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Title: The sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075914/00018
 Material Information
Title: The sun
Uniform Title: sun
Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sun Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: March 10, 1906
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tallahassee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Leon County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Leon -- Tallahassee
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.451667 x -84.268533 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 18, 1905)-v. 3, no. 47 (Sept. 12, 1908).
Numbering Peculiarities: Published at Tallahassee, Fla., June 23-Sept. 12, 1908.
General Note: Claude L'Engle, editor.
General Note: "If it's right, we are for it."
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Bibliographic ID: UF00075914
Volume ID: VID00018
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33400104
lccn - sn 95047216
 Related Items
Other version: Morning sun (Tallahassee, Fla.)
Succeeded by: Dixie (Jacksonville, Fla.)

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In this
Number


EVERGLADES


DRAINAGE


STORY


-


Volume I-No. 17


JAGKSONVILLE. FLORIDA. MARGH 10. 1906


Single Gopy 5 Gents


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A WINDY PROPOSITION, ANYHOW


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March 10, 1906


4M6 'ONO~ W W-M


RECLAIMING A WATERY WILDERNESS


Bold Plan of a Man Who Dares To Undertake What
Others Have Balked At and Pronounced Impossible


Essaeda Points -f Everlade Improvement.
Two features of the Everglades drainage project
are strikingly prominent:
The reclamation of valuable land.


The making of the inhabitants of that
masters of the markets for early vegetables
cal fruits.


region the
and tropi.


A Trip to the Everglade Region


By ED WARD FITZGEIURAL


WITH the hope of adding to the fund of information concerning
the Everglade improvement, I visited the scenes where the
first steps are being taken toward beginning the great project-
Fort Lauderdale and New river.
I desire, first, to direct attention to the common use of the term-
"drainage of the Everglades"' '-misapplied when used in reference to
the proposed work of Governor Broward.
W.


F,.


Dred*e Buldlng at Fort L.audedale.
Governor Broward, Ghlef Engilneer Newman* Foremen
6kinner In foretrouni


Gaasaiy and


years ago the ground was overflowed and covered with growth of saw-
grass can be found fertile vegetable farms bearing magnifieernt OrpS.
In this case "drainage of the Everglades" has proved to be a profit-
able investment-so profitable, indeed, that the poorest of the land now
cultivated is valued at $85 an acre.
According to the statements of the growers, the soil shows no indi-
cation of wearing out. It retains its vitality year after year, and the
same heavy crops follow successively.
A fine tomato field can be seen that formerly was under water many
months of the year, as indicated by the marks on cypress trees standing
here and there.
Not only do vegetables grow with rapidity and vigor, but citrus
fruits show their fondness for the soil, and orange and grapefruit trees
of recent setting out are growing as fast and healthily as could be desired.
Yet ten years ago, with the exception of a portion of the land of
the Marshalls, the following acreage was Everglade: L. W. Marshall,
75 acres; W. H. Marshall, 50 acres; Osceola Fruit and Vegetable Co.,
60 acres; J. W. Braddock, 10 acres; W. E. Butts, 5 acres; A. H. Butts,
5 acres; H. D. Braddock, 4 acres; Wheeler & Smith, 12 acres; W. R.
Moore, 6 acres; R. A. Bryan, 10 acres; Swan Swanson, 4 acres, and at
least 100 acres more belonging to various persons-all of it being adapted
to cultivation,
The success attained by these farmers offers testimony beyond dis-
pute of the fertility of the muck soil of the Everglades, and the high
value they place upon their lands shows the confidence they possess in
the money-making qualities of their farms.
So much for the side of fertility of the muck soil. It has been
tested, and satisfactory results have repaid the labors of the pioneers.
Now for the side of transportation-always a vexatious and fre-
quently an unprofitable problem, especially for the new settler.
In this matter of Everglade improvement, however, the canals will
play an important part in transportation. In addition to the work of
redemption these inland waterways will do more to equalize freight
rates in South Florida than any orders of the best railroad commission
that could be created.
Beside, with the network of main canals and their tributaries the
farmer would not be isolated. His boats could carry his products to
shipping points, whence larger vessels would transport to market.
Completion of the first main canal from the head of New river to
I4ke Okeechobee and enlargement of the canal leading to the Caloosa-
hatchee would open a transportation lane across the State.
From the source of New river, where the work of digging the first
canal will begin, to the ocean is about eight miles. The river spreads
where it empties into the ocean, and a bar has formed, which has seven
feet of water at high tide. Inside the bar the channel is sand bottom,
five to ten feet deep from New river sound to Snyder creek, and one
mile of dredging from the creek to the ocean would make New river
navigable for deep-draft vessels. It has been estimated that an expen-
diture of not more than $100,000 would be needed to make a channel
with 24 feet of water.
For six miles up the river the depth ranges from 20 to 40 feet.
The completion of the East Coast canal will also furnish an outlet
to the northward, thus providing water transportation from both sides
to the Everglade territory.


It Is not the Intention to drain the Everglades; that is in the
sense of popular belief, which apparently is of the opinion that the im-
provement by the State means to wipe dry that portion of the earth.
Instead, the plan of improvement to be followed is the lowering of
the waters of Lake Okeechobee, thus preventing overflow of the lands.
The cause of inundation being removed, the lands will then be in
condition for drainage, reclamation and occupation by the settler, who
will do such work of drainage, by means of ditches, as may be neces-
sary to render his land tillable. The main canals, leading from Lake
Okeechobee, and the lateral arms will furnish outlets for Individual
dralnae.
That is the scope of the Everglade improvement; the canals to be
dug by the State, and the preparation for cultivation to be done by the
settler.
When Lake Okeecholec is lowered the source of overflow is cut off
forever, and the method of preparing land for cultivation would involve
no more expense or labor than needed for similar land elsewhere.
At least the assertion is justified by seeing what has been done
along New river near Fort Lauderdale.
iAnd is being cultivated now with great success that ten years ago
was included in the Everglades.
Through the persistence of settlers and expenditures for drainage
by the Florida East Coast Railway on both forks of New river the line
of the Everglades has been pushed to the westward, and where a few


Drede Machinery and Material on the Yard


S.


I


SUN










March 10, 1906


TN.SUN


GOV.


D OWARD'S


PLAN


EXPL GAINED


System of Canals and Dykes Five Hundred Miles
Long to be Constructed Through Overflowed Area


The preparations for beginning the work of dredging the first main
canal are being pushed as fast as possible.
The first dredge is nearly ready for launching, and when that is
done the machinery will be placed on board and the vessel towed to the
head of New river.
The machinery will be fitted by an expert dredge builder, and care
has been taken to provide all equipment of the best class.
Each dredge will excavate one mile a month, each cutting 70 yards
of the 140-foot canal, which is to be 10 feet deep at point of beginning.
It will take nearly five years to reach Lake Okeechobee.
As the work proceeds smaller dredges will be used to cut laterals
from the main canal to the Hillsboro river and other streams north of


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N- A-Lower section of Florida. White section shows overflowed ara. Irreular shaded
Other lines from Lake to the xouth are unlocated proposed eanals.


Dy CLAUV L'EHGLE.
Whoever has undertaken to do what others have not done, though the way
was open to all, has been the victim of scorn and ridicule, which has lasted just
so long as the thing was not done, but when the thing was done the scorn has
turned into praise, the ridicule into honor.
Columbus was jeered at as he wended his way from court to court with his
plans for his westward sailing; Napoleon was ridiculed when he told the leaders
of the French revolution how to get rid of the weak anid, vaillating Directory
governmnM t; Robert Fulton's staumboat was dubbed "Fultoans Follys" friends
of Stopheuson wagered that their horse could outaun his leoo timve
Yet, Columbus's voyages led to the discovery and settlemet of adm -- p e;
Napoleon's plan adopted and worked out, resulted in the advaaoemest of human
liberty over the prostrate body of divine right to govera ltol's, Flly was the
bnnig of the transformation of ooeans Into highways of eOmeees, sadM


New river, thus arranging for proper distribution of the outflowing wa
ters from the lake.
Meanwhile as the canal progresses it will serve to drain a large.area
of land, and the actual beginning of digging will be followed by many
sales of land.
Already applications are being received from intending purchasers,
who have been influenced by the fine crops growing on the land pre-
viously reclaimed.
Residents of the New river region can see only good in the plan of
Everglade improvement. As nearly all are tilling lands that were for-
merly a part of the Everglades, their opinions, proved by practice,
should be received at higher valuation than the theories evolved by
those opposing improvement.


line defines edge of the blades. Line from Lake to Fort Lauderdale marks flrit canal to be cut.


tephenson's locomotive proved to be the connecting link to the practical anni.
hilation of time and speoe.
Let us not, therefore, commit the mistake of the Italians, who laughed at
Columbus, nor the Frenchmen who ridiculed Napoleon, nor the English who
made fun of Stephenson, nor the Americans who jeered at Fulton, in dealing with
the Everglade Drainage proposition of Napoleon B. Broward, Governor of
Florida.
A laugh, after thorough investigation has proved that it is TIME TO
LAUGH, is a much more enjoyable laugh than ove that subsequent fulfllmant
of the project of tbe proposer turns into a dry grin.
It Is lor this purpose of inveatitlon that I have, for half a year pas, been
collecting data bearing on Broward a Draina sbeme, whish I will preat i
a series of articles to he publish i n this omu
In order to start right, I deem It eaental to sy right Ore, that dwrag
the last g uernatorial e I dnIlootMd ina d dBowais &"ad i
Ias map aa a votgettg M pf Mi PM t ito 8mpl ttNoei r i .


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March 10, 1906


merit or effectiveness that I did not consider Broward or his plan as factors in
the ra. But when the election of Broward showed that the people believed
in him and his some, I concluded that if tim majority of the people endorsed
the amnand the plan t was tim for Investigation to begin.
Gentlemen ifed with keener intellect than mine have stated in the public
print that they e exprepsed their opinions on the EJwveld Da naem o
sition. While I may beg forgiveness for envying my more strongly mentally
endowed brothers, it is without shame that I onfess that I have not been able,
with the study I have up to ,his time given the proposition, to decide whether


B does not want his drained. He cuts no ditches and the wa&tr stay onit
0 would like to have his drained, but he has read what Christopr h 8Mailing
says about fir. He ats the drains, but puts pmtes where they enter t
anals, and has It wet or dry acoordg ohis will.hI
Now, multiply A. B, and C by_ w ver fgAre denotes the number of people
"wo w Jmu4vpy lmaV ald AI the canals, and the complete system of
reclamation and irrigation is before you. .. t Th will
This is Broward's Everglade drainage p an, carried to completion. Ther be buil
be about Ave hundred miles of canals dug by the State. Six dro will be built
on approved plans, EACH ONE GUK EED to complete twelve ilas of
canal per year. Seven years will be required to complete the work. b
One of the two redg now building at Fort Lauderdale will be dining
within sixty days. The first route is from the head of New river to Lake Okee
chobee.
(See May A with route marked.)
This distance is fifty-five miles, and the fall is twent-.one feet. There is no
doubt whatever about the feasibility of this canal. It will carry off the water
from the lake. Compare this fall of 21 feet in 55 miles, to that of the Saint Johns
river, 15 1-2 feet in 306 miles.
(01eDiagram B p 5.)
As to the prateability of diging this canal, soundings along its entire line
show muck for a distance of thirty-eight miles from the lake extending over
sixteen feet below the surface, and rock for a small part of the remaining dis-
tance close enough to the surface to require removal. This rock is soft, like that
used in building in Miami, and can be dug out with a spade.
This first, the New river route, as well as the San Lucie route, and the route


Sawirass Everglades.


the State of Florida will be benefited or damaged by the successful carrying out
of the proposed plans for draining the Everglades. I realize that it is of the
greatest importance to the people of this State; that all the people are greatly
interested in it, and that the people want the facts. It is my purpose to give all
the facts that I am able to procure and to do my best to intelligently present
them without coloring them in the least and without losing sight of the impor-
tant fact that there are two sides to this question.
If FACTS are presented in this manner it will matter NOT IN THE LEAST
whether I form or express an opinion or not.
BROWARD WILL NOT DRAIN THE EVERGLA RS.
For arousing interest in any much-discussed subject there is nothing like a
novel statement of It, and when its verity is equal to its novelty the statement is
more attention-compelling still.
Therefore, I repeat, that it is not Broward's plan to drain the Everglades.
He proposes to uet a system of canals from Lake Ockeechobee to the ocean and
the Gulf, through which the water that, in rainy seasons, overflows the lake and
floods the country may be conducted.
Picture to yourself a saucer of milk filled to the brim, sitting on a table.
Then imagine the contents of a pitcher of milk being poured into the already
filled saucer. It is then easy to form a mental picture of the flooded surface of
the table. That's the present condition of Lake Okeechobee, twenty-one feet
above the sea level, with upwards of three millions of acres of land lying at a
lower level, subject to the overflow from the lake.
Broward proposes to cut six canals six miles apart, each one hundred and
forty feet wide and ten feet deep, connecting the lake with the ocean and the
Gulf.
(Pee Map A pae 3.)
These canals win traverse the three and odd millions of TTNALLOTTED
SWAMP AND OVERFLOWED LANDS lying mostly to the southward of the
lake, as well as other millions of allotted lands lying to the east, west and
north.
When these canals are cut, the work of the State is done, and NO LANDS


6cene on


New River at Fort ,Lauderdale.-.-104,000 Grates of Veget-
ables ShippeI from there this Season.


due south from the middle lower edge of the lake, was surveyed by Col. J. M.
Kreamer.
(See map A with routes marked.)
This engineer made a report to his employer, the Disston Company, in
which he pronounced them feasible and which contained estimates of the cost.
Colonel Kreamer placed the extreme cost of digging at 2 cents a cubic yard,
or about $4,700 a mile, for a canal 150 feet wide and 8 feet deep, exclusive of the
two dredges, which would cost about $50,000.
The plans of Governor Broward call for a width of 140 feet and a depth of
10 feet for the main canals, so that the cost will be about the same.
Those who object to the plan on the ground of lack of preparation and esti-
mates, may find some information in the inspection of the drawings and the
perusal of the foregoing statements and extracts from Colonel Kreamer's report.
The trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund defend their right to levy
a tax on all swamp and overflowed lands, the titles to which came from the
Trustees, by citing the following:


Upper drawing is eross.setlon from Gulf to Ocean through
lake Okeechobee. showing the lake 21 feet above sea level.
Other drawings from top to bottom show profiles from Lake
KtsMimmee to lake Okesehobee; from Okeechobee to New river
[route of Arst Broward enal], and from Okeechobee to San
Lucle river-compiled from actual surveys made In February,
1906, by J. W. Newman, 0. E., by direction of the Board of True
tess of the Internal Improvement Fund.


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ARB DRAINED, because the material taken up by the dredges cutting the
canals will be deposited on the sides of the cut, and will make a pile about
TWENTY FEET HIGH all along both sides of the State canals.
Here, then, is a system of dykes and canals. The canals controlling the
water nla the lake (preventing overflow) and the water on the surface of the lands
Vneatisguo to them.
upp e A, B, and C owned adjoining township lying between two of these
A want. his lead drained. He cut ditchee through it and connects with


RESOLUTION IN RELATION TO DRAINING
(No. 14.)


THE EVERGT AntLU.


Whereas, Large tracts of the public lands lying in the vicinity fIa e-
chobee, and In that regon south of said lake called "the Evelade," bei Ogov-
ered with water, are Incapable of being surveyed and sub-divddd, and ar 'er,.
fore valnelm to the United States: an are re-
And Whereas, It Is believed that a large portion of said lands may be
drained bY alMs, reclaimed, and made valuable for the cultivation of tropicl
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THE SUN


And Whereas, It*ls believed that these lands, if reclaimed, would not only
remunerate this State for the expense of such reclamation, but would yield a
considerable surplus above such expense; therefore,
Resolved by the Senate and o of Reprem native of the State of
lorida in General Aembly Comened, That Congress be requested to grant to
Mr 6s6 al f a ft s&1Atm siuttA of Ckrioo-sa-AfoAeee river and of the
northern shore of Lake Okeechobee, and between the Gulf of Mexico and the
Atlantic ocean, on condition that the State will drain them and apply the pro-
ceeds of the sale thereof, after defraying the expense of draining, to purposes
of education.*
(Passed by the Senate December 80, 1847. Passed by House of Representa-
tives, January 6, 1848. Approved by the Governor January 6, 1848.)
Pages 80 and 81 of the Laws of 1847.
By an act of Congres approved September 28th, 1850, it is provided, "That
to enable the State to construct the necessary levees and drains to
reclaim the swamp and overflowed lands therein, the whole of those swamp and
overflowed lands, made unfit thereby for cultivation, which shall remain unsold
at the passage of this Act, shall be, and the same are hereby granted to said
State."
The Act further provides, "That, the proceeds of said lands, whether from
sale or by direct appropriation in kind, shall be applied exclusively, as far as


ning recently because there was no elevator money on hand. With lots of money
belonging to the owner of the elevator, the tender-hearted postmaster saw the
Judge walk upstairs.
Plenty of people thought it would be better to spend money to run the
elevator, than for marble dados, but, it could not be done.
f have seen ft printed in several papers, and I have even seen it cartooned,
that Judge Locke's continuance of the injunction against collecting the special
drainage tax was a knock-out blow to the Everglade drainage scheme, or if not a
knock-out, a staggerer and serious crippler.
I cannot see it that way, for several reasons, from which I select two that
seem sufficient:
First reason: January 1st, 1005, the Trustees had on hand $293,156.55. Of
this $225,000 is tied up by an injunction granted in a suit of the L. & N. Ry.
against the Trustees. I learn by inquiry in Tallahassee, that about $10,000 has
been spent since January. This leaves $68,155 SUBJECT TO CHECK with which
to finish the two dredges and begin digging. This is enough to complete them and
operate them for two years.
Twenty-four miles of canal can be dug and thousands of acres of lands
made ready for drainage and irrigation in that time. And this land can be sold
for enough to continue the work.
With the completion of ten miles of canal northwest of New river an area


MIW=-l I-Upper drawing is profile of St. Johns river. Middle drawing shows graduated fall of St. Johns river from source to mouth-283 feet In 890 mIle#-compiled from drawings made
by Francis R. Shunk, U. 8. Engineers. Lower drawings, from left to right, show graduated fall of first canal from Okeechobee to New river-21 foot fall in IM mill -and profile of lame, and
profiles of San Lucie cut-21 feet fall in 28 miles. By comparison with the fall In the St. Johns river, the practicability of the proposal canals Is clearly shown.


necessary, to the purpose of reclaiming said lands by means of the levees and
drains aforesaid."
Under this grant, the State has received 20,133,900.67 acres of land, the
same being much more than one-half of the entire acreage of the State of
Florida, -the total area of the State being 37,931,530 acres, which includes both
land and water surface.
By an Act of the Legislature, approved January 6, 1855, the same being
Chapter 610, Laws of Florida, all the swamp and overflowed land granted to
the State by the above Act of Congress was"irrevocably vested in five trustees,"
who were designated Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund, to hold the
land in trust for the wee and purposes mentioned in the act.
Every grant made by the Trustees, who were by act of 1855 IRREVOCABLY
VESTED WITH THE TITLE of swamp and overflowed lands ceded to the State
by Congress, was a CONDITIONAL GRANT. The trustees could not give a better
title than they had, and their title was subject to drainage and reclamation. The
Secretary of War of the United States defined swamp and overflowed lands to be-
"any subdivision of land the greater part of which is wet and unfit for culti-
vation."
Thus a man, a firm or a corporation receiving a grant may have included in
it, a considerable quantity of high land, but as the trustees got nothing but
what was described as "swamp and overflowed" lands, they could not deed any-
thing but "swamp and overflowed" land, which was a conditional grant subject
to drainage tax. This, the trustees claim, answers the objectors who own high
land which, they claim, can receive no benefit.
I have seen and heard statements that it would be better to spend the money
in possession of the Trustees for good roads, or for inducing immigrants to come
into the State and occupy some of the thousands of sores of unoccupied lands
that require no drainage. Very nice suggestions, both of them, with which I am
inclined to agree.
But, the Trustees can legally do neither the one nor the other. They must
spend the money for drainage and reclamation, or LEAVE IT IN THE BANKS
YOR LAWYERS TO FIGHT OVER.
Note the words of the act of Congress ceding the lands to the State-"the
proceeds of said lands SHALL BE APPLIED EXCLUSIVELY, as
far as necessary to the purpose of reclaiming said lands by means of levees and
drains."
To illustrate: Postmaster Gerow has on hand large sums of money belonging
to the United Statem, but the elevator ia the Goverment building stopped run


of 902,000 acres of land will be ready for occupation. Lands of the same char-
acter along New river, that ten years ago were within the Everglade district, but
which have been partially redeemed by settlers, are valued at $35 and upward
an acre, and many persons who are aware of the great fertility of the lands to
be reclaimed are but waiting to see if the project of drainage is assured, when
they will eagerly buy.
Second reason: Judge Locke's ruling DID NOT DECIDE THE CASE. New
testimony and new arguments can be submitted and the Judge may decide finally
in favor of the Trustees.
Then, the constitutional amendment to be voted on in November will, if
adopted, cure the defects in the act levying the special tax.
I have seen it printed and cartooned that Broward's drainage scheme was
a drainage of the State treasury scheme. .
Not so. None of the money in the treasury can be spent by the Trustees for
this or any other purpose. They are spending and will continue to spend money
given them for this very purpose.
But suppose it did drain the treasury. The money belongs to the people, and
the people by DIRECT BALLOT as well as by vote of their representatives in
the Legislature, have authorized the drainage of the Everglades.
I have seen it printed that the land will be no good even if it is drained. I
have no facts to offer for or against this proposition. The Governor says he has
had the land inspected and analyzed and submits reports from chemists, that
declare these lands to be the best sugar lands in the world.
I have talked this drainage scheme over with people who have said that the
railroads have already been granted about a million acres more land than there
is land left vested in the State, and that the lands, when drained, will be gobbled
up by the railroads.
If the railroads are RIGHTFULIlY ENTITLED TO IT, let them have it, if
not, the Trustees can hold it. It makes no difference to'the State of Florida WHO
OWNS THE LAND. The only use the State has for money is to promote the hap-
piness and welfare of the people, and taxes are levied for this purpose on the
land, no matter who owns it.
But, there are thousands of acres of school lands in this area which is to be
drained. These cannot he gobbled up by the railroads.
The foregoing is the story of the drainage proposition as I see it, presented
with no thought of influencing opinion for or against it. It has been prepared
from data which I have gathered during the past six months, and which anyone
could get by the expenditure of asom energyand considerable patiee.e


