Group Title: sun.
Title: The sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075914/00017
 Material Information
Title: The sun
Uniform Title: sun
Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sun Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: March 3, 1906
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tallahassee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Leon County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Leon -- Tallahassee
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.451667 x -84.268533 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 18, 1905)-v. 3, no. 47 (Sept. 12, 1908).
Numbering Peculiarities: Published at Tallahassee, Fla., June 23-Sept. 12, 1908.
General Note: Claude L'Engle, editor.
General Note: "If it's right, we are for it."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075914
Volume ID: VID00017
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33400104
lccn - sn 95047216
 Related Items
Other version: Morning sun (Tallahassee, Fla.)
Succeeded by: Dixie (Jacksonville, Fla.)

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In this Issue RAILROAD COMMISSION UNDER FIRE
Page 3


A Journal of Cartoon and Comment


Volume 1-No. 16


JAGKSONVILLE, ILORIDA, MARGl 3, 1906 Single Gopy


5 Gents


DON'T MIND THE CENSUS-STORKS ABE COMING OUR WAY











IF IT'S RIGHT, WE ARE FOR IT---


CLAUDE L'ENOLE
Editor


TiTHE


SUN


Ml UMIM1 Im ill WINL A WIL O WN1, U OMIT, m m T mL FM B, T Il sN mi M a1 t W S Fit "imTLr, JASSImwLL, UNA
Volme 1-,No. 16 d JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA, MARCH 3, 1906 S Cas5 per Copy, $2 per Year
Fntered at the Poet Office at JacksMonville, Fla., a seond-cdM matter


IN THE SUNP'S CHARIOT
Iatate Talks Between Ptbsher and Reader
We have said several times in this department that letters come lo
us every day from people who are impressed with The Sun.
Most of the Impressions are good ones. Some few are bad.
All of the letters please us, because even the bad ones contain no
objection on the general principles of truth, riht and justice.
The objections are all special-on some point wherein our view is
not the view of the objector.
We print two of these letters this week.
THE SUN, Jacksonville, Fla. FAIRFIELD, FLA., February 27, 1906.
THE SUN, Jacksonville, Fla.
Gentlemen-Knowing I have not paid for The Sun, which I like for its fear-
lessness, honesty and truth, I enclose $1 for continuation of same.
You have the common masses behind you, and I sincerely trust and hope
that The Sun will continue to be the fearless, independent organ of the truth,
honesty and that which is right, no matter who it hurts.
I regret to see Watson made so conspicuous in the last Sun, for knowing him
to be an enemy to the Democracy, I have no use for him; yet you cannot please
everybody. Success to you. Respectfully,
M. L. PAYNE.
What this friend says about Watson does not effect our opinion of
Watson's honesty as a man, his force as a writer or his vigor as a think-
er. Like our correspondent, we do not agree with Mr. Watson in poli-
tics, but we respect his opinions because of the greatness of his soul.
We do not agree with Abe Lincoln in politics, but we endorse his
standard of humanity.

FULFORD, FLA., February 2, 1906.
THE SUN, Jacksonville, Fla.
Mr. Editor-I think The Sun is the Commoner of Florida, and when this is
said, it is the highest compliment that can be paid The Sun by me.
Usually I am slow in paying my subscription fees for any paper, but on re-
ceipt of the second copy of The Sun, I went down to The Metropolis office at
Miami and paid for same. This too was a compliment to The Sun.
JOHN A. IIARP.
This letter places us where we do not wish to stand. We are not
entirely with W. J. Bryan in his views of governmental problems. We
agree with him in politics, but cannot follow his changes.
As the writer says, he desires to praise us, and we know he has
done It when he utters the sentiment of his heart.
As we have said before, we expect honest men to disagree with us
sometimes.
All we ask is, that all *ood men will respect us. We will then
win enough affection from those who do airee with us to last us
through life's short journey.


From our large collection we present a small bunch of
SUN BOUQUETS.


The Jacksonville Sun is improving
rapidly. We all enjoy it ever so
much. The stories are certainly in-
teresting. Hope it will soon have a
large circulation throughout the
country. Why don't everybody take
it? It is cheap enough for so much
good reading.-White Springs Her-
ald.


The Florida Sun is a bright paper,
and deserves a large subscription
list. Editor L'Engle and Cartoonist
Tsylor are giving their readers their
mopqe's worth.-Taylor County Cit-
Ia.


If the Jacksonville Sun wins its
victory in that city it will be because
the people stand by it. There will
be a rattling of the dry bones when
The Sun's rays begin to strike the
bunch square.-(iainesville Sun.


The editorial page of last week's
Sun, published in Jacksonville by
Editor L'Engle and Cartoonist Tay-
Slr, is worth the full price of a year's
subscription.-Cocoa and Rockledge
News.


A


Great Half-Price


Offer


Read every word in this announcement, for it is tile opportunity of
years. Seven of the greatest magazines in the country have combined to be
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given to the public and it is safe to say never will it beI made again. This
year several magazines have increased their Pubtcription price, which shows
how much greater this offer really is. The only reason we are making it to
the people of this State is because we have iincreasd the subcription price of
THEI .U to $ pW usr, and we want all Florida to read THE- SU.


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Woman's Home Companion, one year,
The Review of Reviews, one year, -
Pearson's, one year, -
The American Magazine, one year, -
. Tom Watson's Magazine, one year, -
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THE REVIEW OF REVIEWS Substantial American men and women are going
to keep up with the times and they are going to
take the shortest cut-which is The Review of Reviews--a monthly survey of the world's
progress.
WOMAN'S HOME COMPANION is not excelled by an other home and
fashions, artles, illustrations family publication in the world. Stories,
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,lPEARSON' Is one of the leading fiction magazines of the day, both its serial and
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considered authority on book reviews.
THE AMERICAN MAGAZINE For thirty ears known as Leslie's Magazine.
T E A E I N MAGAZINE It was lately purchased by a powerful syndi-
cate, and no funds are lacking to make it one of the best magazines in America,
TOM WATSON'S MAGAZINE No monthly magazine in America ever before
met with such a hearty welcome as did Tom
Watson's by all classes of people, and deservedly so, for Mr. Watson is at once the foremost
writer and clearest thinker before the public today. It is tilled with the best thoughts of
the best minds on all subjects of interest to the American people.
THE SUN la the paper with a will of its own, and is by far the best paper in
Florida-commending all right and censuring all wrong.

Grab This Opportunity
If you want one magazine with our paper for a year, you cannot do better than to accept
one of following offers, while they are hot off the bat and before they are withdrawn:
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*".4.*' r*












March'S, 1906


TEE SUN


RAILROAD D


COMMISSION


UNDER


FIRE


A Compilation of Opinions for and

Against It as a Public Benefactor


In the absence of a direct political issue the value
of the Florida Railroad Commission is fast becom-
ing a live topic with many of the State newspapers.
The Ocala Banner leads the way in condemnation
of the Commission, while the Madison Recorder,whose
owner is secretary of the Commission, is the most
staunch defender of the body and its works.
A weak spot in the position of the defenders is
lack of information stating the value of the Commis-
sion in dollars and cents. Generalities are abundant,
but no definite figures of saving to the people are
announced. The statement is made that iu many in-
stances the freight rates have been reduced, and with
that declaration the public mind is supposed to be
quieted.
Nor does the Commission itself present anything
more satisfactory. Like an alleged philanthropist, is
reported to be doing good by stealth, so is the Rail-
road Commission reticent concerning its acts of benefi-
cence, trusting to establish a reputation for uphold-
ing the public welfare without disclosing the manner
of means or the net result of its efforts.
At present the members of the Commission are
extremely busy. It is noticeable that industry always
prevails in that department of the State government
previous to an election. All members are present at
Tallahassee and are very active.
Railways are being fined for failure to bulletin
belated trains, new depots are ordered, and matters
of like nature are deliberately considered.
The newspapers duly record this activity of the
Commission, and the people remember that there is
such a bureau in existence.
Sometimes the railways obey these orders. Again,
they do not. Obedience depends upon the viewpoint
of the railway management. A case occurred at Lake
City, where a union depot was ordered by the Com-
mission some years ago. The lines affected were the
S. A. L., the G. S. and F., andthe A. C. L., or Plant
System, as the latter was then known.
The Seaboard was going to build a station to re-
place one that had burned, and had so made agree-
ment with the G. S and F. for joint construction and
occupancy. The Plant System demurred at the pro-
posed site, which was at the junction of the other
roads, and refused to build with them, unless the
station was placed adjacent to its tracks. When this
refusal was brought to the notice of the Commis-
sion one of the members moved that action in case
of the Plant System "be deferred." No more orders
were issued. The S. A. L. and G. 8. and 1. built the
station on the site that suited them and the Plant
system flocked by itself, while the new structure was
dubbed a union depot, built by order of the Railroad
Commission.
Comment relative to the value of the Commission
has been aroused by the statement that the salaries
and expenses of the bureau for the past year were
nearly $13,000, causing inquiry as to what benefit the
people have received for such expenditure.
The Palatka Times-Herald thinks "when one con-
siders the immense amount saved the shippers of the
State through the efforts of this body this item of
expense is not heavy." The Times-Heral, however,
confesses its ignorance of the saving. A "imagines"
that it must be "hundreds of thousands of dollars,"
judging from the "language of the newspapers."
Imagination, therefore, appears to be the varnish
that causes to shine the veneer of popular belief in
the infallability of the Railroad Commission to be
other than an instrument of public welfare.
The Ocala Banner is also among the list of inquir-
ers who are anxious to learn how much a year the
Commission has saved to the people of the State,
and the DeLand News, in reply, does not seem able
to give answer concerning freight rates, but warms
up in discussion of the reduction of pasaanger fare,
and points out that the great saving to travelers be-
tween Jacksonville and Orlando would pay the cost
of the Commission to the whole State.


Nobody will dispute the fact that a reduction to
three cents a mile from four cents is conducive to a
large saving by the public, yet an act of the Legisla-
ture could have effected this benefit without cost to
the people.
For many years the J., T. and K. W. Railway
maintained a three-cent fare, but shortly after the
road was bought by the Plant System the fare was
raised to four cents a mile, and the Railroad Com-
mission permitted such raise. The rate of fare on
the G. S. and F. was three cents a mile, fixed so by
the management, and maintained without order from
the Commission.
The Florida East Coast Railway reduced the
fare to three cents a mile several months before
the more or less famous ukase of the Commission
that passenger tariff in Florida must be assessed at
three cents a mile.
So far no defender of the Commission has brought
forward anything more definite than the reduction of
passenger fare on some of the railways, which reform,
as stated, could have been accomplished by act of the
Legislature.
The passenger rate is a minor matter in compari.
son with the freight rate. While many are affected
by the former, yet all are touched by freight rates.
It is the consumer who pays the bill, and the shipper
of fruits and vegetables is put under a handicap
that forces him out of business.
Such is the contention of the Ocala Banner, and
in spite of the enmity between that paper and its
contemporary, the Star, the latter agrees with the
Banner's opinion, saying: "The Commission has been
a miserable failure in the matter of securing just
and equal freight rates to the thriving inland towns
of Florida." It asks: "Can nothing be done to secure
a freight rate ?" and declares that it is tired of asking
the question," adding that "it looks like, a farce to
vote for a Railroad Commission candidate."
The Banner in its bill of particulars, names many
who have been driven out of the truck-growing busi-
ness in that region through a failure of the Railroad
Commission to afford relief.
The Banner says: "The Easterlings, the largest
vegetable growers perhaps in the United States, who
operated largely a t Martin, a very rich section in
tnis county, have pulled up stakes and moved away.
"A large number of growers at Anthony have
restricted their acreage and some have Leen forced
to quit altogether.
"A party of gentlemen from Vincennes, Indiana,
purchased a large tract of land near Ocala and plant-
ed the same in vegetables. They said that their object
was not to get rich quick, but they wanted to do a
steady, legitimate business.
"After three years' trial they have pulled up
stakes and returned to their Indiana home.
"The gentlemen composing this party said that
the climate of Florida is all right; they liked it im-
mensely; it produces finely, and that the soil is all
right; that people here are clever and hospitable.
They, in a word, had no fault to find with any of the
climatic conditions. No fault to find with the soil,
nor with the people.
"Indeed, they found the soil more productive
than they had anticipated. It produces abundantly
and they got good prices for their products, but they
said that it is a matter of impossibility to succeed
in growing vegetables in the interior of Florida and
pay the freight rates assessed against them."
It recites the troubles of a Marion County farmer,
who for twenty years had kept up the struggle
which ended in defeat. Excess freight rates put him
out of business, and asks what does a man in such
difficulty "care about the Florida Railway Commis-
sion fining a railway company fifty or an hundred
dollars for not bulletin a belated train ?"
The Live Oak Democrat, commenting on the eril-
elsms offered by the Banner, remarks that, "We
know little about th efforts of the Florida Coml-


sion to compel our roads to make just freight rates,
but it is reasonable to suppose that it has given just
attention to all complaints made and has done its
best in the premises. To say less would be to im-
peach the conscientious fidelity to duty of the mem-
bers of the Commission."
The Democrat is willing to assume thut the Com-
mission is doing its best, but thinks if the claims
of the Banner are true that "the Florida Railroad
Commission is a practically worthless factor in our
Mtate government in the matter of securing equita-
ble freight rates for our shippers, it is a proper mat-
ter for public discussion and some remedy should be
applied."
The Banner says that the people of the interior
are refused a "square deal," and that the "Railroad
Commissioners, elected by the people in the interior,
refuse to put interior cities on an equality with sea-
port cities."
Whether the Commission has refused to do this,
or whether it is unable to equalize the rates is un-
known. It is a fact, though, that water competition
possesses power of rate-making superior to any
commission. i'hen, should the Railroad Commission,
if it is to be of benefit to the people, attempt to
equalize rates for inland towns, and provide that
the inhabitants of the interior should not be com.
spelled to balance the railway profit that might be
lowered through competition with water transporta-
tion.
Competitive points should possess an advantage
over the non-competitive, though under supervision
of the State Railroad Commission it is doubtful if
they do, if the experience of Ocala can serve as
example.
The noted ease of LaGrange, Ga., brought forth
the decision from the United States Supreme Court,
that in effect a commission was powerless to establish
a rate for a non-competitive point.
Shipments made to LaGrange from New Orleans
were at higher charge than the same from New
Orleans to Atlanta, although the distance was
greater in the latter case. Indeed, a shipment could
be made from Now Orleans to Atlanta and thence
back over the same road to LaGrange at a lower rate
than from New Orleans to LaGrange direct. The
court held that thia was just, because Atlanta was a
competing point and LaGrange was not, so that even
the Inter-State Commerce Commission was powerless
to afford relief.
The Madison Recorder, in defending the Commis-
sion, asserts that freight rates have been lowered,
but it fails to give figures or other evidence that
reductions have been generally made under the direc-
tion of the Commission. It says: "When the Com-
mission was established, it adopted the class rates
of the railroads practically as they then existed.
The name system is in existence today, except that
they have been reduced in many cases. Although the
rates to the Northern markets are inter-state, yet
through the good offices of the Commission, more
than two-thirds of them have been reduced below
what they were before the Commission was estab-
lished."
The Recorder fails to explain how the Commis-
sion influenced the inter-state rates, yet if the body
has accomplished such results, it should be given
high credit.
In answer to the Banner's demand for equali-
zation the Recorder declares that it has been done,
stating that "the only rates which the Commis-
sioners have made and are not based entirely on mile-
age, are the fruit and vegetable rates, which they
were instrumental in getting reduced."
Such explanation may be satisfying to the pub-
lic, still it would carry some weight if a comparison
of figures had been made. The claim that rates have
been lowered is a statement to be taken on faith.
The Cocoa and Rockledge News does rot attempt
to show a benefit resulting from the Commission, but
sees in the criticism that "the mailed hand of the
railroads is now striking at the Stat&Railroad Com-
mission. The pot metal brigade is passing the word
around in Florida that the Commission must go. The
Commission.is standing by the people, hence the rail-
road edict has gone forth that it must be abolished.
On guard, there, people of Florida 1 The primary is
approaching, and a word to the wise is sufficient."
A strange defense and deficient in logic. Criticism
of the Commission is not indicative of friendship to
the railways, but rather a spur to better work on
the part of the Commission or else admission that
it is unable to secure the reforms demanded by the
people.
Factn, not fancies, nor generalities, is the request
made by the public. In short, the people want to be
shown, and unlm the Commision finds it poesble
to make sah showing, It existence will be looked
on as a nles attachment of the State government.







~v


March 3, 1906


4 THE SUN


SEEN


BY


THE


SUN


OF


L TE


The Semate has agreed to vote on the Statehood
bill March 9.
A cigar factory is the latest instance of Gaines-
ville's industrial development.
The First Florida Brigade, U. C. V., will hold its
annual reunion at DeFuniak March 24.
An imperial ukase fixes may t1 as the date of
opening the Russian National Assembly.
Two thousand persons were drowne,l in Colombia
by a tidal wave which followed an earthquake.
The will of John B. Stetson bequeaths the entire
estate of $6,000,000 to his widow an'l family.
The United States Supreme Court upholds the
tight of railroads to route shipments on through
t, riffs.
Harry N. Roach, for eight years private secretary
to James G. Blaine, lives as a hermit near Winamac,
Ind., and rails at society.
The third annual session of the St. Petersburg
Chautauqua opened Tuesday evening with a large
attendance. -
John F. Wallace favors a sea-level canal at Pan-
ama and opposes construction of thework by the
Government.
A milk trust has been formed by,the dairymen
of Tampa, and March 1 the price was raised to12
cents a quart.
A large crop of oranges and grapefruit is the
prospect for the Manatee country next season, as the
bloom is heavy. 's
The National Divorce Congress ended its sessions
by passing resolutions urging a bill prohibiting mi-
gratory divorces.
It is believed in Ohio that Congressman Gros-
venor will be appointed to some consulate after his
term in Congress.
Citizens of Bath, England, by a vote of two to one,
refused to accept Andrew Carnegie's offer of $65,000
for a public library.
Ill health of King Edward is a matter of concern
in England, as he is reported to bear every evidence
of physical breakdown.
Eight miners were killed and fifteen injured by
an explosion in the mines of the Little Cahab- Coal
Company at Piper, Ala.
Union painters of Tampa have struck for increase
of pay, and the employers have declared their inten-
tion of conducting an 'open shop."
The battleship Ohio has been sent from Manila to
Hong Kong, where she will be'docked and repaired
for possible service in Chinese waters.
Advices from Venezuela state that Castro says he
will drive every foreigner out of the country and
will tear the Monro Doctrine to pieces.
The United States Treasury showed a surplus
February 28 of $1,102,003, the first time in nearly
two years that a deficit has not existed.
Joseph Leiter is being tried on the charge of crim-
inal negligence in the coal mines at Zeigler, Ill.,
where sixty lives were lost in an explosion.
The Senate has passed the Gillespie-Tillman reso-
lution providing for an investigation of the coal and
oil trades and their connection with railroads.
Secretary Root in a letter to Congressman Denby
of Michigan, declares the United States has had no
opportunity to examine Congo Free State troubles.
Hon. David B. Henuerson, former Speaker of the
House of Representatives, died Sunday at Dubuque,
Iowa, after suffering for months from paralysis.
Probability of adjustment of the differences be-
tween the coal miners and the mine owners is increas-
ing, ad Indications are that no strike will occur.
The aInterstate Commerce Commission, in an opin-
iee Elven at Washington, held that rates between
the New York, New Haven and Hartford and West-
era roads formed a discrimination in favor of the
standard Oil Company, but that it was not empow-
eres to nant e.


