Group Title: sun.
Title: The sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075914/00022
 Material Information
Title: The sun
Uniform Title: sun
Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sun Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: April 7, 1906
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tallahassee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Leon County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Leon -- Tallahassee
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.451667 x -84.268533 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 18, 1905)-v. 3, no. 47 (Sept. 12, 1908).
Numbering Peculiarities: Published at Tallahassee, Fla., June 23-Sept. 12, 1908.
General Note: Claude L'Engle, editor.
General Note: "If it's right, we are for it."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075914
Volume ID: VID00022
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33400104
lccn - sn 95047216
 Related Items
Other version: Morning sun (Tallahassee, Fla.)
Succeeded by: Dixie (Jacksonville, Fla.)

Downloads
Full Text


READ


THE


GUM


STORY


IN


THIS


NUMBER


Volume 1-No. 21 JAGKSONVILLE, FIORIDA, APRIL 7, 1906


Single Gopy 5 Gents


NOTHING THAT INT PAATABLE TO THE TONGUE IS SWALLOWED BY THE TRUSTS










fILilJi. fT


WT~~~.7flT7TTTT


-F TIT'S R 'II, 4WE ARE FOR IT
++' ', S 'i ,. ...


CLAUDE L'ENGLE
Editor


THfr Ewd


SUN


A. K. TAYLOR
Cartoonist


Hi I mI M WLY i A WUL f IIIS PW 1 W1 m MPI W ,T 1 IIY, 1 AT S WEST FMWTiwT ,
iume 1--No. 21 K' A ONlUVILE, FLORIDA, APRIL 7, 1906 5 Cents per Copy, $2 per Year


_. O" __ ,--- --. -------------- --. g __AA


atreAft tePoes t fice at JSO5OVUSF1.,UsU U mauw


^ xt. x' ..-


.-'-.1..;- --- ,P' -, -,
dnChariot

eal tweeMa PUbiser and Reder
We thought we were going to make a real good paper when we
bUWE by 0this idea-
To PiOPLE till A IAPER WITH A WILL OF ITS OW.N.
Now, eveyboV y kit that #he :one becomes OBSESSED with an idea it is
ius to try to ,d1if .Oe;O. m n outrun the sheriff, swear off taxes, dodge
Sb'ook agent, and ~ the o aim Reaper fr& awhile, but once become
OI,ad l. re. poaitvely to escape.
Well, as w were w e came uidi the Influence of this obsession in re-
gard to journalism, and-
HERE WE ARE WITH THE SUN.
Looking down the well-worn path of Florida journalism, we were' somewhat
dismayed to find nary a gap through which we could drive our Sun Chariot, if we
handled the ribbons exactly like others %ern, doing.
So we forthwith placed ourselves in jeopardy of another obtession, and were
promptly caught.
We decided to do three things that were ABSOLUTELY STARTLING in
their originality in the history of journalistic enterprise in Florida.
We decided to-
PRINT ALL THE NEWS;
TO PRINT IT CORRECTLY,
AND TO PRINT IT IN ENGLISH.
We thought we would make a hit with a paper built on these lines, and would
l-ave been satisfied with a nice little single sacker just outside of the infield.
We even had visions of a fairly long drive good for two bases. *
Our mental limitations were elastic enough to accommodate the thought of a
chance three-bagger.
But never did we dream of the possibility of a wallup that would cause our
sphere to soar high over the fence and get lost among the daisies that grow in the
fields outside while we walked the bases amid the plaudits of the multitudes who
have been watching, our game.
WE HAVE DONE THIS THING SURELY, and we will not try to conceal
this soul-satisfying fact from all who have helped in its accomplishment.
One day last week a man whose locks have been silvered in the service of the
fourth estate, one whose name, if mentioned, would be recognized as worthy to be
placed among those whose literary attintnent manifested by his facile pen have
brightened the lives, enlightened the understandings and elevated the morals of
Floridians for more than a decade; we my, a Journalist friend said tons the other
day, "You have done a wonderf.4 thing when you have produced and are pro-
ducing a weekly paper that is read and respected by everybody, and admired by
nearly every one who reads it."
This is what we would define as a compliment in the superlative degree, if we
were suddenly called upon for a definition.
Then we get letters by the dosen like this one:
LOS ANGELES, CAL., March 25, 1906.
CLAUDE L'ENGLE, ESQ.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Dear Sir--This to say, that I am very much pleased with
The Sun, which I have promptly received for the past five or
six weeks through the bort Pierce News, to which I also sub-
scribe, and get to like this, my weekly friend, better and bet-
ter the longer I read same.
It is certainly a frank, impartial live and up-to-date
illustrated weekly, of which Jacksonville and the State of
Florida ought to be proud of, and support in a most liberal
manner. The reading matter is crisp and interesting, and
the account of the proposed plan fur the drainage of the
Everglades is certainly something which should be very in-
structive to the ctitens of your State.
To come back to earth again, we desire to call your attention to THE SUN.
Sounds paradoxical, but it isnt.
Have you noticed the good stuff we are printing these days?
If you have, we will just conduct a little review; if you have not, we will re-
mind you.
Stories we print are-
Interesting,
Well told,
Original,
Others to come will be-
Likewise,
SOnly more so.
3et a sat in The Sun's Chariot.


U-


A


Read every word in this announcement, for it is the opport
years. Seven of the greatest maguaines in the country have oombit
offered together at aa greatly reduced rate. Never before was such
given to the public and it is safe to say never will it be made arl
year several maganes have increased their subscription price, whi1
how much greater this offer really is. The only reason we are mal
the people of this State is because we have increased the subsopitior
TNEM V to $ pir year, and we want all Florida to read TH I.


Cosmopolitan, one year, -
Woman's Home Companion, one year,
The Review of Reviews, one year, -
Pearson's, one year, -
The American Magazine, one year, -
Tom Watson's Magazine, one year, -
THE SUN, one year, -


Total,


$1.0QO
1.00
3.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
$10.00


Send $5.75 and Get Them All for One Year

THE COSM POU which was recently purchased by Mr. W. R. Hearst, has
sml CO nSMOPOUTAmbeen greatly improved by the new management and i1
now the most"poplar ten-ent illustrated monthly in the world. Already it ales have
increased 10000 over what they were four months ago, when it became a part of the fa-
mous Hearst publishin orgnisation. The publishers are sparin no effort to secure for it
all that is most desirable n the way of pictures stories and articles. As an example, pic-
tures by Frederic Remington and stories by W. W. Jacobs are now running in the Cosmo.
politan. and a strong new serial by H. 0. Wells.
T uRuVi VtW PZaibWP Shltantial American men and women are gilng
sEm wiEmW V Owe toTepup with the times and they are going to
tabe the shortest cut-which is The review of Revews-a monthly survey of the world's
prom.
WOMAN'S HOME COMPA N is not excelled by an other home and
ns, artles, Nllurao M. family publication In the world. Stories.
fawionf art/elm, llld.
AR ON' eof the leading fiction magazines of the day., both its serial and
on vshOre wusM borlebri taby authors of world-wide reputation. Pearson's is
coaserd authority on book Mrview.
THE A IIM C NA AM For thirty ears known as Leslie's Magazine.
m* -- w = n-- rIt was lately purchased by a powerful syndi-
cate, and no funds anre lekla to mk itme of the best magazines in America,
TOIM WATION'S MNTm' No monthly magazine in America ever before
w.w .. r.. -. met with such a hearty welcome as did Tom
Watson's by all classes of peop. sad devedly so. for Mr. Watson is at once the foremost
writer and cleares th ker before tme pbUe today. It isto filled with the best thoughts of
the best minds on all subjects of latehte to he American people.
THJ heWw the papr with a willof its own, and is by far the best paper in
THE Sper
FlordWeamesdlag all right and censuring all wrong.

Grab This Opportunity
It you want one magazine with our paper for a year, you cannot do better than to accept
one of following offers, while they are hot off the bat and before they are withdrawn:
COX MOPOLITAN, one year ...................................................... 00
THE HUN one year .............................................$2 00

THlE SU N. one .2 00
THE AMERICAN MAAZI......NE.. on.. yea....... ......1 00
THE SUN.o yM ea, r-................. .... ........... ...-111111 1...... 0

TOIE N.one yeAMAAZINE. one ear ................... ... 00
TO WATSw)N' MAOAZIN. one ......... .. ..................... o00
TI E HL N. e e ... .. ......... ... ....... .......... ....... 2 00
Fill out coupon, mail it tx"Isy with your remittance, and be sure of getting
the greatest magazine combination Mat wai ever offered-an opportunity of
years and one it Is afe to may will never be made again.

TH IUN,


Enclovied pl.'aue fMW I


for which enter Iny name for one year's sub.


scription to your jejwr mW d Lwe f'ilowli.g eusgvleus. ..u. .......................


Nanet


A44rem



Vi


Great Half -Price


W


'A


,ah .IVI T'ta .,i-p











April 7, 1906


THE SUN


Third Page


Naval Stores the Topic


Hark, hark I the dogs do bark,
The gummers are coming to town;
Some will rear, some will tear
And some will pout and frown.


That was a very staid and quiet little circular letter sent out last month
from the headquarters of the Naval Stores Export Company in this city, but as
a starter of "things doing," it bids fair to make the apple of discord look like the
official announcement of a call for a Quaker meeting.
One of these innooent-looking little circular letters was addressed to each
stockholder in the million-dollar export company which had something happen
to it the early part of last December.
As the "boys in the woods" put up nearly all of this million, they will be
sure to answer the summons by means of the aforesaid i. e. c. to the first annual
meeting of the stockholders in the Naval Stores Export Company to be held in
this city Tuesday next.
These dwellers in the quiet places, where the ear is soothed by the soft
soughing of the stately pines, instead of being jangled by the honk! honk of
the auto horn, where the basing lightwood knot charms the eye which in cities
Is dassled by the glittering solitaire, where the nose is greeted with the resin-
ous perfume of the boxed timber, instead of being assailed by the oily pungence
of exploded gasoline, these men who answer the call to the first annual meeting
of the Naval Stores Export Company, will come with that look of searching
inquiry on their faces so disconcerting to those who know they cannot give the
satisfying answer to the question asked in the parable-"What have you done
with the talent I gave unto thee?"
And, alasl like the foolish steward, in the parable, the "Jacksonville Gum
Bunch" which managed the business of the great company with the million, will
I* forced to exclaim-"We buried itl" But unlike the foolish steward in the
parable, the gum buneh CANNOT DIG IT UP, for it was, but is not.
These 'boys in the woods" will be invited to look at a balance sheet about
like this:
Condition of Naval Stores Export Company at First Annual Stock-
holders' Meeting:


ASSETS.


Cash in bea k about.....................................$350,000,
realized from sale of stocks to Saotter.


Terminals in Foernandina, Tamps and Pensaoola, cot about
$150,000; probable worth if sold for cash.............. 75,000
Total assets ..........................................$428,000


LIABILITIES.


Capital stock paid in cash, mostly by "boys in the woods," about $900,000
Sundry debts about .............. .... ..................... 8 ,000
$955,000
Loss in one year ......................................... $630,000
It is reported that the present temper of some of the stockholders in the
company will not tolerate any further attempt to carry out the agreement made
with Shotter to keep up the organisation of the Export Company so as to enter
the field at Shotter's command, if other business men in this city should make him
feel the prick of strong competition in an effort to stifle It. If this report is
correct it will mean, LIQUIDATION or the filing by any dissatisfied stockholder,
of an application for a receiver.
If liquidation comes, the settlement will look something like this:
Any Stockholder in Account with Naval Stores Export Company-
1905-April-Put in .............................. .$1.00 per share
1906-April-Took out ................ .............. .$0.42 per share
Those figures are not to be taken as absolutely correct, they are not taken
from the company's books, they are offered as practically the figures that will be
submitted at the annual meeting next Tuesday, and are compiled from informa-
tion given to me by several stockholders of the company, after comparing and
averaging the figures which did not vary more than a couple of thousand
dollars.
When the story which was printed in THE SUN December 9 last, was being
discussed by the "Gum Bunch," which appeared to be much annoyed by the
story, statements were made by the "bunch" to offset the effect of the facts
therein presented, to the effect that the lose by the "amicable agreement of all
parties concerned," would not exceed $260,000. These statements were not
printed-just given orally to all who would listen. It is now quite certain that
the lose will be considerably more than double the amount given out four months


ago.


(Continued on Twelfth Pe)











IT'S tIOoHT, WE ARE FOR IT


I N 4A .


CLAUDE L'ENOLE
Editor


IIH-fE


SUN


A. K. TA
Cartoon


Ja UMIMmI A"IMA AM M ITS Si M PMn M FM iKHg p mmn o% B yM MMmY, AT 31 WUT, Frmyi IT, M UIM
hi I---No. 21 JC JAMONVILE, FLORIDA, APRIL 7, 1906 5 Cents per Copy, $ per Year


nme;<.. 't#ti n t Po MofMt at Jakadonville. Fla.. second-elam matter


Si~2~2 Ua~ .In %SAYW&MW -- --- -


e 's Chariot

Itfana Talks Btwee Purblisber and Reader
i'elAw _' thought we were going to make a real good paper when we
i tdis idea-,
TH PEPLE K A P.APR WITH A WILL OF ITS OWN.
Xbw, e um^ mw t Irhen o e becomes OBSESSED with an idea it iN
Ubi to try to i 4 ~,m nm utrun the sheriff, swear off taxes, dodge
book agent, and ,i, i the I, o Reper fu4r while, but once become
t4E88EDr ad d A w. there potively Mn escape.
Well, As were iwe came uider th d influence of this obsession in re-
gard to journalism, and-
HERE WE ARE WITH THE SUN.
Looking down the well-worn path of Florida journalism, we were'somewhat
dismayed to find nary a gap through which we could drive our Sun Chariot, if we
handled the ribbons exactly like others were doing.
8o we forthwith placed ourselves in jeopardy of another obsession, and were
promptly caught.
We decided to do three things that were ABSOLUTELY STARTLING( in
their originality in the history of journalistic enterprise in Florida.
We decided to-
PRINT ALL THE NEWS;
TO PRINT IT CORRECTLY,
AND TO PRINT IT IN ENGLISH.
We thought we would make a hit with a paper built on these lines, and would
)Iave been satisfied with a nice little single sacker just outside of the infield.
We even had visions of a fairly long drive good for two bases. *
Our mental limitations were elastic enough to accommodate the thought of a
chance three-bagger.
But never did we dream of the possibility of a wallup that would cause our
sphere to soar high over the fence and get lost among the daisies that grow in the
fields outside while we walked the bases amid the plaudits of the multitudes who
have been watching our game.
WE HAVE DONE THIS THING SURBLY, and we will not try to conceal
this soul-satisfying fact from all who have helped in its accomplishment.
One day last week a man whose locks have been silvered in the service of the
fourth estate, one whose name, if mentioned, would be recognized as worthy to be
placed among those whose literary attainmento manifested by his facile pen have
brightened the lives, enlightened the understandings and elevated the morals of
Floridians for more than a decadeI we ay, a journalist friend said to ns the other
day, "You have done a wonderful thing when you have produced and are pro.
during a weekly paper that is read and respected by everybody, and admired by
nearly every one who reads it."
This is what we would define as a compliment in the superlative degree, if we
were suddenly called upon for a definition.
Then we get letters by the dosen like this one:
LOS ANGELES, CAL., March 25, 1906.
CLAUDE L'ENOLE, ESQ.
Jacksonville, Fla.
Dear Sir-This to my, that I am very much pleased with
The Sun, which I have promptly received for the past five or
six weeks through the ort Pierce News, to which I also sub.
cribe, and get to like this, my weekly friend, better and bet-
ter the longer I read same.
It bI certainly a frank, impartial live and up-to-date
illpirated weekly, of which Jacksonville and the State of
Florida ought to be proud of, and support in a most liberal
manner. The reading matter is crisp and interesting, and
the account of the proposed plan for the drainage of the
Everglades is certainy someth ng which should be very in-
structive to the citldsn of your State.
To come back to earth again, we desire to call your attention to THE SUTN.
Sounds paradoxical, but it i='t.
Have you noticed the good stuff we are printing these days?
If you have, we will just conduct a little review; if you have not, we will re-
mind you.
Stories we print are-
Interesting,
Well told,
Original,
Bright,
Others to come will be-
likewise,
\ Only more so.
CM sa ia The Sun's Chariot,
;Tt [~ier.


A


Great Half-Price


Read every word in this announcement, for it is the opportu of
years. Seven of the greatest magazine in the country hve combine
offered together at a greatly reduced rate. $ever before wa such ait er
given to the public and it is safe to say never will it be made again. I sr
year several magazine have increased their subscription price, which o
how much greater this offer really Is. The only reason we are makinglitto
the people of this State is because we have increased the sublription Pae of
MTih l to $I pr ver, and we want all Florida to read TII IW .


Cosmopolitan, one year, 1 -
Woman's Home Companion, one year,
The Review of Reviews, one year, -
Pearson's, one year, -
The AmerlOan Magazine, one year, -
Tom Watson's Magazine, one year, -
THE SUN, one year, -


Total,


- -


140
3.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
$10.00


Send $5.75 and Get Them All for One Year
THE COSMOPM IUTAN which was recently purchased by Mr. W. R. Hearst, has
E C MOPOLITAn been greatly Improved by the new management and s
now the mostpopular teonent illustrated monthly in the world. Already its ales have
increased 100,000 over what they were four months ago, when it became a part of the fa-
mous Hearst publishing organisation. The publishers are sparing no effort to secure for it
all that is most desirable In the way of pictures stories and articles. As an example, pic.
tures by Frederic Remington and stories by W. W. Jacobs are now running in the Cosmo.
politan, and a strong new serial by H. G. Wells.
THm 'VKI OFR E R Wf Substantial American men and women are going
Sn m r sin lV to keep up with the times and they are going to
take the shortest cut-which is The Review of Revfews-a monthly survey of the world's
progress.
WOMAN'S HOME COMPANION Is not excelled by any other home and
asions, artlles, lustrwasons. family publication in the world. Stories,
KARSON'SI is one of the leading fiction magaines of the day, both its serial and
sR N short stories being by authors of world-wide reputation. Pearson's is
oondered authority on book reviews.
THE AMERICAN MASAZINE For thirty years known M Leslie's Magazine.
T nHE iU-MM AN mA Am jItwas litely purchased by a powerful syndi.
cate., and no funds are lacking to make it one of the best magazine in America,
TOM WATSON'S MAGAZINE No monthly magazine in America ever before
w -MR iA met with such a hearty welcome as did Tom
Watson's by all classes of people, and deservedly so, for Mr. Watson is at once the foremost
writer and clearest thinker before the public today. It is filled with the best thoughts of
the best minds on all subjects of Interest to the American people.
THE SUN is the pap with a will of its own, and is by far the best paper in
Florldscommedint all right and censuring all wrong.

Grab This Opportunity
If you want one magazine with our paper for a year, you cannot do better than to accept
one of following offers, while they are hot off the bat and before they are withdrawn:
COSMOPOLITAN, one year .................................................... 00
THE SUN, one year..... .. .. .. ....... ....................... 00
PEARSON'S. one year............. ............................................... $1 00
THE SUN, one year .....2.. .. ........... .................... 200
THE AMERICAN MAGAZINE, one year ................................... 1 00
THE SUN, one year............... ............. ............ 00
TOM WATSON'8 MAGAZINE. one year....................................t 00o
THi E SUN. one year........ **....... *......................... ".. 2 00
SM I n t M V .m .............w
Fill out coupon, mail it today with your remittance, and be sure of getting
the greatest magazine combination that was ever offered-an opportunity of
years and one it is safe to say will never be made again.

T HE SU N t .......................................................
Jauskswu, Fl.
Enclosed please find S..........................for which enter my name for one year's sub.
scription to your paper and the following magazines...................


Name.......................................................................
Address... ......... .... ...... .... ...

