
longed to "the bunch." This suit will be vigorously prosecuted, and WE EXPECT
TO WIN IT.
We will let the courts deal with these individuals who have damaged us, now
that we have eliminated them as a bunch from our columns.

Two Good Servants-Re ard Them
The approaching primary offers no opportunity to the electors of this State
to divide on questions of party policy or of party issues.
It Is a DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY, in which none but white Democrats can
vote. Because of the fact that there is no question of party principle involved
*he choice of the electors will necessarily have to be made from a list which con-
tains no names but loyal Democrats.
PERSONAL FITNE88 FOR HOLDING THE VARIOUS OFFICES IS THE
ONLY QUESTION which the electors of the State are called upon to answer cor-
rectly in the primary of May 15th.
We have stated our position in practically these words before, but in order
that there may be no mistake as to our reasons for advocating the election of the
men whom we may decide to advocate we again state it.
As the time for the primary approaches, interest in polities becomes greater.
and as there are only thirty days left between this date and the date of the first


primary, and as the questions to be solved at the approaching primary are of
THE GREATEST IMPORTANCE to Florida, we shall occupy a part of the space
on this page, which belongs to the people, to discuss the qualiications of those
Democrats who are offering themselves as the people's servants.
WeA.thik that Jastl Chares B. L Pa l sa JetIs Jame B. WhitUeld,


who are candidates to suooeed themselves on the Supreme bench, should be again
selected by the Democratic voters in the coming primary.
Thesi men have performed the exacting duties and nave acquitted themselves
of the high obligations of their office honestly, faithfully and well. No word of
competent criticism has been uttered against these men. Fidelity In the discharge
of duty is rewarded in every walk of life. The merchant rewards his faithful
employee, and the lawyer advances his diligent clerk. The great corporations
bestow positions of honor and trust on those who have served them well, and
there is no reason why Florida should not keep alive the incentive to work hard
and faithfully in the minds of her public servants.
Justice Parkhill has been engaged in the practice of law for twenty years.
He has served as County Solicitor for Escambla County. He was appointed
Judge of the First Cirelt of Florida, and was elected for the six-year term to that
office about nine months ago. Shortly after his-election he was offered the
appointment to a vacancy on the Supreme bench. This opportunity to advance
himself and to satisfy his ambition to go higher in the service of his State
appealed to him so strongly that he accepted the appointment, although he knew
that the tenure of the new office could not exceed eighteen months, which was
NEARLY FIVE YEARS LESS than the office to which he was elected.
The custom of the Democratic party to give two terms to faithful office-
holders, the fitness of Justice Parkhill for the position he now holds, both indi-
cate THAT HE SHOULD BE GIVEN ANOTHER TERM. We trust that the
electors of Florida will return Justice Parkhill.
Justice Whitfleld has given many years of his life to the public service. He
was Treasurer of the State, he was Attorney General of the State, and was
appointed for an unexpired term on the Supreme bench and reelected at the last
general election, but under the constitutional rule of choosing long and short
terms, he secured the short term, and now comes up for reelection.
That he has been efficient, faithful and competent, his excellent record in
ifs former offices and his ability and impartial work in his present office bears
ample testimony.
Since Justice Whitfleld has been on the bench the work of the Supreme
Court of Florida has been prosecuted with so much seal and dispatch that the
court 18 NOW UP WITH ITS DOCKET. This, of course, is not due entirely to
the efforts of Justice Whitfleld, but he participated in this good work and deserves
part of the credit for it. His record has not been successfully assailed, and the
people should return him to the office he now holds.

Judge Baker Not Deserving
To our many friends who live outside of Duval County, to whom this paper
goes each week, we do now apologize for introducing a local topic for discussion
(n this page.
We realize the obligation placed upon a journal which, in its circulation,
covers the entire State, to select matter of interest to all the people, and we have
tried to carry out this obligation to the best of our ability.
But we feel that we have not the right to neglect a local question when con-
ditions are such that if our readers in Duval County are not posted an unfortu-
uate mistake may be made.
We desire to introduce as a topic for discussion 'the race for State Senator
from Duval County which is on. And now that we have taken a second thought
about this matter we feel that we do not owe very many apologies to our readers
outside the county, because the Senator from this county, while giving his atten-
tion particularly to local matters, will have it in his power to legislate for the
whole State.
WE DO NOT THINK THAT JUDGE W. H. BAKER SHOULD RfriU.b NT
THIS COUNTY IN THE STATE SENATE.
He is open to the suspicion, well grounded we think, of being a "spite" can-
didate. Mr. John N. C. Stockton, the brother-in-law of Judge Baker, and to
whom Judge Baker owes all the offices of trust, honor and emolument which he
has held for years in this county, has been "mad" with Representative H. H.
Buckman for some time. This bad feeling on the part of Mr. Stockton toward
Mr. Buckman was engendered by the complications arising out of the settle-
ment of the Mayport Railroad matters, in which Mr. Stockton and Mr. Buckman
were involved, on opposite sides.
There is NO REASON ON EARTH WHY MR. BUCKMAN SHOULD NOT
RE RETURNED TO THE LEGISLATURE OF FLORIDA.
As Representative from this county at the last session he made a brilliant
record. He was a tireless worker, a capable legislator, an honest public servant,
and no one has ventured to assert that he did not carry out the trust which the
people imposed upon him. Such a servant as Mr. Buckman should receive
irdorsement. If he were to fail of the endorsement of his people, whom he has
served well, when he asks it, such failure' would tend to destroy the incentive to
Ihold office and make it more difficult to get good men as public servants.
As Councilman of the city of Jacksonville Mr. Baker has NOT DONE GOOD
SERVICE FOR THE PEOPLE. He has been President of the Council for two
terms. He has not only failed to record his vote against street grabbing propo-
sitions made from time to time by the corporations, but he has introduced at
least one of them, and has left his seat as presiding officer and taken the floor to
advocate its passage. He may have introduced more of them-we are getting up
his record, which we will present as soon as it is completed.
We know that he failed to oppose the PERPETUAL GRANT to City Attor-
ney J.M. Barre of the foot of Main Street WITHOUT COMPENSATION TO THE
A Preident of the Council it wa his duty to make up the standing com-
mittees of that body. He appointed J. DOUGLAS WETMORE, A NEGRO of the
objectionable type, on several committees.
He has, by failing to "squelch" him, encouraged this negro to carry on his
role of arrogant, conspcuous interference with the deliberations of that body,
'hich to some HAS LOOKED VERY MUCH LIKE LEADERSHIP. It was en-
tirely within his power to "squelch" this objectionable, too-aspiring negro, but
he has allowed him for years to annoy the white members ofthe ouncil, and
as been suspected, not without some reason, judging by appearances, of uing
It is quite true that Wetmore visits Judge Baker's office frequently, and that
these visits have taken place at a period a day or two before the Council was
aiout to meet.
We have seen no evidence in the inspection of Judge Baker's career as a pub.
lic servant that would lead us to hope that he would do anything for the realp
ood of the people in the State Legis nature. His career in the Council certainly
T no guarantee of efficient service in the higher field to which he asks to be called
The success of Judge Baker at the polls would revive the spirit of factiosl-
m in this county which has sorely vexed it for years. As brother-in-law of
John St totn and his political protege he represent- what used to be known as
h stmrghtout ton, w h was very active in stirring up factional strife in
this county for many ywarL.


John Stockton- ha been eliminated from polities. The last general election
convinced everybody, but himself, that he is no longer a power. We do not
Sish Mr. Baker, as his riduarylegatee, ,to come into hishrItae of faction
sUtie, quathed to him by his brother-in-law.


F


Li-b












4.


at


THE SUN


s,


NINTH PAGE
Saturday, April 14, 1906


Why Spare Gentlemen Thieves
Since the return of the daughter of the President from her honeymoon, we
had almost forgotten the President's son-in-law. But Mr. Longworth has again
reminded us that he is not to be overlooked.
He was the guest of honor at a banquet given by the Hamilton Club, in
Chicago, last Monday night in celebration of Appomattox Day.
The husband of the President's daughter, as becomes all guests of honor,
made a speech. It was reported as a good speech, received with much applause.
It was his first reported speech made by Congressman Longworth since his
amorous break into the charmed circle that surrounds the seats of the mighty,
and it was not therefore surprising that Nicholas should have exhibited signs of
Teddy's influence.
The speech struck that high note of CIVIC PURITY that has been rather
strained from hard and constant usage by the restless Roosevelt and developed
into a plea for justice to the poor abused servants who consent to take the
people's money as compensation for a promise to do the people's work.
Mr. Longworth deplored the present tendency to assail the characters and
criticise the acts of public men.
He said-
"I want to say with reference to politics and the present situation in general
to-day that it seems to be the fashion nowadays to assail all our public men, to
belittle their character and impugn their motives. If you believe all you read
and hear, you might well reach the conclusion that there is not a man to-day in
public life whose motives are free from suspicion. You might well believe that
politics means graft, and that graft means politics. If you don't happen to agree
with the views of the political man to-day, you assail his motives, and you insin-
uate that there are corrupting motives behind him."
We think that Mr. Longworth is needlessly alarmed, and that his word pic-
ture of the conditions prevailing is much overdrawn.
IT IS NOT the fashion to assail ALL our public men. There are some thou-
sands of good, honest, faithful public servants who have not been assailed. These
men serve the Government with clean hands and with a due sense of their obliga-
tion to serve it well. Any journalist, space writer, or purveyor of shame stories,
who would dare to attack even the least of these public men, would soon find him-
self scorned by other good men or an inmate of one of our public prisons.
IT IS NOT TRUE that one is liable to reach the conclusion that politics
means graft and graft means politics. It is true that one big grafter in a high
place can bring reproach on the public service, but the many pure and honest
men in politics save it from the Longworth classification.
WE DO NOT DEPLORE the present tendency to assail public men if the
public men who are assailed happen to be THIEVES, BRIBE-TAKERS, AND
ALL-AROUND CROOKS.
We are pleased that the people of this republic have the opportunity opened
to them to find out who are betraying it by acts of shame and dishonesty.
We would louder lift the lamenting voice than even the President's cupid-
caught, and Hymen-held, son, if ONE HONEST MAN had been slandered by a
shame writer, but search as diligently as we may, we cannot find a single victim
to consecrate with our tears from the many who have been attacked, nor has
there come to us knowledge of the incarceration of any writer for criminal libel.
We are forced, therefore, to conclude that the stories of graft that have
bween written are most of them true, and that the men whose names have been
called by the responsible writers are mostly guilty of the things charged to them.
It has happened, and will no doubt happen again, that good men holding
public office will be attacked in the press by writers who are known only for their
leek of mental balance, or who nurse an imaginary slight at the hands of the
persons attacked, or whose vanity thirsts for notoriety, or who harbor a grievance
against some persons, or have a grouch against the world in general. These
cases are rare, and what writers like these say is not considered otherwise than as
samples of turgid vituperation without point and power.
We pass these over, and come back to the exposures made by MENTALLY
IE8PONSIBLE writers, and we find them all enjoying liberty undisturbed by
the storm of protest that would be launched at them if they had happened to
call the turn on the wrong man, or the wrong turn on any man.
Further along in his speech Mr. Longworth said-
"I am not one of those who believe that everything is getting worse; things
sro getting better."
We agree with the gentleman in this.
Things ARE GETT NG BETTER.
The very reason why they are getting better is because the newspapers and
magazines of the country are able, and some shining lights among them ARE
WILLING to expose corruption and rascality whenever they see it, no matter
how high any particular exponent of the shameful practice may have climbed on
the ladder of wealth and position.
As long as the public press is not afraid to print the names of thieves and
brand them with their infamy the hope of bettering conditions will be alive and
virile.