March 10, 1906













I II I III ISUN


March 10, 1906


merit or effectiveness that I did not consider Broward or his plan as factors in
th rae. But when the election of Broward showed that the people believed
in him and his scheme, I concluded that if the majority of the people indorsed
the man and the plan, it was time for investigation to begin.
Gntem fted with keener intellepts than mine have stated in the public
print that ay" expressed their opinions on the Everglade Drainage propo-
sition. While I may beg forgiveness for envying my more strongly mentally
endowed brothers, it is without shame that I confess that I have not been able,
with the study I have up to ,his time given the proposition, to decide whether


B does not want his drained. He cuts no ditches and the water staBs on it.
0 would like to have his drained, but he has read what Christop r Mailing
says about fre. He cuts the drains, but putl pates where they enter the State
canals, and has it wet or dry asecorn to his wil. .
Now, multiply A. B, and 0 by whatever figure denotes the number of people
now or in future owning land along the canals, and the complete system of
reclamation and irrigation is before you.
This is Broward's Everglade drainage plan, carried to completion. There will
be about ive hundred mile of canals dug by the State. Six dredge will be built
on approved plans, EACH ONE GUARANTEED to complete twelve Pmlle of
canal per year. Seven years will be required to complete the work.
One of the two dredges now building at Fort Lauderdale will be digging
within sixty days. The first route is from the head of New river to Lake Okee-
chobee.
(See May A with route marked.)
This distance is fifty-five miles, and the fall is twenti-one feet. There is no
doubt whatever about the feasibility of this canal. It will carry off the water
from the lake. Compare this fall of 21 feet in 55 miles, to that of the Saint Johns
river, 15 1-2 feet in 306 miles.
(See Diagram B p 5.)
As to the practicability of digging this canal, soundings along its entire line
show muck for a distance of thirty-eight miles from the lake extending over
sixteen feet below the surface, and rock for a small part of the remaining dis-
tance close enough to the surface to require removal. This rock is soft, like that
used in building in Miami, and can be dug out with a spade.
This first, the New river route, as well ai the San Lucie route, and the route


Sawgrass Cvertlades.


the State of Florida will be benefited or damaged by the successful carrying out
of the proposed plans for draining the Everglades. I realize that it is of the
greatest importance to the people of this State; that all the people are greatly
Interested in it, and that the people want the facts. It is my purpose to give all
the facts that I am able to procure and to do my best to intelligently present
them without coloring them in the least and without losing sight of the impor-
tant fact that there are two sides to this question.
If FACTS are presented in this manner it will matter NOT IN THE LEAST
whether I form or express an opinion or not.
BROWARD WILL NOT DRAIN THE EVERGLADES.
For arousing interest in any much-disouseed subject there is nothing like a
novel statement of it, and when its verity is equal to Its novelty the statement is
more attention-compelling still.
Therefore, I repeat, that it is not Broward's plan to drain the Everglades.
He proposes to out a system of canals from Lake Ockeechobee to the ocean and
the Gulf, through which the water that, in rainy seasons, overflows the lake and
floods the country may be conducted.
Picture to yourself a saucer of milk filled to the brim, sitting on a table.
Then imagine the contents of a pitcher of milk being poured into the already
filled saucer. It is then easy to form a mental picture of the flooded surface of
the table. That's the present condition of Lake Okeechobee, twenty-one feet
above the sea level, with upwards of three millions of series of land lying at a
lower level, subject to the overflow from the lake.
Broward proposes to cut six canals six miles apart, each one hundred and
forty feet wide and ten feet deep, connecting the lake with the ocean and the
Gulf.
(fee Map A, pawe 3.)
These canals will travere the three and odd milHons of UNALLOTTED
SWAMP AND OVERFLOWED LANDS lying mostly to the southward of the
lake, as well as other millions of allotted lands lying to the east, west and
north.
When these canals are cut, the work of the State is done, and NO LANDS


S-ene on


New River at fort Lauderdale-...104,000 Grates of Veget-
ables Shipped from there this Season.


due south from the middle lower edge of the lake, was surveyed by Col. J. M.
Kreamer.
(See map A with routes marked.)
This engineer made a report to his employer, the Disston Company, in
which he pronounced them feasible and which contained estimates of the cot.
Colonel Kreamer placed the extreme cost of digging at 2 cents a cubio yard,
or about $4,700 a mile, for a canal 150 feet wide and 8 eet deep, exclusive of the
two dredges, which would cost about $50,000.
The plans of Governor Broward call for a width of 140 feet and a depth of
10 feet for the main canals, so that the cost will be about the same.
Those who object to the plan on the ground of lack of preparation and esti-
mates, may find some information in the inspection of the drawings and the
perusal of the foregoing statements and extracts from Colonel Kreamer's report.
The trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund defend their right to levy
a tax on all swamp and overflowed lands, the titles to which came from the
Trustees, by citing the following:


Upper drawing is croM-sectlon from Gulf to Ocean through
Lake Okeechobee. showing the lake 21 feet above sea level.
Other drawings from top to bottom show profiles from Lake
Kiasmmee to Lake Okeechobee; from Okeechobee to New river
[route of rst Broward canal], and from Okeechobee to Ban
Lucie river-compiled from actual surveys made In February,
1906, by J. W. Newman, C. E., by direction of the Board of Trus-
tees of the Internal Improvement Fund.


ARE DRAINED, because the material taken up by the dredges cutting the
canals will be deposited on the sides of the cut, and will make a pile about
TWENTY EET HIGH all along both sides of the State canals.
Here, then, is a system of dykes and canals. The canals controlling the
water in the lake (preventing overflow) and the water on the surface of the lands
lyI eoastiguous to them.
u lpoe A, B, sad C owned adjoining townships lying between two of these
A wants.hls b aIO drained. He eute ditche through it and connects with
lb d" .


RESOLUTION IN RELATION TO DRAINING THE EVERGLAI,
(No. 14.)
Whereas, A tracts of the publicIn lands ying in the icinitY ofa
chobee, and n thsa on south of said ke called "the Evegla ofLae" Oke
ered with water, are incapable of being survey and subdvi(ed, and bre there.
fore valueless to the United States: ve d a there-
And Whereas, It is believed that a large portion of said lands m be
drained by aas, reclaimed, and made valuable for the cultivation of toa be
p- andt frhtroit;oof trop1W


. in. -1 .1 '. ..f. : .. -


d JL7 -T
rma 1.104 a vn%% 66^66ow" ow OWN sawwrAme


THE SUN












THE SUN


And Whereas, It.is believed that these lands, if reclaimed, would not only
remunerate this State for the expense of such reclamation, but would yield a
colsiderable surplus above such expenses therefore,
Rewoled by the Senate andN ow f Reprmestatve of the State of
Floride in Generl Assembly (onvened, That Congress be requested to grant to
this State all of said lands lying south of Carloo-sa-hatoheee river and of the
northern shore of Lake Okeechobee, and between the Gulf of Mexico and the
Atlantic ocean, on condition that the State will drain them and apply the pro-
oeeds of the sale thereof, after defraying the expense of draining, to purposes
of education.
(Pased by the Senate December 80, 1847. Passed by House of Representa-
tives, January 6, 1848. Approved by the Governor January 6, 1848.)
Pages 80 and 81 of the Laws of 1847.
By an act of Congres approved September 28th, 1850, it is provided, "That
to enable the State to construct the necessary levees and drains to
reclaim the swamp and overflowed lands therein, the whole of those swamp and
overflowed lands, made unfit thereby for cultivation, which shall remain unsold
at the passage of this Act, shall be, and the same are hereby granted to said
State.*"
The Act further provides, "That, the proceeds of said lands, whether from
sale or by direct appropriation in kind, shall be applied exclusively, as far as


nig recently because there was no elevator money on hand. With lots of money
belonging to the owner of the elevator, the tender-hearted postmaster saw the
Judge walk upstairs.
Plenty of people thought it would be better to spend money to run the
elevator, than for marble dados, but, it could not be done.
I have seen it printed in several papers, and I have even seen it cartooned,
that Judge Locke's continuance of the injunction against collecting the special
drainage tax was a knock-out blow to the Everglade drainage scheme, or if not a
knock-out, a staggerer and serious crippler.
I cannot see it that way, for several reasons, from which I select two that
seem sufficient:
First reason: January 1st, 1905, the Trustees had on hand $293,155.55. Of
this $226,000 is tied up by an injunction granted in a suit of the L. & N. Ry.
against the Trustees. I learn by inquiry in Tallahassee, that about $10,000 has
been spent since January. This leaves $58,155 SUBJECT TO CHECK with which
to finish the two dredges and begin digging. This is enough to complete them and
operate them for two years.
Twenty-four miles of canal can be dug and thousands of acres of lands
made ready for drainage and irrigation in that time. And this land can be sold
for enough to continue the work.
With the completion of ten miles of canal northwest of New river an area


Hgstlm -Upper drawing Is profile of St. Johns river. Middle drawing shows graduated fall of St. Johns river from source to mouth-23 feet in t80 milow-complled from drawings made
by Francis R. Shunk, U. 8. Engineers. Lower drawings, from left to right, show graduated fall of first canal from Okeechobee to Nuw river-21 feet fall in M milks--and profile of same, and
profiles of San Lucie cubt-21 feet fall in 28 miles. By comparison with the fall in the St. Johns river, the practicability of the propomle canals IN clearly shown.


necessary, to the purpose of reclaiming said lands by means of the levees and
drains aforesaid."
Under this grant, the State has received 20,133,900.67 acres of land, the
same being much more than one-half of the entire acreage of the State of
Florida,-the total area of the State being 37,931,530 acres, which includes both
land and water surface.
By an Act of the Legislature, approved January 6, 1855, the same being
Chapter 610, Laws of Florida, all the swamp and overflowed land granted to
the State by the above Act of Congress was"irrevocably vested in five trustees,"
who were designated Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund, to hold the
land in trust for the wes and purposes mentioned in the act.
Every grant made by the Trustees, who were by act of 1855 IRREVOCABLY
VESTED WITH THE TITLE of swamp and overflowed lands ceded to the State
by Congress, was a CONDITIONAL GRANT. The trustees could not give a better
title than they had, and their title was subject to drainage and reclamation. The
Secretary of War of the United States defined swamp and overflowed lands to be-
"any subdivision of land the greater part of which is wet and unfit for culti-
vation."
Thus a man, a firm or a corporation receiving a grant may have included in
it, a considerable quantity of high land, but as the trustees got nothing but
what was described as "swamp and overflowed" lands, they could not deed any-
thing but "swamp and overflowed" land, which was a conditional grant subject
to drainage tax. This, the trustees claim, answers the objectors who own high
land which, they claim, can receive no benefit.
I have seen and heard statements that it would be better to spend the money
in possession of the Trustees for good roads, or for inducing immigrants to come
into the State and occupy some of the thousands of acres of unoccupied lands
that require no drainage. Very nice suggestions, both of them, with which I am
inclined to agree.
But, the Trustees can legally do neither the one nor the other. They must
spend the money for drainage and reclamation, or LEAVE IT IN THE BANKS
lOR LAWYERS TO FIGHT OVER.
Note the words of the act of Congress ceding the lands to the State--"the
proceeds of said lands SHALL BE APPLIED EXCLUSIVELY, as
far as necessary to the purpose of reclaiming said lands by means of levees and
drains."
To Illustrate: Postmaster Gerow has on hand large sums of money belonging
to the United States, but the elevator ina the Goverment buildingd r


of 92,000 acres of land will be ready for occupation. Lands of the same char-
acter along New river, that ten years ago were within the Everglade district, but
which have been partially redeemed by settlers, are valued at $35 and upward
an acre, and many persons who are aware of the great fertility of the lands to
be reclaimed are but waiting to see if the project of drainage is assured, when
they will eagerly buy.
secondd reason: Judge Locke's ruling DID NOT DECIDE THE CASE. New
testimony and new arguments can be submitted and the Judge may decide finally
in favor of the Trustees,
Then, the constitutional amendment to be voted on in November will, if
adopted, cure the defects in the act levying the special tax.
I have seen it printed and cartooned that Broward's drainage scheme was
a drainage of the State treasury scheme. .
Not so. None of the money in the treasury can be spent by the Trustees for
this or any other purpose. They are spending and will continue to spend money
given them for this very purpose.
But suppose it did drain the treasury. The money belongs to the people, and
the people by DIRECT BALLOT as well as by vote of their representatives in
the Legislature, have authorized the drainage of the Everglades.
I have seen it printed that the land will be no good even if it is drained. I
have no facts to offer for or against this proposition. The Governor says he has
had the land inspected and analyzed and submits reports from chemists, that
declare these lands to be the best sugar lands in the world.
I have talked this drainage scheme over with people who have said that the
railroads have already been granted about a million acres more land than there
is land left vested in the State, and that the lands, when drained, will be gobbled
up by the railroads.
If the railroads are RIGHTFULLY ENTITLED TO IT, let them have it, if
not, the Trustees can hold it. It makes no difference to"the State of Florida WHO
OWNS THE LAND. The only use the State has for money is to promote the hap-
piness and welfare of the people, and taxes are levied for this purpose on the
land, no matter who owns it.
But, there are thousands of acres of school lands in this area which is to be
drained. These cannot he gobbled up by the railroads.
The foregoing is the story of the drainage proposition as I see it, presented
with no thought of influencing opinion for or against it. It has been prepared
from data which I a gathered during the pasisx maoth, sad whi MM
would gt by te of some energy ad e idera Mle
..' ^ y\ *1'


March 10, 1906


^^












S TEZ 5U~i


SHAKING


THE


OLD


PLUM


March 10, 1906




TREE


By Edward Ft3gerald


Hon. R. Hudson Burr, Railroad Commissioner,
believes in trying to hold on to a good thing, and
has declared nis candidacy for re-election.
He will attempt to grind another grist in the
same old mill, but the water that turned the politi-
cal wheel has flowed out and the stream is dry.
When Burr was elected Railroad Commissioner
he was to be the nettle that would prick the rail-
ways so painfully that the public burden would be
lightened of excessive rates.
As the real thing in Commission reform, he was
to have the railroad; cutting the buck in their
haste to adjust rates for the common people.
According 'to the program outlined in the slabs
of metal furnished the State press by the thoughtful
Guy Metoalfe, who labored so long and tirelessly to
make a smooth piece of political furniture out of
the raw material in the person of Burr, the people
were at last to have their innings and the rail-
roads would be compelled to snare their dividends
with the real earners.


This looked good to the dear people. At last
one of their very own was to take the corporations
by the throat and prevent the hola-up so long
alleged to be practiced. Like a hungry fish the
majority swallowed the bait without tasting it, and
the "people's champion" was hurled into office with
the velocity of a rifle bullet.
That was the beginning, and since that time Mr.
Burr has played a light thinking part in perform-
ing his one-third of the duties of the Railroad Com-
mission. The eloquent tones of the leaden thought
waves that resounded throughout the land during
the campaign period have become stilled, while the
lips of Mr. Burr's goddess of reform have uttered
but one shriek of joy since she was placed on her
pedestal by the votes of the people. That was when
the Atlantic Coast Line and the Seaboard Air Line
were "ordered" to reduce passenger fare to three
cents a mile.
The Legislature could have done this without
cost to the people, but passing that truism, let Mr.
Burr hug to ais bosom 6ne-third of the glory result-
ing from such heroic act.
It would be cruel, to say the least, to strip him
of his one garment of reform, short as it may be,
and compel him to exhibit his nude political figure
while performing campaign stunts in the effort to
secure re-election.
It is not likely, either, that the public will care
to listen to Burr's explanation of his failure to make
good his promises by reason of Jeff Browne's con-
servatism. The saying that any old excuse is better
than none will hardly terve in this case, and the
attempt to make votes at the expense of Mr. Borwne's
official conduct will be about as successful as pick-
ing a 100 to 1 shot at the Sheepshead Bay race.
track.
Besides Browne will have sufficient of his own
shortcomings for which to answer, without playing
jinricksha man to Burr*s political cart.
The race for Railroad Commissioners continues
rich in humor, and the'latest to contribute to the
political "House of Mirth" Is E. W. Irvine, whoso
home is in Lake City, a fact of which he appears to
be ashamed, if hotel registers afford comptent testi-
mony, his favorite designation of residence being
Petersburg, Va.
Mr. Irvine was his own discoverer. After careful
search of his personal makeup he found that he
was the real square timber needed in the manufac-
ture of a Railroad Commissioner.
Whether he will be able to convince the people
of this fitness will be another story, the present
point being how it happened.
Mr. Irvine is a drummer and becoming vexed
with the negligence of railroads in giving tired tray.-
eler knowledge of belated trains, found a ease where
the law was violated and insisted that the railway
company yield up its pound of fesh. The Railroad
Oimamunion, he declares, tried to throw him on a
siding, but he managed to roll along the main track,
with .the result that no alternative presented itself
to the Commission but to fine the offending road.
Whether the fine has been paid the public has not
0a14119d.
It was then that Mr. Irvine took stock of him-
self and decided that he was called to serve the
o in the edle of Railroad Commissioner.
" D Mwn In Dade County the tide of political life
o t to flow, and though the situation at
ameught but locaf features the
9i 6 011- expert its effect o Sta poll
->


OPES1W10(W a'CHE5TMTrIUT RR
MhD THF VVC~P ORMY1 FRUIT.
7AA 1. --


One circumstance that puts energy Into the politi-
cal life of that county is the resurrection of the
Metoaife faction, which rejuvenated, is skipping
along like a colt, annoying its opponents by its Joy-
ous spirits and its renewed ability for creating tur-
moil. ,
To Joel Dean, former owner of the News of West
Palm Beach, must be given the great share of credit
for his part in supplying tie oxygen that revived
this near political corpse of the north end of the
county. By his aid the elder Metcalfe was elected
Mayor of Went Palm Beach, and the heavy vote
given him showed that henceforth his faction was a
power to be considered.
Mr. Dean has just sold his paper, and while not
wishing to give up the newspaper busies, yet the
price offered was so tempting that he was unable to
resist. Rumor, however, associates his name with the
establishment of another newspaper, and if such
report is correct he will doubtless receive much
encouragement from those who support his political
views.
The inhabitants of Polk County will likely he
confronted with the question of splitting the county,
forming a new division with Takeland as the eotity
seat.
The rapid growth of Lakeland has carried in its
wake the des for locatimn of the courthouse at
that pise, but Bartw, sU esauty capital, is strom


ly intrenched and the attempt to take the courthouse
from her would result in a bitter and costly fight.
In order to avoid such struggle it is quite possible
that the Lakeland contingent will advocate creation
of a new county and will prepare for legislative
action to that end.
In the Eighth Judicial Circuit, composed of the
counties of Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Levy and Put-
nam, a warm race will occur for the office of State
Attorney.
Hon. Benj. P. Calhoun, the present incumbent,
and Thomas W. Fielding of Starke are candidates
and both are preparing for an active fight. It was
rumored that Hon. Syd Carter of Gainesville had
his eye on this plum, but he has not so announced.
If he did enter the three-cornered contest would
make one of the livliest fights ever conducted in
that circuit.
Among former Senators who have announced
for re-election are Frank Sams of Volusia and H.
II. McCreary of Alachua. Mr. Sams, who has served
a number of years in the upper House, enjoys much
and well-deserved popularity in his district. He is a
strong candidate, and as good Senatorial timber
would be difficult to find in his district, no opposi-
tion has appeared above the surface yet, and it s
likely that Mr. Sams will secure election without
opposition.
In Alachua County McCreary has been success-
ful for two terms, and became a sort of county boss,
but his attempt to hold the reins of power has
displeased some and disgusted others, so that his
control of affairs seems to have become weak-
kneed and generally out-of-joint. Whether such con-
dition will result in bringing out a candidate who
can defeat him for the Senate is a secret of the future
that only the count of the primary can tell, but it
is almost a certainty that he will encounter decided
opposition.
Hon. John Beard of Pensacola is conducting an
active campaign for the Senate from Escambia
County. Mr. Beard is an entertaining speaker,
bright and forcible, and if he does not win it will
not be from lack of energy in placing his candidacy
before the people.
Four years ago Mr. Beard was a candidate for
Congress in the eventful race which resulted in the
election of Wm. B. Lamar and the political death
of Fred Myers of Tallahassee. Since then Mr. Beard
has not been active in State politics, but during
the Presidential campaign of 1904 he was one of the
orators under direction of the National Democratic
Committee and made many speeches in other States.
Speaking of Mr. Beard recalls the Wailes claim
against the State, in which Beard has an interest,
and the fact that this matter has never been settled
to the satisfaction of the claimants. The $25,000 ap-
ropriated by the Legislature of 1903 yet remains
in the State treasury, Mr. Wailes declining to accept
that amount.
It is quite probable that this matter has not been
ended by the action of the Legislature making that
appropriation, and that the affair will again be
brought up for a more equitable adjustment at the
next session.
There are many persons who teel that Mr. Wailes
and the other claimants were unjustly treated by the
offer of such small recompense for the work con.
nected with the collection of the Indian War claim
against the Government, and that the full 15 per
cent of the amount should have been paid them.
That their demand was either justifiable or else the
entire claim should have been repudiated on the
ground of no service to the State.
Indeed, it was shown that $25,00 would not relm.
burse Mr. Wailes for the expense to which he was
put in presenting the claim to the Government.
Some time since a political club was organized in
Jacksonville, the essential qualification to member.
snip being that of unionism, every member belong.
ing to a union labor organization. The purpose of
the club is not to push the political fortunes of any
person only to the extent where such action may be
beneficial to union labor. It stands ready, however
to oppose candidates and schemes considered preju
diclai to the cause of unionism.
An officer of this club has stated that an appeal
will be made to working men throughout the State
to favor the Everglade improvement plan of Gov-
ernor Broward and to vote for the constitutional
amendment connected therewith. tional
The zeal with which the Times-Union a non
union paper, is attacking Governor Brow ard a non-
Everglade reject, furnishes tne inentuave anfo te
pect of suc action. Indeed, this officer a asserted tt
anything denounced by the Times-.Union was a
worthy object of investigation by the workingan,
and he believed that in this ease the motives which
prompted the condemnation of Brow tr
welfa of the common people. t


-'I.