--,--, ,.,,,, ",,, "",,, """O 1


V<


YLOR
nist


-W-AWL --.MMLAL
m Sk Xk


7
A


.+


..''* ', .'^.









April 7, 1906


THE SUN
*t


Third Page


Naval Stores the Topic







10 If





(MALI--







aRFRAID TO
SxETO(WSTE









ITI
i I OW!Ii,
H ....*,










Last April the Jacksonville Gum Bunch was the bi*est thin This April the Jacksonville Gum Bunch Is not
In town so larte


Hark, hark I the dogs do bark,
The gummers are coming to town;
Some will rear, some will tear
And some will pout and frown.


Terminals in Fernandina, Tampa and Pensaoola, cost about
$150,000; probable worth if sold for cash.............. 75,000
Total assets ..........................................$4260000


That was a very staid and quiet little circular letter sent out last month
from the headquarters of the Naval Stores Export Company in this city, but as
a starter of "things doing," it bids fair to make the apple of discord look like the
official announcement ot a call for a Quaker meeting.
One of these innooent-looking little circular letters was addressed to each
stockholder in the million-dollar export company which had something happen
to it the early part of last December.
As the "boys in the woods" put up nearly all of this million, they will be
sure to answer the summons by means of the aforesaid i. e. c. to the first annual
meeting of the stockholders in the Naval Stores Export Company to be held in
this city Tuesday next.
These dwellers in the quiet places, where the ear is soothed by the soft
soughing of the stately pines, instead of being jangled by the honk t honk I of
the auto horn, where the blazing lightwood knot charms the eye which in cities
is dazzled by the glittering solitaire, where the nose is greeted with the resin-
ous perfume of the boxed timber, instead of being assailed by the oily pungence
of exploded gasoline, these men who answer the call to the first annual meeting
of the Naval Stores Export Company, will come with that look of searching
inquiry on their faces so disconcerting to those who know they cannot give the
satisfying answer to the question asked in the parable--"What have you done
with the talent I gave unto thee?"
And, alasI like the foolish steward, in the parable, the "Jacksonville Gum
Bunch" which managed the business of the great company with the million, will
Ie forced to exclaim-"We buried it!" But unlike the foolish steward in the
parable, the gum buncb CANNOT DIG IT UP, for it was, but is not.
These "boys in the woods" will be invited to look at a balance sheet about
like this:
Condition of Naval Stores Export Company at First Annual Stock-
holders' Meeting:


ASSETS.


Cash in bank about....................................... 360,000,
realized from sale of stocks to Shotter.


LIABILITIES.


Capital stock paid in cash, mostly by "boys in the woods," about $920,000
Sundry debts about ................................ ... .... 36,000
$966,000
Loss in one year ................. .. .... ..... .. 30,000
It is reported that the present temper of some of the stockholders in the
company will not tolerate any further attempt to carry out the agreement made
with Shotter to keep up the organisation of the Export Company so as to enter
the ftlld at Shotter's command, if other business men in this city should make him
feel the prick of strong competition in an effort to stifle It. If this report is
correct it will mean, LIQUIDATION or the filing by any dissatisfied stockholder,
of an application for a receiver.
If liquidation comes, the settlement will look something like this:
Any Stockholder in Account with Naval Stores Export Company-
1905-April-Put in .............................$1. ..00 per share
1906-April-Took out ............................. $0.42 per share
These figures are not to be taken as absolutely correct, they are not taken
from the company's books, they are offered as practically the figures that will be
submitted at the annual meeting next Tuesday, and are compiled from informa-
tion given to me by several stockholders of the company, after comparing and
averaging the figures which did not vary more than a couple of thousand
dollars.
When the story which was printed in THE SUN December 9 last, was being
discussed by the "Gum Bunch," which appeared to be much annoyed by the
story, statements were made by the "bunch" to offset the efect of the facts
therein presented, to the effect that the lose by the "amicable agreement of all
parties concerned," would not exceed $250,000. These statements were not
printed-just given orally to all who would listen. It Is now quite certain that
the loss will be considerably more than double the amount given out four months
(Continued on Twelfth PaTp)


I,,.
.\ a
* ~~'% ~ ~


yq












Poue'th Page


April 7, 1906


THE SUN


Some


Matters


Set


Right


By GOVERNOR N. B. BROWARD


Editor THE SUN, Jacksonville, Fla.:
Dear Sir-In order that the public may be put in
possession of facts that clealy show the irresponsi-
blity of the two newspapers, the Times-Union and'
the Metropolis, and I might throw in for good
measure the Jasper News, I hand you herewith,
first, a oertild copy of all the orders in a certain
case, issued by Judge Locke, which record shown
THAT NO DECISION HAS BEEN RENDERED in-
dieating that the Act known as the Drainage Act,
based by the lat Legislature, is unconstitutional.
The three abovenamed newspapers have repeatedly
published accounts of what purported to be the decis-
ion of Judge Locke, declaring the Act of the Legis-
lature creating the Drainage Commissioners, under
which Act an acreage tax of A cents an acre was
levied by the Drainage Commissioners, void and un-
constitutional.
NEITHER JUDGE LOCKE NOR ANY OTHER
JUDGE PRESIDING OVER ANY COURT IN
FLORIDA, HAS MADE ANY DECISION ON THIS
QUESTION. I am satisfied that the editors of the
three newspapers named will read this record, which
condemns them in tsae minds of all the people of
Florida who read this article, as being untruthful.
Nevertheless, neither of them will bat his eyes nor
feel at all hurt, because he is used to it.
Order Dated January 11, 1906.
United States Circuit Court, Southern District of
Florida-In Chancery.
southern States Land and Timber Company vs. Na-
poleon B. Broward, et al.-Order for Injunction:
Upon motion of the complainant in the above en-
titled cause, and upon consideration of the sworn
bill of complaint herein, it is ordered, adjudged and
decreed that the defendants be enjoined as prayed
in the bill of complaint until the further order of the
Court, and that the defendants show cause, if any, in
this court, on the 1st day of February, 1906, why
said injunction should not be continued.
Done and ordered this llth day of January, 1006.
ALECK BOARMAN, Judge.

Order Dated March 1, 1906.
in the United States Circuit Oourt for the Fifth
Judicial Circuit in and for the Southern District
of Florida-In Chancery.
southern States Land and Tipber Company vs. Na-
poleon B. Broward, as Governor of the State of
Florida, et al.:.
This cause coming on further to be heard on the
rule upon the defendants to show cause, if any, in
this Court, why the injunction heretofore granted
herein by the order of this Couit on the llth day
of January, 1006, should be *continued during the
pendeney of this cause, and also coming on to be
heard on the bill of complaint herein and upon the
affidavits of the defendants, the Board of Drainage
Commissioners under the laws of the State of Flor-
ida, and upon affidavits, certified copies or records
and other evidence filed by complainant in support
of the bill, and upon affidavits, certified copies of
records and other evidence filed by the defendants
herein, and the cause having been argued by counsel
representing all of the parties thereto, and the
Court having considered of its judgment and decree
herein:
It is ordered, adjudged and decreed, that the in-
junction granted by the Court herein and by its
order, dated the 11th day of January, 1906, be, and
the same is, hereby continued until the further order
of the Court in this cause.
Done and ordered in open Court at Jacksonville,
Florida, this 1st day of March, 1906.
JAMES W. LOCKE, Judge.
I
Order Dated March 30, 1006.
in the Circuit Court of the United States, in and
for the Southern District of Florida.
Southern States Land and Timber Company vs. Na-
poleon B. Broward, as Governor of the State of
Florida, et al.:
This cause coming on to be heard upon the de-
murrer to the bill of complaint herein, and having
been fully heard by argument of counsel, and having
been duly considered by the Court, it is ordered that
staid demurrer be, and the same is, hereby overruled
and the defendants have until the rule ay of May
to plead or answer as advised.
JAMES W. LOCKE, Judge.
Jacksonville, Fla., March 30, 1906.
THESE ARE THE ONLY ORDERS IN THE
CASL
I als furnish you for publication part of an arti.
le prated ina the Jacksonville Metropolis, November
gg, 16tw w h, you will notice, speaks eloquently
'tg hvr 9t th drainage and reclamation of the Flor-
idat ts Was the Metropolis right when it
54TSJAi4t mdlb s of the Everglades in 1902, or


* C


was it only one of its many vaporings that the editor
himself cannot give any reason for? I will leave
that to the public to decide?

DRAINING THE EVERGLADES-A REMARKA-
BLE WORK THAT HAS BEEN UNDERTAKEN.
OBJECT OF OPERATIONS-AN INTEREST-
ING ACCOUNT OF THIS GREAT ENTER-
PRISE-THE EXTREME FERTILITY OF THE
BASIN GIVES GREAT PROSPECTS TO THE
PROMOTERS--LANDS PECULIARLY FITTED
FOR THE PRODUCTION OF SUGARCANE.
Easily comparable with the digging of the isth-
mian canal, the laying of the Pacific cable and other
great works of public utility is the draining of the
Florida Everglades. Work on this great scheme of
public improvement has been begun, and the progress
made warrants the assertion that the vast tract will
in time he entirely reclaimed.
Those who recall the geography lessons of their
youth know that the Everglades are a vast stretch
of swampy land occupying much of the southern end
of the Florida peninsula. Few, however, know or
realize the extent of the Everglades or their poten-
tial value. Estimates of the number of acres to be
reclaimed vary from 800,000 to 4,000,000, but all
accounts agree in stating that the land when drained
will rank among the richest in the world.
From a land of desolation and waste the Ever-
glades region is to become one of fertility and wealth,
giving as its principal product an enormous yield of
sugarcane. Thousands of acres of reclaimed ground
on the edge of the swamp are already yielding crops
of fruits and winter vegetables on soil which a short
time ago was two to three feet under water.
While this enterprise is by no means a new one,
the advances made in engineering science during the
past quarter century have made the problem more
feasible than it was a few years ago, and the work
can be done, it is said, at a minimum cost for so
vast an undertaking.


OPERATIONS, BEGUN.


Operations have already been begun, and on the
land reclaimed at the north side of the great basin
quite a large tract has been cleared, upon which
profitable crops of sugarcane, vegetables of all kinds,
rice and corn have been produced without fertilizing
the soil or paying much attention to the cultivation.
The lands to be reclaimed are situated in this great
basin in Southern Florida and separated from the
Atlantic only by a ridge of linlestone, being on their
eastern boundary about five miles distant from tide-
water.
'the task of reclaiming the Everglades presents no
insuperable or very difficult engineering problems,
a he land is nowhere less than ten feet above the
TIDE LEVEL, and the natural drainage is toward
the ocean, which is separated from the swampy re-
gion by a strip of soil only a few miles in width.
Through this strip a number of streams-the Miami,
Hillsboro, Cypress. New, Little, Arch and Snake
rivers-have forced their way by natural pressure.
The falls or rapids at their present heads are grad-
ually working westwardly, and in time these rivers
would, unaided, effect the drainage of the primeval
swamp.
THE OBJECT.
The object of the present efforts is to assist the
rivers by removing the barriers at their heads and
thence running channels into the heart of the Ever-
glades. In this way the entire region will be ren-
dered dry and arable. Nine canals in all will be
constructed, with a total length of 144 miles, and
eight of these will be twelve miles in length, each
fifty feet in width and twelve feet in depth. The
ninth or main canal will be forty-eight miles long,
fifty feet wide and of the same depth as the others.
When completed these canals will be used not
only for drainage purposes, but also for carrying
materials to the new grounds and for transporting
the produce from the plantations to the coast for
shipment to foreign countries and by rail to home
markets.
The time necessary to complete the work, accord-
ing to the engineers and contractors having it in
charge, will be about five years, and the total cost is
estimated at about $850,000. The cost of reclaiming
the lands and preparing them for planting will be
about $2.75 per acre, which is considerably less than
the expense of clearing forest lands of average
density. EXTREME FERTILITY.

The Everglades basin is filled with a soil of ex-
treme fertility and productiveness, being composed
of drift, or alluvium, mixed with decayed vegetable
matter, and is generally underlaid by a deposit of


marl, a source of much fertility and a corrective
of acidity. The soil is from two to twelve feet
deep-a black mold underlaid with marl. It is the
purpose of the people having the work of reclama-
tion in charge to plant cane, erect mills and pro-
mote other agricultural and industrial enterprises.
Statistics show that sugarcane yields enormously in
the right sort of Florida soil, an average of forty-
seven and one-half tons having been obtained from
one field of 420 acres without artificial fertilizing
alnd with little attention.
The lands being level, they are peculiarly fitted
for sugar fields and for the use of modern appli-
ances-the steam plow and cultivator. Cane planted
ten years ago is now growing in the district. Expe-
rienced sugar growers from Cuba, Louisiana and
Florida estimate that these lands will easily pro-
duce 6,000 pounds of sugarcane per acre. Fifty
bushels of rice, fifty bushels of corn and forty bushels
of oats are now being made on large areas of similar
Florida lands, which have already been drained.
The drainage of lands will promote many indus-
tries-agricultural, mechanical and commercial. The
purchase of sugarcane delivered at its central mills
will be one of the prime objects, and growers who
desire to plant small areas of cane-ten to a hundred
acres-will be offered the highest prices.

Many affidavits have been made and filed in the
Court by persons living in this State, which tend to
create a doubt in the minds of the people as to
whether Everglades drainage is practicable. In
order that the people may have some light upon
the subject of drainage and reclamation in other
parts of the United States and in some parts of
Europe, I herewith inclose to you and ask that you
publish as part of this a letter written to ne by Mr.
C. G. Elliott, engineer in charge of irrigation and
drainage investigations, under the Secretary of Ag-
riculture of the United States, whose positive state-
ments, many of them copied from history and others
written from his personal observation, I hope will
be of interest to the people and that they will care-
fully consider not only the source of this Information,
but the subject matter itself, and realize the great
riches that have resulted to the people by the work
described by Mr. Elliott:

Washington, D. C., March 24, 1906.
Gov. N. B. Broward, Tallahassee, Fla.:
Dear Sir-I am not unmindful of the promise I
made to you to furnish some references and particu-
lars regarding large drainage projects which have
been successfully executed and the profits and benefits
which have accrued to the owners of the land and
to the commonwealth in which they are located. It
it to be regretted that the history of these various
projects is confined to fragmentary accounts widely
scattered and not readily accessible. The historian
has neglected to make prominent mention of many
cases which had an important influence in the devel-
opment of agriculture. He is ever ready to describe
the progress of cities, the construction of great
bridges, and the numerous internal improvement to
be seen at all times and noted by the passer-by, but
NEGLECTS TO DESCRIBE THE STUPENDOUS
IMPROVEMENTS IN THE RECLAMATION OF
LANDS which have contributed so materially to our
wealth and to the process of which we boast.
You, of course, desire the mention of such work
as will serve in a measure as a precedent for the
great undertaking you and your State have on hand
in reclaiming a part of the Everglades. It is safe
to say that no drainage project which may be men-
tioned is in every respect similar to the one in Flor-
ida, yet it is interesting and will doubtless be in-
structive to describe some of the difficulties and suc-
cesses which have attended reclamation work in
other States and in foreign countries.
I recall an interesting examination which I made
of one of the islands in the Sacramento river of Cali-
fornia, which has been permanently reclaimed and
is now ONE OF THE MOST PRODUCTIVE SPOTS
IN THE VICINITY OF SAN FRANCISCO, the west-
ern metropolis of our country. The island is ap-
proximately two miles wide and thirteen miles long,
and contains an area of 17,000 acres. In its original
condition much of it was below the medium stage
of the water and was always overflowed at every
rise of the river. It is now protected from overflow
by a levee thirty miles long, which completely sur-
rounds it and rises in many places sixteen feet or
more above the surface of the land, the cost of which
has been about $750,000.
The early history of this work shows that the
WORK WAS MOST DISCOURAGING to the owners.
The levee was at first built by Chinese labor in which
wheelbarrows and shovels were used. This was en-
tirely SWEPT AWAY, but was rebuilt in 1878 and
later broken, then repaired and BROKEN AGAIN in
1881. In 1889 the levee was ENTIRELY REBUILT











THE SUN


and raised to a height of two feet above the flood in
1881. Since that time it has never been entirely
destroyed, but has in many instances been main-
tained with great difficulty. In late years the levee
has been strengthened by using a large dredge
equipped with a two-yard clam shell bucket and a
boom 125 feet long. This was kept in constant ope-
ration for the purpose of raising the height of the
levee five feet above the highest flood yet known.
This dredge is owned by the reclamation district
and is operated by a force of eight men employed by
the management. The cost of operating has been as
low as FIVE CENTS per yard, though frequently
running more where the excavation is difficult and
slower progress made. The interior drainage of the
island is accomplished by a few large ditches which
collect the water and lead it to pumping plants, one
of which is located at the lower end of the island
and the other on one side midway between its ex-
tremities. The pumps are of the centrifugal pat-
tern, the smaller one having a twenty-four-inch dis-
charge and the larger one forty-four-inch, the former
being capable of discharging 16,000 gallons per min-
ute and the latter 35,000 gallons per minute. The
annual rainfall is ABOUT FOURTETEN INCHES,
most of which is precipitated during the winter
months, so that the drainage plants are operated
approximately ninety days during the year, the
pumping season ending about May 15. Not only
must this land be protected from overflow by levees
and the interior drainage accomplished by ditches
and pumps, but during the summer season it must
be irrigated. Florida does not have the six months'
drouths of California. This is accomplished by
means of several siphons which may be opened and
river water run back over the land when necessary.
In other parts this is not practicable and pumps
are installed by the several landowners to furnish
them with the necessary water.
This island is shaped much like a large oval plat-
ter, both in contour and in cross-section. The land
is owned by thirty-five different people, many of
whom are non-residents, and the buildings are all
located upon the border of the island. The outer
part is all planted to fruit, the Bartlett pear being
produced in great perfection, and is one of the most
profitable productions of the island. This fruit land
can SCARCELY BE BOUGHT AT ANY PRICE. It
is reported that not infrequently FIVE HUNDREDi
TO ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS PER ACRE are
realized each year. The subsoil of the interior is of
a PEAT NATURE, and has not burned up, covered
with a rich river silt which produces certain field
crops in great luxuriance. Potatoes, beans, and espe-
cially asparagus, are produced in great perfection.
I was attracted by an asparagus field of 500 acres
and impressed with the ease of production when told
that it was planted upon the native soil without
special preparation or fqjilization. and grown on
peat (muck) foundation. The field land rents for
about $12 an acre, the tenants apparently being sat-
isfied and prosperous. This island is only forty
miles from the city of San Francisco and the produce
can be conveyed cheaply by boat every morning to
the city, which gives to them a certain and remuner-
ative market. The entire amount expended in the
reclamation of this island to date is given an $1,100,-
000. The annual charge for repairs, pumping and
maintenance of the levees varies from fl to $3 an
acre, and yet it pays to do it.
The history of this project reveals some of the
contingencies that may be expected in the reclama-
tion of land subject to overflow. This feature of
the problem WILL NOT BE PRESENT in the drain-
age works on the Everglades. I should not neglect
to say in connection with the drainage of this island
that the seepage through the levees and the soil in
very considerable. As before stated, the rainfall is
about 14 inches. Taking into account the amount
of water pumped during the ninety days in which
the plant is operated, we find that the entire rain-
fall is removed so that all of the water required
for the soil and the growth of plants during that
time is supplied by seepage. We may safely say
that the amount of water coming to the land through
seepage in this case is about equal to that required
by the crops during the early part of the season.
Fourteen thousand acres of Sherman Island, ad-
joining the one just described, were at one time leveed
and improved and very handsome results in the way
of production obtained. Like the others, however, the
protecting banks were entirely destroyed by the
floods, but ARE NOW BEING REBUILT, and it is
quite probable that the island will in time become
as permanently reclaimed as Grand Island from which
such satisfactory results are now obtained. The
delta of the San Joaquin river contains several
islands which have been leveed, and ALL OF THE
LAND is considered EXCELLENT PROPERTY. The
navigable channel which reaches from the coast as
far as Stockton, given most excellent trlnsportnaIon
facilities, the name of "THE VENICE OF AMERIT.-
CA" being appropriately applied to this group of
productive islands. It was my privilege to visit two
of these last fall. The larger. called Roberts Island.


