Group Title: sun.
Title: The sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075914/00016
 Material Information
Title: The sun
Uniform Title: sun
Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sun Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: February 24, 1906
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tallahassee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Leon County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Leon -- Tallahassee
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.451667 x -84.268533 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 18, 1905)-v. 3, no. 47 (Sept. 12, 1908).
Numbering Peculiarities: Published at Tallahassee, Fla., June 23-Sept. 12, 1908.
General Note: Claude L'Engle, editor.
General Note: "If it's right, we are for it."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075914
Volume ID: VID00016
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33400104
lccn - sn 95047216
 Related Items
Other version: Morning sun (Tallahassee, Fla.)
Succeeded by: Dixie (Jacksonville, Fla.)

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Full Text



If You Don't Agree With The Sun eAnhtwe,,arn Thin


Volume 1-No. 15 JAGKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 24, 1906 Single Gopy 5 Gents


Tut, Tut I Don't Be "OLD WOMANISH "-Use the Club.










IF IT'S RIGHT, WE ARE FOR IT


CLAUDE L'ENOLE
Editor


THiE


SUN


A. K. TAYLOR
Cartoonist


at UUSIMIm w YT WIll A WULL of ITS OWI, PuIRi m mi TU Pl nUA, Y INE M mPvM 11 WAT ST eMMsYTH aT-T, JaMsUMSJE, nMIBA
Volue 1-No. 15 JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 24, 1906 5 Cents per Copy, $1 per Year
Entered at the Pout Offioe at Jackwonville, Fla., as imoond-cl matter

Arthur Brisbane, who is in the foremost rank as an editorial writer, in a recent Sunday New York American, said of Thqs. E. Watson
of Georgia, He is without doubtier best editorial writer and the clearest thinner now before the public."


What Thos. E.


Watson Thinks of Us


MR. CLAUDE L'ENGLE.
My Dear Si,-I have gone through the file of The Sun which you were good enough to send me. If there is
any better weekly paper than this, it would puzzle one to name it. In variety and value of reading matter The Sun
is hard to beat. The artist, Mr. Taylor, has the talent of a first-rate cartoonist. His Just a Common Cur," The
Dog and the Fleas," "Old Two-Face," and Naval Stores Situation" are up to the high-water mark of pictorial satire.
Not being familiar with Florida State politics, I am not competent to pass judgment upon your editorial treat-
ment of that subject, but your articles upon national affairs show you to be a thinker, bold and independent.
I was particularly pleased with your leaders, Roosevelt-What Has He Done?" "The White Man's Burden,"
"Lamar Did Exactly Right," and "Troubles of an Editor."
Perhaps the most convincing evidence of my good opinion of your weekly magazine is the dollar which I sent to
prepay my subscription immediately after I had read a sample copy which a friend placed in my hands.
Very truly yours,
THOSE. E. WATSON.


On and


After


March First, Nineteen Hlun-


dred and Six, the Subscription Price of


The Sun


Will Be


Two Dollars Per


Year


Effective March 1st, 1900, the subscription price to this journal
will be Two Dollars per year.
This restoration of the subscription price of The Sun to the figure
at which it was originally put is the result of simple mathematical cal-
culation. About two months ago our subscription price was reduced to
one dollar per year. This was done because we desired to place the
people's paper at a popular price, so that every man in this, State
would feel that he could afford to enroll himself on the list which con-
tains the names of intelligent and virtuous people living in every county
in Florida and in many localities in other States.
We fully expected to carry this popular price as long as the paper
lives, but last week the foreman of our composing room woke us up
from the delicious dream we were having over the good work we were
doing with this popular price scheme by throwing some figures
at us.
In these figures was the cost of white paper, the cost of ink, the
amount paid for composition, presswork and mailing.
To these figures we added the cost of special stories, serials and
short humorous sketches we were running. Then such items as picture
making, engraving and editorial expense were added.
The grand total thus obtained was divided by the number of copies
printed, and it became apparent that we were selling this journal for
kM" that It cost to produce it.
With this staring us in the face, something had to be done, and
reviewing the situation, there were two courses open to us-
Lower the quality of the publication, thereby reducing the cost of
production, or-
Bale the subscription price.


Not one moment was lost in the choosing.
We were determined-
That the quality of the reading matter must remain the best pro-
curable;
That the cartoons.must continue to be done with that close atten-
tion to detail that makes Mr. Taylor's work distinctive. We were not
willing to'reduce the number of thesQ creations;
That the white paper, the ink and the mechanical work must be
kept at the highest standard;
And that every detail of the publication must be looked after with
an eye single to the production of the best;
So we decided to raise the price.
We believed that we have rightly judged the people of Florida and
our friends in other States when we decided that however keen they
may be to economize in their expenditures for bodily comforts, such as
food and clothing, when it came lo Intellectual food, they would not
consent to practice economy.
We have made bold to act on this judgment by-
Placlft annual subscrptlons to The Sun at $2, with propor-
tional decrease in amount for shorter subscription periods.
-All those who have paid for The Sun at the dollar rate will con-
tinue to receive it until their terms have run out.
All new subscriptions will be accepted at the old rate up to March 1
After March 1st, Two Dollars, please.
We have the pleasure to announce that we have secured the serv-
ices of Mr. F. T. Graham as canvasser. Mr. Graham will call on the
. people in our behalf, and we desire to tender, in advance, our thanks
to those who show courtesy to him.


I
~1~-~--~ L~












February 24, 1906


T SUNB?


WHAT'S THE MATTER WITH CONGRESS


Asking that question, John Vandercook, in a
series of articles for the Scripps-McRae syndicate of
newspapers, presents an interesting view of the sub-
mersion of Congress by the Executive branch of the'
Government, showing that more and more is Con-
gress ceasing to be representative of the people.
In his first paper Mr. Vandercook treats of "the
spectacle of passing power" of Congress. "The meas-
ures we are taught to believe are for the public good
veem to get lost or mutilated as soon as they reach the
halls of our national representatives. The average
citizen denounces the Senate, and is suspicious of the
House."
The assertion is made "that Congress is in decay
is shown in the very cit which Congress has created
for its habitation." The writer notes the physical
expression of Washington as bearing on the subject
of diminution of Congressional power. The growth
of the city in a business way about the White House,
while the capitol is "remote and deserted." As such
growth has been attained, so as the power of Con-
gress waned. The "verdict is impressive," and' is
written "in brick and stone and marble."
This writer points out that "in the President's
set and in the Cabinet are persons who enjoy great
public confidence and respect," yet the Senate and
House does not share in such public feeling, there-
fore marking "an extraordinary revolution of senti-
ment within one hundred years. In the idea of Con-
gress is the central theory of government, namely
that all our laws and enterprises should spring from
the decision, after free debate, of the elected repre-
sentatives of the people."
Mr. Vanderecok then asks the question: "Who,
therefore, is responsible for the decay of Congress?
Is it the result of an evolution of government? Is
it the fault of Congress itself; or are we, the ordi-
nary people, responsible!" which he attempts to an-
swer.
Calling attention to the "internal evidences of
decay," the first proof of its being is cited ih the
small respect paid to duty and the failure of mem-
hers to "take themselves seriously."
In the average session a few men in each chamber
do the work in a "perfunctory monotone," and there
is scarcely any debate worthy of the name." "Abso-
lute inattention" marks an address, the delivering
of which is a "farce."
Speaking of the address of Senator Tillman, "who
still appears to take the Senate seriously," on the


subject of usurpation of. the Executive, the writer
says: "It might have been thought that other Sen-
ators would have been interested in this. During the
first part of his speech, which was scholarly, well-
balanced and carefully thought out, there were prob-
ably twenty Senators present, all but two or three
of whom were writing letters or reading." At the
end, though, nearly all were present and listening,
because in excitement Tillman had burst into tearn.
"The Senators cared nothing for his arguments, but
they were interested as soon as the speech became
purely theatrical. They 'eared for the worst and
not for the best of what Tillman had to say."
Neglect of duty at the capitol, however, is fol-
lowed by activity of members at the White House,
where they are busy "in the unconstitutional role
of office brokers." The business of Congress is sacri-
ficed that constituents may be placed in office and
district fences of a member kept intact. Sub-
servience to the President is declared to be a way for
success is most cases of this kind. "Probably as
much as any one thing has this office broking con-
tributed to the decay of Congress. Senate and Housa
are committing suicide with the slow poisons of in-
ditierence and disloyalty."
"The House of Do and the House of Don't" is
the writer's way of naming the Executive and Con-
gress. The Executive takes the initiative in legis-
lative matters, while Congress does not orginate legis-
lation of real importance. "Session after session
the question has come to be whether the President's
recommendation shall be followed or whether Con-
gress shall kill or mutilate the Administration's
measures." As an echo of the thought of the White
House, Congress is yearly losing prestige while the
President is gaining in power.
"Mistakes of our forefathers" is a chapter where-
in Mr. Vandercook shows that much of our scheme
of government was a theory, and succeeding gener-
ations have provided no plan for betterment. The
makers of the Constitution gave no practical form
for appeal to the people, or in giving the people
"means to control their representatives after they
had elected them."
"After the practical experience of a century and
a quarter we find our threp divisions of government
in something of a tangle.: It is the President who
takes the initiative in legislation, and it has become
more and more the function of Congress to obstruct
legislation. If anything gets by Congress, such as