-~ '2.


-'










Ma ch 10, 1906


JOHIf


HENRY


AT


THE


THEA TER


4y George V. Hobart


FOR ME.


I was down on the card to lead a
lady friend of mine to a New York
theater where you can roll around in an
orchestra chair at fifty cents a throw.
When a guy can buy a couple of cosy.
corners in a dead swell theater for fifty
cents per coze, he's a mark to blow four
plunks to squeeze into one of those joints
where they feed you on problem plays
and fricassed pasts.
I figured it out that way, and stood
pat.
That evening finds me in the parlor
as dsual. You know the parlor I mean.
When a guy reaches that condition
waier he gives himself the careful glance
and says, "Gee! I got to get shaved this
evening!" you can bet there's only one
parlor in the world for him.
I'm sitting on the sofa with one mitt
lying carelessly on the family album
and the other bunched around a 51.70
cane, when my lady friend floats into
the arena.
There's a short-arm clinch, a break-
away, and we're back in our corners.
"Oh, John Henry!" says my lady
friend, giving her real hair a couple of
taps and glancing out in the dining-
room to see if mother was rubbering.
I tell you, boys, it's aces when your
lady friend does that after a shbrt clinch.
There's nothing to it.
When a girl stamps her foot and talks
with a tobasco lisp and says, "How dare
you kiss me, sir? You are impertinent,
sir!" it's a 30 to 1 shot that Gussie
Gladtop, the ribbon clerk, who calls
every Tuesday evening, first gave her an
excuse for writing that libArtto.
She's just dying to have you bite her
again, but she handles her language
wrong, and the four-flush call-down
makes you back-pedal so hard that you
grab your hat, and you find yourself
saying day-day long before papa drops
in with his usual bundle of benzine and
an A-flat hiccough on the aide.
For me the glorious creature who
simply says, "Oh, John Henry!" and
pats her temples to see if her Seven
Sutherland Sisters happens to be
mussed.
Anyway, after the bell rings I says to
my lady friend, "If you'll tease a trolley
with me, we'll be on our way to-morrow
night to the theater!"
"Oh, how lovely I" says my lady friend.
"I do so love to go to the theater. Where
shall we go? Oh, I know! Let's go
and see Sara Bernhardt! I'm just dying
to see her !"
Up and away to the mines! Sarah
Bernhardt at five plunks a chair and me
scratching gravel to get my laundry
back from foreign lands of a Saturday
night!
"I'm just dying to see Sara!" says
the Sweetest Thing Ever, and I'd be a
small bunch of parsnips if I hadn't
volunteered in the life-saving service
then and there.
"Yes," I says to my lady,friend, "I
thought you'd like to see Bernhardt !"
and all the time I'm giving this glad
speech I'm going down the line men-
tally to see who will give me quick ac-
tion on a steam-heated touch.
"I think it is awfully nice of you to
ask me to see Bernhardt," says The Real
Thing, throwing a goo-goo at me that
seties eveytng. After a Joyous
gla Usae that I'm p to bmk Ito


the box office and wrestle the keeper for
the gate money.
Anyway, after a Labored Conversation
with a friend, I'm helped to the price
next day, and I patter away for the
pasteboards. My lady friend togs out
in her revelry rags, and I'm somewhat
of a Big Event myself when we slide
into the Gold-Bond building and reach
out for Ten-Dollars' worth of amuse-
ment, hot off the griddle.
"Mercy meel' says my lady friend,
after the curtain has been up awhile,
"what are they talking about? I can t
understand a word I"
I'm sitting there holding the funeral
services over my ten plunks, so I'm not
wise to what's doing on the stage.
"What's the matter?" I says.
"Listen!" says Clara Jane.
I listened. In a minute I was next.
The trackwalkers on the stage were talk-
ing Dagol Dago, mind you! and me
just after putting on mourning for my
ten plunks!
"Oh!" they're doing the trick in
French," I says, offhand, just as though
I paid my car care in French every
morning.
Say! I don't know enough about
French to find Paris on the map-honest,
that's straight! But I'm thinking of
my dear departed ten, so I makes the
play I
"What are they saying now ?" says the
Proposition in Peaches.
Right there was where I fell in the
cellar.
"Bon gre de la tour be jee!" I says,
handing her the hottest accent that was
ever turned loose.
"Oh, John Henry!" says my lady


MUST GETAIIHAVE FOR TONIGHT.
friend. "Why, I didn't know you could
speak Freneh! How lovely! What
does it mea hEnglisht"
It was up to me to make good.
"It means," I says, "that Sara is
hand a eall-dowa to the old y that
looks lm i a ea s SadwihL i Mays
to io. 'Sn kel yW've aot oUther


bun on! How dare you trail into my
flat with your tide high enough to float
a battleship?'"
"That doesn't sound very ljetical,"
says the Extreme Limit.
"It isn't political," I says, "but it's
the goods, all right. 'Bon gre,' that's
French for a bun, and 'de la tour' means
the rest."
That was where I caught step with
my finish.
i had to translate everything that was
said on the stage, and I couldn't even
pronounce the name of the piece they
were playing.
All I could do was to remember some
of the swell language I had heard at
other lay points, and I rushed them at
my lady friend so fast that she hadn't
time to decide taat I ought to be on my
way to a foolish house.
When Bernhardt addressed a lot of
French supers 1 used up a bunch of
tickle.your-fancy language that May
Irwin hands to her rib-racked audiences,
and my lady friend stood for it.


When Coquelin pushed out his chest
and jawed every one in sight, I threw
my whole soul into the translation ana
handed my lady friend a line of talk
that I heard in a burlesque at "The New
York." Coquelin made an awful hit
with my lady friend. If I could have
remembered more of those good things
Coquelin would have been aces with her
ever after.
When Coquelin and Sara got into one
of those short-arm duets, I sprung some
ot Florodora on my lady friend. She
seemed to like it. Especially when I
handed her some of Edna Walnace Hop-
per's epigrams, with a short line of talk
from Tommy Ryley and a side-speech
here and there from Ed Rosenbaum. I
hated to do it, but I was in up to my
neck, and I couldn't holler for help. No
one in the audience would have re-
sponded. They were all too busy mak-
ing the same bluff that I was. Even the
ushers were trying to applaud with a
French accent.
I never lost ten plunks so hard in all
my life.
Before the first act was over I had
Sara talking about a sure cure for rheu-
matism that I read in an almanac, and
I had Coquelin reciting the "Charge of
the Light Brigade."
It was a hot evening-for met
Before the second act was half through
I went off my dip. I was nutty from
pit to dome. I had enough bum French
in my topknot to start one of tnose sit-
back-hold-tight table d'hote places, with
wine at 40 cents a grab.
It was fierce.
But it was all off when I put Sara into
Mother'Goose. That was the last camel.
My lady friend wouldn't stand for it


when I told her that Bernhardt was say-
ing "Old Mother llubbard, she went to
the cupboard." She thought I was
stringing her. I guess I was.
I told her that the French had gone
1o my head. Clara ,June said I looked
pale, and hadn't we better go home; slh
had enough, anyway I
I'll bet she had. I'll bet four dollars
my lady friend had the worst play, bar
none, that was ever adapted from the
French. That's what sihe had, and I
had such a headache!
After we paddled off home my lady
friend said she didn't exactly understand
the plot of the play, but she'd be glad if
[ got the book and read the rest of it to
her.
Me! -off to the woods Me l-to the
tall timber till site wakes up! No more
glad tidings trom the French for me.
My lady friend is the Whole Output, but
she'll have to get out of her trance and
take me without mayonnaise dressing.
I was a lobshter to sit in the game, but
t m not pate cde foie gras enough to stay
there after my feet get cold.
The next time I trot with my lady
friend to the theater it will be to "The
New York," where they talk plain
United States, and where you get two
cosy corners at 50 cents a throw!
hBelleve me I
Yours, on the griddle,



JOSEPH R. DUNN

West Building, Jacksonville, Fla.

Real Estate and

Investments......


RIVERSIDE
...AVENUE...
.... .LOT........


Fronting


one hun-


dred feet on the Ave-
nue; five hundred feet
to Concrete Bulkhevtd.
If sold in the next few
days will cut the price,
making it the cheap-
est Avenue lot in RIv-




NICE HOUSES .
FINE LOTS AT
ATTRACTIVE PRICES


Springfield Belt Line



The Brown Realty Co
hL 4
0 L 10 4 *AN


" IIOIV DARE Yoll?"


SUN











6 TaE


March 10, 1906


SHAKING


THE


OLD


PLUM


TREE


By Edward Fitjgerald


Hon. R. Hudson Burr, Railroad Commissioner,
believes in trying to hold on to a good thing, and
has declared his candidacy for re-election.
He will attempt to grind another grist in the
same old mill, but the water that turned the politi-
cal wheel has flowed out and the stream is dry.
When Burr was elected Railroad Commissioner
he was to be the nettle that would prick the rail-
ways so painfully that the public burden would be
lightened of excessive rates.
As the real thing in Commission reform, he was
to have the railroad cutting the buck in their
haste to adjust rates for the common people.
According to the program outlined in the slabs
of metal furnished the State press by the thoughtful
Guy Metcalfe, who labored so long and tirelessly to
make a smooth piece of political furniture out of
the raw material in the person of Burr, the people
were at last to have their innings and the rail-
roads would be compelled to snare their dividends
with the real earners.
This looked good to the dear people. At last
one of their very own was to take the corporations
by the throat and prevent the hola-up so long
alleged to be practiced. Like a hungry fish the
majority swallowed the bait without testing it, and
the "people's champion" was hurled into office with
the velocity of a rifle bullet.
That was the beginning, and since that time Mr.
Burr has played a light thinking part in perform-
ing his one-third of the duties of the Railroad Com-
mission. The eloquent tones of the leaden thought
waves that resounded throughout the land during
the campaign period have become stilled, while the
lips of Mr. Burr's goddess of reform have uttered
but one shriek of joy since she was placed on her
pedestal by the votes of the people. That was when
the Atlantic Coast Line and the Seaboard Air Line
were "ordered" to reduce passenger fare to three
cents a mile.
The Legislature could have done this without
cost to the people, but passing that truism, let Mr.
Burr hug to als bosom ne-third of the glory result-
ing from such heroic act."
It would be cruel, to say the least, to strip him
of his one garment of reform, short as it may be,
and compel him to exhibit his nude political figure
while performing campaign stunts in the effort to
secure re-election.
It is not likely, either, that the public will care
to listen to Burr's explanation of his failure to make
good his promises by reason of Jeff Browne's con-
servatism. The saying that any old excuse is better
than none will hardly berve in this case, and the
attempt to make votes at the expense of Mr. Borwne's
official conduct will be about as successful as pick-
ing a 100 to 1 shot at the Sheepshead Bay race
track.
Besides Browne will have sufficient of his own
shortcomings for which to answer, without playing
jinricksha man to Burr's political cart.
The race for Railroad Commissioners continues
rich in humor, and the*latest to contribute to the
political "House of Mirth"' is E. W. Irvine, whose
home is in Lake City, a fact of which he appears to
be ashamed, if hotel registers afford competent testi-
mony, his favorite designation of residence being
Petersburg, Va.
Mr. Irvine was his own discoverer. After careful
search of his personal makeup he found that he
was the real square timber needed in the manufac-
ture of a Railroad Commissioner.
Whether he will be able to convince the people
of this fitness will be another story, the present
point being how it happened.
Mr. Irvine is a drummer, and becoming vexed
with the negligence of railroads ia giving tired tray.v-
elers knowledge of belated trains, found a eas where
the law was violated and insisted that the railway
company 'yield up its pound of flesh. The Ralilroad
Commission, he declares, tried to throw him on a
siding, but he managed to roll along the main track,
with .the result that no alternative presented itself
to the Commission but to fine the offending road.
Whether the fine has been paid the public has not
It was than that Mr. Irvine took stook of him-
self and decided that he was called to serve the
Mpeoo la the oece of Railroad Commissioner.
D[own in Dade County the tide of political life
iso a to flow, and though the situation at
ptf-t esoatai naught but local featureset the
beu w bllsdbe exert it effect s on a poll.
tia.


OPH11lQOFlGO CHE5ThUT BURR-
AMID TYIfLCQ ORMY% FRUIT.
Th~, UAZ 1. -


p


One circumstance that puts energy Into the politi-
cal life of that county is the resurrection of the
Metcalfe faction, which rejuvenated, is skipping
along like a colt, annoying its opponents by its joy-
ous spirits and its renewed ability for creating tur-
moil.
To Joel Dean, former owner of the News of West
Palm Beach, must be given the great sham of credit
for his part in supplying tie oxygen that revived
this near political corpse of the north end of the
county. By his aid the elder Metcalfe was elected
Mayor of West Palm Beach, and the heavy vote
given him showed that henceforth his faction was a
power to be considered.
Mr. Dean has just sold his paper, and while not
wishing to give up the newspaper business, yet the
price offered was so tempting that he was unable to
resist. Rumor, however, associates his name with the
establishment of another newspaper, and if such
report is correct he will doubtless receive much
encouragement from those who support his political
views.
The inhabitants of Polk County will likely be
confronted with the question of splitting the county,
forming a new division with Takeland as the county
wet.
The rapid growth of Lakeland has carried in its
wake the desire for location f the eoartheue at
that place, but Bartow, %M county eaptal. Is stroan.


ly intrenched and the attempt to take the courthouse
from her would result in a bitter and costly fight.
In order to avoid such struggle it Is quite possible
that the Lakeland contingent will advocate creation
of a new county and will prepare for legislative
action to that end.
In the Eighth Judicial Circuit, composed of the
counties of Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Levy and Put-
nam, a warm race will occur for the office of State
Attorney.
Hon. Benj. P. Calhoun, the present incumbent,
and Thomas W. Fielding of Starke are candidates
and both are preparing for an active fight. It was
rumored that Hon. Syd Carter of Gainesville had
his eye on this plum, but he has not so announced.
If he did enter the three-cornered contest would
make one of the livliest fights ever conducted in
that circuit.
Among former Senators who have announced
for re-election are Frank Sams of Volusia and H.
II. McCreary of Alachua. Mr. Sams, who has served
a number of years in the upper House, enjoys much
and well-deserved popularity in his district. He is a
strong candidate, and as good Senatorial timber
would be difficult to find in his district, no opposi-
tion has appeared above the surface yet, and it is
likely that Mr. Sams will secure election without
.opposition.
In Alachua County McCreary has been success-
ful for two terms, and became a sort of county boss,
but his attempt to hold the reins of power has
displeased some and disgusted others, so that his
control of affairs seems to have become weak-
kneed and generally out-of-joint. Whether such con-
dition will result in bringing out a candidate who
can defeat him for the Senate is a secret of the future
that only the count of the primary can tell, but it
is almost a certainty that he will encounter decided
opposition.
Hon. John Beard of Pensacola is conducting an
active campaign for the Senate from Escambia
County. Mr. Beard is an entertaining speaker,
bright and forcible, and if he does not win it will
not be from lack of energy in placing his candidacy
before the people.
Four years ago Mr. Beard was a candidate for
Congress in the eventful race which resulted in the
election of Wm. B. Lamar and the political death
of Fred Myers of Tallahassee. Since then Mr. Beard
has not been active in State politics, but during
the Presidential campaign of 1904 he was one of the
orators under direction of the National Democratic
Committee and made many speeches in other States.
Speaking of Mr. Beard recalls the Wailes claim
against the State, in which Beard has an interest,
and the fact that this matter has never been settled
to the satisfaction of the claimants. The $25,000 ap-
propriated by the Legislature of 1903 yet remains
in the State 'treasury, Mr. Wailes declining to accept
that amount.
It is quite probable that this matter has not been
ended by the action of the Legislature making that
appropriation, and that the affair will again be
brought up for a more equitable adjustment at the
next session.
There are many persons who teel that Mr. Wailes
and the other claimants were unjustly treated by the
offer of such small recompense for the work con-
nected with the collection of the Indian War claim
against the Government, and that the full 15 per
cent of the amount should have been paid them.
That their demand was either justifiable or else the
entire claim should have been repudiated on the
ground of no service to the State.
Indeed, it was shown that $25,00 would not reim-
burse Mr. Wailes for the expense to which he was
put in presenting the claim to the Government.
Some time since a political club was organized in
Jacksonville, the essential qualification to member-
snip being that of unionism, every member belong.
ing to a union labor organization. The purpose of
the club is no, to push the political fortunes of any
person only to the extent here such action may be
beneficial to union labor. It stands ready however,
to oppose candidates and schemes considered preju-
dieial to the cause of unionism.
An officer of this club has stated that an appeal
will be made to working men throughout the Sta
to favor the Everglade improvement plan of Gov-
ernor Broward and to vote for the constitutional
amendment connected therewith.
The zeal with which the Times-Union, a non-
union paper, is attacking Governor Browar and the
Everglade project, furnishes tne incentive for pros-
pect of sue action. Indeed, this oMfer asserted tpoat
anything denounced by the Times-Union was a
worthy object of investigation by the workiuwman,
and he believed that in this ease the motives which
prompted the condemnation of Broward that pareh
wr aspired by certain iterests prej to
weltfr of the common people.











March 10, 1906


THE SUN


JOtHN!


HENR Y


AT


THE


THEATER


vy George V. Hobart


FOR ME.