A. J. Balfour, the former British Premier, was
returned to Parliament for the City.of London by
huge majority. Mr. Balfour is in poor health.
Capt. R. P. Hobson has opened his campaign for
Congress in the Sixth Alabama district against Con-
gressman Bankhead, who defeated Hobson two years
ago.
A jail is to be built at Fort Pierce, the seat of the
new county of St. Lucie. It will be constructed of
l.ri,-k and cement, and the estimated cost is about
$7,000.
A Government dredgehoat has been at work on
the channel in Orange river, and the stream is being
cleared in a manner very satisfactory to steamboat
men.
Mrs. ('ory, wife of the president of the Steel
Tru4t. is at Sioux Falls, S. 1)., where she will remain
in order to secure legal residence in applying for
divorce.
Congressman Keifer of Ohio has introduced a bill
providing for reduction of Southern representation
in Congress, but indications are that it will fail of
passage.
Elliot F. Shepard, who ran over a woman with his
automobile in France, will have to serve three months
in prison, the sentence being affirmed by the Ministry
of Justice.
Business men of Columbus, Ga., are said to be
working for connections at Apalachicola between a
Gulf steamship line and the river steamers from
Columbus.
Application has been made by business men of
Thomasville, Ga., for a charter for a railroad to ex-
tend from Thomasville to St. Joseph, Fla., a distance
of 120 miles.
The building of the Tampa Northern Railroad
is said to be assured, and prospects are that the
road will be completed between Tampa and Brooks-
ville within a year.
An agent of the U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey
is making a trip along the East Coast for the pur-
pose of locating landmarks and statio'is and replac-
ing marks where necessary.
The dry dock Dewey, which is being towed to
Manila, was badly wrenched in recent storms, and
will be detained at the Canary Islands until March
12 in order to make repairs.
The Bankers' Life and Mutual Reserve Life of
New York; the Cosmopolitan Life of Freeport, Ill.,
and the Northwestern National Life of Minneapolis,
have withdrawn from Missouri.
The Duchess Sophie Charlotte of Oldenburg and
Prince Eitel Friedrich, second son of the German
Emperor, were married in the Court Chapel at the
palace at Berlin February 27.
Rev. George D. Wade of Lead, S. D., has been
sentenced to imprisonment for one year, and to pay
a fine of $1,000 for defrauding the Government by
means of illegal homestead entries.
An electric line from Tampa to the east coast is
a reported project; a representative of New York
interests in Tampa stating that a survey for the
proposed road would be made soon.
Timmons-Blount Company of Tampa, dealer in
naval stores, has been organized and the name
changed to the Peninsula Naval Stores Company, and
the capital stock increased to $500,000.
A delegation from the House committee on rivers
and harbors and interstate commerce will visit Apa-
lachiceola and inspect West Pass there March 12. Con-
gressman Lamar will accompany the party.
State Superintendent of Insurance Hendricks of
New York replies to his critics by saying it is not his
duty to concern himself with the honesty of insurance
officers, and that he could not if he wished.

The agricultural committee of the House declares
in favor of stopping the appropriation for free seeds,
and the matter is likely to provoke a hearty fight
when the time comes for action by Congress.
I. E. Cooper, who was to have been hanged at
Areadia last Friday, was granted a reprieve by the
Board of Pardons. Cooper was convicted of killing
J. H. Bowman, marshal of Punta Gorda, January 29,
1903, and has twice before been reprieved.


The Greenville Yellow Pine Company has been
organized, and a tract of 19,000 acres of timber
bought in Madison County. A mill with a capacity of
72,000 feet a day, will be erected at Greenville.
A leading industry of Lee County is the factory
at Caxambas for canning clam broth and 'chowder.
The weekly output is said to exceed 2,000 dozen cans
of the product, which is shipped to New York.
The Chautauqua at Gainesville opened March 2
and will continue until March 15. Among those who
will appear on the platform are Senator Dolliver
of Iowa and Captain Hobson of Merrimac fame.-
The Sponge Exchange Bank has been organized
at Tarpon Springs with capital of $15,000. The
sponge industry at that place has reached such pro-
portions that a banking house became a necessity.
Chairman Burrows of the Senate Committe3 (n
Privileges and Elections, has agreed with Senator
Smoot and his counsel to hear the evidence in rebLt-
tal in the case of the Utah Senator, March 26.
Robert J. Collier, on the stand in the hearing of
Colonel Mann, editor of Town Topics, for perjury,
swore that he was paying all costs of prosecution,
and would willingly spend $200,000 to convict him.
A society woman of St. Louis was fined $10 for
contempt of court because she refused to answer the
question of a negro lawyer. She paid the fine, but
insisted that she did not have to answer "the nigger.'
A trackless trolley system is proposed to connect
Fort Meyers with Alva, the center of a big orange
growing region on the Caloosahatchee. The line will
be put in operation if the county will build a hard
road.
Congressman Blackburn of the Eighth North Car-
olina district, presented himself in court at Asheville
and was released in $1,000 bail, his trial being set for
April next, on the charge of having taken fees in
return for his official influence.
The people of Starke now get their laundry work
done at home, the new steam laundry being in opera-
tion. The new ice plant, with a capacity of ten tons
daily, is being constructed, and citizens expect to be
supplied with ice before April 1.
General Thomas J. Wood, senior surviving com-
manding officer of the Union army in the Civil War,
died in Dayton, Ohio, last Sunday. General Wood
was also a veteran of the Mexican war, serving on
the staff of General Zachary Taylor.
Hon. J. C. Baisden of Live Oak has been appointed
to the vacancy in the State Board of Control. Mr.
Baisden is the third to receive the appointment since
the resignation of Hon. Nat. Adams, Messrs. Sandlin
and Pope each declining the honor.
Professor Langley, secretary of the Smithsonian
Institute, and a noted scientist, died at Aiken, S. C.,
Tuesday. During his later years Professor Langley
had spent much time in attempting to perfect a fly-
ing machine, but his models proved unsuccessful.
Industrial activity is the order of the day in Her-
nando County. Wood-working plants, development of
phosphate mines and railroad building are among
the enterprises, and a demand for carpenters and
other skilled, as well as untrained labor, is reported.
Punta Gorda is to be added to the list of Florida
towns having its manufactory for sand-lime brick
and cement building blocks. The increasing price of
lumber and the demand for cheaper building mate-
rial offer the incentive for the plant, which will be
established at once.

A board of trade has been organized at Lake
Butler, the business men of that town believing
that united action should be used to push the inter-
ests of the place. A plan for partial drainage of the
lake and beautifying its borders is among contem-
plated improvements.

Mr. and Mrs. W. K. Vanderbilt, Jr., were attacked
by a mob at Pontederce, Italy, a boy having been
run down by the Vanderbilt automobile. Mr. Van-
derbilt was rescued by the police, after having been
beaten by the crowd. He was later released, as prose-
cution was not made.

Delaware and New Jersey representatives have
filed application for a suspension of proceedings in
the long-pending boundary suit between the two
States. Efforts will be mad reto seurea settlement
by legislation. The dispute started in 1750 and got


into the courts in 1877:












March 3, 1906


THE SUN


SUMMER Y

The Russian Emperor has rejected measures pro-
viding more, severe methods of checking disorder in
the empire. The press of St. Petersburg, with a
single exception, denounces the convocation of the
National Assembly before the elections have been
finished.
American mission stations at Nanchang, China,
have been destroyed and two English and six French
missionaries were killed in an attack by the natives.
Fourteen American missionaries escaped. The United
States gunboat El Cano, at Nanking, was ordered
to the scene of trouble.
The total orange and grapefruit crop of Lee
County for the season now closing will be about
120,000 boxes. The estimate for the next crop is
175,000 to 200,000 boxes. Lee County received the
prize of $500 at the Tampa Fair last fall for the best
collection of citrus fruits.
Work was begun March 1 on what will be the
highest railroad bridge in the world; across the top
of the famous Royal Gorge, near Canyon City, Col. It
will be 2,800 feet above the hanging bridge of the
Denver and Rio Grande Railroad. The bridge will be
used on a line of an electric railway.
A new union depot is now assured for Fort Pierce
and work will begin after the close of the tourist
season. The Florida East Coast Railway has secured
the lands needed for improvements, and beside build-
ing a depot will enlarge the freight yards. The new
station will be inclosed with fence and gates.


OF


THE


Plans have, been drawn for a forty-room hotel at
Tibbals, and the building will be completed in time
to provide accommodation for pineapple buyers and
other persons who will be at that place during the
summer shipping season. It will also place Tibbals
in the rank of an Indian River winter resort.
A large force of men are now employed an the
Apalachicola Northern Railroad, which will extend
from the Gulf to River Junction. Rails sufficient to
lay forty miles of track have been brought to River
Junction, and track-laying will soon begin. The
length of the road will be about eighty miles.
Judge Locke of the United States District Court
has denied the motion to dissolve the temporary in-
junction granted the Florida East Coast Railway
and the Boston and Atlantic Coast Company restrain-
ing the Commissioners of Dade County from pursu-
ing a plan of drainage and irrigation, and the in-
junction will stand until final decision is rendered
in the suit brought against the defendant conmmis-
sioners.

The shooting of a white brakeman at Springfield,
Ohio, by two negroes brought on a race riot, which
required the strength of a regiment of State militia
to subdue. For two nights the mob was active in the
part of the city inhabited by negroes, and a number
of houses were burned and the blacks were stoned
through the streets. Many negroes have left town
and more will follow. This is the second race riot
to occur in Springfield, the one two years ago also
calling out the militia to restore order.


NEWS


East Coast Railway officials and citizens of Miami
are using every effort to secure additional Govern-
ment aid for deepening the harbor at Miami, so that
eighteen feet of water can be obtained. The first
appropriation made was insufficient, and to complete
the work another appropriation is necessary.
'The Supreme Court of Missouri rules that wit-
nes s were compelled to answer questions in the
Standard Oil hearing in St. Louis, and as the same
point was involved when H. H. Rogers refused to
answer at the hearing in Now York, a court order
will be sought in the latter State requiring Rogers to
answer.
Secretary Shaw of the Treasury Department, in
making recommendation for the Jamestown Exposi-
tion, expressed his disapproval of coining dollars in
commemoration of the event, and which would be
nold at a premium, and he advised that the marine
feature be emphasized and no attempt made to rival
previous industrial exhibits. It is the intention of
the Government to make the naval display the
prominent feature.
Senator LaFollette of Wisconsin has intro lI:(cd
a bill requiring committees of all political parties
in national and Congressional elections to account
for all moneys expended in said elections; for filing
of statements of receipts and disbursements of polit-
Wial committees with the Secretary of Commerce
nid labor, and to prohibit corporations from directly
or indirontly contributing to any political committee
ot to any candidate for political offlui.


ROYAL POINGIANA, MIAMI, FLA.


Japanese are not eligible to American citizenship,
according to the decision of the Superior Court of
Massachusetts, rendered through the clerk of. the
court, in passing upon the application of a Japanese
for naturalization papers. The' decision was based
upon the fact that the applicant was neither a free
white nor of African descent.

Major Gillette, who succeeded Captain Carter in
supervision of the harbor improvements at Savan-
nah, and was instrumental in causing the exposure
leading to the imprisonment of Carter and the impli-
cation of Greene and Gaynor on the charge of de-
frauding the Government, has resigned from the army
and taken the position of chief engineer of the bureau
of filtration of Philadelphia.

Typogrphical Union No. 16 of Chicago started a
movement for the formation of an anti-injunction
league. The motto is "Free Speech and Trial by
Jury." The purposes of the proposed organization is
to place all candidates for public office, national,
State or municipal, without regard to political affilia-
tion, on record on the question of the issuance of
injunctions during labor disputes.
The need of a supply of fresh water on the keys
will cause the Florida East Coast Railway to have
wells drilled in the hope that water can be found.
All the water for the use of the laborers on the exten-
sion work has to be carried on barges from Miami,
and many thousand gallons are used daily. There
are no wells on the keys, and it is not known whether
fresh water can be found, but the experiment will
be tried.


A strike of the 200,000 farmers composing the
American Society of Equity, an organization with
headquarters in Indianapolis, was called for March
1 Every farmer who responds to this call will
agree to withhold from marketing any agricultural
products except at prices that are to the level.that
has been decreed as equitable by the officials of this
organization, and residents of the big cities may feel
the effects.
The Cash Buyers' Union of Chicago, with a capi-
tal stock of $5,000,000, has been place in the hands
of a receiver and criminal prosecution of officers may
follow. The operations of the concern had attracted
the postal authorities, and the result of investigation
brought the matter into court. Postoffice inspectors
informed the court that although $1,027,000 in stock
had been sold, mostly by correspondence through the
mails, the bank account of the corporation amounted
to less than $100. The receivership proceedings were
based on the petitions of three creditors. whose n(g-
gregate claims amount to $700. The total due credi-
tors is said to be about $250,000. Many residents of
Florida were investors in stock of the Cash Buyers'
Union.

The Supreme Court of Texas has rendered a decis-
ion holding that exclusive contracts made between
railroads and express companies are violative of the
anti-trust seat of 1903. The suits were filed against
the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway and the
American Express Company. The court says that the
fact that the contract was entered into prior to the
assge of the act is without weight, for as soon as
I at bame *evtlve the trust t coms


under its provisions. Thirty other cases are affected
by this decision, which will give the State more than
$1,000,000 in penalties. The four express companies
operating in Texas are the American, Wells.-Fargo,
United States and Pacific. The case will be taken
to the United States Supreme Court.

REBUILDING RUSSIAN NAVY.
Stt. Petersburg.-Despite the protests of the Ger-
asinia Shipbuilding Company in Kiel, the Osar en-
trusted a French firm with the reconstruction of the
cruiser Askold, 5,900 tons, which escaped to Shang-
hai on August 10, when the Port Arthur fleet tried
to break through to Vladivostok. The Askold was
hit twelve times in thirty minutes, but owning to
her superior construction and the slowness of the
.Jap ships engaged, managed to keep up a speed of
twenty miles and escaped. The German firm main-
tams that the Askold made the best showing of any
vensel in the Russian navy, her good record being
due to the fact that she was built in the Kiel yards,
hoesntly and skilfully.

(ARDI)NAI IS TAUGHT A LESSON IN HISTORY.
Iherlin.-Cardinal and Archbishop Fischer of
Col(fne mentioned in a note of rebuke addressed to
Superintendent Meyer, in Zwickau, that he was not
quite sure whether Zwickau existed when the founda-
tion for tne Cologne cathedral was laid. Thereupon
the superintendent informed his eminence that bt.
Mary's Church, in his towa, was opened A. D. 1188.
The foundation for the Cologne cathedral was laid
148.


WEEK'S













THE SUN


March 3, 1906


SIA4KING


THE


OLD


PLUM


TREE


THE SHERIFF OF OLD DUVAL.


This $10,000 per year plum perched on the top-
most branch of the tree, looms large and juicy before
the eyes to whom the taste of political fruit is grate-
Jul, and creative of a craving dot to be satifled short
of the partaking thereof.
Early in the season six long poles were reared
skyward reaching for this plum. One of these-
%.