an income tax law, it must run the gauntlet of the
judicial bench of the Government, where it may
finally be suppressed. In fact, the whole system is
shown to be much better adapted for not doing than
it is for doing."
A constitutional amendment, he declares, is neces-
sary to save Congress, whereby the people can control
the representatives and enforce needed legislation.
The British Constitution is cited. "The House of
Lords can only veto a measure once;" there is no
limit to the rejection power of the United States Sen-
ate-a House bill can be killed in the Senate as many
times as it appears.
"In England the procedure is this: The House
of Commons, elected on some popular issue, passes a
measure; the House of Lords gets the measure and
kills it; it is then in the power of the Prime Minis-
ter, who is the servant of the House of Commons,
to get a great national referendum. He can dissolve
the Commons and get a new election within thirty
days. Supposing he again gets a majority for this
particular measure, it is again passed and sent to
the House of Lords. The House of Lords has'already
killed the measure once, but after a popular referen-
dum of this kind it offers no further obstruction. It
i6 the theory of government in England that when
the people have twice indorsed a measure at the polls
it is a sign that they desire it, and there is no power
which can obstruct it."
"We have seen the Senate amend tariff bills in
favor of the sugar trust; kill rate regulation bills
in interest of the railroad trust prevent fair play to
our island possessions for the sake of the tobacco and
other trusts; and still we have no way to tell the
Senate speedily and emphatically of our disapproval.
In other words, we are in the nonsensical position
of having obstructed our own national progress by
the creation of a body which will neither do what the
country wants nor let anybody else do what the coun-
try wants."
In conclusion the writer says: "We believe its
decay forms the greatest problem before the Ameri-
can people to-day, and we believe the remedy lies in
amending Congress and not in ending it. It can only
be restored to its original purpose by constitutional
amendment which will subject it to direct popular
control; at any rate, so far as the House is con-
cerned; and in regard to the Senate, by permitting it
to kill a popular measure only once, and not after
there has been a referendum of the nation."


What's


Agitating


People


These


sDays


Again the attention of Congress is called to the
demand for removal of the tax on grain alcohol
which has been denaturalized so that it cannot be
* used as a beverage.
Strong forces are opposing such measure, and as
the Philadelphia Record pertinently remarks, "the
Republican doctrine that taxes should be imposed
for private benefit, has become so ingrained into our
structure of government" it will be wonderful if the
1weople will be able to gain such a concession from
law-makers supposed to be of public choice.
The Standard Oil Company, the W. C. T. U. and
the distillers of wood alcohol are the opposing fac-
tors to a beneficent measure.
Monopoly, fanaticism and graft are linked to-
gether in unholy purpose.
More than three years ago Congre sman Boutell
of Illinois introduced a bill in the House providing
for the removal of the tax on grain alcohol, but the
bill never got out of the committee room.
Standard Oil and wood alcohol killed it.
In the introduction of this bill much care was
given to explanation of the benefit it would confer.
Grain alcohol could bl made for 10 cents a gallon
or less. Waste products of the farm and household
could be utilized for its manufacture, the finished
poduct being used for lighting, cooking, and as fuel
or manufacturing purposes and for automobiles.
Indeed, its use were many.
Grain alcohol, under ordinary conditions, can be
made at less cost than wood alcohol, therefore it is
apparent that if made of waste material so plentiful
now on every farm tl'at the cost of grain alcohol
would be so low as to drive the poisonous wood alco-
hol from the market.
But cheap grain alcohol would cause a deep In-
road into the profits of the Standard Oil Company
as well. The market for gasoline would be smashed.
On this subject the loston Herald says: "Is
Congress willing to take the position that the agri-
cultural interests of this country are to be hampered
in the development of what would certainly prove a
great and profitable industry for the sake of en-
hancing the profits of the Standard Oil Company
and the limited number of those who have engaged
in the wood alcohol business? Entirely aside from
the enormous advantages that would seerue to many


industries from tax free de turalized grain alcohol,
the plea of the farmers alone should on this matter
be so overwhelming that Congress would have to
listen to it. The petitioners for such legislation
have made their case clear, and if their petition is
denied it will only be because the wood alcohol and
petroleum interests exercise great influence in the
Congress."
Lawson has charged that H. H. Rogers of the
Standard Oil Company controlled a majority of the
Senate, and denial hai not been made. If this bill
reaches the Senate its fate will determine the truth
of the charge.
Dr. Darlington, Health Commissioner of New
York, has been investigating wine offered for sale
for church communion service, and says that he found
it to contain wood alcohol, hard cider, aniline dyes
and practically no juice of the grape. Speaking of
the food adulteration in New York, Dr. Darlington
said: "There is hardly a food on the market that
if not adulterated. I imagine that it will be even
harder to punish the guilty parties than to detect the
adulterated goods."
The demand for pure food legislation continues,
and effort is being made to secure a national law
prohibiting the adulteration of foodstuffs.
"While Federal legislation would afford the only
adequate means of combating the peril of impure
food, much undoubtedly can be done through merely
local agencies such as the city health department
now propo ses to employ in protecting the public
against the sale of bad meats,' is the opinion of the
Chicago News.
While a national pure food law is desirable, yet
there should be no hesitancy in passing State laws
regulating the sale of adulterations. The Washing-
ton Post says: "Certainly there ought to be, and
there is in nearly all the States, legislation to pre-
vent the manufacture and sale of adulterated or mis-
branded foods and drugs."
Following the adoption of such laws, however,
enforcement is necessary. Lax observation permits
continuance of the evil.
As an example of enforcement is offered the work
of inspectors nla Chleao for one week in one district:
Codemation of 4,0 pounds of meat and 16,245


pounds
Ing its


of fish, thus preventing the stuff
way to the table of the consumer.


from find-


Jack London, the .author, who was frank enough
to say outright what many persons believe and prac-
tice, was made the subject of the following announce-
ment by the trustees of the' free library of Derby
Neck, Conn.: "As Jack London publicly announces
he is an anarchist, devoting the Constitution to hell
and the government to destruction, we have ordered
all of his works withdrawn from circulation, and we
urge not only other libraries to do likewise, but all
lovers of their country to cease buying his books or
taking any magazines publishing his stories."
Several years ago Congressman Tim Campbell
became noted for saying, "What's the Constitution
among friends?" Meis construction of the venerable
document appears to have been accepted in many
instances, it having been found by both President and
Congress that the Constitution was extremely elastic
when necessary to be stretched.

In discussing problems of high finance and the,
manner of juggling securities in a manner to fool
the public, the San Francisco Chronicle polite out
a new reason for watering the stock of a corporation.
It is for the purpose of disarming public hostility
over large dividends.
The Chronicle says: "The Standard Oil Com-
pany has managed its capitalization in a way de-
lightful to conservative financiers, but which it has
found imprudent and ik about to change. The capital
stock of the Standard Oil Company is $100,000,000,
every cent of which doubtless represents actual cash
outlay, either original or by capitalization of earn-
ings. But on that it pays dividends of 40 per cent
per annum, and more in good years. Such dividends
excite popular hostility, and so, it is announced, the
corporation is to be reorganized by calling in the old
stock and reissuing it at the rate 0f six or seven
shares for one. This will not make tWe total income
to be divided any less, or the total investment any
more, but it will appear as a 6 or 7 per cent divi-
dend, instead of 40 per cent, and after a year or two
they have reason to believe that the public will for*
(Continued on Seventh Pap)









IF IT'S RIGHT, WE ARE FOR IT


CLAUDE L'ENOLE
Editor


THE


SUN


A. K. TAYLOR
Cartoonist


a mmI WOLT WIN A mWU N iSe own, P6 r MM m T sPUWBM, l =s= OSMIW, #AT wWt roW m fI=!=, aOs, M
Volume I-No. 15 JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, FERUARY 24, 1906 5 Cents per Copy, $1 per Year
Entered at the P'oet Ofoe at Jacksonville, Fla., 1 a eoond-clfs matter

Arthur Brisbane, who is in the foremost rank as an editorial writer, in a recent Sunday New York American, said of Thos. E. Watson
bf Georgia, He is without doubthe best editorial writer and the clearest thinker now before the public."


What Thos. E. Watson Thinks of Us
MR. CLAUDE L'ENGLE.
My Dear Sii-I have gone through the file of The Sun which you were good enough to send: me. If there is
any better weekly paper than this, it would puzzle one to name it. In variety and value of reading matter The Sun
is hard to beat. The artist, Mr. Taylor, has the talent of a first-rate cartoonist. His "Just a Common Cur," "The
Dog and the Fleas," "Old Two-Face," and Naval Stores Situation" are up to the high-water mark of pictorial satire.
Not being familiar with Florida State politics, I am not competent to pass judgment upon your editorial treat-
ment of that subject, but your articles upon national affairs show you to be a thinker, bold and independent.
I was particularly pleased with your leaders, Roosevelt-What Has He Done?" "The White Man's Burden,"
Lamar Did Exactly Right,"'' and Troubles of an Editor."
Perhaps the most convincing evidence of my good opinion of your weekly magazine is the dollar which I sent to
prepay my subscription immediately after I had read a sample copy which a friend placed in my hands.
Very truly yours,
THOSE. E. WATSON.