Here's Good News for Florida
To Florida we give wassail and gratulation. Its chief city will in a few short
monthss take its place among the deep water ports of the world.
Jacksonville now has twenty feet of water from the ocean to its docks; be-
fore the present year is out it will have twenty-four, and as the bar shows a depth
of thirty feet at high tide. and is constantly deepening, it is a mere matter of
time-short time and a little money-to secure sufficient water to accommodate
the largest ships that float.
In the progress sad development of the State this factor of deep water for
Jacksonville stands second to none.
Jacksonville, by means of its superb railroad connection, offers to the prod-
ucts of Florida quiek transportation to domestic consumers, and deep water will
make it possible for ships in the foreign trade to call here for the products that
the railroads leading into Jacksionville from all parts of the State are bringing


to this port for distribution.
Deep water for Jacksonville means the more rapid development of the
resources of Florida and a greater incentive for capital to come Into the State
to develop these neesure o amount of the assurance of an outlet through Jack.
nville o the marketof the world.


Let the South B&toam
Following close on the heels of Judge Parker, who recently made a speech-
making tour through the South, comes one of those circulars, bearings marks of
the manifolding machine, which are so prodigally distributed during political
campaigns, and which begin to burden the mails when the gentle art of "trust-
busting" begins in Congress.
These are the products of that strictly modern invention-The Press Bureau.
They are designed to create public sentiment, or to switch it from paths that lead
to truths that would hurt somebody's interests, into paths that lead in the right
direction, as interpreted by those who have axes to grind.
The circular that followed Parker through the South was mailed from Wash-
ington, D. C., the natural headquarters of Press Bureaus. Like all of these
carefully worded documents, for whose preparation men of high talent an re-
tained, this circular seeks to touch the chord of popular opinion, and, as it was
intended solely for distribution in the South, it appeals t6 the pride of the South-
ern people and their ambition to see sons of the South hold high places in the
national Government. .
It is headed "THE SOUTH MUST LEAD-INVITATION TO COMMAND
THE NATIONAL DEMOCRACY-EULOGIES OF SOUTHERN MEN."
In a note to the editor this language Is used:
"This matter is sent out under the auspices of the Demooratic Literary
Bureau, and there is no charge for the same. You are invited to use it freely,
either as editorials or otherwise. If you wish similar copy to be mailed to you
each week please add this bureau to your exchange list."
We look with sharp suspicion on this circular. We know of no person or col-
lection of men who are able to maintain a literary bureau in Washington except
those who have large interests to protect and the money to use freely to protect
them.
The only way in which a popular movement of this kind could be Inaugurated
would be by the calling of a convention of Southern men, and WE HAVE SEEN
NO SUCH CALL.
We regard it as an attempt to play on Southern sentiment In order to work
up an enthusiasm for a Southern man for President, and Southern men for other
high offices, who would be asoceptable to the "Interests" and could be relied on
TO PROTECT THE "INTERESTS OF THE INTERESTS." This last Is the
newly coined expression to designate the trusts.
The circular says that "the country sorely needs honesty" that "Democrats
must rescue the Government from the party of graft and greed," and that "the
Southern States are the stronghold of Democracy."
We agree heartily with this sentiment, but if the Southern States are to
rescue the country it must be done by putting men in office WHO ARB SE-
LECTED BY THE SPONTANEOUS UPRISING OF SOUTHERN PEOPLE
THEMSELVES, without the aid of a literary bureau started in Washington three
years before the campaign is on.
We note also that the circular takes up Judge Parker's tour through the
South and quotes the words of the "safe and sane" but colorless one who led
the Democratic party to the most disastrous defeat which any party has ever
suffered in the history of political strife.
Who is Judge Parker, and what gives his utterances power to impress the
Southern people?
lie was notoriously the candidate of Belmont, he was the signer of the
celebrated "gold telegram," he obediently consented to stand on a platform
WHICH DIFFERED NOT FROM THAT ON WHICH HIS OPPONENT STOOD
with the single exception of the negro plant which Roosevelt's pro-negro senti-
ment inspired the Republican convention to insert.
The South SHOULD come to the rescue of the nation; the South CAN fur-
iJsh leaders who would bring the country out of the orgy of graft and corruption
which now pervades it; but Judge Parker IS NOT THE MAN TO BOUND THE
TRUMPET CALL. We of the South do not wish to be spagain led into the Wil-
derness by Democrats of the stamp of August Belmont and Arthur P. Gorman
and Pat McCarren and Tom Taggert and Thomas F. Ryan.
It has been suspected for some time, and it is now thoroughly known that
Democracy, as preached and practiced by the gentlemen above named, DIFFERS
NOT FROM REPUBLICANISM EXCEPT IN NAME. It is known that August
Belmont and Tom Ryan are Democrats because the "interests," or the trusts, of
the country wish them to be Democrats, and need friends In the Democratice party.
The trusts control the Republiesa party through Morgan, and seek to control
the Democratic party through Belmont and Ryan.
Whichever way the election goe, IF THESE MEN LEAD, the inaterests of
the Interests are protected.
We do not wish to throw stones at Judge Parker-he i not an Issue--but
we do not see why HE has the right to talk to Southern Demoerat, sad we look
with suspleion upon a circular calling the Democracy to arms which quotes the
words of Democracy's most ignominious failure.

Fhen sh, We Wh U
To them that hath tings, shall be added;
From them that hath not, shall be taken away that which they have.
Notan exact quotation, but the expresloa of a condition in the office of The
Hun, Thursday of this week, when the cash drawer was despoiled of its contents, $16.


This sum was male way with by a thief who entered the office of The Sun,
forced its cash drawer, and forced us to place $16 to the profit and lok account.
Lucky thief tofind anything In that ash drawer. We have often looked in vain.


ALS











THE SUN


Apo, 4, 190


fl!,


"Oertainly. Did you no 6 know" she
ad, droppu into = h. "It IS four
aner w that he has held supreme
power to Ms and Rusify these poor
Fis. Ah, m'sleurt this country, once
o prosperous, blot upon the face of
u His methods. re th worst and
ufssrupulous of any employed by
Rus Da. Nefor he came here he was
the beet hated man in Petersburg, and
tht they my, is why the Emperor sent
him to us."7
"Ad he is uncle of this young lady,
EMt Heath r
"Utlele Ahl I don't know that,
m'sieur. I have been told so. His
alseO-popr young ladyl-can that bet
SWhnotf' I asked.
But the woman gave me no reason;
she only exhibited her palms and sighed.
She seemed to have compassion upon the
gris lIought hear rt was really softer
a I ha believed it to be.
"Where does this Baron live ?" I asked,
surprised that he should occupy so high
a pla= e in Russian oficialdom-the rep-
rseMetatve of the Car, with powers as
great as the Emperor himself.
"At the Government Palace, in Hel-
singMom"
"And Elma Heath is here-in this
grimn fortresI WhyT"
"Ah, m'sleur, how can I tell? By rea-
son of family secrets, perhaps. They
account for so mush, you know."
"That is exactly my opinion," I said.
"She has been brought here against her
will."
"Most probably. This is not a cheer-
ful place, as you see, We have five
months, of ice and snow, and for four
mouths are practically out off from ivy.
ilisation and we no new face."
"Terriblel" I gasped, glancing round
at those dark stone walls that seemed
to breathe an air of t ey and mys-
tery. The old castle had, I supposed,
beei turned into a convent, as many
have bee in Germany and Austria. Back
in feudal times it no doubt had been a
grand old plaoe. "And have you been
here long I asked.
"lewve years only. But I am leaving.
Even I, used asI am to a solitary life,
can stand it no longer. I feel that Its
cold silence and dreariness will drive me
mad. In winter the place Is like an ice.
well."
The fact that the Baron was ruler of
Finland amamed me, for r had half-ex.
peeed him to be some clever adventurer.
Y as the events of the past flashed
though my brain, I recollected that in
Rannoeh Wood had been found the min.
ature of the Russian Order of haint
Sa di4tintion which, in all probe.
ability, had been conferred upon him.
If 14, the eo01cidoe, to say the least,
aa'a eakable one. I questioned my
Mn t further ei the Baron.
i"A aiu,",:fl si e delI "t"I call
hM m r of the Fn s. I was
he who ordered the peasants of Kasko to
be l until fear of them died-and
r gave him the Star of White
a~ge for It-he who sup pmed half
the newspapers and put eight editors
in prison for publishing port of a
meeting of the Swedes i e fors
h who emourages otlol a"d brib.
ery among the oeals for the further-
ance of Russan interetej he who has
ordered Russian to be the oeaal lan.
guage, who has restrleted public educa-
tion, who bas over-taxed sad ground
down the people until now the aae is
laid, and In d is ady for ope re-l
volt. The prisos are Olled with the in-
noeno t men ar oed; the powr am
t .ng, and The Srangl, as they
call him, reports to the O(ar that Fin-
land is submisive and Is Russanihdl"
I had heard something of this abom-
inable state of affairs from time to time
from the English press, but had never
taken notice of the name of the oppresm-
sor. So the uncle of Elma Heath was
"The _trangler of Finland," the man
who, in four years, had reduced a pros-