In the First and Second Congressional districts
it looks like a walkover for both Steve ran
and Frank Clark, while the promise of a hot fight
in the Third district is nullffed by the refusal of
C. Moreno. Jones to be a candidate.
Rumor had credited Mr. Jones with the intention
of opposing Congressman Lamar, but in response to
inquiry by The SUN, Mr. Jones wrote: "I am not,


wielded by a persistent, perennial. (I was about to
say perpetual) anyhow, a "natural-born reacher,--
was cast hurriedly down when his gentle, innocent
soul took alarm at the bare idea of the possibility of
Wing compelled to play the role of Jack Ketch. An-
other took second thought about the table of actu-
alities and possibilities, and having, in early child-
I ood, been impressed with the truth of that familiar
I roverb concerning tho relative value of one bird in


the hand and two birds in the bush, rot down the
"BHand Lttet ~l'riter" book, and cop ed therefrom
t ka i 'e i decl'i ation that was pronounced a man-
ter*- "Pfav quartettain the race for Sheriff of
SJvmd thiat offers to the discriminating voter a va-
m: wh"ih to choose. No matter who runs


the elector's taste in Sheriffs can be pleased by a se-
lection from the present offerings.
John Price, the old Confederate soldier; R. Flem-
ing Bowden, the out-spoken City Councilman; Eu-
gene Dodge, affectionately called "Tucky," the young
man's candidate; and M. Augustus Brown, who car-
ries on his shoulder the Governor's pat, make up this
interesting quartette.
As to practical experience deemed necessary to
1he proper administration of the important duties of
this office, each of the four has it, for each one has
filled the office, and no word of criticism has been
uttered against any one of them as an official. Each
being equal to the other in this respect, the race will
I-e run on lines of personal popularity and ability to
get to the voter with a line of talk that will convince
the greatest number of this uncertain species.
It will be an interesting race.
Twenty-one members of the State Democratic
Executive Committee were present when the roll was
called at the meeting last Saturday morning, and
twelve were represented by proxy, one of the holders
of a proxy being W. J. Bryan of Jacksonville, who
offered a resolution of primary call for the guidance
of the members of the committee.
Some protest was .voiced against an early pri-
mary, but the majority held that Mr. Bryan's opinion
was good enough for them, and the dates, May 15 and
June 12, were accepted by the majority.
Little enthusiasm marked the session, and it
closed with the adoption of a resolution calling on
the Florida delegation in Congress to invoke the aid
of the Government in exterminating the white fly.
The only diverting incident of the meeting was
the appeal from Lee County that the committee take
some action enabling that county to nominate the
Senator from the Twenty-fourth district. Lee County
has done nothing but vote for the choice of Monroe
County for the last sixteen years, and is getting
tired of the game.
In the petition to the committee it was stated
that "Our voters have loyally supported the Demo-
cratic nominee, but they are now to a point where it
will be difficult to hold them in line should they
again be refused the candidate."
No consolation was offered by the State commit-
tee, which is powerless to restrain Monroe's glut-
tony for the Senatorship, so that )L pretty fight
is in prospect in that region if the Lee County
electors are not placated.
Doubtless this will prove a matter of distress to
lion. W. Hunt Harris of Key West, who has repre-
sented that district for two terms and is again a
candidate. E. M. Semple, who is opposing Harris, is
also from Key West, and it is more than likely that
he will profit if the factional war is declared.
On account of Monroe's greater population, Lee
County has no show to nominate a candidate without
the consent of the former, but if it cannot elect it
can contribute to the defeat of a candidate, and as
Mr. Harris has enjoyed the office for half the period
of which Lee County has been deprived, it looks
very much as if he will be the object of slaughter if
a treaty of peace cannot be arranged.
At a meeting of the Executive Committee of Mon-
roe County a resolution was adopted declaring "That
it is the sense of the committee that the nomination
and re-election of Hon. Jefferson B. Browne as Rail-
road Commissioner, is necessary for the welfare of
Key West."
Times change and the opinions of men are revised
and altered. It is not so many years ago that Jeff
Browne's suggestions were turned down and he was
ungracefully snubbed at a caucus of his own ward,
but with the rise of his political fortunes he was
forgiven.
Since the Democratic party has been in control
of Florida the prospect of a dull and featureless
campaign has never been so apparent as at present.
If any activity is to be expressed it is not indicated
outside of the races for the Railroad Commissioner-
ships, and none may be shown In those events. The
developments of the next week or two will perhaps
signify the spirit of the contest.


nor have I been, a candidate for Congressional
honors."
This seems to dispose of the question of strong
opposition to Mr. Lamar. It is true that Hon. Jef-
ferson D. Stephens has announced himself as a can-
didate for Congress from that district, but by those
familiar with conditions in that portion of the State
he is not regarded as having sufficient strength to
obstruct Lamar's path of ambition.
(The paragraphs corncerning the Third district


were written last Tuesday, previous to mention of
the same in any paper. This explanation is offered
that the writer may not be adjudged guilty of pla-
giarism.)
Prospective dullness in the State and Congres.
sional campaigns will not be a forecast of county
(Continued on Seventh Page)


NO


C. M.JONES,
Attorney and Counsellor at Law,
PENSACOLA. FLA.
Pensacola, Fla., Feb. 24, 100..
HON. CLAUDE L'ENGLE,
Editor of The Sun,
Jacksonville, Florida.
Dear Sir-Replying to your inquiry of February
22, 1906, "as to whether I am a candidate for
Congress from the Third Congressional District of
Florida," say: I am not nor have I been a can
didate for Congressional honors. Please make
this public. Yours truly,
C. M. JONES.













March 3, 1906


THE SUN


What's


mgita ting


People


These


Days


Defense of Joseph's policy of effecting a corner
ni corn has been the topic of John D. Rockefeller, Jr.,
in his talk to his Bible class for several Sundays, and
the insistence with which the leader justifies Jo-
seph's actions is construed as an attempt to form a
parallel with the Rockefeller fortune and defend his
father's policy of monopoly.
Members of the class, however, do not seem to
enjoy these talks of Joseph's business sagacity, fear-
ing the newspaper comment thqt would follow, one
member saying:
"The way some of the newspapers are making
fun of everything that good young man says is dis-
graceful. I and other members of the class sincerely
hope that our leader will not talk about. Joseph's
corn transaction, for fear of the unmerited ridicule
that would result."
Young Mr. Rockefeller took up the subject again,
though, last Sunday, and during his discourse said:
"I have studied this part of Joseph's life very
carefully, and I cannot see anything about his con-
duct to criticise. Joseph foresaw that seven years
of famine were to follow the seven years of plenty.
He set about laying up an ample supply of corn. In
this he showed commendable thrift and business
smartness. Most people are not sensible enough to
put by something for a rainy day. Then, again,
there arc many who are not able to do it.
"When the famine came those who were without
corn came to Joseph the thrifty. He demanded
their land in exchange for the corn. It was a per-
fectly justifiable business transaction. What would
you have expected him to do? You wouldn't have
expected him to give away his corn for nothing,
would you? No ruler has ever given his people free
food in time of famine. Joseph could not be ex-
pected to do that.
"But look you on what liberal terms Joseph took
the people's land. He did not take it away from
them altogether. He allowed them to occupy the
lands even after they had traded them for his corn.
They simply paid him rent and became tenants in-
stead of landlords. Surely that was generous. We
find that the people were thoroughly satisfied with
the bargain, and had nothing but praise for Joseph
after the famine had passed."
Considering the well known religious zeal of John
D. Rockefeller he evidently takes this bit of Biblical
history as divine approval of his methods of money
getting, nor is it strange that his son should drag it
forth with ample explanation, thinking perhaps of
producing a favorable effect upon the public mind.
The Philadelphia Record, however, is moved to
shed additional light on the subject, saying:
"We are perfectly willing to give the Patriarch
Joseph the benefit of the maxim, de mortuis nil nisi
bonum. But in view of the fact that John D. Rocke-
feller, Jr., improved the occasion last Sunday to
extol the wisdom and humanity of Joseph's operations
in corn and real estate, the character and magni-
tude of which could not fail to interest an heir of
the Standard Oil Company, we feel moved to direct
attention to a few points to which the beneficiary
of the greatest monopoly on earth paid no heed.
"Joseph's resources for acquiring corn during
seven years of large crops could only have been the
public revenues; consequently the people of Egypt
were paying for the breadstuffs accumulated against
the seven years of famine. But when the grain was


Shaking the


Old Plum Tree
(Continued from Sixth Page)
contests. There will be few counties where the scrap
for the plums will not be as warm as the most en-
thusiastic politician would wish. Especially will
this be so in the matter of electing Representatives
to the next Legislature.
There will be candidates who will want State
insurance legislation; candidates opposed to the
Buckman law; opposed to Everglade drainage; the
usual brigade of housecleaners of State departmentA


needed it was sold as the personal property of Phai-
roah, who gathered in all the money of the people,
and then all their flocks, and finally all their lands.
"No doubt this was in accordance with the highest
standards of philanthropy, political science and
statesmanship of the period. But it is interesting to
observe that young Mr. Rockefeller's ethical ideas
show no advance over those of three or four thousand
years ago. He is moved with admiration for Joseph's
consideration in not taking the land away from the
people, but merely changing their status from that
of landlords to that of tenants. Any farmer who has
been foreclosed out of his title and allowed to hire
what used to be his farm could understand this
transaction better than Mr. Rockefeller seems to, and
the young millionaire ought to explain of what use
he thinks the land of Egypt would have been to
Pharoah if the population had been evicted and had
had to take its choice between the desert and the
Red Sea."

William E. Curtis, the well-known correspondent
of the Chicago Record-Herald, who has been investi-
gating the matter of reduction of railroad passenger
fare, finds that the railroad men in New York "are
unanimous in the opinion that the legislation in
Ohio and other states limiting the railroads to a
charge of 2 cents per mile for earring passengers is
the direct penalty of abolishing passes."
The bill in the Ohio legislature was passed without
delay, showing the feeling of the members. A simi-
lar bill was introduced in the Virginia legislature
and has passed one House, while in West Virvinia
and Kentucky two-cent-a-mile bills are before the
Legislatures with every prospect of becoming laws.
Mr. Curtis says.:
"This is the punishment imposed upon the
railway companies for depriving the members of the
.legislatures and their friends and other politicians
of perquisites which they have enjoyed so long.
From a pecuniary point of view it would have been
much more economical for the railway companies
to have continued to carry them free rather than
have their revenue from passenger tariff cut down
almost 33 per cent, because the ruling rate, except
for excursions, has been about three cents a mile.
The Pennsylvania Railroad, which started the anti-
pass movement, will lose millions of dollars because
of these 2-cents-a-mile laws."
The passing of the law in Ohio forced the rail-
road magnates to vehement rage, causing them to
declare a war of reprisal by not granting any con-
cessions below the legal rate, and this leads the New
York Tribune .to express the opinion that "the
Ohio railroads which threaten at once to revenge
themselves and reimburse themselves for the two-
cent-a-mile law by cutting off all excursion tickets
will probably find that the expedient is as unprofit-
able financially as killing the goose that lays the
golden egg, and as painful revengefully as cutting
off one's own nose to spite one's own face. Rail-
roads do not make excursion rates out of disinterest-
ed love and affection, but to stimulate travel. They
find it pays to make a special train rate if they can
induce a hundred persons to travel who would not
otherwise use their cars.
"It is a matter of pure business enterprise, and,
in spite of irritation over the two-cent rate, the rail-
roads before long will be issuing commutation tick-
ets and telling the rentpayers of Cleveland and Cin-
cinnati of the charms of the suburbs which they can
reach for 10 cents and have homes of their own
with grass for the children to play on. So, too, they
will be offering round trip tickets at reduced rates
to state fairs, firemen's conventions and church con-
gresses.
"Temper is all very well in its way, and injured
dignity is highly impressive, but business is busi-
ness and the general passenger agent who can make
two passengers grow where one grew before will con-
tinue to be honored in Ohio and elsewhere, even
though Congress and state legislatures dare to regu-.


and institutions; those who favor drastic railroad
legislation.
One of the latter has already announced from
Orange County in the person of E. W. Shanibarger.
who occupies the platform of "public ownership of
public franchise." In a card Mr. Shanibarger says:
"Railroads as now conducted are but the instru-
ments by which the voracious rob us. This must and
will cease," and his remedy is public ownership.
In noting the probability of candidates who will
seek Legislative office on the ground of opposition
to the draining of the Everglades, it ir, remarkable
that so much time should elapse since the subject
was first broached by Governor Broward and now.
when condemnation and criticism of the scheme i*
being heard from so many parts of the State.
Governor Broward made his campaign and was
elected on that imm, and if any voter was ignorant


late rates. Commuters and aspirants for cheap
sightseeing may keep calm in spite of government
'oppression' of transportation enterprises."

The Iowa Senate has passed a resolution author.
izing Governor Cummins to call a convention of rep-
resentatives of the several states of the Union in
.July to devise means to secure amendment to the
federal Constitution so that United States senators
may he elected by the people instead of by the legis-
latures.
Senator Lewis, author of the resolution, in speak-
ing of the need for such reform, said of the United
State Senate that it "has killed statehood-a sen-
ator owns low taxed mines in the territories. It
has refused to observe the demand of the people for
railroad rate legislation during ten years. It has
adopted rules which gives one senator the right to
stop the wheels of government by talking. It bor-
ders on a state of degeneracy. Three of its members
recently were under indictment or conviction of
crimes."

In New York there was a clamor for a tax on
mortgages. Reformers contended that the money
lender should be made to bear a portion of the bur-
den of taxation, while opponents of the measure
pointed out that the tax, though paid by the mort-
gagee would really he paid by the borrower through
increased interest. The bill became law and now it
is found to be a failure. Eight months of its oper-
ation has given discontent, as the rate of interest
has been raised one-half per cent, and both borrower
and lender demand a repeal.

legal action will be taken against a faith cure
cult in Philadelphia on account of the death of a
two-year-old girl suffering from typhoid fever andi
who was denied medical attention. The tenants of
the family religion forbade them calling a physi-
eian's aid, and prayer was offered by the family and
other members of the cult. In the investigation be-
fore the coroner an 18-year-old sister of the child
said:
"Grace was sick for three weeks. We knew she
had typhoid fever. We did not call in a physician,
and we did not give her any medicine; none of us
believe in doctors or medicine. We realized that
Grace was very ill, but we believed that the Lord
would raise her up by faith."
Many similar cases have been recorded in the last
few years, but the remedy for such criminal negli-
Snece has been slow of operation.

Dr. Andrew 1). White, former president of Cor-
nell University, asserts that the principal cause of
lynching in this country is owing to the ease with
which murderers escape punishment. He said that
when it is considered that out of every 46 homi-
cides committed in the United States only one in
45 is legally punished it is no wonder that people
look elsewhere for the solution.
In a recent address Dr. White said:
"There is nothing more nonsensical or ridicu-
lous than the goody-goody talk about lynching.
Muh may tbo said in favor of the quotation of the
famous Englishman, Godwin Smith, 'There are
some communities in the United States in which
lynch law is better than any other law.'
"In the next year 9,000 people will he murdered
in this country. As I stand here today I tell you
that 0,000 people are doomed to death with all the
cruelty of the criminal heart and with no regard to
home and family ties.
"I have no sympathy for the criminal. My sym-
pathy in for those who will be murdered, for their
families and for their children."
Judging by the records of the courts it is ap-
parent that sympathy for the criminal exerted in
one form or another is responsible for such a con-
dition. Moreover, technicalities seem to play a more
important part than evidence, and through these
important part than evidence, and through these tech
nicalities the meshes of the judicial net are widened,
permitting the criminal to slip through.


of the propowd plan it was not because of Broward's
failure to tell all he could of the subject. Collect-
ively and individually the elector was appealed to
in behalf of the project; Broward waq elected, the
Legislature enacted the law and now hinpe work has
ligun alleged expert testimony is being reported
nearly every day claiming that if the drainage is
accomplished the State will be greatly damaged.
This mpy be true or it may not. but at any rate
su'h opposition should have made its hearing before
the Lzgislature that passed the act. instead of re-
mining silent and permitting evil-if it was that-
to ibe done.
As a result the matter bids fair to be an issue at
-4'he next session when the opposition will present a
brief of protest that should have been offered when
the bill providing for the drainage was Arst intro-
doced.


iMI













IGHVH MPAQA
Saturaag, March 3. 1906


Er


THE SUN


sr


ED


IT


Sbaw and Scb(f's Come-Back Ball
Ever see one of those little "oome-back balls" used by merrymakers on carni-
val days?
If you have, you know how quick they hit and get away.
If you haven't look at Mr. Taylor's cartoon on this page.
That long, fine piece of rubber attached to the ball is 80 ELASTIC
It brings the ball back to the hand holding the other end SO QUICK.
The combination of rubber ball and rubber string fools the people SO BAD
THAT IT REMINDS US OF SECRETARY SHAW'S AND HIS FRIEND
JACOB SCHIFF'S ELASTIC '# RRENCY PROPOSITION.
Nice man, Schiff, and Shaw is the same, only more so.
Dandy little plan gotten up by this pair of esses.
Nothing crude about it. Everything arranged beforehand.
Schiff, who, up to that time had been the smooth, suave, safe-and-sane
banker of the familiar brand, breaks lose one day and sounds the wild alarum.
"Panis," says he, "of the wbrst sort ever, will come, and that right soon,
unless we have elastic currency."
Nothing particular happened, after this Paul Reviere ride of Schiff's, which
no doubt surprised him. greatly, and perchance vexed him some.
When a man "sounds the tocsin" he has a right to expect blue ruin to get
busy and the people huddle together in bunches and spots.
But, no. Nobody noticed anything-
Except Shaw.


He was aroused to the great danger, according to program, and brought out
the "little come-back ball."
Look at it!
For illusive, deceptive, non-catchable, corked-up cinches FOR THE HAND
THAT HOLDS THE END OF THE "ELASTIC" it is the best ever devised by
busy brain of boodledom.
Says Shaw-
"Currency must be more elastic. Quite right! Sehiff himself has said it. We
have already given the banks the power to make money. Let them make more.
To make money banks must have bonds. They can make the bonds. Any old
bonds will do. Banks put up the bonds, make the money and the Government
must redeem the money if the bonds should happen to turn out bogus."
Oh l frank Mr. Shaw. Many thanks.
Who issues the elastic currency?
The banks.
Who decides when the money must be stretched?
The banks.
Who decides when the money must be shrunk?
The banks.
Who decides what bonds shall be put up for the elastic issue?
Again the banks.
Suppose the bonds are bogus, who pays,
The banks? OH! NO.
THE GOV ERNMENT.
Will the public get t n, Inctit if thi.. lu0n!.-in:l..tled, Imnk-.reated, bank-
restricted, elastle eirrency?
Try to eateh the little come-back ball. .
Is the s answer.


Blowing Smoke Rings
John Saxe, a Yankee lawyer, editor and author of humorous poems told, in
one of the best of them, about a party of blind men who were taken to see an
elephant.
When in presence of the monster, which none of them had ever before
encountered, they groped about with outstretched hands trying to satisfy their
curiosity.
One of them got hold of the elephant's tail, and immediately exclaimed:
"Why this wonderful ceature is nothing but a ropel" Another touched the
massive side of the beast and pronounced it a wall. Another coming in contact
with one of the animal's legs said it was a pillar, and the remainder of the
gropers gave judgment according to their blindness to other parts of the elephant's
anatomy, except the one with which they came in contact.
This was John Saxe's way of satirizing those people who pass judgment on
qVestions without viewing all sides of it.
It is more than probable that the Vermont poet never knew the distinguished,
versatile gentleman who delights to effervesce for the select few who read the edi-
toriil columns of the Tampa Tribune.
But Saxe SURELY LOCATED HIlM when lie composed that poem about
the blind men and the elephant.
Editor Stovall welds a trenchant pair of shears, whetted to a fine discrimi-
nation, and usually presents an excellent selection of non-credited editorials,
clipped from other papers; but once in a while the enterprising Wallace mounts
Pegasus, and sits himself down to write.
It is on these rare occasions that the editorial columns of the Tribune present
the editor thereof as answering to the aforenamed poet's description of him.
In a double-barreled, double-leaded, black face type, bristling HOME-MADE
editorial printed some days ago, this (Peter) KNIGHT of the paste pot, grandilo-
quently proclaims, arrogantly asseverates and wordily boasts that Tampa is
bigger than Jacksonville.
Like the blind man holding onto the elephant's tail, (Peter) Knight Wallace
points out the one fact that Tampa puts out more manufactured products yearly
than Jacksonville as proof of his claim for Tampan supremacy.
Yes, Ybor City, which includes Tampa in its area, with the kindly assistance
of West rampa, which is not in the city of Tampa, DOES manufacture more
cigars and cigarettes than Jacksonville.