On and


After


March First, Nineteen Hun-


dred and Six, the Subscription Price of


The Sun


Will Be


Two Dollars Per


Year


Effective March 1st, 1900, the subscription price to this journal
will be Two Dollars per year.
This restoration of the subscription price of The Sun to the figure
at which it was originally put is the result of simple mathematical cal-
culation. About two months ago our subscription price was reduced to
one dollar per year. This was done because we desired to place the
people's paper at a popular price, so that every man in this State
would feel that he could afford to enroll himself on the list which con-
tains the names of intelligent and virtuous people living in every county
in Florida and in many localities in other States.
We fully expected to carry this popular price as long as the paper
lives, but last week the foreman of our composing room woke us up
from the delicious dream we were having over the good work we were
doing with this popular price scheme by throwing some figures
at us.
In these figures was the cost of white paper, the cost of ink, the
amount paid for composition, presswork and mailing.
To these figures wo added the cost of special stories, serials and
short humorous sketches we were running. Then such items as picture
making, engraving and editorial expense were added.
The grand total thus obtained was divided by the number of copies
printed, and it became apparent that we were selling this journal for
les tha It cost to produce It.
With this staring us in the face, something had to be done, and
reviewing the situation, there were two courses open to us--
Lower the quality of the publication, thereby reducing the cost of
prodceonr, or--
BRaW the subscription price. -


Not one moment was lost in the choosing.
We were determined-
That the quality of the reading matter must remain the best pro-
curable;
That the cartoons.must continue to be done with that close atten-
tion to detail that makes Mr. Taylor's work distinctive. We were not
willing to reduce the number of these creations;
That the white paper, the ink and the mechanical work must be
kept at the highest standard;
And that every detail of the publication must be looked after with
an eye single to the production of the best;
So we decided to raise the price.
We believed that we have rightly judged the people of Florida and
our friends in other States when we decided that however keen they
may be to economize in their expenditures for bodily comforts, such as
food and clothing, when it came lo Intellectual food, they would not
consent to practice economy.
We have made bold to act on this judgment by,-
Placlnf annual subscriptions to The Sun at $2, with propor-
tional decrease in amount for shorter subscription periods.
-All those who have paid for The Sun at the dollar rate will con-
tinue to receive it until their terms have run out.
All new subscriptions will be accepted at the old rate up to March 1,
After March 1st, Two Dollars, please.
We have the pleasure to announce that we have secured the serv-
ices of Mr. F. T. Graham as canvasser. Mr. Graham will call on the
people in our behalf, and we desire to tender, in advance, our thanks
to those who show courtesy to him,


a 'I


_ f












February 24, 1906


TnS~UN


WHirS THE MATTER WITH CONGRESS


Asking that question, John Vandercook, in a
series of articles for the Scripps-McRae syndicate of
newspapers, presents an interesting view of the sub-
mersion of Congress by the Executive branch of thi
Government, showing that more and more is Con-
gress ceasing to be representative of the people.
In his first paper Mr. Vandercook treats of "the
spectacle of passing power" of Congress. "The meai-
ures We are taught to believe are for the public good
ieem to get lost or mutilated as soon as they reach the
halls of our national representatives. The average
citizen denounces the Senate, and is suspicious of the
House."
The assertion is made "that Congress is in decay
is shown in the very city which Congress has creathld
for its habitation." The writer notes the physical
expression of Washington as bearing on the subject
of diminution of Congressional power. The growth
of the city in a business way about the White House,
while the capitol is "remote and deserted." As such
growth has been attained, so as the power of Con-
gress waned. The "verdict is impressive," and is
written "in brick and stone and marble."
This writer points out that "in the President's
set and in the Cabinet are persons who enjoy great
public confidence and respect," yet the Senate and
House does not share in such public feeling, there-
fore marking "an extraordinary revolution of senti-
ment within one hundred years. In the idea of Con-
gress is the central theory of government, namely
that all our laws and enterprises should spring from
the decision, after free debate, of the elected repre-
sentatives of the people."
Mr. Vandereook then asks the question: "Who,
therefore, is responsible for the decay of Congress?
Is it the result of an evolution of government? Is
it the fault of Congress itself; or are we, the ordi-
nary people, responsible?" which he attempts to an-
swer.
Calling attention to the "internal evidences of
decay," the first proof of its being is cited ih the
small respect paid to duty and the failure of mem-
bers to "take themselves seriously."
In the average session a few men in each chamber
do the work in a "perfunctory monotone," and there
is scarcely any debate worthy of the name." "Abso-
lute inattention" marks an address, the delivering
of which is a "farce."
Speaking of the address of Senator Tillman, "who
still appears to take the Senate seriously," on the


subject of usurpation of the Executive, the writer
says: "It might have been thought that other Sen.
ators would have been interested in this. During the
first part of his speech, which was scholarly, well-
balanced and carefully thought out, there were prob-
ably twenty Senators present, all but two or three
of whom were writing letters or reading." At the
end, though, nearly all were present and listening,
because in excitement Tillman had burst into tears.
"The Senators cared nothing for his arguments, but
they were interested as soon as the speech became
purely theatrical. They 'eared for the worst and
not for the best of what Tillman had to say."
Neglect of duty at the capitol, however, is fol-
lowed by activity of members at the White House,
where they are busy "in the unconstitutional role
of office brokers." The business of Congress is sacri.
ficed that constituents may be placed in office and
district fences of a member kept intact. Sub-
servience to the President is declared to be a way for
success is most cases of this kind. "Probably as
much as any one thing has this office broking con-
tributed to the decay of Congress. Senate and Houw
are committing suicide with the slow poisons of in-
ditterence and disloyalty."
"The House of Do and the House of Don't" is
the writer's way of naming the Executive and Con-
gress. The Executive takes the initiative in legis-
lative matters, while Congress does not orginate legis-
lation of real importance. "Session after session
the question has come to be whether the President's
recommendation shall be -followed or whether Con-
gress shall kill or mutilate the Administration's
measures." As an echo of the thought of the White
House, Congress is yearly losing prestige while the
President is gaining in power.
"Mistakes of our forefathers" is a chapter where-
in Mr. Vandercook shows that much of our scheme
of government was a theory, and succeeding gener-
ations have provided no plan for betterment. The
makers of the Constitution gave no practical form
for appeal to the people, or in giving the people
"means to control their representatives after they
had elected them."
"After the practical experience of a century and
a quarter we find our threp divisions of government
in something of a tangle. It is the President who
takes the initiative in legislation, and it has become
more and more the function of Congress to obstruct
legislation. If anything gets by Congress, such as


an income tax law, it must run the gauntlet of the
judicial bench of the Government, where it may
finally be suppressed. In fact, the whole system is
shown to be much better adapted for not doing than
it is for doing."
A constitutional amendment, he declares, is neces-
sary to save Congress, whereby the people can control
the representatives and enforce needed legislation.
The British Constitution is cited. "The House of
Lords can only veto a measure once;" there is no
limit to the rejection power of the United States Sen-
ate--a House bill can be killed in the Senate as many
times as it appears.
"In England the procedure is this: The House
of Commons, elected on some popular issue, passes a
measure; the House of Lords gets the measure and
kills it; it is then in the power of the Prime Minim-
ter, who is the servant of the House of Commons,
to get a great national referendum. He can dissolve
the Commons and get a new election within thirty
days. Supposing he again gets a majority for this
particular measure, it is again passed and sent to
the House of Lords. The House of Lords has'already
killed the measure once, but after a popular referen-
dum of this kind it offers no further obstruction. It
i. the theory of government in England that when
the people have twice endorsed a measure at the polls
it is a sign that they desire it, and there is no power
which can obstruct it."
"We have seen the Senate amend tariff bills in
favor of the sugar trust; kill rate regulation bills
in interest of the railroad trust; prevent fair play to
our island possessions for the sake of the tobacco and
other trusts; and still we have no way to tell the
Senate speedily and emphatically of our disapproval.
In other words, we are in the nonsensical position
of having obstructed our own national progress by
the creation of a body which will neither do what the
country wants nor let anybody else do what the coun-
try wants."
In conclusion the writer says: "We believe its
decay .forms the greatest problem before the Ameri-
can people to-day, and we believe the remedy lies in
amending Congress and not in ending it. It can only
be restored to its original purpose by constitutional
amendment which will subject it to direct popular
control; at any rate, so far as the House is con-
cerned; and in regard to the Senate, by permitting it
to kill a popular measure only once, and not after
there has been a referendum of the nation."