I was down on the card to lead a
lady friend of mine to a New York
theater where you can roll around in an
orchestra chair at fifty cents a throw.
When a guy can buy a couple of cosy.
corners in a dead swell theater for fifty
cents per coze, he's a mark to blow four
plunks to squeeze into one of those joints
where they feed you on problem plays
and fricassed pasts.
I figured it out that way, and stood
pat.
That evening finds me in the parlor
as dsual. You know the parlor I mean.
When a guy reaches that condition
were he gives himself the careful glance
and says, "Gee! I got to get shaved this
evening!" you can bet there's only one
parlor in the world for him.
I'm sitting on the sofa with one mitt
lying carelessly on the family album
and the other bunched around a 51.70
cane, when my lady friend floats into
the arena.
There's a short-arm clinch, a break-
away, and we're back in our corners.
"Oh, John Henryl" says my lady
friend, giving her real hair a couple of
taps and glancing out in the dining-
room to see if mother was rubbering.
I tell you, boys, it's aces when your
lady friend does that after a, sh6rt clinch.
There's nothing to it.
When a girl stamps her foot and talks
with a tobasco lisp and says, "How dare
you kiss me, sir? You are impertinent,
sir!" it's a 30 to 1 shot that Gussie
Gladtop, the ribbon clerk, who calls
every Duesday evening, first gave her an
excuse for writing that libretto.
She's just dying to have you bite her
again, but she handles her language
wrong, and the four-flush call-down
makes you back-pedal so hard that you
grab your hat, and you find yourself
saying day-day long before papa drops
in with his usual bundle of benzine and
an A-flat hiccough on the side.
For me the glorious creature who
simply says, "Oh, John Henry l" and
pats her temples to see if her Seven
Sutherland Sisters happens to be
mussed.
Anyway, after the bell rings I says to
my lady friend, "If you'll tease a trolley
with me, we'll be on our way to-morrow
night to the theater l"
"Oh, how lovely says my lady friend.
"I do so love to go to the theater. Where
shall we got Oh, I know! Let's go
and see Sara Bernhardt! I'm just dying
to see. her!"
Up and away to the mines Sarah
Bernhardt at five plunks a chair and me
scratching gravel to get my laundry
back from foreign lands of a Saturday
night!
"I'm just dying to see Sara!" says
the Sweetest Thing Ever, and I'd be a
small bunch of parsnips if I hadn't
volunteered in the life-saving service
then and there.
"Yes," I says to my lady .friend, "I
thought you'd like to see Bernhardt!"
and all the time I'm giving this glad
speech I'm going down the- line men-
tally to see who will give me quick ac-
tion on a steam-heated touch.
"I think it is awfully nice of you to
ask me to see Bernhardt," says The Real
Thing, throwing a oo-goo at me that
settle everything. After a joyous
gl am Il that I'mpa to m lwto


the box office and wrestle the keeper for
the gate money.
Anyway, after a Labored Conversation
with a friend, I'm helped to the price
next day, and I patter away for the
pasteboards. My lady friend togs out
in her revelry rags, and I'm somewhat
of a Big Event myself when we slide
into the Gold-Bond building and reach
out for Ten-Dollars' worth of amuse-
ment, hot off the griddle.
"Mercy me !' says my lady friend,
after the curtain has been up awhile,
"what are they talking about? I can t
understand a word!"
I'm sitting there holding the funeral
services over my ten plunks, so I'm not
wise to what's doing on the stage.
"What's the matter?" I says.
"Listenl" says Clara Jane.
I listened. In a minute I was next.
The trackwalkers on the stage were talk-
ing Dago! Dago, mind you! and me
just after putting on mourning for my
ten plunks!
"Oh!" they're doing the trick in
French," I says, offhand, just as though
I paid my car care in French every
morning.
Say! I don't know enough about
French to find Paris on the map-honest,
that's straight! But I'm thinking of
my dear departed ten, so I makes the
play I
"What are they saying now T" says the
Proposition in Peaches.
Right there was where I fell in the
cellar.
"Bon gre de la tour be jeel" I says,
handing her the hottest accent that was
ever turned loose.
"Oh, John Henry!" says my lady


MUST GET BIIAVE FOR TONIGHT.
friend. "Why, I didn't know you could
speak French! How lovely! What
does it mean ia English?"
It was up to me to make good.
"It mesas" I says, "that Sara is
handing a call-dow to the old guy that
looks l a a ses s M dwil. s says
to Mi, 'S IMele you've got saother


bun on! How dare you trail into my
flat with your tide high enough to float
a battleship?'"
"That doesn't sound very lpetical,"
says the Extreme Limit.
"It isn't political," I says, "but it's
the goods, all right. 'Bon gre,' that's
French for a bun, and 'do la tour' means
the rest."
That was where I caught step with
my finish.
i had to translate everything that was
said on the stage, and I couldn't even
pronounce the name of the piece they
were playing.
All I could do was to remember some
of the swell language I had heard at
other play joints, and I rushed them at
my lady friend so fast that she hadn't
time to decide tiat I ought to be on my
way to a foolish house.
When Bernhardt addressed a lot of
French supers I used up a bunch of
tickle-your-fancy language that May
Irwin hands to her rib-racked audiences,
and my lady friend stood for it.


"IHOW IDARE YOUI?"


When Coquelin pushed out his chest
and jawed every one in sight, I threw
my whole soul into the translation ana
handed my lady friend a line of talk
that I heard in a burlesque at "The New
York." Coquelin made an awful hit
with my lady friend. If I could have
remembered more of those good things
Coquelin would have been aces with her
ever after.
When Coquelin and Sara got into one
of those short-arm duets, I sprung some
of Florodora on my lady friend. She
seemed to like it. Especially when I
handed her some of Edna Walnace Hop-
per's epigrams, with a short line of talk
from Tommy Ryley and a side-speech
here and there from Ed Rosenbaum. I
hated to do it, but I was in up to my
neck, and I couldn't holler for help. No
one in the audience would have re-
sponded. They were all too busy mak-
ing the same bluff that I was. Even the
ushers were trying to applaud with a
French accent.
I never lost ten plunks so hard in all
my life.
Before the first act was over I had
Sara talking about a sure cure for rheu-
matism that I read in an almanac, and
I had Coquelin reciting the "Charge of
the Light Brigade."
It was a hot evening-for me!
Before the second act was half through
I went off my dip. I was nutty from
pit to dome. I had enough bum French
n my topknot to start one of tnoem sit-
back-hold-tight table d'hote places, with
wine at 40 cents a grab.
It was fierce.
But it was all off when I put Sara into
Mother Goose. That was the last camel.
My Ia4 friend wouldn't stand for it


when I told her that Bernhardt was say-
ing "Old Mother Ilubbard, she went to
the cupboard." She thought I was
stringing her. I guess I was.
I told her that the French had gone
Lo my head. Clara Jane said I looked
pale, and hadn't we better go home; she
had enough. anyway I
I'll bet she had. I'll bet four dollars
my lady friend had the worst play, bar
none, that was ever adapted from the
French. That's what she had, and I
had sluch a headache!
After we paddled off home my lady
friend said she didn't exactly understand
the plot of the play, but she'd be glad if
I got the book and read the rest of it to
her.
Met-off to the woods Me l-to the
tall timber till she wakes up! No more
glad tidings trom the French for me.
My lady friend is the Whole Output, but
she'll have to get out of her trance and
take me without mayonnaise dressing.
I was a lobster to sit in the game, but
t in not pate de foie gras enough to stay
there after my feet get cold.
The next time I trot with my lady
friend to the theater it will be to "The
New York," where they talk plain
United States, and where you get two
mcoy corners at 50 cents a throw!
believe me!
Yours, on the griddle,





JOSEPH R. DBuilding, Jackso NN
West Building, Jacksonville, Fa.


Real Estate and
Investments......


RI VIStWIDE

essA~b6e6e


Fronting


one hun-


dred feet on the Ave-
nue; five hundred feet
to Concrete BuilkIead.
If sold in the next few
days will cut the price,
making it the cheap-
est Avenue lot in Riv-
erside.



NICE HOUSES -
FINE LOTS AT
ATTRACTIVE PRICES


Springfield. Belt Line



The BrownRealtyCo

r MN 43aa


SAGRIFIGE











I GHHI I906
Salumwg, March 10, 1906


THE SUN


sr


ED


IT


i George and Little Me Too
We think it was an undignified thing that Governor Broward did last Satur-
day night when he discussed is Everglade Reclamation proposition from a street
stand.
It was all right and proper for N. B. Broward, CANDIDATE FOR OFFICE,
to speak to whomsoever would consent to hear him from any available rostrum,
at al times and places. As a candidate his acts were his own and the policies
he advocated were but HIS OPINIONS unindorsed by the official voice of the
people.
When the people of this State elected him to the highest office within their
gift, thereby indorsing him and his policies, he became the representative of
the sovereignty of the people, and his policies were raised to the dignity of
State polioe.
As Governor of Florida he did violence to the dignity of his high office
when he discussed a State polly in the street. The proper place to discuss a
matter of State is in the Cabinet or b a message to the Legislature.
But however much we may be displeased with the Governor's offense against
the proprieties, we are compelled to admire his readiness $o give an account of
his stewardship, whenever he is called on, and his willingness to face in person
those who oritioise his eots.
Broward was on the spot where the talking was to be done, but neither the
large nor the small editor whose newspapers have printed columns of stuff
against the proposed plan came up to the scratch when time was called. Both
the man of the large waistband, and the man of the small hatband, sent letters
of regret, and a person reading these letters of regret was duly impressed with
the fact that BIG G 1QJGU made a call on little Wv ile, read him his letter and
little Willie smised his mighty pen and said "me too."
The similarity of these letters from the editors of the two Jacksonville
dailies was not the most remarkable thing about them. Both of these gentle-
men said that they had discussed the drainage propoton in the columns of
their respective papers and had expressed their opinions on it.
We an not blessed with that power of vision that enables us to read between
the lines of such fine writers as these, and cannot, therefore find out the things
that are not contained in the text, but the most careful reading of the text of
the many columns of matter that have been printed in the two papers has failed
to bring to light a real expression of opinion on the points at issue, nor has it
shown to u1 a discusson of the proposition except from the side of the oppo-
sition.
We cannot speak for others, but OUR READING of the alleged discussions
and the alleged opinions of the drainage proposition thus far contained in the
columns of the two Jacksonville dailies conveys the impression on us that the
two editors did what the Bourbon Kings of France used to do-firt make up
their minds, and that any proposal TO DO A NEW THING WAS WRONG, and
then hunt up reasons against it, CAREFULLY OVERLOOKING EVERYTHING
in its favor.
We do not wonder that Governor Broward expressed himself as illustrated
by Mr. Taylor in the cartoon on this page.

Voice From the "Glades"
We print below an editorial on the Everglade drainage plan written by
a citizen of Fort Lauderdale, In order to present to the people an opinion from
the territory to be affected.
This writer, whose statements bear the impress of knowledge of the sub-
Ject gained from personal inspection of the ground, and practical experience
of the conditions, takes up several editorial paragraphs appearing in a recent
editorial on the question and discusses them from the standpoint of a citizen
of Florida who lives in the drainage district.

THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES.
[By S. T. Ranahan, of Fort Lauderdale. ]
"The proposition to drain the Everglades is one that presents many phases to
the candid inquirer."
This statement is correct, and we congratulate the editorial writer for the
remarkable truthfulness that is expressed in the first sentence of the editorial.
"There is too much in question for its discussion editorially except one
feature at a time."
This is an honest confession often made by editorial writers when discussing
publlb questions, but in most confessions of this kind the readers who read
between the lines are forced to form an opinion that the editors who begin to
confess are either too shallow and weak to deal fairly with economic questions
or they draw their salaries and ideas from the same source.
"Putting aside all other features, we ask, is there any need of draining the
Everglades at present T"
Governor Broward answers-"yes "
The intelligent and thinking voters of Florida nominated and elected Gov-
ernor Broward on a platform that demanded that the State of Florida keep pos-
ession of the Everglades, reclaim them by drainage and apply the proceeds from
the sales of land to the expenses of the Internal Improvement Fund of Florida.
The memory of some editorial writers is like that of a hound dog, that after
a hard chase after game which was not caught, lies down near the fire and dreams
that the chase is still on and barks occasionally to the great amusement or disgust
of the rest of the pack that followed in the chase.
Why has the national Goxernment spent millions of dollars reclaiming the
arid lands of the West ? Just because the voters of those States elected representa-
tives who were intelligent thinkers and not warts on the body of corporation
polities that are neither useful nor ornamental except to those Rip Van Winkle
politicians who want to wake up in twenty years and do something.
"Is there any need to drain the Everglades at present ?"
Just come down and see for yourself and you may be able to form an intelli-
gent opinion. Try to buy a few acres of land near the Everglades that can be
drained and used for raising fruits and vegetables. Go back from the railroad a
few miles in the Everglade section and find a suitable location, and then you
will find that there is no use of having a twenty-year dream about an immediate
"'hat do WB need in Florida, land or people T"
Who are WEB and what are WE doing with the millions of acres that have
been granted by the State of Floridat and which WE are holding at prices that
give evidence that WE think them valuable.
It seems strange that some people never wake from their dreams until they


are called upon to contribute their share of expenses to public beneats.
The State of Florida needs more people, and the best way to encourage
people to settle in Florida is to levy a tax on land values in proportion to the
besmts rncadved and then use what is necessary to make land habitable by drain-
a ge a aSdM pubt opinion sooetlly In 194W. ad the primaries


ING VOTERS of the tte of Florida left the WE opinion foundry of the WE
WM class with a lot of blowhole opinions on hand that were so light that they
would float across the Everglades on a soap-bubble.
As before stated, WE are respectfully invited to come to the Everglade
section and investigate from a PRACTICAL STANDPOINT and throw away
th theories and ideas of people who have explored the Everglades from steam-
boats on Lake Okeechobee or Kissimmee river; apd then with a map and railroad
gnide-book write about the possibilities and probabilities of the greatest unsur-
vieed and but partially explored section of land in the United States.
Come down and see the Everglade section at New river, where the dredges
are being built. Go up the river and see the greatest vegetable farms in South
Florida, then go out to the Everglades a short distance and see the future para-
dise which will make homes for thousands of people when the drainage canal
reolaims the overflowed land. Space will not permit the wr iterto Ie tail
all that could be said about drainage and the land that has been reclaimed n
thl section alone, but the work done at the head of both forks of New river by
the Florida East Coast Railroad Land Department SHOWS MOST. CONCLU-
SIVELY what drainage will do for overflowed lands.
The welfare of one should be the concern of all, and this should apply to
sections of country as well as to people. Let public questions be disonsed fairly
and the people who think intelligently will dictate the policy to be followed by
our public officials.


'V ~


. l '4 l '


'1-v


Judicial Arrogance
The Tampa Herald criticized Judge Gordon of the Criminal Court of that
city for his laxity and leniency in imposing sentence on gamblers and violators
of the liquor law. The expression of opinion cost the editor $100.
He was dragged into court and without trial was punished for darli to
publicly call attention to the alleged delinquencies of the august Judge, wo
sense of dignity had been offended.
Where does such a creature of the public will, placed on the bench by the
vote of the people and answerable to them for his acts, derive such arrogant
authority that he can punish those who call attention to his dereliction of duty?
Evidently a reform is needed in this respect.
Elevation to a Judgeship does not carry immunity from public criticism any
more than in the ease of any other servant of the people, and if a Judge faniels
that he is injured by the expression of a newspaper he should be compelled to
invoke the same libel law that is open to the private citizen who desires eati.
faction, but to permit a Judge to call a newspaper man into court and ae him
comtitute a form of tyranmy injurlous to the well-benlag of a free Govera t.


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THE SUN


NINTH 'PAGE


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Saturday, March 10, 1906


Pardoniig Board Condemnation Hysteria
For the benefit of those who are loud in their condemnation of the Pardon.
ing Board of this State we reproduce part of a Jlong Pardoning Board condemn-
ing editorial in last week's issue of the Puhta Gorda Herald, edited by A. P.
Jordan.
"The Herald does not share the evil suspicions that are expressed. It believe"
that the Governor and the other four members of the Pardoning Board are hon-
orable, upright men, who are earnestly striving to act conscientiously, although
some Lake City people charge them with being robbers. But the Herald does
believe that these State officials have again been deceived, a weakness to which
all men are liable; and it does know that their action in this Cooper case has
pleased the lawless element and in this respect has proved and will continue to
prove an encouragement to crime.
"Of course it was not so intended; but it would have been better to hang an
innocent man, pronounced guilty on their oaths by twelve of his peers, than to
have thus endangered the live of many other innocent men by practically saying
to those contemplating murder that they have very little risk to run."
"BI'lJK TO HANG AN INNOCENT MANI"
What a monstrous proposition to put before the people.
Hang an innocent manl


TH/IT 15 1O

PRT Of THE

TREE IT f P
7rufl6T5 P


HINKr THE'
ERfrL DF (
NRMr PROPO-
ONM' BU
- '


~.-


This statement shows to what length the indulgence of unthinking criticism
will lead a Christian gentleman.
Better by far that EVERY CRIMINAL SHOULD ESCAPE punishment than
one Innocent man should be hung.
We have said that the parole system is the best way to deal with criminals.
The Florida Pardoning Board now uses this system EXCLUSIVELY; every par-
don granted is conditioned on good behavior.
We present the following statement from the chairman of the Illinois Board
of Pardons to show how well the parole system has worked in that State:
"Springfield, Ill., Feb. 8.-To the Editor: The parole law became effective
July 1, 1895. From that date until October 1, 1904, 2,744 prisoners were paroled
from the Joliet penitentiary. Of this number 344 were returned for violation of
their parole. One hundred and sixty-eight of the 344 were returned for committing
crime while on parole; the remaining 176 were returned for minor violations
of their parole agreement.
"During the year from July, 1894, to July 1, 1895, the last year the deficit
sentence law was in forest, tin daily ounat in prism averaged 1,77. During that


year there were released from the penitentiary, by virtue of their sentences
h expired, 679 prisoners.
"The last official report made under the law to the Governor covers the two
years ending October 1, 1904. During those two years the average number of
prisoners was 1,330. The average number paroled for the two years was 337
each year. With only 347 less prisoners, the number paroled each year was less
than one-half the number released by virtue of the expiration of their sentence
the last year the definite sentence law was in force.
AVERAGE TERMS SERVED.
"The prisoners who were released for the year from July 1, 1804, to July 1,
1895, served on an average of one year, seven months and eleven days. The pris-
oners who were paroled for the two fiscal years ending October 1, 1804, served
on an average two years, five months and five days inside the prison walls, and
one year on parole, during which latter period they could be returned to the
prison without the expense of a trial if they violated their parole agreement,
because while on parole the law says they shall be 'considered as remaining under
conviction for the crime of which they were convicted and sentenced.'
"The last year the definite sentence law was in force-that is, from July 1,
1894, to July 1, 1805-there were received at the Joliet penitentiary prisoners
who had served prior terms in that institution as follows: One hundred and
thirteen second term, 30 third term, 13 fourth term, 5 fifth term, 2 sixth term.
During the year 1905 there were received prisoners who had served prior term.
in Joliet as follows: Forty-one second term, 14 third term, 3 fourth term, 2
fifth term.
During the year 1905 there were received at the prison 470 prisoners. There
were released on parole 387. Of this last number two have been returned under
iadietment for crime committed while on parole and sixteen for minor violations
of their parole agreement.
SERVING MAXIMUM TERMS.
"During the year 1905 there were received at the prison 470 prisoners. There
were sentenced for the maximum term provided by law for their crimes. There
are now in prison 128 prisoners serving their maximum term-the same having
been fixed by the Board of Pardons. These cases are, in most instances, men
who belong to the habitual criminal class, some of them having served a number
of prior terms, but never for longer than two years.
"Under the definite sentence law, as the records at Joliet will show, many
habitual criminals-men who had served a number of terms and were classed
among the most dangerous-received sentences of only one or two years. It is
this class of men who are now compelled to serve the maximum sentence provided
by law for their crimes.
"Parties who are complaining of the manner in which the parole law is
being enforced will do well to send to Joliet and receive a copy of the last report
of thepenitentiary commissioners and study it carefully. They will learn that
as a reformatory measure, and as a law to sufficiently punish those whose desire
is to continually prey upon society, it is being most faithfully administered.
"ANDREW RUSSELL, Chairman of the Board of Pardons."

The Drummers 4Ire Entitled to the Best
A proper and just demand has been made on the Georgia Legislature by the
commercial travelers of that State.
A simple request that hotelkeepers be required to observe cleanliness; that
clean, dry sheets be put on the beds for each new occupant.
Little enough for a traveler to ask-that his bed be provided with fresh
sheets, and that he not be compelled to sleep on the linen used by another
person.
In the introduction of this bill it was explained that many hotels were
negligent in this respect. That many landlords held to the theory that once a week
was often enough to change the sheets, no matter how many persons may have
occupied the bed during the time, and that in the interest of health a law was
necessary.
The bill should become a law, and not only in Georgia, but other States
where such uncleanly conditions prevail.
Of all persons traveling through the land the drummer has the BEST
RIGHT to demand good accommodations and cleanliness, and his efforts to secure
good service will prove of benefit to all.
A hotel is the home of the drummer for a greater portion of his time, and
his requests are not unreasonable.
The guild of commercial travelers makes many a hotel profitable to its
owner, and many would be compelled to close the door if it were not for the
patronage of the drummer.
Bid him Godspeed in the crusade for clean sheets.
It is not a subject for ridicule, but a matter of concern to all travelers who
will profit by the drummer's campaign for cleanliness.
With the wretched accommodations given the traveling men in many places
is it a matter of wonder that they should strive for improvement?
The country owes much to the drummer. lie is a fountain of optimism and
an electric battery of working force, both for his house and the territory through
which he travels.
He sees the best side of everything and does not fail to express his views
relative to the best methods of industrial development.
He adds much to the patronage of hotels, railways, livery stables, and is
an active upbuilder in many ways of his territory.
In Florida the path blazed by the drummer has been followed by many other
footsteps that have tended to advance the progress of the State. The great whole-
sale houses of Jacksonville owe their prosperity to the drummer, who tirelessly
and with many hardships, has made them known, in the most remote portions of
the State.
The interests of many a locality has been advanced by the drummer, who
with keen insight has heralded broadcast its advantages. The favorable expres-
sion of the drummer travels far, and unfortunate indeed, would be a condition
that would remove the commercial travel from our industrial life.
As the noted Simeon Ford says of the drummers: "They are the ambassa-
dors of information and the disseminators of intelligence."
John Rockefeller has offered Russia $200,000,000 in exchange for valuable
railroad concessions, and if the trade is made, the Russians will awaken some
morning to learn features of Czarism that are typical of the real thing in
that line.


The golden fleece of Mr. F. Augustus Heinze is now reported as having been
added to "System's" collection, through the skill of that clever hunter, so pic-
turesquely described by Lawson-H. II. Rogers.
Senator Tillman finds that the railway rate bill has become a many.limbed
tif ee ding mueb pruning to insure its life; the grafting will be done if it ives.