The New York Sun gets facetious over Frank Clark's remonstrance against
the gag methods of the Speaker of the House of Representatives. The Sun may
say that Frank's language is high-flown, but the Speaker is, none the less, a
despot, and Mr. Clark's words differ not from those used by all persons who
have been brave enough to protest against tyranny in whatever form it shows
itself. Fortunately for Mr. Clark, he does not represent a State that permits such
self-confessed criminals as Depew and Platt to occupy its seats in the national
L.~gisliture, and he don't have to please the editor of the Npw Lork Sun. If he
pleased him more he would please us less. So much less, that we would call
him home.

This talk about Clark reminds iu that we have another man in Congress
who pleases us. His name is I.pnwr. We first began to like him as a Congress-
man (we had long liked him as a friend) when he did his level be,t to rid us of
Swayne. Pe opuilrt our fancy next when he took a fall out of Minority Leader
John Sharpe Williams, who has led the Democrats further into the Wilderness
than Moses did the chosen of Israel. ^nd now the final shine is put on our
ad',irption for the gentleman frem the Third Florida, when we contemplate the
rate bill as passed and recall that this hill is practically the Hearst bill that
Lamar reported. the only difference heint. that the Hepburn bill lacks some
features of the Hearst bill that. if included, would have made it & much better
bill. It is gratifying to our pride to see ALL the Democrats and nearly all the
Republicans of the House follow the lead of our Representative.

Once again have those fellows whose pleasure it is to drink the warm blood
out of an empty skull, and wonder all the while at their sheer devilishness, raised
the cry for gore. This time it is for the blood of an ignorant countryman named
Cooper whom the Pardoning Board has recently reprieved from legal slaughter.
It may be wrong topardon criminals, but it is an error that was constantly made
by the ONE PERFECT MAN during his ministration on this earth. We would
rather take our chance with the Pardoning Board than with the editors who
condemn it for giving a man g chance to redeem his past offense, even though he
be guilty, which in this case, is doubtful in the absence of a motive for the crime.

Oh, Christopher Maling! great is thy luck. Thy name has been made a
household word for unadulterated wisdom. This happened by the merest chance.
Certain newspapers in this State whose editors were itching to jump on Brow-
ard's Everglade drainage scheme, and who lacked the courage or the industry
to go, themselves, after the facts, have, like a duck on a Junebug, swooped down
on your words against the drainage proposition, and by repeating them made
you known. Do not gett too cocky alshout this, Christopher-if your name had
happened to he Ragamuffin Bill, and your knowledge of the subject had been
equal to the fag-end of the minus sign, you would have been made famous all
the same.

We note, with pain that our old and esteemed friend, Captain Whidden, has
been used as a catspaw to pull drainage chestnuts out of the fire for those who
when it is too late to holler, are determined to see no good in Broward's scheme.
We know the Captain well, and we know that he will not like to be made -to pla
this role. He is authority on calves and beef steers, but on aquatic propositions
he does not aspire to greater knowledge than is required to properly gauge the
quantity necessary to make his toddy hit the right spot.


There is a meeting called for March 6, at Bartow, Fla., to organize the fruit
and vegetable growers of Florida. This is the right kind of a meeting. It is about
time that the farmers organized for their protection, and with the organization
covering the entire State, with the central office in Jacksonville to receive and
distribute the products, the plan will do much good.


0












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NINTH PAGE


THE SUN


Saturday, March 3, 1906


Fair Chance for the Rate Bill
Has Ben Tillman been gold-bricked?
This question is asked by several Democratic newspapers since the selection
of the South Carolina Senator to manage the Railroad Rate Bill on the floor
of the Senate.
The reason for the query seems to lie in the fear that blame for the failure
of the bill to pass, or its emasculation, will be shifted from the shoulders of the
Republican Senators who have resolved to either kill or cripple it into ineffect-
iveness, to those of the Democrats by Senator Tillman's selection as champion.
We are willing to trust Ben Tillman to protect Democrats from this wily
combination even if it does include such past masters in the science of political
craft as Aldrich and Elkins.
Whatever may be the fate of the rate bill, of one thing its friends may rest
assured-
IT WILL GET EVERY CHANCE FOR STRONG, VIGOROUS LIFE that's
coming to it, in the hands of Senator Tillman.
For clearness of vision, comprehensive grasp of details, thorough knowledge
of parliamentary practice, readiness in debate, power and clearness. of expres-
sion, THIS MAN OF THE PEOPLE HAS NO SUPERIOR among those who
occupy the people's seats in the Congress of the nation.
Those who have feared the issue of the rate bill in the Senate, may now
take heart.
The fight for its life will be led by a commander whose zeal knows no
flagging, whose honesty admits of no question and knows no compromise, whose
courage is not to be daunted and whose equipment for the struggle is a LITTLE
BETTER THAN THE BEST that will be pitted against it.
We note that Senator Tillman took a trip home after he reported the bill.
He returns to the Senate today.
This little trip was taken for the purpose of preparing himself for the
task put upon him, and he has returned well posted on the great subject which
will from this time engage his attention.
That thorough knowledge of the subject engaging his attention, that enabled
the plain South Carolinian to call down the college-cultured Henry Cabot Lodge,
author of "The Story of the Revolution," on revolutionary history; will enable
the champion of the rate bill to defend it from all the pitfalls that hostile Repub-
licans may dig.
With a full sense of our limitations we have refrained from discussing the
merits of rate regulation presented by the Hepburn bill, or the Cullom bill, or
the Elkins bill.
Our readers have had the benefit of the opinions of the great men of the
country. Our feeble voice could not now be heard and even if heard would receive
no attention.
But, just as a matter of record, so that we may point to it when the big
ones get through, we will say-
THE PEOPLE WHO EXPECT RATE REGULATION IN ANY OF THE
FORMS NOW PRESENTED, TO SETTLE THE GREAT QUESTION OF TRANS-
PORTATION CHARGES, WILL BE DISAPPOINTED.
Two reasons have we for making this prediction.
First-The commission to regulate rates will be appointed by the President
and confirmed by the Senate. It is, therefore, bound to be a partisan body and
is certain to wield its powers for the benefit of the party to which the President
appointing it, and a majority of the Senate confirming it, belong.
If this party IS RULED BY THE MONEY POWER, SO WILL THE COM-
MISSION BE.
Second-The right of review by the courts will so congest the courts with
cases appealed from the commission, that the courts will NEVE!' SEE DAY-
LIGHT after the first year's business has piled up the cases, AND 111THIS WILL
PARALYZE THE COMMISSION because it cannot make a ruling on a new case
involving the same questions that are on appeal and unadjudicated.
This, be it understood, we say merely to preserve the record of our opinion.
Our object in writing this editorial is to quiet any fear that the rate regula-
tion question will not be ably presented and handled in the Senate.
Senator Tillman is not the kind of man to work the gold brick bunco game on.
HE WILL PASS THE BILL IF THE REPUBLICANS IN THE SENATE
DO NOT LINE UP SOLIDLY AGAINST IT.

Mr. Keifer, late drummer boy in the union army, later Speaker of the Hlouse
of Representatives, and latest a new member of that body, has introduced a hill
to reduce the membership of the Southern States in Congress because of the dis-
franchisement of negroes. Mr. Keifer looks like a picture of old Santa Claus,
but he will never be able to deliver this present to his Republican friends. The
white Republicans represent the negroes in national conventions, just as much as
Democrats represent them in Congress, BUT the Republican candidates for
President need the convention votes a heap worse than the South needs the Con-
gressional votes.

And Grosvenor got turned down. This pleasing mortality of a political
career gives us that glad feeling CLEAR THROUGH. If there was ever a man
who sat up more than any other man---and the list of late sitters-up is large-.to
villify the South, it was this Grosvenor. Whenever he lost an opportunity to get
in'a dig at Southern people, he allowed himself no rest until he found it. And
now hlie will bother us no more, for he has been given the right to lose himself.
Letters addressed to the headwaters of Salt River may reach him provided they
be sent before the inhabitants of that region find him out
Great are the trials and strange the vicissitudes of the literary Hife. While
the editor of the white column of the Metropolis was expostulating in great
big type against reckless automobile drivers maiming poor but worthy citizens
who are compelled to ride shanks mares, the business manager of this champion
of the people (when it does not cost anything) was kept busy explaining why
he came to run over a woman while speeding his machine.


Get out your pencils and revise the list of great discoveries. Here's a man
who has made a sure enough discovery: "The Florida SUN paid its respects to
Jennings, Stockton and Barrs in its last issue. Doubtless the SUN has made mis-
takes in its estimate of those men. We think there are worse on the planet."-
Taylor County Citizen.


Beware of the Pillory
Not counting Sundays just sixty-two days are left to get ready for the
primaries.
Now is the time to begin to think about who you wish to make your public
servants.
You have the power to choose good ones by going to the polls and voting
for honest, capable men.
You can risk getting bad ones by staying away and placing the choice in the
hands of professional voters out for the stuff.
There are enough good people in this State to elect good men to every office
created by the people for the good of the people.
If good men are not selected, at the primaries, now only sixty-two working
days off, it will not be the WILL OF THE BAD PEOPLE, but the NEGLECT
OF THE GOOD PEOPLE that will be responsible for the result.
Do not wait until after the primaries are over to register your kick against
evil and incompetent office holders.
Begin preparations for the kicking act now, and by the time l.rimary day
comes you will be ready TO KICK TO SOME EFFECT.
A kick BEFORE THE POLLS CLOSE is a kick well placed..
A kick AFTER*the settling of the primary day sun, is nothing hut an aerial
performance.
Louginus, a learned Greek, who was minister to the Queen of Palmyra,


THE PUKL PI RY FOR BOTH.
-= B L a


)


chiding the merchants of the city for not upholding him in his efforts to avert
war with Rome, which proved the ruin of them all said:
"They deserve to lose their liberties who will not spare time from selfish
pursuits to guard them. Where a government is popular it behooves every indi-
vidual, if he values the power delegated to him, to use it, otherwise it is, by
degrees, lost, and once absorbed into the hands of the few, it is not easily, if at
all, to be regained."
This was said nearly two thousand years ago, but it was SO WISELY SAID
that it answers just as well TODAY as it did THEN, as a warning to those
w.vho neglect the duties imposed on all good citizens by primary day.
The people of the great State of New York are now trying to get what you
who live in Florida NOW HAVE-the right to nominate candidates for office
1-y direct vote of the people.
A bill is now pending in the New York Legislature which seeks to establish-
The primary nominating system.
The alphabetically arranged ballot.
These things WE HAVE NOW, and under their operation the WILL OF
THE PEOPLE can be ascertained WITH ABSOLUTE CERTAINTY
IF THE PEOPLE WILL DO THEIR DUTY ON PRIMARY DAY.
If all the good people would vote.
If they would vote only for good people-
Graft in public office would cease, political corruption would diuppear, and
thli power of money would not be a factor in governmental affairs.
Do not let the force of Mr. Taylor's cartoon on this page be dhected to you.
Choose the best men for office-
And vote for them on primary day.
If those good citizens of Ohio who are trying to lynch two negroes for shoot-
ing a white man, will come South we will be glad to give them some valuable
suggestions on the humane way to deal with thi la of free eitians of the
republic.










March 3, 1906


R'


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Y


Dy Chevalier William Le Oueux


All through the morning we vwlke.l
on, our hands badly torn by brambles.
Even Muriel's thick gloves did not
wholly protect her, and once when she
received a nasty scratch across the check,
she stopped and laughingly exclaimed:
"Now what untruth must I insmnnt to
account for thatT?"
My own coat was badly torn, and more
than once I was compelled to scrnmuhlD
through almost impassable thickota, yet
we found no trace of any previous iin-
truder, and having completed our cir-
cle were compelled to admit that- the
gruesome evidence of the second criwn'
did not exist at that spot.
More than once I felt half inclined to
tell her how I had actually discovered
the body of the woman, yet on reflection
1 foresaw that in such circumstances
silence was best. If I desired to solve
the strange complicated enigma which
had thus culminated in a double crime,
it would be necessary for me to keep my
own counsel and remain patient and
watchful.
When Hutcheson replied from Leg-
horn, and when I discovered where Olinto
was employed, I might perhaps follow
up the clues from that end. I might
find his wife Armida and learn some-
thing of importance from her. So I was
hopeful, and by reason of that hope re-
mained silent.
Muriel was untiring in her activity.
Hither and thither she went, beating
down the high bracken and tangles of
weeds, poking with her stick into every
hole and corner, and going further and
further into the wood in the certainty
that the body was therein concealed.
For my own part, however, I was not
too sanguine of success. The portion of
the wood which we had already ex-
hausted seemed to be the most likely
point. To carry the body far would re-
quire assistance, and in my own mind I
believed the crime to have been the work
of one person. There was no path in
the wood in that direction, but soon we
come to a deep wooded ravine of the ex-
istence of which I was in ignorance. It
was a kind of small glen through which
a rivulet flowed, but the banks were cov-
ered with a thick impenetrable under-
growth out of which sprang many fine
old trees, a place that had apparently
existed for centuries undisturbed, for
here and there a giant trunk that had
decayed and fallen lay across the bank,
or had rolled into the rocky bed far be-
low.
"This is a most likely place," declared
my dainty little companion as we ap-
proached it. "Anything could easily be
concealed in that high bracken down
there. Let us search the whole glen
from end to end," she cried with enthu-
slasm.
Acting upon her suggestion and with-
out thought of luncheon, we made a de-.
scent of the steep bank until we reached
the rocky bed of the stream, and then by
springing from stone to stone--some.-
times slipping into the water, be it said
-we commenced to beat the bracken and
carefully examine every bush. Progress
was not swift. Once the girl, lithe and
athletic as she was, slipped off a mossy
stone into a hole where the water was
up to her knees. But she only laughed
gayly at the accident, and wringing out
her wet skirt, said:
"It doesn't matter in the least, if we
only find what we're in search of."
And then, undaunted, she went on,
springing from stone to stone and
s*adying herself with her stick. If we
could only discover the body of the dead
woman, then the rest would be clear, she
declared. She would openly denounce
the asassin.
As we went on I evolved in my mind
all the curious circumstances in con-
mection with the amazing affair, and rec-
ollected my old Friend Jack Durnford's
words when we stood upon the quarter-.
deck of the Bulwark and I had related
to him the visit of the mysterious yacht.
I, too, had left one effort untried, and
I blamed el for overlooking it I
had not e t of that Boead Street pho-


tographer the name and address of the
original of the photograph that had been
mutilated and destroyed-that girl with
the magnificent eyes that had so at.
tracted me.
The afternoon passed, and yet we
were not successful. I was faint with
hunger and thirst, yet my companion
did not once complain. Her energy was
marvelous-and yet was she not hunt-
ing down a criminal? Was she not de-
termined to obtain such evidence as
would enable her to speak the truth
fearless, and with confidence that it
would have the effect of convicting the
guilty one?
Slowly we toiled on up the pictur-
esque little glen for nearly a mile and
a half. Its beauties were extraordinary,
and the silence was unbroken save for
the musical ripple of the water over
the stones. Hidden there in the center
of that great wood, no one had visited
it perhaps for years, not even the keep-
ers, for no jiath led there, and by rea-
son of the tangle of briars and bush
it was utterly ungetatable. Indeed, it
had ruined our clothes to search there,
and as we went on with so many wind-
ings and turns we became utterly out
of our bearings. We knew ourselves to
be in the center of the wood, but that
was all.
The sun had set, and the sky above
showed the crimson of the distant after-
glow, warning us that it was time we
began to think of how to make our
exit. We were passing around a sharp
bend in the glen where the boulders
were so thickly moss-grown that our
feet fell noiselessly, wnen I thought I
heard a voice, and raising my hand we
both halted suddenly.
"Someone is there," I whispered
quickly. "Behind that rock." She nodd-
ed in the affirmative, for she, too, nad
heard the voice.
We listened, but the sound was not
repeated. That someone was on the other
side of the rock I knew, for in a tree
in the vicinity a thrush was hopping
from twig to twig, sounding its alarm-
cry and objecting to being disturbed.
Therefore we crept silently forward
together to ascertain who were the in-
truders. The only manner, however, in
which to get a view beyond the huge
rock that, having fallen across the
stream centuries ago, nad diverted its
channel, was to clamber up its mossy
sides to the summit. This we did eagerly
and breathlessly, without betraying our
presence by the utterance of a single
word.
To reach the side of the boulder we
were compelled to walk through the
shallow water, but Muriel, quite un-
daunted, sprang lithely along at my
side, and with one accord we swarmed
up the steep rock, gripping its slip-
pery face with our hands and laying
ourselves flat as we came to its sum-
mit.
Then together we peered over, just,
however, in time to see two dark fig-
ures of men disappearing into the
thicket on the opposite side of the glen.
"Who are they, I wonder?" I asked.
"Do you recognize them?"
"No. They are entire strangers to
me," was her answer. "But they seem
fairly well dressed. Perhaps two sports-
men from some shooting party in the
neighborhood. They've lost their way
most probably."
"But I don t think they carried guns,"
I said. "One of them had something
over his shoulder?'
"Wasn't it a gun? I thought it was."
"No, he wasn't carrying it like he'd
carry a gun. It was short-and seemed
more like a spade."
"A spade!" she gasjed quickly in a
low voie. "A spade! Are you certain
of that?"
"No, not at all certain. We only had
an instantaneous glance of them. We
were unfortunately too late to see them
face to face."
"The back of one of the men, the tall
fellow in the brown suit, was broad
and square--the back of someone who


is familiar to me, only for the moment dently not that of the person she had
I can't recollect whose it resembles." expected to find.
She only spoke in a whisper, fearing "Who is she, I wonder?" my comr
lest we should be discovered. panion ejaculated. "Not a lady, evi-
I longed .to scramble down and rush dently, by her dress and hands."
after the intruders, only the belief that "Evidently not," was my response, for
one of them carried a spade and the I still deemed it best to keep my own
other an iron bar struck me as curious, counsel. I recollected the story Olinto
while at the same moment my eye had told me about his wife; of her ill-
caught sight of a portion of the ground ness and her longing to return to Italy.
below us at the base of the rock which Yet the dead woman's countenance must
had evidently been recently disturbed. have been healthy enough in life, al-
"It is a spade the man is carrying!" [Continued on Fourteenth -Page]
I cried excitedly. "Look down there!
They've just been burying something!"
Her quick eyes followed the direction
I indicated, and she answered: ead Your Future in the
"I really believe they have concealed Read Your Future in the
something I
Then when we allowed the men to get
beyond hearing, we both slipped down
to the other side of the boulder and
there discovered many signs that the
earth had been hurriedly excavated and
only just replaced.
Quicker than it takes to describe the WHICH IS THE TRADE-MARK OF
exciting incident which followed, we
broke down the branch of a tree and
with it commenced moving the freshly
disturbed earth, which was still soft and
easily removed. w |t wlh tu
Muriel found a dead branch in the
vicinity, and both of us set to work *
with a will, eager to ascertain what
was hidden there. That something had anO i s
certainly been concealed was, to us,
quite evident, but what it really was we
could not surmise. The hole they had
dug did not seem large enough to admit REAL ESTATE BROKERS
a human body, yet leaves had been care-
fully strewn over the place which, if ap-
proached from any other point than the 204 W. Bay St., Jacksonville, Fla.
high-up one whence we had seen it,would
arouse no suspicion that the ground had
exer been interfered with.
Digging with a piece of wood was .
hard and laborious work and it was a ly listing your Property
long time before we removed sufficient under our star your for-
earth to make a hole of any size. But
Muriel exerted all her energy, and both tune will increase. In-
of us worked on in dogged silence full
of wonder and anticipation. With a quiries now in our office
spade we should have soon been able to
investigate, but the earth having ap- ....for....
parently been stamped down hard prior
to the last covering being put upon it,
our progress was very slow and difficult.
At last, a quarter of an hour or so
after we had commenced, Muriel, stand- Lan
ing in the hole and having dug her stake
deeply into the ground, suddenly cried:
"Lookl Look, Mr. Gregg! Why-what-
ever is that ?"
I bent forward as she indicated, and
my eyes met an object so unexpected that
I was held dumb and motionless.
By what we had succeeded in discov- will insure the sale of
ering, the mystery was increased rather
than diminished, yours if you place them
I gave vent to an ejaculation of com- our hands
plete bewilderment, and looked blankly Ill our hands
into my companion's face.
The amazing enigma was surely com- Cut ouW ad M m I NailI Us
plete !

