Group Title: sun.
Title: The sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075914/00020
 Material Information
Title: The sun
Uniform Title: sun
Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sun Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: March 24, 1906
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tallahassee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Leon County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Leon -- Tallahassee
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.451667 x -84.268533 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 18, 1905)-v. 3, no. 47 (Sept. 12, 1908).
Numbering Peculiarities: Published at Tallahassee, Fla., June 23-Sept. 12, 1908.
General Note: Claude L'Engle, editor.
General Note: "If it's right, we are for it."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075914
Volume ID: VID00020
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33400104
lccn - sn 95047216
 Related Items
Other version: Morning sun (Tallahassee, Fla.)
Succeeded by: Dixie (Jacksonville, Fla.)

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Full Text



StI Nl m er WORK OF THE FLORIDA RAILROAD COMMISSION
in mBS INumberTHE TIMES.UNION FAVORED DRAINAGE IN 1902


A Journal of Cartoon and Comment


Volume 1-No. 19 JAGKSONVILL,, FLORIDA, MARGH 24, 1906 1Single Gopy 5 Gents


IF THERE COULD BE A PENALTY FOR MISMATINO
Recent published statements show that the past year has broken ill previous records for the number of divorces granted in the United States











-IF IT'S RIGHT, WE ARE FOR IT


CLAUDE L'ENGLE
Editor


THE


SUN


A. K. TAYLOR
Cartoonist


m IsU Nn Ws Y NwI A W L OF Ms ow, PIO FU E PIP O w nFMA, BY THK N COM PANY, AT I 11 W raYTH ISMUr, JAKSN FLOR I ODA
VYhme 1-No. 19 JACOSONVLLE, FLORIDA, MARII 24, 1906 5 Cents per Copy, $2 per Year
Entemred at the Pet Office at Jakownville, Fl., second-olm matter


In the Sun's Chariot
Intimate Talks Between Publsher and Reader

Provided the sentiment is pure gold, it natters but little if the ve-
hicle used to manife t it will not stand the acid test as to accuracy.
When we are convinced that our neighbor desires to speak well of
us we do not quibble about such a matter as a misinterpretation of our
position.
This is why we have derived so much pleasure from a paragraph
in the last number of the Gadsden County Times, and this is why we
now reproduce it so that our friends may share our pleasure.
"The Jacksonvlle Sun appears to be in favor of Governor Broward's
scheme' (au it in generally called) to drain the Everglades, and in its issue of
saturday gave a most interesting and vivid account of the Glades as they now are
and are to be made by draining. The Sun's motto is, If it's right, we are for
it.' And because of its stand for the drainage measure, we can only believe it
thinks it is right. We have no fault to find with 'The Hun because of its stand.
Our pity and dislike all in one goes to him who has an opinion and is afraid to
express it."
If it appears to our brother in Quincy that we are in favor of Gov-
ernor Broward's "scheme" to drain the Everglades, we are not respon-
sible for the "appearance."
We have not said that we favor it, nor have we expressed our dis-
approval.
We have said that we were not able to form an opinion for or
against this great undertaking on account of the many and complex
questions that are involved.
We printed all the facts in our possession and left the people to
view the project in the light of these facts.
If the editor of the Gadeden County Times thinks that we appear
to favor the plan, we forgive his error, because of the evident sincerity
of his desire to do us justice, and the chaste and elegant style of his
verbal expression.
While we are on this pleasant topic of the good will manifested to
us by our fellow scribes, we will go a little further into the matter by
selecting from the abundance of our riches two jewels of like lustre:
..... i1_ II


Claude L'Engle's "Sun" has im-
proved at a rapid rate. It is filled
with readable matter, and its selec-
tions from other publications show
good taste and judgment. It pleases
the printer's eye, too, being welprint
ed, and showing a dress o clear, clean
type.-Monticello News.


Claude L'Engle's Jacksonville Sun
continues to shed its bright rays over
the State. It is a good and interesting
paper always, and a welcome visitor
to our exchange table. Taylor's well
known cartoons lend an additional in-
terest to the paper.-Tampa Herald.


Speaking of jewels and the sparkle thereof-
Have you noticed the many good things contained in THE SUN of
late?
How about the John Henry series? Of its kind, this John Henry
stuff is the best there is.
Then, there is that snappy political talk which you get every week
under the head "Shaking the Old Plum Tree." This keeps you posted
about the most important subject of public interest, and presents for
your inspection the men who offer themselves for the places which you
have in your giving.
We used to prepare news tabloids each week, calling the collection
a summary of the week's news. We have changed the prescription,
and now offer the topics of greatest interest with a panoramic view of
them focused within the compass of a few minutes' reading. We like
this better, because so many things happen that one has time only for
the assimilation of most important, the others trouble or pleasure us
but little.
The special stories which we prepare for you each week are selected
with a jealous eye to give you interesting recitals of important happen-
ing, served with verbal garnishments that tempt the mental appetite,
so that the taste is not jaded with ponderous verbosity nor cloyed with
meaningless phrases. The only ingredient sought for or tolerated in the
preparation of this dish is ABSOLUTE ACCURACY, in so far as hu-
man proneness to error will permit.
This is THE SUN which we are printing for you.
If you think it worth your while-read it.
If you like it-tell us so.
I you do not like it-we would like to know why.
All we ask is, that you buy it-not borrow it.
You can have it of us for $2 per year.
Or, if you prefer the smaller dose, 5 cents at your newedealer's.


A


Great Halfa -Price


Offer


Read every word in this announcement, for it is the opportunity of
years. Seven of the greatest maglines in the country have combined to be
offered together at a greatly reduced rate. Never before was such an offer
given to the public, and it is safe to say never will it be made again. This
year several magazines have increased their subscription price, which shows
how much greater this offer really is. The only reason we are making it to
the people of this State is because we have increased the subscription price of
THE IUN to $ Ipr yar, and we want all Florida to read T Men.


Cosmopolitan, one year, -
Woman's Home Companioio


floney


The Review of Reviews, one year,
Pearson's, one year, -
The American Magazine, one year,
Tom Watson's Magazine, one year,
THE SUN, one year, -


Total,


$1.00
rear, 1.00
3.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
$10.00


Send $5.75 and Get Them All for One Year

THE COSM OPOLITANUwhich was recently purchased by Mr. W. R. Hearst, has
111,-- vv wwm been greatly improved by the new management and is
now the most'popular ten-cent illustrated monthly in the world. Already its sales have
Increased 100,000 over what they were four months ago, when it became a part of the fa.
mous Hearst publishing organization. The publishers are sparing no effort to secure for it
all that is most desirable in the way of pictures stories and articles. As an example, pie.
tures by Frederic Remington and stories by W. W. Jacobs are now running in the Cosmo.
politan, and a strong new serial by H. 0. Wells.
THE REVIEW OF REVIEWS Substantial American men and women are going
.....to keep up with the times and they are going to
take the shortest cut-which is The Review of Reviews-a monthly survey of the world's
progress.
WOMAN'S HOME COMPANION is not excelled by an other home and
fashions, articles, Illustrations. family publication inthe world. Stories,
PEARSON'S is one of the leading fiction magazines of the day, both its serial and
short stories being by authors of world-wide reputation. Pearson's is
considered authority on book reviews.
THE AMERICAN MAGAZINE For thirty years known as Leslie's Magazine.
It wu lately purchased by a powerful syndi.
cate, and no funds are lacking to make it one of the best magineba n America
TOM WATSON'S MAGAZINE Nomonthly magazine in Ameriea ever before
............-. .-- met with such a hearty welcome as did Tom
Watso n's by ll classes o people, and deservedly so. for Mr. Watson Is at once the foremost
writer and clearest thinker before the public today. It is filled with the best thoughts of
the best minds on all subjects of interest to the American people.
THE SUN isthe paper with a will of its own, and is by far the best paper in
Florid&;-commending all right and censuring all wrong.

Grab This Opportunity
If you wan t one magazine with our paper for a year, you cannot do better than to accept
one of following offers, while they are hot off the bat and before they are withdrawn:
COSMOPOLITAN, one year........................ .....I.$00
THE SUN, one year.... 2. ..............0
PEAR P ON', one year .................................................................. S o
TIlE SUN, one year ..........00...............
THE AMERICAN MAGAZINE, one year ...................................$1 00
TIlE SUN, one year .......... .. ............................. 2 00
TOM WATSON'S MAGAZINE, one year ................................... 00
THE SUN, one year............". ..........'"200
Fill out coupon, mail it today with our remittance, and be sure of getting
te greatdt magazine combination at was ever offered-an opportunity o0
years and one it is afe to Ay will never be made again.


THE SUN,
j mmk^m .


Enclosed please find 8$.......................for which enter my name for one year's sub-
scription to your paper and the following magazinea......................... .......................


.Name............ ............................................
Address ...................... .. .
.og*o*oeoe **.o .*o oo* o*0 o o o~


.09


kk ...............................................................................










March 24, 1906


THE SUN


Third Page


Work of Florida Railroad Commission

By JEFFERSON B. BROWNE, Chairman Since January 1st, 1908

In response to your courteous letter asking me to ville & Nashville, which was ordered by the Corn-
advise the public through the medium of your paper missioners to operate a 3-cent rate, but the Federal
of some of thework one by the Florida Railroad In the issue of March 3 The Sun print- Court at once interposed it injunction and prevented
Commission, I submit the following: ed the story of the "Railroad Commission this reduction.
In doing this I am not making. any defense off It may be claimed that the reduction by the Flor-
myself, but merely giving to the public in a condensed Under Fire," it being a compilation of Ida East Comay stbe claimed thatnd the reduction b the Flor
form the information which they have already had ida East Coast Railway and the Seaboard Air Line
in our reports published annually. My rule with opinions, loth fur andl against the (omas- Railway was voluntary, but it loses its "voluntary"
regard to all offices I have ever held has been to mission, together with opinions. In or- asre t when it is rCcanled that before they made this
perform the duties of them conscientiously and im. der to present the side of the Railroad pledgedto two cent pamssoner rad beeor nthe mainatedrunk
without any word of defense from me through the Commission, Ilon. Jefferson B. Browne lines, and as the hold-over Commissioner was known
press. as yakwd td o de ft th (im i s s to be in favor of it also, it was a foregone conclusion
prThe more important acts of that the Commission what the action of the Commissioners would be.
missioners since January, 1003-that is, those of a has done for the benefit of the people, Eighty-nine orders have been issued by the Com-
general character-have been set forth in our annual and he has complied, pointing out re- and some of a local character. Thy, 103, some a general
reports, and a compilation of these, with those of a fornis that have eI made, both in tand some of a local character. Thoe latter are as imn-
purely local character, and even a brief epitome of that have thn both i t tothe peo e for whose rera lc ef they were in
the immense volume of correspondence in relation way of improving train service and rate nded as those oa neral character, and among
to private claims, and the unlimited questions which them may be mentioned the erection and enlargement
have been propounded to the Commissioners by peo. reduction. of freight and passenger stations, and establishing
pie in all parts of the State, requiring full investi- i ta. nees (and there none existed before. In each of these
nation, study and determination, would require quite entire rate, as it would take up one whole side of a was alleged there at from 500 to 1,000 persons in them)
a large volume, and overtax the space of any news. newspaper, but in order that the public may form localities where the improvements were ordered,
paper in Florida, and if those editors who are an- some idea of what the reduction was, I give from this would be wher the improvements were ordered
tagonistic to the Commission will not read our re- tariff rates for the first 60 miles; from 90 to 100 would be accommodated.
ports published each year, and cull therefrom what miles; from 100 to 200 miles; from 290 to 300 Editors and others who live in cities and enjoy
has been done, so that they may correctly inform miles, and from 300 to 400 miles, there being a corre. conveniences which people in the country do not, may
their readers, there is no likelihood of their reading psonding and proportionate reduction for every in- not appreciate the great service that has been done
any detailed account that I may publish. termediate block of 10 miles. to the people in the isolated localities where the con-
The fact that certain points which have the This reduction was made on all classes except K, editions hae been improved, as above stated, but the
benefit of water transportation, have a cheaper rate L, N. 0 and P. The rates in class K were already people of these localities know.
than interior cities, has been used by some as an very low, the principal articles therein being coal To show the broad scope of subjects included
evidence that the Commissioners permit unjust dis- and cement. L had also a very low rate, and very within the orders of the Commission, I give below a
crimination. The courts have with great uniformity few commodities move in that class. N has also a few, taken at random from our order book.
held that rates made by railroads to meet water reasonable rate. Salt is about the only article in Requiring physical connection between the Sea-


TABLE SHOWING PREIGHIT REDUCTION MADE JULY 1. 1903.
The first lines give the old tariff and the bottom lines the new tariff, showing reductions made by the Railroad Commisslon.


Per 100 Pounds Por Ton 'uer Carload -
BETWEEN LOCAL STATIONS IN FLORIDA

1 2 13415101AB C DE HF K L M N 0 P R
10 miles and under. Old rate.......................... 30 27 2420 1815 11 10 11 0 1021 16 7 75 $ 1 10 $ 8 00 00 $ 5 00 8
10 miles and under. New rate....................... 24 21 20 15 1413 10 0 8 014 15 12 7 75 1 00 8 00 10 00 5 00 8
20 miles and over 10 miles. Old rate................... 34 31 282321 17 15 12 12 102124 18 8 90 1 20 11 00 12 00 7 00 9
20 miles and over 10 miles. New rate.................. 28 26 24 19 17 15 12 11 11 817 10 15 8 90 1 10 11 00 12 00 7 00 9
30 miles and over 20 miles. Old rate................... 38 35 31 224 10 17 14 14 11232720 9 1 05 1 30 14 00 14 00 8 00 10
30 miles and over 20 miles. New rate.................. 32 30 282320 18 13 12 12 92023 18 9 1 60 1 20 14 00 14 00 8 00 10
40 miles and over 30 miles. Old rate................... 42 38 34282621 10 15 1511253022 10 1 20 1 40 10 00 15 00 9 00 11
40 miles and over 30 miles. New rate.................. 36 34 3227 23 1014 13 13 102327 19 10 1 20 130 160 00 15 00 9 00 11
50 miles and over 40 miles. Old rate................... 46 41 37 30282321 16 16 1227 3324 10% 1 30 1 50 18 00 16 00- 10 00 12
S50 miles and over 40 miles. New rate.................. 40 38 3530252015 14 14 11253020 10% 1 30J 140 17 00 10600 10 00 12
100 miles and over 90 miles. Old rate................... 660 50 52 40 38 33 27 21 21 16374732 13 1 75 1 85 28 00 21 00 14 00 17
100 miles and over 90 miles. New rate................. 60 55 4939342820202014343926 13 1 75 1 80 25 00 21 00 14 00 17
200 miles and over 190 miles. Old rate.................. 90 80 6660534837303123525842 160% 2 17 2 23 38 00 30 50 2000 25%
200 miles and over 190 miles. New rate................. 78 70 64 55 45 40 30 29029021 4555 39 16% 2 17 2 23 34 00 30 50 2000 265%
300 miles and over 290 miles. Old rate .................. 1 05 03 767003584740412857690052 20 2 27 2 33 42 00 34 00 2400 30
300 miles and over 290 miles. New rate................. 90 80 746656 5240393727 5666 50 20 2 27 2 33 30 00 34 00 24 00 30
400 miles and over 300 miles. Old rate.................. 1 14 1 00 8376 6862 514445336270956 23 2 37 2 50 48 00 36 00 28 00 36
400 miles and over 390 miles. New rate................. 1 00 90 8272625745434331627255 23 2 37 2 50 45 00 36 00 28 00 36
Copies of this Tariff Sheet in full can be obtained by writing to Florida Railroad Commission, at Tallahassee, Fla.


competition are not "unjustly discriminating." Con-
sequently the Railroad Commission cannot prevent
it under the power conferred upon them by the law
to prevent "unjust discrimination." The cheaper
rates which Jacksonville enjoys from points outside
of Florida is also the result of water competition;
but even if it were not, this Commission would be
powerless to prevent it, as they are interstate rates,
over which we have no control.
After the reorganization of the Commission in
January, 1903, we addressed ourselves to the sub-
ject of adopting a more reasonable freight tariff for
the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and the Seaboard
Air Line Railway, with the result that a new freight
tariff for these roads was adopted, which reduced all
class rates very materially.
I give below extracts from this freight tariff,
which went into effect July 1, 1903, from which your
readers can form some idea of what reductions were
made. It would be impracticable to publish this


class 0. Class P includes lumber, crate and basket
material, etc. It was contended by the railroads at
the time it was proposed to put this rate into effect
that it made a very material reduction in their rev-
enues, but that they would try to operate it if no
further material reductions were made.
On April 1, A. D. 1005, the Commissioners, upon
application of the sawmill men, after a hearing of
all interests, ordered a reduction in class P rates,
but the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, the Seaboard
Air Line Railway, the Louisville & Nashville Rail-
road, and the Georgia Southern & Florida Railroad
at once applied for and obtained from the United
States District Court for the Northern District of
Florida an injunction restraining the Commissioners
from putting the reduction into effect, UPON THE
GROUND THAT THEIR REVENUE COULD
STAND NO FURTHER REDUCTIONS.
Passenger rates have been reduced to 3 cents per
mile on all the main trunk lines, except the Louis*


board Air Line Railway and the South Georgia &
West Shore Railway at Greenville.
Requiring physical connection to be made between
the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and the Seaboard
Air Line Railway at Gainesville.
Adopting new rules and amending existing rules
as follows:
Relative to equipping lumber cars, in response to
petition from lumber men, so as to prevent railroads
from furnishing cars with permanent, immovable
stanchions.
Requiring notice of delayed trains to be posted
at stations.
Reducing joint rates by deducting 10 per cent
from the sum of the loals.
Prohibiting the abolishing of agencies without
authority from the Commission.
(Continwd 'on Eloventh Page)







P, "- A i .O


.1 R, lop OM-


Fourth Page


March 24, 1906


THE SUN


Times-Union Favored Drainage In 1902


Letter from Gov. N. B. Broward, Containing Copies of Editorials Printed in the
Times'Union In 1902, Which Were as Much for Drainage Then as Recent T.-U.


