Group Title: sun.
Title: The sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075914/00021
 Material Information
Title: The sun
Uniform Title: sun
Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sun Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: March 31, 1906
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tallahassee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Leon County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Leon -- Tallahassee
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.451667 x -84.268533 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 18, 1905)-v. 3, no. 47 (Sept. 12, 1908).
Numbering Peculiarities: Published at Tallahassee, Fla., June 23-Sept. 12, 1908.
General Note: Claude L'Engle, editor.
General Note: "If it's right, we are for it."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075914
Volume ID: VID00021
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33400104
lccn - sn 95047216
 Related Items
Other version: Morning sun (Tallahassee, Fla.)
Succeeded by: Dixie (Jacksonville, Fla.)

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Journal of Cartoon and Comment


I-No. 20


/ \\ If It's Right, We Anr Fr It
JAGKSONVILLE, fL.ORIbA, MARGH 31, 1906 SInle Gopy 5 Gents


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W MST HAVE THEODORE I, WE HAVE THE OBOWNL ADY


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IF IT'S RIGHT, WE ARE FOR IT


CLAUDE L'ENOLE
Editor


T^HEi"


SUN


A. K. TAYLOR
Cartoonist


A s MIm Wnm Y WINT A W2U 1 7S OWN, PNTED FOR TC pOPI oLEr FOIl, Y THi SUP COMPANY, AT 31 WIst FOMAYTm 3 SIM, JAASOU MLE, FLORIDA
Volume I--No. 200 JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, MARCH 31, 1906 5 Cents per Copy, t$2 per Yenr


- n--& nmr&& .' at loprinvillA.. Fla.. as .cond-clasmMAtte


Entered at the Poet Vmw EIilaum n'~-'-t ----I


Florida East Coast Hotel Company

IOTEL PONCE DE LEON HOTEL ROYAL POINCIANA
t AuptlMN Palm IBah, on Lake Worth
Now open Now open
Close Saturday, April 7, 1906 Closes Monday, April 2, 1900

HOTEL ALCAZAR HOTEL ROYAL PALM
SL Auiutte Miami
Now open Now open ,
Closes Saturday, April 21, 1906 Closes Tuesday, April 3, 1906

HOTEL ORMOND HOTEL COLONIAL
0mOrimd.iU.t.uHalnx ahsuo, N. P. (lhama Islands)
Now open Now open
Close Monday, April 9, 1906 Closes Monday, April 2, 1096

HOTEL THE BREAKERS HOTEL THE CONTINENTAL
Pa's Dm -iby*-M.is AtlanUo kahI
Now open Opens Thursday, Marchli 15, 1906
Closes Saturday, April 7, 1906 Closes during August



PARTIAL PRICE LIST OF

Wines, Whiskies, Beer and Malt


IXPMN PMPADI
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lantungClub Re............... o~ $4 00 S700
Nelson o Rye ............ 90 42 7 80
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lann's44Rye...............8 76 6 00 9 0
al Dro ...................... 80 6 50 12 00
t Whske....................... P 7 00 980
-aeh Brandy............... 8 75 00 9 0
AppleBrand..................... 8 76 00 9 50
Hohand Gin....................... 80 4 25 72
Geneva Gin........................ 8 76 00 9 60
North Carolina Corn.......... 265 4 00 700
Mountain Corn................... 8 76 6 00 9 50
. amle R um..................... 2 80 4 2 7 26
Aedford Rum..................... 8 76 6 00 9 50
Grape Brandy.................... 8 76 6 00 9 50
Zing of Kentucky Bourbon 8 76 00 950
Uss .... m ..d.elmpdm.


BULK IOON-JUUS FrRE-NOT PREPAID
Rye, Gin, Corn good grade...................51 50
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Rye, Gin, Corn Rum, best for the money...... 2 50
"44" Rye. Peach and Apple Brandy, mellow.
ed by age........................................ 3 00
Victoria Rye, Social Drops Rye, medicinal
quality ................................................. 4 00
LMP ST. LOUNI MI Per W
Falstaff Beer ..................'........ ..................1 2t
Extra Pale..................................................... 10
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Malt Extact, dark ...................................... 1 10
Coburger, imported..................................... 2 00
Guinness tout, pints................................. 2 25
Im by w u n mo anl2 u.


.' A. HANNE BROS.


Fla.


A Great Half-Price Offer

Read every word in this announcement, for it is the opportunity of
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Grab This Opportunity
If you want one magazine with our paper for a year, you cannot do better than to iilI'tt
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TIE SUN, one yearS..........-.......- 200

ill out coupon, mail it today with your remittance and be sure of getti.'
the greatest magazine combination that was'everoiefle -.an opportunity
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THE SUN,
Afs~k ft.e Y


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Enclosed please find $.............................for which enter my name for one year's sub.
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N a. e... ................. ..... ...... ....................................................................


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..
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Subscription, $2 per year; $1


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-MINMENkmp-


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larch 31, 1906


THE SUN


Third Page


Startling Florida Figures

Showing Enormous Drain of Cash From the State Made by Insur-
ance Companies Each Yeare-Get Millions More Than They Put In


Little doubt exists that the next Legislature of
rida will again take up the question of providing
te insurance, and in view of such event, discus-
of insurance business in this State is timely.
According to the population of Florida the bill
life insurance is heavy, and a large sum is taken
the State annually never to be brought back,
reducing the volume of money in circulation.
By means of State insurance, advocates of the
claim that not only would the premium rate be
r on account of economy of management, but
t the money paid in would be invested as far as
ible within the limits of Florida.
With lower premiums on life insurance better
election could be given the people, as payment
would be more easily made and fewer policies would
pse.
Last year was an extremely profitable season for



Life insurance companies held risks in
Florida last year of $10,972,183, on which
premiums of $1,711,403.80 were paid.
If this condition obtained for ten years
the insured would have paid $6,141,855
more than the guaranteed liability of the
companies.
If the amount of premium paid last
year was invested each year for ten years
at 4 per cent, at the end of that period
the investors would have the principal of
$17,114,038 and interest of $8,744,482.


the insurance companies doing business in Florida.
Both fire and life companies show a heavy balance of
receipts against expenditures; more than two mil-
lion dollars, less commissions paid agents, having
Ween drawn from the State in excess of losses paid.
This does not include the many thousands of dol-
lars paid to accident, surety and other insurance
companies, besides the many fraternal organizations
which draw heavily from Floridians.
Of the 111 insurance companies of all kinds au-
thorized to do business in this State, only two show
a loss for 1905. These were the United States Cas-
ualty Company, which paid losses in excess of re-
ceipts of $603.86, and the Guarantee Company of
North America, which exhibits a loss of $862.70.
The amount paid for fire losses in the State last
year was but 169,941.15, while the receipts of the
various companies reached a total of $1,577,916.81,
giving the insurers a favorable balance of $907,-
974.66. The fire risk assumed was about eighty-five
million dollars.
While the fire risk in Florida is nearly nine times
greater than that of life insurance, yet it is the
latter that is of deeper import to the people.
The value of line insurance as a provision for in-
ture needs has been so h-mnered into the public
mind, both by solicitation and advertising, that the
habit of becoming insured may be considered a na-
tional trait.
It is looked upon as a form of banking, where
the deposit may be secured in old age or in providing
for family at death of a policy holder. By dwelling
upon such benefits the business of life insurance has
attained magnitude beyond all other commercial
enterprises depending for my!tce upon direct toll
from the people.
The amount of life Ipsur-*ne risk in Florida for
1906 was $10,972,188, divided among ninete eom.-


State's Insurance Bill Last Year.

Fire Insurance-
Premiums paid .........$1,677,916.81
Losses paid............... 669,941.15


Balance in favor of
Companies .........


$907,974.66


Life Insurance-
Premiums paid .........$1,711,403.80
Losses paid............... 501,896.91
Balance in favor of
Companies .........$1,209,896.91

panies. Only one of these was a State concern, and
which had qualified for business October 8, showing
December 31, risks of $146,775, on which premiums
of $1,72162 had been paid.
The eighteen foreign companies received $1,709,-
682.18 in premiums during 1905. They paid claims
of $501,896.91, showing receipts of $1,207,786.27 in
excess of losses.
A striking feature of the year's business is that
the premiums paid the New York Life alone were but
$(71.93 less than the total losses jaid by all the com-
panies.
Of the three big companies doing business in this
State the Mutual Life shows receipts above losses
of $328,070.58; the Equitable, $212,816.71; the New
York Life, $341,604.98.
The premiums collected in the State last year
were nearly one-sixth of the total life insurance risk.
If collected at the same ratio for ten years the policy
holders WOULD HAVE PAID $6,141,855 MORE
THAN THE SUM GUARANTEED BY THE TOTAL
OF THE POLICIES.
It cannot be assumed that the present risks would
continue for ten years, as many policies would lapse
because of non-payment of premiums, or be cancelled
on account of death or other reasons for payment
b) the companies, but it is probable that sufficient
new business would be acquired to maintain the
present proportions.
In looking at the matter from this view a point
worthy of consideration is the side of profitable in-
vestment, showing how much less is paid by a life
insurance company than in many other forms of
investment.
Taking ten years as the period of investment on
the basis of last year's business, the holders of in-
surance policies would pay $17,114,038 for the guar-
anteed $10,972,183. But if the premium of $1,711,-
403, paid last year, was deposited each year in sav-
ings banks paying 4 per cent interest, or in other
equally safe kinds of investment at the same per-
centage for ten years, the result would be not only
the possession of the principal at the end of that
period, but interest of $3,744,482, making a total of
$21,488,520, or $10,476,357 more than the sum prom-
iAed by the life insurance companies.
It is the feature of speculating with death, pos-
sibly, that naturally gives the charm to life insur-
ance. The chance of obtaining a great deal for little
given is the strong card. On account of the promise
that the amount eklled for in the policy will be paid
if death ensues within certain time after date of
is-.nce, without regard to the amount paid by the
insured, the standard of attractive investment has
been reached.
To place this form of investment on a solid foun-
dation, necessarily the premium must be fixed in
accordance with the average expectation of life of
the person insured. No person ean complain of such
method, but it appears that tihe insured beside pay-


ing the real fee for insurance is also contributing
largely to a fund for gaining new business. In 1904
more than fifty million dollars were paid by thirty-
two companies in gaining new business, nearly all
of the money going to agents.
In 1904 the expense of the savings banks of Mas-
sachusetts were 1.45 per cent of the year's deposits,
or about one-tenth of the insurance expense of that
State.
In spite of all the investigation of the big insur-
ance companies there yet remains much to be learned
of the manner in which the business has been con-
ducted. Now and then a ray of light reveals some of
the darker doings, and to the desire for information
by the New Jersey Legislature is the public indebted
for knowledge of one company-the Prudential. ThiA
company ranks eighth in the amount of risk carried
in Florida-$333,338-and last year its receipts in
this State were $44,741.79, while its losses were but
$1,547.50.



The funds handled by the Treasurer of
Florida last year from all sources was
about $700,000.
The amount paid the New York Life,
the Mutual and the Equitable Insurance
companies over all losses last year was
$783,390.
The receipts of the Equitable and Mu-
tual were $300,809 and $411,090 respec-
tively, which together exceed by several
thousand dollars the sum handled by the
State Treasurer.


The investigation shows that the great wealth of
this company is due to the lapse of policies. In
1904, 945,640 policies, covering $112,292,676 of in-
surance, lapsed because the unfortunate holders were
no longer able to pay the premiums. In five years
the lapses of Prudential policies amounted to 61 per
cent of the total number issued. There was nothing
coming back to the policy holder; what he had paid
in was lost to him forever.
While information of lapse of policies in the other
big companies is not at hand, yet it is reasonable to
suppose that the percentage of lapse was not less
than in the Prudential. That company appears to
b. of good standing as the others, and the premium
rate is about the same in all. When this phase of
life insurance is considered it is easy to me how
the enormous accumulations of the various companies
have been gained, and why the activity in seeking
new business is unceasing. In order for the com-
panies to continue constant effort is exerted to re-
place the lapsed policies with new holders of insur-
ance, many of whom will pay for a time, and then
will drop out as the burden of annual assessment is
beyond their financial strength.
The real cost of insurance is overloaded with the
commissions to agents, the enormous salaries paid
officers of the companies and contributions for polit-
ical purposes and lobbying. Were these expenses
eliminated the premiums could be so reduced that
fewer policy holders would surrender in despair, and
life insurance would be a form of investment that
the poor man could more easily undertake.
Under State insurance it is declared that such
economy would be practiced. Inreruce would be
furnished at reasonable cost and every protection
and aid be given the polley holder. Then, too, the
annual low of money from the State would be
cheeked, to the benefit of every eitiise..












Fourth Page


THE SUN March 31, 1906


Can Trustees Save the Land

By GOVERNOR N. B. BROWARD
If the People Want Schools in Every County and Hard Roads
Built, They Must Aid the Trustees of the Internal Improve-
ment Fund To Carry Out Their Trust, as Directed by the
-o- -t Power Creating Them -- -


Tallahassee, Fla., March 26, 1900.
Mr. Claude L'Engle, Editor of THE SUN, Jackson.
ville, Fla:
I noticed some statements in the Jasper News,
which statements were copied in the Times-Union, to
the effect that the Trustees of the Internal Improve-
ment Fund of the State of Florida were violating
Unapter 6245, Laws of Florida, which statute reads
as follows:
CHAPTER 5245. (No. 140.)
"An Act Providing for the Building of County Hard
Roads and Providing Appropriations therefore.
"Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of
Florida:
"Section 1. All moneys now in the Internal Im-
provement Fund, after the payment of all legal obli-
gations against the said moneys, shall be (placed)
pleased by the Trustees of the Internal Improve-
ment Fund with the State Treasurer, who shall there-
upon place the same to the credit of the several coun-
ties of the State according to the assased valuation
of the property in the several counties at the time
of the transfer for the purpose of constructing hard
roads in such county.
"See. 2. All lands granted to the State of Florida
by the United States under the act of Congress of
1850, known as the Swamp and Overflowed Act for
Internal Improvement, snail be sold by the Trustees
of the Internal Improvement Fund, at such times
and under suckl conditions as said Trustees may de-
termine; the proceeds therefrom shall be by them
deposited with the State Treasurer and by him
placed to the credit of said county road fund, as
provided in Section I of this Act: Provided, That
nothing herein shall be so (construed) constructed
as to prevent the payment in lands by the said Trus-
tees of the Internal Improvement Fund of all legal
obligations now existing against said fund.
"Sec. 3. All moneys appropriated to the several
counties as provided by Sections I and 2 of this Act,
shall be paid to the Treasurer of such county upon
requisition by the County Commissioners of said
county, conditioned upon its being used exclusively
for the building and constructing a system of hard,
maoadomised or other hard-surfaced roads, said
requisition shall be accompanied by certificate under
seal of the Clerk of the Circuit Court that the Coun-
ty Commissioners make said application solely for
t purpose of building hard, nmacdamiaed or other
hard-surfaced roads.
"See. 4. This Act shall take exect immediately
upon its passage and approval by the Governor.
"Approved June 8, 1903."
I have printed the above statute in full that the
people may know exactly wha t it is. The first clause
of Section 1 limits the whole law; in other words,
the first clause of Sectibn 1, in effect, says that all
moneys now in the Internal Improvement Fund,
after the payment of all legal obligations against
the said moneys, shall be plaapd by the Trustees of
the Internal Improvement Fund with the State Treas-
urer. In other words, that some time, whenever that
may be-THAT IS, WHEN THE OPERATIONS OF
DRAINAGE AND RECLAMATION ARE COM.
PLETED, AND WHEN ALI OBLIGATIONS DE-
TERMINED TO BE LEGAL ARE SATISFIED AND
RELEASED-IF THERE IS ANY MONEY LEFT
AFTER ALL THE LEGAL OBLIGATIONS
AGAINST the said moneys shall be paid, then the
remainder, if any, shall be placed with the State
Treasurer, who shall thereupon place the same to the
credit of the several count es of the State, for the
Purpose of building county hard roads.
Section 2 says: "All lands granted to the State
of Florida by the United States, under the Act of
Ongess of 1850, known as 8wasmp and Overflowed
A for Internal Improvement, shall be sold by the
Trutam of the Internal Improvement Fund, at such
emsd a der such conditions as such Truste