is situated about even miles from the city of Stock.
ton and comprises 17.000 acres. Eight thousand
acres of this lend in under one ownership. the lmlance
being held by small farmers who value their land at
from EIGHTY-FIVE to ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS
an acre. It should be saia that the land is in a
tradition stap between the old system of wheat


farming and the more modern intensive culture in
which irrigation is employed. These lands are so
situated that they can be watered from the river by
merely opening gates which have been provided for
the purpose. The average rainfall is only 15 inches,
most of it occurring during the winter. The lands
which are provided with irrigation are rented for $11
and $12 an acre, the leading crops being beans andti
potatoes. A considerable portion of this land is of
a PEATY NATURE enriched by silt deposited by
former overflows of the river. In some instances the
turf when dry has been burned, such land being
found excellent for growing alfalfa.
STOCKMEN INTERESTED.
Rough and Ready Island, immediately adjoining
Roberts Island, but a little farther down the stream,
contains 1,700 acres which is used largely for dairly
farming. This is irrigated in the same manner as
before described, the larger portion of it being used
for hay and grazing; the balance for forage crops and
vegetables. This land, being upon a little lower level
than Roberts Island, requires drainage by pumping,
a plant being maintained for that purpose. The
drainage water which accumulates from irrigation
and rainfall is gathered by a system of open drains
which lead to the pumping plant, which consists of
two 12-inch centrifugal pumps operated by steam
power from ten to sixty days during the season.
The soil of this land is similar to that before
described, and when dry will umrn quite readily. The
levees have been constructed by dredges, which have
cleaned the channels of the streams and deposited
the waste on the banks for levees, thus making thine
about 20 or 25 feet higher than the land protected.
The variation in the tide is about 3 1-2 feet, thus
making it possible to irrigate the land with fresh
water from the river at any time desired. All trains-
portation is done by BOATS OF VARIOITS SIZES,
which ply upon the streams continually, there being
two large steamers which make daily trips to San
Francisco.
The fact should not Ie overlooked that all of
these lands described have not Ibwen RECLAIMEID
WITHOUT REPEATED D]ESlTRl (TI'iON of manks
and most discouraging losses to the owners of the
lands and promoters of the work. It should ie also
understood that while the land is of a truf or peat
nature, it is filled with river silt, to which element
may be attributed its wonderful and lasting fertility.
We may now pass to lands of an entirely different
character, which are at present in the process of
reclamation in the SOUTHEASTERN PORTION OF
MISSOURI. The famous sunken lands of that part
of the State are at the head of the St. Francis river,
upon which stream the drainage of the country is de.
pendent for an outlet. The basin is characterized
by a sudden drop of 20 feet or more below the lands
bordering it on the east and west, between which the
surface is nearly level and is covered with a growth
of valuable hardwood timber which has been acquired
by lumber companies, who are at present engaged in
removing and marketing the timber. The soil is a
rich ALLIUVIAL MOLD from 4 to (6 feet deep, UN-
DERLAID with RIVER SAND. As fast as their mer.
chantable timber is removed, thin (ind is sold for
farming purposes.
Drainage work was begun several years ago to
fit this land for production and at present it is
STATED THAT THREE HUNDRED MILES of
DREDOED ditches have been constructed, TWO
HUNDRED AND FIFTY are in process of construc-.
tion, and THO HUNDRED MILES more ARE PRO.
JECTED. The plan followed is to construct parallel
ditches on north and south lines, about one mile apart,
extending them southward in the direction of the
slope of the land to a point where the water will be
discharged upon the lower levels, there being at press.
ent no outlet channel adequate to carcy the drainage
from this large water-shed. These ditches in general
are 20 feet wide at the top and 8 feet deep, it being
the plan to excavate them until the sand is reached,
After the construction of these ditches it has been
noticed that the drainage of the LAND IS AF-
FECTED FOR ONE-HALF MILE UPON BOTH
SIDES. This work is done under the provisions of
the STATE DRAINAGE LAW by dividing the area
into tracts varying from 25.000 to 30.000 acres, upon
which the COST OF THE CONSTRUCTION OF
THE DITCHES IS ASSESSED. In several of these
organizations of which I have the description and
figures, I find that the cost per acre has varied from
$1.60 to $2.25 per acre. Those who are engaged in
this work are greatly encouraged by the abundant
production on lands which are now under cultiva.
tion.
I should not fail to allude to an experiment byv
one of the owners of land which had been drained.
who counteracted the effect of drouth which seriously
affected that portion of the country in 1002. It is
understood that lands with sand bottom are less able
to withstand drouth than those with clay bottom.
This difficuldty was experienced in 1002. and in one
ease some dams were placed in the ditch to retain


the water and sub-irrigate the land by harking the,
water through the underlying sand. Thu. effect of
this was to greatly increase the yield of crops for n
distance of ONE-QUARTER OF A MILE EAMIl
SIDE OF THE DITCH, and it to suggested that
such precautions will be of great value in the sub-
sequmt treatment of land of this character. The


April 7,1906


lands sumelent dralage for production. These lands
are underlaid by stiff clay, and have been under-
drained in many instances, to their great advantage.
These Fens. if I obtain the correct impression
from deswriptions I have read, correspond more
nearly to the conditlnas we have to meet in the drain-
age of tidal and overflowed lands in our own coun-
try, than any others with whose history I am ac-
quainted. THEY ARE REGARDED A TIlE GRAN-
(Coutoued on Twelfth Page)


Fifth Page

price at which this land was offered three years ago,
before the drainage, was $5. Land which was drained
by the main ditches described was held at from $8
to $10 an acre.
The striking peculiarities of this region with
reslpe.t to its drainage problems are as follows:
First-The drainage from the large body of outly-
ing land passes directly to the sunken lands, contrib-
uting largely to their overflowed condition and to the
consequent expense of providing drainage channels.
Second-The fall which the discharge ditches
have does not exceed ONE FOOT PER MILE, and
the ditches, after following a course of about fifteen
miles, have no outlet except the level bottom lands
of the St. Francis river and its tributaries.
Third-The entire tract is underlaid by sand,
which, while making its artificial drainage less diffi-
cult, may result in the depletion of the fertility of
the land unless this feature is considered in its sub-
sequent cultivation.
You have doubtless read of, and possibly have
visited the fainous corn belt of Illinois. I was
brought up in that State and for many years prac-
ticed lmy profession in draining large areas of that
land whose fertility has made it famous. Much of
this LAND WAS ORIGINALLY DESHINATED
AM SWAMI1 LANDl BY THE GOVERNMENT SUR-
V EYORS, yet it occupies one of the table lands of
the State. Originally there were scarcely any
streams, and the whole area was interspersed with
iipond and marshes varying from a few acres to TEN
THOUSAND ACRES in extent, while other portions
of the area which were a trifle higher invited settlers
who legan breaking the prairies and farming the
land. It was soon ascertained that it was suitable
for cultivation only during dry seasons. When a
cyele of wet years occurred the drainage was so poor
that but a fraction of a crop could be raised, and I
have known of many instances in which land owners
have deserted their farms or sold them at an exceed-
ingly 'low price because they were not able to sup.
port themselves comfortably.
During the last twenty-five years their improve.
ment by drainage has been going on, which consisted
of the construction ot large artificial drainage ditches
and later of under-drainage by means of tile, so that
now there are portions of the State which are en-
tirely covered by DRAINAGE ORGANIZATIONS,
and scarcely a farm is found in which the expense
for drainage has not equaled from $10 to $20 per
acre. I know of one water-shed which is at the head
of the Vermillion river, consisting of 170 square
miles, for which the outlet ditch is now being greatly
enlarged because of its inadequate capacity as dem-
onstrated by the rainfall of the last few years. The
specifications of this ditch call for an excavation
70 feet wide on the bottom and from 10 to 12 feet
deep,.
The lands that have been improved by all of
this work are the black lands containing a large
prerentage of salt, underlaid with clay commonly
known as joint clay, which responds to drainage with
remarkable readiness. Every square foot of this
land is productive and the entire portion of the
State is divided into farms varying from 80 to 100
iterrs each, upon which are commodious buildings
and other substantial improvements. The land can-
not be purchased for less than $100 an acre, some
of it frequently welling for $130 an acre. It would
not now he suspected that any of this land was
FORMERLY UNPRODUCTIVE BECAUSE OF ITS
SWAMPY CONDITION. This is not an example of
the reclamation of swamp land in the sense that the
term is usually employed, yet possibly it represents
more cost and a larger investment in artificial drain-
age than would be required on many of the lands
which are at present ABSOLUTELY WORTHLESS
BECAUSE OF LACK OF DRAINAGE. It in seen
that their intrinsic value rests upon the fact that
they are fertile and when improved make farms
which will produce all of the varied crops to which
the climate and soil are adapted.
The work I have so far described has come under
my own observation, and I might add other examples
of a similar nature. I have always been interested
in reading the various detached accounts of the
drainage of the Fenlands of England, which to my
mind are the most interesting and important lands
reclaimed by drainage of which we have any account.
They comprise about 800,000 acres of lands border-
ing the coast, through which rivers pas carrying
the drainage of the higher lands to the sea. About
300,000 acres of thin area are below the level of the
tide, the drainage of which must be gathered by large
channels and raised by pumps over protecting dykes
into the soa. These pumping devices were formerly
operated by windmills similar to those used in Hol-
land, but were later -replaced by centrifugal pumps
operated by steam power. The lands in many in-
stances have settled from 2 to 14 feet below their
former level, requiring an addition to the pumping
facilities from time to time in order to secure to the














April 7, 1906


Shaking the Old Plum Tree

By EDWARD FITZGERALD


'BI IC&IE(ORDP



IPA'55~EP THE?



THE' H0MrF5TRfT
S Fr-iPRTE".

T~fU OTF.5


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t
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i
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"-t


wash will not clean
and if a man has a
sen's duty to do his
out of office.


the record of a public servant,
past of ill-repute it is the citi-
part in keeping such character


John W. Burton, the bright young lawyer of Ar-
cadia, who is now in the contest for Representative
from DeSoto County, offers a new feature in the list
of issues he advocates-the establishment of a sys-
tem of public abstracts. In this Mr. Burton is on
the right track. This is a reform which the Legis-
lature should notice. Some plan should be devised
whereby the State, at low fee, would give an abstract
of the title to property, and also guarantee the title.

In noticing matters for the public good, one that
could be carried out with much profit to all is the
publication of the assessment roll of each county.
It may be said that the roll can be examined by any
person who cares to visit the Assessor's office, but
that is not the point desired. By publication of the
list tax dodging would be reduced, because fear of
getting caught with the goods would restrain the
fellow who declares his property is worth but $1,000,
while he may be able to get $10,000 insurance on
the same. Too, the possibility of agreement between
the Assessor and property owner is lessened. Cases
of collusion have been known and have worked out
satisfactorily to each in spite of the fact that the
Board of County Commissioners are supposed to re-
vise the assessment roll.
Printing of the roll, however, puts the matter
into the hands of the public, and if discrimination
be shown protest will quickly follow. Here is oppor-
tunity for some member of the Legislature to gain
fame and at the same time render the people a val-
tied service by working for the enactment of a law
compelling the publication of tax assessments.
S reform, too, is needed in the selection of news-
papers to publish legal notices. At present there is
more or less bunco practiced. The intent of the
law is that legal notices shall be given the utmost
publicity, but owing to the construction of the
statute the contrary is frequently the case. Many
an application for tax sale deed or notice of mort-
gage foreclosure is printed in an obscure paper with
intent to keep the matter as weret as possible.
Many legal notices are given to papers as a mark
of favoritism or in payment of a political debt with-
out regard to serving the best interest of the people
who are taxed to pay the bill.
All legal notices, of whatever character, should
be published in the newspaper having the largest
circulation in the region wherein the legal notice
may be effective. If the notice emanates from any
of the county offices, then it should be printed in
the newspaper having the largest circulation in the
county. Legal notices relating to roads, elections or
schools or other matters of import to a certain por-
tion of the county should be published in the news-
paper having the largest circulation at that point.
Let the law be changed to this form. and let it also
provide a heavy penalty for the publisher who makes
false affidavit of his circulation.
Assuming that the purpose of legal notices is to
give such information publicity, nolbXly can denv
that this reform is fair.

Lee County is disturbed over the small lance to
elect a Senator from that County, which is in the
Twenty-fourth Senatorial Distriet, Monroe forming


tue balance of the territory. Owing to the small
population of Lee County the voters have been
obliged to submit to the superior strength of their
neighbor. A protest was filed with the State Execu-
tive Committee, but it was laughed at and Lee
County threatened to secede from Democracy. Now
an effort is being made to get Capt. W. H. Towles
to become Lee's candidate for the Senate in opposi-
tion to W. Hunt Harris and E. M. Semple of Key
West. The prospect of splitting the vote of the Island
City lends encouragement to the plan o0 the Lee
County politicians. Captain Towles, while not expe-
rienced in political life, would undoubtedly get the
solid vote of his home county, and the factional
struggle in Monroe would be fruitful to him, as he
is very well known in that county, and he would pos-
sibly take votes from each of his opponents.
Captain Towles is one of the wealthy men of the
lower portion of South Florida, and is a fighter who
would make the campaie in that district one of
much excitement.

Now it is reported that John P. Wall of Putnam
County, who became noted while serving in the
House as the "watchdog of the treasury," will oppose
J)r. Crill for tne Senatorship. If it is the intention
of Mr. Wall to keep an eye on the treasury from a
Senatorial standpoint he is taking a hard road to the
goal, as if such a thing as gratitude and apprecia-
tion exists in the mind of the constituency of Put.
nam County, it is not to be expected that Crill will
be swapped for Wall. A "watchdog" is all right in
his way, but he constitutes a small part of what is
necessary to measure to the standard of a legislator,
and to judge from his past record, Dr. Crill not only
bears the qualifications of statesmanship, but also
exercises sufficient watchfulness to protest against
wasteful expenditure of public funds.

lit is noticeable that many candidates are careful
to set forth their position on the Buckman Law,
especially if they favor the continuance of this law.
That it will be an issue in the Legislature there can
be no doubt, but the line of battle projected by the
foe will not be disclosed until the leaders give orders
to fire. The first day of the session is not apt to
close without the introduction of a bill in both
Houses providing for the repeal of the law.
Although uniformity of school books was the
subject exciting fights in both House and Senate last
session, the matter has not ended by any means and
a resume of the struggle can be looked for next
year. The advocates oftextbook uniformity are feel-
ing their way now in the campaign so that when
the Legislature meets they will not be quite friend-
less. Heretofore this smoking out process and the
influencing of those who may be "open to argument"
has been too late to produce satisfactory rmulte.,
but if early birding will tend to prevent failure, then
school book uniformity will go to Tallahassee with
a cheerful front. Many persons think uniformity a
good thing and an economic measure for the people.
Perhaps it is; a trial of the alleged benefits to the
people, however, is another motive that keeps the
scheme alive, and that is the desire of other book
publishers to get into the field where the American
Book Company has such rich pickings. To break
into the territory the uniformity plan is being used
as a wedge and money is the sledge used to drive it.
The weight of the sledge and its power to drive tM
wedge into the Legislature will be revealed a the
next session.


THE SUN


An interesting fight for Senator is in progress
in Lake County-three candidates having announced
and each preparing to wage a vigorous battle for the
plum.
Those who will hand over an assessment fee for
the privilege of running are J. B. Gaines, I. N.
Withers and Alfred St. Clair-Abrams. All are well
know in the district and each can count on enough
support to insure a lively campaign.
Mr. Abrams, however, has a decided advantage,
owing to the hobby he is riding, and which is cal-
culated to appeal to popular fancy-his advocacy
of increased assessment of railroad property, which
would be accomplished by placing the power to
asses in the hands of the Railroad Commission.
How the railroads will view the suggestion of Mr.
Abrams is another story, or rather, a continuance
of the one that ended so sadly for its author in
1903. The Third House, though, will look upon
such a bill with kindly eyes, as the handling thereof
will mean lucrative work for its members.
' If elected, Mr. Abrams will be a strong candi-
date for President of the Senate, and if he succeeds
a goodly stepping stone will be placed for him to
lump into the race for Congress in the First District
two years hence.e

Hamilton County, too, has a three-cornered fight
for the Senatorship, with prospect of a fourth can-
didate being added if Frank Adams heeds the call of
many prominent citizens. Three avowed candidates
are John L. Smith, R. H. Hunter and W. P. Jen-
nings, while another who had been urged to enter
was 0. W. Smith, a well-known merchant of Jasper.
He declines the honor and declares, in a summing
up of the situation "that the people of Hamilton
County could not do better than to return Hon.
Frank Adams." Although Mr. Adams has stated
that he has retired from polities, yet Mr. Smith as-
serts that the former able and eloquent Senator
should not refuse to again serve the people.
Such sentiment appears to be growing in force
with those citizens who see the necessity of secur-
lag the best representation in the Legislature, and
in response fr. Adams may be moved to reconsider
his intention of retirement that popular dentand be
satisfied. As sequence to such event it would be fit-
ting testimonial by his fellow-Senators to choose
him as their presiding offer-a position he has filled
in the past in a most worthy and capable manner.