-e -f ,me


Editorials Have Been Against It


- n- no-


Mr. Claude L'Engle, Editor The SUN, Jacksonville, Fla.:
Dear Sir-Believing that, in view of the recent frantic efforts of the Jack-
sonville Times-Union to manufacture a prejudice in the minds of the people of
Florida against the drainage of the Everglades-a project to the carrying out
of which this State stands solemnly pledged-a pledge which was reaffirmed in
the elections of 1904-helieving that, in view of these unworthy motives of the
Times-Union, the people shoulder informed of the gross inconsistencies, the base
duplicity, the utter insincerity and untrustworthiness of that newspaper's advice,
[ herewith submit some editorial expressions from the Times-Union upon this
same subject of Everglade drainage published less than four years ago.
I ask attention to the fact that when those editorials were published, the
Times-Union was published by the Florida Publishing Company, and its president
and editor-in-chief was George W. Wilson. Today it is published and edited
by identically the same parties who ran it in 1902, when these editorials were
printed in its columns.
But-mark this difference. In 1902, 1' was hoped by the Times-Union that
the Everglades would be drained by its own owners and that the benefits of
drainage would be reaped by its own owners-the Florida East Coast Railway,
operating through another of its subsidiary corporations.
That scheme, however, fell through, and the year 1906 finds the Everglades
about to be drained by the State of Florida for the benefit of the people of
Florida.
The Times-Union howls with rage. Does anyone wonder at this? The
greed of its owners has been thwarted by the arm of the law, and the ravenous
cormorant rages in its fury and disappointment.
The Times-Union, in 1902, coud see clearly enough the enormous wealth
which would be opened up by the drainage of the Everglades. It then thought
its own owners would rake in all that wealth. If the Times-Union is such a


RETURNS. THE WORK OF RECLAMATION IS OF THE SIMPLEST CHAR.
ACTER-WE NEED ONLY DITCHES CUT WITH JUDGMENT, AND THE
RICHEST LANDS OF THE WORLD WOULD BE READY FOR THE PLOW.
THE AREA IS TOO GREAT FOR THE MEANS OF ANY BUT MILLIONAIRES.
WHY SHOULD NOT THE STATE AID THE CITIZEN?
"Florida has now the means; the project asks only the use of the money
and insures its early return with a great increase of taxable area, population
and production. It is possible that we have no precedent for such use of the
States money-certainly the accumulation of such a sum as that lately ordered
paid to us was never considered by those who make laws and set precedents.
Roads are needed. The betterments of our school buildings would do much for
the people, and we should have an executive mansion as well as a capitol; but
the reclamation of our valuable swamp lands would multiply the means for
these improvements and prove of untold value to the State in the immediate
future. With the great swamp drained Florida must immediately take high
rank as a sugar State."


The Florida Times-Union and Citizen,
W. Wilson, president and editor-in-chief.


Wednesday, February 12, 1902. George
Editorial of that date:


"THE TESTIMONY OF THE ANCIENTS."


"The Western capitalists who will soon begin the work of making sugar
for the continent in the Florida Everglades have gone back for their testimony
to the days when interested motives cannot be charged. One of these opinions
is that of General Jessup, who commanded the troops for a time during the
Seminole war, and kept a careful eye on the country as we marched after the
elusive foe. He said in 1848, writing to Senator Westcott:


The solution of a problem that has been bothering scientists for a thousand years-What happens when an Irresistible force meets an
Immovable (or Immutable) body


the Governor has fired a cannon ball at Immutable George. Gross shows where George stood In 1902. If we only knew where he would
land, we would put another cross, but we don't-no one does.


great and good friend of the people, why can it not now see the advantage of
draining the glades for the use and benefit of the people?
The subjoined editorials from the Times-Union of 1902-under exactly
same management and editorship as today-make powerfully interesting reading
Just at this time.


The Florida Times-Union and Citizen, Wednesday, June 4, 1902.
W. Wilson, president and editor-in-chief. Editorial of that date:


George


"RECLAIMING THE WASTE LANDS."


"In the West State aid is invoked and the national Treasury has been called
upon with the consent of the President, to reclaim vast areas of rich lands which
have been classed as desert only for lack of water. Engineers differ as to the
pouibility of reclaiming them, but experiments locally made seem to promise
[he best results and a great 'expansion of our arable territory. To wait is to
invite combination of capital which will give princely fortunes to men who will
own counties and farms end will finally be able to live in royal fashion on rents
drawn from tenants-conditions which all the fathers declared dangerous to the
republic. Great fortunes have been made in America, and these lack investment.
To reclaim these lands now is a patriotic and philanthropic duty, but is it pos-
sible to doubt that trouble will arise on this account before many generations
have given us another set of landlords?
'The interference of the State is the only alternative to this overgrown
private fortune or Government ownership-both dangerous. WHERE THE
TATE HAS THE NECESSARY MONEY OR CREDIT, WOULD IT NOT BE
WELL THAT IT RECLAIM THE LANDS, BOTH SWAMP AND ARID? IN
THAT CASE THE PEOPLE WOULD DIRECT THE FINAL DISPOSITION
1 THE PRiOCEEDS AND EE THAT THE FARMER RECEIVE HIS HOME-
TAD IN EE SIMPLE WHEN HE HAS REIMBURSED THE STATE FOR
ITS OUTLAY WITH INTEREST. IS NOT THIS THE SAFER AND THE
WER PLAN? IN FLORIDA THERE COULD BE NOQUE8TION AS TO
T PFOLICoY Of THE OUTLAY AND THE CERTAINTY OF ADEQUATE


"'From my own obesrvation, when commanding the army operating in that
country ten years ago, as well as from reports made by and information derived
from intelligent officers who operated near and who explored the Everglades and
the large lake, Okeechobee, north of them, I have no doubt the glades are about
30 feet above the level of the sea The practicability of drianing both,
I take for granted The effect of the measure would be to reclaim
many hundreds of thousands of acres without including the bed of the Everglades,
now subject to inundation for several months every year. Were the
surface of the lake and the glades lowered, these fine lands would be reclaimed,
and would soon be converted into valuable sugar plantations, as rich as any in
the world. The hammocks of this country are exceedingly rich. These reclaimed
lands would be converted into olive, lime and orange plantations, and would
be cultivated by a numerous white population.'
"What more can we add now? The general covered the ground completely.
The reclamation of such lands comes exactly when most needed, and gives us the
soil of the Philippines without the disadvantages that attend life in t hose distant
islands. In Florida the nearest approach to a bolo is a gallinipper's saw, and
some of us have learned to regard with the smile a hilopher always extends
to the inevtiable.
"Those lands yield sixty-five tons of cane to the acre, plant themselves for
the next year, and make no charge for fertilizer. Moreover, the climate allows
the crop to mature fully, so that the sucrose content is 15.04 per cent, and the
coefficient of purity 81.68 per cent. It is only req uired that less be spent for
drainage than is demanded b the work of cleari ng away the forest growth else-
where, and the sugar plantation is ready for the plow and the machinery.t
"Here there will be no extra pay for laborers who gather the cane in the wet.
and cold of a Louisiana October, there will be no costly and deceptive levees to
build, and no early frosts to blig ht the crop for the following year congrat
ulate the capital that has been far-sighted enough to begin such a wor k of devel-
opment, and we also congratulate the State that takes a newstep forward on the
way of independent enterprise. Cane can easily double the exports of the State
and add largely to its population and wealth before the century reaches its
majority.. entr re its


'I











THE SUN


Florida Times-Union and Citizen, Friday, June 27, 1902. George W. Wilson,
president and editor-in-chief. Editorial of that date:
"NOW FOR DRAINAGE AND SUGAR."
"The President has signed the bill which provides for the gradual reclama-
tion and irrigation of some sixty million acres of arid lands in the West-the
proposition being to make arable and productive a waste set in the midst of our
continent that is about in extent to the two States of Illinois and Iowa. Almost
alone of the peoples we have made no effort in this direction-a path marked
out to us by the primitive empires of the Euphrates valley, along which the
Pharoahs followed the Assyrians, where the Hindoo is at home and the English-
man and Frenchman have passed before us. Heretofore we have had a surplus
of arable land for our population, but we have now possessed the continent
from side to side, and the coming need for more is already used as a plea for
'expansion' towards lands little known across the great oceans.
"Therefore the time has come to make useful what we already possess at
our door, and the Government would be recreant to its duty to the people did it
fail to provide for a necessity already felt. The use of agricultural machinery
makes it possible for one man's labor to cultivate more than his father could find
profitable, and every inducement should be offered for the removal of the gather-
Ing population of the great cities--we need cheap lands for the education, happi-
ness and prosperity of our present population as well as for the teeming millions
to come. England has resumed the work of irrigation in India as a protection
for two hundred and fifty millions of people against starvation-she has given
Egypt better irrigation than the Pharoahs provided, and from these lands
reclaimed from the desert five thousand tons of sugar reached Philadelphia last
week in one shipment; shall the Nile send food to the Mississippi before we ship
coals to Newcastle?
"What others are doing we will do, but there is a corollary and addendum
to the 'arid land bill' that Florida will propose in her turn. We can have five
million acres of rich alluvial lands, the appointed home of the cane from which
sugar can be made more cheaply and of better quality than from the beet.
Undertaken under one plan, the ultimate cost need not exceed one dollar per acre,
and over the majority of the tract will come under half that sum-a trifle as
compared to the cost of the irrigation plants proposed. The lands will be
intrinsically more valuable, needing only population to make them productive,
and with much shorter and cheaper transportation to the markets of this country
and the world. Lines of trunk roads already approach these lands on every
side, and present facilities would require but short extensions, while the warm
waters of semi-tropic seas touch their shores on two sides and ask nothing but
dredging to open a road round the earth.
"We must not be dependent on Germany, or Egypt, or Hawaii, or Cuba for
our sugar while we need only the simplest business enterprise to provide for our
own needs. Industrial independence is the only guarantee for political freedom
from the influences that distract others-this we can have and must have or we
shall be false to our own ideals and justly run the risk of losing our commercial
supremacy. England views with alarm our invasions of her home market; Ger-
many is uneasy to find herself dependent on us for machinery and meats; France
complains that she must eat our bread or grow hungry, and our steel bridges the
rivers of Africa and spans the roads of Asia. Why should we be less discom-
forted to find ourselves buying the sugar of the Nile? It must not be for long,
and the one defense is the early reclamation of Florida's sugar plantations.
The Florida Times-Union and Citizen, Thursday, March 27, 1902. George
W. Wilson, president and editor-in-chief. Editorial of that date:
"RECLAIMING THE ARID SWAMP LANDS."
"Since the message of the President proclaimed the purpose of reclaiming the
arid lands of the West, the attention of the foremost scientists in the world has
been directed to the problem involved, and much has been said pro and con.
Without going into details and calculations, enough has been printed to show
that the best authorities deny the practicality of such schemes on a scale so great
and the power of man to disarrange the balance as set by Nature. It is shown
that to irrigate the Sahara, as was once proposed by De Lesseps, such a river
system as that of the Mississippi would be necessary--evaporation would increase
with the surface presented to the sun and air-in a few years there would be
nothing to show for all the labor and expense incurred except dry ditches and
useless levees. So with the Russian scheme for replenishing the Aral sea by
way of reclaiming the dry plains to the north, east and west.
"The desert in southern California, of which the President specifically spoke.
is about 200 feet below the level of the Pacific, and it was originally a part of
the Gulf of California, but the Colorado was diverted from its old channel, the
river bed became a salt lagoon, and next a dry bed of worthless sand. But Prof.
W. J. McGee says there is not enough water in the whole Colorado river to
irrigate this tract-150 by 60 miles-its water would disappear if poured over
the sand and nothing would be gained. The same failure resulted in the attempt
to use the waters of the Humboldt river in Nevada-the area of evaporation
increased with the spread of the stream after it was dammed, and no valuable
land was gained, though much had been promised. Within five years an unprece-
dented rise of the Colorado flooded the arid tract in California, but the water
disappeared in the air and the sand without results appreciable in an agricul-
tural sense; the plain at the south of Humboldt lake was flooded at heavy cost,
but the water disappeared as fast as it came.
"The reclamation of the arid West is, then, impossible in any wide or national
sense. But the swamp lands of the South can be drained and would make availa-
ble millions of acres of valuable land. The scientists are as emphatically favor-
able to this proposition as they are antagonistic to the other, and experience is
equally ready to afford proof positive. Suitable lands for orange and pineapple
culture in Florida are now so high in price as to set an effective barrier to the
expansion of these industries, while the drainage of the Everglades would imme-
diately quadruple the area, afford use for the surplus now tormenting the
Treasury, and give a most profitable field for investment. Republicans cannot
take the ground that such schemes are not within the limits of the powers
accorded the general Government after indorsing the effort in behalf of arid
lands-what is sauce for the goose should be sauce for the gander.
"Will President Roosevelt insist on the reclamation of our swamps as of the
Western deserts and have engineers report on the possibilities of the proposition ?
A canal from Cape Canaveral to the south of the Caloosahatchee would pay for
itself, prove an artery for commerce and give us the sugar plantations we need;
it is as practicable now and as much needed as when the Government engineers
reported on it favorably in the fifties."


In an editorial in the Times-Union of Friday, March 16, 1906, it is claimed
that effective drainage canals cannot be dug and operated in the .Everglades
because of the growth in that region of aquatic plants.
That irresponsible assertion was long ago disproved by people familiar with
the facts-not by theorists sitting in an editorial chair in a large city hundreds
of miles away. Here is what the official Report of the Trustees in 1893, of
which Governor Mitchell was chairman, said ofthe effectiveness of canals in the
Everlade repo g on the operations of the Atlantic and Gulf Coast Canal
ad M CompI eay:S


Fifth Page


ELEVATION OF LAKES, ETC.
The comprehensive topographical surveys made by the Drainage Company
includes numerous profiles which establish the elevation of the lakes and river
system above mean tide. These levels generally represent the most depressed
bed of the adjacent watershed.
In order to demonstrate that the entire drainage district is at a sufficient
altitude above the ocean and Gulf to render it entirely susceptible of drainage
by gravitation or open canals, attention is called to a few appended notes of ele-
ations above tide level.


Lake East Tohopekaliga, near Kissimmee .. .. .. .. 70.80
Lake Tohopekaliga ............ ...... .64.5
Lake Isabel .. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. 08
Lake Hart ....................... ... 70.57
Lake Alligator .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 71.48
Lake Hatchneha .. ................ .. .. 60.23
lake Kissimmee .. ............... .... 50.06
Lake Tiger .. .. .... .. ..... ..... .. 50.38
Lake Walk in Water ........... .. '. ...... ..7.44
Lake Crooked .. .. .............. 132.08
Lake Okeechobee .................. .. .. 22.00
Lake Hichpochee . .... .. .. .. .. .... 22.00
Everglades at Lake Worth .. ...... .. .. .. .. 10.50


DRAINAGE, CANALS, ETC.

It is not the province of this statement to give in detail the yearly reports
and operations of the Drainage Company covering the minutia connected with
surveys from year to year. the construction of dredges, snagboats, barges, steam
tenders, the operations of dredges and incidental features connected with the
excavations of canals, etc. It is deemed sufficient to state that the initial work
of drainage commenced in 1881; during that year a general reconnoisance was
made of the country on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts; also of the Kissimmee and
Caloosahatchee river country. A line for a drainage canal was located, begin-
ning at Lake Flirt on the upper Caloosahatchee river, via Lake Ilichpochee and
terminating at Lake Okeechobee. This work was necessarily attended by many
difficulties, the country at that time being uninhabited and devoid of transporta-
tion facilities other than provided by the company.
The rich soils adjacent to the lakes was at that time permanently inundated
to a depth of eighteen inches to three feet. During the year 1881, Dredge No.
1 was built at Cedar Keys; she was self-propelling and steamed unaided to
Charlotte Harbor and up the Caloosahatchee river to Lake Flirt, where she
began the work of excavating January 23, 1882.
The operations of the Drainage Company from that time have been con-
tinuous to this date and have resulted in the reclamatihm of vast areas of rich
land and the general improvement of the drainage of the entire country embraced
under their franchise.
Over eighty miles of large drainage canals and open waterways ranging from
twenty-six to one hundred and six feet wide, and from seven to twelve feet deep
have been constructed throughout the territory.
Two large canals connect Lake Okeechobee with Lake llichpochee to the west;
a large canal extends from Lake Hichpochee to and along the margin of Lake
Flirt, to the head of navigation on the upper Caloosahatchee river and provides
an open waterway from Lake Okeechobee to the Gulf of Mexico.
A drainage canal from the southern border of Lake Okeechobee, fifty feet
wide and seven feet deep, penetrates the rich sugar lands for a distance of ten
miles south.
Col. J. M. Kreamer, chief engineer of the A. & G. C. C. & 0. L. Co., submitted
an exhaustive report on these canals, from which the following is taken:
"The canal from Lake Okeechobee to Lake Hickpochee and from lake Hick-
oichee to Sugar Berry Hammock have been in successful use since 1883. They
were constructed through precisely the same grade of material as is found on
the Bow Legs Landing route. These canals already constructed have not only
at all times remained free and open and clear of all deposits, but they have by
scour enlarged in cross section, both in width and depth. They were originally
cut five and one-half feet deep, they have scoured to the bed rock and in many
places are eleven feet deep. They have alto become wider, duo to erosive action
of the current. *,
"A stream running with the velocity of one-third of a mile per hour will
transport soft clay.
"A velocity of half a mile an hour will carry sand as large as linseed.
"A velocity of two-thirds of a mile an hour will sweep along fine gravel, and
a mile and a half an hour will roll along round pebbles.
"Disintegrated muck is much more easily transported than clay or sand.
"There has never been any muck deposit formed within the canals leading
from Lake Okeechobee.
"The initial current through the Bow Legs canal will be at a rate of 1.876
miles per hour, which is sufficient to roll along large pebbles and will sweep every
vestige of muck from within the confines of the canal margin.
"The efficiency of the canal west from Okeechobee indicates that a canal cut
,n the same general lines will be equally effective.
"In view of the increased distance for transporting fuel and other possible
contingencies I set the extreme cost of excavation at two cents per cubf yard.
A canal 150 feet wide by 8 feet deep and 24 miles long. would represent 5,631,858
cubic yards, at 2 cents per cubic yard the cost will be T112,037, deducting the cost
of canal already constructed $12,101, the completed Bow Legs Landing route
would cost $100,536. To this should be added the cost of two dredges and
barges and necessary outfit, which in round numbers would amount to $50,000
additional."
I have been through all of the canals with the exception of nine miles of a
canal running from Lake Hickpochee into the Everglades during the last eighteen
months on the steamer Naomi, Capt. F. B. Hall, and will say that the canals are
all clear of obstructions of any kind-except the nine miles through which I
did not pass and know nothing about except what I have seen on the map. I will
say further, that if your readers have noticed the advertisements in the Fort
Myers Press, they have seen that two steamers, the Suwannee, a regular exeur-
sion boat, and the Naomi, have been plying between Fort Myers and Lake Okee-
chobee during the past several months.
Captain Johnson, at Kissimmee. operates two steamboats and several barges
between Kissimmee and Bassenger through the cnals. There is one steamboat and
one large naphtha launch catching fish in Lake Okeechobee and shipping them
from Fort Myers to Northern markets.
The eighety miles of canals dug have cost the State 1.600,000 acres of land,
which was deeded in payment for work done at the rate of twenty-five cents pr
acre. Why does the Times-Union insist upon opposing the completion of this
work when it can be seen from Colonel Kreamer's report, above, that the expendi-
ture of $100,536 would completely prevent the overflow of Lake Okeechobee, and
make a large percentage of the muck lands south of the lake available for
cultivationT Very truly yours, N. L
N. B. B3OWABD, Goraor.