may determine, and the proceeds therefrom shall be
by them deposited with the State Treasurer, and by
him placed to the credit of the said county road fund,
as provided in Section 1 of this Act."
fhe act, as above quoted, says what shall be done,
after all legal obligations against the said moneys
have been paid (whenever that may be), which legal
obligations are: First, the cost of proving up and
getting patents to the land, the operating of the
fund, by paying employees, etc.; next, paying prin.
cipal and interest on all bonds under the Internal
Improvement Act for railroads, and the payment in
lands or money to all of the, railroads or canal com-
panies, who have received land grants by legislative
enactments, or through contracts made by the Trus-
tees, which grants now aggregate more than seven
millions acres of land, and the claims against the
money in bonds of $160,000, and a claim in suit, by
the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, $224,000. The
total amount of the fund in the hands of the Trus-
tees is les than three million acres of land, and
about $ 80,000 in money, dredges, etc., with which
to pay-provided, of course, that these obligations
are declared legal by the courts, AS WE PROPOSE
NOT TO PAY THEM UNLESS THEY ARE SO
DECLARED; then, AFTER ALL THIS IS SET-
TLED, this statute would become effective.
Section 2, beginning with the word, "Provided,"
after the quotation made above is, "Provided that
nothing herein shall be construed as to prevent the
payment in lands by said Trustees of the Internal
Improvement Fund of all legal obligations now exist-
ing against said fund." &or the reader to interpret
the statute correctly, he should now be apprised of
the legal outstanding obligations against said fund,
so far as ensactments of the Legislature are con-
coerned.
Since the enactment of Chapter 6246, in 1903,
there was paid out to Col. J. A. Henderson, for com-
missions, selecting lands, 97,000 acres, and to Mr.
8. I. Wailes, commission on selection and procuring
patents to the lands, for the State, over $5,000 in
money and about 6,000 acres in lands, besides the
regular expenses of operating the fund.
The J. A. Henderson estate holds about $160,000
of bonds that they asked payment for, through
their attorney, Mr. T. L. Clarke (See page 249, Vol.
5, Minutes Trustees of the I. I. Fund), but they
have not yet been paid.
THE DUTY TO DRAIN.
The first thing to be done with the money and
the land, after paying for selection and getting pat-
ents to lands and administering the fund, is the duty
of the Trustees to drain and reclaim the lands.
These lands were obtained from the United States
Government ONLY AFTER THE STATE HAD SOL-
EMLY, OFFICIALLY PLEDGED ITSELF TO
DRAIN THEM. The grant from Congres was passed
in response to this soemn ple.ige made by the egis-
lature of Florida, with the approval of the Governor
of the State, in 1847. That pedge IS AS BINDING
UPON THE STATE OF FLRIDA THIS DAY as it
was on the day it was made. It is embodied in the
following resolution:
DRAINAGE AND RPFCTAMATION.
Resolution in Relation to Draining the Everglades.
(No. 14.)
"Whereas, Large tracts of the public lands lying
in the vicinity of Lake Okeechobee, and in that region
south of said lake called 'the Everglades,' being
covered with water, are incapable of being surveyed
and sub-divided, and are therefore valueless to the
United States:
"And Whereas, It is believed that a large portion
of said lands may be drained by canals, reclaimed,
and made valuable for the cultivation of tropical
plants and fruits:
"And Whereas, It is believed that these lands, if
reclaimed, would not only remunerate this State
for the expense of such reclamations, but would yield
a considerable surplus above such expense; therefore,
"Resolved by the Senate and House of Representa-
tives of the State of Florida in General Assembly
Convened, That Congress be requested to grant to
this State all of said lands lyIng south of Carloo-sa-
hatchee river and of the northern shore of Lake Okee-
ebobee, and between the Gulf of Mexico and the
Atlantic oesa, -onuditko that the State will drain
them and apply the proceeds 1 the sale thereof,


after defraying the expense of draining, to purposes
of education.
"Passed by the Senate December 30, 1847. Passed
by House of Representatives January 6, 1848. Ap-
proved by the Governor January 6, 1841.)
"Pages 80 "ad 81 of the Laws of 1847.
"By an act of Congress approved September 28,
1850, it is provided, 'That to enable the.State .
to construct the necessary levees and drains to re-
claim the swamp and overflowed lands therein, the
whole of those swamp and overflowed lands, made
unfit thereby for cultivation, which shall remain un-
sold at the passage of this Act, shall be, and the
same are hereby granted to said State.'
"The Act further provides, 'That the proceeds of
said lands, whether from sale or by direct appropria-
tion in kind, shall be applied exclusively, as far as
necessary, to the purpose of reclaiming said lands by
means of the levees and drains aforesaid.'"
The State of Florida accepted the grant and en-
acted Chapter 610, Laws of Florida, in 1855, creating
the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund of
the State of Florida, and provided for a liberal sys-
temrn of internal improvement, which law the Supreme
Court of the State, in the case of Bailey vs. Trustees,
upheld, and construed that section of our laws to
impose a duty upon the Trustees to carry out the
work of draining and reclaiming the swamp and over-
flowed lands. The Supreme Court also, in the case
of Gleason vs. Trustees, which reads as follows:


HEADNOTE


OF DECISION BY
COURT OF FLORIDA.


SUPREME


"The Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund,
appellants, vs. William H. Gleason, respondent.
"Under the provisions of the internal improve-
ment law of this State it is the duty of the Trustees
of the fund to make such arrangements for the drain-
age of the swamp and overflowed lands as is most
advantageous to the fund. Page 384, Vol. XV
Florida Reports."
The Supreme Court of the United States has
decided that the above enactments by Congress and
the State constitute a contract, and that the Legis-
lature has no power to violate that contract. I
here quote the decision as follows:
"In the Supreme Court of the United States-Me.
Gee vs. Mathis.
"The Chief Justice delivered the opinion of the
court, and after stating the case, proceeded:
"The first question which requires consideration
in the case before us is: Was the levee tax imposed
in violation of any contract between the State and
the United States?
"It is not doubted that the grant by the United
States to the State upon conditions, and the accept-
ance of the grant by the State constituted a contract.
All the elements of a contract met in the trans-
action, competent parties, proper subject-matter,
sufficient consideration, and consent of minds. This
contract was binding upon the State and could not
be violated by its legislation without infringement
of its Constitution. See 16 Fla. 541-542."
LAW CREATING TRUSTEES AND DEFINING
THEIR DUTIES.
The following sections of the Revised Statutes of
Florida, originally enacted in Chapter 610, Laws of
Florida, Acts of 1855-the act which created the
Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund-clearly
define the duties of the Trustees relative to the drain-
age and reclamation of the swamp and overflowed
lands:
"Section 420. Trustees, Their Powers and Duties.
-For the purpose of assuring a proper application
of said fund for the purposes herein declared, said
lands and all the funds arising from the sale thereof,
after paying the necessary expenses of selection,
management and sale, are irrevocably vested in five
trustees, to-wit: In the Governor of the State, the
Comptroller, the State Treasurer, the Attornqy-Gen-
eral and the Commissioner of Agriculture, and their
successors in office, to hold the same in trust for
the uses and purposes herinafter provided, with the
power to sell and transfer said lands to the pur.
chasers and receive payment for the same and invest
the surplus moneys arising therefrom, from time to
time, in stocks of the United States, stocks of the
several States, or the Internal Improvement bonds
issued under the provisions of law, and drawing not
(Continued on Twelfth Pape)












March 31,1906


THE SUN


Fifth Page


Shaking the Old Plum Tree

By EDWARD FITZGERALD


-~ -


Another entry has been made in the race for Rail-
road Commissioners, and if the last, by no means
is it the least-Thomas J. Appleyard, editor of the
Lake City Index and one of the best known men in
Florida. More humor for the campaign, but in mate-
rial sense, as Mr. Appleyard declares that he will be
"the best-natured candidate" that ever solicited a
vote.
His love of funmaking is a characteristic, but
there is no joke in his candidacy. On the contrary,
it means work and a great deal of it to those who
have preceded him in announcing for the office. It
causes an upset of calculations and makes necessary
a revision of estimates in the vote schedule of the
other candidates, who now have a campaign of en-
ergy before them.
The contest for the Commissionerphips four years
ago was lively and full of spirit, but the forecast
of this campaign indicates one of far greater
interest.
One reason for this is found in the direct atten-
tion now being paid the Commission by the public,
which is anxiously inquiring if it is beneficial, and
to what extent, and if the question be answered in
the ffiarmative the desire is expressed that the scope
of its usefulness be expanded.
Then, too, the personnel of the candidates and
their number combines the elements required for an
exciting political struggle.
Although Mr. Appleyard has been active in the
political highway for many years this is the first
office he has ever sought, but if his acquaintanceship
and general popularity can be reckoned as political
assets he can already count many milestones on the
road to success in this race.
While he has not been a holder of an elective
office he has for a number of years been Secretary
of the Senate, and in this position he has served with
every degree of satisfaction. Many times he has
been commended by the Senate for the excellence of
his work and the journals of the upper House, under
bis direction, are models of accuracy.
And it is worthy of note that in his capacity of
Secretary of the Senate he has never been
charged with dereliction of duty. He left polities
aside when he entered the Senate chamber and
addressed himself to the task of performing his
duties with all care and fidelity.
Mr. Appleyard has twice been a delegate from
Florida to Democratic National Conventions-in 1890
and 1904, and as a worker in many State campaigns
he has been prominent.
As to his fitness for the office of Railroad Com-
missioner he is undoubtedly well qualified if a knowl-
edge of conditions governing the work of that burea't
be considered, because since the existence of the Com-
mission he has devoted much time in patient study
of its decisions and informing himself of beneficial
results that might be accomplished.
In this connection it may be said, too, that how-
ever great his desire for the office it would not lead
him to promise reforms that he would know were im-
possible of achievement. If elected be will be a po-
tent fa r in shapg the policy of the Oammis-


sion, and the people can rest in the belief that his
part will not be one of masterful inactivity.
This is a favorable season for newspaper men to
enter the political pit, judging at least by the many
who have announced their intention to run. After
pointing out the way for many years it looks as if
the newspaper men were intending, as far as possible,
to abandon theoretical legislation and try for practi-
cal demonstration of the beliefs they hold.
The candidacy of the brilliant Wm. A. Russell of
the Palatka News has been noticed, and now comes
his contemporary of the Times-Herald-H. A. B.
McKenzie-who signifies his wish to serve Putnam
County as Representative. Mr. McKenzie, too, is an
able editor, with many friends to urge his election,
and it will be fortunate for the people of that county
it both can be elected. It would be worthy tribute
to the two men who have worked unceasingly for the
upbuilding of Palatka and Putnam County.
Another newspaper man who is deserving of recog-
nition by his fellows is Hugh Sparkman, the talented
young editor of the Zolfo Advertiser, who is a candi-
date for Representative from DeSoto County. Mr.
Sparkman has lived the greater portion of his life
in that county and his newspaper work has been a
constant effort to improve the welfare of those among
whom he has toiled. He is opposed by J. B. Coch-
ran, at present County Judge, and a brother of Mis-
sissippi's noted jurist, Judge Cochran.
0. L. Bittinger, editor of the Ocala Star and one
of the State's well-known newspaper workers, is a
candidate for Representative from Marion County.
He has many friends in all parts of Florida to wish
him success and to hope that the voters of the "nan-
ner" county will take this occasion to show their
regard for one who has so long and cheerfully labored
in their interests.
H. H. McCreary of Alachua, who had announced
for re-election and then withdrew, has reconsidered
the matter and again asks for consideration by the
people. Mr. McCreary is editor of the Gainesville
Sun, and there is no record of his ever failing to
push the interests of that section or omitting to call
attention to the many advantages possessed by
Gainesville and Alachua County.
E. S. Mathews, editor of the Starke Telegraph, in
a candidate for re-eleetion as Representative from
Bradford County, and if his constituents show just
appreciation of his work last session he need have
no fear of their failure to choose him, and that by
a large vote.
Individual platforms and self-made issues con-
tinue to flow freely. It seems to be a necessary bit
of furniture accompanying the primary, and one that
is made much use of by every candidate appealing for
the suffrage of the people. While platforms and dec-
laration of principles are so common now, it may
rot perhaps be generally known that the first plat-
form of any party in the United States was declared
in 1889 i the second eampel of Andrew Jack-
son, whem the Demofratle prty mads the following
oblal dedaratiso "That an adequnat


protection to American industry is indispensable to
the prosperity of the country, and that an aban-
donment of the policy at this period would be attend-
ed with consequences ruinous to the best interests
of the nation.'
Too much law is productive of obnoxious govern-
ment, yet each session of a Legislature adds to the
burden. Ideas for the restraint of the people are
poured into the legislative hopper and mixed grist
of oppression in ground out. Many persons, however,
are recognizing the fact that it is futile to promote
goodness by act of the Legislature, and the following
taken from the New York Sun, fits the case exactly:
"Hlis is one of'the bright political minds of St. Paul
ind he said: 'There are so many political doctors
prescribing for all ills just now that one grows dizzy
trying to decipher the prescriptions. The individual
should get a move on. That would mean the simplest
and most lasting kind of reform after all, for as the
man improves so also will the conditions which sur-
round him. That rule applies to everything in life,
even to creating a taste in bathtubs. It is a sure
sign of weakness when a people shriek for more laws
to make them behave.'"
It is pleasure to note that Hon. Park Trammell
has side-stepped the snares laid for the wreckage of
his political existence and that he declines to oppose
Steve Sparkman for Congress. Advice of real friends
and consideration of the folly involved in his becom-
ing a candidate for Congress in this campaign will
maintain Mr. Trammell in the position he now occu-
pies-that of a bright and ambitious young man,
with a political future ot rosy aspect. In his cas
patience alone is necessary, as the current of events
to come will carry him in strong tide to exalted
office.
P. A. Vans-Agnew of Kinsimmee is a candidate
for Representative from Osceola County. In passing
on this bit of news, it is also worthy of mention
that Mr. Vans-Agnew is also chief counsel of the
big land company fighting the State Drainage Com-
mission.

One of the duties of the State press during the
next session of the .lgislature will be to keep an
eye on those member, who then or in the late past
have been employed I interests not in harmony with
the public good. May a little joker is born unseen
and its being neo t sealed until after a bill has
become law, when It' l too late to stop the trick of
the legislator whsi serving two masters to the dis-
comfiture of on people.

Alfred St. ( brams of lAke County, who is
a candidate for nate, ofters a lengthy platform
in Ms appeal for 4 nation. Prominent among the
reforms urged lqj$r. Abrams is enactment of a
law placing ment of railroad property in
the hands of th Railroad Commission. He has
(ontnued om.Trbtenth Pae)












Sixth Page


March 31, 1906


THE SUN


How


Not


To


Pay


Pensions


By OEN. FRED L. ROBERTSON
The Deserving Confederate Soldier In Need of State Aid is Classed With Deserters on
Pension Roll-About One-Half of Each-The Remedy, a State Pension Commissioner
J


The question of State questions is one of absorb-
ing interest to the taxpayer, to the pensioners and to
the Confederate Veterans who are not pensioners
and never expect to be. The pittance that the peo.
pie willingly hand out quarterly to the men who
made Florda glorious even in defeat, Is but a small
reward for the service rendered, but it is all that
the people can afford under the existing conditions.
Perhaps with the careful weeding out of unworthy
leneflearies IT WOULD BE POSSIBLE TO' IN
CREASE THE PRESENT PENSION FIFTY PER
CENT; on such a sum the pensioner, by economy,
might manage to exist, but how are these unworthy
beneficiaries to be gotten off, and kept off the rolls?
At every State encampment of the Florida Divis-
ion, U. 0. V., for several years past, the pension
question and its abuse, has been under discussion
and changes in the law have been suggested for the
protection of the funds and the worthy Confederate
soldier, but none of the changes made remedied the
evil. In process of time opinions crystallised, until
the two last encampments unanimously recommended
the creation of the office of the Pension Commis-
sioner. It was urged in the interest of the State
and of worthy pensioners. Such an officer would
relieve the State of its present list of unworthy
pensioners and protect it against fraud in the
future. The Commissioner should be a Confederate
soldier, a man of highest integrity, fearless and
just. Such a man would guard the fund and help
the needy applicant by prompt attention to the ap-
plication, something that is now impossible, because
the gentlemen that compose the Pension Board are
all department officers and every hour of each day
is full of department duties. It is a fact-known
only to a few outside of the capitol-that for nearly
three years the Pension Board has held its sittings
at night, because there was no time during the day
in whclh to attend to pension matters. This is an
Injustice to these officers. They should be allowed
at least the night for rest and recreation.
In considering applications for pension, the Board
uses its best judgment, but it matters not how care-
fully they examine the documents before them, frauds
will slip in just so long as the present system con-
tinues in vogue. The Boarq has before it only docu-
mentary evidence, and this has in a number of in-
stances been made to show anything but the truth.
The Board must take the evidence that is submitted,
and they do, -except in rare cases where a member
happens to have some personal knowledge of the
. applicant. The difficulties that confront the Board,
would disappear before a Commissioner, because
such an officer would be vested with full power to
investigate every claim presented, and the prospect
of personal contact would exert a mighty influence
tor the suppression of fraud. The fact that the Comn-


missioner would personally investigate every case
that he had the slightest reason to suspect, and that
condign punishment would promptly follow every
attempt to defraud the State would deter improper
application.
It has been acked, "Why, if the Veterans know
certain parties are now improperly on the roll, do
they not report the matter to the Board?" The
answer is easy. To make such report would put
them in the attitude of the complainant and a volun-
tary witness, which would subject them at once to
the covert attack of the fraudulent pensioner. The
man who would swear falsely to secure a pension
for himself or for his neighbor, would have no hesi-
tancy in setting fire in the dead hours of the night
to the home of the informer, and not only burning
the house, but all the inmates; nor would he hesi-
tate to commit murder from the bushes or fence-
corner; besides that, no true man likes to assume
the roll of the informer. "Tell tale"' is a stigma
that even children dread. It may be argued that it is
a duty, and that is true, but has the State any right
to ask or expect a good citizen to put his life, the
lives of his family and his property in jeopardy to
save the State a few dollars? Not when it is in
the power of the State to protect itself without in
any way endangering its good citizens.
In some sections of the State there are nests
of deserters and these fellows are constantly making
assaults on the Pension Board. They swear for
one another; the record shows them in groups, often
of three, swearing for each other and sooner or later
all get on the pension roll, provided death does not
intervene to prevent. This, however, is a somewhat
remote contingency, because men of that stamp are
long-lived both on and off the pension roll. They
were never exposed during the war to any condition
that would tend to break down their vitality; where-
as, the good soldier met wounds and disease, waded
freezing rivers, marched for days in snow and ice,
almost, if not quite, barefooted and in the thinnest
of well-worn rage, slept night after night on the wet
and freezing ground with only an apology for a
blanket, or stood on picket in the pouring rain or
kept vigilance in rifle pits half filled with mud and
water, and lived for months on the meagerest of ra-
tions, rations so short and so poor that one of these
hungry pension grabbers would have thrown them
away as even unfit food for his dogs. Placed along,
side of the good soldier, it is little wonder that
these men are hale and strong and long of years.
There is a peculiar feature noticeable in the pen-
sion application of good soldiers. The men who did
their whole duty, more often than not, find consid-
erable difficulty in satisfactorily establishing their
claim. This is owing to the fact that they never
apply until the wolf is clawing at their doors, then