eOCame I se hart I askd, feeling
that we had rsmimd too lcagtbure n


my presence in that place was perilous
the sooner I escaped from it the better.
"Yes, come," she said. "But silence!
Walk softly," and holding up the old
horn lantern to give me light, she led
me out into the low stone corridor aain,
sondueting me through a number of in-
tricate passages, all bare and gloomy,
the stones worn hollow by the feet of
ages. On we crept noiselessly past a
number of low arched doors studded
with big nails in thi style of generations
ago, then turning suddenly at right
a gles, I saw that we were n a kind of
ou de sac, before the.door of which at
the end she stopped and placed her fin-
pr upon her lips. Then, motioning me
to remain there, she entered, closing the
door after her, and leaving me in the
pitch darkness.
I strained my ears, but could hear no
sound save that of someone moving with-
in. No word was uttered, or if so, it
was whispered so low that it did not
reach me. For nearly five minutes I
waited in impatience outside that closed
door, until again the handle turned and
my oonductorec beckoned me in silence
within.
I stepped into a small, square cham-
ber, the floor of which was carpeted, and
where, suspended high above, was a lamp
that shed but a faint light over the
barely-furnished place. It seemed to
me to be a kind of sitting-room, with a
plain deal table and a couple of chairs,
but there was no stove, and the place
looked chill and comfortless. Beyond
was another smaller room into which the
old nun disappeared for a moment;
then she came forth leading a strange
wan little figure in a gray gown, a figure
whose face was the most perfect and
most lovely I had ever seen. Her wealth
of chestnut hair fell disheveled about her
shoulders, and as her hands were clasped
before her she looked straight at me in
surprise as she was led toward me.
She walked but feebly, and her coun-
tenanoe was deathly pale. Her dress,
as she came beneath the lamp, was, I
saw, coarse, yet clean, and her beautiful,
regular features, which in her photo-
graph had held me -in such fascination,
were even more sweet and more match-
less than I had believed them to be. I
stood before her dumbfounded in admir.
ation.
In silence she bowed gracefully, and
then looked at me with astonishment,
apparently wondering what I, a perfect
stranger, required of her.
"Miss Elm Heath, I presume?" I ex-
claimed at last. "May I introduce my-
self to you ?My name Is Gordon Greg,
English by birth, cosmopolitan by in-
stinct. I have come here to ask you a
question-a question that concerns your-
self. Lydia Moreton has sent me to
you."
I noticed that her great brown eyes
watched my lips and not my face.
Her own lips moved, but she looked at
me with an Inexpressible sadness. No
sound eesaped her.
I stood rigid before her as one turned
to stone, for in that instant, in a flash
Indeed, I realized the awful truth.
She was both deaf and dumb I
She raised her clasped hands to me in
silence, yet with tears welling In her
splendid eyes.
I saw that upon her wrists were a
pair of bright steel gyves.
"What is this place" I demanded of
the woman in the reli ous habit, when
I recovered from thehok of the poor
girl's terrible affliction. "Where am It
"This is the aste of Kajana-the
criminal lunatic asylum of Finland,"
was her answer. "The prisoner, as you
see, has lost both speech and hearing."
"Deaf and dumb I" Iorted, looking at
the beautiful original of that destroyed
photograph on board the Lola. "But
she has surely not always been so!" I
exclaimed.
"No. I think not always,' replied the
sister quietly. "But you said you in-
tended to question her, and didI not

-"But she ca write rspones to my
questionst, I ar--d,


pered reply. "Her mind is affected.
bhe is, unfortunately, a hopeless luna-
tic."
I looked straight into thou sad, wide-
open, yet unflinhing brown eyes utterly
confounded.
Thoe white write held in steel, that
pale face and blanched lip, the inertness
of her movements, all told their own
tragic tale. And yet that letter I had
read, dictated in secret most probably
because her hands were not free, was
certainly not the outpourings of a mad-
woman. She had spoken of death, it
was true, yet was it not to be supposed
that she was slowly being driven to sui-
cideT She had kept her secret, and she
wished the man gornby-the man who
was to marry Muriel Leithoourt-to
know.
The room in which we stood was evi-
dently an apartment set apart for her
use, for beyond was the tiny bed-cham-
ber; yet the small, high-up window was
closely barred, and the cold bareness of
the prison was sufficient indeed to cause
anyone confined there to prefer death to
captivity.
Again I spoke to her slowly and
kindly, but there was no response. That
she was absolutely dumb was only too
apparent. Yet surely she had not al-
ways been sol I had gone in search
of her because the beauty of her portrait
had magnetized me, andI had now found
her to be even more lovely than her pie.
ture, yet, alas! suffering from an afflic-
tion that rendered her life a tragedy.
The realization of the terrible truth
staggered me. Such a perfect face as
hers I had never before set eyes upon,
so beautiful, so clear-cut, so refined, so
eminently the countenance of one well-
born, and yet so ineffably sad, so full of
blank, unutterable despair.
She placed her clasped hands to her
mouth and made signs by shaking her
head that she could neither understand
nor respond. I therefore took my wallet
from my pocket and wrote upon a piece
of paper in a large hand the words: "I
come from Lydia Moreton. My name is
Gordon Gregg."
When her eager gaze fell upon the
words she became instantly filled with
excitement, and nodded quickly. Then
holding her steel-elasped wrists towards
me she looked wistfully at me, as though
imploring me to release her from the
awful bondage in that silent tomb.
Though the woman who had led me
there endeavored to prevent it, I handed
her the pencil, and placed the paper on
the table for her to write.
The nun tried to snatch it up, but I
held her arm gently and forcibly, saying
in French:
able. At length, however, after several
attempts, she succeeded in printing in
uneven capitals the response:
"I know you. You were on the yacht
I thought they killed you."
The thin-faced old woman saw her re-
sponse-- reply that was surely rational
enough-and her brows contracted with
displeasure.
"Why are you here ?" I wrote, not al-
lowing the sister to get sight of my ques-
tion.
In response she wrote painfully and
laboriously:
"I am condemned for a crime I did
not commit. Take me from here, or I
shall kill myself.
"Ahl" exclaimed the old woman. "You
see, poor girl, she believes herself inno-
centi They all do."
"But why is she here!" I demanded
fiercely.
"I do not know, m'sieur. It is not my
duty to inquire the history of their
crimes. When they are ill I nurse them;
that is all."
"And who is the commlndant of this
"Colonel Smirnoft. If he knew that I
had admitted you, you would never leave
this place alive. This is the Schussel-
burg of Finand-the place of Imprison-
ment for thoue who have conspired
against the state."
mhe primes of political conspirators.
eh"


tured in order to obtain eonfe!Oals and
information with AS muh rueltr in
the black day of the UlunsitIon These
walls are thick, and their series, are not
heard from the oubliettes below the
'lake."
I had long ago heard of the horrors of
Schuuelburv. Indeed who has not heard
"Alas, mrsieur, yeel MThe place in
which some of the poor creatures ae tor-
[Continued on Fourteenth Pip]


only


$3

$3M50
$ 50)


All


Styks


Patent


The Marvin Shoe Co.
233 w. SWe Be em JAkimM MM.


Swn hkes Chocoltes
.....and Bon Bons.....


In 1.2, I, 2 and 5 Lb. Packages
PMhUh ig

-25, 409 60

MAL MM *amo




Henry Watterson's Paper
(The Weekly o urflunglr)


THE SUN
Ioth One Yur for Onnl $L50
Few people in the United States have not
adourierJournal. D-o"rao
In all thin .fair In all thing.cdanin
all thin ,-it s lallyamlnw.
pper. a speal arangement we ae
enabled to ofer the Weekly ComUrlerJour.
nal one ywr and t Wapefor theNice
named aboe. Send your mubecrlptlcn
or t cmbaon to us-notto the

Stront ad endarig
OLD NHICKORY and
WUITE ICKOiY WAGONS


ColuMmbus Buis




M'MURRAY& BAKER


The Czar's Spy Chevalier William Qu


thPa


VEY mUe a 0 a
I" wP













April 14, 1906


THE SUN


Eleventh Page


PIve Been Thinking CHARLES BATL LOOMIS


Are you in the habit of sending your husband to
dry goods stores to match things?
If you live in the country or the suburbs and
your husband's office is in the city there is some ex-
cuse for it, but if you live in the city and make the
poor man do such work as that you ought to have
married some one else.
His brain is not your brain. To him shades and
textures and shapes are as nothing.
Either he will be conscientious and get the girl
at the counter to try to make the exact match, and
failing in that will come home without the spools
upon which you are depending for your morning's
work, or else being careless he will get something
that could not by any possibility be made to do.
* In either case you will judge hit from a woman's
view point and' he will make but a poor showing.
The best way is to write down plainly just what


you want him to get and reduce him to mere ignor-
ant errand-boy status.
Then he, a man who perhaps dominates political
assemblies or site high in church councils or delivers
valuable legal opinions, shuffles into the store, meek-
eyed and diffident, and going up to the spool counter
(after wandering all over the store looking for it)
says, "Give me some of that," sad pointing at the
paper shoves it at the young saleswoman. And she
looks at him with pitying eyes as a poor fool and,
reading the directions, hands out the goods.
He goes home with them and ten to one they are
wrong, but he is safe.
His wife can say nothing because he was merely
the shover of a message, not a thinking being with
two halves to his brain.
But the best way to do is to go yourself and thus
save your husband from encounters that cannot fail
to reduce his exalted opinion of himself.