March 24, 1906




'AN' 7,. 117

4k.-ma


lxth Page


THE SUN


March 24, 1906


Shaking the Old Plum Tree

By EDWARD FITZGERALD


A vigorous assault is to be made on that limb of
the plum tree from which hangs those two fat plums
-the Supreme Court Judgeships. The apathy mark-
ing this portion of the campaign has been dissipated
and the struggle for the fruit has begun between six
prospective candidates, and possibly a seventh, if
none of those now in the field fail to toe the scratch
April 16, the closing date of filing candidacy.
Besides the present incumbents, Justices Charles
B. Parkhill and J. B. Whitfield, who are seeking re-
election, Ira J. Carter and J. B. Johnson of Live Oak,
W. W. Flournoy of De Funiak and Thomas J. Clarke
of Monticello will appear before the public, and on
account of this number, to split the vote, A. .1.
Henry of Lake City may add his name to the list.
The contest is assured of liveliness, at least, with
these entries, and will give the people ample range
of talent in making a choice, though there is no exist.
ing reason why they can be better served than by the
two Justices who are candidates for reelection.
Each has been a faithful worker, both are capable,
well-trained and experienced in law.
Yet, it is a matter for public gratification that
there should be additional aspirants for such impor-
tant offices, and that the array of talent offered should
be of excellent quality. It affords a stimulus neces-
sary to the good of thp people in selecting Judges by
preventing limitation of choice.
While it should be a desire that all political con-
tests be conducted in a cleanly manner, the race for
a Judgeship should be made with the highest degree
of political purity. Ways and means of vote-getting
not unseemly in the scramble of other offices are un-
worthy the seeker of judicial honors. In this re-
spect, however, the campaign is foreshadowed by the
best indications.
W. W. Flournoy, who i6 Walton County's entry,
is possibly the best known of the candidates, with the
exception of Justices Parkhill and Whitfield. He is
one of the strongest candidates that could be found in
West Florida; his knowledge of law well qualifies
him for the position, and no member of the bar in
that portion of the State is regarded with higher
esteem. No doubt could exist ot his ability to fill
the position with honor.
The candidate from the old home of Justice Park-
hill, Hon. Thomas J. Clarke, is another who stands
high as a lawyer. Mr. Clarke has served two terms
as Representative from Jefferson County, and his
Legislative record was pleasing to his constituents.
Both candidates from Suwannee County are able
lawyers, Mr. Carter having served as State Attorney
with marked ability, while Mr. Johnson, his former
partner, has proved his legal skill on many occasions.
Judge A. J. Henry has not yet declared his inten-
tion of being a candidate, although the report has
been spread that he will be in the race. He, too, is
a lawyer of much experience.
8oh a field, if all continue in the fight until the
first primary, will result in much division of the
vote of the State, as each candidate is possessed of
strength, but in this both Parkhill and Whitfield
will have an advantage. Each is well known and
each has a good record, and their popularity will in-
inre them unfailing support in many quarters.

A case where common sense has been left in the
lurch and ambition has defeated judgment, is that
of B... Park Trammell of Lakeland, who will oppose
H&a. Stephen M. Sparkma for election to Congress.
Mr. u represent Polk County in the Sen-
ate prd of the body at the last session,
eatl a favorable Iapio lMisat capacity, and
ordhary premise for the future.


He is a bright young man and a successful lawyer.
(Cenial and popular, his political future is bright, or
would be if his political sagacity was fully developed.
In this instance, if he does enter the campaign
against Mr. Sparkman, he will permit himself to be
led to slaughter through the manipulations of alleged
friends, who have no hope of defeating Sparkman
but will take this means of removing Trammell from
the field of future operations.
In short, if Trammell can be killed off now lie
will not be a factor two years hence, when he might
have chance a of going to Congre.ss.
It is a matter of much doubt if he could even
carry Polk County against Sparkman, who was also
once a resident of that county, and the popularity he
gained as a school teacher has never been lost.
The attempt to put forth Trammell in this race
* is simply a scheme that will result in his undoing if
lie accepts the flattering assurances given. It is the
work, too, of a small coterie of Polk County poli-
ticians, who not only seek his political death, but
covet the Senatorship from that county for one of
their number, which Trammell will be obliged to
relinquish if he runs for Congress.
Mr. Sparkman wishes one more term in Congress,
not for the office itself, but in order to further the
interests of Florida relative to river and harbor im-
provements. His committee position will enable him
to do this when another general river and harbor bill
is brought into the House. It is his ambition as a
Congressman to gain these improvements, and in
view of his past work in .this respect and his desire
to complete the service as far as possible, he should
be reelected. He is worthy of such consideration, and
Florida's necessities demand it.
If it is possible for this State to secure Govern-
ment aid in. the improvement of her coasts in the
near future the accomplishment will be through Mr.
Sparkman as a member of the committee on rivers
and harbors, impossible for a new member to get, no
matter how able he might be.
Mr. Sparkman is accused of being an employee
of the Atlantic Coast Line Railway, and of looking
after the interest of that corporation to the detri-
ment of the interests of the people. When it is un-
derstood that the paper making such accusation is
the organ of one of those who is trying to lead Tram-
mell to the slaughter pen in an effort to dominate
Polk County polities, the animus of the charge is
clearly revealed.
It appears, however, that Mr. Trammell was not
quite guiltless in this respect, if, indeed, it is evi-
dence of wrong-doing to hold public office and at the
same time be an attorney for a railway company.
Though is has not been stated that Mr. Trammell
was an attorney at Lakeland for the A. C. L. during
the last session of the Legislature, still perhaps he
may have been, and yet such condition did not mili-
tate against proper performance of his Senatorial
duties as far as known.

A quartette of candidates are now up for the
two vacancies in the Railroad Commission. Messrs.
Browne and Burr will each try for the office again,
and the reform element. in the persons of E. B. Bailey
of Monticello and E. W. Irvine of Lake City, have
their candidacy ready for the public consideration.
Another candidate is reported as getting ready to
hand in his assessment to the State committee-N.
H. Harrison. formerly of Lake City, and who has been
employed by the Seaboard Air Line in the claim
department.
When this bunch of campaigners get to the point
of stumping the people will be entertained, and per-


haps instructed as to the benefits conferred by the
Railroad Commission, and as it is a subject touch-
ing the public pulse more deeply than any other mat-
ter in the campaign, it will be accorded full interest.

Newspaper men of Florida are more and more
attracted to Legislative honors. Last session there
were a number in both Houses, and several are can-
didates for reelection. A new aspirant, though, is
Wm. A. Russell of Putnam County, editor of the
News of Palatka. Mr. Russell, who is one of the
most able and interesting writers of the State press,
is making his first bid for office in this campaign,
and in the event of his election as Representative if
lie only partially achieves the success he has attained
in newspaper work his career would be one of great
satisfaction to the people.
In Dr. E. S. Crill Putnam County has another
candidate worthy of support. He seeks reelection to
the Senate, where he has served with much credit
for several terms. Dr. Crill is always a notable fig-
ure in that body, and has been responsible for much
beneficial legislation. Indeed, his ability and integ-
rity have given him State prominence politically,
pnd it is more than likely that he will play an im-'
portant part in the next Gubernatorial campaign.
Another candidate for the Senate who should
receive hearty consideration is Hon.- John G. Mc-
Giffin of Nassau County, and who has served as Rep-
resentative in an able manner. His past record is a
guarantee of his fitness, and his election would add
to the usefulness of the Senate.

Rev. 0. N. Williams has entered the contest for
Representative from Manatee County, his opponents
being John A. Graham and A. T. Cornwell The
three-cornered fight has assumed a peculiar aspect
because the claim is made that Mr. Williams is not
entitled to have his name placed on the Democratic
ticket, but should be compelled to run as an inde-
pendent, because in the last campaign he was opposed
to the Democratic committee.

Pasco County will honor herself by sending W.
E. Embry as Representative to the Legislature. A
true Democrat and an energetic and forceful man
who has been an important factor in the development
of that section of the State where he makes his home,
his services would be of much value in shaping
needed legislation.

Clerkship of the Circuit Court is a position stir-
ring up strife in Dade County, and four candidates
are putting forth their best efforts to be the high man
when the votes are counted. The office is a fat one,
therefore the intense desire to serve the people.
Another matter of interest in Dade County is the
fight for the Legislature between George A. Worley
and J. W. Watson, the latter having represented
Osceola County in the House previous to removing
to Miami. Mr. Watson enjoyed much prominent
in legislative capacity, being Speaker during the ses-
sion of 1901, and his many friends in the State are
pleased to note his re-entry in politics.

Two prominent members of the old straightout
faction of Dual County will, it is reported, be can.
didates for the liature-Wm. Baker for the
Senate and E. W. Gilien for Representative.
Mr. Baker, who is a brother-in-law of John N. C.
Stockton, was formerly Judge of the Probate Court
(Continued on Next Pape)


I





























Ii


I-, I












March 24, 1906


THE SUN


Seventh Page


.John Henry on Butting In 4 GRGEBV. HOBART


IN THE IANDI)PAINTED BEANElY.


Of course if a fellow has a lady friend
that's a dead swell looker he's always
anxious to grab her by the elbow and
lead her in among the rest of the prom-
enaders.
I'm out to wager two or more seven-
dollar bills that when it comes to face
and form my lady friend has the rest
of the bunch looking like the wall-flow-
ers at a Choctaw cotillion.
She's the only mirror on the mantle-
piece-believe me!
I took her down the lane to one of
those swell grub stations the other night,
and since then every time I think about
it I feel like getting up and ordering
myself out of the room.
Oh! scold me! scold me!
But I had to do it.
When a fellow is out buying his lady
friend a pleasant evening and he runs
into a lot of low-foreheads he has to back
up-that's all there is to it.
It goes against the grain to stand up
and introduce my lady friend to every
laborer in the four-flush vineyard who
trails up to the table and gives me a
glad look.
It does indeed.
Being somewhat of a money hater my-
self, of course I'm wise to enough pikers
to fill a ploughed field.
Just as sure as I stride into a fancy
feed-store with nothing on my mind but
a desire to act like a gentleman and buy
hot cookies for the Best and Only I'm
doomed to meet a bunch of sawdust
sports who want to leave their own
tables and associate wita me.
Of course they only do it just because
they have elastic in their necks.
They expect an introduction to the
Beautiful Girl, and after getting it
they've figured it out to hand her a line
of conversation that will charm her to
a standstill and make the Man she's
With look like a dried apple.
And every mother's son of them talks
like he'd been struck in the grammar
by a ferryboat.
Anyway, I took my lady friend to a
sumptuous soup-house the other evening
for dinner. I've just ordered four-dol-
lars' worth off the card and we're sitting
there in the hand-painted beanery chat-
ting pleasantly and waiting for the
longshoreman to journey back with the
oysters.
Up to our table comes Able Sluice-
berger.
Able has a great pull all along the
line because the picture of an uncle of
his hung in the Hall of Fame for nearly
an hour before the janitor got on to it
and threw it out.
Able puts a hand on each corner of the


table and leans over with all the grace
peculiar to a soft shell crab.
"Hello, John Henry!" says Able.
I bow and give him a Klondike grin,
but he ducks and comes up happy.
"Eatin'?" inquires Able.
"No, Able," I answers, just to put
him wise to the fact that a swift walk-
away would do us all good. "No; we're
not eating. We just dropped in to play
a few hands of bridge whist with the
waiter, and he's gone to get a deck of
cards. We never come into a restaurant
to eat. Usually we drop in during the
rush hours and help the proprietor peel
the oysters. On this occasion, however,
we're out for a dickens of a spree, so
we've decided to play bridge with the
waiter."
"Quit your joshin', John Henry!" says
Able; "you're getting to be a worse kid-
der than Bill McConnell1l"
Then Able pusnes a lovely smile over
in the direction of my lady friend, but
it doesn't land because she's busy be-
hind the bill of fare.
After a while Able notices that it's up
to him to fondle a fierce frost, so he
backs out.


"IORI)RD HOPE."
"Who's your friend?" inquires Clara
Jane, after Able had moseyed away.
Now, you know, a fellow can't confess
to the Original Package of Sweetness
that he's entered in the same race with
a lot of $3 goats.


On the level, now, can he?
It was my cue to make a Big Play.
I had to get gabby and make Clara
Jane believe I associated only with Tor-
rid Tamales.
And did I?
Oh! ask me easy just to tease me!l
"Whot that?" I says, after I fished for
a few French-fried potatoes; "why. that's
Lord Hope."
My lady friend dropped her knife and
fork and gave me the startled gawe.
I never whimpered.
Oh, scold me; scold meI
"Lord Hope!" says she, "Why, John
Henry, you never told me you knew Lord
Hope !"
"Didn't I?" I says; "my! my! how
thoughtless! Well, that's His Lordship
all right, all right"
Clara Jane thought a while and I
carved my initials on a sliver of celery.
"But you called nim Able says she,
after a pause.
"Sure thing I says; "what else?
Want me to call him Mose or Rosey or
Meye r Ikey? He's not Irish."
"I can't imagine an English nobleman
being called Abie," says my lady friend,
for she's a first-rate Believer by na-
ture, but a Doubter when the dice roll
heavy.
I was beginning to feel just about as
happy as a hard boiled egg, but I was
in up to my neck and I couldn't holler
for help.
"Englishmen have queer names, espe-
cially noblemen. Say! won't you have
a charlotte re rue or an apple fritter?
-it'll do you good!" I says, hoping to
swing the conversation close enough to
the shore so that I could jump off and
take to the timber.
But she wouldn't let go.
"Able l Able" says my lady friend to
herself; "Able Hopel that sounds queer.
You must know him pretty well to call
him Able?"
"Oh, yes; we went to school together,"
I says; "wouldn't you like to bite into
a portion of pie just by the way of no
harmt"
"Why, John Henry!" said Clara Jane,
giving me the glassy glare; "and you've
always told me you went to school in
Communipaw!"
My finish was ringing the door bell.
Just then Mike MeGuire strolled into
'the neighborhood and wanted to hang
up his hat on my hook.
Mike is another Lad with a Veeble
Forehead, and when he's not pounding
tne pave in front of Booze Bazaar he's
acting as second assistant engineer in a
pool room.
Once in a while Mike breaks into a
theater and tries to act till some one
catches him with the goods. tlhen he
apologizes, backs out of his harness ,nd
is up and away to the swamps.
"Good evening!" says Mike, puihhing
out the familiar fist.
I'm right back at him with a short-
arm nod of recognition, and in a minute
I'm busy with my beans.
"Feedin', I see!" says Mike, wishing
to show my lady friend that his powersi
of observation are strictly home-nmde.
I gave him a look that I figured would
comb his hair, but he's out to makit a
deep impression on Clara .ane, so my
haughty expression didn't fnish. one,
two, three.
Before I can get back from the break-
away i find him reciting the sad story of


his life and watching my lady friend to
see if she enjoys lit literature.
"Oh, yes," says McGuire, "I do so
love the stage. I've been playing the
Provinces for eighteen weeks at Ilotipur,
the Boy Hero, in Ben Hur, and I was the
hit of the show!"
Wouldn't that upset your box outtce?
Him the hit of the show I
Why, if applause was selling for two
(cnts a ton his ability couldn't get a
unfdful.
Two to one he was out doing the po-
tato plantations with a No. 3 Une. Tom's
('amn. Co.
About all that guy could mix with in
a parcel of Uncle Tommers.
Finally, after writing about four chap-
ters and getting his life lines crossed


"THE EARL OF YARMOUTH."
with George Washington, Manny Friend,
John McCullough and Tod Sloan, he be-
gins to notice that the wind is blowing
chill across the wild moor, so he signals
the conductor and hops off the wagon.
"Who was that?" inquires my lady
friend, as McGuire ambles back to his
own table.
"That," I says; "Oh! that was the
Earl of Yarmouth."
Clara Jane handed me a swift glance,
then she patted her hat-pins and grabbed
her gloves.
"Come along, John Henry!" says she.
"King Edward will be here in a minute,
and after what I've read about him I
don't think I care to meet him. Let's
go home."
She wins in a whisper.
It'll take three weeKS to square myself.
Hereafter, me to Dennetta Me to
the stack o' wheats symposium where the
rest of the entries stick to their stalls.
Where the outside conversation is con-
fined to "Draw one!" and "Boll two,
meejum!"
No more swell Sandwich Salons for
me, where the grafters want to butt in
all the while.
Oh! scold met scold met


Shaking the

Old Plum Tree
[Continued from Preceding Page]
of this county, and at present is serving as President
of the City Council of Jacksonville.
Mr. Gillen has been Tax Collector of Duval, and
his last political experience was an unsuccessful at-
tempt to be elected Sheriff.
Senator McCreary of Alachua, who announced his
candidacy for reelection, has withdrawn. The reason
given is that private business demands attention,
rather a sudden discovery, in view of the fact that
but two weeks had elapsed since masking his announce-
meat.


The prospect is for a lively fight, as John B.
Dell, a former Representative, will attempt to take
up the toga that has dropped from McCreary, and
the friends of Major W. R. Thomas will try to throw
it over the latter's form.
Major Thomas has served in the Senate, but at
that time it was stated that he did not permit his
Senatorial duties to interfere with private business,
and he was the subject of much harsh comment, both *
in prose and verse, for being "called" to Tampa when
the bill to provide a Railroad Commission was before
the Senate, and remaining away until after the bill
was defeated.
In a card, in which friends announce his candi-
dacy, he is said to be "against corporations and
trusts" and for the commonn people" la every way.
He is also to pe as eamp of the Bu a lw.


Whether the past of Major Thomas has been for.
given will be answered by the result of the primary.