they find that the comrades that knew them best
have died or in the changes that have occurred they
have lost all trace of them. Memory has failed
and they cannot recall at will material facts, dates,
names and consolidation of commands, ehanage in
officers, letters of companies and numbers of rei-
ments have to a considerable extent caused a loss
of identity. When the records are at their a rn-
nand, the applications are almost invariably brief
to curtness. They set down the bare fact of ser-
vice, injury and dates, and the comrades or com-
missioned officers are equally as brief. The spaces
in the applications allowed for answers are more
than ample for all their purposes, but the other
fellow-he is never at a loss, he and his colleagues
know exactly where they were-on paper-and every
particle of available space on the application is
dsed for telling the story of faithful (T) service and
inexpressible suffering, and of his afflictions, which
are many, and all the direct result of "exposure and
disease" contracted during the war (they rarely ever
complain of wounds, when they are hurt it is from
falling off from a wagon). As one reads the record,
this mental comment is unavoidable, "what a splen-
did specimen of manhood, if it could have only es-
caped the blighting hand of war."
It is asking rather much of the Boards of County
Commissioners and of county officers, familiar with
the parties, to discourage applicants or turn down
applications for pension. They want to keep their
offices or to get better ones, and in every instance the
man who applies has not only his own vote, but con-
trols several others, all of which will be used against
the unfriendly official. Again, this feature of the
matter presents itself: The applicant is a pauper,
or will be; he will be on the county if he does not
get on the pension roll, and many of these officials
think the State better able to bear the burden than
is the county.
Repeal all existing pension laws and enact a new
one providing for a Pension Commissioner, endowed
with full powers for investigation; do away with the
Pension Board as now constituted, but leave all the
operating machinery where it is-with the Comp-
troller-and the grounds for complaint as to delay
in action and the danger of getting improper parties
on the pension roll of the State will be mili* led.
The objection will be raised in some quarters that
this is creating a new office. It is true, but the
tenure of the Pension Comimssiouer cannot, in the
nature of things, be for very many years, because
with very, very few exceptions, the soldiers of the
South have all passed their sixtieth year, and the
large majority of widows are equally as old; none
are under forty years of age. This condition of
necessity puts a period to the existence of the office
of Pension Commissioner.


eBy
I've Been Thinking CHARLES BAiTEL LOOMIS


The Reader of Novels was wont to judge of a
man's character by a few sharply defined actions set
forth by the novelist, and the woman who scolded
her children in the first, fifth, and seventh chapters
was, of course, a vixen. So also the man who spoke
ungrammatically each time he made his appearance
in the book was a man of low social position, and
the fellow who refused to make Christmas presents
was an incurably mean man.
Having become used to these snap Judgments of
his fellows by a constant reading of novels, the
Reader flattered himself that he could Judge of a
man's character by the first thing he said or by the
first thing that was said of him by his neighbor.
And so it happened that the* Reader of Novels
found himself in a strange plae that did not seem
to be on this earth at all, k a man with a noble
brow and a weak chin and a rng mouth and near-
set and lustrous eyes and a large nose and generous
ears and large feet and small hands and a bull neck
stood near by, and one who looked like a judge was
talking about him and naming his characteristics.
S"He was often cross to his wife," said the judge.
"Ah, a male scold," said the Reader of Novels,
readily. .
"Me was very fond of children'."
"What's that?" said the Reafer of Novels, soent-
lg something incongruous.
"One time his heart was set to murder his brother,
aad me his brother's iNght p eated his death."


I


"A thug," said the Reader of Novels, always to
himself.
"He denied himself all that makes life worth liv-
ing in order to make the last days of his mother com-
fortable, and moved by a good impulse he divided the
estate with his brother although it had all been left
to him."
"The same man?" said the Reader of Novels,
dumbfounded.
"He did a despicably mean act in business and
was never sorry for it." .
"Ah, I though so," said the Reader of Novels.
"Hlis true character is coming out."
"He told a vulgar story to a friend and both
laughed at the undoubted humor of it."
"Ah, ha I" said the Reader of Novels. "Hlie is be-
ing drawn a little truer to life."
"He was deeply moved by a spiritual poem and
appreciated it so sincerely that he wrote it out and
carried it with him, and finally learned it by heart
and tried to govern his life according to its precepts."
"The deuce he did!" said the Reader of Novels,
incredulously.
"He told another vulgar story."
"He'd better have given up shamming," said the
Reader of Novels.
"He drank more than was good for him, and was
see n ln a ew4tkfn of inebriety by young people who
had mpebted him as a governor of the ehure."


"Of course," said the Reader of Novels. "He is
getting truer and truer to his character."
"He established a club to which young men were
welcome and at which no intoxicating liquors were
sold, and saidin all sincerity that be believed Im-
moderate drinking to be a curse."
"The hypocrite, said the Reader of Novels."
"He voted the Republican ticket."
"Good," said the Reader of Novels, who was a
Vermonter.
"He voted the Democratic ticket."
"Turncoat," said the Reader of Novels.
"He gave generously of his means to help a poor
man wholhad been buffeted by the world, and spoke
well of him when to do so exposed him to con-
tumely." ,
N"Who was this, anyhow?" said the Reader of
Novels, more and more puzzled.
"He said malignant things behind a man's back,
things that worked the man s downfall, although he
never knew that."
th ity he didn't. He would have exulted," said
the Reader of Novels.
"He reproached a man in all sincerity for saying
like things of another behind his back, and had a
poor opinion of that backbiter from that time on."
"This is beyond me," said the Reader of Novels.
"He refused night after night to give up his seat
(Continued on Eleventh Page)













March 31, 1906


THE SUN


Seventh Page


John Henry In Literature 0ORGE0BV. HOBART


steak nervously with the
was her night out.


coal shovel. It


"RUNNING HIS FINGERS THROUGH THE EEL-GRASS ON HIS TOPKNOT."


I've got a friend in the literary busi-
ness.
He writes books and wears hair
enough to put the Brotherhood of Bar-
bers on the bum.
When he isn't running a serial story
through the magazines he's running his
fingers through the eel-grass on his top-
knot and looking wise.
I hate to knock a friend, but simply
because a guy is a genius does he have
to rush around with a mop on his ko-
ko, and butt into a public building every
time he thinks in the open air?
iuy friend's name is Newton Wither-
ingham Hurtuboise in print, but at home
they call him Bud for short.
Bud's father says the lad with the
literary bug ought to be driving a cart
in the direction of the dump, but Bud
only smiles and asks mother to pass the
fish.
A fish diet is said to be the real cheese
for the brain.
I think if Bud would only eat a shark
or a whale he might be able to write
something warm.
I'm not knocking, remember; I'm only
saying what I think.
I hate a knocker.
I used to go to school with Bud.
While he was inside licking up loga-
rithms and beating Caesar's Commen-
taries to a pulp, I was always loafing


to touch the old lady for the price of a
car fare.
i never got beyond the Fifth Reader,
and I couldn't dig up a Latin word to
save my soul, so all I can do is to
squeeze into a pool-room, bury my face
in the dope and crawl out a little later
with a hatful of money.
I tell you it's all dead wrong to give
the little old red schoolhouse the glassy
grin. That's right.
Anyway, I bumped into Bud the other
evening and I led him to a trough.
I coughed for a couple of throat teas-
ers and Bud warmed up with the gab.
He was out to. tell me how hard it is
to write a novel, but I cut in on his
circuit.
"It's a cinch!" I says. "All a dub has
to do is to pound out a parcel of para-
graphs, drag them down to the starter
and let them get away in a bunch."
I was ready to buy again, so Bud
didn't contradict me and delay the game.
After I had filled his reservoir he
turns the hot-air into his pipes and
comes down the lane with the assertion
that I couldn't write a postal-card to a
friend and finish right.
I call that ingratitude.
To give me a steer like that after I
mobiled with him across the Plaza and
helped him to six bowls of Anheuscr
milk!
Well, there's no literary fiff that can
give me the elbow.
Just to show Bud what a clever brute
I am I went home and wrote a novel.
The reason it's so good is because I
took my hunch from Rud. Kipling's
style.
It isn't quite as chesty as "David
Harum," but there's more postry in it.
When Bud ,ees it he'll put up the
shutters and take to the lumlwr camps.
Here's the gag:


THE BEAUTIFUL SNOW.


"A HATFUL OF MONEY."


around the outside of the Knowledge
Factory, printing my name on the fence
with a jackknife, and acting just like
the village cut-up.
And look at the difference between us
today
Bud can sit down and write a novel
that will stand you up in the corner, but
whme M wants to pt dowatOs he ha


(A study from life in a great, great city)
Chapter. I.
Vy am I waiting alone
Mit all dese udder folks?
Stob making laughing ven you see
Dot I am making chokes?
-Sam Bernard.
Sorrowfully the snowflakes sat upon
the sidewalk.
A tall, wide man moved thoughtfully
down the street in an opposite direction
to that which he had come from.
Suddenly, and sorrowfully, withal, he
emulated the snowflakes and sat upon
sidewalk.
While at home the wife waited
wearily.

Chapter II.
He rubbered hard to see the stage,
But only saw a hat;
Next day he heard the play was had,
And he was glad of that.
-Andrew Mack's Irish Meloidies.


The sea hath many perils for those
who go down in ships; but bath not the
sidewalks perils for those who go down
in slips?
Esoteric Science leads one to suppose
so.
Meanwhile the wife waited wearily
at hose, ud th cook tapped the e.


Chapter III.
"My mother was a lady," so
She said, but just the same
She ate boiled cabbage with a knife
Exc4pt when company came.
DeWolf Hopper.


Presently the first section of the tall,
wide man pulled in on the home siding.
The second section, consisting of a
boot heel and several portions of over-
coat and trousers, remained out on the
sidewalk.
"Oh, Harold!" the wife exclaimed pas-
sionately, "how did you fall ?"
"When I have fully recovered," he
said, not unkindly, "I may demonstrate
for your benefit the various convolutions
through which 1 passed. At the present
moment, however, an illustration of my
method is impossible for obvious rea-
sons. Therefore, you must let your
imagination feed your curiosity until
such time as I am better able to tie my-
self in a bow knot for your instruction
and edification."
Then lie swore fitfully, and yelled for
the arnica bottle, the brute!
The End.
I showed the novel to Clara Jane and
she threw the most ladylike fit you ever
saw.


(.Insper News, March 23.)
On Monday afternoon, the 5th of this
month, the editor of this paper and Sen-
ator Frank Adams stood in the Tax Col-
lector's office in the courthouse at Mi-
nmi, in Dade County, waiting their turn
to make inquiries about taxes.
An old woman was waiting, likewise.
When her tax receipt was written out
and handed to her, site remarked that
there must be some mistake, as hereto-
fore her taxes had been between three
and four dollars, and now it had reached
between seven and eight dollars. She
was informed by the Tax Collector that
a "drainage tax" had been imposed, and
that this tax constituted the difference.
The Tax Collector further informed her
that some persons had refused to pay
this "drainage tax," but that his in-
structions were not to issue a receipt
unless such tax was paid. The old wo-
man said she could t go to law, that
she would pay it, but not having money
enough, she would leave the receipt and
return for it the next day. Then she
departed.
This occurrence was after the decision
of the United States District Court had
decided the act declaring the drainage
commission null and void, and after that
court's decision that the drainage com-
mission had no power to assess and col-
lect taxes.
This "drainage tax" is still being col-
lected in Dade County from the poor and
ignorant and helpless.
The very ones who should he protected
hy the law are robbed under forms of
law, about the illegality of owhieh they
know nothing.
It is a fearful statj of agairs when
those to whom is ent used the execu-
tion of the laws ign re the laws and
oppress the poor because of their ignor-
anee and poverty.
It is a shame.
It is a burning shame.


"Oh, it's perfectly lovely!" says she.
Me -to the roll-top desk I Me!-
with a fountain-pen in each hand and a
hand-sewed novel hot off the steam pipes
every week.


(Miami Record, March 24.)
The imagination of the gifted editor
of thle Jasper News must have been se-
verely strained to evoke the editorial
quoted, from the actual facts.
Mr. (4autier, when asked as to the oc-
currence, says that while the "old wo-
man1," who, hy the way, is one of the
brightest of the elderly ladies of Miami,
,ind who does not own a foot of land
affected by the drainage tax, was in his
ofllee at the time pointed out by the
News, there was not a word uttered in
relation to the drainage tax question.
There was no complaint on her part as
to higher taxes. The only complaint
made by her was that she inadvertently
brought less money that she ought to
have done in order to pay the small
amount assessed against her property.
If the News man had been entirely
fair lihe would have ascertained that in
Dade County the County Commission-
crs have raised the millage from 19 to
31 mills, and that in many cases the
valutions have IWeen rained, making on
the property a lsmssible doubling-up of
taxes.
While there is much complaint that
local taxes have been largely increased,
there is no complaint from actual resi-
dents of D)ade County of the drainage
tax, and none is ever heard except from
those who live elsewhere, own property
here which they are holding as a spec-
ulation and who are opposed to the poll-
cies of Florida's Governor.
The perversion of a simple incident
into a mendacious attack on a great im-
p movement is unworthy the editor ol the
News, and indicates that all his argu-
mients against the drainage proposition
are based on false premises.
The News has perpetrated the shame.


Seems like in this instance the Miami editor should know
best what happened in his town.


How History Is Made

Two Entirely Different Views of the
Same Subject by Two Florida Editors


"Olit ITIS IIFItFF.(TIY














foo'oropMC


As a caption for this editorial we use Artist Tayl line of Jacksonville under present conditions.
During one of our visits to a vaudeville show we heard one comedian give
a conundrum to another comedian: "What is it," said he, "that wears feathers,
has two legs, a red comb and spurs, and barks like a dog?" Of course the other
"gave it up." "It's a rooster," said the first one. "But why did you say it
barked like a dog?" asked the other. "Just put that in to make it hanrde was
the reply.
We were reminded of this conundrum when we picked up Ordinance No. H
51 of the City of Jacksonville, the caption of which Is: "An Ordinance author-
Ising the remodeling of the Seaboard Air Line Railway freight yards south of
Bay Street and between Bridge Street and Hogan Street."
There are three sections in this ordinance. Section 1 is divided into eight
parts. The sixth part of Section 1 AUTHORIZES THE SEABOARD AIR LINE
TO USE THE FOOT OF HOGAN STREET FROM THE SHORE LINE TO
I


Dig Sefore You Tax
When our well-meaning friends prepare a nice little program for us we are
loath to break into it in any way. It is therefore with considerable diffidence
that we are compelled to demolish the nice structure which one or two of our
brothers have reared for us, under which we have been pictured as sitting in
close communion with Governor Broward, ENDORSING ALL OF HIS ACTS.
To those who have said that we stand sponsor for the Governor, and to those
who may have thought it without expressing the thought, we apologize for being
compelled to spoil this beautiful picture.
WE ARE NOT IN FAVOR OF THE COLLECTION AT PRESENT OF THE
TAX WHICH HAS BEEN LEVIED AGAINST THE LANDS IN THE EVER-
GLADES FOR THE PURPOSE OF DRAINAGE.
We do not think it is proper to collect a special tax on lands UNTIL THE
BENEFIT HAS ACCRUED.
We are not much disturbed about the condition of the "poor" people who
have aroused the sympathies of some of our brothers, who may own some of the
lands subject to this tax. Our information about the ownership of the lands
in the area affected by the tax confirms us in the statement that the total
amount to be collected from small and poor land owners IS SO INCONSID-
ERABLE THAT IT WILL NOT BE A BURDEN- upon the aforesaid poor land
owners.
All but a very small part of this large area is owned by rich corporations;
so, our opposition to the tax comes not from any hysterical idea that the poor
are being ground down into further poverty.
We are opposed to the collection of this tax because we do not think it a
correct principle to collect special taxes on property UNTIL THE BENEFIT
HAS ACCRUED.
Particularly are we opposed to the collection of special taxes until the
land is benefited, when there is an element of doubt that the land WILL BE
benefited.
Eminent engineers have said that the drainage of the Everglades is entirely
feasible and practicable and that the lands which are now practically worthless
will be made very valuable, but before the collection of a special tax is justifia-
ble the ULTIMATE BENEFIT SHOULD BE CERTAIN, and it would be better
to wait until the benefit has actually taken place.
We have arrived at another conclusion in regard to the Everglades drain-
age proposition.
It isthe duty of the present Board of Trustees of the Internal Improvement
Fund to drain the Everglades.
The Act of Congress by which the lands were granted to the State expressly
directs the work of drainage and reclamation. The Act of the Legislature cre-
ating the Board is specific in pointing out this duty of the Trustees. Every
Governor and every Board since 1855 has recognized the binding force of this
obligation. Every Governor has made some effort to drain the Everglades.
Governor Bloxham, during his first term, tried to carry out this obligation;
Governor Perry recognized it and made efforts to perform the work; Governor
Mitchell in his turn took up the question of drainage and reclamation and by his
acts recognized the binding force of the obligation; Governor Fleming did what
he could to carry on the work his predecessors had done.
Governor Bloxham, during his second term, not only reaffirmed his recogni-
tion of this obligation. BUT ENTERED INTO A CONTRACT with a corpora-
tion by which it was proposed to drain the entire area. All of these Governors
and all of the Boards preceding the present Governor and Board have held the
one opinion, THAT IT IS THE DUTY OF THE TRUSTEES TO DRAIN THE
.EVERGLADES.
The only difference between the present Governor and Board and those that
have preceded is THE MANNER IN WHICH THE WORK SHALL BE DONE.
Governor Bloxham tried to do it by contact. Other Governors made efforts
along this line. All failed, and but very little drainage was done during the
fifty years that have elapsed between the time of the creation of the Board of
Trustees and the present
Napoleon B. Broward, candidate for Governor, conceived the idea THAT THE
STATE SHOULD DRAIN THE EVERGLADES. Hti announced it on the stump.
The people elected him Governor, giving Broward'. idea the endorsement which
was necessary to raise it into a question of State policy.
Not only is the obligation to drain the 1lqrglades just as great upon
Governor Broward and the present Board of Trutees as it has ever been on
other Governors and other Boards, but Broward and the present Board are
placed under an ADDITIONAL OBLIGATION WHICH IS OF FAR GREATER
WEIGHT AND IS IMPOSED BY MUCH MORE COMPETENT AUTHORITY
than that of any Act of any Legislature, be lb 8tat or national.
IT IS THE DIRECT INSTRUCTION OrIP"WO0PLE, THROUGH THE
BALLOT, that the work of draining and reclaiming the Everglades should be
prosecuted by the State, acting through the Board of Trustees.