Professor Erasmus Svelthett of St. Jacob's Uni-
versity has written a very learned brochure in which
he sets forth an interesting theory; namely, that the
season that children of to-day are so much more
quiet at the breakfast table than boys and girls used
to be is because they have plenty to read, while the
children of bygone generations, with nothing to do
save eat, had perforce to join in the conversation or
become ennuyes.
There is certainly much to be said in favor of this
theory. Children of the present time never obtain
the balance of conversation, nor do they ever have to
be reprimanded for interrupting or for saying un-
toward things at the wrong moment-although it is
a question whether the right moment for untoward
things ever comes.
But even if this fascinating breakfast literature
did not keep the children quiet there would be no
question of its stimulative action upon their minds.
We who look back over the lapse of years to our
own childhood recall that there were no Maltumin-
parvo breakfast foods with copious directions for
use, and chatty paragraphs printed in various sized
type on the yellow box. 'to be sure, those of us who
lived too far away from great centers to be able to
buy our condensed milk fresh every day from the
itinerant white wagon were accustomed to the cir-
cular cans with their Gail-burdened literature in
various languages, but in those days Gail Hamilton
reigned supreme even in the nursery, and her epi-
grammatic writings spoiled us for the more labored
effusions of the other Gail. Then, too, the cans be-
ing circular, mother had to keep turning them around
if little Willy wanted to read, and this was almost
as bad as being interrupted.
But now all is changed. If papa is taciturn if
mama has a headache and does not care to talk, little
William, who has long since learned how to read, site
at the matutinal repast and quietly imbibes useful


Thinks TM Brethren


The grand jury of De Soto County has
just completed a thorough examination
of all the facts surrounding the case of
1. E. Cooper, convicted of the murder of
Marshal Bowman of Punta Gords. The
jury examined forty-three witnesses, the
names of most of them having been fur-
nished by Cooper's lawyer, J. W. Brady,
who was called into the jury room and
himself questioned many of the wit-
nesses. The grand jury found no facts
on which to bae other indictments for
the crime, and no facts warranting the
. claim that Cooper was innocent. Cooper
will now be legally hanged, and the Jack-
sonville Metropolis wil et up on its
hind legs ad yell "We told you so; the
Metropolis did it." The News wants
. each of its readers to ask himself these
questions: Has justice been defeated
by deferring the execution of Cooper?
Has not the majesty of the law been up-
held by necessary delay and thorough in-
vestigation? Will oact every eitimn of
De 8otoCounty and the State of Flor-
ida feel better, after Cooper has been
hanged, because of the full, honest be-
lief that the right person was executed?
The blood-thirsty Jacksonville Metrop-
olis should confine itself to the publish-
ing of dirty stories and little things of
that kind, in which it excels.-De Land
News.
No public question given to the pub-
lie has eor beesived Jeoh aseful aMd
thorough eoideration as that of ood


roads. In Florida to-day almost every
newspaper is a constant advocate of good
roads in its locality, and considerable is
being accomplished along this line.
Hillsboro County cannot afford to let
this matter rest long after the start that
it has already made. If there have been
mistakes made in the past, profit by
them and continue the good work. Noth-
ing will enhance values more than good
roads. Railroads develop lands and
communities through which they pass,
but after all they do not furnish to the
people the utilitarian services that corm-
plete systems of good roads do. Push
this work forward at all seasons and
under all eirenumstance-Tamps Her-
ald.
It is reliably stated that Hon. Park
Trammell of Lakeland will enter the
Congressional lists in opposition to Mr.
Sparkman. Mr. Trammell served most
ably as President of the last Senate, and
is recognized as a young man of brilliant
ability. He is deservedly popular, but
"knowing one"an are of the opinion that
he has not sufficient strength to suceses-
fully combat the Tampa man.-Palatka
Times-Herald.
The suggestions of the Courier rel-
ative to the attitude of our legislative
candidates o the question of a uniform
school book law, are being given some
favorable ament by adors of the
paperT-walt City Corier.


Mr. uolkman of Duval County says
he believes war will be made on his fa-
mous educational law when the Legis-
lature meet next. spring, and he has
accordingly entered the race for the Sen-
ate with extraordinary vigor, as he
wants to take a hand in the war and
defend his famous measure against the
assaults of its enemies. We don't doubt
that efforts will be made to amend the
law, perhaps to repeal it, but the sub-
ject was so well considered by the last
Legislature and such pregres has been
made in carrying out the provisions of
the law that we do not believe any ef-
fort at repeal will be successful. The
State press, with very few exceptions,
does not indicate any public sentiment
against the law.-Live Oak Democrat.

From all accounts the only member
of the Florida deleation in ongree
who will have opposelon In the coming
primary is our own Billy Lamar.
parkman, in the First district, and
lark in the Second, will have things
their own way, no one yet having ap-
peared with sufficient nerve to try re-
sults with them. As for Mr. Lamar-
well, over in Jackson County there's a
young fellow named Jeff Stephens who
thinks he is in the race for the place,
but hell find, when the ballots are
counted on May 1, that he has another
think about due.-Madison New Enter-
pris.

if a newspaper has the temerity In
this Mtste to express an opinion hostile
to the Jaddw.ltrutiop of Governor Na-
pole B. Broward and s draainge


information of many kinds. All silently the knowl-
edge s borne in on him that "EnergysZoon the fuel.
food of life. Better a pewter plate and Ener oose
than a golden platter and nought but a staled ox
thereon.
If he tire of reading about the virtues of Enery-
soose he may turn his eyes to the corn-tasel colored
box on the right and learn that "Gripe-knots are un-
like any other food preparation. Being entirely di-
gested they naturally wean a strong ma from coffee,
and can be eaten without practice by teething babies.
They contain nothing that will give the stomach the
slightest trouble, and persons who hav used our
food for years do not need their stomasks at all.
They are made of devitaliued chestnut sawdust, and
it is possible to eat them without the use of sugar or
cream"-or anesthetics. "Properly compressed they
can be used by the children as building blocks, and
can then be reduced to a powder and taken one
every two hours, when they ive one all the sect of
having eaten without its foolish pleasures."
When William has read, and one side is thor-
oughly digested-for the literature is not predigested,
like the contents of the box-mama will turn it
around, and he may read inspiring letters from in.
valid who lost their sense of taste years ago and
who have enjoyed Gripe-knots ever since; or els on
the third side he may learn how to make simple,
innocuous desserts of bran.
Really literary families seldom content themselves
with one lettered box of patent food, and some oul.
tivated Bostonians have as many as five or six
brands, of various shades of yellow and brown,
merely that Aloiblades Beacon, tird of reading about
Cornena and its stimulative properties, may turn
to the box of Wheatoast or Puttyjim's Oathik, or
the box of Noegud with its entertaining anecdote to
the effect that "a lady in Seattle, who had not been
able to take a step for fourteen yards, ate a single
box of Noegud and immediately took stops to koep it
constantly in the larder"-and away from the break.
fast table. Or his little mind, unable to cope with
his father's arguments to prove Aguinaldo a bigger
man than Washington, turns with relief to the s&tae-
ment that "Mrs. Bentley of Shogtioooos, Minneota.,
was unable to take anything solid without facial
paralysis. She ate one box of Noegud and now says
that she would rather eat solid rook than be without
it." Mark the subtle sarcasm of her remark. It is
dollars to doughnuts that Aloiblades, Bostonian
though he be, does not see that if she would not be
without it she would not have it within her.
Some may carp at the colors of the packages;
some may even wish that the food could be put in
china receptacles and the literature set beside eamob
plate in "individual" pamphlets, but no one ean
may that there are not many aids to conversation
among the elders and much of an improving nature
to children in the unobtrusive and absolutely
veracious writings of the food companls.


scheme or suggest a criticism of the
State Rallroad Commission, the little
editors of the little administration news-
papers rise up in taner littlenes and
proclaim that said newspapers are
Flaleried, and that is tim tent of
ther argument. These little psewe edi-
tore possess a brain about the sis of a
pun ustion point. Their little souls
would rattle in a mustard seed and make
so much noise that they would think
that they were inhabiting a bass drum.-
Ocala Banner.

Hon Park Trammell, it Is said, will
run against Hon. Stephen LM. parkman
for Congress from the First Congrs
sional District. Better hold up this
time, Mr. President; you might stand
better chanes* two year hence agast
W. S. Jenning, if he runs then, when
your Uncle Stephen will be running
after the Senatorshlp Faithful er-
vice should be .reog and warded,
and if Mr. Mallory Is to have a m0ess*
sor this early, we see no reason why
Ste phen M. Sparkman should not be
sent up higher. Se.-TaIahasees True
Democrat.

Judge C. B. Parkhill has announced
that he will be a candidate to succeed
himself on the Supreme bench. The
Judge, besides bdei e of the most
polished and m oarteous gtle of to
State, is at the as me one o our
most learned jurist, and by retaining
him in ai prOnut pseIst Fl.oda
voters will ake no ifake.-Madleis
New Nterpriae.










Twelfth Page


THE SUN


April 14, 1906


MONTE CARLO, GAMBLING HELL

By HELOISE COMTESSE D'ALEMCOURT


Monte Carlo.-The forthcoming an-
mual report, secret of course, of the
"Anomous Society for Sea Bathing
and oreigners Cub" alias the Blano
Hers' Mot Carlo anbling institution,
will sbow that the Uak did business to
the amount of $8,000,000 last year and
spent (,400,000.
These figures your correspondent ob-
tained from a person very close to
Prince Bonaparte, former husband of
one of the Blanc girls. Blanc, it will be
rnemabered, had two daughters, Marie
Felix, who became the wife of a grand-
son of the great Napoleon, and Louise
Antoinette, who married Prince Con-
stantine Radswill.
Two million four hundred thousand
dollars seems an enormous annual budget
for a country only three times the else
of Oentral Park, New York, but it must
be borne in mind that the expense ao-
count includes the salary of a reigning
Prines, a bishop, papal delegate and
their clergy, the civil list of an absentee
Ameriean girl-prinoem, in addition to
the pay of a bodyguard of five generals,
seventy troopers and forty-four Cara-
biner.