Koenigsberg.-A newspaper man just returned
from a trip through East Prussia claims to have
overheard the following conversation between a
baronial land owner of that district and a chance
acquaintance in a railway carriage
"We Prussian magnate don't believe In the mod-
era nonsense about bringing up children like blooded
foals and fillies, worth their weight in gold if they
lle. We generally deposit babies in the pig sty,
w1e0 there is plenty of food. After a few months
we .. iavetigate o that have hair on their
s ea n at tod to het school; thsee with
?hd iMM sis t ML"


I






* '~r'"r- ~ .,-,rru ... -- *AI.
LP~ -


SatGH H, Marc24,906
Satumay, March 24, 1906


sr


THE SUN


s


E


D


To Purify elections
Whatever doubt there may be as to the former existence of a man named
Homer, and this doubt has not been laid for something like three thousand years,
all are a agreed that the Trojan War, said to have been told of by the venerable
and mystical Greek, is a story well told.
There may be some who have not read the story, but we dare say all of us
have heard of the trick the Greeks played on the Trojans, by which they gained
entrance into the city which they could not take by storm.
These crafty men, who were the ancestors of the very men who at this late
day fool us in the fruit stands by placing the largest strawberries on top, con-
structed a huge wooden horse, the inside of which was filled with chosen warriors
fully armed and equipped to do battle. After the horse was built the Greeks
reti d and played like they were going to leave the country. The Trojans came
out from the walls. looked the horse over, liked him, and rolled him (and his
,wror r into the city. That night while the Trojans were wrapped in pajamas
4 and hmber the Greeks came out of the belly of the horse, opened the gats of
/the oIty to their companions, who had returned, and Troy fell.
This story may have been the origin of the expression-"That's a horse on
me." It did originate the expression, which was formerly much in vogue but
is not so much used now-"Beware of the Greeks when they come bearing gifts."
A free-hand interpretation of this expression, put into the present day ver-
tacular, would be, "I'm from Missouri."
The choice of expressions is yours, but what we started to write about is the
"Campaign Contribution Publicity Movement" started the first of the year by
one Perry Belmont.
We like the sound of the name of Perry's scheme, but this name of Belmont
strikes the ear harshly when connected with things political. It was a man
named Belmont who sold the Democratic party the Parker gold brick during the
last Presidential campaign.
True, this last Belmont was christened August, and the present Belmont is
called Perry, and Perry may be able to stand the acid test better than his
brother.
But just the bare mention of that name Belmont, caused us to recall that
motto about the Greeks when they come bearing gifts.
We are, therefore, a little timid about indorsing that scheme for Publicity
of Campaign Contributions, put forth by Mr. Perry Belmont.
It looks good, and if we knew that Perry is not like his brother August, we
would give it unqualified endorsement.
There is no doubt whatever in our mind that some legislation is needed to
prevent large holders of wealth from making up a huge campaign fund to be
used in carrying elections in this country.
The astounding revelations in the insurance investigation by the Armstrong
committee, were enough to arouse the people to the danger of secret contribu-
tions to campaign funds, by corporations having millions from which to give.
If this thing be not checked elections in the future will not be an expression
of the WILL OF THE PEOPLE but of the will of a dozen men who control
the money.
A bill has been introduced in Congress by Representative McCall of Massa-
chusetts, who passed a similar bill in the Massachusetts legislature in 1902.
This bill embodies the ideas of Perry Belmont, which were indorsed by a confer-
ence held in Washington last January at which were present Governors of States,
representatives of labor, lawyers and politicians. Cromwell Gibbons represented
this State..
The bill applies to contributions to national committees, which are defined
as any committee designed to influence elections in two or more States. These
contributions are to be made only to the chairman, or treasurer, or to a member
of such committee, or to a representative of the committee appointed in writing.
Every such treasurer is required to keep a detailed record of the names of all
persons contributing and of all disbursements made by him, with the namc4 of
the persons to whom payments are made. A detailed sworn statement of such
receipts and disbursements must be filed with the clerk of the House of Repre-
sentatives within thirty days after election. There are various provisions to
prevent evasion by the treasurer or members of the committee. Severe penalties
are provided for the failure of treasurers to file such report as is required by
the bill.
If the bill passes Congress it will of course affect elections for national
officers only. To give the movement the proper scope it will be necessary for the
States to pass the same bill, or a better one.
We think such a bill should be passed by the next Legislature of this State.
It would give every man a chance to be elected to office on his individual
merit, and not give an undue advantage to those candidates who are favored by
interests that want protection and have the cash to pay for it.


Sball We Have'Tb:odore I?


Judge Alton B. Parker, the honest but colorless candidate of the Democratic
party for President at the last election, was reported one day last week to have
said that he thought President Roosevelt would ask for the nomination for a
third term, and that he had always intended to ask for one.
The Judge denied this next day, and of course we accord him that privilege
and relieve him of the burden of authorship of the remark, but WE WILL TAKE
THE. LIBERTY OF REPEATING! THE REMARK, and going a little further
along the line suggested by it.
WE sa that President Roosevelt would like very much to be Theodore 1st
Emperor of America, and if he considers the asking for a third term a step
towards the goal of his ambition. lihe will not only ask it but will flourish the
"big stick" to force his party to give it to him.
Every act of President Roosevelt has bee4 along the line of imperialism. lie
loves to hobnob, on brotherly terms, with kings and emperors.
He is constantly crying for a bigger navy and a stronger and larger army.
He makes treaties in spite of the Senate's refusal to ratify them.
He jumps three or four regiments into the Philippines as soon as he hears
of unrest in China, so that he may declare war at the first outbreak, without
waiting for Congress.
He pushes the war of conquest in the Philippines and pats Wood on the back
when he succeeds in killing 600 defenseless savages. men, women and children.
He never misses a chance to say something good about "strong, centralized
Governments."
If President Roosevelt does not develop into Theodore 1st it will be because
,, the American people have awakened to the danger anh shut him off.
He is doing the best he can to get there.

After thinking over the matter for two and one-half years. John A. Chandler,
former husband of Amelie Rives, has brought suit against Colonel Mann, editor
o, f Town -Topics, for "malicious libel." It is pot certain, however, whether Mr.
C aner's action was influenced by calm deliberation or in seeing opportunity for
Jampl on a man .wh en others adhim down.


S


Cotton Gambling and the Census Reports
We notice that cotton went down 20 or more points one day this week and
that it went up again as many points the day after.
We have noted that the reason assigned for the fall in price was that the
Government Crop Report was larger than the expectations were that it would be.
We have also noted that the reason given for the rise in price was that Liverpool
took a different view of the Government report from the American contingent
and was unexpectedly "bullish."
All this sounds very nice, but we take the liberty of saying that it means
absolutely nothing to the men who grow the cotton crops,. and- has nothing
whatever to do with the REAL VALUE OF THE STAPLE.
Put into plain English, the rise and the fall of cotton this week means simply
that certain gamblers who conduct their business in Hanover Square, New York,
have been trying to overreach one another, and the price of cotton, 'has been
juggled by them to suit their selfish schemes of money-grabbing.
The .same reasons for the change in prices are always given. We never hear
of the rise or .fall of cotton prices unless they are coupled with the Government
Census Report.
Mr. North, head of the Census Bureau, has asked to be relieved of the duty
of collecting cotton crop statistics. This strikes us as- a very proper request and
we sincerely trust that the President will gratify him.
It costs a great deal of money to gather the cotton crop reports, and if they
serve any useful purpose we have failed to notice it. The only use we have ever
seen these reports put to is to give explanations to the people whom the Hanover
Square gamblers have separated from their money as to why the money went from
the pockets of the public to the pockets of the gamblers.
The fluctuating reports are good to foster gambling in futures in the
exchanges and bucket shops of the country, but they shed no light on the cultiva-
tion of cotton nor do they help any legitimate occupation.
This gathering by the Government of the cotton crop reports is expensive,
it promotes gambling, it BRINGS RUIN TO MANY A MAN WHO TRADES
IN BUCKET SHOPS, and it does not help the people any.
Let's stop taking crop statistics and stop publishing crop reports.


The State Federation of Labor
At the annual meeting of the State Federation of Labor held in this city last
week there was unanimously passed a resolution declaring the attitude of the
Federation on the question of child labor and the education of children.
The Federation stands committed to the policy of preventing any child under
fifteen years of age from working in a factory, and for the education of all
children. The Federation left it in the hands of an executive board to appoint
Legislative committees to agitate legislation along these lines at the next session
of the State Legislature, and passed an assessment on themselves to- defray
the expenses incident thereto.
This was a representative body of men from all parts of the State, who
have contributed more than any other one class to the upbuilding and material
prosperity of the State.
ne have no doubt that other salutary measures were discussed and deter-
mined upon at the last session. It is a noteworthy fact that a majority .of the
great movements that have resulted in the advancement of human progress have
originated in the labor organizations. But if the State Federation had done
NOTHING E LSE THAN TO DECLARE AGAINST CHILD LABOR AND FOR
THEb EDUCATION OF THE CHILDREN and to take initiatory steps to help
bring about these things, the meeting would have been a conspicuous success
and would have a salutary effect on the entire State.
President Roosevelt declares thatthe battle of Mount Dajn was "A sniflcnt
-feat of arms." The British held the same view of the Wyoming massal


IT


<- ';..,











LS


isf


THE SUN


NINTH 'PAGE


Saturday, March 24, 1906


The Growth of Ben Tillman
Whenever the sacred cause of human liberty has needed a champion, nature
has provided one fully equipped with the power necessary to do the great work
marked out for him.
Sometimes this champion has been chosen from among the wearers of fine
linen; sometimes, and more frequently, the class that eats of the husks of life
is .called upon to furnish the champion.
It makes no difference to dame nature whether the portals of a mansion or
the door of a hovel opens to her knock when she is SEEKING FOR A MAN; she
puts forth her call in the time of need,
AND LO THE MAN COMES FORTH.
In this country Washington and Jefferson answered the call for a leader
from the ranks of the patricians; Andrew Jackson and Abraham Lincoln were
taken from the commons.
Now comes Ben Tillman from the poor people-from the common people-to
take. his place among the leaders of this great nation in time of need.
When this rugged figure rose on the political horizon of South Carolina a
few years ago, what a shock it was to the proud old aristocrats who had hugged
their traditions of blood and birth as they guided the destinies of the State, and
lifted the incredulous eyebrow to one who presumed to doubt the sacredness of
the traditions or their absolute right to rule.
But nature scorns traditions and sets aside ancient rights when she needs a
man to adjust human affairs, so that the welfare and happiness of the many
may be secured in spite of the prejudices of the few.
That nature chooses wisely and compels confirmation of her judgment, is
again verified in the career of the rugged Senator from South Carolina.
When Tillman was chosen Governor, the same cry went up from the "old
families" that ascended from the lips of Roman matrons when the Goths and
vandals sacked the Eternal City. With proud disdain these scions of the nobility
of birth, blood and tradition held aloof from him whose shoes were stained with
the dust of the fields as he walked through halls that had known for generations
the dainty tread of the well-bred sons of cultured sires and grandsires.
When by sheer force of natural ability and uncompromising honesty, this











I -








i v















man of the people forced himself still further into the confidence of his neigh-
bors, and they sent him to the United States Senate, the aristocrats at home
breathed a sigh of relief and the favored and exclusive ones in that "gentlemen's
club" in Washington were shocked in. their turn.
He knew not the fine points of that lifeless thing called Senatorial courtesy-
nor did he concern himself greatly about that ponderous thing--Senatorial
dignity. He spoke his mind when he considered it necessary and incumbent
upon him to do so, and spoke in the language at his command-the language of a
plain, honest, conscience-keeping man.
He thought deeply and earnestly all the time about the questions presented
to his mind; he studied hard and thoughtfully, and he pondered carefully over
the things he studied.
No man can think big thoughts, study great questions, nor ponder over
important subjects, without developing his mental powers, enlarging his knowl-
edge and broadening his perceptions.
This is what has happened to Ben Tillman.
HE HAS GROWN.
Those who have met him in debate have found him well equipped with the
weanons of attack and defense. When be rises to his feet HE IS POSTED. His


attack is formidable, because he knows the weakness of his enemy. His defense
is well-night perfect because his study of his subject has given him material to
cover up the weak places in his own line of argument.
Seats on the floor and in the gallery of the Senate chamber that were for-
merly filled, to hear the verbal pyrotec alm of "Pitehfork Ben" are ow filled to
bear the Senator from South Crolia illuminate some great matimal qustio


Lodge, Spooner, Hale, Foraker, and the rest of his political opponents,
respect him, and those of his party honor and admire him.
Although his training has softened his forms of expression somewhat, he
is none the less the same FEARLESS TELLER of things that others tremble as
they pass the whisper around. What he feels he expresses. What he thinks is
right, he says right out, and no man who hears him dares harbor a doubt of his
honesty and sincerity.
What a contrast he presents to the oleaginous Depew, the crafty .Platt, the
conscienceless German, the soul-atrophied Aldrich, the hide-bound Lodge, .the
embalmed beef tainted Alaer, the pilded Clark, and the others who haveforgetten
THE INTERESTS OF THE MANY, because of their remembrance of the wishes
OF THE FEW1
Tillman has had his chance to get rich the same as Depew has, the same as
Platt has, the same as German has; the only difference being that Tillman's
chance was better and bigger than theirs.
For nearly a score of years Tillman has been the absolute boss of a, political
machine that created and has maintained the South Carolina Dispensary Bystem.
All the liquor consumed by the people of his State was bought by agents who
owed their places to him.
WHAT A CHANCE FOR A RAKE-OFFI
What high revels of graft does this condition point out to the graft inclined I
Yet TILLMAN IS POOR, and not a single man can be found even among
his political enemies, to accuse him or suspect him of dishonesty.
This is not cited to praise the subject of our sketch. No man deserves any
particular credit for being decent and honest. It is set down to present a
contrast between Tillman and some of those who associate with him in the great
branch of this republican Government.
TILLMAN HAS GROWN.
He has taken his place among the great ones of the nation.
HE IS A MAN.
He is one of those whom nature has called to action when this country,
which stands alone among the nations of the earth as the representative of the
true principle of human liberty, needs good men, great men, strong men, wise
men and honest men, to guide it safely through the perils of political corrup-
tion that has wrecked every republic that has existed to bless mankind.


Jim Crow Columns in Newspapers
We have no fear that we will be accused of "negrophilology," which word,
being translated, means pushing the negro forward to a place where he does not
belong.
We have always expressed our sympathy with the negroes as a race and have
done whatever we could, whenever we could, to better their condition.
We are perfectly willing and even anxious to see him rise, and draw the
line only at his rising into social equality with the whites, which we do not
think would be good for either race. When, therefore, the negroes embark in any
enterprise we are glad to note it. Just now our attention is attracted to a
paper published in this city by negroes. It is well gotten up, presents a neat
typogphical appearance, and no doubt contains interesting matter for negroes.
We quote below from an editorial appearing in a recent issue of this Oaper,
commenting on the habit of printing negro columns in newspapers. The editorial
goes on to give other reasons against the publication of "Jim Crow" columns in
newspapers, but those given in our extract strike us as being sufficiently strong
to cause a discontinuance of this practice.
This, of course, is from the negro standpoint. There are so many reasons
against it from the white man's standpoint, which will occur to any self.respect.
Ing white man, that we do not consider it necessary or even advisable to present
them.
We just conclude, as a matter of course, that it is improper from the
standpoint of the white man:


WHY CONDEMN WHITE NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHING JIM
CROW COLUMNS?


"We are unalterably opposed to all white newspapers which publish 'Jim
Crow' columns, and we think we have good and sufficient grounds for this
opposition. And for the benefit of those who have asked us our reasons we pro-
ceed to state them.
iFirst. We oppose white newspapers which publish 'Jim Crow' columns on
business principles. (a) Every sane man must admit that the negro in this
country (especially in the South), needs well edited and strongly supported
newspapers (daily and weekly) of his own which shall defend him, present his
side to the world and condemn the injustice done him. Now, if the negro is ever
to have these papers he must establish, operate and support them himself. jut
this he will never do so long as he is satisfied with white papers which run
'Jim Crow' columns. Either negro newspapers must go (or live at a poor dying
rate) or white newspapers with 'Jim Crow' columns must go, for the negro
cannot and will not support both, and for our part we have decided that it is our
duty to do what we can to help negro newspapers to live and prosper."


Jacksonville will spend forty thousand dollars or more of its new bond
money in park improvements. In the meantime the city has no hospital for the
accommodation of the indigent sick. Some day a man or woman will die in one
of these parks, and everybody will be sorry.

It is reported that the advance in necessities of life requires a fifty per cent
increase in salaries of Government officials from President to Congressmen.
There are 11,250 women and girls employed in the executive departments in
Washington. Don't forget the ladies.

Well, well, to think of how Governor Broward caught Immutable George is
an object lesson to all those who write much not to forget what they write.
These changing times are apt to get one into trouble if memory is not kept
in good working order all the time.

We have it on good authority that a mistake of 1,500 names was made in
the compilation of the State census report from Jacksonville. The addition of
1,500 names will help some, but the people will never be satisfied until the
city takes a new census.

Frank Clark took the first fall out of Uncle Joe Cannon who runs the
national House of Representatives, Shackelford sad others follow Frank's lead.
lor aa aateur this man Clark of our is the best we -ow about.


I


A














Teeitb fPA


THE SUN,


March 24, 1906


The Czar S Chevalier William Le Quu
pi


"This will pass through many hands
before it reaches thepost If, however,
it ever does get dispatched and you re-
oeive it, will you do me one last favor-
a favor to an unfortunate gin who is
friendless and helpless, and wno will no
longer trouble the world? It is this:
Take this letter to London, and call upon
Mr. Martin Woodroffe at 98 Cork Street,
Piloadilly. Show him my letter, and
ten him from me that through it all I
have kept my promise, and that the se-
cret is still safe. He will understand-
and also know why I cannot write this
with my own hand. If he is abroad,
keep it until he returns.
"It is all I ask of you, Lydia, and I
know that if this reaches you, you will
not refuse me. You have been my only
friend and confidante, but I now bid you
farewell, for the unknown beckons me,
and from the grave I cannot write.
Again farewell, and for ever. Your lov-
ing and affectionate friend, Elma."
"A very strange letter, is it not?" re-
marked te girl at my side. "I can't
make it out. You see there is no ad-
dress, but the postmark is Russian. She
is evidently in Russia."
"In Finland," I said, examining the
stamp and making out the post town to
be Abo. "But have you been to Lon-
don and executed this strange commis-
slon?"
"No. We are going up next week. I
intend to call upon this person named
Woodroffe."
I made no remark. He was, I knew,
abroad, but I was glad at having ob-
tained two very important clues: first,
the address of the mysterious yachtsman,
Woodroffe, alias Hornby, and, secondly,
ascertaining that tae young girl I
sought was somewhere in the vicinity of
the town of Abo, the Finnish port on
the Baltic.
"Poor Elma, you see, speaks in her
letter of some secret, Mr. Gregg," my
companion said. "She says she wishes
this Mr. Woodroffe, whoever he is, to
know that she has kept her promise and
has not divulged it. This only bears
out what I have all along suspected."
"What are your suspicions?"
"Well, from her deep, thoughtful man-
ner, and from certain remarks she at
times made to me, I believe that Elma is
in possession of some great and terrible
secret-a secret which her uncle, Baron
Oberg, is desirous of learning. I know
she holds him in deadly fear--she is in
terror that she may inadvertently betray
to him the truthtI


CHAPTER IX.
sTUANqE DsIBCLOvU8s ARE MADE.
The strange letter of Elma Heath.
combined with what Lydia Moreton had
told me, aroused within me a determi-
nation to investigate the mystery. From
the moment I had landed from the Lola
on that hot, breathless night at Leghorn,
mystery had crowded upon mystery un-
til it was all bewildering.
It was now proved that the sweet-
faced girl, the original of the torn pho-
tograph, held a secret, and that, by her
own words, she knew that death was
approaching. The incomprehensible at-
tempt upon my life, the strange actions
of Hornby and Chater-who, by the way,
seemed to have entirely disappeared-
the asMasaination of the man who by mas-
puerading as the Italian waiter had met
is death, and the murder of Olinto's
wife were all problems which required
solution.
Had it not been for the mystery of it
all-end mystery ever arouses the hu-
man curiosity-I should have given up
tryag to get at the truth. Yet as a
ma with some leisure, and knowing by
that letter of alma Heath's that she was
in sore distress, I redoubled my efforts
to aseertaln the reason of it all.
The mystery of the Lola was still a
ukrtey alog the Mediterranean. At
awa1t.uh and Italian port the yacht's
fsls an- s ma g ral build was writ.