DEEP WATER, SOME 350 FEET, FOR THE TERM OF THIRTY YEARS,
WITHOUT PAYING ONE CENT FOR IT.
The other seven clauses of Section 1 and the remaining two sections of the
ordinance authorize the Seaboard Air Line Railway to do other things, all of
which they could have done without the aid of the ordinance.
The Seaboard Air Line Railway WANTED TO GRAB THE FOOT OF
HOGAN STREET and framed up the sixth part of Section 1 for that purpose.
The other parts of the ordinance were put in for the purpose of covering up
the design of Section 6.
In accordance with the provisions of that ordinance, which was passed on
by City Attorney Barrs, the Seaboard Air Line is proceeding to build a wharf
at the foot of Hogan Street, OCCUPYING PRACTICALLY THE ENTIRE
STREET. Some such word as "driveway" is used in the ordinance, but no one
believes or can be made to believe that the Seaboard Air Line Railway will build
this wharf FOR THE USE OF THE PUBLIC.


We believe that the plan to drain as outlined by the present Board is entirely
practicable and feasible. We have formed this opinion from our own study of
the question. We have been influenced in the forming of this opinion by the
opinion of all of the Governors who have preceded Governor Broward and all
the engineers who have made exhaustive surveys and full reports on the subject.
WE ARE NOT IN FAVOR OF THE COLLECTION AT PRESENT OF THE
TAX TO CARRY OUT THIS WORK until the land is benefited by drainage,
because we think it would be an unjut asct.
But the work of draining the Everglades is not at all dependent upon the
collection of this tax. The Board can do it another way.
The funds which are at present available, and those funds which can be


W-






























It is the easiest thing in the world for any corporation now to get the use
of any street in the city because City Attorney Barre is ready to 0. K. all prop.
positions of this' kind.
He grabbed the foot of Main Street for his own private use, without paying
the city one cent for it, and he is, therefore, compelled to look with a favoring
eye upon the street grabbing propositions of others.
The reasons presented to the City Council, by City Attorney Barrs, for the
granting of this ordinance were that the Seaboard Air Line Railway would open
up some streets on its property south of Bay Street, between Bridge and Hogan.
The ordinance does so provide.
No one has any interest in the opening up of these streets except the Sea-
board Air Line Railway, and it wanted the streets opened because ITS BUSI-
NESS WOULD BE FACILITATED THEREBY.
After these streets are opened no one can use them for any other purpose
than Seaboard Air Line business. The company GETS A THRITY-YEAR GRANT


secured by the sale of lands, added together, WILL BE SUFFICIENT TO DRAIN
THE EVERGT.ADPS.
And the work will go on and will be prosecuted to a successful conclusion, in
aur opinion, without the collection of this tax. We note that some newspaper
have suggested that the Board was doing a wrong act in insisting on the collec-
tion of this tax. We cannot see it that way.
If the Board was to accept our opinion that it was improper to collect this
special tax until the benefit to the land has accrued, it would still be IMPOSSI-
BLE FOR THIS BOARD TO STOP THE COLLECTION OF THE TAX. The
Legislature imposed upon the Board the duty to assess this tax. The tax has
been assessed in accordance with the law. There IS NO LAW FOR THE BOARD


OF HOdAN SEREET FREE, and the citizens get nothing but what they had
before, except such facilities as will benefit the Seaboard Air Line exclusively.
Not only was this grant made to the railway company without benefit to the
city BUT DIRECTLY CONTRARY TO LAW.
The Supreme Court of the State of Florida has held, in the case of Edward
J. Lutterloh, appellant, vs. the Mayor and Council of the Town of Cedar Key,
respondents, which can be found in Vol. 15, page 300 of the Florida Reports, that:
"The corporate authorities of a town have no right to appropriate the
public streets to any other uses than that of travel, or right of way, to which
they were dedicated, and the convenience of the whole public, and they cannot
lawfully obstruct the streets with public or private buildings; and any person
whose property is especially injured thereby, may have the aid of the courts
of equity to restrain such improper appropriation."
We call the Attorney-General's attention to this street-grabbing game which
City Attorney Barre has advised the Council to sanction, with the request that
he take action to stop it.


TO STOP THE COLLECTION OF THIS TAX, and the Board should not be
criticised for obeying the law. If any criticism could properly be brought
against the Board, it would lie if the Board was to stop collecting this tax.
The Act of the Legislature, in our opinion, is wrong, but the Board cannot
correct it, and the people suffer, if there is any suffering, from the Act of the
Legislature, not from the act of the Trustees.
Whatever our opinion may be, or the opinions of others, WILL NOT AFFECT
THE PROSECUTION OF THIS GREAT WORK. The present Board has two
years and nine months in office. It has the money now in bank to build and
operate two dredges during that time. Long before the present Board goes out
of office the feasibility and practicability of the drainage of the Everglades will
be conclusively demonstrated.
Then the opposition will disappear.


The Typograpbical Union
We desire to call attention to the fact that the matter printed on the back
page of this issue is an advertisement paid for at our regular rates. We desire
to say that we are pleased to print this advertisement, Just as we would be
pleased to print the advertisement of any person or body of men who might
desire to use our circulation for the purpose of presenting facts to the people
of this State.
We have refrained from commenting editorially on the differences between
the Times-Union and the Typographical Union. We have explained that edito-
rial courtesy and "newspaper ethics" have intervened to prevent us. We do not
think it it necessary for us to express an opinion in order that RIGHT MAY
TRIUMPH OR THAT INJUSTICE MAY NOT BE DONE.
We will present the side of organized labor whenever the members of organ-
ized labor desire to express their views.
We will present the side of organized capital in like manner, under similar
conditions.
In the first issue of the newspaper which bore the name of this one the
following paragraph was printed:
"Recognizing the right of all men to organize for their own protec-
tion, this newspaper will uphold the cause of organized labor. It will
deal with all questions affecting organized labor justly, fairly and hon-
estly, and with equal justice, fairness and honesty to those who em-
ploy it."
THIS IS OUR POSITION TODAY.
If the time should come when we feel that we might HELP THE TRIUMPH
OF RIGHT by expressing our opinion on this controversy WE WILL EXPRESS
IT, no matter which side it may favor.


Keep Good Men in O fce
Florida has three Congressmen who are doing very well.
No opposition has developed to Mr. Sparkman or Mr. Clark, and they will,
therefore, be continued for another term.
There is opposition to Mr. Lamar, who represents the Third District. For
tunately Mr. Lamar's opponent, although an honest man, is not a very strong
one politically, and we confidently predict that Mr. Lamar will be returned.
We are not sufficiently disturbed about the danger which threaten. to unseat
Mr. Lamar to give, at this time, any reasons why Mr. Lamar should be preferred
over his opponent, except the general proposition, that faithful public servants
should be continued in office AS LONG AS THEY ARE USEFUL SERVANTS,
and that rotation in office, although nice in theory, is bad in practice, when
results are looked for, instead of the gratification of the personal ambition of one
who may aspire to hold the office already acceptably filled.
We congratulate the State of Florida that there is so little danger of any
one of these three capable representatives at Washington being disturbed.

It is not the fault of the country papers of Florida if they are tardy in print-
ing anything favorable to Governor Broward or in seeing anything good in the
plan for Everglade improvement. Owing to the false position in which they were
placed by the Times-Union it is embarrassing for many of them to change
expression.

Hon. J. B. Johnson of Live Oak informs THE SUN that he is not a candi-
date for Supreme Court Justice, and that he has no intention of entering the
contest.


0































As a caption for this editorial we use Artist Taylor's conception of the sky
line of Jacksonville under present conditions.
During one of our visits to a vaudeville show we heard one comedian give
a conundrum to another comedian: "What is it," said he, "that wears feathers,
has two legs, a red comb and spurs, and barks like a dog?" Of course the other
"gave it up." "It's a rooster," said the first one. "But why did you say it
barked like a dog?" asked the other. "Just put that in to make it harder was
the reply.
We were reminded of this conundrum when we picked up Ordinance No. H
51 of the City of Jacksonville, the caption of which is: "An Ordinance author-
ising the remodeling of the Seaboard Air Line Railway freight yards south of
Bay Street and between Bridge Street and Hogan Street."
There are three sections in this ordinance. Section 1 is divided into eight
parts. The sixth part of Section 1 AUTHORIZES THE SEABOARD AIR LINE
TO USE THE FOOT OF HOGAN STKrifi FROM THE SHORE LINE TO


Dig Sefore You Tax
When our well-meaning friends prepare a nice little program for us we are
loath to break into it in any way. It is therefore with considerable diffidence
that we are compelled to demolish the nice structure which one or two of our
brothers have reared for us, under which we have been pictured as sitting in
close communion with Governor Broward, ENDORSING ALL OF HIS ACTS.
To those who have said that we stand sponsor for the Governor, and to those
who may have thought it without expressing the thought, we apologize for being
compelled to spoil this beautiful picture.
WE ARE NOT IN FAVOR OF THE COLLECTION AT PRESENT OF THE
TAX WHICH HAS BEEN LEVIED AGAINST THE LANDS IN THE EVER-
GLADES FOR THE PURPOSE OF DRAINAGE.
We do not think it is proper to collect a special tax on lands UNTIL THE
BENEFIT HAS ACCRUED.
We are not much disturbed about the condition of the "poor" people who
have aroused the sympathies of some of our brothers, who may own some of the
lands subject to this tax. Our information about the ownership of the lands
in the area affected by the tax confirms us in the statement that the total
amount to be collected from small and poor land owners IS SO INCONSID-
ERABLE THAT IT WILL NOT BE A BURDEN. upon the aforesaid poor land
owners.
All but a very small part of this large area is owned by rich corporations;
so, our opposition to the tax comes not from any hysterical idea that the poor
are being ground down into further poverty.
We are opposed to the collection of this tax because we do not think it a
correct principle to collect special taxes on property UNTIL THE BENEFIT
HAS ACCRUED.
Particularly are we opposed to the collection of special taxes until the
land is benefited, when there is an element of doubt that the land WILL BE
benefited.
Eminent engineers have said that the drainage of the Everglades is entirely
feasible and practicable and that the lands which are now practically worthless
will be made very valuable, but before the collection of a special tax is justifia-
ble the ULTIMATE BENEFIT SHOULD BE CERTAIN, and it would be better
to wait until the benefit has actually taken place.
We have arrived at another conclusion in regard to the Everglades drain-
age proposition.
It is the duty of the present Board of Trustees of the Internal Improvement
Fund to drain the Everglades.
The Act of Congress by which the lands were granted to the State expressly
directs the work of drainage and reclamation. The Act of the Legislature cre-
ating the Board in specific in pointing out this duty of the Trustees. Every
Governor and every Board since 1855 has recognized the binding force of this
obligation. Every Governor has made some effort to drain the Everglades.
Governor Bloxham, during his first term, tried to carry out this obligation;
Governor Perry recognized it and made efforts to perform the work; Governor
Mitchell in his turn took up the question of drainage and reclamation and by his
acts recognized the binding force of the obligation; Governor Fleming did what
he could to carry on the work his predecessors had done.
Governor Bloxham, during his second term, not only reaffirmed his recogni-
tion of this obligation, BUT ENTERED INTO A CONTRACT with a corpora-
tion by which it was proposed to drain the entire area. All of these Governors
and all of the Boards preceding the present Governor and Board have held the
one opinion, THAT IT IS THE DUTY OF THE TRUSTEES TO DRAIN THE
EVERGLADES.
The only difference between the present Governor and Board and those that
have preceded is THE MANNER IN WHICH THE WORK SHALL BE DONE.
Governor Bloxham tried to do it by contract. Other Governors made efforts
along this line. All failed, and but very little drainage was done during the
fifty years that have elapsed between the time of the creation of the Board of
Trustees and the present
Napoleon B. Broward, candidate for Governor, conceived the idea THAT THE
STATE SHOULD DRAIN THE EVERGLADES. IH announced it on the stump.
The people elected him Governor, giving Broward'aidea the endorsement which
was necessary to raise it into a question of State policy.
Not only is the obligation to drain the 3kqrglades just as great upon
Governor Broward and the present Board of Truees as it has ever been on
other Governors and other Boards, but Broward end the present Board are
Sliced under an ADDITIONAL OBLIGATION WHICH IS OF FAR GREATER
WEIGHT AND IS IMPOSED BY MUCH MORE COMPETENT AUTHORITY
than that of any Act of any Legislature, be 16 8tat or national.
IT IS THE DIRECT INSTRUCTION OPYHTPWOPLB, THROUGH THE
BALLOT, that the work of draining and reclaiming the Everglades should be
proeuted by the State, acting through the Board of Trustess


DEEP WATER, SOME 350 FEET, FOR THE TERM OF THIRTY YEARS,
WITHOUT PAYING ONE CENT FOR IT.
The other seven clauses of Section 1 and the remaining two sections of the
ordinance authorize the Seaboard Air Line Railway to do other things, all of
which they could have done without the aid of the ordinance.
The Seaboard Air Line Railway WANTED TO GRAB THE FOOT OF
HOGAN STREET and framed up the sixth part of Section 1 for that purpose.
The other parts of the ordinance were put in for the purpose of covering up
the design of Section 6.
In accordance with the provisions of that ordinance, which was passed on
by City Attorney Barrs, the Seaboard Air Line is proceeding to build a wharf
at the foot of Hogan Street, OCCUPYING PRACTICALLY THE ENTIRE
STREET. Some such word as "driveway" is used in the ordinance, but no one
believes or can be made to believe that the Seaboard Air Line Railway will build
this wharf FOR THE USE OF THE PUBLIC.