I


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March 10, 1906


THE SUN


___________________________ U ml


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Dy Chevalier William Le Queux


bThe te lo we ly t Iuin te Sgl,
wabs you he a
"lOtmi U yes Bwh, I wil tahe you to
ton Sec I- drive you ad your A
"CtW Iy. Let W go, he edalsed,
AM ~a A -I M g bell.
r adt -ee P"od sS hi ad eML
stso so ld P them INh this nte
WIa's t utes"he eald to the so-
ot"e who ewered hs -su s."And
teD Glbert mpbleld that I want him
to wsth m ap to Ranoe Wood."
"Y, eir," sawed the man; and
the door elee4L
"Its a ity- tomad pities, Mr.
O seg, tt did t stop those two
use who brd the body."
-y won already across the atmam,
sMd d pp ta eIto the thicket be-
fon I moBteddt roeek," I explaied
"Belde, at the moment I had nos us'
plef of what they'd besa doel. I bo-
lievd tbem to be stragglers from a
hbor shooting party who had lost
"A Fmoet unfortunate!" he said. "I
hope they don't ampe us. If they're
foreigners, they are not likely to get
away. But if they're English or Scota,
the I fear thr's but little chance of
us coming up with them. Yesterday at
the inquest the identity of the murdered
man was strictly pre-served, and the In-
qulry was adjourned for a fortnigt."
"Of course my name was not men-
tionedt" I said.
"Of moum not," was the detective's
reply. Then he asked "When do you
expect to get a telegram from your
friend, the Consul at Legborn I am
anxious for that, in order that we may
commence inquiries lI London."
"The day after tomorrow, I hope. Ale
will certainly reply at once, providing
the dead man's father can still be found."
And at that moment a tall, thin man,
who proved to be Detective Campbell,
entered, and ive minutes later we were
all three driving over the uneven cob-
bles of Dumfries and out in the dark-
nass towards Rannoch.
It was cloudy and tarless, with a
bill mist hantin over the valley; but
my unle's cob wM a swift one, and
we soon began to ascend the hill up past
th castle, and then, turning to the left,
drove along a steep, rough by-road which
led to the south of the wood and out
soroes the moor. When we reached the
latter we all descended, and I led the
horse, for owing to the many treach-
erous bogs it was unsafe to drive fur-
ther. 8o, with Mackenzie and Campbell
carrying lanterns, we walked on care-
fully, skirting the wood for nearly a
mile until we came to the rough wall
over which I had clambered with Mu.
riel.
I recognised the spot, and having tied
up the cob we all three plunged into the
pitob-darkness of the wood, keeping
straight on in the direction of the glen,
and halting every now and then to listen
for the rippling of the stream.
At last, after some difficulty, we dis-
covered it, and searching along the bank
with our three powerful lights, I pro-
ently detected the huge mos-grown
boulder whereon I had stood when the
pair of fugitives had disappeared.
"Lookl" I cried. "There the spotty"
And quickly we clambered down the
steep bank, lowering ourselves by the
branches of the trees until we came
to the water into which I waded, being
followed oloeely by my two companonas.
On gaining the opposite, side I clam-
bered up to the base of the tIulder and
lowered my lantern to reveal to them
the gruesome evidence of the second
crime, but the next Instant I cried-
"Whyl It's gone!"
"Gone!" gasped the two men.
"Yes. It was here. Look l this is the
hole when they buried it! But they
evidently returned, and finding it ex.
humed, they've retaken possession of it
and carried It away"
The two detectives gased down to
when I indlated ad then looked at
mo other r wlct eMz aglng a word.


As we d eed A, Mw e at
the dapMpem* of th d, t theIDh*
lders a ga *olmi
NAdderft nghu pde It -up d -e
d the little bthy the of his
ladters.
WithM his pals I saw lying a tiny
litt ld ermn shebot M leek h ag,
n e istere d, whi in the ster was
a siredlar. mitreM of a keli saint,
eeat sad basutifully lit.
tie tr te whik aight hav adorned a
IUdy's brae-et t
Trhie is a pl t y little thegl" ore-
marked the "It ma s y pofeoull
lead us to something. But, r. ,N
he added, t in to me, "anre y qte
certain you left the body hore
"Certainl I echoed. "Why, look at
the hole I asd. You doat think I have
any Interest in leading you hore e a
fool's erraOd, do youf
"Not at all," e aid apoloetially.
"Only the whole affair seems o very
lteomeeivable-I mean that the men, hav.
tlg onee got rid of the ewideee of their
crime, would hardly return to the spot
and reobtain proAeselo of It"
"Unless they watched m exaume It,
and feared the eosequences If it fell
into yer hands," I
"Of ee, they might have watched
you from behind the trese, and when
you had gone they ame and carried it
away somewhere else," he remarked du-
biously; "but even if they did, it must
be In this wood. They would never risk
carrin a body very far, and here is
urely the belt plae of oeeaneament in
the whole country."
"The only thing remaining is to search
the wood at daylight," I suggested "If
the two men oame back here during my
absence they may still be on the watch
in the vicinity."
"Meot probably they ane. We must
take eve precautio," aid decis-
ively. And then, with our laterns low.
ered, we made an examination of the
vicinity, without, however, discovering
anything else to furnish us with a dlew.
While I had been absent the body of
the unfortunate Armida had disa pared
-a fact whieh, knowing al thi I did,
was doubly mysterious.
The pair had, without doubt, watched
Muriel and myself, and as son as we
had gone they had returned and carried
off the ghastly remains of the poor
woman who had been so foully do to
death.
But who wonre the men-tht fellow
with the broad shoulder whom Muriel
oreognsed, and the slim seafarer In his
p=locoat and peaked esap? The enigma
each hour became more and more in-
serutable.
At dawn Mackenzie, with four men,
wood, but although they continued until
dusk they discovered nothing, neither
was sanything heard of the mysterious
seafarer and his companion In brown
tweeds.
I called on Muriel as arranged, and
explained how the body had so sud-
denly disappeared, whereupon she stored
at me pale-faced, esaying-
"The assassins must have watched us!
They aren aware, then, that we have
knowledge of their crime f
"Of course," I sId*
"AhI "she orle4 hoarsely. "Then we
ar both in deadly peril-peril of our
own lives! These people will hesitate
at nothing. Both you and I an marked
down by them, without a doubt. We must
both he wary not to fall into any trap
they may lay for us."
Her very words seemed an admission
that she was aware of the identity of
the conspirators, and yet she would give
me no clue to them.
We went out and up the drive togeth-
er to the kennels, where her father, a
tall, imposing fgure in his shooting-kit,
was giving orders to the kepers.
"Hullca, O u" riled merrily, ex-
tending hie hand. "You'll make one of
a party to OeI-sa tomeerow, west you?
Paton sad Phillips an 0oml-. Ten


hap here, sad the ladies are coming
;outl6mb with us."
"Thanks," I aid, accepting with pleas-
ure, for by so doing I saw that I might
be afforded an opportunity of being near
Muriel. The fact hat the assassins were
sware of our knowledge seemed to have
caused her the greatest apprehension
lest evil should befall us. Then, as we
taaned away to go back to the house,
Ldtheourt said to me-
"You know all about the discovery up
at the wood the other day I Horrible af
fair-- young foreigner found mur-
dered."
"Yes, I have heard about it," I re-
e a"
"And the police are worse than use-
less," he declared with disgust. "They
haven't discovered who the fellow is yet.
Why, if it had happened anywhere else
but in Seotland, they'd have arrested
the assasin before this."
"He's an entire stranger," I hear," I
remarked. And then added: "You often
.p p to the wood of an evening after
pigeons. I't fortunate you were not
there that evening, eh "
*lIe glanced at me quickly with his
brows slightly contracted, as thouFgh be
did not exactly eomprehnnd me. Jn an
instant I saw that my remark had
emuded him quick apprehension.
"~Yes," he answered with .% eickly
smile which he intended should convey
to me utter unconcern. "They might have
suspected me."
"It certainly is a disagreeable affair
to happen on one's property," I Paid,
still watching him narrowly. And then
Muriel at his side managed with her
feminine ingenuity to divert the conver-
sation into a different channel.
Next day I accompanied the party
over to Glenlea, about live miles dis-
tant, and at noon at a spot previously
arranged, we found the ladies awaiting
us with luncheon spread under the trees.
As soon as we approached Muriel came
forPard quickly, handing me a telegram,
saying that it had been sent over by
one of my uncle's grooms at the moment
they were leaving the castle.
I tore it open eagerly, and read its
contents. Then, turning to my compan-
ions, said in as quiet a voice as I could
comnmand-
"I must go up to London tonight,"
whereat the men, one and -ill, expressed
hope that I should soon return. Leith-
oourt's party were a friendly set, and
at heart I was sorry to leave Scotland.
Yet the telegram made it imperative,
for it was from Frank Hutdibe.n in
Leghorn, and read-
WMade inquiries. Olinto Sautini sear-
ied your servant Armida at ftali/:s Con-
sulate-General in London about a ,car
ago. They give 64B, Albany Road, Clam-
M0 el; he is employed waiter F'errari',
Restaurant, Westbourne Grove.-Briti.h
Comonlate, Leghorn."
The lunch was a merry one, as shoot-
ing luncheons usually are, and while
we ate the keepers packed our morning
begt-a considerable one-into the Perth.
cart in waiting. Then, when we could
wander away alon together, I explained
to Muriel that the reason of my sudden
journey to London was in order to con-
linue my investigations regar.iinu the
sDterious affair.
nW pussid her, for I ha not, of
e e, 0 revealed to her that I had iden-
tified Olinto. Yet I managed to nmke
such excuses and promises to return
that I think allayed ll her suspicions,
and that night, after calling upon the
detective Mackensie, I took the sleeping.
car express to Euaston.
The restaurant which Hutoheson had
indicated was, I found, situated about
half-way upWeetbourne Grove, nearly
oppoite Whiteo'., a small plsoe where
confectionery sad sweet were displayed
in the window, together with long-necked
flasks of Italian chiantl, chump-chops,
small joints and tomatoes. It was soon
after 9 o'elook when I entered the long
ahop with it rows of marble-toppe
w wasof red pi
As unhealti-ok a was sweeping


out the pl with wet swdust, and a
bag, dark-bearded, Abby-fd man in
sh rt-leevee stood behind the small
counter polishing some forksa.
"I wish to see Signor errarl," I said,
addressing him.
"There is no Ferrari, be is dead," re-
sponded the man in broken English. "My
name is Odinsof. I bought the place
from madame."
"You are Russian, I p rsumt"
"Polish, nfsieur-from Vnovie."
[Continued on Fourteenth Page]


Read Your Future in the


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WHICH I THE TRADEMARK OF


Whitehouse


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REAL ESTATE BROKERS


204 W. Bay St., Jacksonville, Ha.


By listing your Property
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Kindly correspond with me on the subject.


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204 West BaySLJa S lE IlFbe
AUta


tune will increase.


In-


TI!


10


T


II


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March 10, 1906


THE SUN


When a man's label is on he has no idea what
people really think of him. I know of a pianist in
New York who has a label that's worth a good
deal to him. Why, with his label on he can make
at least twenty-fve thousand dollars a year, and
socially he is a lion-with his lebel on, mind you.
Ha is such a compeller of tone that he can make
women weep -when they know who he is-and
Paderewski himself is said to have said that there
is no one he would rather hear play than this same
bald head-for he happens to be that rara avis, a
bald-headed pianist.
Zabritski, who was born within a stone's throw
of the New York Academy of Music, of New Eng-
land parents, is the soul of good-nature, and, except
when he is on a concert tour, he hasn't a particle
of big head. He once told me that when he la on a
concert tour he finds that a certain amount of big-
headedness is expected of him by his audienAMs in
order to convince them that he is the real goods,
and so sometimes he refuses to play on a piano
after he has sat down to it and makes the audience
wait until a better one is brought up from the
local warerooms.
Of course the papers next day call him a crank,
but they admit that he is a man of tenacity of pur-
pose, and that is a beloved American trait, so he
scores a hit whenever he is cranky that way. But
the crankiness is all assumed and he often laugh-i
about it among his friends and says, for the matter
of that, one piano is as bad as another when one is
playing off the main line.
All this is when he has his label on. Now I'll
tell you something that happened when his label
was off and he was just an ordinary person.
There was a struggling basso by the name of
Brown, who was desirous of effecting an entrance
into society to the extent of being engaged to sine
at swagger and noisy receptions of the elite-the
kind who pronounce it "elight"-and one day he
came to Zabritaki, whom he had known for years,
with a woful tale about his fear of losing an engage-
ment to sing at the house of a rich lard lady on ac-
count of his accompanist having sprained his wrist,
and would Zabritski go incog and play for him?
And of course Zabritaki would, just as willingly
as he would have done it when he had some hair
and was struggling himself, and so little basos
Brown departed in fine spirits.
Now it happened that the great Zabritski arrived
first at the home of the rich lard lady-who was a
newly richer, by the way-and he gave her to under-
stand that he was only a poor worm of an accom-
panist, and at that her manner, which had been non-
committal, changed to frigidity and she sent him
haughtily into an ante-room off the main hall to
await the arrival of Brown. Zabritski's sense of
humor is often his salvation, and he who is used to
being It in the center of a drawing-room, with ladisA
falling all over one another in their efforts to shake
the hand that was taught by Liszt, went meekly
into the ante-room and shivered in a draft while he
waited.
After a time the newly rich lard lady left her
chattering guests and came in and spoke to him; in
fact she scolded him rather hard because the basso
was late, and Zabitski, with a beautiful assumption
of servility, said: "I'm very sorry, madam, but this


T


By Charles Battel Loomis
is the time for us poor artists to make hay, and my
friend, Monsieur Brown, is singing at a reception
at the Countess Sagoni's. He sings but one number
and will be here soon. & hope you will excuse me for
taking up room here until he comes."
Now all this was innocent fiction, for the little
basso was not singing at the Countess Sagoni's,


although he would have loved to. He was merely
behind time.
But the lard lady pricked up her ears at mention
of the Countess's name, as she belonged to a real
aristocracy, centuries old, which ripened on the
shores of the Adriatic, and the newly richer would
have given her tiara to be one of the favored few
who attended her really musical musicals.
Her tone toward Zabritski softened, and she told
him that he could come in and sit down behind the
grand piano if he found it too cold in the ante-
room. Zabriaski had never eat behind a grand piano
in his life, and as he is fond of new sensations he
accepted her invitation and bid himself from the
chattering throng, and at last Brown came in and


HINKIN


G


sang to Zabritaki's accompaniment, and several times
his voice could be heard above the conversation,
although there were nearly a hundred talking and
ne was the only one singing.
After the music was all finished the little basso
and his humble friend, Zabritaka, went away without
a word ,rom the lard lady, because she was talking
a blue streak to an aristocrat arom above Fifty-ninth
Street, who was as freshly aristocratic as a newly
minted coin, and for the same reason-she belonged
to the coinage of 1003.
But the butler gave Brown twenty-five dollars
in three bills as he went out, and so he was happy-
for he needed the money.
Time works miracles, and some time later the
lard lady gave an evening concert, and having by
rare good luck met the Countess Sagoni, she invited
her, and the Countess Sagoni, having a fondness for
freaks, accepted the invitation. One must relax some-
times.
The rich lard lady had a number of singers who
waited in the anteroom, but her piece de resistance
was no less a lion than that great Hungarian pianist
(born in Irving place), ignace Zabritaki. She had
engaged him through Herr Wolfram Waldvogel, and
I happen to know that he was to receive five hun-
dred dollars for playing once.
Now if she had had a memory for faces she
would have recognized him as soon as he came in-
and yet I don't know. You see herr Waldvogel, who
is a real German gentleman, blond, six feet tall, and
with the manners of an Austrian noble, came with
Zabritski, and he presented him to the lard lady with
tremendous impressiveness, and Zabritaki put on his
most exclusive air and seemed about to die of ennui
on the spot, and that fetched the lard lady all right
(if you will pardon such a free use of English.)
But the thing that settled it was when the
Countess Sagoni went up to Zabritski, whom she
knew very well, and chatted most bohemianly with
him in very choice Italian. After that every one in
the room was hauled up and presented to him, and
then he sat down and played a pathetic thing by
Tsehaikowsky, and many people who knew it was
pathetic were moved to tears-right in the midst of
their conversation-and after it was all over the
lard lady shook hands with Zabritaki most effusively
and asked him if he knew any other artists of "dear
old Hungary" who could do a turn. She also said sue
adored "talent." And Zabritski remembered his sense
of humor just in time, and told her he had a com-
patriot named Braunski, who nad a glorious bass
voioe, and he thought he could get him to sing for
two hundred dollars as a great favor, although he
was simply visiting this country and was doing
nothing of a professional kind.
Of course you know that when the little basso
came to the house he had his label on (the wrong
label, naturally, as Brown, or Braunski, the basso,
was born near Gowanus Canal, over in Brooklyn.)
But the lard lady made much of him, you can
bet your sesterces, and the Countess Sagoni, who
knew a good voice when she heard it, no matter
where a man had happened to be born, had him sing
at one of her Sundays, and that was the beginning
of his present successful career.
Oh, these labels l


THE UNION


AND


THE


TIMES- UNION


By R. L. Harper
Chairman Executive Committee Jackson vile Typographical Valnon


In answer to a query as to the atti-
tude of the Typographical Union against
the Times-Union s "open shop" policy,
I stated that I would endeavor to place
our position clearly before the readers of
THE SUN to-day.
Were the whole people familiar with
the workings of a labor organization--
and likewise well informed as to the in-

side manipulation of the trusts-pos-
sibly they could stand off and judge
impartially in our disputes.
However, be it said to the shame of
we sovereign Americans, the most of us
know merely that trusts exist-and wax
fat; that labor unions exist only in a
death struggle for existence-are here
but to be maligned, bemeaned, and to be
held up to the people by the "endless
chain system of educators"-the corpor-
ation papers-as a lot of hoodlums,
nondescripts and wholly vile agitators
against erty.


Our trouble with Drew and Hall, and
lastly our lockout from the Times-Union,
has but one meaning to we of the
printer ilk. It is the same old story
from the corporation side-"an endeavor
to run the business of the paper," etc.
It is the same old story from the union-
faists standpoint-an endeavor to right
the wrongs of their fellow-workers and
brothers.
Fortunately for the upper dog-the
corporations-they can state their side
of all questions in their own language
through their own megaphonous mouth-
pieces to a gullible public, and the most
of the readers of those papers believe,
and in this belief condemn the union
men, however much RIGHT the union
men may have on their side.
I merely state these facts that the
readers of this most excellent newspaper
my see that we ears not to id lain
Ib worde; will d lay aside a Msble


purpose-a humane and charitable pur-
pose-to throw mud at our enemies and
those who seek to crush us out of ex-
istence because we dare ask of them our
rights-yea, even demand that which is
eurs by every law that bears the stamp
of liberty upon its face.
We look upon the Times-Union as a
mere link in the chain with which we
have to contend for an existence. That
the management of that paper is wholly
responsible for the lookout does not have
the least impression of truth upon our
minds, because we know-and all the
money world knows we know-that this
little link has been selected to grasp
the union cog, to break our gear and
stop our progress if possible. Therefore,
It isa not a local fight alone. It is one
in which the whole labor world is in-
tensely interested and will stand shoul-
der to shoulder in support of this little


loeal of Jacksonville printers bearding
the lion in his den.
And who is it that dares "bristle up"
to the powers that be, and say to them,
"we have rights you must respect" I
affirm that the men involved in the look-
out on the Timea-Union and who walked
out of Drew's last October, are not only
industrious, law-abiding and respected
citizens of Jacksonville, but many of
them are property owner*-they live
here. They are a part of a prosperous
city and have a great deal to lose and
nothing to gain by getting on the wrong
side of a situation. They are men of
honor and stand high with those of.
the commercial world with whom they
have dealt; a great many of them are
members of various secret orders, in
which they have gained the highest hon-
ors those lodges confer-ma oam of
(moMned on Fifteenth PNO


I'V


E


BEEN


11


11












A', THE SUN--


A4


S


sr


S


March 10, 1906


P


Y


Dy Chev aler William Le Queux


"Then the body is stiu In the glen,
where you left itr
"Ye. If you wish, I will take you to
the spot L an drive you and your as-
"ean Iet us g,' he exclaimed,
rising at OaB and ring his bell.
"G three good lancers and some
matches, and put them In this gentle-
man's trap ouide," he said to the eon.
stable who answered his summons. "And
tell Gilbert Campbell that I want him
to go with me up to Bannoch Wood."
"Yfs, sir," answered the man; and
the door again closed.
"It's a pity-a thousand pities, Mr.
Greg, that you didn't stop those two
men who buried the body."
"They were already across the stream,
and dfappearng into the thicket be-
fore I mounted the rook," I explained.
"Besides, at the moment I had no sus-
plicion of what they'd been doing. I be-
lieved them to be stragglers from a
neighboring shooting party who had lost
their way."
"Ah, most unfortunate!" he said. "I
hope they don't escape us. If they're
foreigners, they are not likely to get
away. But if they're English or Scots,
then I fear there's but little chance of
us coming up with them. Yesterday at
the inquest the identity of the murdered
man was strictly preserved, and the in-
quiry was adjourned for a fortnight."
"Of course my name was not men.
tionedf" I sid.
"Of course not," was the detective's
reply. Then he asked: "When do you
expect to get a telegram from your
friend, the Consul at Leghorn? I am
anxious for that, in order that we may
commence inquiries in London."
"The day after tomorrow, I hope. Ae
will certainly reply at ones, providing
the dead man's father can still be found."
And at that moment a tall, thin man,
who proved to be Detective Campbell,
entered, and five minutes later we were
all three driving over the uneven cob-
bles of Dumfries and out in the dark-
ness towards Rannoch.
It was 61oudy and starless, with a
chill mist hanging over the valley; but
my uncle's ob wa a swift one, and
we soon begai to aoend the hill up past
the castle, and then, turning to the left,
drove along a steep, rough by-road which
led to the south of the wood and out
across the moor. When we reached the
latter we all descended, and I led the
hone, for owing to the many treach-
erous bogs it was unsafe to drive fur-
ther. So, with Mackenzie and Campbell
carrying lanterns, we walked on care-
fully, skirting the wood for nearly a
mile until we came to the rough wall
over which I had clambered with Mu-
riel.
I rog. nied the spot, and havit tied
up the cob we all three plunged ino the
pitoh-darkuaes of the wood, keeping
straight on in the direction of the len,
and halting every now and then to listen
for the rippling of the stream.
At last, after some difficulty, we dis-
covered it, and searching along the bank
with our three powerful light, I pres-
ently detected the huge mos-grown
boulder whereon I had atooed when the
pair of fugitives had disap red.
"Look!' I cried. "There's the spotl"
And quickly we clambered down the
step bank, lowering ourselves by the
branches of the tes until we same
to the water into whloh I waded, being
followed closely by my two companioas.
On pganing the opposite. side 1 clam-
bered up to the base of the blulderand
lowered my lantern to reveal to them
the gruesome evidence of the second
crime, but the next instant I crled-
I It's gone"
"Gone!" gasped the two men.
"Y-. It was here. Look I this is the
hole where they buried it But they
evidently returned, and finding It ex-
humed, they've retaken posemlon of it
and carried it away!"'
The two detectives gaed down to
wiam I IntlatLd and the looked at
as othe withet m shng a word.