ten in the police books, while at Lloyd's
the name Lola was marked down as
,among the mysterious'craft at sea.
Chater was missing, while Hornby
was abroad. Perhaps they were both
cruising again, with their yacht re-
painted and bearing a fresh name. But
why? What had been their motive?
Stirred by the complete mystery which
now seemed to enshroud the unfortunate
girl, I set before myself the task of eluci-
dating it. Hitherto I had remained pas-
sive rather than active, but I now real-
ized by that curious letter that at least
one woman's life was at' stake-that
Elma Heath was in possession of some
secret.
On leaving Leghorn I had given up all
hope of tracing the mysterious yachts-
man, and had left the matter in the
hands of the Italian police. But, with-
out any effort on my own part, I seemed
to have been drawn into a veritable net-
work of strange incidents, all of which
combined to form the most complete and
remarkable enigma ever presented in life.
Surely no man was ever confronted by
so many mysteries at one time as I was
at this moment.
Fortunately I had been careful not to
show my hand to anyone, and this per-
haps gave me a distinct advantage. On
my journey back to London, as the train
swung through Peterborough and out
across the rich level lands towards Hit-
chin, I recollected Jack Durnford's
words when I had mentioned the Lola.
What, I wondered, did he know?
Next month, in November, he was due
back in London after his three years'
service on the Mediterranean station.
Then we should meet in a few weeks I
hoped. Would he tell me anything when
he became aware of all I knew? He
held some secret knowledge. Was it
possible that his secret was the same as
that held by the unfortunate girl in far-
off, dreary Finland?
I called at the house in Cork Street
indicated by Elma, and learned from the
old commissionaire who acted as lift-
man ald porter, that Mr. Woodroffe's
chambers were closed.
"'E's nearly always away, sir-abroad,
I think," was all I could get out of the
old soldier, who, like his class, was no
doubt well paid to keep his mouth
closed.
For two days I lounged about West-
bourne Grove watching Ferrari's res-
taurant. In such a busy, bustling thor-
oughfare, with so many shop windows
as excuses for loitering, the task was
easy. I saw that Olinto came regularly
at ten o'clock in the morning, worked
hard all day, and left at nine o'clock at
night, taking an omnibus home from
Royal Oak. His exterior was calm and
unconcerned, unlike that of a man whose
devoted wife had disappeared.
I would have approached him and ex-
'plained the ghastly truth, had it not
been for the fact that the poor woman's
body was missing.
Those September days were full of
anxiety for me. Alone and unaided I
was trying to solve one of the greatest
of problems, plunged as I was in a ver-
itable sea of mystery. I wanted to see
Muriel Leithcourt, and to question her
further regarding Elms Heath. There-
fore again I left Euston, and, traveling
through the night, took my seat at the
breakfast table at Greenlaw next morn-
ing.
Sir George, who was sitting alone-
it not being my aunt's habit to appear
early-welcomed me, and then in his
bluff manner sniffed and exclaimed:
"Nice goings on up at Rannoch! Have
you heard of them?"
"No. What?" I cried breathlessly,
staring at him.
"Well, my suspicions that those Leith-
courts were utter outsiders turns out to
be about correct."
"Why ?"
"We l, it's a very funny story, and
there are a dozen different distorted ver-
sions of it," he said. "But from what I
can gather the true facts are these:
About seven o'clock the aight before last,
as L.ithoourt and his hoe-party were


dressing for dinner, a telegram arrived.
Mrs. Leithcourt opened it, and at once
went off into hysterics, while her hus-
band, in a breathless hurry, slipped off
his evening clothes again and got into
an old blue serge suit, tossed a few
things into a bag, and then went along
to Muriel's room to urge her to prepare
for secret flight."
"Flight!" 1 gasped. "What, have they
gone ?'
"Listen, and I'll tell you. The ser-
vants have described the whole affair
down in the village, so there's no doubt
about it. Leithcourt showed Muriel the
telegram and urged her to fly. At first
she refused, but for her father's sake
was induced to prepare to accompany
him. Of course, the guests were in ig-
norance of all this. The brougham was
ordered to be ready in the stable yard
and not to go round, while Mrs. Leith-
court's maid tried to bring the lady back
to her senses. Leitheourt himself, it
seemed, rushed hither and thither, seiz-
ing the jewel cases of his wife and daugh-
ter and whatever valuables he could
place his hand upon, while the mother
and daughter were putting on their
things. As he rushed down the main
staircase to the library, where his check-
book and some ready cash were locked
in the safe, he met a stranger who had
just been admitted and shown into the
room. Leithcourt closed the door and
faced him. What afterwards transpired,
however, is a mystery, for two hours
later, after he and the two women had
escaped, leaving the house-party to their
own diversions, the stranger was found
looked in a large cupboard and insen-
sible. The sensation was a tremendous
one. Cowan, the doctor, was called, and
declared that the stranger had been drug-
ged and was suffering from some nar-
cotic. The servant who admitted him
declared that the man had said he had
an appointment with his master, and
that no card was necessary. He, how-
ever, gave the name of Chater."
"Chater!" I cried, starting up. "Are
you certain of that name?"
"I only know what Cowan told me,"
was my uncle's reply. "But do you know
him?"
"Not at all. Only I've heard that
name before," I said. "I knew a man
out in Italy of that same name. But
where is the visitor now?"
"In the hospital at Dumfries. They
took him there in preference to leaving
him alone at Rannoch."
"Alone?"
"Of course. Everyone has left, now
tne host and hostess have slipped off
without saying good-bye. Scandalous
affair, isn't it? But, my boy, you'll re-
member that I always said I didn't like
those people. There's something mys-
terious about them, I feel certain. That
telegram gave them warning of the visit
of the man Chater, depend upon it, and
for some reason they're afraid of him.
It would be interesting to know what
transpired between the two men in the
library. And these are people who've
been taken up by everybody-mere ad-
venturers, I should call them!" And
old Sir George sniffed again at thought
of such scandal happening in the neigh.
borhood. "If Gilrae must let Rannoch,
then why in the name of Fortune doesn't
he let it to respectable folk and not to
the first fellow who answers his adver.-
tisement in the Field? It's simply dis-.
graceful I"
"Certainly, it is a most extraordinary
story," I declared. "Leitheourt evi-
dently wished to escape from his visitor,
and that's why he drugged him."
"Why he poisoned him, you mean.
Cowan says the fellow is poisoned, but
that he'll probably recover. He is al-
ready conscious, I hear."
I resolved to call on the doctor, who
happened to be well known to me, and
obtain further particulars. Therefore
at eleven o'clock I drove into Dumfries
and entered his consulting room.
He was a spare, short, fair man, a
trifle bald, and when I was shown in he
welcomed me warmly, speaking with his
pronounced Galloway accent


"Well, it is a very mysterious case,
Mr. Gregg," he said, after I had told
him the object of my visit. "The en-
tieman. is still in the hospital, and I
have to keep him very qufet. He was
poisoned without a doubt, and has had
a very, narrow escape of his life. The po-
lice got wind of the affair, and Macken-
zie called to question him. But he re-
fused'to make any statement whatever,
apparently treating the affair very
lightly. The police, however, are mys-
tified as to the reason of Mr. Leithoourt's
sudden flight, and are anxious to get to
the bottom of the curious affair."
"Naturally. And more especially
after the tragedy up in Rannoch Wood
a short time ago," I said.
"That's just it," said the doctor, re-
moving his pince-nes and rubbing them.
"Mackenzie seems to suspect some con-
nection between Leithoourt's sudden dis-
appearance and that mysterious affair.
It seems very evident that the telegram
was a warning to Leithoourt of the man
Chater's intention of calling, and that
the last-named was shown in just at the
moment when the fugitive was on the
point of leaving."
"Chater." I echoed. "Do you know
his Christian name ?"
"Hylton Chater. He is apparently a
gentleman. Curious that he will tell us
nothing of the reason he called, and of
the scene that occurred between them."
Knowing all that I did, I was not sur-
prised. Leitheourt had undoubtedly
taken him unawares, but knights of in-
dustry never betray each other.
My next visit was to Mackenzie, for
whom I had to wait nearly an hour, as
he was absent in another quarter of the
town.
"Ah, Mr. GreggI" he cried gladly, as
he came in to find me seated in a chair
patiently reading the newspaper. "You
are the very person I wish to see. Have
you heard of this strange affair at Ran-
noch?"
"I have," was my answer. "Has the
man in the hospital made any statement
yet?"
"None. He refuses point-blank," an-
swered the detective. "But my own idea
is that the affair has a very close con-
nection with the two mysteries of the
wood."
"The first mystery-that of the man-
proves to be a double mystery," I said.
"How? Explain it."
"Well, the waiter Olinto Santini is
alive and well in London."
"What!" he gasped, starting up. "Then
he is not the person you identified him
to be?"
"No. But he was masquerading as
Santini-made up to resemble him, I
mean, even to the mole upon his face."
"But you identified him positively?"
"When a person is dead it is very easy
to mistake countenances. Death alters
the countenance so very much."
"That's true," he said reflectively.
"But if the man we've buried is not the
Italian, then the mystery is considerably
increased. Why was the real man's wife
here ?"
"And where has her body been con-
cealed? That's a question."
"Again a mystery. We have made a
thorough search for four days, without
discovering any trace of it. Quite con-
fidentially, I'm wondering if this man
Chater knows anything. It is curious,
to say the least, that the Leithoourts
should have fled so hurriedly on this
man's appearance. But have you actually
seen Olinto Santini?"
"Yes, and have spoken with him."
"I sent up to London asking that in-
quiries should be made at the restaurant
in Bayswater, but up to the present 1
have received no report."
"I have chatted with Olinto. His wife
has mysteriously disappeared, but he is
in ignorance that she is dead."
"You did not tell him anything?"
"Nothing."
"Ah, you did well. There is wide-
spread conspiracy here, depend upon it,
Mr. Gregg. It will be an interesting
case when we get to the bottom of it all.
[Continued on Fourteenth Pagel]













March 24, 1906


THE SUN


Eleventh Page


r'he Florida Everglades W.t


There is no place in the United States where the
conditions are so against exploration as the Ever-
glades.
The Rainy Lake country of Minnesota is some-
what similar in many respects in the summer time,
but when winter comes and ice forms in the lakes
and streams it is possible to travel anywhere one
pleases to go, provided that plenty of food and heavy
clothing is taken along.
The southern part of southeastern Texas and
southwest Louisiana is in many respects similar to
the Everglades, but the Everglades, in a few years,
will become as well known as either of the two sec-
tions mentioned, and when the canals are opened to
Lake Okeechobee there will be a rush for homes such
as the State of Florida has never seen.
In the Rainy Lake section the summers are short
and hot, and mosquitoes and gnats are so fierce that
the timber explorers seldom do any prospecting until
late in the fall or in winter; then with their snow-
shoes and toboggans they travel through the snow
and over the ice until the winter is over. There is
nothing in the Rainy Lake country in the way of
climate, except July, August and winter, and the
only resources are timber and mineral. The land,
even in the summer time, would make a person
hungry to walk over it.
The swamp sections of Louisiana and Texas have
been thoroughly explored by lumbermen, but as the
lands are subject to overflow at any time from the
rising of the rivers, which flow from the swamps, the
resources will be exhausted when the lumber trust
gets through cutting the timber. With the exception
of the levee districts the land is worthless to home-
seekers.
The national Government has spent millions of
dollars in the levee districts, and although large cor-
porations own and control the most of the land, there
are thousands of people living where but a few gen-
erations ago there was nothing but a straggling
waste of water and canebrakes.
When the water is low in the rivers large areas
of this land are cultivated, but when the Mississippi
river gets to high water mark a great many streams
flowing to the river at low water change their course
and flow back into the swamp country. I have seen
a river near Toras, La., change its current within a
few hours, and instead of emptying into the Missis-
sippi, flowed from it back to the bayous and swamps.
The climate in the swamp sections of Louisiana
and Texas has no equal this side of Dante's Inferno.
The summers are long and hot, and the gallinippers
and mosquitoes furnish the fire and brimstone. The
winters are short, but the rainfall and wind is
enough to satisfy any person who was ever there in
the winter that Dante must have drawn some of his
ideas from that section of the world.
The formation of the Florida Everglades is very
peculiar. The elevation above sea level is sufficient
to successfully reclaim a large area of vegetable and
fruit-growing land by a system of canals.
There are no mineral resources of any extent
known, but I have seen "oxidized mica" (pilgrim
gold) in many of the running streams, and near the


Work of Florida

Railroad Commission
(Continued from Third Page)
Prohibiting withdrawing special rates without
authority from the Commission.
Requiring the West Shore Railroad (or extension
to Palmetto) to be operated as part of the Seaboard
Air Line Railway, thereby saving to all persons re-
siding on the line of these roads from having to pay
two locals, thus materially reducing their freight
rates. This case went to the Supreme Court of
Florida upon application of the Commissionere to
require the railroads in question to obey their order,
and was decided in favor of the Commission. The
railroads, however, took the case to the Supreme
Court of the United States, where it is now pending.
If this had not been a matter of very material ben-
efit to the people along the entire line of the West
Shore Railroad and the Seaboard Air Line Railway,
the railroads would certainly not have fought it so
vigorously.
A reduction in phosphate rates of about 25 per
cent. This case also went to the Supreme Court of
the State, where it was won by the Commissioners,
but has been appealed to the Supreme Court of the
United States.
Better train facilities between Yulee and Bald-
win for the convenience of persons living along that
part of the Seaboard Air Line Railway.
Better train facilities by the Atlantic Coast
Line Railroad and the Florida East Coast Railway
between Oran City Junction and New Smyrna, and
Sanford and TitW lle.


Hillsboro river there is a well-defined streak of "bog
ore" that runs high in iron. The timber is scattered
over the hammock islands, some pine and considerable
cypress. When the canals are in operation the
cypress timber will be an item to the credit of the
expense of drainage, and if only 25 per cent of the
area is made habitable the revenues from the timber
and agricultural land will more than pay the ex-
penses of drainage.
On the east coast the principal streams that flow
from the Everglades throughout the year are the
Miami river, Little river, New river and the Loxa-
hachee river. There are other streams or rivers
flowing east or southeast from the Everglades, but
the above named are the principal ones that flow
during the entire year. The largest of these streams
is New river, at Fort Lauderdale, 341 miles south of
Jacksonville.
New river has its source in the Everglades about
eight miles from the Atlantic ocean. At the mouth
of the river it spreads out and forms a bar, which at
high tide will permit vessels drawing seven feet of
water ,to come inside with safety. Inside the bar
the channel is sand bottom, of from five to ten feet
deep from New River Sound to the Cooley Hammock,
where Snyder creek empties into it, and one mile of
dredging from Snyder creek to the ocean is all that
is needed to make New river navigable for deep-
draught vessels, as for over six miles from Snyder
creek up the river the average depth is from twenty
to forty feet.
About three miles from the ocean the river forks,
one fork leading northwest and the other southwest
to the Everglades. The north fork is navigable for
about two miles for boats not drawing over four feet.
The south fork is navigable for four miles, and a
small amount of dredging and cutting off points
would make seven miles of deep water in New river.
Of the climate nothing need be said, as this is in
South Florida, and the soil furnishes all that can
be grown in the way of fruits and vegetables.
The land department of the Florida East Coast
Railway has expended several thousand dollars in
drainage on both forks of New river, and the records
of vegetable shipments from Fort Lauderdale for the
past eight years shows that drainage is a good invest-
ment. Land that ten years ago was called Ever-
glades, is now being cultivated, and the records of
some of the muck land of New river, near what is now
called the Everglades, would make a Forty-niner or
Klondiker turn green with envy.
Although the orange and grapefruit industry is
new there are as fine groves in the New river section
as can be found in the State.
At Fort Lauderdale Governor Broward has started
to make good the promises he made in the campaign
of 1904, when the Everglades improvement was the
paramount question discussed by him, and the peo-
ple of Florida nominated and elected him as Gover-
nor on that issue.
Chief Engineer J. W. Newman has not explored
the Everglades from the tops ot pine trees with field-
glasses, nor has he gathered his experience from
steamboats on Lake Okeechobee or any of the row-


There have been a number of amendments to
classifications, giving certain articles a specially low
rate to meet peculiar conditions, such as rates on
plants shipped from nurseries, sugarcane shipped to
mills, seed cane, moss for packing plants shipped
from nurseries, agricultural implements, Herty cups,
Ate.
At every hearing that the Commissioners have
held where it has been proposed to further reduce
rates, the representatives of the railroads-the vice-
presidents, or some other equally high official-men
of character, standing and integrity, have stated to
the Commissioners that their revenues have been re-
duced since January, 1903, hundreds of thousands of
dollars. Will those who are claiming that the
Commission has done nothing, charge that these gen-
tlemen have been untruthful to the Commissioners
about the result of their reductions? If not, then
the people have been the beneficiaries to that extent.
There are now pending in the courts seven cases
brought by the railroads to prevent further reduc-
tions in their rates ordered by the Railroad Commis-
sioners. In five of these cases injunctions have been
obtained from the United States Courts restraining
the Commissioners from putting the proposed re-
ductions into effect. It appears therefrom that in-
stead of the Railroad Commissioners having 1one
nothing, they have not only greatly reduced rates,
BUT REDUCED THEM TO SUCH A DEGREE
THAT THE FEDERAL COURTS IN FIVE IN-
STANCES HAVE RESTRAINED THEM, UPON
THE GROUND THAT THE REVENUES OF THE
RAILROADS COULD STAND NO FURTHER RE-
DUCTION.
Apart from any affirmative relief which the Com-
missioners have afforded the people, what they have
prevented in the way of increase freight rate, dis-


boat excursions out around the edge of the 'Glades.
In the early nineties Engineer Newman crossed the
Everglades from west to east, and the experience
gained on that tour of exploration has been added to
y surveying the canal route west from the head of
New river to a point where the largest natural chan-
nel flows from the northwest to the river. The levels
and soundings taken by Engineer Newman show con-
clusively that a canal from New river to Okeechobee
lake will reclaim thousands of acres of valuable muck
and prairie land, and will open up transportation
to the hammock islands and timber lands.
Governor Broward is to be congratulated in se-
curing the services of a practjeal engineer, who can
tell from personal experience of the resources of the
Everglades, and the most practicable and economic
method of reclaiming the land the natural resources
for the benefit of ,he people of Florida.
Some of the opinions of civil engineers and other
persons on the features of the Everglades are very
strange to those who have had practical experience
in this region. I have not traveled all over the
'Glades, but from the Miami river west to High
Key and up to Long Key, Pine Island and north to
the big rubber clump, was sufficient experience to
make the assertion that there is sufficient land that
will pay the expense ot drainage of it. There is
more water in the Everglades now than has been
in the past five years, and the necesuit for drainage
is very plain to the vegetable growers who planted
their crops near the sawgrass or on islands near the
edge of the 'Glades. Muck land that was drained
suffered but little from the recent heavy rains, and
there is a large area of muck land that the canals
will drain so that it can be cultivated successfully.
Taken as a business proposition, the drainage and
reclaiming of 25 per cent of the Everglades will be a
good investment for the State. The average price of
muck land in the New river section is $35 an acre,
and prairie and hammock land is from $20 to $35
an acre.
Florida at present receives no revenue from the
overflowed lands in the Everglades, and reclamation
of one-fourth of the area overflowed will give the
State one million acres of land that would be con-
sidered cheap at from $10 to $25 an acre, and the
revenue from the land sales would more than pay
the expenses of drainage.
Land values for taxation would be increased, and
an equitable system of taxation, in which every land-
owner should pay in a just proportion to the benefits
received, would provide a fund to meet expenses of
irrigation of the high hammock islands and drainage
of the overflowed lands surrounding the islands.
These are self-evident facts tnat will stand the
test of the all-wise prophets who oppose draining
the overflowed lands of the Everglades. Injunctions
and lawsuits may temporarily interfere with the
operations now under way, but Governor "Broward
will dig" enough during his term of office to prove
that Everglade drainage was the paramount issue in
the State campaign of 1904, and will be the para-
mount issue in the State campaign of 1908.


criminations in favor of, and rebates to, certain ship-
pers, has been of incalculable benefit, and them in
themselves have been the means of saving to the peo-
ple of Florida thousands and thousands of dollars
per year, more than the cost of the maintenance of
this department of the government.
(Editor's Note.-Thia story will be continued in
the next lssue of THE SUN, when Mr. Browne will
deal with other important work of the Railroad Comrn-
mission. ]

Farm Eight Hundred Years Old.
Berlin.-Farm Stubeckshorn, near Luneburg, con.
training some of the oldest buildings in Europe, sur-
rounded by thousand-year-old oaks, at last passed
from the Billun-Meier family, which held it for 450
years. The last remaining daughter of the boss
farmer, Dora, married and sold the property to a
stock company.
The farm was originally the property of Herman
Billun, a celebrated general of the German King
Otto the Great. The Billuns died out in the twelfth
century, and since then the descendants of their last
major domus, Meier, have ruled Stubeckshorn. They
never accepted an title of nobility, but waxed rich
and powerful in the course of centuries. There is a
long iron strongbox full of documents, signed by Em-
perors and Kings and Dukes, making various grants
to the Billun- elers who, like kings, were allowed to
drive with four horses and to use greyhounds in
hunting. They were also masters of pole in seve
villages.