We believe that the plan to drain as outlined by the present Board is entirely
practicable and feasible. We have formed this opinion from our own study of
the question. We have been influenced in the forming of this opinion by the
opinion of all of the Governors who have preceded Governor Broward and all
the engineers who have made exhaustive surveys and full reports on the subject.
WE ARE NOT IN FAVOR OF THE COLLECTION AT PRESENT OF THE
TAX TO CARRY OUT THIS WORK until the land is benefited by drainage,
because we think it would be an unjut asct.
But the work of draining the Everglades is not at all dependent upon the
collection of this tax. The Board can do it another way.
The funds which are at present available, and those funds which can be


now"


I -N


W-














VooYr Ll BE I~X I
0((u PIECD) BY
yOuCIVR
(; 11 1


if


It is the easiest thing in the world for any corporation now to get the use
of any street in the city because City Attorney Barre is ready to 0. K. all prop.
positions of this* kind.
He grabbed the foot of Main Street for his own private use, without paying
the city one cent for it, and he is, therefore, compelled to look with a favoring
eye upon the street grabbing propositions of others.
The reasons presented to the City Council, by City Attorney Barre, for the
granting of this ordinance were that the Seaboard Air Line Railway would open
up some streets on its property south of Bay Street, between Bridge and Hogan.
The ordinance does so provide.
No one has any interest in the opening up of these streets except the Sea-
board Air Line Railway, and it wanted the streets opened because ITS BUSI-
NESS WOULD BE FACILITATED THEREBY.
After these streets are opened no one can use them for any other purpose
than Seaboard Air Line business. The company GETS A THRITY-YEAR GRANT


T441 of WAS"NGMAY"

OCXUPDWBOY~


OF HOdAN SEREET FREE, and the citizens get nothing but what they had
before, except such facilities as will benefit the Seaboard Air Line exclusively.
Not only was this grant made to the railway company without benefit to the
city BUT DIRECTLY CONTRARY TO LAW.
The Supreme Court of the State of Florida has held, in the case of Edward
J. Lutterloh, appellant, vs. the Mayor and Council of the Town of Cedar Key,
respondents, which can be found in Vol. 15, page 306 of the Florida Reports, that:
"The corporate authorities of a town have no right to appropriate the
public streets to any other uses than that of travel, or right of way, to which
they were dedicated, and the convenience of the whole public, and they cannot
lawfully obstruct the streets with public or private buildings; and any person
whose property is especially injured thereby, may have the aid of the courts
of equity to restrain such improper appropriation."
We call the Attorney-General 's attention to this street-grabbing game which
City Attorney Barra has advised the Council to sanction, with the request that
he take action to stop it.


secured by the sale of lands, added together, WILL BE SUFFICIENT TO DRAIN
THE EVERGLADER.
And the work will go on and will be prosecuted to a successful conclusion, in
our opinion, without the collection of this tax. We note that some newspapers
have suggested that the Board was doing a wrong act in insisting on the collec-
tion of this tax. We cannot see it that way.
If the Board was to accept our opinion that it was improper to collect this
special tax until the benefit to the land has accrued, it would still be IMPOSSI-
BLE FOR THIS BOARD TO STOP THE COLLECTION OF THE TAX. The
Legislature imposed upon the Board the duty to assess this tax. The tax has
been assessed in accordance with the law. There IS NO LAW FOR THE BOARD


VIr







46
\ __


11"t~r yeah'draknaeotax Ik due. 9
0 low flrsL"


TO STOP THE COLLECTION OF THIS TAX, and the Board should not be
criticized for obeying the law. If any criticism could properly be brought
against the Board, it would lie if the Board was to stop collecting this tax.
The Act of the Legislature, in our opinion, is wrong, but the Board cannot
correct it, and the people suffer, if there is any suffering, from the Act of the
Legislature, not from the act of the Trustees.
Whatever our opinion may be, or the opinions of others, WILL NOT AFFECT
THE PROSECUTION OF THIS GREAT WORK. The present Board has two
years and nine months in office. It has the money now in bank to build and
operate two dredges during that time. Long before the present Board goes out
of office the feasibility and practicability of the drainage of the Everglades will
be conclusively demonstrated.
Then the opposition will disappear.


The Typographical Union
We desire to call attention to the fact that the matter printed on the back
page of this issue is an advertisement paid for at our regular rates. We desire
to say that we are pleased to print this advertisement, just as we would be
pleased to print the advertisement of any person or body of men who might
desire to use our circulation for the purpose of presenting facts to the people
of this State.
We have refrained from commenting editorially on the differences between
the Times-Union and the Typographical Union. We have explained that edito-
rial courtesy and "newspaper ethics" have intervened to prevent us. We do not
think it it necessary for us to express an opinion in order that RIGHT MAY
TRIUMPH OR THAT INJUSTICE MAY NOT BE DONE.
We will present the side of organized labor whenever the members of organ.
sized labor desire to express their views.
We will present the side of organized capital in like manner, under similar
conditions.
In the first issue of the newspaper which bore the name of this one the
following paragraph was printed:
"Recognizing the right of all men to organize for their own protec-
tion, this newspaper will uphold the cause of organized labor. It will
deal with all questions affecting organized labor justly, fairly and hon-
estly, and with equal justice, fairness and honesty to those who em-
poy it."
HIS IS OUR POSITION TODAY.
If the time should come when we feel that we might HELP THE TRIUMPH
OF RIGHT by expressing our opinion on this controversy WE WILL EXPRESS
IT, no matter which side it may favor.

Keep Good Men in Ojfce
Florida has three Congressmen who are doing very well.
No opposition has developed to Mr. Sparkman or Mr. Clark, and they will,
therefore, be continued for another term.
There is opposition to Mr. Lamar, who represents the Third District. For
tunately Mr. Lamar's opponent, although an honest man, is not a very strong
one politically, and we confidently predict that Mr. Lamar will be returned.
We are not sufficiently disturbed about the danger which threatens to unseat
Mr. Lamar to give, at this time, any reasons why Mr. Lamar should be preferred
over his opponent, except the general proposition, that faithful public servants
should be continued in office AS LONG AS THEY ARE USEFUL SERVANTS,
and that rotation in office, although nice in theory, is bad in practice, when
results are looked for, instead of the gratification of the personal ambition of one
who may aspire to hold the office already acceptably filled.
We congratulate the State of Florida that there is so little danger of any
one of these three capable representatives at Washington being disturbed.

It is not the fault of the country papers of Florida if they are tardy in print-
ing anything favorable to Governor Broward or in seeing anything good in the
plan for Everglade improvement. Owing to the false position in which they were
placed by the Times-Union it is embarrassing for many of them to change
expression.

Hon. J. B. Johnson of Live Oak informs THE SUN that he is not a candi.
date for Supreme Court Justice, and that he has no intention of entering the
eontot.













Tenth .Pae


The


THE SUN


Czar's Spy


March 31, 1906


CheDrvle Wla L .
Chevalier William' Le Quouz


"That's where they found the man
who was murdered," explained the ser-
vant who stiI stood in the doorway.
"I kaw,"' I replied., "I was just try-
the glasse" Then I put them down,
am tuning saw upon the mantle-
shelf a small, bright-red candleshade,
which I took In my hand. It was made,
I found, to At upon the electric table-
lamp.
"ss Muriel was very fond of a red
light," explained the young woman; and
as I held It I wondered if that light had
ever been placed upon the toiletlable
and the blind drawn up-whether it had
ever been used as a warning of danger?
As I expressed a desire to see the
younglady's boudoir, the maid Cameron
took me down to the luxurious little
room where, the first moment I en-
tered, one fact struck me as peculiar.
The picture of Elms Heath was no longer
there. The photograph had been taken
from its frame, and in its place was the
portrait of a broad-browed, full-bearded
man in a foreign military uniform-a
picture that, being soiled and faded, had
evidently been placed there to fill the
empty frame.
Whose hand had secured that portrait
before the Leithoourt's flight? Why, in-
deed, should I, for the second time, dis-
cover the unhappy girl's picture missing?
"Has the gentleman who called on the
evening of Mr. Leithcourt's disappear-
anoe been back here again since he left
the hospital?" I inquired as a sudden
idea occurred to me.
"Yes, sir. He called here in a fly on
the day he came out, and at his request
I took him over the castle. He went into
the library, and spent half-an-hour in
pacing across it, taking measurements,
and examining the big cupboard in
which he was found insensible. It was
a strange affair, sir," added the young
woman, "wasn't it?"
"Very," I replied.
"The gentleman might have been in
there now had I not gone into the library
and found a lot of illustrated papers,
which I always put in the cupboard to
keep the place tidy, thrown out on the
floor. I went to put them back but dis-
covered the door locked. The key 1
afterwards found in the grate, where
Mr. Leithcourt had evidently thrown it,
and on opening the door imagine the
shook I had when I found the visitor
lying doubled up. I, of course, thought
he was dead."
"And when he returned here on his re-
covery, did he question you?"
"Oh, ye. He asked me about the
Leithoourte, and especially about Miss
Muriel. I believe he's rather sweet on
her, by the way he spoke. And really
no better or kinder lady ever breathed,
I'm sure. We're all very sorry indeed
for her."
"But she had nothing to do with the
affair."
"Of course not. But she shares in the
scandal and disgrace. You should have
seen the effect of the news upon the
guests when they knew that the Leith-
courts had gone. It was a regular pan-
demonium. They ordered the best cham-
pagne out of the cellars and drank it,
ti men cleared all the cigar boxes, and
the women rummaged in the wardrobes
until they seemed like a pack of hungry
wolves. Everybody went away with
their trunks full of the Leithcourt's
this. They took whatever they could
lay'teir hands on, and we, the servants,
couldn't stop them. I did remonstrate
with one lady who was cramming into
her trunk two of Miss Muriel's best
evening dresses, but she told me to mind
my own business and leave the room.
One man I saw go away with four of Mr.
Leitheourt's guns, and there was a reg-
ujar squabble in the billiard room over
a set of pearl and emerald dress-studs
tht somebody found in his dressing-
rooa Crane, the valet, says they tossed
for tami."
"Disgraefull" I ejaculated. "Then as
moos as the host and hostess had gone,
dthe im aly swent through the rooms
s ir 'They took away all that
yas auabe. The'd have had the ail


ver, only Mason had thrown it into the
plate chest, all dirty as it was, looked it
up and hid the key. The plate was Mr.
Glmrae's, you know, sir, and Mason was
responsible."
"'e acted wisely," I said, surprised at
the domestic's story. "Why, the guests
acted like a gang of thieves."
"They were, sir. They rushed all over
the house like demons let loose, and they
even stole some of our things. I lost a
silver chain."
"And what did the stranger say when
you told him of this?"
"He smiled. It did not seem to sur-
prise him in the least, for after all his
visit was the cause of the sudden break-
ing up of the party, wasn't it?"
"And did you show him over the whole
house?" I inquired.
"Yes, sir," responded the servant.
"Curiously enough he had with him what
seemed to be a large plan of the castle,
and as we went from room to room he
compared it with his plan. He was
here for hours, and told me he wanted
to make a thorough examination of the
place and didn't want to be disturbed.
He also said that he might probably
take the place for next season, if he liked
it. I think, however, he only told me
this because he thought I would be more
patient while he took his measurements
and made his investigations. He was
here from twelve till nearly six o'clock,
and went through every room, even up
to the turrets."
"He came into this room, I suppose?"
"Yes, sir," she responded, with Just a
slight hesitation, I thought. "This was
the room where he stayed the longest.
There was a photograph in that frame
over there," she added, Indicating the
frame that had held the picture of Elma
Heath, "a portrait of a young lady,
which he begged me to give him."
"And you gave it to him?" I cried
quickly.
"Well-yes, sir. He begged so hard
for it, saying that it was the portrait
of a friend of his."
"And he gave you something hand-
some for it-eh?"


The young woman, whom I knew could
not refuse half a sovereign, colored
slightly and smiled.
"And who put that picture in its
place?" I asked.
"I did, sir. I found it upstairs."
"He didn't tell you who the young
lady was, I suppose?"
"No, sir. He only said that that was
the only photograph that existed, and
that she was dead."'
"Dead!" I gasped, staring at her.
"Yes, sir. That was why he was so
anxious for the picture."
Elma Heath dead! Could it be true?
That sweet-pictured face haunted me as
no other face had ever impressed itself
upon my memory. It somehow seemed
to impel me to endeavor to penetrate
the mystery, and yet Hylton Chater had
declared that she was dead! recol
elected the remarkable letter from Abo,
and her own declaration that her end
was near. That letter was, s&e aid, the
last she should write to her friend. Did
Hylton Chater actually possess knowl-
edge of the girl's death? Had he all
along been acquainted with her where-
abouts? What the young woman told
me upset all my plans. If Elma IHetth
were really dead, then she was beyond
discovery, and the truth would be
hidden forever.
"After he had put the photograph in
his pocket, the gentleman made a most
minute search in this room," the domes-
tic went on. "Hle consulted his plan,
took several measurements, and then
tapped on the paneling all along this
wall, as though he were searching for
some hidden cupboard or hiding-place.
I looked at the plan, and saw a mark in
red ink upon it. He was trying to dis-
cover that spot, and was greatly disap-
pointed at not being able to do so. He
was in here over an hour, and made a
most careful search all around."
"What explanation did he give?"
"He only said, 'If I find what I want,
Ann, I shall make you a present of a


ten-pound not.' That naturally made
me anxious."
"He made no other remark about the
young lady's death?" I inquired
anxiously.
"No. Only he sighed, and looked
steadily for a long time at the photo-
graph. I saw his lips moving, but his
words were inaudible."
"You haven't any idea of the reason
why he called upon Mr. Leithoourt, I
suppose?"
"From what he said, I've formed my
own conclusions," was her answer.

"And what is your opinion?"
"Well, I feel certain that there is, or
was, something concealed in this house
that he's very anxious to obtain. He
came to demand it of Mr. Leithcourt,
but what happened in the library we
don't know. He, however, believes that
Mr. Leithoourt has not taken it away,
and that, whatever it may be, it is still
hidden here."
CHAPTER X.


I SHOW MY HAND.


On my return to London next day I
made inquiry at the Admiralty and
learned that the Battleship Bulwark
was lying at Palermo, therefore I tele-
graphed to Jack Durnford, and late the
same afternoon his reply came at the
Cecil-
"Due in London twentieth. Dine with
me at club that evening.-Jack."
The twentieth! That meant nearly a
month of inactivity. In that time I
could cross to Abo, make inquiries there,
and ascertain, perhaps, if Elma Heath
were actually dead as Chater had de-
clared.
Two facts struck me as remarkable:
Baron Oberg was said to be Polish, while
the dark-beared proprietor of the res-
taurant in Westbourne Grove was also
of the same nationality. Then I recol-
lected that pretty little enameled cross
that Mackenzie had found in Rannoch
Wood, and it suddenly occurred to me
ti.at it might possibly be the miniature
of one of the European orders of chiv-
alry. In the club library at midnight I
found a copy of Cappelletti's Storia degli
Ordini Cavallereachi, the standard work
on the subject, and on searching the
illustrations I at length discovered a pic-
ture of it. It was a Russian order-the
coveted Order of Saint Anne, bestowed
by the Czar only upon persons who have
rendered eminent services to the state
and to the sovereign. One fact was now
certain, namely, that the owner of that
tiny cross, the small replica of the fine
decoration, must be a person of high
official standing.
Next day I spent in making inquiries
with a view to discovering the house
said to be occupied by Leithcourt. As
it was not either in the Directory or the
Blue Book, I concluded that he had per-
haps rented it furnished, and after
many inquiries and considerable diffi-
culties I found that such was the fact.
He had occupied the house of Lady
Heathcote, a few doors from Grosvenor
Square, for the previous season, although
he had lived there but very little.
Where the fugitives were in hiding I
had no idea. I longed to meet Muriel
again and tell her what I had discov-
ered, yet it was plain that the trio were
concealing themselves from Hlyton Cha-
ter, whom I supposed to be now back in
London.
The autumn days were dull and rainy,
and the streets were muddy and un-
pleasant. as they always are at the fall
of the year. Compelled to remain in-
active, I idled in the club with the recol-
lection of that pictured face ever before
me-the tace of the unfortunate girl who
wished her last message to be conveyed
to Philip Hornby. What, I wondered,
was her secret? What was really her
fate?
This latter question troubled me until
I could bear it no longer. I felt that it
was my duty to go to Finland and en-
deavor to learn something regarding this
Baron Oberg and his niece. Frank
Hutcheon had written me declaring that


the weather in Leghorn wa now perfiet,
mad expressing wonder that I did not re-
turn. 1 was his only English friend, and
I knew how dull he was when alone.
Even his Majesty's Onsuls sometimes
suffer from home-sickness, and long for
bue smell of the London gutters and a
glass of homely bitter ale.
But you, my reader, who have lived in
a foreign land for any length of time,
know well how wearisome becomes the
life, however brilliant, and how sweet
are the recollections of our dear ray old
England with her green fields, her
muddy lanes, and the bustling streets
of her gray, grimy cities. You have but
one "home," and England is still your
home, even though you may become the
most bigoted of cosmopolitans and may
have no opportunity of speaking your
native tongue the whole year through.
Duty-the duty of a man who had
learned strange facts and knew that a
defenseless woman was a victim-called
me to Finland. Therefore, with my
passport properly vised and my papers
all in order, I one night left Hull for
Stockholm by the weekly Wilson ser-
vice. Four days of rough weather in the
North Sea and the Baltic brought me to
the Swedish capital, whence on the fol-
lowing day I took the small steamer
which plies three times a week around
the Aland Islands, and then across the
Gulf of Bothnia to Korpo, and through
the intricate channels and among those
low-lying islands to the gray lethargic
town of Abo.
It was not the first occasion on which
I had trod Russian soil, and I knew too
well the annoyances of the bureaucracy.
Finland, however, is perhaps the most
severely governed of any of the Czar's
dominions, and I had my first taste of
its stern, relentless officialdom at the
moment of landing on the half-deserted
quay.
In the wooden passport office the uni-
formed official, on examining my pass-
port, discovered that at the Russian
Consulate-General they had forgotten to
date the vise which had been Impressed
with a rubber stamp. It was signed by
the Consul-General, but the date was
missing, whereupon the man shook his
head and handed back the document
curtly, saying in Russian which I under-
stood fairly well, although I spoke
badly-
"This is not in order. It must be re-
turned to London and dated before you
can proceed."
"But it is not my fault," I protested.
"It is the fault of the clerk at the Con.
sulate-General."
"You should have examined it before
leaving. You must send it to London,
and return to Stockholm by to-night's
boat."
"But this is outrageous! I cried, as
he had already taken the papers of a
passenger behind me and was looking
at them with unconcern.
"Enough!" he exclaimed, glaring at
me. "You will return tonight, or if you
choose to stay you will be arrested for
landing without a passport."
"I shall not go back!" I declared de.
flantly. "Your Consul-General vised my
passport, and I claim, under intern-
tional law, to be allowed to proceed
without hindrance."
"The steamer leaves at six o'clock,"
he remarked without looking up. "If
you are in Abo after that it wil be at
your own risk."
"I am English, recollect," I said.
"To me it does not matter what or
who you are. Ybur passport, undated,
is worthless.
"I shall complain to the Ambassador
at Petersburg."
"Your Ambassador does not interest
me in the least. He is not Ambassador
here in Finland. There is no Czar here."
"Oh! Who is ruler of this country,
pray ?"
"His Excellency the Governor-General,
an official who has love for neither Eng-
land nor the pigs of English. So recol-
lect that."
Yes, I said meaningly, "I shall
[Continued on Fourteenth Pages]


hi


I













March 31,1906


THE SUN


Eleventh Page


"Where is the Cash?"