As we stood then dumbfounded at
the disappearanoe of the body, the High.
lander's quick glance caught something,
and stooping he picked it up and exam-
ined the litIle object by the aid of his
lantern.
Within his palm I saw lying a tiny
little gold cross, about an inch long,
enameled in red, while in the center was
a circular miniature of a kneeling mint,
an elegant and beautifully executed lit-
tle trinket which might have adorned a
lady's bracelet.
"This is a pretty little thing" re-
marked the deective. "It may poibly
lead us to something. But, Mr. Org"
he added, turning to me, "are you quite
certain you left the body here o
"Certain?" I echoed. "Why, look at
the hole I made. You don't think I have
any interest in leading g you here on a
fool's errand, do your
"Not at all," he said apologetically.
"Only the whole affair seems so very
inoonceivable-I mean that the men, hav-
ing once got rid of the evidence of their
crime, would hardly return to the spot
and reobtain possession of it."
"Unless they watched me exhume it,
and feared the consequences if it fell
into your hands," I suggested.
"Of course, they might have watched
you from behind the trees, and when
you had gone they came and carried it
away somewhere else," he remarked du-
biously; "but even if they did, it must
be in this wood. They would never risk
carrying a body very far, and here is
surely the beet place of concealment in
the whole country."
"The only thing remaining is to search
the wood at daylight," I suggested. "If
the two men came back here during my
absence they may still be on the watch
In the vicinity."
"Most probably they are. We must
take every precaution," he said decis-
ively. And then, with our lanterns low-
ered, we made an expmiltiop of the
vicinity, without, however, discovering
anything else to furnish us with a clew.
While I had been abaet the body of
the unfortunate Armida had disappeared
-a fact which, knowing all that I did,
was doubly mysterious.
The pair had, without doubt, watched
Muriel and myself, and as soon as we
had gone they had returned and carried
off the ,M ly remains of the poor
woman who had been so foully done to
death.
But who were the men-the fellow
with the broad shoulders whom Muriel
recogniaed, and the slim seafarer in his
pilot-coat and peaked cap? The enigm
each hour became more and more in-
serntable.
At dawn Mackenie, with four men,
made a thorough examination of the
wood, but although they continued until
dusk they discovered nothing, neither
was anything heard of the mysterious
seafarer and his companion In brown
tweeds.
I called on Muriel as arranged, and
explained how the body had so sud-
denly disappeared, whereupon she stared
at me pale-faced, saying-
*'The assassins must have watched us!
They are aware, then, that we have
knowledge of their crimes?"
"Of course," I said.
"Ahl "she m rie hoasely. "Then we
are both in deadly peril-peril of our
own lvesel These people will besimtate
at nothing. Both you and I ar marked
down by them, without a doubt. We must
both be wary not to fall into any trap
they may lay for us."
Her very words seemed an admission
that she was aware of the identity of
the conspirators, and yet she would give
me no elue to them.
We went out and up the drive togeth-
er to the kennels, where her father, a
tall, imposingla gure In his shooting-kit,
was giving orders to the keepers.
"Hulla, OegI!" he cried merrily, ex-
tending his had. "You'll make one of
a party to erAisa tom ow, t you?
Pates ad Phip arn sig. oB


sharp here, and the ladies are coming
out to lunch with us."
"Thanks," I said, accepting with pleas-
ure, for by so doing I saw that I might
be afforded an opportunity of being near
Muriel. The fact that the assassins were
aware of our knowledge seemed to have
caused her the greatest apprehension
lest evil should befall us. Then, as we
turned away to go back to the house,
WLtheourt said to me-
'"You know all about the discovery up
at the wood the other dayl Horrible af
fair-a young foreigner found mur-
dered."
"Yes, I have heard about it," I re-
sponded.
"And the police are worse than use-
less," he declared with disgust. "They
haven't discovered who the fellow is yet.
Why, if it had happened anywhere else
but in Scotland, they'd have arrested
the assassin before this."
"He's an entire stranger," I hear," I
remarked. And then added: "You often
g p to the wood of an evening after
ieons. I'ts fortunate you were not
there that evening, eh?"
He glanced at me quickly within his
brows slightly contracted, as though be
did not exactly comprehend me. In an
instant I saw that my remark lad
esaued him quick apprehension.
"Yes," he answered with .1 sickly
smile which he intended should convey
to me utter unconcern. "They might have
suspected me."
"It certainly is a disagreeable affair
to happen on one's property," I said,
still watching him narrowly. And then
Muriel at his side managed with her
feminine ingenuity to divert the conver-
sation into a different channel.
Next day I accompanledl the party
over to Glenlea, about live miles dis-
tant, and at noon at a spot previously
arranged, we found the ladies awaiting
us with luncheon spread under the trees.
As soon as we approached Muriel came
forward quickly, handing me a telegram,
saying that it had been sent over by
one of my unele's grooms at the moment
thy were leaving the castle.
Itore it open eagerly, and read its
contents. Then, turning to my compan-
ions, said in as quiet a voice as I could
command-
"I must go up to London tonight,"
whereat the men, one and ill, expressed
hope that I should soon returr,. Leith-
court's party were a friendly wet, and
at heart I was sorry to leave Scotland.
Yet the telegram made it imperati'.e,
for it was from Frank Huthe.on in
Leghorn, and read-
'Made inquiree. Olinto Saisti.!i mar.
tried your bervast Armids at Italini Con.
usate-0Gersl in London about a /ca
ago. The y live 64B, Albany Road, Cam.
bwwi.U; he i. employed waiter Perrari'i
Rutaurant, Westbourne Grove.-Br-i.o
Con0ulate, Leghorn."
The lunch was a merry one, as shoot.
ing luncheons usually are, and while
we ate the keepers packed our morning
bag--a considerable one-into the Perth.
heart in waiting. Then, whom we could
wanr away alone together, I explained
to Muriel that the reason of my smddep
journey to London was in order to con
tue my Investigations regar.lini thf
nterious affair.
-t a pusnled her, for I hjd not, ol
oaart.revealed to her that had iden.
tiled Olilateo. Yet I managed to make
such excuses and promises to return
that I think allayed il her suspicions
and that night, after calling upon the
detective Meckenue, I took the sleeping
ear express to Euston.
The restaurant which Huteheson had
indicated was, I found, situated about
half-way up Wetbourne Growve, nearly
opposite Wltele's, a mall place where
oonfectonery and sweet were displayed
in the window, together with long-necked
flasks of Italian chlanti, chump-chop,
small joints and tomatoes. It was soon
after 9 o'clock when I entered the lone
sho with its rows of marble-toped
w .tad lo ^or p1 h
A atiokeg lad wasu .wepi


out the plao with wet sawdust, and a
bg, dark-bearded, ftIu -fseed man in
hrtsleeves stood bhld the small
counter polishing some forks.
"I wish to ee Signor Ferrari," I said,
addressing him.
"There is no Ferrari, he is dead," re-
sponded the man in broken English. "My
name is Odin off. I bought the place
from madame."
"You are Russian, I prumel"
"Polish, nfsieur-from Va vie."
[Continued on Fourteenth Page]


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SUN











March 10, 1906


THE BUN


When a man's label is on he has no idea what
people really think of him. I know of a pianist in
New York who has a label that's worth a good
deal to him. Why, with his label on he can make
at least twenty-five thousand dollars a year, and
socially he is a lion-with his lebel on, mind you.
Hs is such a compeller of tone that he can make
women weep-when they know who he is-and
Paderewski himself is said to have said that there
is no one he would rather hear play than this same
bald head-for he happens to be that rara Avis, a
bald-headed pianist.
Zabritski, who was born within a stone's throw
of the New York Academy, of Music, of New Eng-
land parents, is the soul of good-nature, and, except
when he is on a concert tour, he hasn't a particle
of big head. He once told me that when he ls on a
concert tour he finds that a certain amount of big-
headedness is expected of him by his audienAs in
order to convince them that he is the real goods,
and so sometimes he refuses to play on a piano
after he has sat down to it and makes the audience
wait until a better one is brought up from the
local warerooms.
Of course the papers next day call him a crank,
but they admit that he is a man of tenacity of pur-
pose, and that is a beloved American trait, so he
scores a hit whenever he is cranky that way. But
the crankiness is all assumed and he often laughs
about it among his friends and says, for the matter
of that, one piano is as bad as another when one is
playing off the main line.
All this is when he has his label on. Now I'll
tell you something that happened when his label
was off and he was just an ordinary person.
There was a struggling basso by the name of
Brown, who was desirous of effecting an entrance
into society to the extent of being engaged to sing
at swagger and noisy receptions of the elite-the
kind who pronounce it "elight"-and one day hne
came to Zabritski, whom he had known for years,
with a woful tale about his fear of losing an engage-
ment to sing at the house of a rich lard lady on ac-
count of his accompanist having sprained his wrist,
and would Zabritski go incog and play for him?
And of course Zabritaki would, just as willingly
as he would have done it when he had some hair
and was struggling himself, and so little bases
Brown departed in fine spirits.
Now it happened that the great Zabritski arrived
first at the home of the rich lard lady-who was a
newly richer, by the way-and he gave her to under-
stand that he was only a poor worm of an accom-
panist, and at that her manner, which had been non-
committal, changed to frigidity and she sent him
haughtily into an ante-room off the main hall to
await the arrival of Brown. Zabritski's sense of
humor is often his salvation, and he who is used to
being It in the center of a drawing-room, with ladies
falling all over one another in their efforts to shake
the hand that was taught by Liszt, went meekly
into the ante-room and shivered in a draft while he
waited.
After a time the newly rich lard lady left hler
chattering guests and came in and spoke to him; in
fact she scolded him rather hard because the basso
was late, and Zabitaki, with a beautiful assumption
of servility, said: "I'm very sorry, madam, but this


TH INK IN


By Charles Battel Loomis
is the time for us poor artists to make hay, and my
friend, Monsieur Brown, is singing at a reception
at the Countess Sagoni's. He sings but one number
and will be here soon. A hope you will excuse me for
taking up room here until he comes."
Now all this was innocent fiction, for the little
basso was not singing at the Countess Sagoni's,


although he would have loved to. lie was merely
behind time.
But the lard lady pricked up her ears at mention
of the Countess's name, as she belonged to a real
aristocracy, centuries old, which ripened on the
shores of the Adriatic, and the newly richer would
have given her tiara to be one of the favored few
who attended her really musical musicales.
Her tone toward Zabritski softened, and she told
him that he could come in and sit down behind the
grand piano if he found it too cold in the ante-
room. Zabriaski had never sat behind a grand piano
in his life, and as he is fond of new sensations he
accepted her invitation and bid himself from the
chattering throng, and at last Brown came In and


G


sang to Zabritski's accompaniment, and several times
his voice could be heard above the conversation,
although there were nearly a hundred talking and
no was the only one sing.
After the music was all finished the little basso
and his humble friend, Zabritsk*, went away without
a word arom the lard lady, because she was talking
a blue streak to an aristocrat ,rom above Fifty-ninth
Street, who was as freshly aristocratic as a newly
minted coin, and for the same reason-she belonged
to the coinage of 1903.
But the butler gave Brown twenty-five dollars
in three bills as he went out, and so he was happy-
for he needed the money.
Time works miracles, and some time later the
lard lady gave an evening concert, and having by
rare good luck met the Countess Sagoni, she invited
her, and the Countess Sagoni, having a fondness for
freaks, accepted the invitation. One must relax some-
times.
The rich lard lady had a number of singers who
waited in the anteroom, but her piece de resistance
was no less a lion than that great Hungarian pianist
(born in Irving place), ignace Zabritski. She had
enagepd him through Herr Wolfram Waldvogel, and
I happen to know that he was to receive five hun-
dred dollars for playing once.
Now if she had had a memory for faces she
would have recognized him as soon as he came in-
and yet I don't know. You see herr Waldvogel, who
is a real German gentleman, blond, six feet tall, and
with the manners of an Austrian noble, came with
Zabritski, and he presented him to the lard lady with
tremendous impressiveness, and Zabritski put on his
most exclusive air and seemed about to die of ennui
on the spot, and that fetched the lard lady all right
(if you will pardon such a free use of English.)
But the thing that settled it was when the
Countess Bagoni went up to Zabritaki, whom she
knew very well, and chatted most bohemianly with
him in very choice Italian. After that every one in
the room was hauled up and presented to him, and
then he sat down and played a pathetic thing by
Tsohaikowsky, and many people who knew it was
pathetic were moved to tears-right in the midst of
heir conversation-and after it was all over the
lard lady shook hands with Zabritski most effusively
and asked him if he knew any other artists of "dear
old Hungary" who could do a turn. She also said sue
adored "talent." And Zabritski remembered his sense
of humor just in time, and told her he had a com-
patriot named Braunski, who nad a glorious bass
voice. and he thought he could get him to sing for
two hundred dollars as a great favor, although he
was simply visiting this country and was doing
nothing of a professional kind.
Of course you know that when the little basso
came to the house he had his label on (the wrong
label, naturally, as Brown, or Braunski, the basso,
was born near Gowanus Canal, over in Brooklyn.)
But the lard lady made much of him, you can
bet your sesteroes, and the Countess Sagoni, who
knew a good voice when she heard it, no matter
where a man had happened to be born, had him sing
at one of her Sundays, and that was the beginning
of his present successful career.
Oh, these labels I


THE UNION


AND


THE


TIMES- UNION


By R. L. Harper
Chairman Executive Committee Jacksonville Typrahical Valon


In answer to a query as to the atti-
tude of the Typographical Union against
the Times-Union as "open shop" policy,
I stated that I would endeavor to place
our position clearly before the readers of
THE SUN to-day.
Were the whole people familiar with
the workings of a labor organization-
and likewise well informed as to the in-
side manipulation of the trusts-pos-
nibly they could stand off and judge
impartially in our disputes.
However, be it said to the shame of
we sovereign Americans, the most of us
know merely that trusts exist-and wax
fat; that labor unions exist only in a
death struggle for existence-are here
but to be maligned, bemoaned, and to be
held up to the people by the "endless
chain system of educators"-the corpor-
ation papers-es a lot of hoodlums,
nondescripts and wholly vile agitators
against liber.


Our trouble with Drew and Hall, and
lastly our lockout from the Times-Union,
has but one meaning to we of the
printer ilk. It is the same old story
from the corporation side-"an endeavor
to run the business of the paper," etc.
It is the same old story from the union-
ists standpoint--an endeavor to right
the wrongs of their fellow-workers and
brothers.
Fortunately for the upper dog-the
corporations-they can state their side
of all questions in their own language
through their own megaphonous mouth-
pieces to a gullible public, and the most
of the readers of those papers believe,
and in this belief condemn the union
men, however much RIGHT the union
men may have on their side.
I merely state these facts that the
readers of this most excellent newspaper
may ee that we care not to aindue in
Mib w ) will 06 lay aside s oa n


purpose-a humane and charitable pur-
pose-to throw mud at our enemies and
those who seek to crush us out of ex-
istence because we dare ask of them our
rights-yea, even demand that which is
eurs by every law that bears the stamp
of liberty upon its face.
We look upon the Times-Union as a
mere link in the chain with which we
have to contend for an existence. That
the management of that paper is wholly
responsible for the lockout does not have
the least impression of truth upon our
minds, because we know-and all the
money world knows we know-that this
little link has been selected to grasp
the union cog, to break our gear and
stop our progress if possible. Therefore,
it is not a local fight alone. It is one
in which the whole labor world is in-
tesely interested and will stand shoul-
der to asorlder i support of this litt


local of Jacksonville printers boarding
the lion in his den.
And who is it that dares "bristle up"
to the powers that be, and may to them,
"we have rights you mu t respect I
affirm that the men involved in the look-
out on the Timsm-Union and who walked
out of Drew's last October, are not only
industrious, law-abiding and respected
citizens of Jacksonville, but many of
them are property owners-they live
here. They are a part of a prosperous
city and have a great deal to lose and
nothing to gain by getting on the wrong
side of a situation. They are men of
honor and stand high with those of
the commercial world with whom they
have dealt; a great many of them are
members of various secret orders, in
which they have gained the highest hon-
ors those lodges confer-and amo of
(Ombnoed on Fiftemeth Po)


I'V


E


A EEN


11


11










March 10, 190o


TE SUN


P


Y


Dy Chevalier William Le Queux


"Then the body is stih in the glen,
where you left ItTp
"Yes. If you wish, I will take you to
the spot I can drive you and your as-
sistant up there."
"Certainly. Lot us he exclaimed,
risilig at ones and ringing his bell.
Three good lanterns and some
matce, and put them in this gentle-
man's trap outidse," he said to the eon-
stable who answered his summons. "And
tell Gilbert Oampell that I want him
to g wath me up to Rannoch Wood."
"Yq, sir,"' answered the man; and
the door again eloeed.
"It's a pity-a thousand pities, Mr.
Gregg, that you didn't stop those two
men who buried the body."
They were already across the stream,
and dappearngl into the thicket be-
fore I mounted rock," I explained.
"Besides, at the moment I had no sus-
picion of what they'd been doing. I be-
lieved them to be stragglers from a
neighboring shooting party who had lost
their way."
"Ah, most unfortunate he said. "I
hope they don't escape us. If they're
foreigners, they are not likely to get
away. But if they're English or Scots,
then I fear there's but little chance of
us coming up with them. Yesterday at
the inquest the identity of the murdered
man was strictly preserved, and the in-
quiry was adjourned for a fortnight."
"Of course my name was not men-
tioned?" I said.
"Of course not," was the detective's
reply. Then he asked: "When do you
expect to get a telegram from your
friend, the Consul at Leghorn? I am
anxious for that, in order that we may
commence inquiries in London."
"The day after tomorrow, I hope. tie
will certainly reply at once, providing
the dead man's father can still be found."
And at that moment a tall, thin man,
who proved to be Detective Campbell,
entered, and five minutes later we were
all three driving over the uneven cob-
bles of Dumfries and out in the dark-
nes towards Rannooh.
It was cloudy and starless, with a
chill mist hanging over the valley; but
my unle's ob was a swift one, and
we soon began to ascend the hill up past
the castle, and then, turning to the left,
drove along a steep, rough by-road which
led to the south of the wood and out
across the moor. When we reached the
latter we all descended, and I led the
horse, for owing to the many treach-
erous bogs it was unsafe to drive fur-
ther. So, with Mackenzie and Campbell
ferrying lanterns, we walked on care-
fully, skirting the wood for nearly a
mile until we came to the rough wall
over which I had clambered with Mu-
riel.
I reoognised the spot, and having tied
up the cob we all three plunged into the
pitch-darkness of the wood, keeping
straight on in the direction of the glen,
and halting every now and then to listen
for the rippling of the stream.
At last, after some difficulty, we dis-
covered it, and searching along the bank
with our three powerful lights, I pre
ently detected the huge mosa-grown
boulder whereon I had stood when the
pair of fugitives had disappeared.
"Lookl" I cried. 'Theres the spot"
And quickly we clambered down the
steep bank, lowering ourselves by the
branches of the trees until we came
to the water into which I waded, being
followed closely by my two companions.
On gaining the opposite side I clam-
bered up to the base of the boulder and
lowered my lantern to reveal to them
the gruesome evidence of the second
crime, but the next instant T cried-
"Why I t's gone l"
"Oonet" gasped the two men.
"Yes. It was here. Look this is the
hole where they buried itl But they
evidently returned, and finding it ex-
humed, they'vrtaken posesion of it
and carried It away!"
The two detectives gaed down to
wh- I hilested, and then looked at
moh othr withe-t exhanging a word.