Agft


Again the attention of Congress is called to the
demand for removal of the tax on grain alcohol
which has been denaturalized so that it cannot be
used as a beverage.
Strong forces are opposing such measure, and as
the Philadelphia Record pertinently remarks, "the
Republican doctrine that taxes should be imposed
for private benefit, has become so ingrained into our
structure of government" it will be wonderful if the
people will be able to gain such a concession from
law-makers supposed to be of public choice.
The Standard Oil Company, the W. C. T. U. and
the distillers of wood alcohol are the opposing fac-
tors to a beneficent measure.
Monopoly, fanaticism and graft are linked to-
gether in unholy purpose.
More than three years ago Congaisman Boutell
of Illinois introduced a bill in the House providing
for the removal of the tax on grain alcohol, but the
bill never got out of the committee room.
Standard Oil and wood alcohol killed it.
In the introduction of this bill much care was
given to explanation of the benefit it would confer.
Grain alcohol could 1% made for 10 cents a gallon
or less. Waste products of the farm and household
could be utilized for its manufacture, the finished
product being used for lighting, cooking, and as fuel
for manufacturing purposes and for automobiles.
Indeed, its use were many.
Grain alcohol, under ordinary conditions, can be
made at less cost than wood alcohol, therefore it is
apparent that if made of waste material so plentiful
now on every farm tl'at the cost of grain alcohol
would be so low as to drive the poisonous wood alco-
hol from the market.
But cheap grain alcohol would cause a deep In-
road into the profits of the Standard Oil Company
as well. The market for gasoline would be smashed.
On this subject the Boston Herald says: "Is
Congress willing to take the position that the agri-
cultural interests of this country are to be hampered
in the development of what would certainly prove a
great and profitable industry for the sake of en-
hancing the profits of the Standard Oil Company
and the limited number of those who have engaged
in the wood alcohol business? Entirely aside from
the enormous advantages that would accrue to many


Citing people
tiis
industries from tax free deplturaliled grain alcohol,
the plea of the farmers aloite should on this matter
be so overwhelming that Congress would have to
listen to it. The petitioners for such legislation
have made their case clear, and if their petition is
denied it will only be because the wood alcohol and
petroleum interests exercise great influence in the
Congress."
Lawson has charged that H. H. Rogers of the
Standard Oil Company controlled a majority of the
Senate, and denial hiai not been made. If this bill
reaches the Senate its fate will determine the truth
of the charge.


Dr. Darlington, Health Commissioner of New
York, has been investigating wine offered for sale
for church communion service, and says that he found
it to contain wood alcohol, hard cider, aniline dyes
and practically no juice of the grape. Speaking of
the food adulteration in New York, Dr. Darlington
said: "There is hardly a food on the market that
iP not adulterated. I imagine that it will be even
harder to punish the guilty parties than to detect the
adulterated goods."
The demand for pure food legislation continues,
and effort is being made to secure a national law
prohibiting the adulteration of foodstuffs.
"While Federal legislation would afford the only
adequate means of combating the peril of impure
food, much undoubtedly can be done through merely
local agencies such as the city health department
now proposes to employ in protecting the public
against the sale of bad meats," is the opinion of the
Chicago News.
While a national pure food law is desirable, yet
there should be no hesitancy in passing State laws
regulating the sale of adulterations. The Washing-
ton Post says: "Certainly there ought to be, and
there is in nearly all the States, legislation to pre-
vent the manufacture and sale of adulterated or mis-
branded foods and drugs."
Following the adoption of such laws, however,
enforcement is necessary. Lax observation permits
continuance of the evil.
As an example of eoforemeat is offered the work
of Inspectors in Cm for e week n one district:
CoudemMatli of 4 o peOa of moat amd 16,34


These


pounds
Ing its


Days


of fish, thus preventing the stuff from find-
way to the table of the consumer.


Jack London, the author, who was frank enough
to say outright what many persons believe and prac-
tice, was made the subject of the following announce-
ment by the trustees of the' ftee library of Derby
Neck, Conn.: "As Jack Londk publicly announces
he is an anarchist, devoting the Constitution to hell
and the government to destruction, we have ordered
all of his works withdrawn from circulation, and we
urge not only other libraries to do likewise, but all
lovers of their country to cease buying his books or
taking any magazines publishing his stories."
Several years ago Congressman Tim Campbell
became noted for saying, "What's the Constitution
among friends?" His construction of the venerable
document appears to have been accepted in many
instances, it having been found by both President and
Congress that the Constitution was extremely elastic
when necessary to be stretched.
In discussing problems of high finance and the
manner of juggling securities in a manner to fool
the public, the San Francisco Chronicle points out
a new reason for watering the stock of a corporation.
It is for the purpose of disarming public hostility
over large dividends.
The Chronicle says: "The Standard Oil Com-
pany has managed its capitalization in a way de-
lightful to conservative financiers, but which it has
found imprudent and in about to change. The capital
stock of the Standard Oil Company is $100,000,000.
every cent of which doubtless represents actual cash
outlay, either original or by capitalization of earn-
ings. But on that it pays dividends of 40 per cent
per annum, and more in good years. Such dividends
excite popular hostility, and so, it is announced, the
corporation is to be reorganized by calling in the old
stock and reissuing it at the rate of six or seven
shares for one. This will not make the total income
to be divided any less, or the total investment any
more, but it wJil appear as a 6 or 7 per cent divi-
dend, instead of 40 per cent, and after a yr or two
they have reanmo to 1*1ev that tih pb=le wtoi fp*


(Cains POO


' jw


What's





SUN


February 24, 1906


SEEN.


BY


THE


S.VJN


OF


LATE


The midshipmen at Annapolis agreed
stop to having.


to put a


V








































I


Plans are on foot for the establishment of a fer-
tiliser factory at Tampa.
Cabbage is now being shipped North by the car-
load from the Plant City section.
Mont Pelee volcano is again active, and earth-
quakes are reported at Barbadoqs.
Fort Pierce reports much activity in real estate,
many deals having been recently made.
Japanese newspapers are advocating the purchase
of the Philippines from the United States.
A schoolmaster at Quincy, Mass., who flogged 499
boys in four months, is facing an investigation.
Yard and section foremen of the Florida East
Coast Railway have been granted increase of pay.
Congressman and Mrs. Longworth went to Cuba
on a bridal tour, taking steamer from Port Tampa.
The Hungarian Parliament wa*k dissolved by
military force at Budapest, though there was no dis-
order.
Prof. Andrew Sledd, president 9f the State Uni-
versity, has bought a $18,000 orange grove in Dade
County. *
The value of the estate of tde late Charles E.
Yerkes is now said to be $6,000,0004 instead of $15,-
000,000.
A new banking company, with capital of $40,000,
has been organized at Orlando, andlwill begin busi-
ness April 1.
The Board of Public Works of Tampa has
awarded a bid for the construction of storm sewers
for $20,000.
A laborer in Chicago started the fund to erect the
memorial to President Harper on the Chicago Uni-
versity campus.
The Dade County Fair, one of Florida's prominent
annual events, will open at Miami op March 5, con-
tinuing until March 10.
President Mitchell of the United Mine Workers
says that from present indications there will be a
strike of the coal miners.
The tomato shipping season has opened on the
lower east coast, the town of Danid having sent the
first carload to market.
Congressman Grosvenor of )hio, who has repre-
sented his district for more than twenty years, has
been defeated for renomination.
The manufacture of sand limd brick is a new in-
dustry at Plant City, a large plant having been built,
which will soon be in operation.
Strawberry shipments are now being made daily
from Starke, and returns are reported good. The
indications are for a profitable season.
A bill has been introduced in the New York Legis-
lature making it compulsory to have two motormen
or engineers on electric and steam trains.
Officials of the Western Federation of Miners
are charged with being directly responsible for the
death of ex-Governor Steunenberg of Idaho.
John Mitchell, president of the United Mine
Workers, has declined the Democratic nomination
for Congress for the district at Peoria, Ill.
Improvements will be made on the water front
at Bt. Petersburg, Fla.; the city channel is to be
deepened and protected against tide currents.
A fine crop of celery is reportedat Sanford, and
shipments are being made: It i expected that a
carload day will be forwarded from that point.
The railway rate bill, if it passes the Senate, will
contain a provision for a review by the court of the
rates fixed by the Interstate Commerce Commission.
Work has begun on the street car line in Miami,
a a franchise has been given a gas company, which
will build works and lay mains as soon as possible.
Dr. Rhet Goode, health officer of Mobile, has an-
mamgaed that a quarantine will be declared by Mo-
Saglant Havana and all Cuban ports on March 1.