An Editorial by a Sun Reader on the Money Question


Among the many questions that are frequently die. voters and "boodle and fraud" by the financiers it came to the chickens, the foxes volunteered to
cussed by the people of the United States, the quest during the t fort years. look after the chickens, as they knew all about the
tin of "WHERE S TH HUnitd a er impor- At the oe of the war in 1865 there cw chicken business.
tion of "WHERE 18 THE CASH" is a very impor $50 per capit of money in the United Stte. At The financial foxes have taken possession of
tent one, and it is interesting to note the opinions that time the National Government was not con- the law-making power of the Government, and the
of writers and speakers when dealing with the trolled by political buzzards that feast and fatten humiliating spectacle is seen of a nation ruled by a
money question. on the spoils of special legislation, and for a few cabal of Wall Street money sharks who hold high
According to the Secretary of the United States years there was a general prosperity all over the carnival over the remains of the victims who dare
country. invade their sacred temple where there is no God
Treasury, there is approximately nearly $32 per There were but few large fortunes at that time but ambition, and the survival of the fittest are
capital of money (cash) that has been issued and and they were not concentrated in industrial enter- the high priests who divide the spoils.
is in the hands of the people of the United States. prises as they are today. If a pirate ship should land at any of our ports
But where is it Who has it?. What are they The great national resources were not monopo- and rob the citizens the whole nation would arise
lizBut wheed, and the vast areas of agricultural lands of and demand immediate action, and the fate of the
doing with it? the West furnished opportunities to thousands of pirates would be death when captured.
The investigation of the insurance companies willing workers. Not so, however, with the financial pirates who
showed that approximately one billion of cash was It was during this period that the political states- have been robbing widows and orphans, as the recent
controlled by three men. It i a safe proposition man was succeeded by the political buzzard, and insurance investigations have shown.
controlled by three men. It a from that time the "Invisible Empire" has dictated The pirates were caught red-handed, but not one
that the trust companies hold equally as great all legislation while the deluded people bow in hum- of them were punished by even fine or imprisonment.
an amount in their control and the balance, accord- ble servitude to a condition under which chattel The financial pirates made demands on old "Hickory
ing to Mr. Shaw, is in the treasury of the National slavery pales into insignificance. Jackson" and he put them out of business in short
We have the wealth, but WHERE IS THE CASH order. The next pirate gang took advantage of the
Government. This presents a most complicated on- by which to measure it? National Government in its most trying hour for
edition, and all kinds of theories are advanced by Who are those statesmen who tell of our great existence, and "Honest Abe Lincoln" was forced to
financiers in which they try to show that the United prosperity and wealth and point with pride to the compromise with them, and from that day they have
States is in a most prosperous condition when, in condition of the National Treasury that i filled with raided the National Treasury so frequently that ft
reality, they are making every effort to get control money that has been taken from the people by a has become a standing joke or pastime to get some
system of legalized robbery? special legislation by which to rob the people.
of the money-making power of the Government and Who are those cunning jugglers who assembled These same financial pirates forced the Govern-
control the volume of money so that the necessities at Washington a short time before Congress con- ment to give interest-bearing bonds for greenbacks
of the people will be absolutely under their control. vened and passed resolutions favoring an elastic cur- that were bought with gold at from 40 to 60 cents
Money rules; but will it rule forever? rency based on any security that counted as an asset on the dollar, and kept up their demands until the
of national banks? National Government was forced to issue bonds
The whole world is being agitated as it never was Who are those financial pirates that have de. in time of peace for the benefit of a few political
before, as it becomes more evident that money is manded that all the silver dollars and certificates, pirates who divided the spoils with the Wall Street
being used to pollute the Legislatures where law- treasury notes and grenebacks, be retired by exchang- financiers.
makers assemble to enact legislation, not for the ing them for interest-bearing Bonds that may be The Treasury raid in 1805 was a grand success
usmakers assemble to enact legislation, not for thed by the national banks as a base upon which and Wall Street echoed with the shouts of the sue-
benefit of the people collectively, but for the favored to issue national banknotes in extreme cases of cessful pirates.
few WHO HAVE THE CASH. emergency? The midnight bond deal of 1805 was conceived in
The people of any nation who permit the financiers These are the people who consider a national iniquity and born in sin.
to control the law-making power are slaves to condi- debt as a national blessing. These are the people, When the news went out to the people a great
to control their law creaking power retion.who, like the shell juggler, shouts to attract the at- protest was made against the schemers who took
tions of their own creation. tention of the suckers-"here it is, there it is; now part in the deal.
The money question in the United States has it's here, then it's there; sometimes I lose it myself In order to quiet the agitators another bond
been threshed over and over during the past forty but always find it, and now if any of you can tell deal was arrange' in which all the people (who
years, and today, although the financiers have made where the little ball is you can double your money;" had any cash) were requested to take a part.
years, and t y, although ever, the y are demand- but b that time the juggler's nimble fingers have the The scheme worked just as the financiers planned
their position stronger than ever they re demand- ball in the safe place, not under the shells by any it and the Wall Rtreet pirates gave great receptions
ing that the Government grant them more power to means, and the suckers give up their money and look to those political pirates who betrayed the people
control the volume of money, upon the juggler as a very superior sort of person. and aided the financiers of Wall Street in buncoing
It is very evident that the prophecy of Lincoln These financial jugglers are the people who can the people into the idea that the best way to increase
has been fulfilled. answer the question "WHERE IS THE ASH?" the wealth of a nation was to increase the national
The dollar is above the man in the structure of They have it, and that they are using it is not debt.
Government. an empty #lream but a plain, solid fact that needs Such a financial system is a disgrace to an en-
The recent investigations of the insurance com- no argument for proof. lightened and civilized nation, and it is high time
panics showed most conclusively that the financiers An old fable tells how, at one time, the animals that the people should decide whether the finaclers
make the platforms, nominate candidates, control and birds held a convention and were discussing with "boodle and fraud" or the people, with "horse
elections and dictate legislation. This condition is their conditions. It was unanimously decided that sense and the ballot" will control the Government.
the result of magnified ideas on the part of the the strongest should protect the weakest, and when T. M. RAMBTlR.


I've Been lThiin kil ng
(Continued from Sixth Page)
in the cars to poor tired women, and at last gave his
life to save a poor wretched Magdalen from death by
fire."
At this point the Reader of Novels addressed the
judge, and said:
"What was this person, anyway?"
"He was a human being," said the judge, gravely.
"There are many such."

"Seven Miles to Smith's Shoe Store." So reads
the half-obliterated legend upon the mile-post oppo-
site my door in the country. It is ten years since in
proud fresh paint it first invited my gaze, and what
a comforter and guide and warning it has been in
that time Smith's shoe store is in a provincial
town. Smith's shoe store is presumably dark and
dismal and smells of leather and new rubber over-
shoes and patent insoles, and it probably backs upon
a dirty, turgid stream that supplies some half-dozen
mills that might better go thirsty than taste of its
oily waters.
Often when things have gone wrong with me, the
clouds seeming to have neither end nor beginning, I
have looked at the little sign and have realized that
whatever else might happen I was still seven miles
away from Smith's shoe store.
The mile-post stands amid a lump of brakes;


black alders shield it from the morning sun, and a
sweetbrier bush has scratched at its paint for seven
summers; in the distance one sees purple mountains
and near at hand are fragrant meadows and inviting
woods and an irresolute brook and half-ruined stone
walls on whose mossy rocks the robins sing in the
morning, and I have seen many a humorous bobolink
pause and seem to read the sign and then fly away
from Smith's shoe store, singing mockingly.
Smith's shoe store will always be a sealed book
to me, thanks to the sign. I have received a friendly
warning and I know where not to go. My feet may
need shoes from time to time, but they will never
come from Smith's emporium. I want to feel that
the worst has not happened for me; that Smith's is
still a terra incognita.
Once I went driving aimlessly and turning a cor-
ner I came on a sister mile-post that read "One Mile
to Smith's Shoe Store." The road was narrow and it
was risky turning, but almost in a panic I pointed
my horse's nose in the way it should go and drove
back at a rattling pace-any pace is a rattling one
with me for I need a new wagon. How cheering it
was when I had ridden some thirty minutes to come
to another mile-post that read "Two Miles to Smith's
Shoe Store!" And as I passed each one in turn I
felt like breaking out into a song of thanksgiving,
for the road led me higher and higher and new
glories of scenery were discovered as Smith's fell
farther and farther, and at last I came to my
silent comforter and was assured in characters still
legible that it was "Seven Miles to Smith's." Never
again did I take that particular drive.
There are Smith's shoe stores scattered through-
out our lives. Happy we, if it is possible to keep
the sevea-mile guid-iat in front of our eyes and
fel that whatever r evils ay befall, two good
ihus of read 1e be6 w aao Smith's.


Medicine Manufactured by State
Reduces Death Mortality
Rome.-The State Drug Store, that is the quinine
monopoly assumed by the state in 1887, has done
wonders in reducing the mortality from malaria,
and would do still better if it had not superstition
and ignorance as vicious opponents. The poor peo-
ple in the malaria districts hold to the foolish belief
hat quinine is poison, causing loss of appetite, in-
flammation of the stomach and abnormous growth
of the spleen, which latter, by the way, is a symptom
of the disease quinine suppresses-malaria.
Before the state assumed the quinine monopoly
this most necessary medicine for Italy was made
a quarry by unscrupulous and criminal speculators,
who combined to maintain an abnormally high price,
and, besides, adulterated the drug to such an extent
that consumers got scarcely one-tenth of what they
paid for. As a consequence the mortality from ma-
laria amounted to over 16,000 per year. After the
quinine monopoly was created by the state there
was a falling off of nearly 6,000 in the spaoe of a
twelvemonth. Last year the mortality was reduced
to 7,392, less than 50 per cent of the mortality pre-
vailing when quinine was "trusted" for the benefit
of speculators instead of for the benefit of the people.
The state sells the drug in sealed glass tubes at
cost, and sells it everywhere, not only drug stores,
but tobacco stores, being obliged by law to keep it
on sale. The law compels eity, town and village
authorities to distribute quinine free among the poor,
and to these wholesale customers the state sells the
quinine even below eot. The many lasrg ad own-
ers of Italy are likewls pe teto dito qul
mine freem, but ag aot of the ob baa
shirk that dty, t ae L












Twelfth Page


THE SUN


March 31,1906


Some


Rats


in


the


Garret


By R. L. HARPER, Organizer I. T. U.

Mr. Wilson Repudiates His Positive Agreement With President Lynch and
Negotiations for Settlement of Lockout Come to Abrupt End-The Fight On


The State Federation of Labor, the
annual convention of which closed last
Friday week in this city, failed to where-
= and resolute against the Times-Union
use a settlement was pending that
would have proven satisfactory to the
Printers' Union in the end, and possibly
would not have injured the sensitive
nerves of that paper; but it's all off,
gentlemen I
There is no settlement in sight at this
writing, because the declaration of the
Immutable stands in the way.
Mr. Wilson made a long trip to New
York to find out that 96 per cent of the
leading papers of the country are in
perfect accord with the arbitration pol-
icy of the International Typographical
Union, and that that 96 per cent never
have the least trouble with their work-
men-in fact, they can't have. He
found out that the remaining 4 per cent
of the papers were for the most part
working in harmony with the Interna-
tional Typographical Union, but had as
yet failed to sign up the International
Arbitration agreement; that only a mere
handful of the large daily papers in
America were what is known as "open
shops," and he also learned that those
"open shop" papers were in bushels of
trouble all the time; that the trouble
was first of all incompetent workmen,
then greater expense of operating the
plant through the constant shifting of
"rat" printers from one open shop to
another open shop, railroad fares and
wages far above the scale demanded by
reliable home men.
He learned that President Lynch of
the International Typographical Union
was a broad-minded man-a man capable
of grasping the situation at a glance
and knowing what to do and how to
do it.
He learned that brains (as I have
somewhere said before) conduct the af-
fairs of the great Typographical Union,
and that men with whom he may asso-
ciate as equal socially, but with whom
he would compare mentally about as
equal as the 'waistband and the hat-
band" of the Jacksonville daily news-
hasheries, have long since ceased to dally
with the loaded mule that stands on a
hair-trigger.
Yes, and he larned that where Willie


Randolph Hearst plays the Claude
L'Engle to a mighty throng of readers
tuere is strength in union now as there
was strength in that 'skase" article
when John Hancock wrote his simple
but none the less impressive, name.
And in learning he saw where he
was "getting off at.'"
He agreed with the broad-minded pres-
ident of the massive organization that
union men were most reliable and far
better to get along with, and surrounded
by so much brain he felt that there was
no need of his having trouble with his
little one-horse daily away down here
in the Land of Flowers-and promise-
and then and there resolved to settle up
on a plan that would have worked him
no hardship. It was all agreed to-a
bargain as soon as the Exe6utive Com-
mittee of tne International Typographi-
cai Union could agree to the agreement.
Then President Lynch, acting in good
faith, placed the matter before the throne
that has power over him, and it was
agreed to in toto by that body.
But the Immuable, getting away
from the brains, suddenly remembered
that he had made a declaration against
union labor. From that declaration, so
emphatically and irrevocably made, there
could be no crawfishing. He argued
with himself that he had been. hood-
winked, mesmerized-he really must
have been crazy to have allowed him-
self for a moment to change his mind.
And so the agreement was nolle
prossed-so to speak-and the case
thrown out of court. There is no more
agreement than there is a set of brains
in a simlin-and about as much excuse
for it as there is for the "open shop"-
in fact, no excuse at all.
My argument still holds good that the
Times-Union is being made a catspaw
of. There was no valid excuse for them
to lock the union printers out of the
shop. Our service therein had always
been acceptable to all parties concerned
-excepting possibly, Mr. Stockton-who
has for years acted as if he held the
opinion that capital has a right to com-
bine for just any and every old purpose
but that it is criminal for labor to even
be civilized, let alone combining their
forces for better conditions.
The paper he is supposed to run-its


name I just let slip my mind-stands 1
like a great many other papers of these
up-to-date days, pledged to tell the
truth (and everybody knows it's abso- ,
lutely infallible); it is sanctified in its I
goodness, ana would not for all the world i
deceive the dearly beloved reader; it had i
got so confounded good that it just had I
to do some little piece of devilment in (
order to stay on this wicked world at 1
all-and who was to get the brunt of I
this "old man's prank" but the work-
men? I
Labor, being the Atlas of modern
times, has to shoulder the burdens of a
world and plod along somehow. Some of
us printers had grown so attached to the
rag baby that we just naturally thought
we owned it, lock, stock and barrel-
but we made the fatal mistake of not
laying claim to the ramrod also. There
is no question about us running thej
thing-Thomas says so, and it was a
buffalo case. It was up to us to run
it, and, being the only men on the staff
with sense enough to operate a great
daily, we did our best to touch the high-
water mark of excellence.
We got handsome pay for our pains.
Each one of us own brown stone fronts--
scores of 'em-that we built with the
barrels of money we raked in doing the
"handsome" for Immutable George and
Irresistible Thomas. You see, they
were so good to us we really could not
refuse the money. But you all know
fool workmen can't stand prosperity. We
soaked up as much of our wealth in
sponging out soup joints and barrel
houses as we could-and attend to run-
ning the Morning Glory properly-even
bought lottery tickets in the fake show
schemes of our Grandpa George; board-
ed at the Windsor and slept on feathers
-for want of better-we rode cushions
instead of rods and were invited to cau-
cuses of the saviors of the State-when
the State was to be saved from-from-
well, no matter; when it was to be
saved, for the State gets in terrible peril
every now and then when some "outer"
is about to poll more votes than an
"inner," and we all know that.
Then we'd listen to the silvery-tongued
orator orate about river and harbor ap-
propriations Senators and Representa-
tives had "procured" for us, and went


back to work in the evening patting
ourselves on the breast and saying "Me
-I'm IT"-and most of us knew we
were IT, when it comes to playing the
immaculate jackass. But we couldn't
stand it any longer-we just had to
strike. What else could we do when we
found the door looked and barred?
George (immutable) and Tom (irresisti-
ble) both were dead sure we would break
in and work any way. We had married
the jobp long years ago, some of us, and
a divorce procured in old age often
proves fatal. But is was just like send-
ing the wife home for the summer-we
felt so free and easy, that we never felt
under the mat for the key.
Only a few of the old T.-U. force have
gone-gone out into the wide, wide world
to see what George saw in New York
and, possibly, fell what Tom felt in Jack-
sonville-alone, all alone. Out of the
whole bunch there were but two
traitors-the one who caused the trouble
and the one who bootlicked for him. The
union holds them no grudge-except that
they hid their light beneath the bushel
so long. Manly men are scarce-awfully
scarce-and it grows painful when we
realize that out of twenty-three only
two had the courage to go to the great
golden calf, bow down their heads before
it and chant:
Almighty Dollar looks good to me,
Let me hide my shame in Thee.
Let the scorn of ages roll
O'er my treachery-but give me gold.
Dollar, Dollar-God of Lust,
God of Wilson, God of Trust;
God of Stockton-and his crew-
Sought by many, caught by few.
But, unlike Judas Iscariot of old, they
have not had the decency to go hang
themselves.
Sympathy is wasted on fools, but
somehow I just can't help sympathizing
with a man whose intellect is so warped
as to render him incapable of under-
standing that George W. Wilson has no
more love for a man who violates an
obligation to his union than he has for
any other Benedict Arnold-and when
the "cruel war" is over will have as
little use for the "rat" as he will have
need of snow shoes in the hereafter.