CHAPTER VII.
CONTAINS A SlURPRIHt. Gentlefen-I1 am interested in your pro.
The first object brought to light, about poal to01 timWrla and farm property.
two feet beneath the surface, was a Kindly correspond with me on the subject.
piece of dark gray woolen stuff which,
when the mold was removed, proved to ..........................................
be part of a woman's skirt. ..........
With frantic eagerness I "got into the .....................
hole we had made and removed the soil """"" """" ***
with my hands, until I suddenly touched
something hard.
A body lay there, doubled up and
crushed into the well-like hole the men |
had dug. I e U
Together we pulled it out, when, to
my surprise, on wiping away the dirt
from the hard waxen features, T recog-
nized it as the Ibody of Armida, the and H p i nC
woman who had been my servant in
Leghorn and who had afterwards mar-
ried Olinto. Both had been assa"sinnted!
When Muriel gazed upon the dead 204 West Bay St., Jacksonville, Fla.
woman's face she gave vent to an ex-
pression of surprise. The body was evi- T1AMPMTATM aM


I. ', .


10


T


HI


E


THE SUN


4f


C


Z


44












March 3, 1906


TEE'SUN


You were thinking yesterday, my good woman,
that you were a little better than the lady who
called on you although she has more money than
you.
But are you really better than she?
Your husband is a salaried man and her husband
is an oil magnate.
Of course that does not' necessairly make her any
better than you, because we all know that your
husband had a college education and her husband
was a day laborer.
But why should your husband's education or her
husband's wealth have anything to do with you or
her? Let us cut the husbands out of the proposition.
Well, then, she has more money than you.
Does that make you any better than she? Is th-i
lack of money an unmixed blessing carrying with it
social superiority?
She (with a certain touch of vulgarity, owing to
her ancestors, which you have not, thanks to your
ancestors) has a much kinder heart than you havy.
She honestly tries to be herself in spite of the
money she has, while you have social ambitions that
cause you to be snobbish.
You think you are better than she.
She never thinks about social status.
You feel bitter toward her because her husband
is immensely wealthy.
She feels well disposed toward you because she
thinks both you and your husband are clever-and
with her, clever has a better meaning than the com-
monly accepted one.
No, in spite of her money and her position she is
more of a woman than you are in spite of your
blood and your husband's education.

Cleon told me the other day that being of a mind
to own sets of Balzac and Shakespeare, neither of
which he happened to have in his bachelor apart-
ments, he dropped a line to a well-known publisher
and the next day the delivery wagon stopped at his
door, the books were handed out, his man took them
in, and that was the end of it. Oh, no, not quite the
end; when he settles his bills for the quarter he will
pay for his books.
Now I dare say that Cleon will get some good
from his books because he is really fond of reading
when it doesn't interfere with his golf. And he pur-
chased handsome editions, fresh from the binder's,
spick-span and flawless, with never a dog's ear or a
crease in the leather. But he had no fun out of the
buying. He saw an advertisement, he sent in an order,
and almost by magic the books were on his table.
Yet think of the price he pays for them! Two hun-
dred good dollars.
Yesterday I had some money to spend. I say I
had money to spend. Don't think for a moment that
money that buys shoes and sacks and sheetings and
socks is money spent. If that were the case I could be
said to spend money every day of my life, for my chil-
dren will walk on their feet, and they demand pro-
tection from the elements no matter how high may
be the price of cloth. No, money I had yesterday
was a gift to be actually spent as foolishly as I
might devise.
Like Cleon, I too wanted books, for your circulat-
ing library is only a temporary assuager of literary
hunger and one book owned is worth three "taken
out." But ten dollars will not carry one as far as will
two hundred unless care is taken and discrimination
is used. So I went, not to a store where they deal in
books fresh from the mint, but to a shop devoted
primarily to the cause of dry goods where they were
having a "hurt book" sale, and if you will believe
me, the very first thing that assailed my eye was a
set of Shakespeare that looked hurt beyond any physi-
cian's aid. Limp leather bindings that abused their
prerogative; the box in which they were huddling
together, slit and cracked and broken. How often
hands had seized those coverings They looked as
if they had been the vadee mecum" of a book-lover
for a score of years. And my Shakespeare at home is
all crowded into one volume, so that "The Tempest"
rages about the ears of "The Two Gentlemen of Ve-
rona,' and "Hamlet," with' scant regard for royal
rights, treads on the toes of poor "King Lear."
I opened one of the volumes and found to my
surprise that the pages were immaculate. Not a word
had been read I There were Shakespeare's wit and
poetry and splendor and melody and humanity un-
touched by any save a cursory eye. I asked the
maiden, who, temporarily divorced from the ribbon
and lace counter, was giving her attention to the
world of letters, what the set was worth.
Five dollars" was the answer that fell on my
hungry ears. And I had seen the same set adver-
tised for fifteen Twelve green-backed volumes there
were, and they might be mine for five greenbacks.
Never leaped sword from scabbard sooner than lped
my money from its pocket. I looked over my shoul r,


THINK IN


By Charles Battel Loomis
fearing that some other book-lover would grab the
box of books away frcm me and claim them. I exam-
ined them carefully as a mother does her boy when
he comes crying into the house after a fall, and I
found that they looked more hurt than they were.
They were really more frightened than hurt. Inoea-
sant pawing by unfriendly hands is an awful ordeal
to which to subject a book full of kindly instincts,
as all of Shakespeare's books always are. But they
had fallen on friendly hands at last, and hereafter
they shall be handled with the respect due their
contents.
And right here let me thank the kind people who
treated Shakespeare so cavalierly. This may sound
inconsistent; but are not my thanks due those who
caused the bard to depreciate two-thirds in money
value?
I can see them, typical shoppers, out for bargains
in scrim and Hamburg edgings, making a hurried
visit to the book counter in hope of getting a com-
plete and unabridged set of Mary J. Holmes a works.
And they stumbled on Shakespeare. Of course they
had heard of him before. Cheap shoppers are not so
ignorant as you imagine, lofty reader. They had often
heard of him before, but they supposed that writing
plays for Henry Irving to produce kept him too
busy to do anything in the book line. Curious to see
what sort of books he had written, they tumbled
them out of the box and tested the limpness of the




The Greatest Thing

By MRS. N. W. EPP3ES, Tallahassee, Fla.

(This poem received honorable mention in The
Sun's Prize Poem Contest.)

He that loveth not knoweth not oId, for God is love.-
1 John, 4 chap., 8 verse.
Youth, health and love they had!
What more could mortal ask?
No idle dreams of wealth and fame
When joy attends each task!
Tho' plain and even poor,
The dear home place,
To them 'twas beautiful--
Love was the saving grace.
Toward sunset now their faces turn,
And love abideth still, tho' youth is gone;
Storms came and shadows fell,
But hearts were warm and clouds passed on.
Plain as of old
In the dear home place,
But now, as then,
Love is the saving grace.
Two lowly mounds neathh the old oal tree,
Where the shadows are flickering ever,
And the places that knew them once on earth
Shall know them no more forever.
(lone to home on the Other Side,
Victors they in the race, [song
And angels are chanting the grand sweet
Of Love, the Saving Grace!



covers until those verdant leathers were hopelessly
crippled and doomed to limp forever. They dropped
them on the floor because the bindings were so curi-
ously slippery-so unlike the bindings of Mary J.
Then they picked then up by those same covers as
one lifts a rabbit by its ears, and then they looked
inside. The interior bore a striking resemblance to
poetry, but there seemed to be a paucity of rhyme;
and if it was conversation it was terribly broken up
by abbreviated names. Back into the box they were
hustled to await the coming of another shopper with
peaked face, glittering eye, and hurried step, and
hour by hour the value of that set of Shakespeare
as leather and paper sank lower and lower still,
until one third of its worth was all that was left to
it. In another week I might have had it for the ask-
ing, perhaps. But you shoppers, you did not hurt the
thought in the book mor were the typography and
marg g awry by yur ontempto hads.
1 ear see MM sh stia s of my sM t ahsir


G


and find as much of Shakespeare's divine essence
as Cleon shall find in his hundred-dollar edition.
Therefore, I thank you, careless shoppers. When
the glad season comes that reckless shoppers turn
their thoughts to books, come out, ye bargainers,
and depreciate a complete set of "The Tatler" for
me. Only spare the integrity of the leaves. If you but
let the leafage rival that of Vallombrosa I care not
how you smut the covers, for there are detergents
that shall kill all germs.
When I had secured my Shakespeare, I thought
tnat there might peradventure be a set of Scott for
a song. I saw an "Ivanhoe" here and a "Redgauntlet"
there and a "Lady of the Lake" hard by, and I
asked the maiden, late of the lace department,
whether they had Scott's works complete. She walked
up and down and cast a searching eye over the mass
of books.
"No," said she, finally, with an omniscient smile,
"there's nothing left but his poems and the Waverley
Novels."
A crippled Shakespeare, with reasoning powers
still intact, might seem to be enough of a bargain
for one day, but at another table I found scores
of essayists on dress parade and waiting to be trans-
ferred when it should suit the will 6t some random
purchaser. They were massed in a solid phalanx, for
they had been so unattractive to the rushing shop-
pers that they had scarce given them a toss. There
was nothing limp about them. There they stood, un-
(,smayed, ready for friend or foe, pipeclayed and
soldierly, with "shining morning faces." And nine-
teen cents would buy their discharged I
What do you think, you thoughtless persons who
spend a hundred dollars for a week at the Rangeley
l kes-what do you think of "A Week on the Con-
cord' for nineteen cents? And while you can do no
more than catch some fish that will fade in a few
days I can catch and keep forever thoughts as quaint
and as homely as Thoreau was himself.
0 Cleon, you with your plethoric purse have never
learned the delights of working for your money's
worth. Wou spent two hundred dollars without the
fun of picking and choosing, while I, for leI than
ten, have picked up a library of good fellows; and
enjoyed the search withal.
'The book-hurting shoppers did not toss and gore
lBalzac, for the very name seemed to them something
"scientific," and they passed him by as if they had
been so many Levites. Their unjust discrimination
against him was my loss, for I still lack a Balsac.
Next year it would pay you to dick into the French.
man a little, ye scrim-hunting ladies. He Is easily
handled and although in the department-store edition
his covers are not limp, you can bring down his price
appreciably if you follow bargainsale tactics. And
when you have bepawed him and rejected him as
worse than rubbish, will you kindly drop me a postal
that I may go to see whether he has been let down to
my stature?
But for one afternoon's browsing, credit me with
Macaulay's "Literary Essays," Carlyle's "Sartor Re-
sartum," Loti's "Iceland Fisherman," Emerson's "Eng-
lish Traits," Curtis's "Prue and I," Thoreau's "Wal-
den" and his "Week on the Concord," and Shake-
speare on crutches, and there is still some virtue in
the ten dollars. Cleon, I wouldn't change places with
you unless, together with your generous balance at
the banker's, I could keep my ability to tire out a
dollar.

Do you want to know why the maid leit after the
third hot night? I may be mistaken, but if you will
take me up to the room she occupied I may be able
to find a clue, and there is certainly nothing about
me that resembles Sherlock Holmes.
What a large closet!
Not Not a closet? The maid's room?
Oh, Ia, la I (As they say in France.)
Do you remember the Black Hole/of Calcutta?
Poor maid I
And what an apology for a window. And how hot
the tin roof makes the room even this cool day.
Wasn't it awful the way some people treated
slaves ?
Makes me simply shudder to read the accounts.
Ho your maid stayed through the third hot night?
Courageous girl I
I would have left after the first night's expe-
rience.
it was hot on your own floor with all the windows
open and a direct draft over the bed.
But think of that room.
"Elizabeth or the Exiles of Siberial"
Only they were cold.
And both you and your hubmad pillars of the


church.
Fou might install an eletris fea.
That would help.
I'hree night s ta he 1
PAM .
plowl


Aj


I'V


E


BEEN


11.











THE N


V S. DEPAR TMENT OF


March 3, 1906


AGRICULTURE


Its Various Divisions and Scope of Work


y W. E. Pabor


Few of the farmers of Florida (and
probably it may also be said of many
other States of the Union) fully realize
the mammoth proportions the United
States Department has reached within
the last few years; especially since it
was organised into a distinct depart-
ment or the Government, whose head
official thereby became a member of the
Cabinet. Its work has to do with eco-
nomio matters of as great importance to
the welfare of the people at large as
that of any other department for tue
basis of the nation; wealth as well as
the prosperity of the millions engaged
in soil culture, rests in intelligent agri-
culture, and no nation can become great
that ignores seed-time and harvest and
those who are the servitors of labor.
These remarks are suggested by a re-
cent publication showing the organiza-
tion of the several branches of the de-
partment, its bureaus, its decisions, its
offices and those who fill them. In the
thirty-two pages of this bulletin, revised
to October 1st, 1905, much information
is given which cannot fall to interest
the farmer readers of the Sun; hence a
brief condensation of its contents is not
out of place in my department.
In May, 1882, the purpose and scope
of the work was announced to be "to
acquire and diffuse among the people
of the United States, useful information
on subjects connected with agriculture
and in the most general and compre-
hensive sense of that word, and, to pro-
cure, propagate and distribute among
the people new and valuable seeds and
plants, etc." By slow degrees from this
acorn planted by Congress, has grown
up a tree of stately proportions, whose
branches extend far and wide, whose
fruitage is not confined to one variety,
but each branch has its specialty, as will
be seen as we pass on to sketch each in
its turn.
The office of the Secretary, of course,
stands first in the list. He has under
him an assistant, a chief clerk, an ap-
pointment clerk, a solicitor or legal ad-
viser, a chief of supplies and a curator
or museum caretaker. This museum is
the depository for objects of interest in
agriculture in the possession of the de-
partment and have mainly an educa-
tional value.
The Weather Bureau seems to be con-
sidered, at least in the bulletin, as the
leading if not the most important divis-
ion, as indeed it way well be, since it
has in charge the forecasting of the
weather, the display of weather, frost,
cold wave and flood signals. With a
central office in Washington, it main-
tains 200 subordinate stations within
the jurisdiction of the Government; in
addition it receives intelligence from
Canada on the north, Mexico on the
south, the Azores and all along the
western cost of Europe-thus covering
within its field of observation practi.-
cally the whole of the inhabited por-
tions of the North American continent
and the North Atlantic Ocean."
The Bureau has divisions as follows:
Forest, River and Flood, Climate and
Crop, Meteorological Records, Instru-
ment, Barometry, Ocean Meteorology,
Monthly Weather Review, Telegraph,
Literary, Publication, Supplies, Ac-
counts, observatory (at Mount Weather,
near Bluemont, Va.), Weather Bureau
stations.
While all these are important divis-
ions, each having its chief with a vary-
ing number of subordinates, it may be
sasd that the Climate and Crop, and
the Weather Bureau divisions are the
most fnstr'tlve and useful in a general
way, to the public at large. Florida
vegetable and fruit growers have reason
to be grateful for the home service. un-
der the able observation of Mr. A. J.
Mitchell rendered by the prompt ad-.
antes warnlns set out from Jackson-