--. ~- = -


Twelfth Page


THE SUN


March 24, 1906


What's Agitating the People


"Society, and weon the church, is honeycombed
with perjury," is the substance of an editorial in the
Living Church, one of the leading Episcopal papers
of the country.
Replying to the question whether the church is
strong enough to fight such conditions the paper
replies
"Ah, but she has not cleared her own skirts. We
must not forget perjury is flaunted in her face by
her own priests, ana there are not wanting among
the most powerful of her sons those who defend
them in it."
The Living Church declares that "the record of
recent legal Investigations into insurance misman-
agement, Into the oil trust and into many forms of
trust operation has been one of the most monumen-
tal exhibitions of perjury on the part of men of high
standing as gentlemen that the world has ever seen.
Witnesses take upon themselves flippantly the oath
to tell the whole truth, and then in response to ques-
tion after question smilingly answer: 'I don't
remember.' And our religion has become so softened
that no preacher warns them that 'all liars'-not
event trust magnates, insurance officials and priests
of the church, are excepted-'shall have their part
in the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone,
which is the second death.'"
"He was asleep at his post."
Wornout from overwork a telegraph operator in
Colorado fell asleep and his neglect of duty caused
a wreck in which 26 persons were killed and many
were injured.
The operator says he was overworked; that he
had been on duty 36 hours. The railway company
asserts that he was not;. that his hours were from
7 o'clock at night until 7 o'clock in the morning
and that he was not obliged to work longer.
A court will attempt to prove which statement is
correct, but punishment of the offender will not
restore life or assuage the grief of those bereaved.
The Chicago News, in rendering an opinion on
this disaster, says:
"If the operator at Adobe was actually compelled
to remain at his post day and night until he dropped
asleep from sheer exhaustion some one higher up
in the management of the railway should be made
to undergo criminal prosecution. So long as atroci-
ties of this kind can occur on our transportation
lines it will be futile for the managers of American
railway systems to try to free themselves of the
charge of wanton disregard for human life. The
Colorado accident was a barbarity which should not
have been possible in a civilized country. It was
inexcusable, the factors contributing to it being
plainly classifiable as among preventable causes. Yet
t is but one of many accidents due to defective equip.
ment or blundering and incompetent management.
Not until a few railway officials are hanged for
murder, or until rigiu laws are enacted and enforced
compelling the employment of proper methods in
running trains will safety of railway travel be
secured in this country."
A suggestion of drastic treatment, yet some rem-
edy should be found to better insure safety of trav-
elers, and one step in this direction would be reduc-
ing the hours of labor. The twelve-hour stretches
of telegraphers ought to be reduced to an eight-hour
day, at least in stations where the duties are many.
Another reform tending to safety would be the
placing of a second engineer in the cab of every loco-
motive hauling a passenger train. No vessel dares
put to sea without maintaining a lookout every min-
ute of the voyage, and if a lookout in the person
of an assistant engineer for every passenger train
be adopted by the railways many accidents would be
avoided. In case of sickness or death of the first
engineer while the train was in motion, or disregard
of signals or orders his place could be filled or the
omissions of duty corrected by his assistant.
The Navy Department will attempt to prevent
the use of naval titles for commercial and advertise.
ing purple., a step which is in good taste and likely
to be pleasing to everybody except patent medicine
manufacturers and promoters of schemes. The atten-
tion of the department was drawn to the Admiral
Prindle Mining Company, and the retired offler
whos name and title were thus used was officially
reported for "reprehensible conduct" and notified
that the name of the concern be changed.

A recent busiaess change in Jacksonville is a
matter of regret in that commercial intercourse has
erased with one of its most popular citisens-Ed Fet-
tiUg, who Ia disposiag of his interests in the Petting
Fhartmltum Oompaq to the Knight Crockery Com-
pany, is at prtset removed from the many whose
please it was to transet business with him. His
t n alIty, complied with enterprise enabled
to p a sa d profitable business, In
te sme dal e-am M was tly aided by the
jtebkg m-hel he ml. A lira adowtir, he


not only brought results to his own store, but his
operations of this kind appealed to other merchants
who followed in his footsteps in seeking publicity.
A benefactor to the commercial interests of this city,
a valued friend to publishers, his retirement is a
source of more than passing moment, and the friends
he thus made will hope that his future will be radi-
ant with the brightest side of life. While regretting
the retirement of Mr. Fetting, yet it is satisfactory
to state the progress of his late business will be
increased by the combination with the Knight Crock-
ery Company, the merger of the two great houses
and the ample capital necessary for expansion giv-
ing a scope for commercial action in keeping with
the past policy of each.
Another business success worthy of note is that
of Messrs. S. D. Cheatham and W. F. Alderman, who
for the past year have been associated in the cloth-
ing and men's furnishing trade under the name of the
H. A. Renfroe Company, and are now conducting
business under the title of the Cheatham-Alderman
Company. These two gentlemen were controlling
stockholders of the establishment before the change
in the firm name, and Mr. Cheatham, as manager,
had been largely responsible for the profitable pat-
ronage enjoyed by the H. A. Renfroe Company
before the transfer. The experience and ability of both
gentlemen have placed this business in the front rank
and the tide of trade flowing to its doors well illus-
trates the popularity they possess.
Few persons have given heed to the importance
of the work being done by the East Coast Canal
Company, in dredging canals and connecting the
waterways on the eastern coast of the State into a
continuous passage way. But three miles yet remain
to dig of the last canal on the line, and this will be
done in a few months. Then the work of dredging
Pablo Creek will begin and when that is completed
a safe waterway will be ready for traffic from Jack-
sonville southward along the entire coast.
Agitation for a railway across South Florida has
again been aroused and report places probability
of something being done toward that end. Accord-
ing to plans of promoters the road would extend
from Tampa across the State to St. Lucie Inlet or
some other point where a port could be found. St.
Lucie Inlet has the preference, because a natural
harbor is already there and at small cost could be
made available for deep draft vessels, so it is stated
by those who have investigated. Such a railway
would prove of much benefit to that portion of the
State. As a developer of resources and a stimulant
for the settlement of new territory it would be im-
possible to estimate the good that could be accom-
plished by the building of the proposed line. There
is much tertile land adjacent to the Kissimmee river
not available for culture now because of its inacces-
sibility, but with transportation facilities would be
of great value. On the eastern side of the river, in
the vicinity of Bassenger, Fort Drum and other
points there is much fertile territory that would add
to the wealth of the State if cultivated, but without
railway transportation marketing of products is im-
possible.

While the criticism applied to Speaker Cannon
by Congressman Shackelford of Missouri will hardly
change conditions, yet it puts before the people the
necessity of reform in the House of Representatives
if free legislation is to be accomplished. In address-
ing the Speaker, Mr. Shackelford said:
"You sit an enthroned despot, subjecting the
rights and destinies of this great people to the die-
tates of your own unbridled will. No member can
submit any matter to a vote of the House until he
shall have first sought and found favor in your sight.
The Constitution contemplates that the Speaker shall
be the servant of the House. In definance of the Con-
stitution. you have made yourself its master. You
have packed every committee so that no bill can be
reported without your consent. Unless you are will.
ing no member can move to discharge a committee
from the consideration of a bill and take it up in
the House." .
Mr. Shackelford, with Congressman Lamar, was
the object of displeasure of John Sharp Williams at
the opening of Congress, when he caused their
removal from a committee, because they had antago-
niaed a railway rate bill which Williams had favored.
The Standard Oil Company has become tired of
being "investigated," though it does not appear that
any of the so-called investigations have increased
the public stock of information.
According to a Washington correspondent of the
New York Herald, the Standard is getting ready to
fight back. He says:
There are strong indications that the Standard
Oil Company is prei a to make a spirited con-
tt or what is miits right, d to m eet the


criticisms that are being poured in on it by various
Government agencies, from the President down. It
it understood that it was for the purpose of explain.
ing its position that H. H. Rogers and James D.
Archibald visited the White House recently. The
President has refused to discuss the visit, and it is
said that Mr. Rogers has been quite as secretive, but
the facts are getting around which indicate that the
Standard has taken the administration bull by the
horns and made it acquainted with some information
which is not generally known."
The spirit of weariness of which .the Standard
complains is more than likely to be caused by the
approaching investigation authorized by the United
States Senate, conferring additional power on the
Interstate Commerce Commission, and in this con.
section the correspondent says: "It is constantly
being attacked as the arch taker of rebates by the In-
terstate Commerce Commission, and especially by
Commissioner Prouty, and is soon to be laid open
to another attack by the Interstate Commerce Com-
mission, wfich is asking Congress for an appropria-
tion of $150,000 for the purpose of uncovering every-
thing about that company, as well as the anthracite
coal roads, under the terms of the Tillman-Gillespie
resolution."
The language of the Tillman-Gillespie resolution
is calculated to cause a shudder of uneasiness to
creep over these trust magnates, and if the investi-
gation is properly conducted the reports will proba-
bly be sensational in detail. The public will now be
interested in watching the tactics of the administra-
tion in this matter.
Exhibition of the sentiment accorded THE SUN'S
effort to set Governor Broward right before the press
of the State is well shown by the following from the
Tampa Times:
"The Jacksonville Sun publishes a report of Gov-
ernor Broward's speech at Jacksonville, which has
been so bitterly assailed by sundry newspapers, and
we candidly confess we see nothing in it to call for
any very emphatic denunciation. No wholesale
arraignment of the press of any State appears in it,
nothing that justifies any such lambasting as seems
to have been tendered the speaker by those offended
contemporaries. Governor Broward was not the first
choice of the Times for the position he occupies, but
that is no reason why he should not be accorded
fair play and the respect due the executive of the
State. We have differed with him in matters pro-
ceeding from the executive chamber. but we do not
believe him to be actuated by dishonest and unpatri-
otic motives. He is entitled to a full and complete
and impartial hearing before men differ with him
in such terms as have been employed. It is quite
possible that the method of his opponents in prevail-
ing controversies helps him more than it promotes
their cause. Let us carry on our little domestic
discussions with dignity of manner and temperance
of language-in which particulars the Governor seems
to deport himself very excellently."

Small Shoes, Poor Health
Many women spoil themselves by cramping and
crushing their poor, unfortunate feet into shoes too
small for them. This is really a most idiotic thing
to do, as it not only causes the most intense pain,
often ruins the gait entirely, but frequently brings
about, if not really serious injury to the foot, at any
rate such painful, unpleasant and uncomfortable re-
suits as corns, bunions and. other pedal disfigure-
ments.
A woman who persists in wearing shoes too small
for her cannot long remain in good health, for she
learns to dread exercise because of the pain and diffi-
culty involved. A shoe that is either too short or
too narrow is such an instrument of torture that one
would think no really sensible woman would ever
have recourse to it. but every shoemaker knows that
not a few fashionable women habitually undergo this
self-imposed penance, and though they are invariably
wrinkled and aged before their time, and a pained,
anxious and even disagreeable expression becomes per-
manently fixed on their once pleasant features, they
tierist in thinking the game worth the candle
and that the possession of "a pretty foot" atones for
all the pain. discomfort and misery which are their
constant portion.
a queezed-in foot, however, can generally be de-
tected, and, as a rule, is anything but a thing of
beauty. The whole shape is often altered until the
foot is almost deformed at length into the Chinese


Kaiser's "Liddle" Joke.
.erlin.-At a late hunt meet one of the Kaiser's
guests rode up to him, parried his horse gracefully.
and saluting cried: "At your Majesty's orders. I
desire to introduce myself-Lieut Baron Zedlits."
Glad to meet you," answered William. "I sup-
Poer you know my name."


i


i I











March 24, 1906


Thinks BY TH Brethren


GENERAL GROWTH OF
COAST.


THE EAST


During the past two years the growth
of every new town and settlement on the
east coast has been very noticeable and
most satisfactory. Many of the tourists
and winter visitors have noticed this and
commented on it in a way that demon-
strates the fact that the outside world is
waking up to the fact that Florida is
coming to the front rapidly, and that it
will soon be one of the best States in
the Union.
* There are some towns along the In-
dian river that were classed as dead ones,
and it was confidently predicted, even
by the residents of these same towns,
that they would never grow any or do
any good. But the general impetus that
came to this entire section recently,
through good advertising, has stimu-
lated them, and the number of winter
visitors, increasing, they have been im-
proving and growing until now they give
promise of being mighty good towns.
Titusville has come out of its lethargy
and is doing considerable building and
improving, and as a result real estate
values have taken a turn for the better,
and it is now evident that it will in-
crease each year. Eau Gallie has taken
on almost a boom. The coming of the
Kentucky Military Institute has been a
great help; now all this town needs is a
first-class hotel so the relatives and
friends of the cadets can come there and
visit them, at the same time be enjoying
the delights of a Florida winter. Mel-
bourne, which was considered almost
hopeless, has surprised them all, and is
going ahead rapidly. There is no pret-
tier situation anywhere for a town, and
it is gratifying that it is on the gain.
Stuart is another town that is going to
surprise them all, too. It has the loca-
tion, the water, the soil, the shipping fa-
cilities, and it will make a good town.
In our own county of St. Lucie, of course,
all of the towns and villages are building


and growing, and this is especially true
of the county seat, Fort Pierce. It has
6 record for growing and improving that
cannot be beaten in the State. Let the
good work go on.-Fort Pierce News.


PROSPEROUS


CONDITION OF EAST
COAST.


Now that all danger of frost is prac-
tically over for this year, it is safe to
say that the prospects for the east coast
were never better. In the first place
the orange and grapefruit crop has been
the largest ever known, especially in
this section, and very good prices have
been received for the fruit. Next comes
the bean crop, which has far exceeded
that of any year in some time, and es-
caping the frost which usually hits us
some time in the winter, even though it
is very light, the yield this year has
been very large. The rainy season has
really been beneficial, especially on the
island and the higher points. Some few
on the lower lands have suffered from
too much water, but in the main the
crop has been a fine one and the prices
,,ave been uniformly satisfactory.
These two crops have been of great as-
sistance during the winter months, and
they have been augmented by the many
small fruits and quantities of vegetables,
which have been raised for the local mar-
kets; but the great source of revenue in
this section is pineapples, and all indi-
cations point to the finest crop of these
in the history of pineapple growing on
the Indian river. The plants are in an
almost perfectly healthy condition, espe-
cially where they have been given proper
care and attention. Under the sheds
they are in bloom, in fact, the greatest
portion of them are in bloom, and it is
not too early, either. The outside plants
are beginning to bloom, and the expe-
rienced growers think there will be an
immense crop.
The idea that a big crop will down the
price is not generally conceded, as it has


been frequently shown that as good
prices were received when there was a
big crop as when it was small. At any
rate, there is every reason way this sec-
tion should be most prosperous, and all
the people should work together for the
general improvement of the roads, and
all the conditions that make for success
and pleasure.-Fort Pierce News.
General Gilchrist, according to an in-
terview published in the Tampa Tribune,
is of the opinion that had it not been for
the efforts of the Jacksonville Metrop-
olis, Tampa Tribune, Punts Gorda Her-
ald and Live Oak Democrat, the Pardon-
ing Board would now be turning orim-
inals loose on the State indiscriminately.
While we think it possible that the Par-
doning Board has been a little lavish
in the distribution of pardons, we can-
tion of the menshrdlu shrdlu nu n
not accept General Gilchrist's estimate
of the men who compose the board.-
Plant City Courier.
This is evidently a year for eliminat-
ing the chronic office-seekers and the
croakers. The old-timers, who have been
in the habit of getting busy just before
every campaign, and who never refuse
anything in the office line, are being
turned down all over the State, and there
is a healthy indication that more busi-
ness men will be selected to conduct the
affairs of the public. If some people
would exert the same amount of energy
and enthusiasm in their business, or in
some business, as they do over politics,
they would make a great deal more
money and the public would certainly be
grateful.-Fort Pierce News.
Hon. R. Hudson Burr addressed an
"open letter" to Editor Frank Harris of
the Ocala Banner, proposing to meet the
latter in a joint debate and discuss cer-
tain matters. Mr. Harris replies that
he is "not a candidate for Railroad Com-
missioner, nor for any other office with-
in the gift of the people of Florida," and
is not seeking ad captandum notoriety.
He says, also, that "the columns of the
Ocala Banner are open to Mr. Burr for
any contribution he or any friend of his
may make in his defense." "This is an
age in which cold type," says the Banner,
"more than noisy oratory, talks."-Lake
City Index.
Henry Watterson, the brilliant editor
of the Courier-Journal, and the brainiest
editor in the United States, says that
the west coast is the coming section of
Florida. He has been spending the win-
ter here this year. His observation is
that our lands are wonderfully fertile,
our climate ideal and our undeveloped
resources magnificent. What we need is
money and men, the other resources and
conditions for prosperity are abundant.
-Southern Argus.
Drive over our country roads and see
the evidences on either hand. Farm
houses are being painted, wire fences are
being built, tenant houses are being re-
paired and waste lands are being put
into cultivation. But, alasi our roads
remain the same rutty, bumpy, bogy,
ridgy, hilly, sloppy, messy, mule-killng
affairs.- Monticello l iews.
If the Everglades are worth draining-
and it seems that some one ought to be
able to decide that question-they should
be drained and the land put on the mar-
ket. That should be the position of
every honest citizen of Florida.-Gaines-
ville Sun.
Every citizen of Florida should read
the article on the Everglades drainage
in the last issue of the Jacksonville Sun.
It gives more information on the subject
than has heretofore been published.-De
Soto County Advertiser.
It begins to look like the city police
force will have to be increased to take
care of our blind tiger booze fighters on
"rotten row."-Monticello News.