Can Trustees

Save the Land
(Continued from Fourth Page
less than 6 per cent annual interest; also the sur-
plus interest accruing from such investments. Said
Trustees shall have all the rights, property, powers,
claims, remedies, actions, suits and things whatso-
ever to them belonging or appertaining before and at
the time of the enactment hereof, and they shall
remain subject to and shall pay, fulfill and perform
and discharge all debts, duties and obligations of
their trust existing at the time of the enactment
hereof or provided for herein. Page 233, Revised
Statutes of the State of Florida.
"Section 432. Trustees to Fix Price of Lands.-
The Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund
shall fix the price of the public land included in
the trust, having due regard to their location, value
for agricultural purposes, or on account of timber or
naval stores, and make such arrangements for the
drainage of the swamp or overflowed lands as in their
judgment may be most advantageous to the Internal'
improvement Fund, and the settlement and cultiva-
tion of the said lands by allowing preemptions under
suen rules and regulations as they may deem advisa-
ble; Provided, That in no case shall preemption for
more than one section of land be granted to any one
settler."
"Section 433. Alternate Sections May Be Granted.
-The alternate emotions of the swamp and overflowed
lads for six milU on each side may be granted


by the Legislature to such railroad companies as
they may deem proper." Page 234, Revised Statutes
of the State of Florida.
This last section is the only power reserved in the
Legislature by the act conveying the land to the
Trustees in trust for the uses therein expressed.
See Trustees vs. St. Johns Ry. Co., pages 531-543.

PRESENT CLAIMS AGAINST THE FUND.
There are now claims against the fund, amount-
ing to more than seven millions of acres of land, by
railroads, who claim at under legislative enactments.
There were $350,000 in money in the fund when I
became Governor. The Trustees were enjoined from
using $225,000, even for the purpose of drainage and
reclamation, before the enactment of Chapter 5245,
which injunction was granted by Judge Swayne of
the United States Court and still prevails, so that
sum of money cannot be touched. If the Trustees
should undertake to put in it the State Treasury,
they would be liable to go to jail for contempt of
that court.
The remainder of the money is being used by the
Trustees for the purpose for which it was intended,
to-wit: drainage and reclamation. The P. & A.
Railroad claims, in one suit, $225,000 in money,
under legislative grants, 1,447,000 acres of lands, in
addition to what it has already received. The F. E.
C. Railroad claims, under their land grant act of
the Legislature. 2,040,000 acres of land, and as there
is but 2,980,000 acres of land in the fund, you can
see that it would be impossible to even settle these
two claims in full, but there are about four million
acres in other claims of railroad and canal enter-
prises, under other legislative eoac"ewnts.


Acts were passed in the early '80s making grants
of lands to railroads, and these take precedence
over the Act so glibly quoted by certain newspapers
and by which these certain newspapers are attempt-
ing to make the people believe that the Trustees are
preventing them and their counties from receiving
large sums of money for good roads, when they know,
or ought to know, that unless the Trustees DEFEAT
THE RAILROADS IN THIER SUITS FOR THE
LAND, THERE WILL NEVER BE A DOLLAR TO
PUT INTO GOOD ROADS, OR INTO THE SCHOOL
FUND EITHER.
About 100,000 acres of land, composing each
sixteenth section of the Everglades, belongs to the
School Fund, but it is valueless unless drained; but
if drained and reclaimed, it would be worth from
one to five million dollars, but the newspapers that
are opposing drainage and reclamation are willing
that the school fund should never be doubled or
quadrupled, so long as their reputed masters and
very good friends are permitted to take from the
people of Florida the 2,800,000 acres, exclusive of the
school lands, which are worth, when drained, $35
per acre, or about one hundred million dollars, pre-
vent the drainage, and finally buy the school lands
at their own price.
We are doing our utmost to protect the people
in their rights, and save for them in the end, money
for their schools and hard roads. Had no land
ever been granted to the railroads, outside of the
six-mile limit, but instead been used for the purposes
required under the contract, to-wit: drainage and
reclamation, WE COULD BUILD SCHOOL HOUSES
IN EVERY COUNTY AND GOOD ROADS ALL
OVER THE STATE.
(Continued on Next Page)











March 31, 1906


THE SUN


Thirteenth Page


What's Agitating the People


The "immunity bath" prepared by James IL Gar-
field, Commissioner of Corporations, and given to the
ex-members of the Beef Trust by Federal Judge
Humphreys, has been a severe blow to the adminis-
tration's plans of trust "busting."
As a result, President Roosevelt now holds the
belief long entertained by the common people, that
the Federal judiciary needs reforming. The Wash-
ington correspondent of the New York Herald writes
that "it can be stated that the main reason why the
President and the Attorney-General have opposed
giving wide power of review o0 railroad rates to the
courts is that they do not trust the United States
Judges."
The vexation of the administration over its fail-
ure in the courts is causing it to consider means to
raise the standard of United States Judges and vari-
ous suggestions are offered as a remedy, one of the
most significant being a limited term instead of for
life, as at present.
The decision of the court favoring the immunity
plea of the meat packers is causing the Department
ot Justice to fear that the same plea will avail in
cases against other trusts, on account of the "immu-
nity" granted individual members of these corpora-
tions by Commissioner Garfield.
The Bureau of Corporations has failed of its
purpose. It was organized for the purpose of secur-
ing absolute facts concerning corporations, but Gar-
field has failed to extract anything of value. He was
misled and buncoed. He learned nothing new of the
trusts, but has tied the hands of the Government
in the course of his unprofitable work. The Phila-
delphia Record, in commenting on the policy of
Garfield, says: "The materials collected by Com-
missioner Garfield when he went out with sound
of trumpet in his hunt for the Beef Barons have
proved worse than valueless on trial. His report
was little better than an apology, with its remarka-
ble discovery that the Beef Trust in its moderation
was content with the trivial profit of a dollar a
head on cattle. The fact is that the astute fellows
of the Beef Trust, skilled in all the artifices of de-
ception and concealment, were more than a match
for the naive Commissioner. With the pretense that
they were delivering up to him their most important
secrets, they were only making of him a pledge for
their immunity from punishment."
The attempt of the Government to restrain the
trusts, however, is a striking illustration of doing a
thing in the wrong way. Remove the cause and the
evils perpetrated by the trusts will cease. The real
remedy is pointed out by the Philadelphia Record, as
follows: "In the meantime, there is in the hands
of the Government and people the one supreme rem-
edy for the stupendous evils of the Trusts in repeal
of the exorbitant protective duties by which they


Can Trustees

Save the Land
[Continued from Preceding Page]
The four million acres of land, sold by Governor
Bloxham to get the fund out of the hands of a
receiver, was to pay a debt incurred by the Trus-
tees, under legislative enactment, requiring them to
indorse railroad bonds, and in addition to the pro-
ceeds of the four million acres, there has been deeded
to the railroads about eight million acres, and they
claim seven million acres more. My opinion is that
the legislative grants have no force against the duty
to drain imposed on the Trustees, and that the courts
will so decide. If I am right, you then will be saved
about three million acres of land, which, drained and
reclaimed, will be worth one hundred million dollars
The Hessian of whom we read in history was a
man hired by England to fight our colonists, and
he was hated because he had no quarrel with us, but
shot down our people for pay. Newspapers that
will for pay or for any other consideration, print
misleading statements and falsehoods for the pur.
pose of deceiving the people, to the advantage of a
w intretedpesons, a traitors to the people


are fostered. If this favoritism of Government, by
which these industrial and commercial combinations
have been created, were withdrawn there is not one
of them, including the Beef Tiust, that would not
be reduced to comparative harmlessness. Where trade
is free monopoly must perish for want of nourish.
ment. There would then be no need of invoking
the arm of the criminal law to prosecute offenders,
for they would cease to exist. It is idle to com-
plain of the failure of the Government to prosecute
the Trust spoilers to conviction when the Govern-
ment itself furnishes them with the means and the
temptation in its tariff system. The same system
which has bred swarms of smugglers along with the
Trusts is a potential cause of the corruption of pub-
lic morals, while the learned pundits of social econ-
omy are vainly searching for it where it is not to
be found. With the substantial revision of an in-
iquitous tariff there will be no call for a 'Trust
Buster' in the White House or anywhere else. But
how long will the 'stand-patters' in Congress be
able to hold the tariff between the Trusts and a de-
spoiled people?"

The man from Missouri demanded to be shown,
and the time-honored tradition was observed last
week when Attorney-General Hadley of Missouri
forced H. H. Rogers of the Standard Oil Company
to answer questions.
Mr. Rogers's memory was restored by means
of a court order and he was able to remember that
the two oil companies doing business in Missouri,
and which are claiming to be competing with each
other, are really controlled by the Standard. The
business is alleged to be conducted in violation of
the laws of the State against monopoly and it is on
tnis point that the Attorney-ueneral will attempt
to prosecute the officers of the Standard Oil Company.
The Cleveland Plain Dealer thinks that "This is a
great victory from both a legal and moral stand-
point. A virtual confession has been made that the
operations of the monopoly in Missouri would not
stand scrutiny, hence the resort to deception by
conjuring up an entirely shadowy semblance of com-
petition. The trust has passed from impudent defi-
ance of law to evasion and then to confession. The
people of the whole country even more than those
of Missouri have reason to congratulate themselves
on this outcome, for It has been demonstrated that
the law cannot always be ignored or defied with
safety; a state of things which should suggest to
corporation managers the propriety of so conducting
their business that they will have nothing to fear
from a publicity that cannot hereafter be entirely
escaped."
If the recommendations of Assistant Secretary
of the Navy Newberry meet with Government ap-
proval, Key West will be an important naval base.
Mr. Newberry was much impressed with the value
of Key West from a naval viewpoint, particularly
as it is the last station in the United States for


they pretend to serve, and should occupy that place
in the contempt of our people that traitors have
ever occupied.
Certain newspapers are attempting to make it
appear that the Trustees are depriving the counties
of money that they might have for building hard
roads, when, as a matter of fact, they should know
that the Trustees are working day and night, in
many instances, to save the entire fund from being
gobbled up by the very persons who are willing to
pay the aforesaid newspapers to write misleading
statements.
Your Trustees are doing all in their power to
save your money and land. Do not be deceived by
some editors who are paid to deceive you.
Under the law and decisions of the court, before
Chapter 5245 requiring money to be turned over to
the counties for the making of hard roads can take
place, we must first pay all legal obligations, which
means not merely the legislative enactments, but
whatever the courts decide to be good law, which
enactments, if decided to be good law, require the
paying out of the fund more than seven millions of
acres of land to railroads and canal companies, and
about $400,000 in money, claimed for bonds and as
belonging to railroads, on account of being the pro-
coeds of the sale of swamp and overflowed lands. If
the Trustees win in their litigation, the people will
have about three million acres of land, whatever it
may be worth, and that reclaimed and drained; if
the railroads win, they pt lad, money and all.


ships going to Panama. As a supply base in war
time it would be easy of access to our navy, and the
railway now building will add much to other desira-
ble. features.
A shadow existing in a body disappears with
life, is the discovery made by Prof. Elmer Gates of
Washington. According to a London cable to the
New York Sun, Dr. Ward, in a lecture before the
Psycho-therapeutio Society of London, told of the
experiments of Professor Gates with light rays, pro*
during a form of waves similar to X-rays. The
report of the experiment relates that "Under these
rays living objects throw a shadow which exists
only as long as there is life in the object. A live
rat was placed in a hermitically sealed tube and held
in the path of the rays in front of a sensitized screen.
So long as the rat was alive it threw a shadow. When
it was killed it became suddenly transparent. 'Here,'
said the lecturer, 'there was a strange phenomenon.
At the very instant the rat became transparent a
shadow of exactly the same shape was noticed to
pass,as it were, out of and beyond the glass tube and
vanished as it passed upward on the sensitized
screen."
A new force is likely to be added to the politics
of this country. The American Federation of Labor,
numbering nearly 6,000,000 members, under the lead
of President Gompers, has made the following an-
nouncement:
"We reaffirm, as one of the cardinal principles
of the trade union movement, that the working peo-
ple must unite and organize, irrespective of creed,
color, sex, nabtonality, or politics.
"That the American Federation of Labor most
firmly and unequivocally favors the independent
use of the ballot by the trade unionists and working-
men, united regardless of party, that we may elect
men from our own ranks to make new laws and ad-
minister them along the lines laid down in the legis-
lative demands of the American Federation of Labor,
and at the same time secure an impartial judiciary
that will not govern us by arbitrary injunctions of
the courts nor act as the pliant tools of corporate
wealth.
"That our efforts are centered against all forms
of industrial slavery and economic wrong, we must
also direct our utmost energies to remove all forms
ot political servitude and party slavery, to the end
that the working people may act as a unit at the
polls at every election."
This declaration has caused censure by a number
of great newspapers, but the following expression
from the Philadelphia Record, probably more clearly
records the sentiment of the people:
"This movement is in line with the plan of free
government adopted by the people of the United
States. An appeal to the ballot involves submission
to the will of the people as determined by the ballot.
This is infinitely better than the argument by strikes,
boycotts and occasional dynamite."
Such movement was started in Australia about
ten years ago and so satisfactory has been its prog-
ress that now the labor party is a controlling factor
in the direction of the Government.
The Socialist party of Manatee County will hold
a convention April 21, nominating a full county
ticket and a candidate for Representative to the
Legislature.


Shaking the

Old Plum Tree
(Continued from Fifth Page)
worked for this change when he was a Representative,
the bill passing the oHuse, but was defeated in the
Senate by three votes. Mr. St. Clair-Abrams declare
that it is an injustice to the people that the roads
should be assessed at the rate of 43,000 or $4,000 a
mile and then when shippers plead for relief they are
met by the statement from the railroad managers that
the roads are capitalized at $25,000 to $30,000 a mile
and that the law permits reasonable income on such
capitalization. Hie thinks the roads would hardly
have the "nerve" to appear before the Commission
and argue that their property was only worth 04,000
a mile for taxation, while in estimating passenger
and freight charges the worth is $25,000 a mile.
Hon. I. L. Farris of Jacksonville has announced
his readiness to serve the people of Duval as Repre-
sentative and has Joined the company now seeking
that honor. Mr. Farris has constructed an elaborate
platform and if he is elected his time will be fully
occupied if he attempts to secure enactment of but
a few of the planks he has hewn for Ohe benefit of
the people. .... ..










Foiavtunth Pare


- -


March 31, 1906


Political Advertisements

FOR THC SENATE
To the Voter of Duval County (18th
Senatorial District):
I hereby announce myelf as a candi-
date for the State Senae from this, the
18th Senatorial District, Dural county,
to be voted for at the coming pimari.
H. H. BUCKMAN.

ror Gounty Gommisi0oner
I wish to announce my candidacy for
County Commidoner for the Fourth
District of Duval County, Florida, sub-
ject to the coming primary, and shall
appreciate the support of the citizens of


the county.


T. L. AOOSTA.


e 0 e


Windsor Hotel


Jacksonville's Finest
and florida's Largest
and Best Year-Round
Hotel


DODGE I GULLCN6
Owners and Managers


0 0 0


The West End Cafe
Fm WU Um UALI B


01 WedstILEyS


a m bukem --,ft o


JOHN INZI, MOnr

Strong enduring
OLD HICKORY and
WHITE HICKORY WAGONS


Columbus Buggies
ArRA& BAKER



M'MURRA BAKER


The Czar's Spy
(Continued from Tenth Page)
recollect it." And I turned and went
out of the little wooden offie, replacing
my passport in my pocketbook.
I had already been directed to the ho-
tel, and walked there, but as I did so
I saw that I was already under the sur-
veillance of the police, for two men in
plain clothes who were lounging outside
the passport office strolled on after me,
evidently to watch my movements.
Truly Finland was under the Iron-heel
of autocracy.
After taking my rooms, I strolled
about the flat, uninteresting town, won-
dering how best to commence my search.
If I had but a photograph to show peo-
ple it would give me a great advantage,
but I had nothing. I had never, indeed,
set eyes upon the unfortunate girl.
Six o'clock came. I heard the steam
siren of the departing boat bound for
Sweden, but I was determined to remain
there at whatever cost, therefore I re-
turned to the hotel, and at seven dined
comfortably in company with a Ger-
man who had been my fellow-passenger
across from Stockholm.
At eight o'clock, however, just as we
were idling over dessert, two gray-coated
police officers entered and arrested me
on the serious charge of landing with-
out a passport.
I accompanied them to the police office,
where I was ushered into the presence
of the big, bristly Russian who held the
town of Abo in terror, the Chief of Po-
lice. The officials which Russia sends
into Finland are selected for their harsh
discipline and hide-bound bureaucracy,
and this human machine in uniform was
no exception. Had he been the Minister
of the Interior himself, he could not have
been more self-opinionated.
"Well?" he snapped, looking up at me
as I was placed before him. 'You name
is Gor-don Gregg, English, from Stock.
holm. No passport, and decline to leave
even though warned-eh !"
"I have a passport," I said firmly,
producing it.
He looked at it, and pointing with his
finger, said: "It has no date, and is
therefore worthless."
"The fault is not mine, but that of a
Russian official. If you wish it to be
dated, you may send it to your Consul-
ate-General in London."
"I shall not," he cried, glaring at me
angrily. "And for your insult to the
law, I shall commit you to prison for
one month. Perhaps you will then learn
Russian manners."
"Oh I so you will commit an English-
man to prison for a month, without trial
-eh? That's very interesting Per-
haps if you attempt such a thing as that
they may have something to say about it
in Petersburg."
"You defy mel"
"ixot in the least. I have presented
my passport and demand common court-
esy.,
"Your passport is worthless, I tell
you!" he cried. "There, that's how
much it is worth to met" And snatch-
ing it up he tore it in half and tossed
the pieces of blue paper in my face.
My blood was up at this insult, yet I
bit my lips and remained quite calm.
"Perhaps you will kindly tell me who
you are?"' I asked in as quiet a voice as
1 could command.
"With pleasure. I am Michael Bor-
anski, Chfef of Police of the Province of
Abo-Biorenbourg."
"Ahl Well, Michael Boranski, I shall
trouble you to pick up my passport,
stick it together again, and apologies to
me!"
"Apologia.sel Me apologise And the
fellow laughed aloud, while the police
otters on either side of me grinned from
ear to ear.
"You refuse T"
"RefuseT Certainly I do!"
"Very well, then," I said, re-opening
my pocketbook and taking out ad open
letter. "Perhaps you will kindly glance
at that. It is in Russian, so you can
read it."