Bradford County farmers are finding hog raising
profitable, and many good sales are reported.. At
Blair $3,000 worth of hogs were sold, with more sales
pending.
Improvements at the Palatka ice factory will
give the plant a capacity of thirty-five tons daily.
Increase of trade caused enlargement and new ma-
chinery.
Germany has decided to grant the favored nation
clause to the United States for another year, in order
that in the meantime a new commercial treaty might
be made.
Governor Broward has been at Fort Lauderdale
this week inspecting the dredges to be used in the
drainage work. One dredge is nearly ready for
launching.
Congressman Frank Clark has introduced a res-
olution providing for investigation of charges of
cruelty at, the St. Elizabeth IHospital for Insane in
Washington.
A recft scene on the Miami river was about
three dozen yachts and houseboats. These belonged
to wealthy visitors, who had spared no expense in
their outfitting..
Lamar Chappell, brother of the Mayor of Colum-
bus, Ga., and a relative of Congressman Lamar, com-
mitted suicide at St. Petersburg, Fla., ill health be-
ing the cause.
B. F. Daniels, a former Rough Rider, and who
was appointed a United States Marshal in Arizona,
charged with selling a mine for which he had no title,
has been acquitted.
The German Reichstag is making inquiry into the
standing of American insurance companies in Ger-
many on account of the recent legislative investiga-
tion in New York.
Passenger travel on the famous Oklawaha river
is given additional facility by the new steamer Alli-
gator, which recently made her first trip from Sil-
ver Sprlngd to Eustis.
On account of the law providing for a two-cent
passenger rate in Ohio, the railroads of that State
have agreed to give no reduced rates for excursions,
conventions or ministers.
The United States navy tug Potomac arrived at
Las Palmas, Canaries, Monday, and reported that
she left the dry dock Dewey 600 miles to the west-
ward of that port, all well.
King Edward, in the speech from the throne at
the opening of Parliament, indicated a desire for a
form of self-government for Ireland; the Transvaal
is to have a Constitution.
President Roosevelt has sent to Congress the re-
port of the Isthmian Canal Commission and board of
consulting engineers, with a recommendation in favor
of a lock canal at Panama.
A movement is on foot to .organize the fruit and
vegetable growers of Florida, and a meeting will be
held in Bartow, March 6. when an attempt will be
made to perfect organization.
Life insurance officials think that premiums will
be reduced, and that insurance will cost as much as
before the investigations' of the companies, but that
the dividends will be increased.
An attempt was made to assassinate President
Reyes of the Republic of Colombia. Eight shots
were fired, and.five bullets hit the President's car-
riage, but he escaped unharmed.
The French Foreign Office announces that France
has conceded the control of the Moroccan police to
.the Sultan, who must select French officers. Ger-
many's assent is yet to be secured.
Petitions signed by thousands of women of Cal-
ifornia and Colorado, protesting against the seating
of Reed Smoot, the Mormon Senator, have been pre-
sented to the United States Senate.
SAbout 1,200 bales of long staple cotton are held
in the warehouse at Alachua, the growers being firm
in their resolve to hold for a higher price, and are
confident that later they will secure it.
The final statement in the affairs of the Citizens
National Bank of Oberlin, Ohio, wrecked by Cassie L
Chadwi&k over a year ago, has been published, show
iug that the amount she received from the bank was
$347,600.


Joseph Arthur, the well-known playwright, died
Tuesday in New York. Mr. Arthur had a winter
home .at Hobe, Fla., and left there a few days ago
for New York to secure medical treatment.
A hotel to cost $30,000 will be erected in Per-
nandina, .the plans having been accepted and prep-
arations for building will begin at once. The struc-
ture will be three stories with mansard roof.
A vote by the Senate on the Statehood bill is ex-
pected to occur within ten days. Delegate Rodey of
New Mexico asserts that delay in voting is giving
the railroads opportunity to acquire large tracts of
land.
When the work of rock ballasting the roadbed of
the East Coast Railway is completed it is said that
the experiment of oiling will be made, hoping that
by so doing twice a year the road will be kept dust-
Sess.
Pensacola has completed the arrangement for her
Mardi Gras festiv.-l, and everything is in readiness
for the event, which begins Monday, February 20. In-
dications point to many visitors during the celebra-
tion.
Stuyvesant Fish resigned from the directorate of
the Mutual Life Insurance Company because he
wanted to know all about the inside dealings of the
company with outside concerns, and could not secure
such information.
Former Speaker of the House of Representatives
David B. Henderson has suffered another paralytic
stroke at his home in Dubuque, Iowa. It has almost
deprived him of his sight, his wife being the only
person he recognizes.
In reply to the demand of Dr. Morris for apology
of the treatment received by Mrs. Morris at the White
House, the President states that her arrest was
necessary, and justifies the conduct of the officers
who ejected Mrs. Morris.
Pat Crowe, who became notorious through the
charge of having kidnapped the young son of Edward
Cudahy, the'Omaha meat packer, demanding $25,000
for release of the boy, which was paid, has been ac-
quitted of his alleged crime.
Dr. Charles E. Hewitt of the University of Chi-
cago Divinity School declares that graft has taken
possession of the Christian ministry, neglecting their
religious duties and using their positions for finan-
cial gain by questionable methods.
A Democrat, George W. Guthrie, has been chosen
as the first Mayor of Greater Philadelphia. Many
riots occurred and arrests were made by the whole-
sale for illegal voting. The old ring, which had
long controlled politics, was knocked out.
Calvin Austin, who has been elected president of
the newly organized Clyde Steamship Company, be-
gan life as an office boy with a steamship company
at Boston thirty-four years ago, and his life as a
master of transportation has been successful.
A company has been organized in Aripeka, Her-
nando County, for the purpose of developing the
Aripeka section. A boat will be built and semi-
weekly trips made to Tampa, and telephone lines to
Brooksville and other towns will be constructed.
A decision involving 500,000 acres of land in
Florida is being held under advisement by Judge
Charles Swayne of the United States Court at Pen-
sacola. This land is in possession of the State, but
is claimed by various railways under legislative
grant.
The Seaboard Air Line Railway is said to have
abandoned its proposed extension south of Sarasota,
and will use the money instead for deepening the
harbor at that place. Sarasota Bay has also been
allotted $5,000 of the rivers and harbors emergency
fund.
The Interstate Commerce Commission has ordered
an investigation into the charges made by the inde-.
pendent oil producers and shippers of Kansas that
the railroads and Standard Oil Company are in a
combine to control the traffic and build up a monop-
oly.
President Roosevelt is taking a personal interest
in the inquiry into charges of fraud in connection
with the lands of the five civilized tribes in Indian
Territory, and at his order a plan to quash the in-
. dictments against several persons accused of fraud
* was abandoned. In addition the Interior Department
s has given orders which probably will result in *
number of new indictments.


, '-. K












February 24, 1906


THE SUN


SVMMAR Y

The property of the State Normal School (abol-
ished .under the Buckman law) at De Funiak has
been sold to a syndicate headed by Judge Daniel
Campbell, and it is stated that a; Presbyterian school
will be established.. The State received $3,400 for
the property.
Congressman Blackburn of North Carolina, Re-
publican, is charged with having accepted a fee for
using his influence to obtain action by an executive
department, and the Department of Justice is con-
sidering the case. Blackburn claims that it is the
result of factional politics.

Legal action has been taken by the Mutual Life
Insurance Company for restitution of money against
Richard A. McCurdy, the former president; R. H.
McCurdy, Louis A. Thebaud and Charles H. Ray-
mond. It is estimated that the amount sought from
McCurdy, Sr., is $300,000.

M. Fallieres assumed the duties of President of
France Sunday, the ceremony of the transfer of office
taking place at the Elysee Palace, where M. Loubet
made a short speech, to which the new President
briefly replied; the Ministry continues in office at
the request of the new President.
Great improvements have been made in the water
supply of Miami, and a large force is now engaged
in building a reservoir. The work, which has been
going on for two years, is now nearly completed.
Four wells have been sunk, each having a capacity
of 800,000 gallons of water every twenty-four *hours.
Lord Ashburton of England was married in Paris
to Frances Donnelly, an American actress, whose
stage name is Frances Belmont, formerly of New
York, and one of the original "Florodora' sextet of


OF


THE


1901. Lord Ashburton is a descendant of the signer
of the famous Ashburton treaty with the United
States.

News comes from the extension work of the Flor-
ida East Coast Railway that within a year trains will
be in operation over the new trackage to Key West,
all being completed by that time with the exception
of bridging the channel at Bahia Honda, twelve
miles in width, where a ferry will be used tempo-
rarily.

Charles H. Moyer and William D. Haywood,
officials of the Western Federation of Miners, and
G. A. Pettibone, a former member, have been taken
to Boise, Idaho, on the charge of murdering former
Governor Frank Steuenberg of Idaho. Wholesale
plots to murder former Governor Peabody and Su-
preme Court Justices of Colorado are also charged.

John A. McCall, former president of the New
York Life Insurance Company, died Sunday afternoon
at Lakewood, N. J. On account of the revelations of
scandal in the insurance company and McCall's part
therein he was forced to resign the presidency, and
as a result of these troubles his health became shat-
tered, and probability of prosecution is said to have
hastened his death.
Governor Samuel W. Pennypacker of Pennsyl-
vania has been chosen president of the Congress on
Uniform Divorce Laws, which met in Washington
this week. The congress was called by Governor
Pennypacker last summer, the Pennsylvania State
Legislature having appropriated $10,000 to defray
the expenses of the gathering. The membership is
national in scope, all but three of the States being
represented. The work of the session was to make
plans for enactment of a national divorce law.