The Marion County executive committee passed
a resolution censuring the State committee for call-
ing an early primary, basing its condemnation on
the alleged ground that insufficient time was granted
the eletors to acquaint themselves with the objects
of the primaries. It was the opinion of the Marion
County Democrats that the first primary should not
be held earlier than June 15.
Doubtless such feeling prevails in many other
counties, but in few..has any haste been shown to
take advantage of the time permitted by the State
cmalttee, therefore, complaint should give way to
'a usual the plea for honest, capable men, espe-
elally for the Legislature, is being made by press
sad Birl This Is as it shdaOui be. but something
mre prayer is needed to produce such condi-
Oft. t sa d boldness of expression is required
to d t 0 dogs and grafting wolves, if
atmthimsel ves forWhite.-


....................... II II Ill.. !.M.!.L


kip













AfI7,,,19O6,


THE SUN


Seventh Page


BY
John Henry Plays Pool "v'.wHA


S\ I game once from the champion player I figured it out that the ball he was
of Tioga County and ever sinoe he's looking at was the one Thirsty Bill was
been sitting up in the rack throwing fondling, but I didn't say nthg.
down hints to the slow walkers. I was due to hear a loud holler from
." Try the combination on the 7-ball the old 'un if Biddle played that ball.
-" /for the corner" croaks Long-haired "What is it nowT" I inquired.
Lemuel. "The one I bittI"
SlNow the gag is that from where lm- Did you ever meet one of those fellows
uel sits you couldn't see the 7-ball with h o s"Iee h and te
the Lick telescope. smashes in to seven balls and claims
0 e the Lick telescope. ,hp"
In hops Willie McSweet, the Village everythi dro 1"
Beauty. Don't they Jolt you?
IhhfWillie is the lad with the loft full of
mm WIM Iiill I M light conversation, and Mama lets him
"IYNDER A CROSS-FIRE FROM THE CHAIR-WARMERS.P" stay out till 0:15 every evening. --
Willie .traveled over the New York
Did you ever drop in of an evening laughs so heartily over this Pineroism Central once as far as Albany and when *
and try to play pool under a crossfire that Glisten swells up and buys Thirsty he came home his fond parents had to
from the chairwarmers? another tub. put baseball masks on his head fore iand
It's the limit, aft, to keep it from bursting.
It hai golf slapped to a standstill, --- "Ah!" says Willie; "playing pool?"
and pony polo isn't one, two, nine. "No," remarks Glisten, "they're put-*
From the moment you reach for your j ting up a picket fence I" and old Thirnty '
cue the sofa-pounders cut loose and chin Bill hands out a laugh which nets hint
you to a call-down. another dipper.
"Breaw 'em easy, now!" says old Then there's the Mister Man you're
Thirsty Bill. f playing with.
All the afternoon he's been sitting up I was entered in a handicap that even-
with some ice and a bottle of Wilson. g with a chap named Biddle. ,
That's' all. iddle is one of those low conmelinin
He has to close one eye and squint who throw.out catch-lines and wait for
the bther when he looks at you, but the laugh.
he's as wise as a weasel. Ilia line of gags d(lates back to tile'
If ou stood him up he wouldn't days when the B. & 0. was flirt built.
know the 14 ball from the cuspidor. Nowadays when. I hear a pool-romw I
One of those old dubs that's never comedian speaking lines about getting
happy unless he's teasing his throat seasick on the B. & 0. I'm wise to the
with booze or talk. be fact that he dips in the Farmer's Al-
Then Red Necktie rolls his barrel in -" manac for his comedy stuff.
the shop and cuts, a conundrum: Biddle likes to knock. I v
"Why don't you play the 8 ball in the / lie says he'd rather Ib AlaI ])i, I
side" fie says he'd rather be Alan Dale
Red Neektie only played one game in than be President, because Dlale on
his life and that was tag. / throw the hammer and get back to his
Somebody caught him then with the safety deposit vaults without a sratch. WI "
goods, and all he has done since is cud- lhe ays it's a einh to be dramatiIL ."
die down in a chair and tell people how toaster and trinmner when you v an hide By this time Thirsty Bill had all his
to make fancy with the cue. in the tall grams and do your knocking lghts u.
Then the three Bixby Brothers- through a ong-ditan newspar. ligh d the upborder burning and a
Shine, Polish and Glisten--start in to Anyway, that's neither here nor there calcium "spot" followed him around.
write epigrams. "What are you playing for?" I said "Can shu play com nashun on sat pink
"Play the round ball" suggests "THIRSTY BIL." iddle. monkey ash settin' on green ball?" he
Shine. "The ball I'm looking at," he an- asked; and then he went down and out.
"Chalk your feet and you won't slipl" Then Long-haired Lemuel crawls un- swered. I put up my cue and blue-penciled
observes Polish. der the rope and begins to offer sug- There's a slight difference of opinion the push.
"Play the yellow ball in the cozy gestions in a hoarse whisper. between BRiddle's eyes-they have oppo- Pool is a great game, but the chair-
corner!" chirps Glisten, and old Thirsty Long-haired Lemuel won a fifty-point site points of views, as it were. crouchers put crepe on it.




Broward and the Jacksonville Dailies


'(Madison Recorder.)
The Jacksonville dailies continue to
misrepresent the drainage question.
They misquoted the speech delivered by
Governor Broward in Jacksonville some
time ago by asserting that the Governor
declared that all the papers in the State
are corrupt. For such prominent papers
to make the assertion, many of the pa-
pers of the State believed it and criti-
cised the the Governor harshly. Now
it is learned that the accusation was
false. Prominent citizens who were
within a few feet of the Governor when
he delivered the address declare that he
criteised only the Metropolis and the
Times-Union.
But in order to get even, in order
to bring down condemnation of the press
of the State on the Governor, these pa-
pers did not hesitate to deliberately mis.
quote the Governor's speech.
The Times-Union is mightily against
the drainage proposition. All kinds of
argument have been used by that paper
to show the absurdity of the proposition.
Yet less than four years ago, the same
paper occupied the same position on the
question that the State administration
now does. Does the Times-Union expect
the people of the State to perform an
acrobatic somersault every time that
paper doesT. A few years ago the Times-
Union was talking about the State drain-
ag of the Everglades, the immense
wealth to 0ome to the State through


suigarcane culture. It placed the propo-
sition above education and good roads.
Now it calls the scheme "tomfoolery."
The people of Florida are not going to
flop about on different sides of a propo-
sition every time the editor of the Times-
Union gets orders to change sides.
The last performance of misrepresen-
tation comes from an editorial in the
Jasper News. It represents the sad pic-
ture of a widow paying taxes on land
in the drainage district at Miami. It
claims that the incident actually oc-
curred. The Metropolis of Jackson-
ville uses the editorial as the subject
of a cartoon.
Now, comes the Miami Record and de-
clares, after an investigation, that the
story is false. The woman in question
did not own a foot of land in the drain-
age district and therefore paid no taxeM
on such land.
The Jacksonville dailies have not 6le*n
fair enough to correct the misreprewn-
tation of the Governor's speech. Will
they be fair enough to correct this last
falsehood that one of them has aided
in disseminating?
(Tampa Herald.)
With wonderful accord the JIackson.
ville Times-Union and the Jacksonville
Metropolis both declared that Governor
Broward said in his speech in .Jackson-
ville recently that the entire State press
was purchasable. They have harped on


this alleged insult to the State press and
have grown red in the face in their
Quixotic defense of the abused and slan-
dered State preni. Governor Broward
flatly denied saying anything of the kind,
hut declares that he made a serious
charge against the two Jacksonville pa-
pers. In defense of themselves the two
paragon of valor-defenders of the
State press-have had absolutely no
reply to make to the Governor. The
people of Florida too well know (over-
nor Broward to believe that he would
tell an untruth. The two Jacksonville
papers have simply gotten themselves
into a mess and they have not the judg-
ment or the sense of right to make the
proper acknowledgments and get out
honorably. That's all.

( Monticello News.)
The 'Times-Union not long since 'auld
"Now for Drainage and Hugar!" That
'was when drainage meant "sugar in the
gourd." It makes a lot of difference
whose gourd the sugar will li in. Brow.
hard's plan means sugar in the people's
gourd.

(Madison New Ent'rpri'e.)
governor r liroward scored heavily on
his drainage' scheme by reproducing in
last week's issue of Claude l'Engle's
Hun several lengthy editorials taken
from the Times-Union's iles of a few


years ago, in which the editor of that
paper argued not only the feasibility
but the advisability of the drainage of
the Everglades from an affirmative
standpoint. The reproduction of them
articles at this time will cause many
people to wonder if drainage was a
thing then, why is it not a good
thing now?

(Cocoa and lockledge News.)
The thanks of the people of 'Florida
and especially the press, are due Claude
L' ungle and his Sun for relieving Gov-
orner Broward from the aspersions east
upon him and through him the fas.'
name of our great State, by the baseless,
injurious and untrustworthy statements
and reports of his speech of March 3
by the big Times-Union. It is a notice-
able fact that those newspapers that fol-
lowed the above-nwntioned paper in their
condemnation of Governor Broward are
now out of chat and are trying to pull
the hole in after them.
(Madison Recorder.)
The TimoesUnion says the people of
Florida knew that paper before they did
Governor Broward. Yes, they showed
that in the last primary when they
voted against the candidate supported
by the corporation sheet (though he had
formerly been a popular idol) and voted
for Broward.










AHrH tG04Q
Saitudw, April 7, 1906


sf


THE SUN


sr


ED


IT 0


The. leman Grafer Here
"With all the modern improvements" is the catch 'line used in advertisements
of dwellings, railway traffo equipment, dollar clocks and universities.
Let some "light-oompleoted" colored man open a new tonsorial parlor, or
some man of millions found a hospital, and each will use the term quoted above
in dearibing his particular project.
Walter Wellman will make a dash for the pole-"with all the modern im.
prove.ent.s" Serglus Witte is striving to bring forth a Russian Empire-
"with all the modern Improvements;" Pat Chappell, the enterprising little negro,
ii running his Rabbit Foot show-"with all the modern improvements;" and
the latest news from the Philippines conveys the information that our brave
soldier boys are killing the savage--"wlth all the modem rn improvements."
With all lines of human activity showing signs of the yielding to the popu-
lar demand for doing things different from the way they were done in other
days, it is not surprising that the ubiquitous, irrepressible FAKIR and the con-
sclenoeles, ever-present GRAFTER should be presented in a new dress with
up-to-date methods of fooling the people.
So, we Introduce by means of the cartoon on -this page, THE GRAFTER
WITH ALL THE MODPRN IMPROVEMENTS.
)e are told that Esau was "an hairy man," therefore, when his brother Jacob
coveted the parental blessing that was his brother's by right of deserving, he
covered his hands with sheep wool, which the blind Isaac mistook for the hairy
hands of the good brother, and gave to Jacob the blessing that was earned by
Esau.
Labia, in his turn, wishing to settle his daughters in life, fooled Jacob with
the "weak-eyed" Iaah instead of the beautiful Rachael for whom he had served
(or seven years, and got another seven years' work out of Jacob.
Methods like these would have been considered crude even by those gentle-
men who hid the little ball somewhere else and asked the mystified countryman
to guess which of the three walnut shells covered it.
Shell game men,' bunco steerers, gold brick sellers, and all others belonging
to the great army of graft, have worked the public long, industriously and faith-
fully; but the public has grown wise, and can spot one of these types by the
clothes he weanrs, by the pomade on his hair, by the false.diamond in his shirt.
So familiar did this type become that times became exceedingly hard and
money very scares with those who carried the usual signs.
But though its former devotees are decadent, graft is such a subtle thing,
the game of getting something for nothing is so fascinating, faking is such an
easy way to acquire money, that it could not perish from the earth, while the
Inventive genius of man was present to keep it alive.
THE GREAT AMERICAN GAME OF GRAFT IS STILL BEING PLAYED.
It is the PLAYERS who have changed.
THIS IS THE AGE OF THE GENTLEMAN GRAFTER.
He is found on the bench, in legislative halls, on church boards and in places
where the money of widows and orphans is guarded.
The brasen-throated barkers who short-changed side-show patrons have
been pushed aside by the EMINENTLY RESPECTABLE BUSINESS MAN who
short-weights his customers.
Loud waistcoats and varnished, square-toed shoes are no longer to be seen
when a grafter is spotted. The PERSONS who wore these have been forced to
give way to the GENTLEMAN in plain black ties and modish business suits.
When the great graft game is worked nowadays the workers can point with
pride to a successful business career.
When the call to graft is sounded in these modern times, it is answered
by conservative, progressive oitlesns who bring their cloak of respectability along
with them as they jump to their places at the table spread for them.
The old line grafters ARE STILL IN THE GAME, but they are now used
as pawns to prevent the checkmate of the KING GRAFTERS.
Those of the past, In nare-spreading, are STILL WORKING, but they now
serve the BIG BOSS for a regular wage, and look with bulging eyes at the huge
spoils which they never dreamed were possible to be gathered.
This is the age of progress, and modern methods will tell when results are
counted.
Oh I gentlemen grafters, we pronounce you the worst of this hell litter.
Jacksonville being a city-"with all the modern improvements," has all
things that other live cities have, and numbers among its inhabitants the gentle-
man grafter.

Heme T7 Roadsfor One
Sometimes an idea comes to us. Some that have come to us, we believe, are
of useful type while others are not highly esteemed-yet we always have a
welcome for one of merit coming from anyone of our friends.
We have one now that has floated to us from Mr. Allan Rogers, a road-
builder of many years' experience, and we hope that his idea will be put into
praetlee in the construction of hard roads in this county, and more particularly
the one from this city to Pablo.
The plan of Mr. Rogers provides for two roads in one, or rather a right and
a left-hand roadway each ten feet wide and separated by a four-foot strip, in
which a hedge would be planted and also trees at intervals of twenty feet. He
states that this would cost only about $20 a mile more, while its value to the
road would be many times that sum annually.
First, it should be noted that in adopting this plan of division that the
wear on the highway would be greatly lessened on account of the trafe being
divided. It is well known that teams travel on the middle of the road, and a


road w built to divide the trafcwould ast twice long amebuiltIn the'
custamary q.


Then, by this arrangement, the road would not become a speedway for auto-
mobiles. This annoyance would be spared the driver of horM and daWer of
accident would be avoided, as the automobilist would be obliged to reduce speed
in order to pass by vehicles going ip the same direction on the ten-foot roadway.
If the money of all the peopt is spent on road-building, all the people
should receive the full benefit of the road. Speedway's are good things to have,
but they should be built with private funds.
The value of the intervening hedge and shade trees, aside from th useful
purpose served, should be considered from the point of beauty added to the
highway.
It is a good idea in every respect and we pass it along to the County Com-
missioners of all the forty-six counties in Florida.


1IL 856#VESro M
/LESO TOffMr.-
P~~N(tOjW O
(A.W


e~f {~: "


N


I


1A NEW P

The Governor Chose the Best
Some persons may have wondered why Governor Broward should have chosen
THE SUN as the vehicle to present his side of Everglade drainage to the public,
when he was invited in an open letter to use the columns of each of the Jackson-
ville dailies.
There is no mystery about it whatever.
The Governor knew that THE SUN was interested in the matter from a
news standpoint. We had been collecting data on the subject for several months
in order to talk to our readers about it in an intelligent manner.
We wished to give all the information possible. Besides printing the data
collected and illustrating by maps, we sent a representative to the point where
dredging was to begin that we might have a story containing local features of
the drainage work.
On learning that this publication was to be made, Governor Broward ordered
extra copies of the paper. He has since offered articles for publication and pur-
chased extra copies for distribution.
He chose THE SUN for the purpose because it was enterprising enough to
print all it could find of value bearing on the subject, and at the same time in
a manner free from bias.
He evidently did this for the above-mentioned reason alone, because hiI
project has not ween favored editorially. In fact, we have strongly diareed
with him on onepoint-that of taxing the people BEFOIIE THI' BENEPIT
FROM THE PANWERE CERTAIN.


^&i11


Il All


--4-













ALS


sr


THE SUN


NINTH 'PAGE


s,


Saturday April 7, 1906


Defense of the United States Senate Is but poorly accomplished by ridiuling
the "ten-ent editors," u Senator Lodge ironically designates those magazine
editors who are responsible for articles impeaching the integrity of the Senate.
It is not so many months since the same kind of ridicule was hurled at those who
called attention to the mammoth graft practiced by certain life insurance com.
panies, yet thr truth triumphed. The insurance magnates who spent funds
belonging to the policy-holders in an attempt to discredit stories printed by the
"ten-cent editors" have been hurled in disgrace from their positions. Perhaps a
similar aftermath may befall the United States Senators who are charged with
"treason."

Railroad rebates now appear in new guise; "overcharge" being the mask.


Labor and the Ballot


We are not vain of our opinion, and whenever we do express it it is with due
sense of our limitations, shortcomings and lack of wisdom and experience.
It, therefore, gives us no pain when people are found who disagree
with us.
The pain which we do not experience does not, however, prevent us from
being pleased when we find that our opinions are the opinions of Intelligent and
honest persons, whoever they may be.
We are prompted to write this because we note in the news that the Execu-
tive Conncil of the American Federation of Labor has declared that the ballot is
the proper weapon for Labor to utilize to win'its battles.
More than a year ago we expressed this opinion. We said that resolutions,
however well drawn, and declarations, however strongly made, could not accom-
plish the work being prosecuted by organized labor for the recognition of its
rights; that the only way in which organized labor could ever accomplish any-
thing for the betterment of its condition was to go into the ballot box.
If every man who believes in the principles of organized labor and union-
ism were to east his ballot according to his belief the common people would
again rule this country and we would bear no more of trust an the corruption
of the Governn t by the anof moey.


Judge Locke Did Not Decide
It is remarkable how plain matters of fact are sometimes twisted.
Especially when such twisting is deemed necessary to establish a point of
argument or to serve a personal purpose.
Floridians have been fed to the point of gluttony on this sort of informa-
tion relative to the position of the Federal Court in the Everglades drainage case.
Certain newspapers assert, with gleeful feeling, that Judge Locke has decided
that the taxation clause of the drainage law is unconstitutional.
JUDGE LOCKE HAS NOT 80 DECLARED.
He has not decided that the law is unconstitutional nor invalid, nor that
the assessment of the acreage tax is void.
Judge Locke has simply ordered continuance of the injunction restraining
the Board of Drainage Commissioners from collection of the acreage tax, allow-
ing the defendants until May to file answer.
Neither is there probability of the Court rendering a decision concerning
the validity of the law or touching on the validity of the acreage tax until the
final settlement of the suit.
In the meantime, however, the Board of Drainage Commissioners was con-
sidering the collection of the tax on lands not affected by injunction.
It believed it had the right to do this, but after weighing the merits of the
case with a view of justifiable action, the Board has decided to rest in the matter
pending a Court decision in its favor.
WE ARE PLEASED WITH THIS ATTITUDE OF THE BOARD.
We regard it as a matter of justice.
While we believe the Board had no choice but to follow the law enacted by
the last Legislature, and to carry it out with fidelity, yet we feel gratification at
its action in refusing to go further with the portion relating to special taxation.
We believe the law is unjust, inasmuch as the property owner is taxed for a
long period before his land will be benefited by the work.
Let reclamation come FIRST and then taxation in accordance with the
benefit received, will be PROPER TAXATION.
This is a proposition for the Legislature to consider. No matter how the
Federal Court may decide that portion of the drainage law providing for the
collection of a special tax before the lands are benefited should be repealed.
Meanwhile let the truth be told and facts related without twisting.

Jailer Jones and the Blood4hond&
As reported in both the daily papers Jailer Jones committed a very grave
error recently in refusing to allow bloodhounds to be uned for the pur-
pose of detecting a criminal. In the case in question this was ihe only way in
which there lay a hope of catching the criminal. Jailer Jones should be sum-
marily dismissed from office. He should not be allowed to ever hold an office or
public trust again. He should be scorned by all men and made to feel the. weight
of public displeasure for committing so outrageous an act against the public
spirit.
BUT, WE CANNOT SAY THIS ABOUT JAILER JONES, BECAUSE HE
DID NOT DO THE THINGS HE WAS REPORTED TO HAVE DONE.
That episode of the refusal of the bloodhounds, the calling of eitismu at the
jail, WAS NOT TRUE. It was a figment of the imagination of an over-salous
newspaper reporter who was so indignant that he could not reach the telephone
and call up Mr. Jones to ask him for his aide of the story.
It was repeated the next day by the paper which has accustomed itself to
accept as true whatever is printed in the columns of its morning contemporary.
Several indignant citizens called at the office of THE SUN and requeted
that we express the public disapproval of Mr. Jones's act. They succeeded in
stirring us up, but when we called up Mr. Jones we were assured by him that
no such episode took place.
He said that Sergeant Minor telephoned about midnight asking him if he
could get the bloodhounds; that he informed Sergeant Minor that both of the
dogs were sick, and he himself was sick, and that even if the dogs were well they
would not go with anyone who had not been accustomed to handle them. No
persons called at the jail, nor did Mr. Jones refuse to let any one have the dogs.
In view of this statement of the case, as we have said, WE WILL NOT MEN.
TION what ought to be done to Mr. Jones.
Our esteemed contemporary, the Miami Record, with whom we have up to
this time been compelled to disagree on all questions that have conm up, has
in one of its issues last week given us the opportunity to agree with it.
We congratulate the editor of the Miami Record on presenting the true
story of the woman who went to pay her taxes in Dade County. The Jasper
News said she was a poor woman and that the "drainage tax bore heavily
upon her." The Miami Record says tht the drainage tax had nothing whatever
to do with the distress of the poor woman.

Certain South Florida newspapers are brightening their editorial columns by
liberal reprints from the Scri pps-McRae newspapers, but for some reswon they
fall to give credit to the Cincinnati Post or the St. Paul News or other of the
famous chain of newspapers from which the excellent editorials are taken. Per-
hap. they "Forget It" in an attempt to "Cheer U p" their readers. Yet these papers
should not be censured too harshly for the pilfering of editorial matter when
a paper like the Atlanta Journal sets the example-recent transgressions being
"A Suspicious Coal Strike" and "'Those Who Fall."