MUST BE BOTHERED
MONEY.


ABOUT


Some little while ago when the New
Orleans banker's daughter, her Serene
Highness, Alice, Princess of Monaco,
Duchess of Valntinois, Marchioness of
Baux, Countess of Carlades, Baroness of
Buls, Noble Mistress of St. Reny and
Matlgnon, Countess of Thorigny, Baron-
es of St. Lo and Luthumiere, Duchess
of Estouteville, Masarin, Meilleray and
Maenne, Princess of Poroein, Countess
of Ferrette, Balfort Thann, Rosemund,
Baroness Aitkirch, Marchioness of Guis-
card, and Noble Dame of Isenheim-
that' her full title-some time ago when
this lady of many names was examined
before a Paris Judge a to the value of
a lot of Jewelry annexed by her valet,
she said languidly "You mean money
value? I never bother about that;
never keep accounts, never look at bills,
just spend what I want. If there is no
more at hand, my treasurer sends a tel-
egram for more, but as to the actual
amount expended or bills paid I have
no idea. It doesn't concern me at all."
Perhaps that's one of the reasons why
Albert and Alice live apart, at any rate
thM world enjoys complete ignorance
wlth respect to the financial arrange.
ments between His Highness and Her
Highness of Monaco, but all was made
elar to your correspondent as to Prince
Albert's agreement with the Blano
heirs, and as to the Blanc heirs' respon-
sibilities toward the monarey and
Albert's and Alice's 16,000 subjects.


NEST FEATHZkSi
YEARS.


FOR FIFTY


For fifty years to come, the royal
family of Monaco will receive an appan-
ag of 8,000,000 frane per year, beside.
the enormous income from its 10,000
share of stock, nominal value 3,000,000
francs, actual value 30,000,000 francs,
and not for sale even at that figure.
To correctly estimate appanage and
stockholdership, it should be considered
that Blanhm originally paid less than
400,000 for the real estate and license
held, by his gambling company. His
first contract withthe Prince read:
"One million two hundred and fifty thou-
sand francs per annum to His Highness
and ,000 shares at 500 franc each."
At the renewal of the contract, the
Prince exacted another gift of 5,000
shares and had his salary run up to the
snug amount before mentioned.
We are told by paid scribes every lit-
t~ while that the principality of Mo-
nacb "has prospered enormously under
Albert's mild scepter. That good for-
tune is smiling upon the country is un-
dentlable." No Prince's territory in the
wide world is a finer garden spot, there
Is no more aflunt couastitulay Mo-


naso is a collection of palaces, great ho-
tels, fine houses and church, enchant-
ing gardens and rocky building lots, sell-
ing at higher prices than real estate on
New York's Broadway. And nowhere,
not even in the United States, increased
the population as rapidly. Albert's
father lorded it over 8,448 subjects, the
great majority of whom walked bare-
foot. When the husband of Alice Heloe
ascended the throne, 9,804 men, women
and children called him Highness and
Father. To-day he is ruler and auto-
crat of 16,000 people; some American
police captains have not larger clientele.


A MILD RULER,
LOW THEM


BUT WON'T
TO GAMBLE.


AL-


Albert is a mild ruler, and the Blanc
heirs pay for all. Though Jews, they
insisted that the little district be raised
to a Bishopric with four or five Mon-
signors, a Vicar General, a prelate and
a large staff of priests. The Blanes
built a cathedral, too, and declared that
Catholic was "state religion," none
other need apply. Next they told His
Highness' subjects that all taxes were
abolished; they need neither pay a tax
to the Prince, nor a dog tax, and be-
sides would be policed free of charge. A
free fire department was also etub-
lished, free schools, free water and free
sewerage followed.
In anti-Blanc times town and country
did not know street lights-the Blanc
heirs established, first, gas free of
charge, and then electric lighting. And
there were neither gas bills, nor are
there charges for electricity.

SALARIES OF GAMBLER BOSSES.

But, of course, even the enormous
profits of the Casino couldn't put a
whole principality of 16,000 people on
the free list if the directors wallowed in
graft, like managers of the American
ig Four. No Hyde-Tarbell-McCall-
McCurdy-Hegeman salaries for the man-
ipulators of the roulette. The president
gets a measly $20,000 a year-I can see
McCurdy's son-in-law turn up his nose
at such a miserable stipend; the direc-
tor general considers himself happy with
$8,000 a year-what would McCall's
nephew of the seventh or eighth degree
say to such a bagatelle? Ridiculous I
An4 the directors get $4,000 annually,
not a penny more, and no extras from
syndicates and other stealing.
The gambling bosses' budget further-
more includes 100,000 francs annually
for secret police, and enormous sums
for theater, orchestra, charity and
"primes." Yes, prises-the nice races
would be sorry afairs, indeed, if it were
not for the prize offerings of the Blanc
heirs.
DON'T SUICIDE, SAY BLANC HEIRS,
AT LEAST NOT WHILE HERE.

The charity accounts' most formidable
item is known as "anti-suicide." When
a gambler, lady or gentleman, lose his,
or her, all and is getting ready "to pas
in his or her chips," an agent of Messrs.
Blane approaches and suavely suggests
"to do nothing rash."
"How much money did you bring
here?"
The sum is noted down and verified
by the various croupiers with the aid of
the secret service men. "Well, here is
an order for 10 per cent of your losses
and your ticket home. You will oblige
us by departing at once."
The would-be suicide take the slip
of paper to the bank and, without a
louomu puI e13 .q1n jno ,puiq 'pJo.
after the applicant has signed an un-
dated note for the full amount "payable
in Monte Carlo." This note he must re-
deem before he is ever allowed to enter
the gambling rooms again. If he is
cured of his passion for gambling he
won't be bothered for repayment. But
your correspondent is told that not 5
per cent of the note go by default and


that, consequently, the Blano heirs lose
very little money by gambling on the
gambler's passion to gamble again and
again.
SCHOOL FOR CARD DEALERS OR
CROUPIERS.


According to the general belief the
card dealers (in French, croupiers),
roulette assistants, etc., are I'ruined
gamblers," forced to earn a' livelihood in
this disreputable fashion. This is an
erroneous idea. The bank recruits its
croupiers from the ranks of French and
Italian unoommissioned officers and
small officials. Applicants must be be-
low twenty and have a clean bill of
health, mentally and physically. They
are subjected to medical examination,
and none are accepted but fellows of iron
nerves, who, at the same time, have a
talent for mental arithmetic.
After passing examinations, the can-
didates are admitted to the croupier's
school, where their talent for figuring
is developed, and where, besides, they
learn all about cards, wheels, baeoarrat
and every other sort of game, whether
it's played in Monte Carlo or not. While
undergoing instruction, the candidates
get 150 francs a month, when full-fledged
croupiers they receive from 250 to 400
francs at the roulette, from 400 to 600
francs at the trente-et-quarante tables.

CROWDS IN MONTE CARLO.

Just now Monte Carlo is crowded, and
its fifty-five hotels, some of them real
Waldorf-Astorias, are daily turning
away people. Here follow some figures
concerning Monte Carlo visitors: In
1870 less than 150,000 men and women
visited the resort; in 1889, the 500,000
mark was reached; last year 1,073,884
went to Monte Carlo. The present sea-
son promises to smash all records.

ALL ARE WELCOME BUT SUBJECTS
AND KNOWN THIEVES.

The Blano heirs open their arms
wide to all comers save known default-
ers and thieves and His Highness' sub-
jects. The European police have a way
of sending portraits and personal de-
scriptions of grafters and thieves to
Monte Carlo, and while His Highness is
not cruel enough to arrest such persons
and deliver them up to stern justice, yet
ne withholds from them the permit
necessary for admittance to the gambling
halls. Persons who do not resemble
absconding bank cashiers or runaway
Lombard Street messengers have no diffi-
culty obtaining admission on the
strength of their passport or visiting
card.

AMERICAN SUNDAY SCHOOL IN
GAMBLING HELL.
The scenes in the gilded gambling
halls have been so often described it
would be carrying coal to Now Castle
to attempt to say anything new. But
something new did happen the other
day when an American Sunday school
marched in solemn step, a spectacled
spinster ahead and half a dozen teach-
ers and a reverend gentleman following.
I hasten to add that the scholars did not
accompany their master and mistresses.
I was almost afraid that they were bent
on a Carrie Nation racket mission, but,
instead of a hatchet, each pulled out a
small knitted purse, "heavenly-blue" or
green of color.
"Mrs. X. gave me this to play on the
wheel," said the first Mary Jane, ex-
hibiting a silver dollar. The second had
a $2.50 gold piece from another church
member, the reverend boasted of three
stakes of $., $5 and $10 respectfully.
They were told that they must change
the money into francs, and inquired
anxiously whether that would entail
any kind of a ioss since their friends
"would hardly stand for that." What
bliss when they discovered that Ameri-


can gold sold at a premium, and that
even greenbacks were accepted at full
value. But silver-never, Jamaist
That made Mary Jane mad and she
threatened to "write to Roosevelt by the
very next mail" and also to the local
paper.
WANTED TO PLAY BEST TABLES.
While preparing to beard the devil in
his lair, the Sunday school teachers as-
sured each other over and over again
"that it was only done for a Joke," and
that they hoped "none of them reporters
would catch on." Then, seeing the most
fashionably dressed crowd around the
trenteet-quarante tables, they tried for
an opening there, meah offering his, or
her, flve-frano piece. Of course, the
croupier majestically waved them aside,
and 1 had the greatest difficulty In the
world explaining to my oompatrot$ that
he was not acting "out of meannes,"
but according to the rules, which permit
nothing less than 20 francs to be placed
at these tables.
"Then where can we go with our
money" queried Mary Jane, drumming
on her stomach with her spectacles.
I took the good folks to a roulette
table where five-franc stakes were sac-
cepted and-God is good to the bold-all
won, whereupon they immediately pock-
eted their friend's money and set their
own. When I left, the reverend gentle-
man was broke; the elder Mary Jane
had lost "a fortune," $16, but Mary
Jane, the second, had won enough to
allow her to extend her tour to Naples.
I heard her say to the reverend: 'Never
mind, the Blanc heirs must see you
home."
According to the rules, the Blanc
heirs just owe him (2-no exceptions
made in the case of clergymen.