The present agitation for universal
franchise, after the American style, re-
veals the fact that two-thirds of all
grown Prussians possess no property to
speak of, and that their income is below
226S per annum. Hence the claim of the
Government that, to grant universal
franchise, "would mean turning over the
Government to nobodies and scamps."


Thirteenth Page


Ask or T LS




CHOCOLATE BON BONS

25 40 and 60 Ct. per Ib.
By mall 20 eta. additional for post.
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ANY' BY n.


THE ONLY TILL'S
Jacksonville, Florida



Read Your Future In the


STAR


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REAL ESTATE BROKERS


204 W. Bay St., Jacksonville, Fla.


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IRANSpgTATIUM IN


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THE SUN







- -~ -~Mr.


Twelfth Page


THE SUN


March 24, 1906


What's Agitating the People


"Society, and even the church, is honeycombed
with perjury," is the substance of an editorial in the
Living Church, one of the leading Episcopal papers
of the country.
Replying to the question whether the church is
strong enough to fight such conditions the paper
replies:
"Ah, but.sbe has not cleared her owa skirts. We
must not forget perjury is flaunted in her face by
her own priests, and there are not wanting among
the most powerful of her sons those who defend
them in it."
The Living Church declares that "the record of
recent legal investigations into insurance misman-
agement, Into the oil trust and into many forms of
trust operation has been one of the most monumen-
tal exhibitions of perjury on the part of men of high
standing as gentlemen that the world has ever seen.
Witnesses take upon themselves flippantly the oath
to tell the whole truth, and then in response to ques-
tion after question smilingly answer: 'I don't
remember.' And our religion has become so softened
that no preacher warns them that 'all liars'-not
event trust magnates, insurance officials and priests
of the church, are exoepted-'shall have their part
in the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone,
which is the second death."'
,,
"He was Asleep at his post."
Wornout from overwork a telegraph operator in
Colorado fell asleep and his neglect of duty caused
a wreck in which 25 persons were killed and many
were injured.
The operator says he was overworked; that he
had been on duty 36 hours. The railway company
asserts that he was not;. that his hours were from
7 o'clock at night until 7 o'clock in the morning
and that he was not obliged to work longer.
A court will attempt to prove which statement is
correct, but punishment of the offender will not
restore life or assuage the grief of those bereaved.
The Chicago News, in rendering an opinion on
this disaster, says:
"If the operator at Adobe was actually compelled
to remain at his post day and night until he dropped
asleep from sheer exhaustion some one higher up
in the management of the railway should be made
to undergo criminal prosecution. So long as atroci-
ties of this kind can occur on our transportation
lines it will be futile for the managers of American
railway systems to try to free themselves of the
charge of wanton disregard for human life. The
Colorado accident was a barbarity which should not
have been possible in a civilized country. It was
inexcusable, the factors contributing to it being
plainly classifiable as among preventable causes. Yet
it is but one of many accidents due to defective equip-
ment or blundering and incompetent management.
Not until a few railway officials are hanged for
murder, or until rigiu laws are enacted and enforced
compelling the employment of proper methods in
running trains will safety of railway travel be
secured in this country."
A suggestion of drastic treatment, yet some rem-
edy should be found to better insure safety of trav-
elers, and one step in this direction would be reduc-
ing the hours of labor. The twelve-hour stretches
of telegraphers ought to be reduced to an eight-hour
day, at least in stations where the duties are many.
Another reform tending to safety would be the
placing of a second engineer in the cab of every loco-
motive hauling a passenger train. No vessel dares
put to sea without maintaining a lookout every min-
ute of the voyage, and if a lookout in the person
of an assistant engineer for every passenger train
be adopted by the railways many accidents would be
avoided. In case of sickness or death of the first
engineer while the train was in motion, or disregard
of signals or orders his place could be filled or the
omissions of duty corrected by his assistant.
The Navy Department will attempt to prevent
the use of naval titles for commercial and advertis-
ing purposes, a step which is in good taste and likely
to be pleasing to everybody except patent medicine
manufacturers and promoters of schemes. The atten-
tion of the department was drawn to the Admiral
Prindle Mining Company, and the retired officer
whose name and title were thus used was officially
reported for "reprehensible conduct" and notified
that the name of the concern be changed.

A recent business change in Jacksonville is a
matter of regret in that commercial intercourse has
eased with one of its most popular citizens-Ed Fet-
ting, who in disposing of his interests in the Fetting
Fu itun Company to the Knight Crockery Com-
psay, is at present removed from the many whose
pleasure it was to transact business with him. His
al pesonality, coupled with enterprise enabled
to dld upa iand profitable business, in
th.e soosesfl coaduct was greatly aided by the
ate 'aetbd s he ed. Aiberal advertiser, he


not only brought results to his own store, but his
operations of this kind appealed to other merchants
who followed in his footsteps in seeking publicity.
A benefactor to the commercial interests of this city,
a valued friend to publishers, his retirement is a
source of more than passing moment, and the friends
he thus made will hope that his future will be radi-
ant with the brightest side of life. While regretting
the retirement of Mr. Fetting, yet it is satisfactory
to state the progress of his late business will be
increased by the combination with the Knight Crock-
ery Company, the merger of the two great houses
and the ample capital necessary for expansion giv-
ing a scope for commercial action in keeping with
the past policy of each.
Another business success worthy of note is that
of Messrs. S. D. Cheatham and W. F. Alderman, who
for the past year have been associated in the cloth-
ing and men's furnishing trade under the name of the
H. A. Renfroe Company, and are now conducting
business under the title of the Cheatham-Alderman
Company. These two gentlemen were controlling
stockholders of the establishment before the change
in the firm name, and Mr. Cheatham, as manager,
had been largely responsible for the profitable pat-
ronage enjoyed by the H. A. Renfroe Company
before the transfer. The experience and ability of both
gentlemen have placed this business in the front rank
and the tide of trade flowing to its doors well illus-
trates the popularity they possess.
Few persons have given heed to the importance
of the work being done by the East Coast Canal
Company, in dredging canals and connecting the
waterways on the eastern coast of the State into a
continuous passage way. But three miles yet remain
to dig of the last canal on the line, and this will be
done in a few months. Then the work of dredging
Pablo Creek will begin and when that is completed
a safe waterway will be ready for traffic from Jack-
sonville southward along the entire coast.
Agitation for a railway across South Florida has
again been aroused and report places probability
of something being done toward that end. Accord-
ing to plans of promoters the road would extend
from Tampa across the State to St. Lucie Inlet or
some other point where a port could be found. St.
Lucie Inlet has the preference, because a natural
harbor is already there and at small cost could be
made available for deep draft vessels, so it is stated
by those who have investigated. Such a railway
would prove of much benefit to that portion of the
State. As a developer of resources and a stimulant
for the settlement of new territory it would be im-
possible to estimate the good that could be accom-
plished by the building of the proposed line. There
is much fertile land adjacent to the Kissimmee river
not available for culture now because of its inacces-
sibility, but with transportation facilities would be
of great value. On the eastern side of the river, in
the vicinity of Bassenger, Fort Drum and other
points there is much fertile territory that would add
to the wealth of the State if cultivated, but without
railway transportation marketing of products is im-
possible.

While the criticism applied to Speaker Cannon
by Congressman Shackelford of Missouri will hardly
change conditions, yet it puts before the people the
necessity of reform in the House of Representatives
if free legislation is to be accomplished. In address.
ing the Speaker, Mr. Shackelford said:
"You sit an enthroned despot, subjecting the
rights and destinies of this great people to the dic-
tates of your own unbridled will. No member can
submit any matter to a vote of the House until he
shall have first sought and found favor in your sight.
The Constitution contemplates that the Speaker shall
be the servant of the House. In definance of the Con-
stitution, you have made yourself its master. You
have packed every committee so that no bill can be
reported without your consent. Unless you are will-
ing no member can move to discharge a committee
from the consideration of a bill and take it up in
the House."
Mr. Shackelford, with Congressman Lamar, was
the object of displeasure of John Sharp Williams at
the opening of Congress, when he caused their
removal from a committee, because they had antago-
nized a railway rate bill which Williams had favored.
The Standard Oil Company has become tired of
being "investigated," though it does not appear that
any of the so-called investigations have increased
the public stock of information.
According to a Washington correspondent of the
New York Herald, the Standard is getting ready to
fight back. He says:
"There are strong indications that the Standard
Oil Company is preparing to make a spirited con-
test for what is its rights, and to meet the


criticisms that are being poured in on it by various
Government agencies, from the President down. It
it understood that it was for the purpose of explain.
ing its position that H. H. Rogers and James D.
Archibald visited the White House recently. The
President has refused to discuss the visit, and it is
said that Mr. Rogers has been quite as secretive, but
the facts are getting around which indicate that the
Standard has taken the administration bull by the
horns and made it acquainted with some information
which is not generally known."
The spirit of weariness of which .the Standard
complains is more than likely to be caused by the
approaching investigation authorized by the United
States Senate, conferring additional power on the
Interstate Commerce Commission, and in this con-
nection the correspondent says: "It is constantly
being attacked as the arch taker of rebates by the In-
terstate Commerce Commission, and especially by
Commissioner Prouty, and is soon to be laid open
to another attack by the Interstate Commerce Com-
mission, wlich is asking Congress for an appropria-
tion of $150,000 for the purpose of uncovering every-
thing about that company, as well as the anthracite
coal roads, under the terms of the Tillman-Gillespie
resolution."
The language of the Tillman-Gillespie resolution
is calculated to cause a shudder of uneasiness to
creep over these trust magnates, and if the investi-
gation is properly conducted the reports will proba-
bly be sensational in detail. The public will now be
interested in watching the tactics of the administra-
tion in this matter.
Exhibition of the sentiment accorded THE SUN'S
effort to set Governor Broward right before the press
of the State is well shown by the following from the
Tampa Times:
"The Jacksonville Sun publishes a report of Gov-
ernor Broward's speech at Jacksonville, which has
been so bitterly assailed by sundry newspapers, and
we candidly confess we see nothing in it to call for
any very emphatic denunciation. No wholesale
arraignment of the press of any State appears in it,
nothing that justifies any such lambasting as seems
to have been tendered the speaker by those offended
contemporaries. Governor Broward was not the first
choice of the Times for the position he occupies, but
that is no reason why he should not be accorded
fair play and the respect due the executive of the
State. We have differed with him in matters pro-
ceeding from the executive chamber. but we do not
believe him to be actuated by dishonest and unpatri-
otic motives. He is entitled to a full and complete
and impartial hearing before men differ witl him
in such terms as have been employed. It is quite
possible that the method of his opponents in prevail-
ing controversies helps him more than it promotes
their cause. Let us carry on our little domestic
discussions with dignity of manner and temperance
of language-in which particulars the Governor seemins
to deport himself very excellently."

Small Shoes, Poor Health
Many women spoil themselves by cramping and
crushing their poor, unfortunate feet into shoes too
small for them. This is really a most idiotic thing
to do, as it not only causes the most intense pain,
often ruins the gait entirely, but frequently brings
about, if not really serious injury to the foot, at any
rate such painful, unpleasant and uncomfortable re-
sults as corns, bunions and. other pedal disfigure-
ments.
A woman who persists in wearing shoes too small
for her cannot long remain in good health, for she
learns to dread exercise because of the pain and diffi-
culty involved. A shoe that is either too short or
too narrow is such an instrument of torture that one
would think no really sensible woman would ever
have recourse to it, but every shoemaker knows that
not a few fashionable women habitually undergo this
self-imposed penance, and though they are invariably
wrinkled and aged before their time, and a pained,
anxious and even disagreeable expression becomes per-
manently fixed on their once pleasant features, they
still persist in thinking the game worth the candle
and that the possession of "a pretty foot" atones for
all the pain, discomfort and misery which are their
constant portion.
A squeezed-in foot, however, can generally be de-
tected, and, as a rule, is anything ut a thing of
beauty. The whole shape is often altered until the
foot is almost deformed at length into the Chinese
variety.

Kaiser's "Liddle" Joke.
Berlin.-At a late hunt meet one of the Kaiser's
guests rode up to him, parried his horse gracefully.
and saluting cried: "At your MaJesty's orders. I
desire to introduce myself-Lieut. Baron Zedlits."
Glad to meet you," answered William. "I sup-
pose you know my name."














Thinks *ByTH Brethren


GENERAL GROWTH OF
COAST.


THE EAST


During the past two years the growth
of every new town and settlement on the
east coast has been very noticeable and
most satisfactory. Many of the tourists
and winter visitors have noticed this and
commented on it in a way that demon-
strates the fact that the outside world is
waking up to the fact that Florida is
coming to the front rapidly, and that it
will soon be one of the best States in
the Union.
. There are some towns along the In-
dian river that were classed as dead ones,
and it was confidently predicted, even
by the residents of these same towns,
that they would never grow any or do
any good. But the general impetus that
came to this entire section recently,
through good advertising, has stimu-
lated them, and the number of winter
visitors, increasing, they have been im-
proving and growing until now they give
promise of being mighty good towns.
Titusville has come out of its lethargy
and is doing considerable building and
improving, and as a result real estate
values have taken a turn for the better,
and it is now evident that it will in-
crease each year. Eau Gallie has taken
on almost a boom. The coming of the
Kentucky Military Institute has been a
great help; now all this town needs is a
frst-class hotel so the relatives and
friends of the cadets can come there and
visit them, at the same time be enjoying
the delights of a Florida winter. Mel-
bourne, which was considered almost
hopeless, has surprised them all, and is
going ahead rapidly. There is no pret-
tier situation anywhere for a town, and
it is gratifying that it is on the gain.
Stuart is another town that is going to
surprise them all, too. It has the loca.-
tion, the water, the soil, the shipping fa-
cilities, and it will make a good town.
In our own county of St. Lucie, of course,
all of the towns and villages are building


and growing, and this is especially true
of the county seat, Fort Pierce. It has
& record for growing and improving that
cannot be beaten in the State. Let the
good work go on.-Fort Pierce News.


PROSPEROUS


CONDITION OF EAST
COAST.


Now that all danger of frost is prac-
tically over for this year, it is safe to
say that the prospects for the east coast
were never better. In the first place
the orange and grapefruit crop has been
the largest ever known, especially in
this section, and very good prices have
been received for the fruit. Next comes
the bean crop, which has far exceeded
that of any year in some time, and es-
caping the frost which usually hits us
some time in the winter, even though it
is very light, the yield this year has
been very large. The rainy season has
really been beneficial, especially on the
island and the higher points. Some few
on the lower lands have suffered from
too much water, but in the main the
crop has been a fine one and the prices
.uave been uniformly satisfactory.
These two crops have been of great as-
sistance during the winter months, and
they have been augmented by the many
small fruits and quantities of vegetables,
which have been raised for the local mar-
kets; but the great source of revenue in
this section is pineapples, and all indi-
cations point to the finest crop of these
in the history of pineapple growing on
the Indian river. The plants are in an
almost perfectly healthy condition, espe-
cially where they have been given proper
care and attention. Under the sheds
they are in bloom, in fact, the greatest
portion of them are in bloom, and it is
not too early, either. The outside plants
are beginning to bloom, and the expe-
rienced growers think there will be an
immense crop.
The idea that a big crop will down the
price is not generally conceded, as it has


been frequently shown that as good
prices were received when there was a
big crop as when it was small. At any
rate, there is every reason way this sec-
tion should be most prosperous, and all
the people should work together for the
general improvement of the roads, and
all the conditions that make for success
and pleasure.--Fort Pierce News.
General Gilchrist, according to an in-
terview published in the Tampa Tribune,
is of the opinion that had it not been for
the efforts of the Jacksonville Metrop-
olis, Tampa Tribune, Punts Gorda Her-
aid and Live Oak Democrat, the Pardon-
ing Board would now be turning crim-
inals loose on the State indiscriminately.
While we think it possible that the Par-
doning Board has been a little lavish
in the distribution of pardons, we can-
tion of the menshrdlu shrdlu nu n
not accept General Gilchrist's estimate
of the men who compose the board.-
Plant City Courier.
This is evidently a year for eliminat-
ing the chronic office-seekers and the
croakers. The old-timers, who have been
in the habit of getting busy just before
every campaign, and who never refuse
anything in the office line, are being
turned down all over the State, and there
is a healthy indication that more busi-
ness men will be selected to conduct the
affairs of the public. If some people
would exert the same amount of energy
and enthusiasm in their business, or in
some business, as they do over politics,
they would make a great deal more
money and the public would certainly be
grateful.-Fort Pierce News.
Hon. R. Hudson Burr addressed an
"open letter" to Editor Frank Harris of
the Ocala Banner, proposing to meet the
latter in a joint debate and discuss cer-
tain matters. Mr. Harris replies that
he is "not a candidate for Railroad Com-
missioner, nor for any other office with-
in the gift of the people of Florida," and
is not seeking ad captandum notoriety.
He says, also, that "the columns of the
Ocala Banner are open to Mr. Burr for
any contribution he or any friend of his
may make in his defense." "This is an
age in which cold type," says the Banner,
"more than noisy oratory, talks."'-Lake
City Index.
Henry Watterson, the brilliant editor
of the Courier-Journal, and the brainiest
editor in the United States, says that
the west coast is the coming section of
Florida. He has been spending the win-
ter here this year. His observation is
that our lands are wonderfully fertile,
our climate ideal and our undeveloped
resources magnificent. What we need is
money and men, the other resources and
conditions for prosperity are abundant.
-Southern Argus.
Drive over our country roads and see
the evidences on either hand. Farm
houses are being painted, wire fences are
being built, tenant houses are being re-
paired and waste lands are being put
into cultivation. But, alas l our roads
remain the same rutty, bumpy, boy,
ridgy, hilly, sloppy, messy, mule-killing
affairs.-Montiello ld ews.
If the Everglades are worth draining-
and it seems that some one ought to be
able to decide that question-they should
be drained and the land put onthe mar*
ket. That should be the position of
every honest citizen of Florida.-OGaines.
ville Sun.
Every citizen of Florida should read
the article on the Everglades drainage
in the last issue of the Jacksonville Sun.
It gives more information on the subject
than has heretofore been published.-De
Soto County Advertiser.
It begins to look like the city police
force will have to be increased to take
care of our blind tiger booMse fighters on
"rotten row."-Montioello News.