A new duty has been found for the secret service men of the Treaury De-
partment-"looking after" the writers of letters to Judge Humphries, the Federal
Judae who is being denounced as a "tool of the Beef Trust." The sioet service


force was organized for protection against counterfeiting and smuling, but as
the Government continues to recede from the control of the people* so does the
power of this body of police imonarie a m=aner mammeag to a ld of liberty.


RI













Thiith Page


THE SUN


Apif 79 196


The Czar s Spy \. Chevalier William Le Qu.ux


My fellow-traveler from Stockholm,
who repre-ented a firm of paper-makers
in Hamburg, and who paid an annual
viAt toAbo ad H slfor, ated as
my gude around the wn, while I
awifed the information from the hum.
bled Chief of Police. My German friend
pog4ted out to me how, since Russia
Ued bher hand upon Finland, progress
*a arrested, and certainly plain
i were on every hand. There
was growing discontent everywhere, for
many of the newspapers had recently
boan suppressed and the remainder were
under a svere, censorship agriculture
had already decreased, and many of the
cotton-spinning and sawmills were silent
and deserted. The exploitation of those
gigantic forests from which millions of
trukse were floated down to the sea an-
nually had now been suspended, the
great landowners were deserting the
country, and there was silence and de-
pression everywhere. Finland had been
separated for economic purposes from
the more oivilised countries, and bound
to the poverty-stricken, artificially iso-
lated and oppressed Russia. The double-
headed eagle was everywhere, and the
people at silent and brooding beneath
its lack shadow.
"There will be an uprising here before
long," declared the German confidentially
as we were taking tea one day on the
wooden balcony of the hotel where the
sea sand the low-lying islands stretched
out before us in the pale yellow of the
autumn sundown. "The people will re-
volt, as they did in Poland. The Fin.
nish Government can only appeal to the
Csar through the Governor-General, and
one can easily imagine that their sug-
getions never reach the Emperor. It is
said hen that the harsher and more cor-
rupt the official, the greater honor does
he receive from Petersburg. But trouble
is brewing for Russia," he added. "A
very serious trouble-depend upon it."
Looked upon the gray dismal scene,
the empty port, the silent quay, the dark
line of gloomy pine forest away beyond
the town, the broken coast and the wide
expanse of water glittering in the north-
ern sunset. Yes. The very silence
seemed to forbode evil and mystery.
truly what I saw of Finland Impressed
me even more than what I had witnessed
in the far-off eastern provinces of Eur-
opean Russia.
My object, however, was not to inquire
into the internal condition of Finland,
or of her resentment of her powerful
conqueror. I was there to find that un-
fortunate girl who had written so
strangely to her old school friend and
whose portrait had, for some hidden
reason, been destroyed.
On the morning of the third day after
my arrival at Abo, while sitting on the
hotel veranda reading an old copy of the
Paris Journal, many portions of which
had been "blacked out" by the censor,
the Chief of Police, in his dark green
uniform, entered and saluted before me.
"Your Excellency, may I be permitted
to speak with you in private ?'
"Certainly," I responded, rising and
conducting him to my bedroom, where I
closed the door, invited him to a seat,
and myself sat upon the edge of the bad.
"I have made various inquiries," he
said, "and I think I have found the lady
your Excellency is seeking. My infor-
mation, however, must be furnished to
you in strictest confidence," he added,
"'because there are reasons why I should
withhold her whereabouts from you."
"What do you mean?" I inquired.
"What reasons ?"
"Well-the lady is living In Finland
in secret."
"Then she is aliveI" I exclaimed
quickly. "I thought she was dead."
"To the world she is dead," responded
Michael Boranski, stroking his red
beard. "For that reason the informa-
ties I give you must be treated as con-
idemtial."
"Why should she be in hiding? She
is aity of no offense-is she?"
r man shrugged his shoulders, but
did not reply.
"And this Baron Oberg? You tell me
nothing o1 him," I said with disatisfac-


"How can I when I know nothing, Ex-
follenoyf" was his rMinse.
I felt certain that t fellow was not
speaking the truth for I had noticed his
surprise when I had first uttered the
mysterious nobleman's name.
"As I have already said, Excellency,
I am desirous of atoning for my insult,
and will serve you in every manner I
can. For that reason I had sought news
of the young English lady-the Made-
moiselle Heath."
"But you have all foreigners regis-
tered in your books," I said. "The
search was surely not a difficult one. 1
know your police methods in Russia too
well," I laughed.
"No, the ady was not registered," he
said. "There was a reason."
"Why?"
"I have told you, Excellency. She is
in hiding."
"Where t"
"I regret that much as I desire, I dare
not appear to have any connection with
your quest. But I will direct you. In-
deed, I will give you instructions to a
second person to take you to her."
"Is she is Abot"
"No. Away in the country. If your
Excellency will be down at the end of
the quay to-morrow at noon you will
find a carriage in waiting, and the driver
will have full instructions how to take
you to her and how to act. Follow his
directions implicitly, for he is a man I
can trust."
"To-morrow I" I cried anxiously. "Why
not to-day? I am ready to go at any
moment."
The Chief of Police remained thought-
ful for* a few moments, then said-
"Well, if I can find the man, you
might go to-day. Yet it is a long way,
and you would not return before to-mor-
row."
"The roads are safe, I suppose? I
don't mind driving in the night."
The official glanced at the clock, and
rising exclaimed-
"Very well, I will send for the man.
If we find him, then the carriage will be
at the same spot at the eastern end of
the quay in two hours."
"At noon. Very well. I shall keep
the appointment."
"And after seeing her, you will of
course keep your promise of secrecy re-
garding our little misunderstandingT?"
he asked anxiously.
"I have already given my word," was
the response; and the man bowed and
left, much, I think, to the surprise of
the hotel proprietor and his staff. It
was an unusual thing for such a high
official as the Chief of Police to visit
one of their guests in person. If he de-
sired to interview any of them, he com-
manded them to attend at his office, or
they were escorted there by his gray-
coated agents.
The day was cold, with a biting wind
from the icy north, when after a hasty
luncheon I put on my overcoat and
strolled along the deserted quay where
I lounged at the further end, watching
the approach of a great pontoon of pine
logs that had apparently floated out of
one of the rivers and was now being
navigated to the port by four men who
seemed every moment in imminent dan-
ger of being washed off the raft into the
sea as the waves broke over and drenched
them. They had, however, lashed them-
selves to their raft, I saw, and now
slowly piloted the great floating plat-
form toward the quay.
I think I must have waited half an
hour, when my attention was suddenly
attracted by the rattle of wheels over the
stones, and turning I saw an old closed
carriage -drawn by three horses abreast,
with bells upon the harness, approach-
ing me rapidly. When it drew up, the
driver, a burly-looking fair-headed Finn
in a huge sheepskin overcoat, motioned
me to enter, urging in broken Russian- I
"Quickly, ExcellencyI-quicklyi!-you
must not be seen!"
And then the instant I was seated, .
and before I could close the door, the
horses plunged forward and we were 4
tearing at full gallop out of the town. 1
For five miles or so we skirted the sea
along a level, well-made road through


a barren wind-swept country whence the
meaer harvest had already been gar-
nered. Then were no village. All
around was a houseless land, rolling
miles of brown and green, broken and
checkered by bits of forest and clumps
of dark melancholy pines. The road ran
ever and anon right down to where the
cold, green waves broke upon the rocky
shore. In a few weeks that coast would
be icebound and saow-ooyered, sad then
the silence of the God-forsaken country
would be complete.
After five miles or so, the driver pulled
up and descended to readjust his harness,
whereupon I got out and asked him in
the best Russian I could command:
"Where are we going?"
"To Nystad."
"How far is that?"
"Sixty-eight," was his reply.
I took him to imply kilometers, as be-
ing a Finn, he would not speak of versts.
"The Chief of Police has given you
directions ?" I asked.
"His high Excellency has told me ex-
actly what to do," was the man's answer,
as he took out his huge wooden pipe and
filled it. "You wish to see the young
"Yes," I answered, "to first see her,
and I do not know whether it will be
necessary for me to Make myself known
to her. Where is she?"
"Beyond Nystad," was his vague an-
swer with a wave of his big fat hand in
the direction of the dark pine forest
that stretched before us. "We shall be
there about an hour after sundown."
Then I re-entered the stuffy old con-
veyance ihat rocket and rolled as we
dashed away over the uneven forest road,
and sat wondering to what manner of
place I was being conducted.
Elma Heath was in hiding. Why? I
recollected her curious letter and re-
membered every word of it. She wished
Hornby to know that she had never re-
vealed her secret. What secret, I won-
derea ?
I lit an abominable cigar, and tried to
smoke, but I was too filled with anxiety,
too bewildered by the maze of mystery
in which I now found myself. Two
hours later we pulled up before a long
log-built post-house just beyond a small
town in a hollow that faced the sea, and
I alighted to watch the steaming horses
being replaced by a trio of fresh ones.
T he place was Dadendal, I was informed,
and the proprietor of the place, when I
entered and tossed off a liqueur-glass
of cognac, pointed out to me a row of
granite buildings fallen much to decay
as the ancient convent.
Then, resuming our journey, the short
day quickly drew to a close, the sun
sank yellow and watery over the tower-
ing pines through which we went mile
after mile, a dense, interminable forest
wnerein the wolves lurked in winter,
often rendering the road dangerous.
The temperature fell, and It froze
again. Through the window in front I
could see the big Finn driver throwing
his arms across his shoulders to promote
circulation, in the same manner as does
the London "cabby."
When night drew on we changed horses
aain at a small, dirty post-house in the
forest at the edge of a lake, and then
pushed forward again, although it was
already long past the hour at which he
had said. we should arrive.
Time passed slowly in tihe darkness,
for we had no light, and the horses
seemed to find their way by instinct.
The rolling of the lumbering old vehicle
after six hours had rendered me sleepy,
I think, for I recollect closing my eyes
and conjuring up that strange scene on
board the Lola.
Indeed, I suppose I must have slept,
for I was awakened by a light shining
into my face and the driver shaking me
by the shoulder. When I roused myself
and, naturally, inquired the reason, he
placed his finger mysteriously upon my
lips, saying:
"Hush. your high nobility, hush!
(ome with me. But make no noise.
If we are discovered, it means death for ,
is-death. Come, give me your hand.
Slowly. Tnad oftly. See, e is the


boat. I will get in Arst. We shall not
be heard upon the water. 8o.".
And the fellow led me, half-dazed,
down to the bank of a broad, dark river
which I could just distinguish-he led
me to an unknown bourne.

CHAPTER XI.
THE CASTLE OF TERROR.
The big Finn had, I found, tied up his
horses, and in the heavy old boat he
rowed me down the swollen river which
ran swift and turbulent around a sudden
bend and then seemed to open out to a
great width. In the starlight I eoild
[Continued on Fourteenth Page]


Read Your Future in the


STAR

WHICH 18 THE TRADE-MARK OF



Whitehouse


d Hopkins


REAL ESTATE BROKERS


204 W. Bay St., Jacksonville, Fla.


By listing your Property
under our star your for-
tune will increase. In-
quiries now in our office
o.... r....



Timber Lands

Farm Property


will insure the sal of
yours if you place them
in our hands

ut Out Cu04 adm MaW to Us

WhiM.b a Hopis,

Gentlemen-I am interested in your pro.
posal to sell timber lands and farm property.
Kindly correspond with me on the subject.
----- .......... .... .................................................





Whitehousei


and
d Hopkins

204 W. Bay St., Jacksonv, Ha.
TRANSMTATM A MW












April 7, 1906


THE SUN


Eleventh Page


SAccuse Christian Society Lutheran PtorKutter
cie \ Lutheran Pastor Kutter


Berlin.-The Rev. Dr. Kutter, a Lutheran
pastor of wide popularity, has just published a re-
markable book full of startling facts and figures, con-
stituting a terrible indictment of Christian society
which, he says, is habitually guilty of acts no heath-
en would ever think of committing against his fel-
low man. Here follow some telling extracts from
the volume, which is causing considerable stir in
Government circles and in the. churches:
MODERN ORDER OF SOCIETY ATTACKED.
"The modern order of society is a parody on
justice and equity; reduce your demands for honest
treatment to ever so low a level, the Christian
society of today will not grant them, on the contrary,
it will cover you with scorn for asking justice at its
hands.
THE RULE OF MONEY.


"And the


away of money is such as no heathen


emperor, or financier, ever so much given to violence,
dreamed of imposing upon the people.
"Christian society is not only a robber and plun-
derer, by the capitalistic order of things established,
it is a home-destroyer, where it should be a homeo-
maker. Who counts the names of persons, the tribes,
the nations annihilated, driven from home and set-
tlements, robbed of their lands, their fisheries, for
the sake of money?
"Christian society forces the small man to under-
feed, to under-clothe, to live in inadequate quar-
ters. It despises him) Ind derides manual labor as
unfit for the intellectual. It does this and a thousand
more things equally un-Christian, equally inpolitic
and calls it 'the divine order of things,' propping
up the blasphemous assertion by religious and philo-
sophical commonplaces. And the more shameless
hypocrites tell of 'unalterable laws' that compel soci-
ety to act thus meanly and unjustly 'because it's
the will of God, who made the rich and who made
the poor.'
CHRISTIAN SOCIETY MURDERS.
"Christian society is a murderer on a more exten-
sie scale than any heathen conqueror. Our factory
system and a hundred other systems of production,
coal mining, steel-making, etc., murder the poor
and downtrodden by inches, but murder them surely.
"Capitalism means death to the small man, death
by starvation, slow or rapid. The trusts, financial
rings or syndicates, whatever they are named, are
wholesale executioners of mankind, tolerated by the
Government. They condemn to death, year after


year, thousands of small merchants, elerks, home-
makers and other good citizens. They take their
livelihood away to fill the pockets of those already
colossally rich. And the poor man without a liveli-
hood is a candidate for death, physical or moral, or
both. lie must either steal or starve, and anyway he
becomes a burden on the community, living or dead.


MAJORITY BLED FOR A FEW.


"Our famed 'Order of Society' is a system to drain
the pockets of the majority for the profit of the
treasure-hoards of a few. Who is responsible No
single individual. But the individual merchant, finan-
cier, tradesman is compelled to truckle to the system
and shelve his Christian scruples if he has any.


GOVERNMENT'S ATTITUDE.


"It is the foremost duty of the state to protest
against the aggression of the powerful, but our
Christian Governments do nothing of the kind. With
arms folded over a breast swelling with pride, the
state stands unmoved, while thousands of its citi-
zens go to destruction, while myriads of little fish
are swallowed by the big whale, called financier and
speculator. Indeed, the Christian state is the shame-
less high protector of capital's destructive practices.


THE "BATTLEFIELD OF INDUSTRY."


"Somebody called the industrial state 'the battle-
field of industry' with good reason. In the factories,
in the workshops, in the offices, in the mines, below
and above the the earth, a war to the knife is going
on without interruption and the more civilized the
country, the bloodier.
"The lust for profit begrudges men and women
rest by day and night; let them fall into the ma-
chinery and be killed, if they cannot stand upright
any longer. And as to undermining their health, that
is the employer's concern.
"The system of compensation as it exists in facto.
ries and in mines, particularly, is founded on tho
cheapness of human life and flesh. Statisticians show
that the modern workman lives a great deal better
than his predecessor, that he even aspires to luxuries,
but such reflections are cruel lies when we think of
the prevailing misery existing in workmen's quar.
ters.
"Just as long as the wages of the majority do not
exceed by a considerable percentage, the cost of life's
necessities-the most absolutely necessary of the
necessities-just as long as men and women are paid
less than is essential for right living; just as long
as the babies of workmen must do without a moth.
er's care for the greater part of the day, because the
women must engage in factory work to eke out the
meager wages of the 'provider of the family, just as
long as the working classes are living from hand to
mouth, while, those experiencing illness or accident
are immediately plunged in the lowest depths of mis-


ery by the Increased expense; just as low as the
Christian society deal out charity so-called to the
aompaniment of espionage and similar heartless
pradioes; just as long remains Christian society a
destroyer of family life, a murderer of mcthers and
babie, a menaces to the innocent, honest girls. And
just as long as these things are possible the Chris-
tian world must rest under the indictment of being
a wholesale murderer.


THE SYSTEM OF WHOLESALE LIES.


"Those aiding, abetting and defending this nefari-
ous system of man's slaughter, have they never been
told the eternal truth, 'Thou shalt not lie.O Of course,
they know, but they do lie and, infamous blasphem.
ors that they are, often garnish their lie with pious
words.
"They know it is wrong to lie, and know it is
wrong to steal. Yet they do steal, not openly-unless
they ar very big Inanciers-and not so as to run
the danger of arrest for flagrant disregard of the
law, but their actions are no less thefts, downright
thefts, even if they pass as 'business usages' and
harmless maneuvers, such as adulteration, etc.


RICH STEAL MORE THAN POOR.


"According to the police records, the poor are
great thieves. It is a lie. The poor, though there are
a hundred times more poor than rich-d not commit
one-tenth of the crimes against property that may
justly be laid at the doors of the well-to-do.
"Show me the big financier, the bulk of whose
money was acquired honestly! Show me the merchant
princes and trust managers who deal Justly at all
limes, with their customers and employee. Show me
the great factory owner who does not practice adul-
teration.
"Show me the great land owners and speculators
in real estate who can say that the ground and plots
he controls were honestly, or even lawfully, acquired.


ROCKEFELLER.


"Hllow did Rockefeller squire his enormous for-
tune-Rockefeller, upon whom all servants of Mam-
mon, priests and pastors included, look with rever-
ence as the biggest of them all?


CHRISTIAN AND HEATHEN.


"When a heathen steals, why he is a thief? When
a Christian steals, he still believes himself an honest
man. The system of gains and profits under which
he works is so complicated that he must steal even
when he intends to be honest; that he steals without
knowing he commits an unjust act, that stealing
becomes his 'good right.'
"It was the Christian privilege to obliterate the
distinction between right and wrong-in favor of the
moneybags.."
In the following chapters the reverend gentle-
man flays the Christian nations on account of their
immorality. His aoocusations could not, with propri-
ety, be printed in a family newspaper.


Fire Insurance Discussed


Jacksonville, Fla., April 2, 1006.
Editor The SUN:
In your issue of March 31, 1906, under heading
"Startling Florida Figures," you print, among other
data, the receipts and losses in the State during
1905 by fire insurance companies, as follows:
Premiums received ........ $1,577,915.81
Losses paid ................. 660,941.15
and then you state the balance in favor of the com-
panies as $907,0974.68.
These figures (incorrect according to the printed
statement issued by State Trensurer Knott) are as
misleading as they are startling, and therefore
should not be allowed to stand when the true condi.
tion of affairs is so easily obtainable. To accept
your statement as it is, one would be misled as
badly as if I were to determine your profits by de-
ducting from your gross receipts only the cost of
the paper upon which The Sun is printed.
You do not consider at all the fact that, in addi-
tion to their losses, the companies incur very large
expenses for oommissions, taxes, etc. By reference
to the record of these companies that I send you for
your information, it will be msen that the cost of
doing businese-that is, the flat expense, excluding
losea, will run anywhere between 32 and 45 per cent.
For the purpoem of this article I have taken the
expense rate of every company doing a fire insu-


rance business in this State, and I find the aver-
age expense ratio of every company to be .3756. If
you will deduct, therefore, .3750 per cent from the
receipts you will find that, according to your figures,
the results in Florida in 1905 were as follows:
Premiums received ........ .$1,577.915.81
Losses paid ........669,941.15
Expenses ....... 592,665.17- 1,262,606.32


Apparent profit


...... $ 315,300.47


But this is not all. These companies have yet to
pay over to the State 2 per cent of their gross re-
ceipts, or $31,558.30 in addition to an unpaid in-
curred losses, which may be some $50,000 more. And
1906 was an exceptionally good year.
Perhaps the best idea of the profits (?) of the
fire insurance companies on Florida business may
be obtained by a consideration of their actual expe-
rience in Florida for the last five years, which, ac-
cording to the reports of the State Treasurer, in
as follows: Premiums received, $6,550,770.57;
losses $7,807,704.45; expenses, $2,450,338.97.
It will be seen, therefore, that for the past five
years the fire insurance companies have paid out on
Florida business $3,513,362.85 more than they have
received. If all future years should be as food
for them as 1905, it will take more than fifteen


years for the companies to play even on their losses
within the last five years.
It is not my purpose to discuss the advocacy of
the State's going into the fire insurance business,
but a study of ate figures by State officials may
be "startling" need, particularly in view of the
fact that tbe State itself has received from these
company in the last three years for loes on prop-
erties owned by the State more than the premiums
paid by the State on its property during the same
period.
But I am digressing. I only intended to et you
straight and show you that loses" are not the eoly
deductions to be considered in arriving at the profit
of the fire insurance business. Yours truly,
LOUIS Z. AYA.
(Nons-In printing the figures showing the re-
ceipts and losses of the fire insurance companies and
the balance in their favor, which, by the way,
through error in adding totals was about $8600
less than stated, no attempt was made to show
that this balance was a profit to the companies, and
the publication was made with no intent to mislead,
but simply to tell the extent of the business in this
State. We are pleaded to print the statement of Mr.
Baya, because of the information on the subject
from the viewpoint of the st of eura man.-Ed SUW.)