Made Egyptian Princess
Crumble Into Dust
Paris.-A famous medical professor
and antiquarian, whose name is with-
held by the police, is in jail on a charge
of having killed his servant girl in a fit
of rage. Pressure is brought to keep
the matter quiet, but the State's At-
torney is bound to prosecute, and thus
the whole matter will eventually be-
come public.
The Professor hoarded in his study an
ebony casket containing an Egyptian
mummy of great historical value. He
claimed that it represented the remains
of a famous EgyptianKings daughter,
the only one of a dynasty that perished
many thousands years ago. The Pro-
fessor's family and particularly his ser-
vants, were forbidden to go within ten
feet of the casket, and the Professor
himself mopped up the dust collecting
on it with a speoially-constructed pair
of bellows.
Some time ago a "green" servant girl
was installed n the Profees 's house-
hold, and, of course, was instructed like
the rest, but Eugenic was of so curious
a nature that, a few days ago when
alone in the study, she not only went
to the casket and viewed it from the out-
side, but pried it open. Seeing a black
Euenie attempted to handle the strange
doll and under her unschooled lserse
it collapsed lioe a card house and fell
Eugenic was terribly frightened, but
told her mistress, who promised to pai-
fy the doctor. The later heard the re.
port seemingly withol anger, but sent
for Eugenie to hear he story from her
own lips. When she had hnished, he
pulled a revolver out of his pocket and
shot the girl dead.
He pleads excitement, temporary in-
sanity, etc., but the circumstances point
to deliberate murder, and there are many
who think it would be a good thing to
guillotine the Professor as a warning
to othen holding life of the poor at a
low estimate. "










April 14, 1906


THE SUN


Thirteenth Page


Agriculture---Florida's Opportunity

Conducted by W. E. Pabor


PR1tTUP,.
Sweet April I many a thought
Is wedded unto thee, as hearts are
wed;
Nor shall they fail, till, to its Autumn
brought
Life's golden fruit is wed.
-Longfellow.
The strawberry grows underneath the
nettle, and wholesome berries thrive and
ripen best neighbored by fruit of baser
quality. -Shakespeare.
Nothing great is produced suddenly,
since not even the grape or the fig is.
If you say to me now that you want a
tig, I will answer to you that it requires
time; let it flower first, then put forth
fruit and then ripen. -Spictetus.
SOUR MILK AND OLD AGE.
Drink sour milk-or eat it-and live
to be one or two hundred years old. Do
you want to live that long? Do you
think you could, in Florida, where nine.
tenths of the people get their milk from
the tin cow? A learned professor with
the almost unpronounceable name of
Metohinkoff, has discovered that the mi-
crobe which causes milk to sour, pro-
ducing lactie soladd, is the deadly enemy
of the microbe that is mainly respon-
sible for making us old and feeble, and
is known as the microbe of putrefaction,
whose habitat is in the human intes-
tines. Well, well I Methusela must
have lived on curdled milk, for sure.
But one must be sure and skim all the
cream (is there any cream in the milk
from a Florida cow?) from the lacteal
fluid before letting it get sour. Then
you boil it and let it ferment till t ends
n a curdled condition, ready to grapple
with that miserable microbe that works
in such a deadly way in our "Innards."
And the Professor fortifies his theory
with facts. More people than we ever
realized live, laugh, grow fat on this
diet. Here is what he says about it:
"In Egypt from earliest antiquity,
the milk of the buffalo, cow and goat hi
been a common article of diet known
as lebenraib. On the Balkan peninsula,
vahourth, a fermented milk, ais in gen-
oral use as food. The natives of Alge-
ria depend for dally diet largely upon
lebe a fen, a fermented milk. In Rua sour
milk is soosimed in great quantities in
two forms. First, the proeto kwacha,
uncooked milk, which is not used used until
it coagulates, or grow sour. The see-
ond sort, varnetU is milk which is
sprinkled, while milk Is boiling, a strong
yeat used in making the sour bread of
that country.
"To the black tribes of Central Africa
sour milk serves the double purpose of
food and medleins. Among the Myesi
cured milk in almost solid form is the
principal food. The Assobnes, dwellers
upon the M&a-Tn ia Pluteu,
llkewiU the -ulu andmOwankndi tabe
milk only in the state of fresh cheese.
With this they mix salt and allsple
and fedin in its oonsuption all the pleas-
ure of the e onpiu m.
He dit saam of a womaa livingin
the Cauamu nm med Theael Abalvav
aged one hundred and eighty yr, har-
dy enough to be able to do ar bhoue-
work and ordinary sowing. Altboh
beat, she walk with a r a n to She
has never used an aalscoholic drin. she
rises at six every morning and her prin-
cipal nourishmet eoisits of rye bread
and sour buttermik.
It is to be ubted f the people at
large want to live so long. It might
do for Floridians, but the eearcity of
the real Simon pure article in moet seo-
tions of the State, will prevent it. adop-
tion.
Hay William Smyths, the wll
known writer oR idumrioe toplei, in a
Howth: Tte United States should
drain the Southern SwamP
tf Me ren that it re ta ms


flood water to irrigate the Western des-
erts in order that we may widen the
foundations of our national life, en.
chance the common prosperity, and give
men more room in which to build their
habitations." This, of course, is in.
tended to apply more to the swamps of
tua Gulf border States than to Florida,
inasmuch as the State has in possession
all these lands and the Government but
very little available for occupation
under the homestead laws.
There is nothing new under the sun,
not even in alfalfa growing. The seven
cuttings per year may appear so, as told
by Judge Heaver of Leesburg to the edi.
tor of the Commercial. But Pliny, writ-
ing a century before the dawn of the
Christian era, said of it: "It is out
when it is just beginning to flower, and
this is repeated as often as it throws
out new blossoms, which happens mostly
six times in the year, and four at the
very least." This was in Greece, whore
it was an exotic, introduced from Media
at the time of the Persian wars with
King Darius. It is said that from one
sowing crops were out for thirty years,
which is now almost the case in our own
country; in Colorado, under irrigation
it has occupied the same ground, in
some instances, for more than a quarter
of a century. But there the soil is very
deep and very strong.

SOWING THE SEED.
"The Progressive Union of New Or-
leans is planning to advertise the coast
country on the line of the Louisville &
Nashville Railroad They propose to set
forth the advantages of this oast coun-
try, both as a winter an' summer resort,
and also for the establishing of dairies
and truck farms."
So says the Mobile Register. The
managers of the Louisville A Nashville
Railroad are, no doubt, behind the Pro.
grnive Union, just as the Santa Fe
System is behind the hicago publica-
tion called "The Earth," copie of which
have recently fallen into m hands. The
"Sunset" magazine is exploited by the
Southern Pacific and the "Four-Track
News" by the New York Central. All
the leading railroads seem to he adopt-
ing this method of adroitly advertiing
their line of traffic and the advantage
of settlement in their particular di-
tricts. The Southern and the Atlantic
Coast Line might not find it a bad
scheme to fall into line and have their
own monthly publication, sufficently
disguised to pass muster under the eye
of the Postffce Department and be
registered for mailing as second ldae
rate. A vast deal of valuable informa-
tion about the Gulf and mcoat country
could thus be widely circulated and
idle lands become occupied, homes es-
tablished, traffic increaseed and the rev-
enues of the States be added to by such
means.
By sowing the seed, we reap the har-
vest.

Broward's Scheme To
Drain the Everglades
It is the duty of Governor Broward to
drain the Everglades. He was elected
on that issue. Tha people who are crit-
icising the GoWIror for trying to do
what he was elected partly to do, are
condemning not him but the people who
elected him. A majority of the people
of Florida declared by their ballots that
they wanted the Everglades drained, and
that they wanted Broward to do it
Broward cannot do otherwise than go
dhead with the work until he is lawfully
retrained by a higher authority than
the sovereign will of the good people of
Florida. Boing a man of the people,
elected by the people, repr the
people, he is to carry out the w t ef th
pepiia ,t vw _pnemeed in 1i eeMtso.
^ewarlsly e-uld mot, nr will he,
be swayed from his purpose and obHlp'


tion to the people by the minority who
were rebuked at the polls, and have
proven themselves to be neither his
friends nor the friends of those whose
policies and purposes he repreents.
Broward will drain the Everglades if
it is within ais power as Governor to do
so. The man who bravely faced hard-
ships, dangers and death to help to free-
dom a downtrodden race, as he did for
the Cubans, may be depended upon to
fight the battles of the people of his na-
tive State for the internal improvement
of the State, against the encroachment
of corporations, or in reisting the set-
ting aside of their sovereignty and will,
by a few dissatisfied newspapers and de-
feated politicians.
The objectors to Broward's draining
the Everglades are not the people who
voted for him.-Southern Argus.

"Countess of Chicago"
Is a Counterfeiter
Paris.-Countess de Chicago, a very
pretty young woman who, however, never
crossed the erringpond, was nabbed by
the police sitting on a sofa in which re-
posed 20,000 counterfeit francs in silver.
The arrest was due to her habit of pay-
ing all bills with new two-franc pieoes
of the same year. Squeezed by the third
degree, the ladyship of the Windy City
confessed that she was the agent of
Baron de Saint-Jean, a real nobleman,
who made the counterfeits. The Baron
was found in an elegant villa, surround-
ed by every evidence of wealth. When the
police ofilcer attempted to search the
houe, the Baron pushed a button and
eight lackeys in knee-pants and gold.
laced costs appeared. "Wallop this
plebeian good and sound," said the
Baron, "and throw him out into the gut-
ter." The policeman whistled and ten
gendarmes came to his rescue, where-
upon the lackeys left their noble master
to fight his own battles. The counter-
feiting plant was discovered, and the
Baron acknowledged that he has been
making base money for fifteen years.
"The Barons de Saint-Jean received
the privilege of coining under Louis XI,"
he said proudly, "and I am simply doing
what I have te legal right to do-coin.
ing money. If 1 did not, I wouldn't have
a cent to bless myself with, the first
republic having oonfisated my family ew
tat". Ye, the nobility of the Countess
de Chicago is of my own creation. The
Barons of Saint-Jean possessed the privi-
lege of creating nobles, too. I merely er
ated her Mile. de Chicago" she added the
Counters. I think I had the right to
make her my agent, but since she gave
me away, I will have nothing more to
do with the goose. You may arrmt her-
I will not protest."
The heartless police arrested the
Baron instead and took the Countes de
Chicago to the house of detention, where
she is cajoled and flatttered, the lady
having turned states evidence.