The present agitation for universal
franchise, after the American style, re-
veals the fact that two-thirds of all
grown Prusians poe no property to
spak of, and that their iomae below
Super annuam. Hee the elalm of the
oerameAt that, to grant nvernsal
frname, "wouldas uanlig over the
Of----It to. aebodi-s eJd MMjsh


Thirteenth Page


Ask or TI S

Write to LL
FM MNUI- MMA

CHOCOLATE BON BONS
iONL TI' U
25,40 and 60 Ct. per lb.
By mail 20 ct. additional for pt.
Age. If we can cater for President
Roosovelt we can cater for you.
At hintmail
ANYIticeBYW
ime pbbne
THE ONLY TILL'S
Jacksonville, Florida



Read Your Future In the


STAR


WHICH IS THE TRADE-MARK OF


Whitehouse


andHopkins


REAL ESTATE BROKERS


204 W. Bay St., Jacksonville, Fla.


By listing your Property
under our star your for-


tune will


increase.


In-


quiries now in our office
for *


Timber Lands


Farm Property

will insure the thesale of
yours if you place them
in our hands

W MutbMe oMAA to


Gentlemen-I am interated in your pro.
posl to sell timber lands and farm property.
Kindly correspond with me on the mbeet.


o**.# ...*..... ...**** **.** .**** .** .o .******** e..*********.


Whitehouse


-Hopkins

2 W. Bay St. Ju R.
AtAsUTAA-Mn NA


March 24, 1906


THE SUN


I


a


I


a












Pourtonth Page


The Czar's Spy
(Continued from Tenth Page)
I only wish this fellow Chater would
tell us the reason he called upon Leith-
cOurt."
"What does he sa T"
"Merely that hea a no wish to pro*-
*eute, and that he has no statement to
make."
"Can't you compel him to say some-
thifnt" I asked.
"No, I can't. That's the infernal diffi-
culty of it. If he don't choose to speak,
then we must still remain in Ignorance,
although I feel confident that he knows
somethlng of the strange affair up in the
wood."
And although I was silent, I shared
the Bootoh detective's belief.
The afternoon was chill and wet as I
climbed the hill to Greenlaw.
The sudden disappearance of the ten.
ants of Rannoch was, I found, on every-
one's tongue in Dumfrlee. In the smoke-
room of the railway hotel three men were
disoeusing it with many grimaces and
sinister hints, and the talkative young
woman behind the bar asked me my opin-
ion of the strange goingse-on up at the
castle.
As I walked on alone, with the dark
line of woods crowning the hill-top be-
fore me, the scene of that double tragedy,
I again calmly reviewed the situation. I
longed to go to the hospital and see Hyl-
ton Chater, yet when I recollected the
part he had played with Hornby on
board the Lola, I naturally hesitated.
He was allied with Hornby, apparently
against Leithoourt, although the latter
was Hornby's friend.
What, I wondered, had transpired in
the library of that gray old castle which
stood out boldly before me, dark and
grim, as I plodded on through the rain?
How had Leitheourt succeeded in render-
ing his enemy insensible and hiding him
in that cupboard? Did he believe that
he had killed him?
If I went boldly to Ohater, then it
would only be the betrayal of myself.
No. I decided that the man who had
smoked and chatted with me so affably
on that hot, breathless night in the Med-
iterranean must remain In Ignorance of
my presence, or of my knowledge. There-
fore I stayed for a week at Greenlaw
with eyes and ears ever open, yet exer-
cising care that the patient in the hOs-
pital should be unaware of my presence.
Mackenzie saw him on several ooca-
slons, but he still persisted in that tan-
talising silence. The inquiry into the
death of the unidentified man in Ran-
noch Wood had been resumed, and a ver-
dict returned of willful murder against
some person unknown, while of the sc-
ond crime the public had no knowledge,
for the body was not discovered.
Time after time I searched the wood
alone, on the pretense of shooting pigeon,
bu discovered nothing. When not hav-
ing sport on my uncle's property, I Joined
various parties in the neighborhood, not
because Scotland at that time attracted
me,.but because I desired to watch
events.
Ohater, as soon as he recovered, left
the hospital and went south-to London,
I ascertained-leaving the police utterly
in the dark and filled with suspicion of
the fugitives from Rannoch.
I longed to know the whereabouts of
Murlel, loping to gain from her some in-
formation regarding their visitor who
had so nearly esaped with his life. That
she was aware o0 the object of his visit
was plain from the statements of the
servants, all of whom had been left with-
out either money or orders.
One day I called at the aetle, the
front entrance of which I found closed.
(*alrae, the owner, had come up from
London, met his factor there, and dim-
sarged all the late tenant's servants,
kepn on only three of his own who
he been in service there for a number
of years. Ann Cameron, a housemaid,
was one of these, and it was she whom I
met when entering by the servants' hall.
On questioning her, I found her most
willing to describe how she was In the


corridor outside the young mistress'e
rom when Mr. Leithcourt dashed along
in bmathlem haste with the telegram in
hie boad. She heard him cry: "Look at
thisl Read it, Muriel. We must go.
Put your thin at once, my dear.
N.er mind about fo pLge. ry mine-
ute lad. is of -on"amue =71 W at he


March 24, 1906


THE SUN


lest in the World

Correctly describes the Anheuser-Busch
Brewery. Covers 128 acres-equal to 70
city blocks. Storing capacity 600,000
barrels. Employs more than 6,000 people.

Sales for 1905


1,403,788 Barrels

of Beer

which exceeds that of any other Biewery in
the world.
Anheuser.Rusch Brewlnd Aas'n
_ St. LouI. U. S.A.


JOS. ZAPF & CO., Distributors.
Jacksonville.


OPWhOr04 ONIM .


cried a moment later. "You won't go?
You'll stay here-stay here and face
them? Good Heavens! girl, are you
mad? Don't you know what this means ?
It means that the secret is out-the se-
cret is out, you heart We must fly "
The woman told me that she distinctly
heard Miss Muriel sobbing, while her
father walked up and down the room
speaking rapidly in a low tone. Then
he came out again and returned to his
dressing room, while Miss Muriel pre-
sumably changed from her evening gown
into a dark traveling dress.
"Did she say anything to you?" I in-
quired.
"Only that they were called away sud-
denly, sir. "But," the domestic added,
"the young lady was very pale and agi-
tated, and we all knew that something
terrible had happened. Mrs. Leithoourt
gave orders that nothing was to be told
to the guests, who dined alone, believing
that their host and hostess had gone
down to the village to see an old man
who was dying. That was the story we
told them, sir.'
"And In the meantime the Leithoourts
were in the express going to Carlisle?"
"Yes, sir. They say in Dumfries that
the police telegraphed after them, but
they had reached Carlisle and evidently
changed there, and so got away."
By the administration of a judicious
tip I was allowed to go up to Miss
Muriel's room, an elegantly furnished
little chamber in the front of the fine
old place, with a deep old-fashioned win.
dow commanding a magnificent view
across the broad Nithsdale.
The room had been tidied by the maids,
but 'allowed to remain just as she had
left it. I advanced to the window, in
which was set the large dressing table
with its big swing-mirror and silver-
topped bottles, and on gazing out saw,
to my surprise, it was the only window
which gave a view of that corner of
Rannoch Wood where the double tragedy
had taken place. Indeed, any person
standing at the spot would have a clear
view of that one distant window while
out of sight of all the rest. A light
might be placed there at night as a sig-
nal, for instance; or by day a towel
might be hung from the window as
though to dry and yet could be plainly
seen at that distance.
Another object in the room also at-
tracted my attention-a pair of long
field-glasses. Had she used these to
keep watch upon that spot?
I took them up and focused them upon
the boundary of the wood, finding that I
could distInguish everything quite
plainly.
(CONTINUED NEXT WEEK.)


When in Jacksonville
....Do as Others Do....


o GILR ATIH'
223 W. Day St.
F OR Satisfing Heals
FOR Q ic Lunches..
A Co d WetMl's Cell*
WiI RM and Resh You

UNION-MADE SHOES

The Marvin Shoe Co.
283 Westi ay Street (Evertt Bleek)
SOLE AINTS FOR
The Stetson Shoe, $.50 and $6.00
The Packard Shoe, $3.50 and $4.00
FOR MEN
The Ultra Shoe.............for Women
The American Girl Shoe for Women

MAIL ORDERS

The Marvin Shoe Co.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Try
JOSEPH ZAPF a CO. Green Brier


I Tennessee Whisky

S1" irs PURE
iw,, THAT'S SURE


ole Distributors of the Olebrated
ANIH Sl i4UCH IMlSt KIK eot Af
Ali Wholeale Wines. Liquors,
MlneraJ Waters, Et.
If You want PUeand Reliable Goodsg, ifyou want!


R U On Our List
OF SATISFIED CUSTOMERS? I


E. A. RIGKER
WHOLESALE UQUOR DEALER

Special 4-Quart Offer
Fow US.7 we will sendexpress prepaid. 4 full
quarts of MMl Ry.
FWr $3.1 we will send, express repaid. 4 full
quarts of le y
Fwr $.01 we will send. express prepaid. 4 full
quarts of Sois Ry1.
For $4.69 we will send express prepaid, 4 full
quarts of OM Lai -the best goods to
be had for the money.
Fr $117 we will send, express prepaid, 4 full
quarts of HNOSMi t.
quarts of 0W Maui I.Q
Fo t.1U we will send, express prpald. 4 full
quarts of s N Ur.
F U.7 we will Pend, express prepaid, 4 full
quarts of Nei OmiumNuf


E9 A. RIGKER
Wholesale Uquor Dealer
0e.rt* lo efi ay, Jaek vll, Fla.
IN uSM FR mTH AusM


I


':1,


Robt.W. Simms
SOLE AGENT
Jacksonville, Fla.
SN FOR mUKnMeAL PRI UST










March 24, 1906


THE SUN


Fifteenth Page


Political Advertisements

FOR THE SENATE
To the Voters of Duval County (18th
Senatorial District):
I hereby announce myself u a candi-
date for the State Senate from this, the
18th Senatorial District, Duval County,
to be voted for at the coming primarie&.
H. H. BUCKMAN.
For Gounty Gommissioner
I wish to announce my candidacy for
County Commissioner for the Fourth
District of Duval County, Florida, sub-
ject to the coming primary, and shall
appreciate the support of the citizens of
the county. T. L. ACOSTA.


f -f ff,


Windsor Hotel


Jacksonville's Finest
and Florida's Largest
and Best Year-Round


Hotel


DODGE & GULLENS
Owners and Managers


0 1 0


CHAS. BLUM a CO.
Jaokslnvll, Fla.

Strong and enduring
OLD HICKORY and
WHITE HICKORY WAGONS
The my i-gl Msf

Columbus Buggies
Ai M In


M'MURRAY& BAKER


Taylor's Cartoon Book
The Herald extends its thanks to A.
K. Taylor, the incomparable cartoonist
of the Jacksonville Sun, for a copy of
his latest cartoon book. Taylor's car-
toons on men and affairs of this State
are all well and favorably known from
one end of Florida to the other. His
ideas are always clear and strong, and
his subject matter well presented. On
the Sun, with wider latitude than he has
ever had before, Taylor's cartoons have
proved to be a greater feature than ever
n Florida public affairs, and the first
book which he has issued since going
with the Sun, is but a forerunner of
what will follow fro mhis gifted pen
later on.-Tampa Herald.
We nre in receipt of Taylor's Cartoon
Book, just out, and have enjoyed it im-
mensely. 'The cartoons have appeared
in the Jaeksonville Sun during the last
six months, and are now put into book
form, published on fine paper, neatly
paper bound, and sell for one dollar. The
cartoonist shows up public men and their
doings in a most striking and effective
way, and Mr. Taylor is an artist of un-
usual ability and wit in his line.-Ar-
cadia Champion.
About the neatest publication that has
recently brightened this office is Tay-
lor's Cartoon Book. It consists of the
cartoons that have been published in the
JacKsonville sun (luring the past six
months, and is handsomely printed. Mr.
Taylor is without a peer as a cartoonist
in the South, and he has done some of
his best work for the Sun. And speak-
ing of the Sun, it is one of the brightest
publications to be found anywhere.-De
Sto County Advertiser.
Taylor's Cartoon Book, just received,
is a very interesting collection of his
cartoons that have appeared in the Jack-
sonville Sun. There is no discount on
the work of Mr. 'aylor. He is a clever
cartoonist.-Gainesville Sun.
The Banner office is in receipt of A.
K. Taylor's Cartoon Book, for which its
publishers have our thanks. Mr. Taylor
is the popular cartoonist of the Jack-
sonville Sun, and in his line he is "it."-
Jasper Banner of'Liberty.
The News acknowledges the receipt of
Taylor's Cartoon Book from the office of
the Sun, with "compliments of Taylor."
These cartoons are timely and apt cari-
catures of men and conditions, and have
proven a sharp whiplash to those who
get off the track.-Cocoa and Rockledge
News.
The Jacksonville Sun's talented car-
toonist, A. K. Taylor, has our thanks
for a book of cartoons. As an artist Mr.
Taylor has few peers, and his latest
work is up to the usual high standard
of excellence.-Times-Herald.
Mr. A. K. Taylor, the inimitable artist
of the Jacksonville Sun, has our thanks
for a copy of his cartoon book. Taylor's
cartoon are always up to date and en-
joyable-provided his cartoon touches
the other fellow.-Jasper News.
"Ex-Governor ,Jennings Prakses Gov-
ernor Broward," is a headline in the
Pensacola Journal. Governor Uriwar:l'.
bitterest enemy could not wish hnim
worse than this.-.Jasper New4.

...WANT COLUMN...
FOR SALE.
Second-hand Soda Fountain, John Mat-
thews apparatus; "The Brighton;" 4-
rolled steel tanks of 10-galon capacity;
apparatus in good condition and in ume
today. For price and further particulars,
apply to D. P. LAWRENCE,
P. O. Box 627, Orlando, Fla.
FOR SALE o *re havin 210 et front
Son Trout Creek, near Cummer's
II"


The West End Cafe


.,gWm IN I


1 m -Xi


Wm. Burbridge


REAL ESTATE


Bargains in Improved and Unimproved
Property Correspondence solicited.
It Lam. Pu 164I.
...CONSIGN YOUR...
Fruits and Produce

W. H. Christopher
mOIOIm AND
COMMISSION MERCHANT
lOIL BIaySt. ** Jadknkeo sFI.
Prompt Attention.. Best Prices
Returns Day of Sale


Reference, National Bank of


Jacksonville


If It's Drugs
Bettes Has It
The Ilm tws
Fdu Uine TdM Aisles
Agnt tp r Huyer's Caudy
iSwg hm b --ube
Bettes Drug Store
r. lay I LaUwf, Jalt svUllS Fla.
JUST WWTE A LITTI


Dear Dad-I arrived In Jacksonville
nearly blind, and was taken to the opti-
cian's, where I was treated by a neurolo.
gist, who proscribed diet, and put me on
a fig for breakfast, no lunch, and a pecan
nut for dinner, and after six day' treat-
ment I could see a loaf of POtMkhir
Bre five miles. Yours,
NED.
P. S.-It's bread like mother used to
make.

THE SUN, $2 PER YEAR


PARTIAL PRICE LIST OF

Wines, Whiskies, Beer and Malt


mUIllmnu 8m 4O N IV 11ft
luntlng Club Rye............... 266 1400 700
elson ountyRye ..... 90.......26 780
Monosrajp Rye ............... 2D 4 0 00
Hanne's 44" Rye............... 876 6 00 9 0
Social Drop ...................... 0 680 1200
Malt Whike..................... 75 800 60
meah Brandy.................. 8 756 00 9 50
Apple Brandy..................... L 76 6 00 950
Holland Gin....................... 2 80 4 7 26
Geneva Gin ............ ..... 765 5 00 9 50
North Carolina Corn........... 4 00 7 00
Mountain orn...................... 76 00 980
Jamaica Rum .................. 280 4 6 7 6
Medford Rum..................... 1 76 6 00 9 60
Grape Brandy...................... 8 76 5 00 9 60
King of Kentucky Bourbon t 76 600 9 80
kAssedsm igmd as il m ds o iismeg


MUL al --A W hN-IM PPADMk
Rye, Gin, Corn. oId rde.................... 80
Rye Gin, lOo Rum, fe quality................. 00
Ie Gin, Corn Rum, bet for the monet...... 2 80
44" R Peh and Apple Brandy, mellow.
ed b gy .................................................. 8 00
Victoria Rye, Social Drops Rye, medolnal
quality.................................................... 4 00
LMP ,T UMMII- PWI
Falstaff Boer ..................................................
Extra Pale............................1.......0............. 0
Standard ................................... ............... 00
Malt xtct dark .................... .................. 10
Coturger, imported....................................... 9 00
Oulnnes Stout, pinta.................................... '
PMs fto mel am agslom lm


12425 HANNE BROS.
W. dam St*


Jackrnav~lie
m1


Florida East Coast Hotel Company


HOTEL PONCE DE LEON

Now open
Closes Saturday, April 7, 1906

HOTEL ALCAZAR

Now open
Closes Saturday, April 21, 1906

HOTEL ORMOND
IsmN a MW I-*Hl
Now open
Closes Monday, April 9, 1906


HOTEL ROYAL POINCIANA
Pam Wobk m Lik b Ib
Now open
Closes Monday, April 2, 1906

HOTEL ROYAL PALM

Now open
Closes Tuesday, April 3, 1906

HOTEL COLONIAL
BauM, L. P. (Smm kbMb)
Now open
Closes Monday, April 2, 1096


HOTEL THE BREAKER HOTEL THE CONTINENTAL
Pl UImt -4o.e4m M hub
Now open Opens Thursday, March 15, 1906
Closes Saturday, April 7, 1906 Closes during August


MARCUS CONANT


Funeral Director


Embalmer
Teleraph ordoln receive prompt attention.
11 L Posy 0 H9 9J-k-n: -ift*
ISIM I- i
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wIM


m^--Bf


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'bnar- Mr 7l / -


iidhi
iidhi


The House of Cable


Is as well known in Florida Musical
Circles as the House of Seven Gables
is in Literary Circles


Pianos, Organs and Piano

...Players...


Sold by Us are so high in grade and
so lasting in quality that we are
respected as well as we are known


CALL O OOR WRITE TO


The


. .


Cable
110 West Bay Street


Co.


. FLORIDA


When You Think About
Musical Instruments......


U


I


TOWERS' HARDWARE CO. Te
SSTOVES, HOUSE FURNISHINGS OUTLERY, AMMUNITION, SASH, DOORS, BLINDS,
a PAINTS, OILS, ETO. WHOMIUL AND DETAIL


JACKSONVILLE,


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If every person who approves of THE SUN
was to send us Two Dollars for a year's subscrip-
tion, we would have all the money we need. Be-
cause every one does not, we haven't. You be
the one to start it.


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