NEWS


The United States Supreme Court has rendered
a decision that railroads cannot deal in the com-
modities which they haul over their lines. This de-
cision is a blow to 'the railroads owning coal mines
and selling their own product, and the Interstate
Commerce Commission furthermore claims that pri-
vate car lines are common carriers, and if the prin-
ciple of the court decision includes them, then the
owners of refrigerator cars would be prohibited from
using their cars for transportation of their own prod-
ucts.
John B. Stetson died at his winter home near De
Land Sunday afternoon. Apoplexy was the.cause of
death, and Mr. Stetson was unable to recover con-
sciousness after receiving the stroke. His health,
previous to the attack, had been good, so that his
sudden illness and death were a great shock to his
family and friends. Mr. Stetson, who was a wealthy
hat manufacturer of Philadelphia, had been a win-
ter resident of Florida for many years, and was the
founder of the famous Stetson University at De
Land, and was its chief supporter. He was seventy-
six y'ars old.
The Senate has passed a pure food bill, Senators
Bacmn, Bailey, Foster and Tillman voting against the
measure. Senator Tillman opposed the bill because
he said it was crudely drawn, containing no fixed
standards and Jeaving that power of regulation to
Dr. Wiley of the bureau of cnemistry. Senator
Bailey said that the Interstate Commerce provisions
of the bill were invajid, and that a one-man power
would be created. He said: "Begin as you are do-
ing in this bill and you will soon have a department
as powerful as the Postoffice Department. I doubt
if any despotism In the world vests in one individual
as much power as we give to the Postmaster General,
who can close anv man's business by an edict from
which he has no appeal."


POOR


0 VUEEN


OF


SPA N- TO.-E


0y IHeloise Comtesse d' Alemcourt


MADRID, Feb. 10.-The court and
aristocracy are getting ready for the
queen-to-be. One hundred ladies-count
them l-for ceremony, two hundred and
fifty "women" for service. And noble-
man's bodyguard, and "the queen's own,"
three hundred Halbardiers, each a six-
footer. And "chief-grand-charges,"
"grandcharges" and "charges" galore,
ladies and gentlemen, that must walk
ahead, or behind the majesty or at her
side, or mope in her ante-rooms, or
read her letters, books, newspapers or
magazines before she may.
For Spanish royalty is a plant of
such delicate texture that the full
grown man. and woman is hedged
round and watched and coddled and
prevented from doing things as long as
tnere is life in them.
FIFTEENTH CENTURY OFFICIALS.
And her Majesty will have a Grand-
Falconier-though there are no hawks
in Spain now, and a Grand-Huntsman-
though her steaks and chops and veni-
son are delivered at the kitchen door;
and a Grand Fisherman-though she
may never eat fish, even on Fridays; and
a Grand-Feeder-of-the-Royal-Swans, a
military household, a master of Archives,
a Master Librarian, a Director General-
of-the-Horse, a Chief Architect, and mar-
shals and masters and other gold sticks
too numerous to count.
Poor little woman-lest she be as
self-assertive as Queen Bess, as wise as
Catherine and as diplomatic as Victoria,
these empty-headed busy bodies will
smother her with officiousness and un-
der guise of lightening her burdens,
keep her occupied with adtiquate for-
-nalisms twelve hours out of every
twenty-four.
400-PAGE BOOK OF TITLES.
Since time immemorial the fiancee
of a Spanish King receives, immediate-
vly after the engagement is officially an-
nounced, a 400-page book enumerating
the names, offices, titles, privileges and
duties of her blue blooded servants to be
--really her masters.


This she memorizes by heart, if she
ever failed to remember that a gold
stick of the first order has three but-
tons at the side of his knee pants,
while one of the third order has six, or
that the mistress of the robe is privileged
to unfasten her corsets, while the lady-
of-the-bedchamber must not hand her a
shirt so long as a royal princess is
around to do so, she would be accounted
a failure even if she had the beauty and
grace of Madame Recamier, the wisdom
of Madame de Stael, and the winning
ways of Empress Josephine.
RELICS OF BYGONE DAYS.
Nearly all officials of the Spanish
court hold offices created by the Bur-
gundy Princess in the 14th and 15th
century. In those days the King killed
his meat on the hoof; his own employees
caught the fish that graced the royal
board and the retainers', the majesty
was his own candlestick maker, by proxy
of course, the proxies being necessary
adjuncts to his household, as managers,
cashiers and lobbyists are today part
and parcel of Rockefeller's staff. In
lieu of salaries they were entitled to
various privileges, and these latter
the Spanish court perpetuates to this
day, thereby giving work to a lot of
noblemen and noblewomen, who, on cere-
monial occasions, dress up in strange
toggery, and at all times surround the
King and Queen, separating them from
their subjects. "The Spanish ceremonial,"
then, stands in fact for old Burgundy
court usages, but it must be admitted
that the Hidalgo wonderously improved
on them. The main point: The Burgun-
dians enslaved their servants and officers,
in Spain the King and Queen are slaves
of ceremony.
Everything in the King and future
Queen's household is regulated accord-
ing to old musty laws. The Queen, for
instance, must go to bed in winter at
8:30 p. m., in summer at 10 p. m.
A QUEEN WHO KICKED.
"I won't," once upon a time a Spanish
majesty asserted, stamping her more or


less pretty foot. The first lady of- the
bed-chamber, to whom the royal will
was announced, informed the mistress of
the robes, the latter told the master of
ceremony, the third blabbed to the major-
domo in chief. That official said there
was no answer, but at 8:20 sharp-it
was in winter then-all the grand dames
of the household walked into the Queen's
chamber. This .one knelt down to take
oft her shoes, that one undid her hair; a
third pulled off her stockings, a fourth
unfastened her dress, a fifth took the
jewelry out of her ears, etc.
And with her majesty's kicking, claw-
ing and screaming, the undressing brig-
ade proceeded gently but firmly and
without saying a single word. Only
when the grand mistress of the robe
loosened her majesty's corset strings-
she bowed to low that the Queen suc-
ceeded in scratching her nose-only at
that interesting moment the sovereign
of 25,000,000 people was told that it was
bed-time.
And at 8:30 she was actually de-
posited in her bed and tucked in on all
sides, and while two grand dames sat
on her feet to keep her down, the rest
sang litanies and said their beads. After
6'1*t the Queen went to bed when told.
SPANISH QUEENS HAVE NO LEGS
This Queen, as told, made quite ex-
tensive use of her kicking apparatus, yet
officially "Spanish Queens have no legs."
With these words, the Grand Master of
the Madrid Court threw into the fire
*,elve dozen pairs of the finest silk
stockings ever woven, a present of the
city of Lyons. The vulgar crowd mu-t
not know that Queens are built like oth,'r
women-accordingly the ladies of the
royal bed-chamber are under oath to
have eyes only for the work they are
actually performing. The dame author-
ized to remove and put on ner majesty'
corsets is also a uthorized to know that
the Queen has losoms, but the lady who
laces her shoes durst know only that the
Queen has feet. If she pretended to
know that she wears garters-"off with
her official head."
And in pre-Napoleonio times the bead


that saw too much of the Queen actually
fell into the basket. Provided, of course,
they caught the proprietor. Once, in
the days when France "flung the head of
a King as a guage of battle to the allied
sovereigns of Europe," a daughter of the
seventh Ferdinand of Spain, while rid-
ing about the park of Aranjuek, lost con-
trql of her horse and fell, her foot catch-
ing in the stirrup. She was in eminent
danger' of being dragged to death by the
frightened animal, when two equeries
came to her rescue, caught the animal,
released the Princess' foot from the stir-
rup and bedded her on the lawn. The
Master'of Ceremony, when informed of
the occurrence, rode straightaway to the
scene with a bag of gold and two fresh
horses. "Off with you to the frontier,"
he 'cried. "Here is money. Here are
passports. If you are found within the
reach of the police to-night your heads
would pay the forfeit, according to law."
"What have we done?" cried the
knights, "have we not saved the Prin-
cess life at the risk of our own? Ask
her yourself if we did not behave with
the utmost delicacy and courage?"
"True," replied the marshal, "but
your life is forfeited nevertheless. You
have touched the royal body."
It seems a pity that Napoleon made
an end of this dynasty only for six short
years.
IO)CKED IN AT NIGHT.
We have already dwelt on one regula-
tion affecting the night rest of the
Queen of Spain. As told she must say
her prayers at the hours appointed by
some Burgundy Princess in the Four-
teenth Century. but what is worse,
twelve ladies of the bluest blood will
watch over her. listening to her every
breath and rushing in every time she
chooses to cough or get up. This dozen
dames appear in the palace at 11 o'clock
every evening, rain or shine. end is es-
corted by.the corps of Halhardiers to the
ante-room, adjoining the side of the bed
where her Majesty sleeps. And there
they sit until sunrise on little stools
without back, praying and pricking up
(Continued on Thirteenth Pge)


'WEEK'S


5.