The Bureau of Animal Industry comes
next, to its leading work is the inves-
tigation of communicative dismmeases
among animals and the promulgation
of measures for prevention and extemi-
nation. It also has charge of the dairy
interests, both in home and foreign mar-
kets. Its divisions are as follows Blo-
chemio, Dairy, Inspection Pathalogical,
Quarantine, Zoological, Experiment, Edi-
torio, Animal Husbandry. This last divis-
ion conducts experiments in animal
breeding and feeding, in co-operation
with State Experiment Stations.'
*
The Bureau of Plant Industry fol-
lows, studying plant life in all its rela-
tions to agriculture. In addition to the
chiefs of each division, it has specialists
in the line of botany, pomology, tropi-
cal and semi-tropical fruits, drug and
poisonous plants, seeds, etc., of special
interest to Florida is the division as the
"Bionomic" as, in addition to the gen-
eral study of tropical agriculture, its
scope has been extended so as to pro-
vide for a bionomio treatment of the
numerous temperate and tropical plants
which were original natives of tropical
countries, such as Indian corn, cotton,
beans, tomatoes, etc. Experiments are
being conducted with weevil-resistant
Central American varieties of cotton and
with varieties of corn adapted to special
conditions of growth, as in the humid
tropics or the arctic regions. Coffee,
rubber and cocoa are the tropical prod-
ucts receiving special attention.
The various divisions are as follows:
Botanical, Farm Management, Pomolog-
ical, Seed and Plant Introduction, Econ-
omy of Tropical and Semi-Tropical
Plants, Drug and Poison, Dry Land Ag-
riculture, Experimental Gardens and
Grounds, Seed Laboratory, Co-operative
Cotton Demonstration Work.
*
The Forest Service "collects and dis-
nominates information of practical value
bearing on the maintenance, improve-
ment, extension and utilization of Amer-
ican forests. Has control of the National
Forest reserves, conducts inquiries into
foreign products, improvements in meth-
ods of procuring them, the saving of
waste in their manufacture and new
sources of supply. It has six divisions,
to-wit: Measurements, Management,
Dendrology, Extension, Products, Rec-
ords. The third comprises all matters
pertaining to the life history of forests
and forest trees; also makes special
study of a subject of interest to Flor-
ida," the effects of turpentine gathering
on the life of rosin-bearing conifers and
the conditions and treatment under
which such trees yield the largest quan-
tity of rosin for naval stores." I believe
a bulletin on this subject was issued
a while ago by the department.
*
The Bureau of Chemistry has been in
existence since the establishment of the
Department, but previous to that time
a chemist had charge of all work in
his line relating to agriculture. It con-
fines its attention to questions of public
interest as referred to it by the Govern-
ment on heads of the department. Inqui-
ries -)f value only to individuals or to
small groups of people are not taken
up. It therefore does not examine and
report upon samples thus sent.
The leading division is that of foods,
and their adulteration. It buys in the
open market, examine and makes rec-
ords thereon. Special attention is given
to imported articles of consumption. It
has six laboratories established In six
of the principal ports to aid and expe-
dite work. There are also sugar, dairy.
a miscellaneous (in which is included
the subject of insecticides), drug plant
analysis, leather and paper and a micro-
scopical laboratory, together with one
of special investigations; this, by special
direction of Congrmpess is studyig the ef-
feats of eavirosmamt upoNa she dal


composition of grains and sugar pro- gravers and photographers, together
dutag plants. with a long roll of clerks and laborers
S,* r who attend to the details of distribu-
The Bureau of Soils has six divisions, tion. The number of bulletins printed
as, follows: Soil Physics, in charge of during the last fiscal year amounted to
soil surveyors, under the immediate di- nearly six million copies. Under the law
reotion of the chief of the bureau. Thir- four-fifths of this number were placed
ty-six assistants are required to carry at the disposal of Senators and Repre-
on *e various branches connected with sentatives; the balance being distrib-
the division. Their work is of such pub- uted by the bureau over which, as man-
lie interest that reports made and print- aging editor, Mr. George William Hill
ed in a separate volume. The tobacco has presided for many years.
division states the adaptability of vari- *
ous oils for new varieties, especially The Bureau of Statistics estimates,
thqsd from Sumatra. The introduction tabulates and gives forth to the public
btle department of the high-priced Su- the annual products of the agricultural
Urai wrapper into Connecticut and world. Detailed statements of the results
its successful cultivation there, prom- of investigations concerning both domes-
ises to check the large importations to tic and foreign agriculture are issued
the extent of many millions of dollars through the medium of an official pam-
per year, which goes to show the value phlet entitled the Crop Reporter, de-
of tht investigations made. There is an signed for general circulation among
alkalf division which conducts investi- producers and consumers. It may be
gatlos connected with the arid lands here observed that this investigating
aid seepage waters of the Rocky Moun- bureau has recently been investigated
tain region. The soil management divis- and found to possess "leakage" qualities
iqn, it of recent creation, designed, to that have placed it in a position of unre-
sltppliment the work of the soil survey, liability as well as being charged with
handling special problems, improved favoritism in the matter of reports af-
methods of cultivation and handling of fecting the stock markets of the nation.
farm lands. It maintains a general field service, with
WState agents and voluntary correspond-
The Bureau of Entomology is not the ents numbering a quarter of a million.
least important of the various divisions. A statistical expert is kept in London,
Bugs devastate crops every year to the who furnishes the bureau with foreign
extent of millions of dollars and no sec- crop reports.
tion of the country is exempt from their The Experiment Station office covers
ravages. Twelve divisions have charge relations with home and foreign agricul-
of the! various matters belonging to the tural institutions, with the various sta-
buread, and the information gained is tions in the different States of the
published from time to time in bulletin Union and the dependencies of Alaska,
form !nd distributed to those interested. Hawaii and Porto Rico, the promotion
The; department of insects in the Na- of farmers' institutes, investigations on
tional' Museum is the result of work the nutritive value and economy of hu-
along this line and insects are identified man foods and irrigation and drainage
and clAssed for experiment stations, pub- investigations.
lie institutions and private individuals. The office of Public Roads completes
These are the various divisions: Field the list of bureaus. It is of recent intro-
crop insects, in separate sections for the duetion, but has a field of operation
North and South; fruit insects, both for so vast as makes it an important factor
deciduous and tropical fruits; truck and in the public service. It "collects sta-
small fruit insects; forest insects; tistics concerning systems of road man-
stored products insects, such as grains, agement and all phases of road improve-
flour, meal, seeds, dried fruits, drugs, ment; investigates methods of road-
tobacco., as well as dried meats, cheese, building and furnishes expert assistance
etc. "The investigations are directed to rural sections in road construction;
toward a study of the life history and tests road materials; co-operates with
the determination of means of prevent- schools and colleges in highwayengineer.
ing the ravages of the insects concerned; ing construction and publishes informa-

slhde trees and ornamental plants; in- tion of value concerning road improve-
seote ip relation to diseases of man and ment for free distribution." Each year
other 1pnimals, under which head are the subject of good roads is receiving
classed malaria, yellow fever,. and the the attention of the people more and
house-fly in connection with typhoid more, regardless of section, and to no
fever. No doubt, after the experiences class of the community is its importance
of New Orleans and other Southern more apparent than that of the farmer
cities (including our own Pensacola) the whose highways and by-ways, as a rule,
mosquito will soon be reported upon by are in a condition provoking denuncia-
this bureau; apiacultural, which goes to tion of county and State officials, who
show that the busy bee has assumed an fail to see the necessity of using public
importance demanding a special section, moneys for the public good along the
in which the crossing of different varie- line of good roads for farmers to travel
ties ard being conducted with a view to reach town or railway station.
to'the production of a superior honey- *
producing strain. Who knows, perhaps The foregoing may be dry details. but
some day a stingless bee will be intro- they relate to a department of our Gov.
duced to aplarianst ernment that comes more directly in
nwAnfn n *611 &L


The work of the Biological division
relates to the geographic distribution of
animals'and plants, the economic rela-
tions of birds and mammals, and is
charged with carrying into effect the
Federal laws for the importation of wild
birds and animals and the protection of
native game. Iti work is divided into
three divisions, the most important one
being that devoted to Investigations de-
termining the relation of birds to agri-
culture.
The Division of Publications in the
publishing house of the department from
which issue all the yearbooks, reports,
bulletins, circulars, etc.. that are dis-
tributed free or for which a nominal
charge is made. Its force comprises edi-
tors, proof readers, compilers, indexers,
abdtractors, artists, draughtimen, en-


tctmact with the farmers of the country
than-excepting perhaps the postofflce-
any of the others. Its machinery is vast
and comprehensive, requiring the best
intelligence that can be commanded for
effective work. There have been some
irregularities, no doubt, criminal acts
to be charged to some of its subordi.
nates; hut in this it is no different than
other Cabinet departments. The expe.
rience of late years will be as seed sown
in good ground for a harvest of purity
of motives from which the petty meth-
ods of politicians and the baseness of
graft will he eliminated and a higher
plane of public service for the public
good h1 reached, in the interest of that
clas of whom Lord Chatham said:
"Trade increases the wealth and glorv
of a country; but its real strength and
stamina are to be looked for among the
cultivators of the land.g the


12


oubm











March 3, 1906


THE SUN


Agricultural Department

Conducted by W. E. Pabor


In a series of experiments in corn cul-
ture and the difference in effect of cot-
tonseed and cottonseed meal, the Geor-
gia Experiment 'Station director reaches
a conclusion that "it is not expedient
to apply cottonseed as a fertilizer di-
rectly to corn, but that the meal should
be used instead." Doctor Redding de-
clares that chemical analysis proves
880 pounds of meal are equal in content
of plant food to 2,000 pounds of seed.
The oil in the seed is practically of no
value as a fertilizer.
A recent issue of the Miami Metrop-
olis contained nearly three columns of
"Questions Answered," in which was
given much information of value con-
cerning the agricultural area environ-
ing that prosperous city, just such as
is needed by homeseekers and prospective
investors. One very great advantage is
in a "no-fence law," which is a great
blessing in a new country to settlers of
limited means. Made up into a little
booklet a wide circulation could be given
to "Questions Answered."
AhI March; we know thou art kind-
hearted, spite of ugly threats and looks,
and, out of sight, are nursing April vio-
lets.-Helen Hunt Jackson.
This is true, for Colorado, where Hel-
en Hunt Jackson lived and wrote under
the shadow of Pike's Peak; but not for
Florida, where the lilies and the violets
and the roses bloom all the year
round. The mulberries are ripening; tne
pineapple plants are sending up their
crimson crowns, the lime, the lemon, the
orange and the pomelo are beginning to
make the balmy air fragrant with their
perfume and the robins still abide with
us, fearful, as yet, to flit away to their
Northern habitat.
THE MANATEE SNAIL.
The Florida Experiment Station has
issued a press bulletin, too long for in-
sertion in our department, on the Mana-
tee Snail, which has been found in the
orange groves of Manatee County feed-
ing upon the sooty mold. It does not
seem to be a new comer to the country,
but its origin is unknown, though
thought to be a native of Florida. Its
value, however, seems to be recognized,
as it cleans fungus from leaf, stem and
fruit. As it increases rapidly under fa-
vorable conditions, it will no doubt
spread to other sections of this State
and become an important factor in
fighting diseases of citrus fruits. The
snail is small in size, seldom over one
inph in length when full grown; shell
smooth, white and having four bands
of brown spots. Certain kinds of fungus
known as being beneficial parasites and
of value to orange growers are not dis-
turbed by the snail. The brown fungus,
known as an effective parasite on white
fly larvae, the red-pink performing sim-
ilar service, the red and the grey-headed,
both parasitic on the common scales;
these four the snail does not disturb,
but feeds and thrives on sooty mold.
Cocones have been introduced in sections
outside of Manatee County, and it is
thought the range occupied will extend
from the St. Johns river to the Caloo-
sahatchie.
Thus Nature meets the emergencies
itself creates and for each new disease
of plant life provides a remedy. As wrote
George Eliot: "Nature repairs her rav-
ages," is just to all mankind and repays
them for their industry.
FREE BULLETINS FOR FLORIDA
FARMERS.
Elsewhere in this issue will be found
an article on the scope of the U. 8. De-
partment of Agriculture. Not the least
important of its divisions is the one in
charge of the publications of the depart-
ment, many of which are free to all ap-
plicants, while a nominal charge is made
for rome in special lines of work. But
the Farmers' Bulletins are free and,
while the greater part of the 250 or
more that have been issued to date are
designed for Northern and Western
farmers, there are many in the interest


of the South.
Of those that are at present available
we have grouped into classes the num-


ber and title line for the benefit of such
of the agricultural readers of The Sun
who might like to have copies. They
will be sent to any address on applioas
tion to the Secretary of Agriculture,
Washington, D. C.
FORAGE CROPS.
No. 37, Kaffir Corn; 50, Sorghum; 58,
Soy Bean; 81, Corn Culture in the
South; 101, Millets; 102, Southern For-
age Crops; 147, Winter Forage Crops
for the South; 164, Rape as a Forage
Crop; 215, Alfalfa in the Eastern State&.
VEGETABLES.
No. 39, Onion Culture; 68, Black
Rot in Cabbages; 129, Sweet Potato
Culture; 107, Cassava; 220, Tomatoes;
232, Okra.
POULTRY.
No. 41, Fowls, Care and Breeding;
51, Standard Varieties; 61, Ducks and
Geese; 141, Poultry on the Farm; 200(
Turkeys; 234, Guinea Fowls for Food;
230, incubators.
TOBACCO.
No. 82, Tobacco Culture; 83, Tobacco
Soils; 120, Insects Affecting Tobacco.
HOGS.
No. 24, Hog Cholera; 100, Hog Rais-
ing in the South.
MISCELLANEOUS.
No. 25, Peanut Culture; 140, Pineap-
ples; 174, Broom Corn; 167, Cassava;
1098, Strawberries.
FOR THE HOUSEKEEPER.
No. 203, Canned Fruits, Preserves and
Jellies.
CALHOUN COUNTY.
It would seem as if the little-com-
pared with some others---county of Cal-
houn, in the far western section of Flor-
ida, possessed attractions for settlers
from the North and West looking for
purely farming lands, not to be excelled
in opportunities for the making of
homes and successful culture of the soil.
It is a small county, sixty-five miles
long, north and south, and only from
fifteen to forty miles wide. Its southern
border is washed by the warm waters of
the Gulf of Mexico, while it has for its
eastern border the Apalachicola river;
up which transportation by boats gives
daily connection with the railroads at
Chattahoochee landing, or River June-
tion. There are other streams coursing
through the county, notably the piq*.
turesque Chipola, running through its
central part. On the southeast lies St.
Joseph's Bay, said to have the greatest
natural depth of water over the bar
of any bay on the Gulf, while on the
southwest is St. Andrew's Bay, perfectly
land-locked and large enough to float
the fleets of the whole world..
The county lays no claim to being one
favorable to the growth of citrus fruits,
but for general farming purposes its soil
is so rich and strong that many crops
are grown requiring no commercial fer-
tilizer to bring them to a profitable har-
vestage. Its near proximity to the Gulf
give it a more equable climate than
counties lying north of it like Jackson,
and it is claimed that freezing point
is rarely touched, while the summer heat,
though reaching 95 degrees, is tempered
by the almost constant breeze blowing
up from the salty waters of the Gulf.
There are about three-quarters of a
million acres of arable land on which
in small communities are settled per-
haps six thousand people, two-thirds
white, the balance consisting of "our
colored brother," as politicians term
him about election times, and the nig-
ger the rest of the year. Nine-tenths of
the land area is still in timber, mostly
pine and cypress, with considerable
juniper, cedar, oak, poplar, sweet gum,
bay, hickory, magnolia, birch, cotton-
wood and yopon (whatever that is),
which show necessarily a strong soil,
such as is required for hard woods. This
soil is described as of a loose, sandy
nature, underlaid with clay. From it
can be raised upland and Sea Island
cotton, corn, oats, ricle, potatoes, suar-
cane and of course all the vegetables


grown in the temperate soil.
Honey is one of the leading products,
a quarter of a million pounds of an e-
cellent quality putting it at the head of


the honye counties of the state. The
county of Liberty is a close competitor
in this line, with Volusia next. Of the
Y0,000 stands of bees scheduled in 1003,
Calhoun had nearly three thousand.
The county, says the News, of Wewa-
hitehka, from whose columns and the
reports from Commidioner McLin's of-
lce I glean the information given in
this article, wants settlers. Naturally.
There are "opportunities" for ten thou-
sand thrifty ones. Fifty thousand acres
of Government lands are subject to home-
stead entry. The State has an immense
acreage that can be bought at low prices
on yearly payments. Lands owned by
syndicates or individuals are held at
a higher valuation, but still are within
reach of even the poorest newcomer.
Another advantage, and one of no
mean merit, is that pure water every-
where abounds, easily accessible by the
drive-well system at a depth of from
thirty to forty feet, and, while on the
subject of water, it is said that there is
not a barroom in the county to furnish
any other beverage that the pure, spark-
ling water nature gives to man without
money and without price.
To conclude: Why spend hundreds of
thousands of dollars to reclaim swamp
lands when millions of arable acres
are available for settlement?


TEA CULTURE.


free of last February. Tea has become
so universal a stimulant that, if we
grow it for home consumption, it would
save very many thousands of dollars to
ti. farmers and fruit growers of Florida.
It might be said, however, that this
"tablet" idea is not a new one. A Sou-
chong tea compressed into cakes of
almost a brick-Il&e hardness is supplied
to Russian army offers in Manchuria
and elsewhere. It is creamy and sweet
in taste, requiring less sugar than ordi-
nary tee and the infusion is made by
putting a small bit in a bowl and pour-
ing hot water over it.