THE SUN


Aprr 79 196


The Czar' s Spy Chevalier Wila wLe Queux


My fellow-traveler from Stockholm,
whb r eted a firm of papermakers
iton _ambg, and who paid an manual
vlslt to AbW and ors, ated as
* my glde around the own, while I
awitid the Information from the hum-
bled Oh of Pollce. My German friend
poted out to me how, sinoe Russia
laced her hand upon Finland, progress
Seen arrested, and certainly plain
Swere on every hand. There
was growing discontent everywhere, for
many of the newspapers had recently
beta suppressed and the remainder were
un4er a severe, censorship! agriculture
had already decreased, and many of the
cotton-spinning and sawmills were silent
and deserted. The exploitation of those
gigantic forests from which millions of
S trmnk were floated down to the sea an-
nually had now been suspended, the
great landowners were deserting the
country, and there was silence and de.
pression everywhere. Finland had been
separated for economic purposes from
th more eivilised countries, and bound
to the poverty-stricken, artificially iso-
lated and oppressed Russia. The double-
headed eagle was everywhere, and the
people sat silent and brooding beneath
its black shadow.
"There will be an uprising here before
long," declared the German confidentially
as we were taking tea one day on the
wooden balcony of the hotel where the
sea and the low-lying islands stretched
out before us in the pale yellow of the
autumn sundown. "The people will re-
volt, as they did in Poland. The Fin.
nish Government can only appeal to the
Czar through the Governor-General, and
one can easily imagine that their sug-
gestions never reach the Emperor. It is
said here that the harsher and more cor-
rUpt the official, the greater honor does
he receive from Petersburg. But trouble
is brewing for Russia," he added. "A
very serious trouble-depend upon it."
I looked upon the gray dismal scene,
the empty port, the silent quay, the dark
line of gloomy pine forest away beyond
the town, the broken coast and the wide
expanse of water glittering in the north-
ern sunset. Yes. The very silence
seemed to forbode evil and mystery.
Truly what I saw of Finland impressed
me even more than what I had witnessed
in the far-off eastern provinces of Eur-
opean Russia.
My object, however, was not to inquire
into the internal condition of Finland,
or of her resentment of her powerful
conqueror. I was there to find that un-
fortunate girl who had written so
strangely to her old school friend and
whose portrait had, for some hidden
reason, been destroyed.
On the morning of the third day after
my arrival at Abo, while sitting on the
hotel veranda reading an old copy of the
Paris Journal, many portions, of which
hd been "blacked out" by the censor,
the Chief of Police. in his dark green
uniform, entered and saluted before me.
"Your Excellency, may 1 beo permitted
to speak with you in private?'
"Oertainly," I responded, rising and
conducting him to my bedroom, where I
closed the door, invited him to a seat,
and myself sat upon the edge of the bad.
"I have made various inquiries," he
said, "and I think I have found the lady
your Excellency is seeking. My infor-
mation, however, must be furnished to
you in strictest confidence," he added.
"because there are reasons why I should
withhold her whereabouts from you."
"What do you mean ?" I inquired.
"What reasons ?"
"Well-the lady is living in Finland
In secret."
"Then she is alive!" I exclaimed
quickly. "I thought she was dead."
"To the world she is dead," responded
Michael Boranski, stroking his red
beard. "For that reason the informa-
tion I give you must be treated as con-
fidential."
"Why should she be in hiding? Sithe
is guilty of no offense-Is she ?"
The man shrugged his shoulders, but
did not reply.
"And this Baron Oberg? You tell me
nothing of him," I said with dissatisfac-
tUon


"How can I when I know nothing, Ex-
celleny?" was his response.
I felt certain that the fellow was not
speaking the truth, for I had noticed his
surprise when I bad fist uttered the
mysterious nobleman's name.
"As I have already said, Excellency,
I am desirous of atoning for my insult,
and will serve you in every manner I
can. For that reason I had sought news
of the young English lady-the Made-
moiselle Heath."
"But you have all foreigners reis-
tered in your books," I said. "The
search was surely not a difficult one. I
know your police methods in Russia too
well," I laughed.
"No, the lady was not registered he
said. "There was a reason.
"Why?"
"I have told you, Excellency. She is
in hiding."
"Where?"
"I regret that much as I desire, I dare
not appear to have any connection with
your quest. But I will direct you. In-
deed, I will give you instructions to a
second person to take you to her."
"Is she is Abo?"
"No. Away in the country. If your
Excellency will be down at the end of
the quay to-morrow at noon you will
find a carriage in waiting, and the driver
will have full instructions how to take
you to her and how to act. Follow his
directions implicitly, for he is a man I
can trust."
"To-morrowl" I cried anxiously. "Why
not to-day? I am ready to go at any
moment."
The Chief of Police remained thought-
ful for a few moments, then said-
"Well, if I can find the man, you
might go to-day. Yet it is a long way,
and Iou would not return before to-mor-
row.-
"The roads are safe, I suppose? I
don't mind driving in the night."
The official glanced at the clock, and
rising exclaimed-
"Very well, I will send for the man.
If we find him, then the carriage will be
at the same spot at the eastern end of
the quay in two hours."
"At noon. Very well. I shall keep
the appointment."
"And after seeing her, you will of
course keep your promise of secrecy re-
garding our little misunderstanding?"
he asked anxiously.
"I have already given my word," was
the response; and the man bowed and
left, much, I think, to the surprise of
the hotel proprietor and his staff. It
was an unusual thing for such a high
official as the Chief of Police to visit
one of their guests in person. If he de-
sired to interview any of them, he com-
manded them to attend at his office, or
they were escorted there by his gray-
coated agents.
The day was cold, with a biting wind
from the icy north, when after a hasty
luncheon I put on my overcoat and
strolled along the deserted quay where
I lounged at the further end, watching
the approach of a great pontoon of pine
logs that had apparently floated out of
one of the rivers and was now being
navigated to the port by four men who
seemed every moment in imminent dan-
ger of being washed off the raft into the
sea as the waves broke over and drenched
them. They had, however, lashed them-
selves to their raft, I saw, and now
slowly piloted the great floating plat-
form toward the quay.
I think I must have waited half an
hour, when my attention was suddenly
attracted by the rattle of wheels over the
stones, and turning I saw an old closed
carriage -drawn by three horses abreast,
with bells upon the harness, approach-
ing me rapidly. When it drew up, the
driver, a burly-looking fair-headed Finn
in a huge sheepskin overcoat, motioned
me to enter, urging in broken Russian-
"Quickly, Excellency ---quickly! -you
must not be seen!"
And then the instant I was seated.
and before I could close the door, the
horsnes plungedl forward and we were
tearing at full gallop out of the town.
Fot five miles or so we skirted the sea
along a level, well-made road through


a barren wind-swept country whence the
meager harvest Mad already been gar-
nere There were no villages. All
around was a houseless land, rolling
miles of brown and green, broken and
checkered by bits of forest and clumps
of dark melancholy pines. The road ran
ever and anon right down to where the
cold, green waves broke upon the rooky
shore. In a few weeks that coast would
be iebound and now-oovered, sad then
the silence of the God-forsaken country
would be complete.
After five miles or so, the driver pulled
up and descended to readjust his harness,
whereupon I got out and asked him in
the best Russian I could command:
"Where are we going?"
"To Nystad."
"How far is that?"
"Sixty-eight," was his reply.
I took him to imply kilometers, as be-
ing a Finn, he would not speak of versts.
"The Chief of Police has given you
directions ?" I asked.
"His high Excellency has told me ex-
actly what to do," was the man's answer,
as he took out his huge wooden pipe and
filled it. "You wish to see the young
lady?"
"Yes," I answered, "to first see her,
and I do not know whether it will be
necessary for me to mnake myself known.
to her. Where is she?"
"Beyond Nystad," was his vague an-
swer with a wave of his big fat hand in
the direction of the dark pine forest
that stretched before us. "We shall be
there about an hour after sundown."
Then I re-entered the stuffy old con-
veyance that rocket and rolled as we
dashed away over the uneven forest road,
and sat wondering to what manner of
place I was being conducted.
Elma Heath was in hiding. Why? 1
recollected her curious letter and re-
membered every word of it. She wished
Hornby to know that she had never re-
vealed her secret. What secret, I won-
derea ?
I lit an abominable cigar, and tried to
smoke, but I was too filled with anxiety,
too bewildered by the maze of mystery
in which I now found myself. Two
hours later we pulled up before a long
log-built post-house just beyond a small
town in a hollow that faced the sea, and
I alighted to watch the steaming horses
being replaced by a trio of fresh ones.
The place was Dadendal, I was informed,
and the proprietor of the place, when I
entered and tossed off a liqueur-glass
of cognac, pointed out to me a row of
granite buildings fallen much to decay
as the ancient convent.
Then, resuming our journey, the short
day quickly drew to a close, the sun
sank yellow and watery over the tower-
ing pines through which we went mile
after mile. a dense, interminable forest
wnerein the wolves lurked in winter,
often rendering the road dangerous.
The temperature fell, and it froze
again. Through the window in front I
could see the big Finn driver throwing
his arms across his shoulders to promote
circulation, in the same manner as does
the London "cabby."
When night drew on we changed horses
again at a small, dirty post-house in the
forest at the edge of a lake, and then
pushed forward again, although it was
already long past the hour at which he
had said, we should arrive.
Time passed slowly in the darkness,
for we had no light, and the horses
seemed to find their way by instinct.
The rolling of the lumbering old vehicle
after six hours had rendered me sleepy,
I think, for I recollect closing my eyes
and conjuring up that strange scene on
board the Lola.
Indeed, I suppose I must have slept,
for I was awakened by a light shining
into my face and the driver shaking me
by the shoulder. When I roused myself
and, naturally, inquired the reason, he
placed his finger mysteriously upon my
lips, saying:
"Hush. your high nobility, hush!
Come with me. But make no noise.
If we are discovered, it means death for
us-death. Come, live me your hand.
Slowly. Tread softly. See, her is the


boat. I will get in first. We shall not
be heard upon the water. So."
And the fellow led me, halfedared,
down to the bank of a broad, dark river
which I could just distinguish-he led
me to an unknown bourne.


CHAPTER XI.


THE CASTLE OF TERRBOR.


The big Finn had, I found, tied up his
horses, and in the heavy old boat he
rowed me down the swollen river which
ran swift and turbulent around a sudden
bend and then seemed to open out to a
great width. In the starlight I coWld
[OContinued on Fourteenth Page]


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WHICH 18 THE TRADE-MARK OF



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REAL ESTATE BROKERS


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TI WNSNOTA I0 MW


*i''.* T


In-












April 7, 1906


THE SUN


Eleventh Page


I Accuse Christian Society Lutheran Pastor Kutter


Berlin.-The Rev. Dr. Kutter, a Lutheran
pastor of wide popularity, has just published a re-
markable book full of startling facts and figures, con-
stituting a terrible indictment of Christian society
which, he says, is habitually guilty of acts no heath-
en would ever think of committing against his fel-
low man. Here follow some telling extracts from
the volume, which is causing considerable stir in
Government circles and in the. churches:
MODERN ORDER OF SOCIETY ATTACKED.
"The modern order of society is a parody on
justice and equity; reduce your demands for honest
treatment to ever so low a level, the Christian
society of today will not grant them, on the contrary,
it will cover you with scorn for asking justice at its
hands.
THE RULE OF MONEY.
"And the sway of money is such as no heathen
emperor, or financier, ever so much given to violence,
dreamed of imposing upon the people.
"Christian society is not only a robber and plun-
derer, by the capitalistic order of things established,
it is a home-destroyer, where it should be a homeo-
maker. Who counts the names of persons, the tribes,
the nations annihilated, driven from home and set-
tlements, robbed of their lands, their fisheries, for
the sake of money?
"Christian society forces the small man to under-
feed, to under-clothe, to live in inadequate quar-
ters. It despises him) pnd derides manual labor as
unfit for the intellectual. It does this and a thousand
more things equally un-Christian, equally inpolitic
and calls it 'the divine order of things,' propping
up the blasphemous assertion by religious and philo-
sophical commonplaces. And the more shameless
hypocrites tell of 'unalterable laws' that compel soci-
ety to act thus meanly and unjustly 'because it's
the will of God, who made the rich and who made
the poor.'
CHRISTIAN SOCIETY MURDERS.
"Christian society is a murderer on a more exten-
siv scale than any heathen conqueror. Our factory
system and a hundred other systems of production,
coal mining, steel-making, etc., murder the poor
and downtrodden by inches, but murder them surely.
"Capitalism means death to the small man, death
by starvation, slow or rapid. The trusts, financial
rings or syndicates, whatever they are named, are
wholesale executioners of mankind, tolerated by the
Government. They condemn to death, year after


year, thousands of small merchants, clerks, home-
makers and other good citihass. They take their
livelihood away to fill the pockets of those already
colossally rich. And the poor man without a liveli-
hood is a candidate for death, physical or moral, or
both. He must either steal or starve, and anyway he
becomes a burden on the community, living or dead.
MAJORITY BLED FOR A FEW.
"Our famed 'Order of Society' is a system to drain
the pockets of the majority for the profit of the
treasure-hoards of a few. Who is responsible? No
single individual. But the individual merchant, finan-
cier, tradesman is compelled to truckle to the system
and shelve his Christian scruples if he has any.
GOVERNMENT'S ATTITUDE.
"It is the foremost duty of the state to protest
against the aggression of the powerful, but our
Christian Governments do nothing of the kind. With
arms folded over a breast swelling with pride, the
state stands unmoved, while thousands of its citi-
zens go to destruction, while myriads of little fish
are swallowed by the big whale, called financier and
speculator. Indeed, the Christian state is the shame-
less high protector of capital's destructive practicon.
THE "BATTLEFIELD OF INDUSTRY."
"Somebody called the industrial state 'the battle-
field of industry' with good reason. In the factories,
in the workshops, in the offices, in the mines, below
and above the the earth, a war to the knife is going
on without interruption and the more civilized the
country, the bloodier.
"The lust for profit begrudges men and women
rest by day and night; let them fall into the ma-
chinery and be killed, if they cannot stand upright
any longer. And as to undermining their health, that
is the employer's concern.
"The system of compensation as it exists in facto-
ries and in mines, particularly, is founded on tho
cheapness of human life and flesh. Statisticians show
that the modern workman lives a great deal better
than his predecessor, that he even aspires to luxuries,
but such reflections are cruel lies when we think of
the prevailing misery existing in workmen's quar-
ters.
"Just as long as the wages of the majority do not
exceed by a considerable percentage, the cost of life's
necessities-the most absolutely necessary of the
necessities-just as long as men and women are paid
less than is essential for right living; just as long
as the babies of workmen must do without a moth-
er's care for the greater part of the day, because the
women must engage in factory work to eke out the
meager wages of the 'provider' of the family, just as
long as the working classes are living from hand to
mouth, while. those experiencing illness or accident
are immediately plunged in the lowest depths of mis-


ery by the increased expense; just as long as the
Christian society deal out charity so-called to the
accompaniment of espionage and similar heartless
praoties; just as long remains Christian society a
destroyer of family life, a murderer of mothers and
babies, a menace to the innocent, honest girls. And
just as long as these things are possible the Chris-
tian world must rest under the indictment of being
a wholesale murderer.
THE SYSTEM OF WHOLESALE LIES.
"Those aiding, abetting and defending this nefari-
ous system of man's slaughter, have they never been
told the eternal truth, 'Thou shalt not lie.' Of course,
they know, but they do lie and, infamous blasphem-
ors that they are, often garnish their lies with pious
words.
"They know it is wrong to lie, and know it is
wrong to steal. Yet they do steal, not openly-unless
they are very big financiere-and not so as to run
the danger of arrest for flagrant disregard of the
law, but their actions are no less thefts, downright
thefts, even if they pas as business usages' and
harmless maneuvers, such as adulteration, etc.
RICH STEAL MORE THAN POOR.
"According to the police records, the poor are
great thieves. It is a lie. The poor, though there are
a hundred times more poor than rich-do not commit
one-tenth of the crimes against property that may
justly be laid at the doors of the well-to-do.
"Show me the big financier, the bulk of whose
money was acquired honestly Show me the merchant
princes and trust managers who deal justly at all
times, with thpir customers and employee. Show me
the great factory owner who does not practice adul-
teration.
"Show me the great land owners and speculators
in real estate who can say that the ground and plots
he controls were honestly, or even lawfully, acquired.
ROCKEFELLER.
"low did Rockefeller acquire his enormous for-
tune--Rookefeller, upon whom all servants of Mam-
mon, priests and pastors included, look with rever-
ence as the biggest of them allI
CHRISTIAN AND HEATHEN.
"When a heathen steals, why he is a thief? When
a Christian steals, he still believes himself an honest
man. The system of pains and profits under which
he works is so complicated that he must steal even
when he intends to be honest; that he steals without
knowing he commits an unjust act, that stealing
becomes his 'good right.'
"It was the Christian privilege to obliterate the
distinction between right and wrong-in favor of the
moneybags.."
In the following chapters the reverend gentle-
man flays the Christian nations on account of their
immorality. His accusations could not, with propri-
ety, be printed in a family newspaper.