r











S .ns


February 24, 1906


S SHAKING


THE


OL.D


PL UM


TRIEE


Not for many seasons, at such short interval to to
the nominating period, has therp been the outward Th
political apathy as shown at present. cl,
It is not because there is "nothing doing" that
this seeming lack of candidates is noticeable, for the ev
undercurrent is flowing as swiftly as one spay wish, -l
but it denotes a spirit of caution that has been
learned with other lessons coming with the primary 1r
training. Po
In this year's campaign, at least, a waiting game
has seemed desirable. The unsophisticated will w
doubtless attribute this delay and modesty to the ie
desire on the part of the candidate to spare the people tQ
undue discussion and thought, nor is it because the o
aspirant for office is anxious to hide his candidacy MA
from public inspection because of his shrinking per- a
sonality. ii
No; a more potent reason exists-the announce-
ment by the State Democratic committee of the date n
for the primaries. At its meeting to-day that body R
will decide the momentous question, and the bars will t
be let down for those who want to serve their fel- '
low-citisens.
The matter of the primary dates is of much con-
cern to those seeking office. A. short campaign is in f
favor of the weak candidate, who, however, may be
well known. He will have a decided advantage over
the stranger in the race, who, by reason of unac-
quaintance with the electors, will not be able to make
as close a canvass as would be possible for him were
the primary date more distant.
It is for this reason that thus far the publicly
announced crop of candidates has been short. While
in many localities slates have been made and plans
outlined, yet it needs the announcement of dates by
the executive committee to set the machinery in mo-
tion.
Too, the newcomer in the political field is anxious
to know how much time he will have, and if the pri-
mary is set for an early day he will think seriously
Is'fore running against the old and toughened' politi-
cal harvest hand.
Judging by the sentiment of the State press, the
desire is for a late primary, but in view of the ac-
tions of the executive committee in the past that
body is not apt to be swayed by public sentiment
nor anything else but the wishes and wisdom of cer-
tain of its own members. Obviously, a late primary
date is in the interest of fairness. The primary itself
was adopted as a means of fairness it making nomi-
nations, and was so advertised by its alleged father,
hut the spirit of its well-doing can only be attained
by giving ample time to all.
Neglect of duty is a charge that could be fairly
laid at the door of a number of members of the
executive committee in the past. While the result
may be the same if nearly all were in attendance, yet
the public would be more pleased with that condition
than to see a few men hold the balance of power
through proxies, and at least, the actions would be
more healthy and conducive to better faith in the
primary system.
It is expected that a number of newly-developed
schemes will infuse life into the campaign for Sen.
ators and Representatives, and among them will be
ta well-defined position assumed by organized labor
throughout the State.
Not that there will be a labor ticket in the field,
ho far as known. but this political strength will be
used as a club for those who have offended and de-
tiounced union labor.
While a feeling of resentment has prevailed in
many portions of the State toward an tagonists of
union labor, yet united effort has been lacking. The
psition taken by the Times-Union in locking out
he union printers, declaring an "open shop, and
getting out the paper with a force of rat printers, has
been the spark needed to touch off the inflammable
pile.
Indorsement of a candidate by that paper, or
favorable mention or comment of any political plan.
will be regarded as a target for the hostile shots of
union labor, which is now preparing for amalgama-
tion with view of suh purpose.
Hon. W. Hunt Harris of Key West is one of the
few who has announced for the' State Senate, not-
withstanding his punliohed statement two years ago
thet ie would not again be a candidate. Mr. Harris
has served several years in t Senate, and at the
last measles was a conspicuous advocate of the East
Coast Railway extension bill, and so well did he
pa-s Mb .otUitnuns that doubtless he feels unable


withstand their appeals to again represent them.
o Mr. Harris belongs the distinction of having killed
e insurance bill, which he talked to death at the
losing of the session.
He is opposed by E. M. Semple of Key West, who
idently does not enjoy the confidence of those inter-
st defended by Mr. Harris, Wse the latter would not
ave reconsidered the matter "of retirement.
In Leon County the ball opened early, as the an-
ouncements of W. A. Rawls and John W. Hender-
)iu have been before the public for some time. Mr.
awls says in his announcement: "Important events
ill face us at the next session of the Legislature," a
it of fact nobody will deny. Every Legislature oc-
,ipies the same position, but "keeping the face," as
he Chinese say, is the problem. Incidentally one
important matter to come up at the next session,
I in the past, is investigation of the State printing.
Ir. Rawls is a banker, and with both the present
nd the previous administration has preserved close
rntmacy.
Mr. Henderson Is the son of the late John W.
lenderson, who for so many years occupied a corn-
manding position in State pqlitles as a dictator of
measures and a manipulator of men. This race in
he Eighth District promises much excitement, and
while Mr. Henderson has not the experience of his
opponent, yet he is energetic and resourceful, and a
pretty contest will ensue.
Six candidates have announced for Representative
fronm Leon County, and among the number is one
whose race will be watched with interest in all parts
of the State-Edwin F. Duke, who for years has been
a popular hotel man ot Tallahkosee.
Hon. James E. Broome of Quincy is a candidate
for the Senate from Gadsden County, and is opposed
by Hon. J. Baxter Cimpbell. Mr. Broome has not
been in active politics since the last State campaign,
when he was a candidate for Secretary of State. He
is one of the "old guard" of Democracy in Florida,
ianving been prominent for th0ty years in the coun-
vils of the party, and one of Stoe whose services in
outing the Republicans from power were of the
greatest value to the people of this State. For many
year Mr. Broome represented his district in the Sen-
ate, and his recent absence from the chamber, where
his silvery tones and equally silvery locks, had been
so often heard and seen in grateful and forceful ora-
tory, was regretted by his former colleagues.
The infant Gubernatorial boom recently launched
for Capt. W. J. Tucker of Fort Pierce has already run
upon a snag that threatens the life of the fragile ves-
sel trusted to the cruel tossing of the political tide.
In the announcement of Captain Tucker's qualifica-
tions for the office and his various business inter-
ests, it was not deemed necessary to mention the fact
that he owns and has conducted for several years a
retail liquor store in Fort Pierce. This forgetful-
ness has been corrected by Rev. John N. Thompson,
who in a signed letter to the Florida Baptist Witness,
charges such fact, and thus puts the members of that
denomination on guard against nominating a man
who devires profit from the liquor traffic.
Two fat judicial plums will go off the tree this
year in the form of two vacancies on the bench of the
Supreme Court. The terms o( Justices Charles B.
Parkhill and J. B. Whitfield expire on January 1,
1007.
Each is a candidate for re-election, both have been
Lard-working and are popular with the people, so
that serious opposition, if any, is not likely to de-
eOne possible aspirant for th(s office may be Judge
A. J. Henry of Lake City, who was a candidate two
years ago, but was defeated. It has been hinted that
the everlasting contention over the Bu'kman law may
rerve as an excuse for candidates to the Supreme
.usticeship, but this is not likely. While the de.
cision of the Supreme Court concerning the consti.
tutionality of the Buckman law may have giver
offense and cause irritation in certain quarters, still
i' is by no means probable that the fact of a Justice
having decided according to his light can be mad4
at issue against his candidacy.
In all seriousness some papers have discussed th(
possibility of women candidates in this State, usint
av the preface to the argument that the Governo
threw "down the bars" when he appointed Mrs. Dear
iorn Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade County, fox
getting that even the action of a Governor may b
wanting in legality.
The Constitution provides that none but mal
electors can vote in Florida, and obviously no pel
son can hold office of any kind who is not qualifle
in the same manner as an elector. It is not likely
that any person will contest the validity of the ad
performed by the woman Cireuit Clerk of Dad
County, yet according to the Constitution und
v'hich the government is carried on, there can be r
doubt that all transactions of that office since hi
incumbency are illegal.
Not only is that the fact in this particular can
tut the Revised Statutew of this State do not contal
recognition of a female notary public, although mat
*re appointed and perform the functions of the oflkfi


It is not know whether a woman notary has ever per.
formed a marriage ceremony in this State, but a
word of caution to those who might celebrate their
matrimonial obligations before a notary is no teat of
the legality of the wedding by 'getting a woman to
tie the knot.
ST. PETERSBURG.
More Anecdotes of Russia's Only Popular General,
the late Dragimoroff. 0
St. Petersburg.-Anecdotes of the late Father of
his Soldiers, General Dragimoroff, have a grateful
tone in the general concert of bloody strife, incendiar-
ism and murder.
To Find Out Whether Soldiers Were Well
Treated.-Occasionally, when on inspection, Dragi-
moroff went along the front and laid his hand upon
the heart of the privates. If all the hearts beat reg-
ularly, he used to thank the colonel and the officers:
"I know that you treat your soldiers well. None
were afraid when I approached them." If he felt
turbulent heart-beats, the colonel heard quite differ-
ent language.
Try Oats on Your Horses.-"Colonel, your horses
are skeletons. What does it mean?" he addressed a
thieving officer in a voice of thunder.
"I can't make it out, your Excellency. I tried
everything to make them look well and hearty."
"Begin the oat treatment at once, or by I
will unfrock you," cried Dragimoroff, "and fine you
a month's pay for every ill-looking horse I see in a
week from now."
Officers Must Be Polite.-Dragimoroff once ob-
served that a young lieutenant omitted to respond to
a soldier's salutation. He ordered him to stand at
attention for five minutes, while the soldier passed
him half a dozen times. And as often as he passed
salutations had to be exchanged.
At another time he caught a cavalry officer wear-
ing spurs forbidden by the regulations, and ordered
him under arrest for two weeks.
The officer accepted the punishment, but said:
'By the way your Majesty wears the same spurs
as I."
"Indeed, what an old ass I am," cried Dragi-
moroff. "L ought to go to jail for a month at the
very least, but have no time. You will please sit off
the month for me, making your punishment six weeks
instead of four."
Of Kuropatkin he said: "A talented soldier, but
of a small mind. On the battlefield he is not think-
ing of honor and country, but of the intrigues they
are spinning against him in St. Petersburg.