Try

"Green Brier"

Tennessee Whisky

IT'S PURE

THIIATS SURE


Robt.W.Simms
SOLE AGENT


18











March 3, 1906


THE mU


A4GRICULTURE


Its Various Divisions and Scope of Work


Few of the farmers of Florida (and
probably t may also be aid of many
other States of the Union) fully realize
the mammoth proportions the United
States Department has reached within
the last few years; especially since it
was organized into a distinct depart-
ment or the Government, whose head
official thereby became a member of the
Cabinet. Its work has to do with eco-
nomic matters of as great importance to
the welfare of the people at large as
that of any other department for sue
basis of the nation; wealth as well as
the prosperity of the millions engaged
in soil culture, rests in intelligent agri-
culture, and no nation can become great
that ignores seed-time and harvest and
those who are the servitors of labor.
These remarks are suggested by a re-
cent publication showing the organiza-
tion of the several branches of the de-
partment, its bureaus, its decisions, its
offices and those who fill them. In the
thirty-two pages of this bulletin, revised
to October 1st, 1905, much information
is given which cannot fail to interest
the farmer readers of the Sun; hence a
brief condensation of its contents is not
out of place in my department.
In May, 1862, the purpose and scope
of the work was announced to be "to
acquire and diffuse among the people
of the United States, useful information
on subjects connected with agriculture
and in the most general and compre-
hensive sense of that word, and, to pro-
cure, propagate and distribute among
the people new and valuable seeds and
plants, etc." By slow degrees from this
acorn planted by Congress, has grown
up a tree of stately proportions, whose
branches extend far and wide, whose
fruitage is not confined to one variety,
but each branch has its specialty, as will
be seen as we pass on to sketch each in
its turn..
The office of the Secretary, of course,
stands first in the list. He has under
him an assistant, a chief clerk, an ap-
pointment clerk, a solicitor or legal ad-
viser, a chief of supplies and a curator
or museum caretaker. This museum is
the depository for objects of interest in
agriculture in the possession of the de-
partment and have mainly an educa-
tional value.
*
The Weather Bureau seems to be con-
sidered, at least in the bulletin, as the
leading if not the most important divis-
ion, as indeed it way well be, since it
has in charge the forecasting of the
weather, the display of weather, frost,
cold wave and flood signals. With a
central office in Washington, it main-
tains 200 subordinate stations within
the jurisdiction of the Government; in
addition it receives intelligence from
Canada on the north, Mexico on the
south, the Aores and all along the
western cost of Europe-thus covering
within its field of observation practi-
cally the whole of the inhabited por-
tions of the North American continent
and the North Atlantic Ocean."
The Bureau has divisions as follows:
Forest, River and Flood, Climate and
Crop, Meteorological Records, Instru-
ment, Barometry, Ocean Meteorology,
Monthly Weather Review, Telegraph,
Literary, Publication, Supplies, Ae-
counts, observatory (at Mount Weather,
near Bluemont, Va.), Weather Bureau
stations.
While all these are important divis-
ions, eaeh having its chief with a vary-
ing number of subordinates, it may be
said that the Climate and Crop, and
the Weather Bureau divisions are the
moat fInstretive and useful in a general
way, to the public at large. Florida
vegetable and fruit growers have reason
to be grateful for the home service. un-
der the able observation of Mr. A. J.
Mitchell rendered by the prompt ad-
vance warmlgs seat out from Jacksomn-
vlle as to approaching climatic dis-


A W. E. Pabhor-


The Bureau of Animal Industry comes
next, to its leading work is the inve-
tigation of communicative diseases
among animals and the promulgation
of measures for prevention and extermi-
nation. It also has charge of the dairy
interests, both in home and foreign mar-
kets. Its divisions are as follows: Bio-
ohemio, Dairy, Inspection; Pathalogical,
Quarantine, Zoological, Experiment, Ed4i-
torio, Animal Husbandry. This last divis-
ion conducts experiments in animal
breeding and feeding, in co-operation
with State Experiment Stations.'
*
The Bureau of Plant Industry fol-
lows, studying plant life in all its rela-
tions to agriculture. In addition to the
chiefs of each division, it has specialists
in the line of botany, pomology, tropi-
cal and semi-tropical fruits, drug and
poisonous plants, seeds, etc., of special
interest to Florida is the division as the
"Bionomic" as, in addition to the gen-
eral study of tropical agriculture, its
scope has been extended so as to pro-
vide for a bionomic treatment of the
numerous temperate and tropical plants
which were original natives of tropical
countries, such as Indian corn, cotton,
beans, tomatoes, etc. Experiments are
being conducted with weevil-resistant
Central American varieties of cotton and
with varieties of corn adapted to special
conditions of growth, as In the humid
tropics or the arctic regions. Coffee,
rubber and cocoa are the tropical prod-
ucts receiving special attention.
The various divisions are as follows:
Botanical, Farm Management, Pomolog-
ical, Seed and Plant Introduction, Econ-
omy of Tropical and Semi-Tropical
Plants, Drug and Poison, Dry Land Ag-
riculture, Experimental Gardens and
Grounds, Seed Laboratory, Co-operative
Cotton Demonstration Work.

The Forest Service "collects and dis-
seminates information of practical value
bearing on the maintenance, improve-
ment, extension and utilization of Amer-
ican forests. Has control of the National
Forest reserves, conducts inquiries into
foreign products, improvements in meth-
ods of procuring them, the saving of
waste in their manufacture and new
sources of supply. It has six divisions,
to-wit: Measurements, Management,
Dendrology, Extension, Products, Rec-
ords. The third comprises all matters
pertaining to the life history of forests
and forest trees; also makes special
study of a subject of interest to Flor-
ida," the effects of turpentine gathering
on the life of rosin-bearing conifers and
the conditions and treatment under
which such trees yield the largest quan-
tity of rosin for naval stores." I believe
a bulletin on this subject was Issued
a while ago by the department.
*
The Bureau of Chemistry has been in
existence since the establishment of the
Department, but previous to that time
a chemist had charge of all work in
his line relating to agriculture. It con-
fines its attention to questions of public
interest as referred to it by the Govern-
ment on heads of the department. Inqui-
ries -)f value only to individuals or to
small groups of people are not taken
up. It therefore does not examine and
report upon samples thus sent.
The leading division is that of foods,
and their adulteration. It buys in the
open market, examines and makes rec-
ords thereon. Special attention is given
to imported artiles of consumption. It
has six laboratories established in six
of the principal ports to aid and expe-
dite work. There are also sugar, dairy,
a miscellaneous (in which is included
the subject of insecticides), drug plant
analysis, leather and paper and a micro-
scopical laboratory, together with one
of special investigations; this, by specal
direction of Congres is studying th ef -
fects of environmmst upon tho deam l


ompoition of grains and sugar pro-
4uc ng plants.
SToe Bureau of Soils has six divisions,
as, follows: Soil Physics, in charge of
4oil surveyors, under the immediate di-
rection of the chief of the bureau. Thir-
ty-sx assistants are required to carry
on. te various branches connected with
the division. Their work is of such pub-
lic interest that reports made and print-
ed in a separate volume. The tobacco
division states the adaptability of vari-
ous *oils for new varieties, especially
thbsd from Sumatra. The introduction
by te department of the high-priced Su-
mtrA wrapper into Connecticut and
it eucoessful cultivation there, prom-
ies* to check the large importations to
the, extent of many millions of dollars
per year, which goes to show the value
of th, investigations made. There is an
alkali division which conducts investi-
gations connected with the arid lands
and seepage waters of the Rocky Moun-
tain region. The soil management divis-
ion: it of recent creation, designed, to
s$ppl ment the work of the soil survey,
hOndling special problems, improved
methods of cultivation and handling of
farm lands.
W -
The Bureau of Entomology is not the
least important of the various divisions.
Bugs devastate crops every year to the
extent of millions of dollars and no sec-
tion of the country is exempt from their
ravages. Twelve divisions have charge
of the various matters belonging to the
bureau, and the information gained is
published from time to time in bulletin
form and distributed to those interested.
The, department of insects in the Na-
tional' Museum is the result of work
along this line and insects are identified
and classed for experiment stations, pub-
lie institutions and private individuals.
These are the various divisions: Field
crop insects, in separate sections for the
North and South; fruit insects, both for
deciduous and tropical fruits; truck and
small fruit insects; forest insects;
stored products insects, such as grains,
flour, meal, seeds, dried fruits, drugs,
tobacco., as well as dried meats, cheese,
etc. "The investigations are directed
toward a study of the life history and
the determination of means of prevent-
ing the ravages of the insects concerned;
shade trees and ornamental plants; in-
Mete in relation to diseases of man and
other animals, under which head are
classed malaria, yellow fever, and the
house-fly in connection with typhoid
fever. No doubt, after the experiences
of New Orleans and other Southern
cities (including our own Pensacola) the
mosquito will soon he reported upon by
this bureau; apiacultural, which goes to
show that the busy bee has assumed an
importance demanding a special section,
in which the crossing of different varie-
ties ard being conducted with a view
to:the production of a superior honey-
producing strain. Who knows, perhaps
some day a stingless bee will be intro-
duced to aplarianst!
*


The work of the Biological division
relates to the geographic distribution of
animals'and plants, the economic rela-
tions of birds and mammals, and is
charged with carrying into effect the
Federal laws for the importation of wild
birds and animals and the protection of
native ame. Its work is divided into
three divisions, the most important one
being that devoted to investigations de-
termining the relation of birds to agri-
eulture.
The Division of Publications is the
publishing house of the department from
which issue all the yearbooks, reports,
bulletins, circulars. etc.. that are dis-
tributed free or for which a nominal
charge is made. Its force comprises edi-
ton, proof readers, compilers, indexers,
abstraeteo, artists, draughtamen, en-


gravers and photographers, together
with a long roll of clerks and laborers
who attend to the details of distribu-
tion. The number of bulletins printed
during the last fiscal year amounted to
nearly six million copies. Under the law
four-fifths of this number were placed
at the disposal of Senators and Repre-
sentatives; the balance being distrib-
uted by the bureau over which, as man-
aging editor, Mr. George William Hill
has presided for many years.
The Bureau of Statistics estimates,
tabulates and gives forth to the public
the annual products of the agricultural
world. Detailed statements of the results
of investigations concerning both domes-
tic and foreign agriculture are issued
through the medium of an official pam-
phlet entitled the Crop Reporter, de-
signed for general circulation among
producers and consumers. It may be
here observed that this investigating
bureau has recently been investigated
and found to possess "leakage" qualities
that have placed it in a position of unre-
liability as well as being charged with
favoritism in the matter of reports af-
fecting the stock markets of the nation.
It maintains a general field service, with
State agents and voluntary correspond-
ents numbering a quarter of a million.
A statistical expert is kept in London,
who furnishes the bureau with foreign
crop reports.
The Experiment Station office covers
relations with home and foreign agricul-
tural institutions, with the various sta-
tions in the different States of the
Union and the dependencies of Alaska,
Hawaii and Porto Rico, the promotion
of farmers' institutes, investigations on
the nutritive value and economy of hu-
man foods and irrigation and drainage
investigations.
The office of Public Roads completes
the list of bureaus. It is of recent intro-
duction, but has a field of operation
so vast as makes it an important factor
in the public service. It "collects sta-
tistics concerning systems of road man-
ageme'nt and all phases of road improve-
ment; investigates methods of road-
building and furnishes expert assistance
to rural sections in road construction;
tests road materials; co-operates with
schools and colleges in highwayengineer.
ing construction and publishes informa-
tion of value concerning road improve-
ment for free distribution." Each year
the subject of good roads is receiving
the attention of the people more and
more, regardless of section, and to no
class of the community is its importance
more apparent than that of the farmer
whose highways and by-ways, as a rule,
are in a condition provoking denuncia-
tion of county and State officials, who
fail to see the necessity of using public
moneys for the public good along the
line of good roads for farmers to travel
to reach town or railway station.
*0


The foregoing may be dry details, but
they relate to a department of our Gov-
ernment that comes more directly in
contact with the farmers of the country
than-excepting perhaps the postoffice-
any of the others. Its machinery is vast
and comprehensive, requiring the best
intelligence that can be commanded for
effective work. There have been some
irregularities, no doubt, criminal acts
to be charged to some of its subordi-
nates; but in this it is no different than
other Cabinet departments. The expe.
rience of late years will be as seed sown
in good ground for a harvest of purity
of motives from which the petty meth-
ods of politicians and the baseness of
graft will he eliminated and a higher
plane of public service for the public
good Ie, reached, in the interest of that
class of whom Lord Chatham said:
"Trade increases the wealth and glory
of a country; but its real strength and
stamina are to be looked for among the
cultivators of the land."


I


12


V. DEPAR TMENT OF










March 3, 1906


TH SUN


Agricultural Department

Conducted by Wv. E. Paor


In a series of experiments in corn cul-
ture and the difference in effect of cot-
tonseed and cottonseed meal, the Geor-
gia Experiment Station director reaches
a conclusion that "it is not expedient
to apply cottonseed as a fertilizer di-
rectly to corn, but that the meal should
be used instead." Doctor Redding de-
clares that chemical analysis proves
886 pounds of meal are equal in content
of plant food to 2,000 pounds of seed.
The oil in the seed is practically of no
value as a fertilizer.
A recent issue of the Miami Metrop-
olis contained nearly three columns of
"Questions Answered," in which was
given much information of value con-
cerning the agricultural area environ-
ing that prosperous city, just such as
is needed by homeseekers and prospective
investors. One very great advantage is
in a "no-fence law," which is a great
blessing in a new country to settlers of
limited means. Made up into a little
booklet a wide circulation could be given
to "Questions Answered."
Ahl March; we know thou art kind-
hearted, spite of ugly threats and looks,
and, out of sight, are nursing April vio-
lets.-Helen Hunt Jackson.
This is true, for Colorado, where Hel-
en Hunt Jackson lived and wrote under
the shadow of Pike's Peak; but not for
Florida, where the lilies and the violets
and the roses bloom all the year
round. The mulberries are ripening; tne
pineapple plants are sending up their
crimson crowns, the lime, the lemon, the
orange and the pomelo are beginning to
make the balmy air fragrant with their
perfume and the robins still abide with
us, fearful, as yet, to flit away to their
Northern habitat.
THE MANATEE SNAIL.
The Florida Experiment Station has
issued a press bulletin, too long for in-
sertion in our department, on the Mana-
tee Snail, which has been found in the
orange groves of Manatee County feed-
ing upon the sooty mold. It does not
seem to be a new comer to the country,
but its origin is unknown, though
thought to be a native of Florida. Its
value, however, seems to be recognized,
as it cleans fungus from leaf, stem and
fruit. As it increases rapidly under fa-
vorable conditions, it will no doubt
spread to other sections of this State
and become an important factor in
fighting diseases of citrus fruits. The
snail is small in size, seldom over one
inch in length when full grown; shell
smooth, white and having four bands
of brown spots. Certain kinds of fungus
known as being beneficial parasites and
of value to orange growers are not dis-
turbed by the snail. The brown fungus,
known as an elective parasite on white
fly larvae, the red-pink performing sim-
ilar service, the red and the grey-headed,
both plrasitic on the common scales;
these four the snail does not disturb,
but feeds and thrives on sooty mold.
Cocones have been introduced in sections
outside of Manatee County, and it is
thought the range occupied will extend
from the St. Johns river to the Caloo-
sahatchie.
Thus Nature meets the emergencies
itself creates and for each new disease
of plant life provides a remedy. As wrote
George Eliot: "Nature repairs her ray-
ages," is just to all mankind and repays
them for their industry.


FREE BULLETINS FOR
FARMERS.


FLORIDA


Elsewhere in this issue will be found
an article on the scope of the U. S. De-
partment of Agriculture. Not the least
important of its divisions is the one in
charge of the publications of the depart-
ment, many of which are free to all ap-
plicants, while a nominal charge is made
for some in special lines of work. But
the Farmers' Bulletins are free and,
while the greater part of the 250 or
more that have been issued to date are
designed for Northern and Western
farmers, there are many in the interest
of the South.
Of those that are at present available
we have grouped into classes the num-


ber and title line for the benefit of such
of the agricultural readers of The Sun
who might like to have copies. They
will be sent to any address on applies
tion to the Secretary of Agriculture,
Washington, D. C.
FORAGE CROPS.
No. 37, Kaffir Corn; 50, Sorghum; 58,
Soy Bean; 81, Corn Culture in the
South; 101, Millets; 102, Southern For-
age Crops; 147, Winter Forage Crops
for the South; 164, Rape as a Forage
Crop; 215, Alfalfa in the Eastern Stated.
VEGETABLES.
No. 39, Onion Culture; 68, Black
Rot in Cabbages; 129, Sweet Potato
Culture; 167, Cassava; 220, Tomatoes;
232, Okra.
POULTRY.
No. 41, Fowls, Care and Breeding;
51, Standard Varieties; 61, Ducks and
Geese; 141, Poultry on the Farm; 200l
Turkeys; 234, Guinea Fowls for Food;
230, incubators.
TOBACCO.
No. 82, Tobacco Culture; 83, Tobacco
Soils; 120, Insects Affecting Tobacco.
HOGS.
No. 24, Hog Cholera; 100, Hog Rais-
ing in the South.
MISCELLANEOUS.
No. 25, Peanut Culture; 140, Pineap-
ples; 174, Broom Corn; 167, Cassava;
198, Strawberries.
FOR THE HOUSEKEEPER.
No. 203, Canned Fruits, Preserves and
Jellies.
CALHOUN COUNTY.
It would seem as if the little--com-
pared with some others-county of Cal-
houn, in the far western section of Flor-
ida, possessed attractions for settlers
from the North and West looking for
purely farming lands, not to be excelled
in opportunities for the making of
homes and successful culture of the soil'.
It is a small county, sixty-five miles
long, north and south, and only from
fifteen to forty miles wide. Its southern
border is washed by the warm waters of
the Gulf of Mexico, while it has for its
eastern border the Apalachicola river;
up which transportation by boats gives
daily connection with the railroads at
Chattahoochee landing, or River Junc-
tion. There are other streams coursing
through the county, notably the pi-*.
turesque Chipola, running through its
central part. On the southeast lies St.
Joseph's Bay, said to have the greatest
natural depth of water over the bar
of any bay on the Gulf, while on thq
southwest is St. Andrew's Bay, perfectly
land-locked and large enough to float,
the fleets of the whole world..
The county lays no claim to being one
favorable to the growth of citrus fruits,
but for general farming purposes its soil
is so rich and strong that many crops
are grown requiring no commercial fer-
tilizer to bring them to a profitable har-
vestage. Its near proximity to the Gulf
give it a more equable climate than
counties lying north of it like Jackson,
and it is claimed that freezing point
is rarely touched, while the summer heat,
though reaching 95 degrees, is tempered
by the almost constant breeze blowing
up from the salty waters of the Gulf.
There are about three-quarters of a
million acres of arable land on which
in small communities are settled per-
haps six thousand people, two-thirds
white, the balance consisting of "our
colored brother," as politicians term
him about election times, and the nig-
ger the rest of the year. Nine-tenths of
the land area is still in timber, mostly
pine and cypress, with considerable
Juniper, cedar, oak, poplar, sweet gum,
bay, hickory, magnolia, birch, cotton-
wood and yopon (whatever that is),
which show necessarily a strong soil,
such as is required for hard woods. This
soil is described as of a loose, sandy
nature, underlaid with clay. From it
can be raised upland and Sea Island
cotton, corn, oats, rice, potatoes, sugar-
cane and of course all the veletables


grown in the temperate soil.
Honey is one of the leading products,
a quarter of a million poud of an a-
cellent quality putting it at the head of


the honey counties of the state. The
county of Liberty is a close competitor
in this line, with Volusia next. Of the
0,000 stands of bees scheduled in 1903,
Calhoun had nearly three thousand.
The county, says the News, of Wewa.
hitohka, from whose columns and the
reports from Commisloner McLin's of.
Aice I glean the information given in
this article, wants settlers. Naturally.
There are "opportunities" for ten thou.
sand thrifty ones. Fifty thousand acres
of Government lands are subject to home-
stead entry. The State has an immense
sareage that can be bought at low prices
on yearly payments. Lands owned by
syndicates or individuals are held at
a higher valuation, but still are within
reach of even the poorest newcomer.
Another advantage, and one of no
mean merit, is that pure water every-
where abopnds, easily aooessible by tha
drive-well system at a depth of from
thirty to forty feet, and, while on the
subject of water, it is said that there is
not a barroom in the county to furnish
any other beverage that the pure, spark-
ling water nature gives to man without
money and without price.
To conclude: Why spend hundreds of
thousands of dollars to reclaim swamp
lands when millions of arable acres
are available for settlement?