He snatched it from me with Ill-grace,
but not without curiosity. And then, as
be read the lines, his face changed and
he went paler. Raising his head, he
stood staring at me open-mouthed in
amaement.
"I apologies to your Excellencyl" he
gasped, blanched to the lips. @I most


humbly apologia. I-I did not know.
You told me i nothigI"
"Perhaps you will kindly mend my
pasport and give It a proper vise.
In an instant he was up from his
chair, and having gathered the torn pa-
per from the floor, proceeded to paste it
gather. On the back he indorsed that
it had been torn by accident, and then
gave it the proper vise, affixing the
stamps.
"I trust, Excelleney,' he said, bowing
low as he handed it to me, "I trust that
this affair will not trouble you further.
I assure you I had no intention of in-
sulting you."
"Yes, you had!" I said. "You in-
sulted me merely because I am English.
But recollect in future that the man who
insults an Englishman generally pays
for It, and I do not intend to let this
pass. There is a higher power in Fin-
land than even the Governor-General."
"But, Excellency," whined the fellow
who only ten minutes ago had been such
an insulting bully, "I shall lose my posi.
tion. I have a wife and six children-
my wife is delicate, and my pay here is
not a large one. You will forgive, won't
you, Excellency? I have apologised-I
most humbly apologize."
And he took up the letter I had given
him, holding it gingerly with trembling
fingers. And well he might, for the doc-
ument was headed:
"Minister of the Imperial Household,
Palace of Peterhof.-The bearer of this
is one Gordon Francis Gregg, British
subject, whom it is Our will and com-
mand that he shall be Our guest during
his Journey through Our dominion. And
we hereby command all Governors of
Provinces and minor officials to afford
him all the facilities he requires and
privileges and immunities as Our guest."
The above decree was in a neat copper-
plate handwriting in Russian, while be-
neath was the sprawling signature of the
ruler of one hundred and thirty millions
of people, that signature that was all-
powerful from the Gulf of Bothnia to
the Paciflc-Nicholas."
The document was the one furnished
to me a year before when, at the invita-
tion of the Russian Government, I had
gone on a mission of inquiry into the
state of the prisons in order to see, on
behalf of the British republic, whether
things were as black as some writers
had painted them. It had been my in-
tention to visit the far-off penal settle-
ments in Northern Siberia, but having
gone through some twenty prisons in
European Russia, my health had failed
and I had been compelled to return to
Italy to recuperate. The document had
therefore remained in my possession be-
cause I intended to resume my journey
in the following summer. It was in or-
der that I should be permitted to go
where I liked, and to see what I liked
without official hindrance, that his Ma .
esty the Emperor had, at the instiga-
tion of the Ministry of the Interior,
given me that most valuable document.
Sight of it had changed the Chief of
Police from a burly bully into a whining
coward, for he saw that he had torn up
the passport of a guest of the Czar, and
the consequence was most serious if I
complained. He begged of me to pardon
him, urging all manner of excuses, and
humbling himself before me as well as
before his two inferiors, who now re-
garded me with awe.
"I will atone for the insult in any
way your high Excellency desires," de-
clared the official. "I will serve your
Excellency in any way he may com-
mand."
His words suggested a brilliant idea.
I had this man In my power; he feared
me.
"Well," I said after some reluctance,
"there is a little matter in which you
might be of some assistance. If you
will, I will reconsider my decision of
complaining to Petersburg."
"And what is that, Excellency ?" he
gasped eagerly.
"I desire to know the whereabouts of
a young English lady named Elmsa
Heath," I said, and I wrote down the
name for him upon a piece of paper.
"Age about twenty, and was at school at
Coichester, in England. She is a niece


of a certain Baron Oberg."
"Baron Obergl" he repeated, looking
at me rather strangely, I thought.
"Yes, as she is a foreigner she will be
registered in your books. She is some-
where in your province, but where I do
not know. Tell me where she is, and I


in1 Lie.-


flew 1345.


Dear Dad-I arrived in Jacksonville
nearly blind, and was taken to the opti-
clan's, where I was treated by a neurolo-
gist, who proscribed diet, and put me o0.
a fig for breakfast, no lunch, and a pecan
nut for dinner, and after six days' treat-
ment I could see a loaf of PiMiber'si
BM five miles. Yours,
NED.
P. S.-It's bread like mother used to
make.



MARCUS CONANT

Funeral Director


Embalmer
Proper apliances for requisite attention.
Telegraph orders receive prompt attention.
11 L F Ireyt SI, lMkiM lls, Fla.


...CONSIGN YOUR..
Fruits and Produce


We H. Christopher
mNSUC AND
OOiMUiguO MIOHANT
IM L vIM t. .NMfc gTg
INLkIN a* ualft
Prompt Attentionn.. Best Pres
RetuMns Day of Sale
Reference, National Bank of Jacksonvi


will ay nothi more about my pa
port," I added.
"Then your high Excelleny wishes to
see the young lady?" he said refletively,
with the paper in his hand.
"Ye*."
"In that case, it being commanded by
the Emperor that I shall serve your Ex-
Oellency, I will have immediate in-
quiries made," was his answer. "When
I discover her whereabouts, I will do my-
self the pleasure of calling at your Ex-
oellenoy's hotel."
And I left the fellow, very satisfied
that I had turned his ofiiousness and
hatred of the English to very good ac-
count.
On that gray, dreary northern coast
the long winter was fast setting In. Poor
oppressed Finland suffers under a hard
climate with August frosts, an eight
months' winter in the north, and Ave
months of frost in the South. Idling
in sleepy Abo, where the public build-
Ings were so mean and meager and the
houses for the most part built of wood,
I saw on every hand the disastrous re-
sult of the attempted Russifloation of
the country. The hand of the oppressor,
that official sent from Petersburg to
crush and to conquer, was upon the
honest Finnish nation. The Russian bu-
reaucracy was trying to destroy its
weaker but more successful neighbor,
and in order to do so employed the
harshest and most unscrupulous officials
it could import.
(CONTINUED NEXT WEEK.)


Wm. Burbridfe

REAL ESTATE

Bargainsin Improved and Unimproved
Property Correspondence solicited.


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TH9 SUN


Broward and the State Press

Jut Because the Other Papers Are Publishing the Other
Side, The Sun Publishes the Daerrd Side of the Press
Comment, in Order That the People May Have a Variety


The amount of ridiculous stuff that is
being published by the newspapers of
.a.e tate in relation to Governor Brow-
ard's drainage scheme is amazing, and
goes to show how little is really known
as to the true condition of the Okee-
ohobee region, most of these editors hav-
ing obtained their ideas from fairy tales
magazine writers, whose imaginations
have been drawn upon to a greater ex-
teqt than any rea source of informa-
tion. Among the many stories current
in the Florida press of today is that
there are tides in Lake Okeechobee, an
underground passage from the sea, and
large springs in the lake, all of which
exists only in the minds of toe origina-
tors of these yarns.
As a matter of fact Lake Okeechobee
is a body of fresa water covering a ter-
ritory about 30x40 miles in extent, with
sandy shores, beyond which is the rich
body of sawgrass muck lands, which it
is the purpose of the Drainage Board to
reclaim for cultivation by permanently
lowering toe lake. The water in the
lake is regulated by the wet and dry sea-
sons, invariably falling in the dry sea-
sons, and again rising after the heavy
rains have set in. In normal seasons
there is a difference of several feet be-
tween the low and high water periods.
This season, on account of the unusual
heavy and constant rains throughout
the fall, winter and spring, the lake is
several feet above the normal, but just
as sure as the rains cease the lake will
fall.
With all the information at its com-
mand the Times-Union of last Friday
sets forth a new reason why the lake
cannot be drained. It has discovered
that aquatic plants so choke up the
canals that they must be dredged twioe
a year to keep them open, and there-
fore it says, water will "not run down
hill." Why not send a representative
down here and see what a false state-
ment this is. Steamers are plying the
canals regularly from Kissimmee to
Fort Myers, and the largest Caloosa-
'hatchee river steamers have made fre-
quent trips into the lake, no less a per-
sonage than Thos. A. Edison and his
family being on a trip now in the lake
on the steamer Suwanee.
Now since the canals were out by the
Dieston Company over twenty years ao,
there has not been a dredge in the
Hicpochee canal, the only canal acting
as a drainage canal out of Lake Okee-
chobee. Far from filling up, it is Just
the reverse. The canal has washed itself
out from a 45-foot canal until the width
is 75 to 85 feet, and instead of having
to dredge out this canal to keep it open,
a large sum of money was spent in an
effort to dam up this canal, to prevent
overflows on the Caloosahatchee river.
And- right here let us remind the
Times-Union that it is the duty of the
State to relieve the settlers along the
Caloosahatchee (upon whose banks is
the largest continuous body of rich, pro-
ductive lands in the State), from over.
flows. Years ago engineers warned the
State that a canal cut into this river
would cause great overflows, and such
has been proven to be the case, until
&aousands of acres of the richest land
are constantly in anger of overflow.
The plan to tower Lake Okeechobee
woum, at once reclaim thousands of acres
o0 muck lands and place the upper Ca.
loosahatchee out of danger.
Why should the Times-Union and oth-
er papers in the State attempt to create
false Impressions as to the feasibility of
draining the sawgrass region, which is
really not a part of the Everglades prop-
er? If an unjust tax has been levied
why not make the fight on that In
fact, the courts have said that she meth-
od of collecting the special tax is not
constitutional. Then, why not have a
law passed ,aat would fall alike upon
all lands to be benefited, the State's as
well as the private land owners? The
muck lands can be drained, thousands
of acseres of rich soil can be reclaimed, the
big land companies and the transporta-
tion companies would be benefited, and
South florida would become one of the


most prosperous sections of the State.-
Fort Myers Press.
Governor Broward has some stout de-
fenders among the Florida editors in his
drainage policy but we are pained to ob-
serve a disposition in a few of them to
unnecessary acrimony in discussing the
subject. It is a question we all have a
right to talk about without imputing
bad motives to each other, and the Gov.
ernor, as the champion and leader of the
big enterprise, cannot reasonably expect
to escape a fire of criticism from many
quarters. Nothing worse has been said
about him than that the success of his
scheme is involved in a serious doubt,
and there seems to be plenty of expert
testimony to justify this. If he wins
out, he will be vindicated; if he doesn't
the vindication will be with his critics.
Meanwhile there is no need for crimina-
tion and recrimination, ,or it is a pub-
iic issue calling for thorough public dis-
cussion and there are none o0 the ele-
ments of scandal in it, no graft, no
bribery, nor the suspicion of any that
we have ever heard of, hence intemper.
ate writing and talking, on either side
of the issue are out of place. The Ev.
erglades are the property of the people
of Florida and they have a right to
watch with jealous scrutiny any dispo-
sition sought to be made of them and to
express themselves freely on the subject
pro and con.-Live Oak Democrat.
Unless the Times-Union arrogates to
itself the power to stand for the State
press, its statements that Governor
roward in his Jacksonville speech at-
tacked the State press as a whole is as
malicious as it is without foundation.
The stenographic report of that speech
is even milder than the Governor's state-
ment in the last issue of the Jackson-
ville Sun. He named the "Times-Union,
Metropolis and certain, other papers
which you all know." This is far from
an attack on the "State press," and these
papers, which from lapse of memory or
knowledge of the policy of the Times-
Union, have been growin g warm under
the collar about the matter should re-
tract and lay the blame where it lies
properly.-DeFuniak Breeze.
Governor Broward, in his now cele-
brated Saturday evening speech in Jack-
sonville, did not charge the press of
Florida with venality, nor that their
opinions had been purchased by rail-
roads, corporations or rings of corrupt
politicians. In that speech he oriticised
tae Times-Union and Metropolis of Jack-
sonville, and those newspapers that, by
their truculency to railroads and corpo-
rations, proved that they had been pur-
chased or were purchasable. We base
the above statement upon his explana-
tion made in the Jacksonville Sun last
week. He positively denies charging ve-
nality to the press of the State and we
are bound to accept his statement as cor-
rect.-Southern Argus.
It is amusing and pathetic to see the
Times-Union and Metropolis squirming,
now that they have been caught in the
toils. They both apparently deliber-
ately conspired to misrepresent Govern-
or BW ward's recent speech in Jackson-
ville, and throw the charge Governor
Broward made upon the entire press of
the State instead of taking it them-
selves, as it was stated. They have
been shown up in this reprehensible
conduct and both of them are doing all
kinds of peculiar things to make their
position seem tenable. But the people
of the State of Florida understand those
two papers and give little heed to them.
-Tampa Herald.
It appears that the press of Florida
were deceived in regard to Governor
Broward's denouncing the State press in
his Jacksonville speech. It is said that
he made no reference to any newspapers
in Florida other than the Jacksonville
Timee-Union and the Jacksonville Me-
tropolis. Possibly these two great
dallies have become so great and power-


Pifttenth Pagi


ful as to consider themselves the State
press.-Plant City Courier.
Governor Broward denies that he
charged, in his Jacksonville speech, that
the State preo, generally speaking, waU
owned by the corporation interest. The
Governor's denial is entitled to respect-
ful consideration. We have waited' for
his denial before writing any editorials
with heated ink brought to boiling in a
scraped-out pastepot. Some other State
papers would have done well to have
kept their finger off the hair-trigger till
the Governor had been given a chance
to present his side.-Monticello News.
The Jacksonville Sun is doing valiant
work in defense of Governor Broward.
It now seems that the editors of the
State were unnecessairly alarmed at the
Governor's supposed attitude against
them, for in the speech which gave them
such offense published in full in the Sun
only the Times-Union. and Metropolis
were mentioned. It's only another in-
stance where these two great dailies
took snuff and most of the smaller fry
sneezed their eyes out.-Arcadia Cham.
pion.
Governor Broward is solemnly charged
with prosecuting a work "forbidden by a
Federal court." May we venture to sug-
gest that it does not look that way. It
does not seem that the Governor has
been forbidden by any court to drain
the Everglades. He has been, as we un-
derstand it, temporarily restrained from
levying and collecting certain special
taxes for that purpose-which is a some-
what different thing. Let's play fair.-
Tampa Times.
The Times-Union and the Mettopolis
"slicked" us little fellows on the Gov-
ernor-and some "sicked." This paper
did not. It is hardly credible that the
Governor charged the whole State press
with being subsidized, since he knows
of many whose editorial sentiments ar
not purchased or purchasable.-Monti-
cello News.
If the Jacksonville Sun correctly
quotes Governor Broward's speeh In
Jacksonville, in which he defended his
drainage scheme, it is very evident that
the State press has been duped by the
Times-Union and Metropolis, which pa
per, gave out the statement that the
Governor had lambasted the whole State
press.-Plant City Courier.

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The Story in a Nutshell


T HERE has been six weeks of NEGOTIATION between
Mr. Geo. W. Wilson, editor-in-chief of the Florida
Times-Union, and Mr. James M. Lynch, President of the
International Typographical Union, with the result that


The Times-Union Remains Locked to Organiied Workmen

Mr. Wilson met Mr. Lynch in New York City, and agreed
that all the iivion men who were looked out of the Times-
Union office on February 6th and who were still in Jack-
sonville should be given their positions, and that the
office be completely unionized within three months from
date of acceptance of the proposition by the Executive
Board of the I. T. U., the vninn agreeing to whitewash"
such of the non-inion force as "desired" to remain in the
employ of that paper, or as the paper "desired to retain.


Mr. Wilson Has Repudiated That Agreement

And retains only non-union men in. the employ of the
Times-Union, when he had been granted everything he
asked for from the International Typographical Union.
Had this tentative agreement been signed by Mr. Wilson,
as per his word to Mr. Lynch, at the expiration of ninety
days the International Arbitration Agreement would
have been entered into, which would have rendered
strikes impossible for a term of five years on that paper,
thus insuring against "labor troubles," so annoying to
labor and capital alike.



And That's the Whole Story

J __________________________________________ .L HftKR Titar




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