Fire Insurance Discussed


Jacksonville, Fla., April 2, 1906.
Editor The SUN:
In your issue of March 31, 1906, under heading
"Startling Florida Figures," you print, among other
data, the receipts and losses in the State during
1905 by fire insurance companies, as follows:
Premiums received .........$1,577,915.81
Losses paid ................. 669,941.15
and then you state the balance in favor of the com-
panies as $907,974.66.
Thee figures (incorrect according to the printed
statement issued by State Tre.surer Knott) are as
misleading as they are startling, and therefore
should not be allowed to stand when the true condi-
tion of affairs is so easily obtainable. To accept
your statement as it is, one would be misled as
badly as if I were to determine your profits by de-
ducting from your gross receipts only the cost of
the paper upon which The Sun is printed.
You do not consider at all the fact that, in addi-
tion to their losses, the companies incur very large
expenses for commissions, taxes, etc. By reference
to the record of these companies that I send you for
your Information, it will be seen that the cost of
doing business-that is, the flat expense, excluding
loe0, will run anywhere between 32 and 45 per cent.
For the purpoMe of this article I have taken the
expeme rate of *my eompy doing a fire inn-


rance business in this State, and I find the aver-
age expense ratio of every company to be .3750. If
you will deduct, therefore, .3750 per cent from the
receipts you will find that, according to your figures,
the results in Florida in 1905 were as follows:
Premiums received .........$1,577.015.81
Losses paid ........ $0669,41.15
Expenses ....... 592,665.17- 1,262,606.32


Apparent profit


...... $ 315,300.47


But this is not all. These companies have yet to
pay over to the State 2 per cent of their grons re-
ceipts, or $31,558.30 in addition to any unpaid in-
curred losses, which may be some $50,000 more. And
1906 was an exceptionally good year.
Perhaps the best idea of the profits (?) of the
fire insurance companies on Florida business may
be obtained by a consideration of their actual expe.
rience in Florida for the last five years, which, ac-
cording to the reports of the State Treasurer, in
as follows: Premiums received, $6,550,770.57;
losses $7.607,794.45; expenses, $2,450,838.97.
It will be seen, therefore, that for the past five
years the Are insurance companies have paid out on
Florida business $3l,513,3U more than they have
received. If all future s sh would be as od
for them as 1906, it will ta th fifteen


years for the companies to play even on their losses
within the last five years.
It is not my purpose to discuss the advocacy of
the State's going into the fre insurance business,
but a study of these figures by State officials nay
be "startling" Indeed particularly in view of the
fact that the State itIself has received from these
companies in the last three yeas for loss on prop
erties owned by the State more than the premiums
paid by the State on its property during the atne
period.
But I am digressing. I only intended to set you
straight and show you that "losses" are not the only
deductions to be considered in arriving at the profits
of the fire insurance business. Yours truly.
LOUIS Z. BAYA.
(Novr-In printing the fgures showing the re-
ceipts and losses of the fire insurance companies and
the balance in their favor, which, by the way,
through error in adding totals was hout $8;500
less than stated, no attempt was made to show
that this balance was a profit to the companies, and
the publication was made with no intent to mislead,
but simply to tell the extent of the business in this
State. W are pleased to print the statement of Mr.
Bays, becmo of the isformaton on the subject
from the viewpoiat of the ia ram e ma.-Ed BUN.)














THE SUN


Some Matters


Set Right
[Continued from Fifth Page]
ARY OF ENGLAND, and produce the largest crop
of grain of any section of agricultural land in the
kindo It is stated by economists that it is doubt.
ful if ngland Mcold support the large population
e now s without the product of these hands.
Like other lands which sve been reclaimed, great
labor and expense has ben required. In the case of
the Fens of England, more than 800 years have
elapeed since the first effort in drainage were made.
It was not until 1820 that definite plans suMffiently
elaborate for the work required, were made by Sir
John Rennie, and 100 years then elapsed before the
sens became productive land to any great extent.
The 41f ultles encountered if gathered together in
a eopaseted form would disoonurage any but the most
sanguine temperaments, yet today these lands are
essential to the WELFARE AND PROSPERITY OF
ENGLAND. I should mention in this connection
the fact that Sir William Dugdale, who was at one
time engaged in the execution of the drains executed
la the Great Bedford level, published in 1652 a book
containing a description of the plans and work ac.
eomplished up to that date, in the reclamation of the
ps in England. In the latter part of the seven.
teeth century there was a remarkable revival of in-
terest in the improvement of the waste lands of Eng-
land and interest in drainage became so widespread
as to attract the attention of every property owner
of the kingdom. This great interest seems to have
led to the publishing of a new and revised edition
of Dugdale's work, entitled "The History of Drain-
ing and Embanking," which appeared in 1772, and
is the work from which all accounts of these stupen-
dous undertakings are drawn.
The method employed in the drainage of the Fens
is briefly as follows: The area is divided into dis-
tricts of from 6,000 to 12,000 acres, which are pro-
vided with large ditches which communicate with
sluice-ways built through the protecting dykes. Part
of the water from the ditches is discharged through
the sluices by gravity at times of low tide, while the
remainder is lifted by pumps so that the required
depth of drainage is secured. These ditches


through the more level portions have a fall of from
1'WO- SIX INCHES per mile, and in Many sec-
tions are level The water from the hills which
naturally Am into the land is literepted by
ditehes and carried in a special canal to the sea.
From the fat that the reclamation of these lands
has extended over such a great length of time, it is
impossible to form an adequate conclusion as to the
amount of money and labor that has been expended
in bringing them to their present condition.
I may be pardoned if I venture the statement
that many of the popular press accounts of the
aOhievments of drainage are overdrawn and more
highly colored than is justified by the facts at hand.
It is natural that the salutary results obtained
should impress the observer and writer and make a
much more attractive story than an account of the
difficulties and experiences which have attended the
bringing about of them results. The drainage of any
large area of land is a stupendous undertaking which
should be considered most carefully from the be-
ginning.
Since beginning this letter I have realized that
I could touch only a few of the points relating to
drainage improvements which might interest you in
the undertaking you now have on hand. None of
the works I have described have been accomplished
without the expenditure of much labor and money,
and the time required in their execution has in some
instances been long. It is no light work, yet under
tue conditions I have described it has proved to BE
ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT WHICH CAN
ENGAGE THE ATTENTION OF ANY COMMON-
WEALTH OR STATE. Sincerly yours,
0. G. ELLIOTT,
Engineer in Charge of Irrigation and Drainage In-
vestigations.
A careful consideration of the letter will cause
everyone to realize the difference between the stupen-
dous undertakings described by Mr. Elliott, which
were finally successful, and the simple problem that
confronts the people of Florida in draining the
Florida Everglades. Take up one of the other prob-
lems that he writes about, concerning the reclama-
tion of the Fens in England, a territory of 800,000
acres, almost one-third the area of the Florida Ever-
glades, a large portion of it below the tidewater
level. The water has been fenced out with dykes
and damns, great pumps have been installed and are
used constantly to pump the water into the sea, and


Naval Stores the Topic
(Continued from Third Page)


This will not be a pleasant surprise to
the "boys in the woods," who are not
accustomed to lose a half million dollars
a year, and may 80 ANNOY some of the
stockholders, that they will kick up a
row that will land the company into
liquidation or receivership.
Whenever a member of the "gum
bunch" referred to this loss of a
garly quarter of a million, he always
sugar-coated the pill with the statement
that the operators could afford to lose so
trflilg a sum as this, because the ad-
vance in the price of naval stores, which
the formation of the Export had caused,
put into tOe pockets of the operators
many times the amount lost in the Ex-
port Company.
There is no doubt whatever that the
operators received several millions more
for their output last year than they ever
did before. A simple mathematical cal-
culatiop will demonstrate the truth of
this. Spirits advanced about 9 cents a
gallon since March a year ago, and rosin
advanced in proportion, but whether this
advance was entirely due to the forma-
tion of the Naval Stores Export Com-
pany is a question which gentlemen well
informed in naval stores matters are now
asking. Without going into this ques-
tion there is no eecaping the fact that
the operators did not get the top prices
for their products. At the time turpenw
time was quoted in Savannah at 79 cents,
under the agreement made between the
Export Company and the operators
spirits should have brought 79 cents in
Jaksonville, BUT NO ONE RkusiVKD
THIS PRICE EXCEPT J. P. Williams
Co., who had a written contract.
The Naval Stores Export Company
treated the price of 79 cents as a fic-
titious one, and notified the operators
that it was necessary to get the price
down to where the consumers would buy.
When settlement was made with the
operators who had shipped their prod-
ucts to Jacksonville expecting to get
this fancy price. IT WAS ON THE
BASIS OF 00 CENTS FOR SPIRITS.
If the agremsmt had been carried out to
the letter and ttlemet had bees made


THE DAY OF ARRIVAL, the operators
would have been in pocket SEVERAL
MILLIONS MORE. This is a grievance
which will no doubt be aired at the forth-
coming stockholders' meeting. The
operators will ask "Where are those
profits we expected to get?"
One of the most prominent facts in
connection with the whole naval stores
situation is the change that has taken
place in naval stores circles in Jackson-
ville within the last five months. Be.
fore the publication of THE SUN'S
"gum" story last December, the Jack-
sonville "gum bunch" dominated the
naval stores situation. The few gentle-
men who controlled the destinies of the
Consolidated Naval Stores Company
were looked upon with awe and looked
up to with reverence by the boys in the
woods. BUT NOW ALL THIS IS
CHANGED. These gentlemen are occu-
pying a very small place in the minds of
the naval stores men. It is now well
known that the Naval Stores Com-
pany, which used to handle about 60 per
Cent of the Florida product, now handles
less than 30 per cent, and that the busi,
nes of the Barnes-Jessop Company has
increased 80 per cent since last Decem.
ber. Then the Consolidated Naval Stores
Company did a large business in Pen-
aseols. Mr. J. L. launders, who was
one of its managers there, has withdrawn
from this company and has organized a
half-million-dollar stock company for
himself, and has naturally taken away
many of the customers of the Consol i
dated. The Peninsular Naval Stores
Company of Tampa, which is considered
a Shotter company, has also undoubtedly
taken much business away from the
Consolidated. The West, Flynn & Har-
ris Company of this city has also en-
joyed a very large increase in its busi-
ness since last December. The Jackson-
ville Naval Stores Company, which is
known as a Shotter company, has
largely increased its business.
It is reported that the Consolidated
Naval Stores Compay has been made to
walk the plank by Mr. Shotter and
THAT THEY ARE NO LONGER ABLE
TO PROMISE their eatomem the 8a.


vannah price for naval stores consigned
to them at Jacksonville. It (the Con-
solidated) is compelled to accept the
price that Shotter offers them because
they signed an agreement to TURN
OVER THEIR RECEIPTS TO SHOT-
TER. This has given other factors in
Jacksonville an opportunity to bring
Jacksonville to the front as a naval
stores market and save the situation.
One of those factors has, ever since last
December, guaranteed to its customers
Savannah prices at Jacksonville and has
announced its determination to continue
to do so. As a means of making good
this promise this factoring house has
encouraged the formation of selling com-
panies in Jacksonville. One of these
companies is composed of Mr. E. C. Pat-
terson and Mr. John Martin, who were
respectively, manager of the Domestic
and Foreign Departments of the Naval
Stores Export Company; another is man-
aged by Mr. Krauss and Mr. Henry El-
son, both of whom have experience nec-
essary to achieve success.
By means of these companies the Jack-
sonville factors who are free from Shot-
ter will be enabled to market their na-
val stores receipts satisfactorily, and
thus be able to keep up the prices AND
SAVE THE NAVAL STORES BUSI-
NESS OF JACKSONVILLE FROM
GOING TO SAVANNAH. This condi-
tion of affairs amply demonstrates that
Jacksonville HAS NOT LOST ITS NA-
VAL STORES BUSINESS, but on the
contrary. the business here has largely
recovered from the blow inflicted on it
by the agreement with Shotter. The
only change is that NEW PEOPLE are
prominent in naval stores affairs-that
instead of the Consolidated crowd dom-l.
nation the situation OTHER PEOPLE
HAVE FrrErtPsi IN AND WRESTED
THIS DOMINION FROM THEM.
The deliberations of the stockholders
of the Naval Stores Export Company at
its first annual meeting will be of great
interest to the people of this State. Care-
fully censored reports will no doubt be
sent out and published in the conserva-
tive journals. The SUN will endeavor
to find out WHAT REALLY DID HAP.
PEN and will print it just as it hap-
pened. This time THE SUN may not be
able to finad out ALL THAT HAP-
PENED, but THE SUN generally finds
out thinl*


April 7, 1906


note that in Mr. Elliott's opinion it would be very
difficult for the people of Great Britain to get along
without the grain that is produced upon this re.
claimed land and that the Eglish people owe much
of their present prosperity and happiness to this one
enterprise that has proven such a great blessing to
them.
The problem that confronts us is very different.
The land, much of it 22 feet above sea level and with
the water on top of that--a plain matter of digging
ditches or channels through which the water may
flow unobstructed to the sea-no pumping to be
done. The character of digging is of the simplest
kind. Most of the excavations will be through pure
muck that can be almost as easily handled with a
uredge as could a pail of water be handled by a man
in bailing out a lighter.
You will remember that the Times-Union advo.
cated using the Indian War Claims Fund for the pur.
pose of draining the Florida Everglades. It also,
after calling attention editorially to the approval
by President Roosevelt of the Act authorizing the
Agricultural Department to drain, reclaim and irri-
. gate lands in the West, suggested that some of the
money be diverted from the West to the purpose of
reclaiming the wet lands in Florida that were suita-
ble to the production of sugarcane. The Department.
of Agriculture is willing and anxious to aid in the
reclamation of the Florida Everglades. Only two
weeks ago THE SUN printed a letter written to me
by the Hon. James Wilson, Secretary of Agriculture,
in which he said that he would do anything he could.
That, coupled with the letter here printed, from Mr.
C. G. Elliott, the engineer in charge of that branch
of the Department of Agriculture which does the
work of draining and reclaiming and irrigating lands
in the United States, should indicate clearly to your
mind that what the Times-Union pleaded for then
has now become a reality, but now that help is with-
in reach it opposes the project, What has come
over the spirit that controls that newspaper that it
should now oppose what it advocated then? The
people should not be trifled with. THE PEOPLE
WILL NOT PERMIT THEMSELVES TO BE TRI-
FLED WITH if they are only aware of the fact that
an attempt of that kind is being made. I leave
tis matter with them. The Everglades belong to
them. Half a million of acres of it will produce a
crop annually more valuable than the present an-
nual assessment of all the real and personal property
in the State.


Heavy Sentences for
Anti-Militarists
Paris.-The head of the anti-milita-
rists, Herve, was sentenced to four years'
imprisonment, three others to three, one
to two years, three to fifteen months,
six to one year, and ten to six months'
imprisonment, besides a fine of 100
francs each. These sentences promise
to embarrass the Government much
longer than it cares to, and the excite-
ment in public and press, particularly
workingmen's circles, is taking a dan-
gerous turn. The sentence is pretty
generally regarded "as preposterously
inane." "I protest against so stupid
a sentence," cried a hundred voices
when the Judge delivered same. The
State Attorney who procured it through
his sentimental appeal to the patriotic
feeling of the jurors, is roundly abused
and charged with deliberate falsehoods,
to-wit: He said that no French army
officer had ever commanded his troops
to fire upon laborers, again that there
was no class distinction in France; third,
that anti-militarism was a crime against
the State, and that opposition against
the army existed only in a few minor
States, such as Spain, Holland and
Switzerland.
The following passages in the anti-
militarists' manifesto prompted the sen-
tence: "When as soldiers you are ordered
to shoot upon men, women and children
fighting for bread-shoot, but not your
brethren, but the dastards who order
you. When ordered to march to defend
the money-bags at home against the
monet-bags on the other side of the
frontier-do not march, for you are
asked to fight against your brethren and
Iour own better interests. Every war
s a crime. The order to go to war
ought to be responded to by a general
strike and insurrection.
"On My 1 1906, the workmen of the
world will arrange a demonstration to
show that they are no longer willing to
work more than eight hours a day. The
army will be ordered to drown this man-
ifesttion in the blood of workmen. Sol-
diers of France, workmen, refuse to play
policeman and spy, refuse to carry arms
asinst your brethren now, on May 1,
ad forevnr:.


Twelfth Page











April 7, 1906


THE SUN


Thirteenth Page


Who and What We Are

By R. L. HARPER, Organizer 1. T. U.


In my endeavors to be intelligently
understood by the readers of THE SUN
in "Some Iats in the Garret," and in
order that there should not be even "too
much of a good thing" dished up to you
intelligent Floridians, I left for this arti-
ele the subject, "Who and What We
Are."
Some of those who would gladly be-
hold-and are putting forth strenuous
efforts to make it possible-the disso-
lution of labor unions, would convey to
you the information that such organi-
zations merit your profoundest condem-
nation, but the intelligent, observant and
fair-minded people of the civilized world
are fast awakening to the realization
of the object, intention and rights of
the laboring element and their unions,
and though not many years ago in Eng-
land there was an effort to suppress
trades and confederation of laborers, and
many of them were actually indicted
for criminal conspiracy, as being perni-
cious and dangerous to the best interests
of society, still by a wise, proper and
conservative course of action we are fast
ingratiating ourselves into the confi-
dences and good wishes of our fellow-
men of all classes, as they begin to un-
derstand that our organizations are for
self-protection and self-control, and that
our councils are characterized 'by mod-
eration, caution, legal and reasonable de-
mands, and, in addition, our intentions
are perverted if it is thought that we
are in any way antagonistic to capital.
We are its safeguards; labor and capi-
tal are mutually dependent one upon
another; their confidence should like-
wise be mutual; their intercourse open
and honorable; their wants free from
oppression, tyranny, unfairness or exac-
tions; the demands and rights of each
should always be entitled to a patient,
respectful and non-discriminating hear-
ing at the hands of the other. For an
arbitrary interference with an unjust
regard of the privileges of another, nec-
essarily produces a want of observance
and a desire to resist the encroachments
upon the freedom of the other. There
is no agency that has ever so success-
fully averted conflicts and disruptions
between labor and capital as the con-
servatism, good judgment, rightful and
moderate demands that have emanated
from just and fair, yet firm and decisive,
labor councils.
In this era of refinement, enlighten-
ment and civilization, it is a matter of
no little surprise how any one can con-
tend that trade organizations or unions
among the toiling people of our country
are objectionable and dangerous in their
tendencies, when manifestly they are and
have been productive of morality, intel-
ligence and a personal pride among mem-
bers thereof that creates a desire for
self-elevation and advancement. Self-
protection and self-control, for which we
strive, necessarily begets sobriety, integ-
rity, moral and Intellectual development
among us, that is now receiving the
plaudits and encouragement of observant
and non-partisan men. The happiness
and ultimate success and prosperity of
a union is the aggregate prosperity of
its individuals. "The best part of a
man's education is that which he ac-
quires himself." The very discussion
of various subjects among ourselves In
our meetings is most beneficial to uL.
We are enabled to more intelligently
consider and determine questions that
pertain to our welfare. Our Information
Is thereby increased, our intellect bright-
ened, our comprehension broadened.
The question of the advancement and
betterment of the tolling assets is in
no aspect a purely local one. The wage-
worker, who, by his own brawny arm
and physical powers, supports himself
and family, is not known alone to any
one or particular locality. He is every-
where upon the face of this broad land.
He knows no North, no South. "FProm
the bleak coasts of Massachusetts to
where the placid waters of the blue Pa-
cific kissle the golden shores of Califorali
he can be found cheerfully, yet oeastim-
ously toiling for loved one dependent


upon him for maluatennoe and support.
We belong to no faction or sect. We
are free and liberty-loving oitizns of
the grandest government under the broad
canopy of God's skies, "the land of th0e
free and the home of the branv." We
are true and loyal Americanqt we are
proud of our eltizenship, our laws aid
our Constitution, and wage war ONLY
IN. DEFENSE of liberty. We breathe
the same air of freedom and liberty, and
live under the same national flag, as
other Americans; a flag that waves tri-
umphantly in our midst, and "kisses
with its silken folds the genial breezes
of our Southern clime." We want only
the privileges and immunities accorded
to other citizens of this great republic-
protection and unrestrained enjoyn.ent
of this liberty and their rights.
How can it be said that when we band
together to assist each other in climb-
ing life's rugged hill, to lighten the bur-
den allotted to all mortality, that we
are selfish, exacting and dangerous in
our organizations to society and our
country ?
When you are informed that trade
unions are a band of "cut-throats,
thieves and pirates, seeking only the
spoils of a rotten political faction," as
has been charged against the Typograph-


lcal Union of Jacksonville by a paper
aganlast which we have raised never a
hand-simply let alone, believing that
fair-minded men-if perchance anyone
saw the paper at all-would attribute
the rantankerous rating to a bilious
liver of its editor-you may safely sur-
mise that organized labor has discov-
ered an enemy and drawn away his mask
long before the public is aware that such
a person is in existence.
We stand now, as we have ever
stood-for justice and right. We con-
demn no man whose lack of knowledge
of conditions has pitted his stock in
trade against not only our unions, but
his own best interests; for well we know
that even among our own membership
there are those who see only the surface
and delve not into the core for the seed
from which the trade union sprung; well
we know that the exactions of capital
in this day of "grind and gold" leaves
but few of us sufficiently clear-minded
at the close of a day's work to study
out the cause and effect of any eco-
nomic question-and if we, who have so
gained a reduction in hours of toil that
we can get acquainted with our families
in the leisure hours, find scarcely the
time to learn and fully understand the
many plans for our undoing, pray tell


me how men who are worked long hours
and under unfavorable conditions are to
learn that he who seeks to keep him out
and away from the trade union is his
enemy-his bitterest foe, his betrayer
into bondage, the pilferer of/ his every
right as an American?
To condemn a workman for his igno-
rance of these potent truths is equiva-
lent to an acknowledgment of ignorance
on your own part; but bear you well in
mind that not all the men who are non-
unionists are ignorant. A great many
are in the employ of professional strike-
breaking concerns, are professional
strike-breakers for the greater profits
thereby obtainable, and, like the men
who give them employment, are camp-
ing on the trail of the almighty dol-
lar-too selfish to see justices too grasp-
ing to recognize the rights of others.
The printers' organisation in Jackson-
ville has not been infallible. It has
made mistakes-and serious ones; it has
done some things that, after mature
thought, showed a lack of proper con-
sideration of the rights of others. But
whatever our errors, they were them of
the head and not of the heart, and none
have stood readier to rectify mistakes
than the Typographical Union of Jack-
sonville,







4,


ISO


Pauatmenth Pare


THE SUN


w :"~ w"Boww*


ApriI:7,!1906


-Yes, I have already been told," was
her answer with a strong accent, as we
stood in that small, bare stone room, a
emi-cirsalar chamber in the tower, once
perhaps a prion. "But are you not
frald to veantur her n" she asked.
, "W.0--eause no strangers are per-


A


rue Tonic m.