TEA CULTURE.
The announcement comes from the
Buteau of Plant Industry connected with
the Department of Agriculture at Wash.
ington, that the tea grown at the ex-
perimental tea gardens in Summerville,
. C., is of excellent character and, from
experiments made of compressing tea
leaves into tablets is deduced the con-
clusion that what would ordinarily
make a big package can, by this new
method be placed in a space about the
size of a safety matchbox. Those who
have tried these tiny tablets, one of
which will make "a delicious" cup of
tea, speak enthusiastically about their
convenient form and the fact of their
being a "pure" article.
That tea in the South can be grown
and placed on the markets in competi-
tion with those of Ceylon, China and
Japan is not at all probable. The cost
of labor stands in the way. But, that the
plant could be grown in every home gar-
den in the Gulf Sta.es, cured and used
as a beverage, admits of no doubt. We
remember seeing wore than ten years
ago fine specimens of tea plant on the
rounds of Dr. Souville, and the writer
ias a few young bushes growing in the
ake region of South Florida, where he
besides, that were not affected by the


freeze of last February. Tea has become
so universal a stimulant that, if we
grow it for home consumption, it would
save very many thousands of dollars to
tU. farmers and fruit growers of Florida.
It might be said, however, that this
"tablet" idea is not a new one. A Sou-
chong tea compressed into cakes of
almost a brick-like hardness is supplied
to Russian army officers in Manchuria
and elsewhere. It is creamy and sweet
in taste, requiring less ugar than ordi-
nary tee and the infusion is made by
putting a small bit in a bowl and pour-
ing hot water over it


Try

"Green Brier"

Tennessee Whisky

irs PURE

THAT'S SURE


Robt.W. Simms
SOLE AGENT

Jacksonvllle, Fla.
8ND FOR INi RAlPRWi UST


18










dW3 TN g-


March 3, 1906


m.-m m -

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. Wed WtM B m" (iMu- sMik)


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The la She............for Women
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Of SATnSW OUSTOME T


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WHOLISALm IQUOR DEALER

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Wholesale Liquor Dealer
O Wr.l mad Iy, Mmpuval, F.
PMS IT FTM UMI



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i-tiMias tS-t. JAMMmFlt.


NWMMAfI U An UIRS
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a


"Yes," she answered. "I expected to
find an entirely different person."
"And if you had found her it would
have proved the guilt of someone with
whom you are acquaintedV"
She nooded in te affirmative.
"Then what we have found this even-
ing does not convey to you the identity
of the assassins


II. HT. fICKMAN.
TANTKID--Iyva .'lelttor for Popular iFla.
Svnrrlnl Extracts and Perf ime. Liberal
aur to right partly. E. MOULIE, near Ostrich
Farm. Jaekmnvllle, Fla.
WUANTED-Orange Iinwsoms on twigs and
Soo Ptals Write for Instruct ons and
prlee'to E. MOULIE. Perfumr, near Omrich
Fa, JeoklovU e. la


TazaChar


The Cjar's Spy
(Continued from Tenth PIage)
though bher hands were rough and hard,
showing that she had been doing man-
Armida had been a particularly good
housemaid, a black-Uhaired, black-eyed
Tuscan, quick, cleanly, and full of a
keen sense of humor. It w s a great
shook to me to find her lying there
dead. The breath of her dress was
stained with dried blood, which, on ex-
amination, I found had issued from a
deep and fatal wound beneath the ear
where she had been struck an unerring
blow that had severed the artery.
"Those men-those men who burled
her I I wonder who they were ?" my com-
panion exclaimed in a hushed voice. "We
must follow them and ascertain. They
are certainly the murderers who hive
returned in secret and concealed the evi
dence of this second crime."
"Yes," I said. "Let us go after them.
They must not escape us."
Then, leaving the exhumed body be-
neath a tree, 1 caught Muriel by the
waist and waded across the deep chan-
nel worn by the stream at that point,
after which we both ascended the steep
bank where the pair had disappeared in
the darkness of the wooa.,
I blamed myself a thousand times for
not following them, yet my suspicions
had not been aroused until after they
had disappeared. The back of the man
in a snuu-oolored suit was, she felt con-
fident, familiar to her. She repeated
what she had already told me, yet she
could not remember where she had seen
a similar figure before.
We went on through the gloomy for-
est, for the light had faded and evening
was now creeping on. From time to time
we halted and listened. But there was a
dead silence, broken only by the shrill
cry of a night bird and the low rustling
of the leaves in the autumn wind. The
men knew their way, it seemed, ev<.n
though the wood was trackless. Yet they
had nearly twenty minutes start of us,
and in that time they might be already
out in tne open country. Woili tlihi
succeed in evading us? Yet even if they
did, I could describe the dress of one
of them, while that of his companion
was, as far as I made out, dark blue, of
a somewhat nauticul out. ue wore also
a fiat cap, with a peak.
We went on, striking straight for the
open moorland which we knew bounded
the woods in that direction, and before
the lig... had entirely faded we found
ourselves out amongst the heather with
the distant hills looming dark against
the horizon. But we saw no sign o0
the men who had so secretly concealed
the body of their victim.
"I witl take you back to the castle,
Miss Le.,court," I said. "And then
t'll drive on into Dumfries and see ,..e
the police. These men must be arrested."
"Yes, do," she urged. "I will get into
the house by the stable-yara, for toey
must not see me in this terrible plight."
It was rough walking, therefore at
my invitation she took my arm, and as
she did so I felt that she was shiver-
ing.
"You are very wet," I remarked. "I
hope you won't take cold."
"Oh; I'm used to getting wet. I drive
and cycle a lot, you know, and very
often get drenched, was her reply. Then
after a pause she said: "We must dis-
cover who that woman was She seems,
from her complexion and her hair, to be
a foreigner, like the man.'
"Yes, I think so," was my reply. "I
will tell the police all that we have
found out, and they will go there pres-
ently and recover the body."
"If they can only find those two men,
then we should know the truth," she
declared. "One of them-the one in
brown-was unusually broad-shouldered,
and seemed to walk with a slight stoop."
"You expected to uascover another
woman, did you not, Miss Leitheourt?"
I asked presently, as we walked across
the moor.


"No, unfortunately it does not. We
must for the present leave the matter
in the hands of the police."
"But if the, identity of the dead
woman is established I asked.
"It might furnish me with a clue,"
she exclaimed quickly. "Yes, try and
discover who she is."
"Who was the woman you expected
to find?"
"A friend-a very dear friend."
"Will you not tell me her name?" I
inquired.
"No, it would be unfair to her," she
responded decisively, an answer which to
me was particularly tantalizing.
On we plodded in silence, our thoughts
too full for words. Was it not strange
that the mysterious yachtsman should
be her lover, and stranger still that on
recognizing me he should have escaped,
not only from Scotland, but away to
the Continent?
Was not that, in itself, evidence of
guilt and fear?
It was quite dark when I took leave
of my bright little companion, who, tired
out ind yet uncomplaining, pressed my
hand and wished me good fortune in
my investigations.
"I shall await you tomorrow after-
noon. Call and tell me everything, won't
you?"
I promised, and then she disappeared
into the great stable-yard behind the
castle, while I went on down the dark
road and then struck across the open
fields to my uncle's house.
At half-past nine that night I pulled
up the dogcart before the chief police
station in Dumfries, and alighting at
once sought the big fair Highlander,
Mackenzie, with whom I had had the
consultation on the previous day.
When we were seated in his room
beneath the hissing gas-jet, I related my
adventure and the result of my investi-
gation.
"What?" he cried, jumping up.
"You've unearthed another body-a
woman's ?"
"I have. And what is more, I can
identify her," I replied. "Her name is
Armida, and she was wife of the mur-
dered man Olinto Santini."
"Then both husband and wife were
killed?"
"Without a doubt-a double tragedy."
"But the two men who concealed the
body?% Will you describe them?"
I did so, and he wrote at my dicta-
tion, afterwards remarking-
"We must find them." And calling in
one of his sub-inspectors, he gave him
instructions for the immediate circula-
tion of the description to all the police
stations in the county, saying the two
men were wanted on a charge of willful
murder.
When the official had gone out again
and we were alone, Mackenzie turned
to me and asked-
"What induced you to search the
wood? Why did you suspect a second
crime?"
His question nonplused me for the mo-
ment.
"Well, you we, I had identified the
yung man Olinto, and knowing him to
be married and devoted to his wife, I
suspected that she had accompanied him
here. It wan entirely a vague surmise.
I wondered whether, if the Foor fellow
had fallen a victim to his enemies, she
had not also been struck down."
His lips were pressed together in dis-
tinct dissatisfaction. I knew my explan-
nation to be a very lame one, but at all
hazards I could not import Muriel's
name into the affair. I had given her
my promise, and I intended to keep it.
(CONTINUED NEXT WEEK.)

Political Advertisements
To the Voters of Duval County (18th
Senatorial District :
I hereby announce myself as a candi.
date for the State Senate from this, the
lth Senatorial District, Duval County,
to be voted for at the coming primaries.


If you cannot buy from your
grocer send us his name and
we will see that you get it.
If you will write, naming this
paper, we will send you a
WrS amp8 F8ree P. pl.


Morton & Deane

Grocery Co.
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA


hletrblm fr frStaledelFleIM


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SUN











March 3, 1906


TE-M?


...CONSIGN YOU...
Fruits and Produce
***** *****o
W. H. Christopher
PRODUCE AND
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IN L IaSt. Jamks-uv8 Fl.
Prompt Attention .. Best PrlGes
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Reference, National Bank of Jacksonville


JOHN ZAHM'S.......
EUROPEAN HOTEL
Is the place to stop when
you come to Jacksonville
GOOD D S POLITCATTENTION
GOOD MEALS

John Zahm, Propr.
1t8 W. By, Jakisonvlil, Fla.

Strong and enduring
OLD HICKORY and
WHITE HICKORY WAGONS
TM #My MO&iNOM Wnnmlg
weI wes*lug
Columbus Buggies
Are MM In
Jacksonvllle, Florida


M'MURRAY& BAKER

If It's Drugs
Bettes Has It


Agent tor Huyler' Candy

Bettes Drug Store
Cer. Bay and La U I, Jamn *, Fla.
JUST WIMT A LIETTH

When in Jacksonville
....Do as Others Do....

TO GILREATH'S


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SQuic Lunches..




Florida Rubber....

.......Stamp Works
224 Main Street
Jacksonville, Fla.
I' It's PRINTING you need
we can please you


PtIONC 1813


Some Thinks by the Brethren


THE WINDY TRIBUNE.
The esteemed Tribune is throwing a
fit because it has discovered anl printed
some figures showing the superiority of
Tampa over other cities of the State,
and this morning it roan that the after-
noon papers are virtually public ene-
mies because they do not reprint those
figures-with due credit of course to the
Tribune for its enterprise in geLtting
them u1> and flinging them in the face
of a surprised and astounded world.
The Tribune is windy. The figures it
discovered and flung upon the air in
black type, double column, double leaded.
were not of its own discovery or iabu-
lation. They were copied from a bulle-
tin issued by the census bureau, and
contain nothing that has not ,een au-
thoritatively known for the past live
years. People wiho will take the trouble
to turn to page 123 of volume 8, being
part 2 of the section on Manufactures,
of the census report for the year 1900,
will find all the facts set forth with
great clearness and fullness there in the
following pages, paragraphs and tables.
The facts and proportions set forth
in those pages are substantially the
same as derived by the Tribune from
its later bulletin from the census bureau,
and the same facts were set out in at
least one of the afternoon papers five
years ago. In the tables referred to, Vol.
8, etc., the cities of Jacksonville, Key
West and Tampa are summarized and
compared, and it is fully clearly shown
that in every respect and particular, as
regards manufactures, Tampa was big-
ger than both of them combined.
Had the Tribune not made an unpleas-
ant exhibition of itself this morning,
charging that jealousy of its enterprise
was the reason of the silence of the
Times on this thundergust of activity,
this paper would not have said anything
about the matter. Newspaper fellows
must stand together somewhat, you
know. There would have been no punc-
ture of its windbag of pretense at the
"most important boosting Tampa has
had for years," if it had been content
to take just what it was worth. But it
is constrained to state that the tremen-
dous scoop of the Tribune is five years
old in date of previous publication and
general publicity. Tampa has been more
than twice as large as Jacksonville in
manufactures for ten years, and for
eight years larger than Jacksonville and
Key West combined. If the Tribune de-
sires to achieve a first-class reputation
for enterprise and originality it must
get its figures from a little speedier me-
dium than the federal census reports
and must keep nearer up with them
than five years.
These are the reasons the Times didn't
enthuse and whoop. It had had its holler
years ago.-Tampa Times.
JUDGE BULLOCK'S DECISION.


With a courtliness of manner, a strict
aaherence to law and a rigid sense of
justice actuating his course throughout,
Judge W. S. Bullock, of Ocala, has pre-
sided for several days in the Circuit
Court of Hillsboro County, his tempo-
rary service terminating yesterday morn-
ing, when the end of the Wilder murder
trial was reached.
Judge Bullock has gratified his
friends and made admirers of those who
were not previously acquainted with him
during his recent stay in Tampa, and
his conduct on the bench is a model for
emulation as well as a subject for praise.
That he acted according to the law
and the evidence-or, rather, the lack
of evidence-in ordering a verdict of
acquittal in the Wilder case is univer-
sally admitted; even, doubtless, by the
able counsel for the State, who, endeav-
oring to do his full duty by the people
and the commonwealth, yet must needs
have felt that his cause was hopeless.
Under the status of affairs that ex-
isted, Judge Bullock could not consist-
ently have done otherwise than termi-
nate the trial. Whatever may have been
the belief of the jury as to the feeling
that existed between the family of the
defendants and the deceased, the Hluk
in the chain of oiroumstanoial evidM
sought to be formed by the pro ueNto


were not of sufficient strength to hold
together. In fact, there was no evidence,
worthy to be called evidence, connecting
them with the murder of Brannen.
Judge Bullock did his duty as he saw
it and the Tribune is gratified to note
the absence of criticism of his decis-
ion.
The Tribune joins with others in hop-
ing that the end of the trial will mark
the end of the unkindly feelings that
have existed in the vicinity of Plant
City and, while it would welcome the
discovery of positive facts that would
result in the discovery and conviction
of the man or men who perpetrated that
most dastardly murder, it trusts that
further conflict and ill-feeling will be
avoided.-Tampa Tribune.


TO BUJY......... I
TO EXCHANGE
TO RENTEW........ING


IXPISI PMPAW
Ml QmUrt MsNm 4tes 8Qto ltfs
lunting Club Rye......2..... 65 4 00 $7 00
Nelson County Rye .......... 2 0 4 25 750
Monogram Rye ................ 8 2 4 50 o00
lanne's 44" Rye............... 76 () 9 50i
Social Dro ....................... 4 50 6 to 12 00
Malt Whiskey................... 75 6 (X) 9 5
'each Brandy.................. 8 75 r5 00 9 50
Apple Brandy................. 8 75 5 (k) 9 50
Holland Gin ....................... 2 O 4 25 7 2
Geneva Gin ..................... 8 75 5 00 9 50
North Carolina Corn........... 2 65 4 oo 7 00
Mountain Corn.................... 8 76 6 00 9 0
Jamalca Rum ................... 2 0 4 25 7 26
Medford Rum..................... 8 75 6 00 9 ro
Grape Brandy................... 8 75 6 00 9 50
King of Kentucky Bourbon 8 76 6 00 9 50


De Soto Pure Rye Whiskey


mm" Nu* 10 IS OsUL


"(Iood for the sick-Not bad for the well."


Full
Full
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Quarts, 5.00-Express
Quarts, 7.00-Express
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OR-- FlME


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P.0.hMX 1. 451 Jukssnvfelsli


MACHINES


SULK MOS-JUN FEX-OT PMPAN
Rye, Gin, Corn, good grade............ ............1 50
Rye, o ul. Corn, Rum, ne uality................. 00
Iye (in, Corn Rum, best for the money...... 2 50
"44" Hye, Peach and Apple Brandy, mellow.
Sby ago........ ............. ............... ........... 8 00
Victoria Rye. 8ocal Drops Rye, medicinal
qtallty ...................................... ........... 4 00
LIMP LO MM- PWrM
Falstaff Beer ......................................... ........ 1
Extra Pale ........................................ ........ ..... 1 10
Standard .................................................. 1 00
Malt Kxtact, dark ................................ ......... 1 10
Coburier, imported........................................ 2 00
Guinnue Mtout, pints............................... 2 2
PMme Iy N mea n lmsim


1246258 HANNE BROS.
W. Adams St. BROS.


Jackuonville,


Florida East Coast Hotel Company

HOTEL PONCE DE LEON HOTEL ROYAL POINCIANA
ft A1MNON PNIn* NoLda Wirt
Now open Now open
Closes Saturday, April 7, 1906 Closes Monday, April 2, 1906


HOTEL ALCAZAR HOTEL ROYAL PALM
IL AUsNBes Miam
Now open Now open
Closes Saturday, April 21, 1000 Closes Tuesday, April 3, 1006
n

HOTEL ORMOND HOTEL COLONIAL
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Closes Monday, April 9, 1900 Closes Monday, April 2, 1006
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HOTEL THE BREAKERS HOTEL THE CONTINENTAL

Now open Opens Thuday, March 16,1906


,lssBtraArl7 96Coe daa ,/g


15


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F. 0. MILLER

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are so high in grade and so


the House of Seven




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