As we stood there dumbfounded at
the disappearance of the body, the High-
lander's quick glance caught something,
and stooping he picked it up and exam-
ined the little object by the aid of his
lantern.
Within his palm I saw lying a tiny
little gold cross, about an inch long,
enameled in red, while in the center was
a circular miniature of a kneeling saint,
an elegant and beautifully executed lit-
tle trinket which might have adorned a
lady's bracelet.
'This is a pretty little things" re-
marked the detective. "It may possibly
lead us to something. But, Mr. egg,
he added, turning to me, "are you quite
certain you left the body here*"
"Certain?" 1 echoed. "Why, look at
the hole I made. You don't think I have
any interest in leading you here on a
fool's errand, do you?"
"Not at all," he said apologetically.
"Only the whole affair seems so very
inconoeivable-I mean that the men, hav-
ing once got rid of the evidence of their
crime, would hardly return to the spot
and reobtain possession of it."
"Unless they watched me exhume it
and feared the consequences if it fell
into your hands," I suggested.
"Of course, they might have watched
you from behind the trees, and when
you had gone they came and carried it
away somewhere else," he remarked du
biously; '"but even if they did, it must
be in this wood. They would never risk
carrying a body very far, and here ii
surely the best place of concealment in
the whole country."
"The only thing remaining ie to search
the wood at daylight," I suggested. "I
the two men came back here during m
absence they may still be on the watcl
in the vicinity."
"Most probably they are. We mus
take every precaution," he said decis
ivel And then, with our lanterns low
ered, we made an evomniatIon of th
vicinity, without, however, discoverin,
anything else to furnish us with a clw
While I had been absent the body o
the unfortunate Armida had disappeare
-a fact whlih, knowing all that I did
was doubly mysterious.
The pair had, without doubt, watch
Muriel and myself, and as soon as w
had gone they had returned and carrie
off the ghastly remains of the poo
woman who had been so foully done t
death.
But who were the men-the fellow
with the broad shoulders whom Muri
recognized, and the slim seafarer in h
pilot-coat and peaked cap? The enign
each hour became more and more il
scrutable.
At dawn Mackenzie, with four me
made a thorough examination of tl
wood, but although they continued unt
dusk they discovered nothing, neith
was anything heard of the mysterioi
seafarer and his companion in brow
tweeds.
I called on Muriel as arranged, an
explained how the body had so su
denly disappeared, whereupon she stan
at me pale-faced, slaying-
"The assassins must have watched u
They are aware, then, that we hay
knowledge of their crime'
"Of course," I said.
"Ahl "she rle4 hoarsely. "Theni
are both in deadly peril-peril of o
own livesl These people will besita
at nothing. Both you and I are mark
down by them, without a doubt. We mu
both be wary not to fall into ay trin
they may lay for us."
Her very words seemed an admissic
that she was aware of the identity 4
the conspirators, and yet she wouldgil
me no clue to them.
We went out and up the drive togeti
er to the kennels, where her father,
tall, impoaing figure in his shooting-ki
was giving orders to the keepers.
"Hulloa, Oreggi!" he oried merrily, e
tending his hand. "You'll make one
a party to Gllea tom-Or ws't yo
Patom and Phllps aem aig. Ti


sharp here, and the ladies are coming
out to lunch with us."
"Thanks," I said, accepting with pleas-
use, for by so doing I saw that I might
be afforded an opportunity of being near
Muriel. The fact that the assassins were
aware of our knowledge seemed to have
caused her the greatest apprehension
lest evil should befall us. Then, as we
tuned away to go back to the house,
LWthcourt said to me-
"You know all about the discovery up
at the wood the other dayl Horrible af-
fair-a, young foreigner found mur-
dered."
"Yes, I have heard about it," I re-
sponded.
"And the police are worse than use-
less," he declared with disgust. "They
haven't discovered who the fellow is yet.
Why, if it had happened anywhere else
but in Scotland, they'd have arrested
the assassin before this."
"He's an entire stranger," I hear," I
remarked. And then added: "You often
r o p to the wood of an evening after
t 0iions. I'ta fortunate you were not
therethat evening, eh?"
H e glanced at me quickly with his
I brows slightly contract d, as though be
did not exactly comprelinid me. In an
I instant I saw that my remark had
Caused him quick apprehension.
t "Yes," he answered with .a eickly
s smile which he intended should convey
t to me utter unconcern. "They might have
c suspected me."
s "It certainly is a disagreeable affair
n to happen on one's property," I said,
still watching him narrowly. And then
h Muriel at his side managed with her
f feminine ingenuity to divert the (onver.
y station into a different channel.
h Next day I accompanle-l the party
over to Glenlea, about five mile; dis
t tant, and at noon at a Apot previously
arranged, we found the ladies await in
-. us with luncheon spread under the trees
e As soon as we approached Muriel came
g forward quickly, handing me a telegram
saying that it had been sent over by
of one of my uncle's grooms at the moment
d they were leaving the castle.
d, I tore it open eagerly, and read it
contents. Then, turning to my compare
d ions, said in as quiet a voice as I could
ve command-
d "I must go up to London tonight,
r whereat the men, one and Ill, expreosse
o hope that I should soon retiurnr, Leiti
court's party were a friendly tet, an
at heart I was sorry to leave Scotland
'l Yet the telegram made it imperative
is for it was from Frank Hutl;jeson i
s Leghorn, and read-
~ 'Moade inquiries. Olinto Baltimi ; a
tried your servant Armida at Itali,:i Con
sulate-General in London about a c<
Sago. They live 64B, Albany Road, Oai
he 1n6; he. i employed waiter 'errar,
il Restaurant, Westbourne Grove.-Briti,
er o0nuulate, Leghorn."
us The lunch was a merry ono, as shoe
rn ing luncheons usually are, and whi
we ate the keepers packed our mornii
d bag-a considerable one-into the Pert
d cart in waiting. Then, whim we con
d wander away aone together, I explain,
to Murielt the reason of my sudd<
it journey to London was in order to co,
e tinue my investigations regar.linj ti
nsterious affair.
NT6 puZaled her, for I Iha not,
re course, revealed to her that (had ide
r tiled Olinto. Yet I managed to ma
te such excusesM and promises to retu
id that I think allayed all her suspicion:
st and that night, after calling upon t
ip detective Mackenzie, I took the sleeping
car express to Euston.
n The restaurant which Hutcheson hi
of indicated was, I found, situated abo
ve half-way up Westbourne Grove, near
opposite Whitele s, a small place whe
h- confectionery and sweets were display
a in the window, together with long-neck
t, flasks of Italian chianti, chump-choj
small joints and tomatoes. It was so
i- after 9 o'eloek when I entered the loi
of shop with its rows of marble-topp
i? table sad g l lounges of red plm
a An unhaltay-looking lad was swespi


out the plaOe with wet uwdust, and a
big, dark-beard, flbby-ft ed man in
shrt-sleeves stood bend the small
counter polishing some forks.
"I wish to see Signor Ferrari," I said,
addressing him.
"There is no Ferrari, he is dead," re-
sponded the man in broken English. "MY
name is Odinsoff. I bought the place
from maisdame."
"You are Russian, I presumee"
"Polish, n sieur-from Varovie."
[Continued on Fourteenth Page]


Read Your Future in the


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WHICH IS THE TRADE-MARK OF



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REAL ESTATE BROKERS


204 W. Bay St., Jacksonville, Fla.


By listing your Property
under our star your for-


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Kindly correspond with me on the subject.
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204 West Bay St. Jacksonville, .
TnEf --


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In-


10


T


H


E


S


5,


S


. %s;4











March 10, 1906


THE BUN


When a man's label is on he has no idea what
people really think of him. I know of a pianist in
New York who has a label that's worth a good
deal to him. Why, with his label on he can make
at least twenty-five thousand dollars a year, and
socially he is a lion-with his lebel on, mind you.
Hs is such a compeller of tone that he can make
women weep-when they know who he is-and
Paderewski himself is said to have said that there
is no one he would rather hear play than this same
bald head-for he happens to be that rara avis, a
bald-headed pianist.
Zabritski, who was born within a stone's throw
of the New York Academy of Music, of New Eng-
land parents, is the soul of good-nature, and, except
when he is on a concert tour, he hasn't a particle
of big head. He once told me that when he is on a
concert tour he finds that a certain amount of big-
headedness is expected of him by his audien.bs in
order to convince them that he is the real goods,
and so sometimes he refuses to play on a piano
after he has sat down to it and makes the audience
wait until a better one is brought up from the
local warerooms.
Of course the papers next day call him a crank,
but they admit that he is a man of tenacity of pur-
pose, and that is a beloved American trait, so he
scores a hit whenever he is cranky that way. But
the crankiness is all assumed and he often laughs
about it among his friends and says, for the matter
of that, one piano is as bad as another when one is
playing #off the main line.
All this is when he has his label on. Now I'll
tell you something that happened when his label
was off and he was just an ordinary person.
There was a struggling basso by the name of
Brown, who was desirous of effecting an entrance
into society to the extent of being engaged to sing
at swagger and noisy receptions of the elite-the
kind who pronounce it "elight"-and one day he
came to Zabritski, whom he had known for years,
with a woful tale about his fear of losing an engage-
ment to sing at the house of a rich lard lady on ac-
count of his accompanist having sprained his wrist,
and would Zabritski go incog and play for him
And of course Zabritski would, just as willingly
as he would have done it when he had some hair
and was struggling himself, and so little bases
Brown departed in fine spirits.
Now it happened that the great Zabritski arrived
first at the home of the rich lard lady-who was a
newly richer, by the way-and he gave her to under-
stand that he was only a poor worm of an accom-
panist, and at that her manner, which had been non-
committal, changed to frigidity and she sent him
haughtily into an ante-room off the main hall to
await the arrival of Brown. Zabritski's sense of
humor is often his salvation, and he who is used to
being It in the center of a drawing-room, with ladies,
falling all over one another in their efforts to shake
the hand that was taught by Liszt, went meekly
into the ante-room and shivered in a draft while he
waited.
After a time the newly rich lard lady left her
chattering guests and came in and spoke to him; in
fact she scolded him rather hard because the basso
was late, and Zabitski, with a beautiful assumption
of servility, said: "I'm very sorry, madam, but this


TII


By Charles Battel Loomis
is the time for us poor artists to make hay, and my
friend, Monsieur Brown, is singing at a reception
at the Countess Bagoni's. He sings but one number
and will be here soon. A hope you will excuse me for
taking up room here until he comes."
Now all this was innocent fiction, for the little
basso was not singing at the Countess Sagoni's,


although he would have loved to. He was merely
behind time.
But the lard lady pricked up her ears at mention
of the Countess's name, as she belonged to a real
aristocracy, centuries old, which ripened on the
shores of the Adriatic, and the newly richer would
have given her tiara to be one of the favored few
who attended her really musical musicales.
Her tone toward Zabritski softened, and she told
him that he could come in and sit down behind the
grand piano if he found it too cold in the ante-
room. Zabriaski had never sat behind a grand piana
in his life, and as he is fond of new sensations he
accepted her invitation and hid himself from tho
chattering throng, and at last Brown came in and


I


NKIN


G


sang to Zabritaki's accompaniment, and several times
his voice could be heard above the conversation,
although there were nearly a hundred talking and
noe was the only one singing.
After the music was all finished the little basso
and his humble friend, Zabritski, went away without
a word ,rom the lard lady, because she was talking
a blue streak to an aristocrat ,rom above Fifty-ninth
Street, who was as freshly aristocratic as a newly
minted coin, and for the same reason-she belonged
to the coinage of 1903.
But the butler gave Brown twenty-five dollars
in three bills as he went out, and so he was happy-
for he needed the money.
Time works miracles, and some time later the
lard lady gave an evening concert, and having by
rare good luck met the Countess Sagoni, she invited
her, and the Countess Sagoni, having a fondness for
freaks, accepted the invitation. One must relax some-
times.
The rich lard lady had a number of singers who
waited in the anteroom, but her piece de resistance
was no less a lion than that great Hungarian pianist
(born in Irving place), Ignace Zabritski. She had
engage d him through Herr Wolfram Waldvogel, and
I happen to know that he was to receive five hun-
dred dollars for playing once.
Now if she had had a memory for faces she
would have recognized him as soon as he came in-
and yet I don't know. You see Herr Waldvogel, who
is a real German gentleman, blond, six feet tall, and
with the manners of an Austrian noble, came with
Zabritski, and he presented him to the lard lady with
tremendous impressiveness, and Zabritski put on his
most exclusive air and seemed about to die of ennui
on the spot, and that fetched the lard lady all right
(if you will pardon such a free use of English.)
But the thing that settled it was when the
Countess Bagoni went up to Sabritski, whom she
knew very well, and chatted most bohemianly with
him in very choice Italian. After that every one in
the room was hauled up and presented to him, and
then he sat down and played: a pathetic thing by
Tsohaikowsky, and many people who knew it was
pathetic were moved to tears-right in the midst of
their conversation-and after it was all over the
lard lady shook hands with Zabritaki most effusively
and asked him if he knew any other artists of "dear
old Hungary" who could do a turn. She also said sne
adored "talent." And Zabritski remembered his sense
of humor just in time, and told her he had a com-
patriot named Braunski, who nad a glorious bass
voice, and he thought he could get him to sing for
two hundred dollars as a great favor, although he
was simply visiting this country and was doing
nothing of a professional kind.
Of course you know that when the little basso
came to the house he had his label on (the wrong
label, naturally, as Brown, or Braunski, the basso,
was born near Gowanus Canal, over in Brooklyn.)
But the lard lady made much of him, you can
bet your sesteroes, and the Countess Sagoni, who
knew a good voice when she heard it, no matter
where a man had happened to be born, had him sing
at one of her Sundays, and that was the beginning
of his present successful career.
Oh, these labels I


THE


UNION


AND


THE


TIMES- UNION


By R. L. Harper
Chairman Executive Committee Jacksonville TyDOgrapMcal VUnion


In answer to a query as to the atti-
tude of the Typographical Union against
the Times-Union s "open shop" policy,
I stated that I would endeavor to place
our position clearly before the readers of
THE SUN to-day.
Were the whole people familiar with
the workings of a labor organization-
and likewise well informed as to the in-
side manipulation of the trusts-pos-
sibly they could stand off and judge
impartially in our disputes.
However, be it said to the shame of
we sovereign Americans, the most of us
know merely that trusts exist-and wax
fat; that labor unions exist only in a
death struggle for existence-are here
but to be maligned, bemoaned, and to be
held up to the people by the "endless
chain system of educators"-the corpor-
ation papers-as a lot of hoodlums,
nondescripts and wholly vile agitators
againstM rty.


Our trouble with Drew and Hall, and
lastly our lockout from the Times-Union,
has but one meaning to we of the
printer ilk. It is the same old story
from the corporation side-"an endeavor
to run the business of the paper," etc.
It is the same old story from the union-
ists standpoint-an endeavor to right
the wrongs of their fellow-workers and
brothers.
Fortunately for the upper dog-the
corporations-they can state their side
of all questions in their own language
through their own megaphonous mouth-
pieces to a gullible public, and the most
of the readers of those papers believe,
and in this belief condemn the union
men, however much RIGHT the union
men may have on their side.
I merely state these facts that the
readers of this most excellent newspaper
sy Mee that we ar not to idule oin
MWle wO $ w tll oJ ly aside be


purpose-- humane and charitable pur-
pose-to throw mud at our enemies and
those who seek to crush us out of ex-
istence because we dare ask of them our
rights-yea, even demand that which is
ours by every law that bears the stamp
of liberty upon its face.
We look upon the Times-Union as a
mere link in the chain with which we
have to contend for an existence. That
the management of that paper is wholly
responsible for the lockout does not have
the least impression of truth upon our
minds, because we know-and all the
money world knows we know-that this
little link has been selected to grasp
the union cog, to break our gear and
stop our progress if poible. Therefore,
it is not a local fight alone. It is one
in which the whole labor world is in-
tensely interested sad will sted shoul-
der to lde a port of this little


local of Jacksonville printers boarding
the lion in his den.
And who is it that dares "bristle up"
to the powers that be, and say to them,
"we have rights you muet respect I
affirm that the men Involved in the lock-
out on the TimesUnion and who walked
out of Drew's last October, are not only
industrious, law-abiding and respected
citizens of Jacksonville, but many of
them are property owners-they live
here. They are a part of a prosperous
city and have a great deal to lose and
nothing to gain by getting on the wrong
side of a situation. They are men of
honor and stand high with those of.
the commercial world with whom they
have dealt; a great many of them are
members of various secret orders, in
which they have gained the highest hon-
ore those lodges confer-end noMe of
(bomuauid oam ifteenth Pq)


I'V


E


SEE N


11


11













SSUN


March 10, 1906


IF IT'S RIGHT, WE ARE FOR IT=


CLAUDE L'ENOLE
Editor


A. K. TAYLOR

SUN Cartoonist


Al IM I mD WmC.V WITH A WL W ITS W WI F T MM 1E L, I NU M W rST R MT OSU AT 31 WEST FOMYTH STMT, JADKIOVI., nOA

Volume I-No. 17 JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, MARCH 10, 1906 5 Cents per Copy, $2 per Year
Entered at the Poet Office at JacksoVMlle, Fla., as ucond-dm matter




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"7 s hf.&Io&wn


So many years ago that they can
scarcely be counted-Tong before any of
our great prandparents were born-a
little king was born away down in the
tangled swamps of Florida. It was very
unlikely that the little fellow, which we
may call a little golden ball, not over six
inches in circumference, would ever be
able to make his mark in the world,
much less to say: "I Intend to be ruler
of a kingdom, and shall take my place
in the long line of kings in the commer-
cial world."
It has been the custom, as we know,
for many of the States of our broad
commonwealth to set up kings of their
own; thus, King Corn, King Cotton and
King Coal, have long held their sway
over their respective kingdoms. But
now another one has entered the field for
kingly honors, and a royal king of gold
he is, toot
There has been some little dispute
about his birthplace. Some contend that
away back in the past, when the Span-
iards first held possession of these
primeval forests, they scattered the seed
brought with them from their native
land through these tangled hammock
lands, where they have ever since been
left to take care of themselves. Others
maintain that our king is a native of
Florida-that his birth dates far back
in the dim old past, when this peninsula
State was gathered out of the depths of
the sea into a long, narrow heap of sand
and shell. Then, when the soils result-
ing from the last redemption of the
ancient seas was fairly settled into place,
and had come to stay, all this wealth of
vegetation nurtured by continual sun-
shine jumped into being, and with it
came the king of the citrus family, to
stay, too.
Florida (beautiful Castilian name-
the prettiest in all the Union) is the
home of our king. He could not have
selected a fairer domain. There, like
the veriest coquette of all our States,
she stubbornly sits upon her seat of
eternal rook, ner back propped up against
her neighbors, Georgia and Alabama; her
feet dangling down into the sea, her toes
sticking out at Key West, while her de-
voted attendants, old ocean and the gulf,
seem to be in a continual quarrel to de-
clde which shall fan her the oftenest.
Along her twenty rivers and uncounted
lakef, fr d on either side with an in-
terminable tangle of jessamine, ivy, ey-
pre, magnolia and palmetto, and where
Slong filmy veil of Spanish moss
throws Its weird and dancing shadows,
our king first saw the light.
A Florida story is this: Every or-
ange is supposed to contain an embryo
King; thls, at all the seeds of an orange
are planted at the same time, in the
ame soil and like conditions, one will
be far in advyaos of all the others in
steadily ot hd asdt vigo of growth.


In short, one will be a king and entitled
to a crown. King Citrus at the begin-
ning of his career was a very unpolished,
boorish sort of a fellow. Yet there was
9 kind of mildewed aristocracy about
him, but it looked very unlikely that he
should ever be able to claim his crown,
raised as he had been in the backwoods
without a particle of culture and refine-
ment. He must have the advantages of
better society and better schooling; he
must go to college) indeed, his character
must be changed in many ways. That
which was bitter and acid in his nature
must be turned to sweet, and the rough
expression of his tawny features must
be made smooth and bright .before he


could rightfully claim
say:



his kingdom and


"I'm monarch of all I survey,
My right there is none to dispute."
The grand possibilities that might be
attained by a thorough education loomed
up before him. Visions of countless
groves laden with golden balls whik


should cover his whole domain, fired his
ambition. Just then a pomological wiz-
ard came along with his uncanny and
alluring suggestions. "What better plan
could be devised," said he, than to seek
an alliance with foreign kings and
queens?" In fact, a royal marriage was
ust the thing. So Italy, Sicily, China,
Portugal and Spain were all called in
council. Each gallantly tendered "scions"
of their princely stock which were most
lovingly embraced by King Citrus. It is
wonderful to notice the marked effect
whio good company, good clothes and
refined, cultural society have upon some
natures. You would hardly have known
King Citrus after his marriage and his


Drawn by Percy P. Lewis.
acquaintance with the wizard. Before
that event, everybody had called him
"common," "low blood" behind his back.
Society had merely bowed to him at a
distance, but never sought to pay him a
visit; but now as he had come into
kingly power, the homage he received
wa truly emarkable. Tone and money


always bring their devotees. "Don't take
off your white kid gloves," said he to
the New York Fifth Avenue belle; "I'll
send you some of the daintiest members
of my family to serve at any of your
grand functions."
But to attain to this superior posi-
tion he must be properly and most suit-
ably nourished. He must be fed with the
best of health foods, for he is decidedly
epicurean in his tastes. The modern
"germ" theory appeals to his sense of
right and justice, for his small enemies,
the rust, mite and scale infinitesimal
as they appear to be, must be vigorously
banished from his kingdom. "It is very
small business for a king," said he,
"but the world demands it and I must
submit."
We cannot, however, vouch for the
highest moral character of King Citrus.
He evidently believes in "graft," cer-
tainly in poligamy. His numerous wives
and offspring will attest to the truth of
the latter fact. From a great globular
monstrosity miscalledd grapefruit), on
which one might readily describe a map
of the world, down to the daintiest im-
aginable little dwarf pygmy, which bears
the euphonious name of "Kumquat," to-
gether with lemons and limes, all are
called his children and grandchildren.
There seems to be no end to the in-
ordinate ambition and aristocratic pro-
clivities of King Citrus. His friend, the
wizard, is continually suggesting new
possibilities. He promised him money
and power. What other two words could
be more enticing? He told him that he
could change the color of his blood, drive
out all objectionable seeds, give him a
smooth, clear skin and lovely complex-
ion. In short, he could completely trans-
form him, make him very beautiful and
give him a long, useful life, even down
to old age!
But there was one thing the wizard
'lid not positively promise him, and that
was to keep Mr. John Frost, the old
Ice King, from the North, from invading
his domain. This venerable, cold-hearted
however, some years ago, to send word
old gentleman, with long flowing white
heard and icy touch, had the courtesy,
that he was coming, but King Citrus, in
his most disdainful way, exclaimed:
"I hate the cold-wave flag
Above the signal station;
I hate the blackened rag
That jeers the freezing nation."
Of course he had the worst of the
fight, and which in his humiliation and
shame, cost poor Florida millions of dol-
lars. In addition to that, besides losing
thousands of his family, he barely es-
caped attending his own funeral!
But King Citrus and the wizard are
again the best of friends. Just now they
are in earnest consultation us to the
(Continued on.next Page)


12


THE










March 10, 1906


THS UN


jPTOIU


Thy C (DIS


Far in the west a black cloud's crest,
No larger than my hand,
Was seen at eve to ftet and grieve
At the sunset's golden band.
And now apace with lowering face
The clouds still darker grow,
And as they spread the sky overhead
Their lightning glances throw.
The wind is stilled, the air is filled
With portents of the storm;
Thk lagging thrush seeks sheltering bush;
The air grows thick and warm.
A blinding flash-a roar-a crash--
The flood gates open wide;
The Storm King's steed o'er hill and mead
Like a ghost is seen to glide;
And in the air wind demons tear
Great branches from the trees.
I hear their yell, and their voices fell-
Horrible sounds are these.
The great oaks groan and the elm trees
moan
As they feel the racking pain,
And they fling their arms in wild alarms
And battle the hurricane.
But the pine tree stands and waves his
hands,
And he casts the gauntlet down;
And his mighty sought the woods arouse,
And all other voices drown.
And the Storm King fears when the pine
he hears,
And the gauntlet he passes by;
But his baffled roar from the sycamore
Causes a startled cry.
Then the monarch calls to his demon
thralls
As a final blast he blows,
And they throng around at the well-
known sound,
And the air then stiller grows.
The warrior hand then waves command,
And the storm band hies away;
But the muffled beat of their coursers' feet
Still rings in my ears today.