Rich, tissue- forming, blood making
properties will be found in

i tALUSER-BUSCH,


The Czar's.Spy
(Continued from Tenth Page)
distin mlsh that it strtohed gray nd
le f to a distan, and that the opposite
bank was fringed with pine.
a"Whre are we going?" I asked my
gude in a low vole. But he only whis.
"R ailt Ixolky Remain patient
a 7i !8WowWo wl- t young ftliak.
"" Ijt I bthe boat, while he allowed
i'trhuil with the eaumt, stein it
with e great heavy oar. Th rir
suddmly narrowed again, with high
pines on either bak, a silent, lonesome
eiah, perhaps indeed one of the lone-
Hlis pk a wil Surope. Once the dia-
ma lhwl of a wolf sounded lose to
en we pamssd, but my guide made no
remark.
AfMt nearly a mill, the team again
Md- out into a broad lake where, in
tdistan, I saw rising sheer and high
from the water, a long square building
of three stories, with a tall round tower
at on corner-an old medieval castle it
seemed to be. From one of the small
wiadows of the tower, as we came into
view of it, a light was shining upon the
water, and my guide seeing it, grunted
in satisfaction. It had undoubtedly
been placed there as signal.
With great caution we approached the
place, k-ping in the deeps a ow of the
bank until we came eatly opposite the
fanklng-tower. In the lighted window
1 datinetly saw a figure of someone ap-
pear for a moment, and then my guide
struck a match and held it in his fin-
gers until it was wholly consumed.
Almost instantly the light was ex-
tinguished, and then, after waiting five
minute or so, he pulled straight across
the lake to the high, dark tower that
descended into the water. The place was
as grim and ilaent o any I had ever
been, an impra' stronghold of the
days before li N were Invented, the
fbrtrea of some feudl prince or count
who ad probably held the surrounding
Muntry ai tn dm
I put my hand against the black,
slimy wall to prevent the boat bumping,
pnd then distinguished just beyond me
4 small wooden ledge and half a dozen
steps which led up to a low arched door.
The latter had opened noiselesly, and
the dark figure of a woman stood peer.
Wng forth,
My guide uttered some reassuring
word in Finnish in a low half-whisper,
and then slowly pushed the boat along
to the ledge, ayi
"Your high nobility may disembark.
There is at present no danger."
I rose, gripped a big rusty chain to
steady myself, and climbed into the nar-
vow doorway in the ponderous wall,
whee I found myself In the darkness
beside the female who had apparently
been expecting our arrival and watching
aour signal.
Without a word she led me through
a short paUae, and then, striking a
match, lit a big old-fashioned lantern.
As the light fell upon her features I
taw they were thin and hard, with deep-
set eyes and a stray wisp of silver across
her wrinkled brow. Around her head
was a kind of hood of the same stuff as
her dress, a black, coare woolen, while
around her neck was a broad linen col-
!ar. In an instant I recognised that ashe
was a member of some religious order,
iome minor order perhaps, with whoe
habit we, in Italy, were not acquainted.
The thin, ascetice countenance was
that of a woman of strong character, and
hker funereal habit seemed much too
large for her stunted, shrunken figure.
"'The sister speaks FPaeh?" I has-
arded in that language, knowing that in
tnoet convents throughout Europe French
is known.
"Out, m'sieur," was her answer. "And
a leetle Engleesh, too-a ve-ry leetle,"
she smiled.
"You know why I am here?" I said,
ratiid that at least one person in that
lomooe country could speak my own


Sold by all Druggists and Grocen.


Prepared by
Anheaser-Busch Brewind Ass'n
St. Louai, U. S.A.


F '1


mitted here, you know. If your presence
here was discovered you would not leave
this place alive-so I warn you."
"I am prepared to risk that," I said,
smiling; at the same time my hand in-
stinctively sought my hip-pocket to as-
certain that my weapon was safe. "I
wish to see Mis Elma Heath."
The old nun nodded, fumbling with her
lantern. I glanced at my watch and
found that it was already two o'clock in
the morning.
"Remember that if you are discovered
here you exonerate me from all blame?"
she maid, raising her head and peering
into my face with her keen gray eyes.
"By admitting you I am betraying my
trust, and that I should not have done
were it not compulsory."
"Compulsoryl How ?"
"The order of the Chief of Police.
kven here, we cannot afford to offend
him."
So the fellow Boranski had really kept
faith with me, and at his order the
closed door of the convent had been
opened.
"Of course not," I answered. "Rus-
sian officialdom is all-powerful in Fin-
land nowadays. But where is the lady?"
"You are still prepared to risk your
liberty and life?" she asked in a hoarse
voice, full of grim meaning.
"I am," I said. "Lead me to her."
"And when you see her you will make
no effort to speak with her? Promise
me that."
"Ah, Sisterl" I cried. "You are ask-
ing too great a sacrifice of me. I come
here from England, nay, from Italy in
search of her, to question her regarding
a strange mystery and to learn the truth.
Surely I may he permitted to speak with
her
"You wish to learn the truth, sir I"
remarked the woman. "I thought you
were her lover-that you merely wisned
to see her once aMain.
"No, I am not her lover," I answered.
"Indeed, we have never yet met. But I
sm in search of the truth from her own
lips."
"That you will never learn," she said,
in a hard, changed voice.
"Because there is a conspiracy to pre-
serve the secret!" I cried. "But I in.
tend to solve the mystery, and for that
reason I have traveled here from Eng.
land."
The woman with the lantern smiled
sadly, as though amused by my impetu-
osity.
"You are on Ruasian soil now,
m'asieur, not English," she remarked in
her broken English. "If your object
were known, you would never be spared
to return to your own land. Ahl" she
sighed, "you do not know the mysieries


and terrors of Finland. I am a French
subject, born in Tours, and brought to
Helsingfors when I was fifteen I have
been in Finland forty-five years. Once
we were happy here, but since the Czar
appointed Baron Oberg to be Governor-
General--" and she shrugged her
shoulders without finishing her sentence.
"Baron Oberg--Governor-General of
Finland I" I gasped.
(CONTINUED NEXT WEEK.)

Political Advertisements

FOR THE SENATE
To the Voters of Duval County (18th
Senatorial Diatrict):
I hereby announce myel as a candi-
date for the State Senate from this, the
18th Senatorial District, Duval County,
to be voted for at the coming primaries.
H. H. BUOKMAN.


FOR THE HOUSE


To the Public:
hbrby mmounce to the citizens of Duval
oun that I will be a candidate before the ap.
De mocratit nominating primaries for
opaa ve in the Legislature of the State
fmmm a County, .and I respectfully ask the
support of the people.
M platform mmay be concisely expressed by
Sayng that I shall expect, If elected, to sustain
by my vote, voice, energy and work ever mea.
ure that wm tend to the advance of or be helpful
to the people of Duval County, Florida without
Injury to other portions of the State; that I will
be unalterably opposed to and will fight with
visor and ene all measures coming up before
the Lelflatre that shall in any way be hurtful
to the Interets of Duval County; and as to par.
ticular questions that may arise In the course of
the camp" It will be my pleasure to discuss
same upon the stump, and to fairly, squarely and
openly present my views upon them.
Respectfully,,
W.MeL.DANCY.

For Gounty Gommissioner
I wish to announce my candidacy for
County Commissioner for the Fourth
District of Duval County, Florida, sub.
ject to the coming primary, and shall
appreciate the support of the citizens of


the county.


T. L. ACOSTA.


The West End Cafe
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ul Wld lgoS


M uksI ,F


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Jacksonville's Finest
and Florida's Lartest
and Best Year-Round
Hotel


DODGE & G ULLENS
Owners and Managers


III''


CHAS. BLUM 8 CO.



THE SUN, $2 PER YEAR


A liquid-food containing, in predigested
form, the strength-giving, nerve-building
elements of Bar ey- alt and Hops. More
potent than drugs and is harmless to the
most delicate person.
Malt-Nutrine, unlike drugs, can be taken
Without fear of contracting a habit.









April 7.,1006


R U On Our List
OFI SATISFIED CUSTOMERS

e. A. RIGKER
WHOLtULI LIQUOR KALEg

0 Special 4-Quart Offer
Fir NS. we will sends expre prpaid, 4 full
quartms ofti .
,m ~N*wtipallsid, 4 full
if $4 we we fetdoup,=M M dI 4 iu

Pir $4.8 we will send. prem prepaid, 4 full
quart. of On LIabd -the beat goods to
be had for the money.
FPer $1.7 we will send. p prepaid, 4 full

quarts of mm .
Fr $S.8we will sed. j p id.4 full
quarts of i .




Wholesale Liquor Dealer




JOSEPH ZAPF co.
JAKSIONV, rLL


r' W- -
Sole Distributors of the Celebrated
ANHEUERI-WCH ERI KIN of Al
Also Wholesle Wines, Liquonrs.
Mineral Waters. Ito.
If You want Pure and Rehible Goods, If you want
the Best in Ever y ped, call on us.


Try"

"Green Brier"

Tennessee Whisky
IT'S PURE
THAOS SURE

RobtW. Simms
SOLE AGENT

Jacksonville, fa.
MSND FOR NEm L PmCE LIST

When in Jacksonvdie
....Do as Others Do....


GO
TO


223 WLR. AT 'S
223 W. Bay St.


FSats g Meals
FOR Qck Lunches..

v-^iso --^**^^~i*-


ThE SUN


State Press on Broward's


Plan To Drain the Glades


GIVE BROWARD A SHOW.


(Tamps Times.)
It is not necessary for the Time to
again define its attitude towards Gov-
ernor Broward. It did not aid in his
selection as the Democratic candidate
for the place he holds. But it accords
to him the same respect and dignifilled
courtesy it would have endeavored to
exact in behalf of the gentleman It pre-
ferred had he been suocessful. The Gov-
ernor believes he is supported by the
majority of the people of the State in
tne project of reclaiming the Everglades.
He is pursuing that object with a steady
purpose, but it will hardly be fair to
stigmatize him as possessed by obsti*
nacy because he does not throw up the
task at the first suggestion that there
are people who do not agree with him.
He made a very good argument in flavor
of the scheme the chief basis of his ap-
pli to the voters at the primaries, and
if our memory is not at fault he charged
that the opposition to him came large-
ly from men who wished to keep the
Everglades in their present condition
of uselessness for the present with the
ultinmte view of converting the land
thereof to private benefit In some of
those numerous ways familiar to busi-
ne" politics.
The Governor was endorsed by the
people with a somewhat narrow margin.
He Is endeavoring to make good his pre-
election promises. It would appear to
be what he ought to do, seldom as the
spectacle is actually presented. Now
let us all carefully repress our angry
passions and give the Governor a snow.
, ..e Times has not given his project the
careful study necessary to a definite
opinion upon its merit and feasibility.
But we do know something about what
constitutes fair play, and we believe
it dear to the American people and the
people of Florida.
It is quite possible that the drain-
age of the Everglades is of doubtful
utility, but we do not happen to recall
just now any similar feat in history
that was not followed by substantial
benefits. On the contrary, there are
well authenticated instances of culti-
vated lands being reduced to marshes
with disastrous effects. At least, per-
mit the Governor to out a ditch or two
from the glades or the lake to the At-
lantic, by the shortest line and steepest
grade. When those ditches shall nave
bad their effect let t onsequent fall
of the lake be ms*ed L t experts
them decide the vohe of water they
subtract and the add!tionl amount of
work it would require to evacuate the
entire basin, compute the amount of
new land that would be rendered avail-
able for cultivation and the probable
money it would bring to the State treas-
ury. Then the problem of further prose-
cution of the work could be calculated
upon with some certainty of arriving at
an intelligent and soundly based con-
clusion.
The Times admits a partiality towards
the prospect of having many millions
of acres of first-class farming lands
opened to settlement in its immediate
vicinity. Should the Everglades prove
to be when devastated of their surplus
waters what Governor Broward inmag-
ines, it would, be the discovery of a new
and fertile province within Tampa's trib-
utary territory. It might open thou-
sands of new homes occupied by men of
enterprise and accumulating wealth. Our
city Is nearer than any other to the
lands proposed to be redeemed and our
people would reap much benefit, more
than in proportion to the 8tate at large.
There are people nla Lee County, within
the drainage district, who favor the
scheme because they believe in it. Some
of them are entlemen in whom the
Times has much confidence.
For these reasons mainly our plesa
that the Governor be allowed a fair
chance to develop his plans at least to
the stage of ascertaining their fai-
bility and the cost of putting them
through. If bhe i right itwould be an
everlasting blunder sad pity to arrest
hid oen iSut-ruhuL


THE DRAINAGE QUESTION.
(Holmes County Advertiser.)
Considerable feeling ad opposition
has been silrrd up pagait Governor
Broward's proposition to drain a por-
tion of the Everglades, and several of
the State press have given vent to more
or less spleen.
We did not support the candidacy of
Governor Broward, and at the time had
little, if any, faith in his draining prop-
ositlon. But our opposition was honest
and sincere and not personal, either,
and we are glad to may that we have
found that our little views were erro-
neous. We learn that where the work
of reclamation by drainage has been per.
footed bye the Disaton Land Company
and others, the results have been all
that was expected, or could have been
desired. Splendid crops of vegetable and
fruit products are the result- with those
reclaimed lands worth $35 to $50 per
acre.
Now then, let the Governor go ahead
and redeem his promise to the people,
which he is anxious to do. We believe
he is on the right track, and so move
all obstructions and let him go ahead,
may we.


UNION MADE SHOES


The Marvin Shoe Co.
m Wet S tr t (IEvMtt alk)

The Stetson Shoe, $5.50 and $6.00
The Packard Shoe, $3.50 and 4.00
rM NM
The Ultra Shoe.............for Women
The American Girl Shoe for Women


The Marvin Shoe Co.
JACK V FLA.

...CONSIGN TOUR...
Fruits and Produce

We He. Christopher

Vi 'm----i MUANME T
INLI0 K- u a -mm, f.


Prompt Attention .. Bet
Returns Day of Sale


Prkies


Reference, National Bank of Jacksonvi le


Fifteenth Papi


Wm. Burbridte

REAL TATE


BargainsI
Property


in Improved and Unimproved
. Correspondence soloited.


its LUNGs


a 0 h IW.4


Dear Dad-I arrived in Jacksonville
nearly blind, and was taken to the opti-
clan's, whore I was treated by a neurolo.
gist, who proscribed diet, and put me on
a fig for breakfast, no lunch, and a pecan
nut for dinner, and after six day' treat
ment I could see a loaf of taMiOi%


ed five miles.


P. S.-It's bread
make,


Yours, NlD.
like mother used to


MARCUS CONANT

Funeral Director
A.
Embalmer
Proper appliance for requliste attention.
Telegraph ordurs receive prompt attention.
11 I Fwe St JLkrosylI tf


If It's Dru s
Bettes Has It

FId I 5of it "Adl

SStore
Bofles Drug Stem


Ows.


by ad I m %'ft ft


Strong and enduring
OLD HICKORY and
WHITE HICKORY WAGONS


Columbus uBiles



M'MURRAY& BAKER


PARTIAL PMCE LIST OF

Wines, Whiskies, Beer and Malt


iMom ie 44b eIO 1it
itaCll .................5 20 o a
as e............. S o 4k0 1
ww w l o.................. SO o0 I
l r ...................... 48 0 t
I .................. 5* 0 6 0 1
Sh a ..................... 75 600 1
e d y.................... 76 600 1
i ...................... 210 4 2 1
Gai ...,.............. 875 600
............... .. 1 6 00 1
o ... ...... .............. s a 6
.. ............... ...... .6 e 0


es
100
100
900
O60
9560
726
960
700
1'0

10


Fmwa
Rye, 01a, Ownm gcol ..,...............I........I A
Rye',' G n, orn, W M., r l...... .........466.1

Victoria Se, ocialDrovsRe. elia

SemiS pin ........................... f


Jmchssmvilh.


l." 's HANKE BROS.


mum


&0,












SSPRINGFIELD

THE


Coming Suburb



S$,EWALKS ARE BEING LAID
'* ,'




]' IrEW SPRINGFIELD is the name of the latest suburb of
N. N Jacksonville, and while this property has not yet been
S placed upon the market, the owners are proceeding with
improvements that will make it the most desirable of all subdivia-
Sions around the city.
As the name of the suburb indicates, the new suburb lies in
the northern section of the city. It lies along Main Street for a
distance of ten blocks, extending from Twelfth Street to Twenty-
firt Street, and extends from Main Street eastward to lona Street.
The tract contains 140 acres, and this has been subdivided into
building lots of a uniform size of 50 by 100 feet.
The well-known real estate firm of Stockton & Budd own this
tract, and, as everyone knows, whatever this firm takes hold of
always proves successful. Therefore, the mere announcement that
the firm of 6tokton & Bt d intend to put this tract of land on
the market April 17, will be the cause of a great demand for lots.
A large force of laborers is now engaged in grading the
streets, setting out shade trees and preparing to lay sidewalks.
Before the property is offered for sale a large amount of side-
walk will be laid, and this work will be continued and sidewalks
will be laid on each and every street in front of every piece of
property. The sidewalks are not cheap board walks, but substan-
tial stone walks, equal to the best in the city. Octagon blocks of
artificial stone are used, and workmen are already engaged in lay-
ing walks along the Main Street front of the property.
The suburb of New 6prinfikld begins at the crossing of )he
Seaboard Air Line tracks on Main Street. That street is paved
all the way out, and makes a direct approach to the principal per-
tion of the city. The car line is only four blocks from the corner
of the property.
The property is all high and dry, and no better location could
be found for a subdivision. Streets sixty feet wide, from curb
line to curb line, are being opened up, graded and sidewalks laid
throughout the tract. The blocks will be 200 by 850 feet each,
and all of the streets will be put in first-class condition at once by
the present owners of the property without any cost to the pur-
chasers.
None of the lots will be sold before April 17, but on that date
the sale will begin, and it is safe to say that the demand for these
lots will be tIe greatest of any suburb yet placed upon the market.
The city is steadily growing northward, and there is no longer any
doubt that every foot of land along Main Street and the Rock
; Road will be bought up and built upon within a comparatively
Short time.

; i j


Stockton & Budd

OWNERS
I| s i I 1 1




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