Kaiser Wants Flowers
In Protestant Churches
Berlin.-The Kaiser is preparing an
Easter sermon, whih will plead for more
towes in Protestant ehurMheM "Our
Prolteetant hurhee," he said the other
day, "are too a or*wnout, dull and
leaden-not a bit of color except on the
ladl' heads and shoulder. I can't
conceive of the barbarim advocated by
some ultra-Prottant ehuroh-ore who
object to flowers, seease Oatolice use
sueh in their ohurohee. I suppoes they
do, but why should our brother' cue-
toms at upon us like a red reag upon a
bullt I have been told that Buddha'
altars are never without flower, and
do not hesitate to say that it is rot and
nosee to argue that church with
lower-deeoated altars are 'churches for
tha eye ad noes.
ie dkn emhould not be a stranger
to ature; It should not exclude flower


and greens. I know ehauhe whose
empty walls and altars cry out for the
children of spring and summer."
In an article by IL T." ain our last
issue it was claimed that under the pres-
ent municipal administration the 'blind
tigers" were being more gentle. They
are a bit more careful-thats all. They
are selling about as much liquor as be.
fore, but are taking more pain to cover
their tracks.-Montlello News.



Read Your Future In the


STAR

WHICH IS THE TRADIMNARK OF



Whitehouse

andn


REAL ESTATE 0

204 W. by S, JackonvllmeF


By listing your Prop ty
under our star your for.
tune will increase. In*
quiries now in our office
..* for....



Timber Lands


Farm IProperty


will insure the sale of
yours if you place them
in our hands





outlamen-I a lonntsid In your e
pooa stoll tmber ludans& a rn pogwVr.
Kindly oomipond with me on





..204 ... .. .. Ja.a.u.vl, P.
'""'"'" '""""'"""'"'"""'""""K """'""""
TII*"T~iM I""""""""""""""""










nvwW~5UU5F


.THE SUN


April 14, 1906


Wm. Burbridge

RI STAlK
Bargains in Improved and Unimproved
Property.. .. orrespondence = elicited.
Inl ~ Phm 14L.


'''Iv


Windsor Hotel


esonvl o'fs !lnest
and rlorklda' priest


and BIot Year-Round



DODGE t GULLbEN
Owi n. Nnaer


(dl ~


~\fr I V
A '


Dear Dad--I r ded In Jackmnvile
miy bliad, and was taken to the opt.
cIn's, where I was treated by a nerolo.
gt, who proedbed diet, and put me on
aflg for breakfast, no lunch, and a pecan
unt for dinner, and after dz day' treat-
niuent I would mee a loaf of Pufdied
*tm flOT4 it. Yous D
SNED.
P.aB.-It's bread like mother used to





i.





AUm*


4'









is







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r


I


The Czar's Spy
(Continued from Tenth Page)
f them who has traveled in Russia
'he very mention of the modern Bastile
i Lake Ladoga, where no prisoner has
rer been known to come forth alive, is
uficient to cause any Russian to turn
ale. And i was in the Schusselburg of
ialandl
I turned over the sheet of paper and
rrote the quation-
"Did Baron Oberg send you here"
In response, she printed the words--
"I believe so. I was arrested in Hel-
ingors. Tell Lydia where I am." ,
"Do you know Muriel Leitheourt1" I
nqulred by the same means, whereupon
he replied that they were at school
teether.
"Did you see me on board the Lola?"
[ wrote.
"Yes. But I could not warn you, al-
though I had overheard their intentions.
They took me ashore when you had gone,
o Siena. After three days I found my-
sielf deaf and dumb-I was made so."
Her allegation startled me. She had
en purposly afflictedl
"Who did itT"
"A doctor, I suppose. They put me
under chloroform."
"Who t"
"People who said they were my
friends.
I turned to the woman in the religious
habit, and cried-
"Do you ee what she has written
She has been maimed by some friends
who intended that the secret she holds
should be kept They feared to kill her,
so they bribed a doctor to deliberately
operate upon ner so that she could
neither speak nor. hear. And now they
are driving her to suicide!"
"M'sieur, I am astounded I" declared
the nun. "I have always believed thai
she was not in her right mind, yet as
surely she seems to be as ane as I am
only wilfully mutilated by some pre
tended friend who determined that nh
further word should pass her lips."
"A shameful mutilation has been comr
mitted upon this poor defenseless girl I'
I cried in anger. "And I will make i
my duty to discover and punish the per
petrators of it."
"Ah, m'sieur. Do not act rashly,
pray of you," th thewoman said seriously
placing her hand upon my arm. "Recol
lect you are in Finland-where th
Baron Oberg is all-powerful."
"I do not fear the Baron Oberg," I ex
claimed. "If necessary, I will appeal t
the Czar himself. Mademoiselle is kep
here for the reason that she is in poi
session of some secret. She must be re
leased-I will take the responsibility."
"But you must not try to release he
from here. It would mean death to yow
both. The castle of Kajaa tells no s
crets of those who die within its wall
or of those cast headlong into its water
and forgotten."
Again I turned to Elm, who stood i
anxious wonder of the subject of ou
conversation, and had suddenly take
the old nun's hand and kissed it affac
tionately, perhaps in order to show mn
that she trusted her.
Then upon the paper I wrote--
"Is the Baron Oberi your uncle?"
She shook her head in the negative,
showing that the dreaded Governor-Get
eral of Finland had only acted a paI
towards her in which she had. been con
polled to concur.
"Who is Philip Hornby?" I inquirei
writing rapidly.
"My friend-at least, I believe so."
Friend! And I had all along believe
him to be an adventurer and an enemy!
"Why did be go to Leghorn?' I ask
"For a secret purpose. There was
plot to kill you, only I managed 1
thwart them, were the word, s.
printed with much labor.
"Then I owe my life to you," I wrote
"And in return I will do my utmost 1
rescue you from here, if you do not fes
to place yourself in m hands."
And to this she replied-


Mr I"ieimes 4 Stts 11

f l .................... s o 650
ofaei's""t Ry ef...............8 765 e 00 1
o al Drs ...................... 50) 5 M
a.hwiS o ........................ 75 00
- h aBld ........................ 75 s00

2 .80 49so
Sam!SS? .. ......876 5
odflor .m................... s 7 5 0
MGM Carolima 2.... 6 4 00m 1

ONras .................. 75 soo
of r4Qafat ...bon 75 600
~bs W mdoopbo 7s0


1700
780
950
950
950
950
7%5
950
725
950


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"I shall be thankful, for I cannot be&
this awful place longer. I believe the
must torture the women here. They wi
torture me some day. Do your best I
get me out of here and I will tell yo
everything. But," she wrote, "I f
yon as never secure my release. I ai
coanled here on a life sentence."
"aut you are English, and if yo ha


.1


~1.


w A"" HANNE BROS.


MW W. k


had no trial I can complain to our Am-
bassador."
"No I am a Russian subject. I was
born in Russl, and went to England
whIen I was a girl."
That altered the case entirely. As a
subject of the Csar in her own country
she was amenable to that disgraceful
blot upon civilization that allows a per-
son to be consigned to prison at the will
of a high oidial, without trial or with-
out being afforded any opportunity of
appeal. I therefore at once saw a dim-
Yet she promised to tell me the truth
if I could but eere her released
A flood of recollections of the amazing
mystery swept through my mind. A
thousand questions arome within me, all
of which I desired to ask her, but there,
in that noisome prison-house, it was Im-
possible. As I stood there a woman's
shrill scream of excruciating pain
reached me, nothwithttanding those
oyclopean walls. Some unfortunate
prisoner was, perhaps, being tortured
and confession wrung from her lips. I
shuddered at the unspeakable horrors
of that grim fortress.
"No. I wish to see if she is really
insane. You will at least allow me this
satisfaction."
And while we were in altercation,
lma, with the pencil in her fingers,
tried to write, but by reason of heb
hands being bound so closely was un.
Could I allow this refined defenseless
girl to remain an inmate of that Bas.
tile, the terrors of which I had heard
men in Russia hint at with bated
Breath? They had wilfully maimed her
mnd deprived her of both hearing and
the power of speech, and now they In
tended that she should be driven mad b3
that silence and loneliness that must a.
ways end in insanity.
I "I have decided," I said suddenly
t turning to the woman who had oonductec
me there, and having now removed the
iteel bopds of the prisoner with a ke]
he secretly carried, stood with folded
D hands in the calm attitude of the re
Sligious.
I "You will not act with rashness?" she
o, implored in quick apprehension. '"Re
t member, your life is at stake, as well a
Smy own.
"Her enemies intended that I, too
I should die I answered, looking straight
into those deep mysterious brown eve
.' which held me as beneath a spell. "Thei
t have drawn her into their power because
ihe had no means of defense. But I wil
Sisesume the position of her friend an
protector."
t "How?"
"The man is awaiting me in the boa
outside. I intend to take her with me.
"But, m'sieur, why that is impose
ir iblel" cried the old woman in a hoard
u voice. "If you were discovered by th
Guards who patrol the lake both nigh
. and day they would shoot you both."
n "I will risk it," I said, and without
another word dashed into the tiny bed
, chamber and tore an old brown blanket
r from off the narrow truckle bed.
n Then, linking my a&m in that of th
a. woman whose lovely countenance ha
verily become the sun of my existence
[ made a sign inviting her to aooompan
me.
The sister barred the door, urging mn
to reconsider my decision.
' "Leave her alone in secret, and act s
4 you will, appeal to the Baron, to Ut