The Story qf King Citrus
(Continued from Twelfth Page)
best method of waging a battle with Mr.
John Frost, should he decide to visit
Florida again. Modern war tactics are
in preparation. We shall me.
In any case, our king does not propose
to stay long in the valley of humilia-
tion. He is thoroughly optimistic. He be-
lieves in progress. As the warm rays of
our Southern sun play around his feet,
and the little rills of youth begin to
trickle around his heart, the old gleam
of vanity appears on his features and
with the utmost generosity, he is now
preparing to say to his friends, both
North and South:
"Take the fruit I give you," says the
bending tree,
]Nothing but a burden is it all to me.
Lighten ye my branches; let them toss
in air--
Only leave me freedom-next year's load
to bear."
UNSANITARY TRAINS.
Who has not passed through vile-
smelling cars in which emigrant home-
seekers must live several days, some-
times a week, before they reach the land
of promise?
Health boards send up their protests
on a thousand well-founded pretexts,
but no one cares about the resdents of
nowhere, who travel in the care that
belong to no State and whose owners
defy all States.
Night falls on the emigrant ear where
the foreign poor sit up and sleep as best
they may in the not too comfortable
esia, while the ai grow foul


Ten or twenty years ago, the conu-
tions were little worse, or perhaps not
as bad as they are today. Fifty persons
-men, women and children-are now
crowded in a homeseeker's car no larger
than a room built to accommodate half
a doxen persons.-Tampa Globe.

Political Advertisements
To the Voters of Duval County (18th
Senatorial District):
I hereby announce myself as a candi-
date for the State Senate from this, the
18th Senatorial District, Duval County,
to be voted for at the coming primaries.
H. H. BUCKMAN.

FOR SALE.
Second-hand Soda Fountain, John Mat-
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rolled steel tanks of 10-gallon capacity;
apparatus in good condition and in use
today. For price and further particulars,
apply to D. P. LAWRENCE
P. 0. Box 627, Orlando, Fla.
TF you want to buy or sell Real Detate or bor.
a row Money on Real Estate. C. BUCKMAN,
22 Hogan Street.

KIRK & BOWIE
Room 15, 117 West Forsyth St.
PIK ese
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Dear Dad-I arrived in Jacksonville
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gist, who proscribed diet, and put me on
a fig for breakfast, no lunch, and a pecan
nut for dinner, and after si days' treat-
ment I could see a loaf of PftMMlesu
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18


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(Continued fro
I had seen from
had met that ne wa
too bulky, and his
flat.
"I have come to i
you have in your
named Bantini. He
some years, and I
interest in him."
"Santini?" he rep
Olinto? He is not h
10 o'clock."
This reply surpi
pected the restaurs
regret at his disap;
as though he had b
on the previous da
"May I have a
asked, seeing that
to take something
have one with mel
"Ach noI But
have a kummelIl"
glasses, and tosse(
single gulp, smack
for the average Ru
national decoction
"You find Olint(
suppose?" I said, f
else to say.
"Excellent. The
waiters in the wor
dare not employ a
English would not
I did."
I looked around,
the trade of the p
in chops and steam
ers at midday, ai
those swarms of w
noon bunz around
dows of the worldl
see that his was
vealed by the prin
one of the ong-fly
4d. and 6Od"
"How long has 0
I inquired.
"About a year-
I trust him implh
in charge when I
He does not get
the cook-who is
ians from differ
Suarrel," he added
live in Italy you I
I laughed in oho
at my watch, said
if he will be here
to see him again.'
The Russian wi
plused, but merely
"He is late som
He lives on the ot
over at Camberwel
the waiter would
extremely curious
wised myself In pe
down the restaur
watching the traf
aide.
The man Odin
hard-working feoll
business, for he fe
of the marble ta
brush, at the sai
work of the palli
denly a side door
put his head in t
ter in French. He
about forty, with
upwards, and an
manner. Seeing m,
ing me to be a cu
closed the door qi
I noticed the high
ders, and his back
ly similar to that
whom we had sece
noch Wood.
The suspicion h
Was this Russi
eeive me when hi
would arrive in a 1
curious, for the n
reflected, have bei
days. Surely his a
caused the proper
convenience?
"That was youi
Milanese who
laughed, when th
"Yes, m'sieur.


rood workman-a
though I had cc
that he uses too
ing. These Englisi
I stood in the d


"Sinore Padrone!" cried the man
r cook, wasn't it? The whose apponraince was so absolutely be-
is quarrelsome?" I wildering. "How did you find me here?
e side door had closed. I admit that I deceived you when I told
But Emilio is a very you I had worked at the Milano," he
tnd very honest, even went on rapidly in Italian. "But it was
instantly to complain under compulsion-my actions that night
much oil in his cook- were not my own-hut those of others."
h do not like the oil. "Yes, I understand." I said. "But


oorway again watching


come out into the street I don't wish


March 10, 1906


THE SUNo ___
the busy throng passing outside towards to
r's Spy Royal Oak. Ten o'cloc struck from a d
neighboring church, and I still waited,
)m Tenth Page) knowing only too well that 1 waited in sa
vain for a man whose body had already
the first moment vH e been committed to the grav e outside that
s no Italian. Ho was tar-away old Scotch town. But I waited cil
face too broad in' in order to ascertain the motive of the a]
bearded Russian in leading me to believe sc
nquire after a waiter that the young fellow would really re-
service," an Italian turn.
was my servant lor Presently Odinzoff went outside, carry- he
I naturally take an ing with him two boards upon which tl
the menu of the "Eight-penny Lunch- hi
heated. "Oh! you mean s onl This Day!" was written in scrawly le
iere yet. He comes at characters, and proceeded to affix them
oed me. I had ex- the shop-front. P
raised me. I had ex- This my opportunity, and quick as w
ant-keeper to express thought I moved towards where the un- ti
pearance, yet he spoke healthy youth was at work, and whis-
ieen at work as usual pered:
ty "I'll give you half-a-sovereign if you'll -
liquer brandy" I answer my questions truthfully. Now,
I would be compelled tell me, was the cook, the man I've just
"Perhaps you will seen, here yesterday ?"
t "Yes, sir."
kummel-yes, I will "Was he here the day before?"
And he filled our "No, sir. He's been away ill for four
d off his own at a days."
ing his lips after it, "And your master?"
asian dearly loves his "He's been away too, sir."'
of caraway seeds. I had no time to put any further
o a good servant," I question, for the Russian re-entered at
or want of something that moment, and the youth busied him-
Italians are the best ielf rubbing tne front of the counter
I am Russians, but in pretense that I had not spoken to
Id. I am Russia but Minded, I had some difficulty in slip-
Russian waiter. These ping the promised coin into his hand at
come to my shop if a moment when his master was not look-
and it struck me that s Then I paced up and down the restau-
lace mainly consisted rant, waiting patiently and wondering
sC for chance custom- whether the absence of Emilio had any
nd tea and cake for connectionn with the tragedy up in Ran-
'omen who each after- noch Wood.
that long line of win- noch Wood.
Wea provider. oud While I stood there a rather thin, re-
d's provider." I could pectably-dressed man entered, and seat-
a cheap trade, as re- ing himself upon one of the plush
ted notice stuck upon lounges at the further end, removed his
-blown mirrors: "Ices bowler hat and ordered from the proprie-
)linto been with you?" tor a chop and a pot of tea. Then, tak-
ntong a newspaper from his pocket, he
piettled himself to read, apparently ob-
-rhaps a little more. livious to his surroundings.
and I leave him And yet as I watched I saw that over
go away for holidays. the top of his paper he was carefully
Along very well wthl taking in the general appearance of the
Milanese. These Ital- place, and his eyes were keenly follow-
nt provinces always ing the Russian's movements. The latter
dknow tlhno duIf .u houted-in French-the order for tue
rknw anth, no doubt.' lhop through the speaking-tube to the
rus, and then glancing man Emilio, and then returning to his
: "I'll wait for him, mustonmer he spread out a napkin and
,at ten. I'd much like placed a small cruet, with knife, fork,
S by no means bread before him. But the customer
as by no means non. seemed immersed in hi paper, and never
Sometimes, butlooked up until after the Russian's back
etimher ide of London-. as turned. Then so deep was his inter-
." it in the place. and so keen those dark
return." His confidence that eyes of his, that the truth suddenly
return struck me as dawned upon me. Mackenzie had tele-
; nevertheless I pos raphed to Scotland Yard, and the cum.
tienoe, strolled up and tomer sitting there was a detective who
rant, and then stood had come to investigate. I had advanced
Mf in the Grove out. to the counter to chat again with the
Seemed a quick proprietor, when a quick step behind me
zoff seemed a quick, caused me to turn.
w with a keen eye to Before me stood the slim figure of a
i to polishing the top man in a straw hat and rat r seedy
bless with a pail and black jacket.
me time directing the '.ffiel
Id-looking youdirecth. Sud "Di Signor Padrone /" he cried.
opened, and the cook s Itaggered as though I had received
o speak with his mas- Olinto Santini in the flesh, smiling
was a typical Italian, and well, stood there before me!iling
dark mustache turned
easy-goinlg, careless ---
e, however, and believ- CHAPTER VIII.
stomer, he turned and
quickly. In that instant LIFE'S COUNTER-CLAIM.
broadness of his shoul-
struck me as strange.- No words of mine can express my abso-
of the man in brown lute and abject amazement when I faced
n disappearing in Ran- the man, whom I had seen lying cold
mnd dead upon that gray stone slab in
eld me breathless, the mortuary at Dumfraes.
an endeavoring to de- My eye caught the customer who, on
e declared that Olinto the entry of Olinto, had dropped his
few minutes? It seemed paper and sat staring at him in wonder-
man now dead must, I ment. The detective had evidently been
en away at least four furnished with a photograph of the dead
absence from work had man, and now, like myself, discovered
ietor considerable in- uiin alive and livim.


(CONTINUED NEXT WEEK.)


Frw $.75 we will send,exrem prepaid, 4 full
Fw $3.1A we will sen, expream repaid,4 full
quarts of
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F $.7 we will prepaid 4 full




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Ow. *Mm Md ly Jnk l'6, qFa.
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*
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I


speak before these' people. Your pa-
one knows Italian, no doubt."
"Ahl only a very little," he answered,
ailing. "Have no fear of him.
"But there is Emilio, the cook?"
"Then you have met himl" he ex-
aimed quickly, with a strange look of
pprebenifon. "He is an undesirable per-
n, signore."
"So I gather," I answered. "But I
desire to speak to you outside-not
ere." And then turning with a smile to
he Pole, I apologized for taking away
is servant for a few minutes. "Recol-
ect, I am his old master, I added."
"Of course, m'a ur," answered the
ole, bowing politely. "Speak with him
here and how long you will. He is en-
irely at your servioe."


mira


Es As RIGKER


"m











Ah 10, 190g


THE sti*


Short Sermon for

Non-Church Goers


THE SATISFIED WANT


by Rev. T. Henry Blenus, Pastor Church Street
Christian Church
There was a restless, unsatisfied want expressed in all anti-evangelical litera-
ture and art. There was a half-articulated lamentation, and a wail of melancholy
in the epics and tragedies of Greece and of all Eastern poetry, as well as in the
lofty meditations of Athenian and Latin philosophy.
This insatiable desire for .truth, and consolation and certainty, was wrought
by sculptures into marble, framed in temples of worship and built into structures
of mammoth proportions, and magnificent architectural skill. Socrates and Plato,
the two great philosophers of their age, realized the utter insufficiency of specu-
lative philosophy or human reason to guide the hopes and destiny of the human
race.
The great want that humanity had felt for so many ages was met in the
incarnation of the Son of God. "God manifest in the flesh" was the solution, and
the only solution of this problem that had baffled ages, set philosophy at naught,
and bid defiance to the grandest efforts of human reason.
Perhaps the man who in ancient times came nearest to the recognition of the
unity and personality of the Deity was Plato, who might be said to have trodden
on the skirts of revelation, but who passed away without beholding either its
face or its form.
The Bible, in its Old Testament, gives us a revelation of a personal God, and
in the New Testament a personal revelation of God. The great necessity for a
mediator was long apparent. The chasm between the finite and the infinite had to
be bridged, and many attempts to accomplish this had been made.
All nations had either sought for a mediator or had degraded their deities
down to the level of human faculties. They all seemed to have recognized the fact,
that the infinite was incomprehensible, so, in order to worship, some inferior
being must stand between the worshipers and the divine object of adoration.
A mediator, literally one who stands between, must stand on the level of
both contending parties. He must share human nature, and yet must stretch
away to the ininite. Christ, the mediator, meets these demands. Clothed in our
own nature, He touches the earth at its lowest plane of sin and misery. By His
manhood, humanity was raised up to God, and God brought down to man. With
the incarnation humanity became divine, and with the divine humanity, came
divine sorrows and divine sympathies which reach every grade and condition of
the human race. These are the underlying principles of our religious faith.


The Vnion and

Times- Vnion
[Continued from Eleventh Page]
them have proven unworthy of the honor
that I know of. They have turned every
dollar earned back into the channels of
trade so long as they earned a dollar
within Jacksonville's gates. A great
many of them are proper i-owners and
are classed among our best citizenship.
They are union men because there is a
reason for organization among work-
men, and because they saw years ago,
the only method of hedging against op-
pression and greed on the one hand and
ill-fed, ill-clad wife and children on the
other.
The class of citizen that has been im-
ported here by the "open shop" concerns
bear no such reputation for honesty and
sincerity of purpose. They, for the most
part, are drifters upon the face of the
earth; they are here to-day and gone to-
morrow-with only the consolaUon of
having aided capital in its war against
manly men. That they are morally
wrong and mentally weak, is evidenced
by the strong police protection they de-
mand-and get-at the expose of tax-
payers. In olden days men paid for
protection from their enemies. Now we
pay for our enemies' protection.
Is it reasonable to suppose that men
with so much at stake; with families
dependent upon them for supports with
obligations outstanding that, were they
repudiated, would besmirch their
name; with the eventual loss of all they
possess in the event that they are forced
elsewhere to seek employment-I say, is
it reasonable to suppose that these men
would, without good and sufficient cause,
strike against a place from which they
had made a living under fair conditions
for a number of years?
If an amicable understanding be-
tween the president of the Times-Union
and the workmen in the employ of that
paper had existed for more than ten
years, and during all that time there
had been little or no friction; if there
had never been a question of dispute
between the chapel and the business of-
fice but what was quickly adjusted on
the give-and-take principle when brought
to the attention of Mr. Wilson (as he
himself has stAed) i f violation of eAe
rules or precedent by the workman had


not always met with prompt adjustment
on the part of the local union;, In short,
had there never been satisfaction among
the workmen with conditions in the
Times-Union composing room nor "easy
sailing" for the management of that
paper with a force of union men there,
would it not appear that the manage-
ment had long been neglecting their duty
by retaining a force upon whom there
was no profit?
The long continuance of amicable ar-
rangements, then, appears to favor the
union side of the question in no small
degree, and it made the resentment of
old, tried and trusted men doubly se-
vere to find that a man had been thrust
in upon them as foreman who had about
as much regard for union rules and laws
as he had for the feelings of the men
over whom he endeavored to czar in
true Russian style. The Times-Union has
stated that it had "no fight with organ-
ised labor-organised labor is fighting
the Times-Union." This foreman was the
"creation" of the business end of the
paper. He was supposed to be a union
man. He carried a union card and paid
dues. He was, by the law of the union,
the only man to whom we could apply
for a situation there, and likewise the
only man with authority to discharge.
Under the same law by which every
union print shop in the United States
and Canada is governed, the foreman is
allowed to discharge men:
(1) For incompetency;
(2) For neglect of duty;
(3) For violation of office rules, or
laws of the union or chapel; and
(4) To decrease the force.
But in every instance, except the
fourth, the foreman must-if called on
so to do-prove that the discharged per-
son is guilty of the charge made against
him.
This law is not a local, but an inter-
national law. It has been operative for
many years and has proven as much a
protection to foremen inclined to act
fairly as it was a protection to the men
under him.
The "creation" of the management
saw fit to totally ignore this law, and
many other laws of the union as well
as laws of common civility. He changed
the office during his four weeks' fore-
manship over union men from a syste-
matte and effective force, to a deranged
and ineffective mass; he "slated" ma--
those he intended to discharge-until
not ow of the twenty-odd mploed there
felt that be was secure for even a nights


work after time was called and the
"grind" started.
When he started his "firing" process
without even so much as giving a rea-
son the union was forced to take decisive
action.
Mr. Wilson had, some months prior to
this turned over the management of the
meoani force to Mr. Stokton--a man
who has mver been a friend in any sense
of the word to organized labor, and it
was perfectly natural that the men
should feel that any effort to right their
wrongs before that tribunal would meet
with scorn and contempt. That they
were correct in this was clearly demon.
strated when, upon reporting for work
on the evening of the sixth of February,
they found the entrance to the ofloe
not only locked and barred, but actually
nailed; a notice posted on the door to
the effect that all workmen must confer
with the business office before going to
work-a notice that had only one mean-
ing, the renouncing of the union in or-
der to go to work.
The executive committee of the union
asked for the displacement of the fore-
man (who had been expelled from the
union) and after thirty minutes of de-
liberation, were told that the Times-
Union could better afford to miss one or
two issues of the paper than to submit
to the dictation o itu business affairs
by the union.
The workmen stood ready to get out
the paper without a foreman, and the
management was so informed, but the
"creation" of the management was worth
more than the force, and we of the Mer-
genthaler and the "knights of the stick"
were turned away because the "open
shop" was necessary to perfect the ease
and comfort of the "'management.
And so the fight is on.
We have no great daily with which
to enlighten the public as to the why.
fore of which, but we have brains-and
common horse sense enough to use them.
We are not slinging mud, but will show
tne people of Flo"ida one of the cleanest
Pnd most effective scraps between the
orces of for-e-money and labor-that
has ever been pulled off within our bor-
ders.
We are few in number here in Jack-
sonville-less than half a hundred at
the present writing in our own local-
but there are some 47,000 of us scat-
tered from Dan to Bersheba who are
laying up the neat little sum of more
than $90,000 a week for Just such con-
tingencies. We have the money, and
what is more, we have 90 per cent of
the printers of the country within our
ranks, and I am not aware of there being
many soreheads in all the bunch. So "lay
on, McDuff, and damned be he who first
dries 'hold, enough 1'"
A long list of good, bad and indiffer-
ent men have found after years of fight-
ing against union workmen that their
best interests were to recognize the rights
of their employees. I could name a few
who spent millions of dollars trying to
crush organized labor out of existence,
but found the army stronger and better
equipped for a continuance of the strug-
gle in the end than they were at the
beginning. So it will prove in this in-
stance.
I am informed that one of the memn-
bers of the Times-Union managerial
board has given out the statement that
inside of a year "there will not be a
labor union in Jacksonville." I don't
know if he said it or not, and care less,
because there has been but one man of
parables born of woman, and he has
long since passed over the divide in ab-
ject disgust at the arrogance of mankind
in general, and Dives in particular; but
let time alone refute or verify.

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