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She recognized my intentions in a mo-
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walking steathfy, and making no noise.
I had seied the ol? horn lantern, and
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(CONTINUED NEXT WEEK)



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April 14, 166


96


THE SUN


only that correct methods have tot yt ortm te fte wil to that e in4. M A Wm
been observed, ad dried cott &mMt m*t whateM ptiW O I mI hold; am or.- r 31 Ul
hereafter be eliminated from.the axper- MM m bly aeqdnted witl the wants and
ieeulteing emaidn T- d Tlher of in ,^- *. a of every LLsecton of Florida, as my A
Oenetim* ngale a *S-M en 1UN aid h led me UIAaE
an be no doubtt t Mhe rodetios of a s
bacteria, whbm sbwki and undeAe
evivio for their owth.o winsl t e ein elDunooratio Naton C ve-n. m t
*eremee, aosmtl DuBd of ladvayIin isu; have be" osnoed with State m U pW 5Up


-V


I


owq I I
Fifteenih Pagi


short Sermon for Politcal Advertisements dans y
rOCh THE SENATE ofsdo uto, m ,II er
Senatorial Dtrit): the ate, t bein a thee
THE SIN OF MAN hereb announce myself cand. ord have never been ttacke n the
date for the State Senate from this, the courts.
ST H18th Snaworial Distrie Duval County, Railroad Commisons of near all the
By Rev. T. Henry Blenus, Pastor Church Street to be voted for at the coming mare tate of the Union have, where pow-
Christian Church H. H. BOKMANa. a givenarejudliouslyeercsed, v
of great benefit to the general pubc and
Not original sin, nor general sin; not refuses to believe a fact on testimony th Tere is noreon why Floridad be
the nature of sin, nor the onsequences; such as inspiration supplies, he denied OR THE HOUS an exception to the role.
but THE SIN O0 MAN. We are to to his intellect the noble function of To the Public: Ch poin out defeots ei our Radld
write of the sin of man not as Plato or comparison and conclusion, and rele- I e o:nc to he elttie of Duval theimlon law thath beln rne dled
Bomrates viewed sin, but as the world's gate to his sensuous nature the o$oe Coun t&I lbeo a id bm e t hea slttae t d uon,
ed met t as He described and of judge of things entirely outside his double a th I all that
The sin of man is essentially and pe In the next step unbelief progress% e a bepio Ipt should ben lbp ta _to le
oullarly man's own sin. It is called In (backwards) to the stage of aptoetic. eat i slt oexpefo. usta in oo
the living Oracles UNBELIEF. Neither ism. A sign was granted by Crist In br vote vol., enoar and work*T aapledey 3 l
higher nor lower beings have practicoed the opening of the eye of a man born a U l It e e o or ut pled, if nomhnted and after
this sin. Whatever sine devils are ca blind. But in spite of It these s"know- ntytoh e oo Dva Couft lol6i wle led to dmins the du ofoffice fairly and m
able of committing, they are not guly nothings" assume the audacity to label un u balt y opposed to ad will with Tle State rief da m.f
of unbelief, for an inspired writer has Christ a sinner. Here unbelief pretends andas l mllieaures inupblt beforeiandinle
thi nL eatre t shall in any way be hurtful siiluei debore it, and in my Mhtble
deoland "The devils also believe and to know that such a miracle is possible, otamnm of Duvast 0e c ad s to par. pinion no an be o a o4tnt
tremble." This statement does not ex. but that the worker of it can be a sinner. iular questions may arise n the o tor in t the
onerate them from the sin that is as bad, In the next staph of sinful develop- the am it wi be my pleasure to mmson. pmt M the R
if not worse-the tempting of man to ment, notwithstanding the Son of God penly ies upon them. should 5h carefully the claims of ev.
disbelieve the Almighty. proved by many' and mighty miacl opesm one uo. em shone who ofibrsfor the ple.iThis
Unbelief as sought many forms of that he was the Son of God, and he son W.McL. ANY. on wnt is a dir the personal
expression, sometimes even disguising of man, yet determined and developed to YOU individually. T member of
itself in the garments of religion, as in unbelief gives birth to jealousy, which FOR TREASURER the board are to be elected. I want to
the Pharasees, ancient and modern; yet so completely tries to belittle Jesus as be one of them. I want YOUR voteand
it is ever the same-God insulting, to view Him as an imposter, thus un. To the DemootleVoters of DuvalCounty: support. should 7m ,?"
Christ rejeoUng thing, dignified in- reasonably depriving Him of even cour- I am sacanidate lor nomntion hthe iDem. thatyoushall Verh
difference, sharp criticism, a cold sneer, teous treatment and branding Him as omer of Daval Oounty f theoffice of County great it.
vituperative abuse, and open and violent a mere pretender and an arrogant and Trsma Myr serviess a known to all. ad If I believe my I t in
opposition, have been, and are today, the wicked blasphemer. Ib my re Isadoned. I promi a eonUtnuas e every cou Iy of teB'whb
expressions of the sin of man toward Finally we reach the climax of unbe- of a faithful performance of the duties of the of. fr you, i vouch for my ftness for the
God. lief when the miracles of Christ are de. fce. Soliciting the support of all In the primary, office.
While men are classified by the world cared not to be the workings of the I S. verWT pectfully, AAs any loyal Democrat would do, I
as different, because of social and finan- Holy Spirit, but to be the works of the A. W. BARRS. pledge myl to abide by the eiult of
clial inequalities, they are all unified be- Devil, and those who nurse such an un- he primary, and will support the noml-
fore God, because of the one sin of which belief in Christ, so that they willingly or Gounty Gommissioner neeos hereof at the eolr election.
all are guilty. utter such a slander against the Holy Very repetflly
Unbelief is tne parent of all other Spirit's power, hurl with fixed and I wish to announce my candidacy for T. J. A[PLYARD.
sins, countless and diversified, by what- premeditated defiance heir wicked and Lake City, Fla., April 9,1 .
ever name known or called, because the untrue statement against the Savior, County Commi.oner for the Fourth a,
law of affinity discovers them all related com t the unpardoable rt of D al county Florida ub-
to a common parent stock. This climaxt of the sin of man is the District of Duval ounty Florida, sub P T
There is gradual progressive de. natural fruition of that early form of Ject to the coming primary, and shall ElI Ul I
development in this sin of men, as there is unbelief, now the culmination of a series appreciate the support of the citizens of k ed lopsdand asei
in the grace of God, and there are eer ofact of the soul ta began with n the county. T. L. AOSTA tn .
tain steps in this development, from its difference. the county. T.L. AOOSTA.
simplest form, leading up to blasphemy Between indifference to Christ's FRE D. E. RANKIN
and a logical mind can easily study it in claims and blasphemy, there are great To the Demooato Voters of Duval County: Box JACKON A V NLI A
its insiduous forms, and track it, unless varieties of forms of unbelief--nop-be- I am a candidate for County Commissioner of Box JACX*ONVII. FLA.
concealed, till it reaches a cold and lief, dis-belief, mis-belief, and error-be. the Fourth District, sublect to the coming Demo-
studied skepticism and blatent blas- lief, Deism, skepticism, atheism, panthe. Oeatoprimary. Upontherequestof manyfriends When In Jac
phemy. Ism, and many other schools if am, I come before the people of Duval County for this
Its nrst and most colorless form is a each of which has the possibility to ma. omff. I tand for te Uneatest good to the great-. .,Do O 0aft D
courteous non-reoeption of the DIVINE turning to blasphemy. t number, and Itf elected I promise to perform e**
RECORD. Here we find no statement Unbelief may hide itself in evidence of the duties of that office faithfully and to the best
of inquiry, no attempt at refutation, no refinement, may conceal itself in boasted f my ability. )FRNK 0. MILR.
criticism, no abuse, but simply a sWent scholarship, may attire itself in the FRANK O. MILLER. Ub
disowning of Divine claims and a diamre erudite soienoes, or veil itself In crime
guard of Divine leading and promises. and disguise itself inmoularism-but it For Railroad Gommissioner 223 W. Bay St
The next step in unbelief passes from is doomed. Doomed by the imperative,
the passive to the active, assuming the rrevooble decree of the Maty of To MI e ummal V s of f t
attitude of the materialist, who wants Heaven. There is no help or hope for ....... '. 3M11t11F R 1W5
to SEE to believe. This practically rules it Its fate is nterably sealey, the U td m of noint. h i ck L"u,&..
faith out of court. As soon as a man justice of God. ng your phave servants for oi ce, each
of youhbav arlghttomsqwho shall be A 0A S a em N N N
your namines. ..ad. ..
The Bacteria Theory t It being imp blWe for the individual ,
iU A Ir IC AItA T voter to know, i peonally, each candi- --
Of late agriculturists have become in- date who offbm himself for State ofltoe,
terested in the experiments made by i.the undigned inoduces himself The West End Ca
the Department of Agriculture at Wash- mC.... the medium of the premm.
er.ln I DIrecor IJudmsof tecourts of Florida have never
ington and at experiment stations ele.M m it practice to solicit votes by
where for promoting the better growth PERSONAL appeal. Member of the ev *. J ee ,.
and nitrogen gathering forms of legumes Railroad COomnmldon a judge They
throih nleation by ba teri At EmbamIer decidecra m bretwee the g t
firsetTw thoughthat a eretain m s__o als sa d then IS oh Ita wo ld and
ure of sueoe would be reached; but thee I iP oanesfor h e e.n a.n the d t inet at
experiments say the Salentifi e- or ,, p r eallother dae seeing d1
periment Station at GeBemv smee to 1I ^e ILa'ke (IT ?i I 6wa' I Rpl
bacteria on cotton applied to legumes ,_ __, ,,__ _m___ __bhthi extend^ t on- wUU.
failed to inoculate as expected. Not na of ace, and TA.,AlmAA llftlm


lose vitality, so that th do not devdel p 'sad w de for the op- .
ti r when met" Ttod doe W U ,af4 dmfc|e, d the Sle ,.
isWot prove aatin is a falue- e these yearusnd d every ef






I' U


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APRIL


17th


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