CECELIA THOUGHT THE FINE-LOOKING CHAP
MUST BE A NOBLEMAN.
Berlin.-At a recent garden festival in the War
Academy, Crown Princess Cecelia, who seems to have
her mother's ready eye for good-looking men, caught
sight of a young student of fine appearance, and dis-
patched a chamberlain to ask "whether he was a man
of family" (meaning a noble family).
"To be sure," replied the student, whereupon the
Crown Princess "commanded him" to join her circle.
After awhile Cecelia said: "You are a Mecklen-
burger, but I did not catch your name."
"Rante, at your royal Highness' service," an-
swered the student.
"Rante? I never heard of a noble family of that
name," said Cecelia, doubtfully.
"Neither did I," replied the student, "but your
royal Highness asked whether I was of family. And
this I could not gainsay, seeing that I have fifteen
brothers and sisters at home."
Cecelia hopes the Kaiser won't hear of this awful
incident.


GERMAN


DELICATESSEN-HORSE,
CAT MEAT.


DOG AND


Berlin.-The meat famine caused a considerable
rise in the price of horse, dog and cat meat, which
are regarded as delicatessen by all but the well-to-do.
Dogs and cats, like horses, are slaughtered in abat-
toirs under the control of the state. Many people
have begun breeding cats and dogs like rabbits for
the market, and do a roaring trade.

PATRICIDE ARRESTED ON HAMBURG-AMERI-
CAN LINER.
Berlin.-Giovanni Prina from Triente was ar-
rested with a steerage ticket for a Hamburg-Ameri-
can liner in his pocket. He carried a false pass, and
confessed that he was identical .with the young man
who killed his father. The latter, he said, came
home drunk and began fighting. He stabbed him in
self-defense, sewed the body Into a sack, weighted
same with stones and threw it into Lake Como. His
sister gave him the money with which to escape to
America.


K


III


as












February 24, 1906


THE UN


I'V


E


AE EN


THI


INKI


Just a heart-to-heart talk upon the twin subjects
of servants and murders. One naturally leads to the
other.
And, at the start, I want to say that I totally dis-
approve of servants as a subject of conversation. The
trials of housekeepers should be a tabooed topic. And
I will say the same of murder trials.
For myself, I make it a point never to read about
murders. I can get all I want from the headlines.
To be sure, there are exceptions to every rule; there
was Robin Graves, who murdered his great-grand-
mother on a dare from his fellow-medical students.
I didn't read anything about it, but I heard people
discussing it, and it had elements of interest in it.
And I always thought that Probyn-Clew ca-e far
from dull. You may remember that Probyn sent
Clew a poisoned caramel on the very day that Clew
sent Probyn a poisoned peppermint, and th3 papers
were full of it. I gathered enough to enable me to
hold my end up when I encountered a person with
bad enough taste to discuss the subject. It was de-
plorable the way people harped on that case.
Then take the affair of the landlady who inur-
dered all her boarders because they resentedl a raise
in the price of board. What a mine of wealth that
was for the reporters My paper had six columns
a day for twenty days, and I just had to read that
because there was nothing else, but polities, in the
paper; but I felt that it was no subject for a person
of any refinement. Yet I knew one man who makes
quite a prtense of being up in the English classics,
and he knew every point in the trial. I could not
trip him up on a single bit of evidence. That ex-
perience just about destroyed my faith in humanity.
iMy brother said that I talked of nothing else but
that trial, and he was quite right. I was completely
absorbed in trying to find some person who knew
nothing of it. And at last I did find an old lady
who never reads the papers. She had not even heard
about it. She wanted to discuss one of Fiske's books
on evolution, but I said, "See here, Mrs. Delancey,
you're a rara avis. You're the first person I've met
who has not heard about this unique series of mur-
ders, and I'm just going to tell you the whole story
so that you may see for yourself what it is that fills
people's minds these degenerate days." And so I told
her the whole story, and she listened breathless; this
cultivated woman was positively as interested as if
she had been a policeman, off (or on) duty, and dis-
cussing shop with a brother officer. Oh, I was sick-
ened.
After a while she wanted to shift off to evolution
so that she wouldn't dream of the horrible murders,
but I looked at my watch and saw that I had a train
to catch, and again Fiske was sidetracked. Fiske
with his lucidity and logic and sweet reasonableness,
was sidetracked for a horrible murder.
Just as I was coming away I asked my hostess,
casually, if she remembered the Bond Street murder,
and she did remember that, for her father lived on
the very same block at the time it was committed.
I actually missed my train because I sat down to
hear her talk about it. It was like a bit out of Ains-
worth. I was not born when it happened, and she
was but a girl, but her father had the bad habit of
discussing such things in the presence of his children,
and it had made such an impression upon her infant
mind that here she was retailing it to me. As a bit
of local history contemporaneous with the days of
Irving and Cooper, it had a certain value; and that
is what appealed to me.
But to return to servants. There is absolutely
no excuse for talking about the Bridgets and Chris-
tinas and Maries and Dinahs that come and go.
Mind you, I am not narrow-minded; there are cir-
cumstances that alter cases. If there is a servant
who excites your interest in humanity, it is allow-
able to talk about her. Now we had a maid for a
couple of days last week who had evidently seen bet-

ter days and many of them. The way she broke
crockery showed that she did not do it with malice
prepense, nor yet out of sheer carelessness as an ordi-
nary maid would have done. She had evidently been
used to being waited upon and had no manual dex-
terity whatever. In fact she told me that she had.
never lived out before. Her name was Mamie Bran-
nigan.
We had one girl who refused to go when her day
was up. She was absolutely worthless as a cook, but
she liked her room, and she wanted to board with us.
My mother wanted me to eject her forcibly, but I am
not a bouncer-and she was. Anyway, I felt it was
a sort of compliment to our house that she wanted
to stay, and so we allowed her to keep the room. She
paid board and we handed her money over as wages
to her successors.
Servants are queer any way you look at them;
but this everlasting talking about them, when we are
surrounded by art and literature and the good deeds
of philanthropists, makes me wonder what we are
coming to. I think that men are almost as bad as
women in this matter. A man is just as likely to be


By Charles Battel Loomis

interested in our case of the servant-boarder as a
woman is, and I never go out anywhere where there
are some strangers present, but I am asked to tell
about her, and that always starts the servant ques-
tion; and I am generally asked to take the floor, be-
cause we have had such queer experiences.
I have time for only one more anecdote, but 1
must tell that. Summer before last mother got a
treasure of a cook. She could cook, she was respect-
ful and respectable, she didn't break and she was
honest, but -
Well, her "but" was that she would not go to the
mountains. Now we take a furnished house in the
mountains every summer, but we can't get a servant
up there, and Nadjezda (she's a Pole) could not be
induced to go. So we went without her, and she
lived in our city house on half wages all summer
long and cooked for herself, while mother went to the
mountains and cooked for herself. Still, it was a
sort of comfort to think that somewhere we had a
capable cook cooking.
I sometimes wish that some of the incapable ones
could be cooking somewhere.
Are you fond of looking up your genealogy?
It's a good thing to be fond of, believe me, only
don't let it stop at the mere getting of names andi
dates.
You believe that Theodore and Dorothea ought to
study history at school. History is the account of
the doings of races and it is very valuable. But the.
study of history in your own family cannot fail to be
stimulating.
If you learn that Great-grandfather Smith was a
murderer or a sheep stealer you can take great com-
fort in the thought that neither Theodore nor Dor-
othea shows any inclination to follow in his footsteps,
and your optimism receives an impetus.
If, on the contrary, you find that Great-grand-
father Smith was much beloved by his neighbors and
tried to do his duty as the Lord gave him light, why
there you have a good reason why Theodore and Dor-
othea should strive to be worthy depcendents of such
an ancestor.
It will be interesting to learn that that peculiar
trick of holding her head on one side that Dorothea
has was a peculiarity of Great-grandmother Robinson,
and that Theodore's one-sided smile was remarked in
Great-grandfather Brown as far back as 1793 in a
diary kept by his schoolmate, Daritus Woodruff.
And if Cousin John bends his elbow too often you
may be less hard on him when you learn that Great-
grandfather Jones could out-drink any man in Suf-
folk County, and that his father was a "three-bottle
man."
If you are selfish and you read in a letter written
just before the battle of Lexington that your great-
great-grandfather was noted for his unselfishness you
have an incentive to shape your life something like
his.
If, on the other hand, you find out in some old
record that your maternal great-great-grandfather
was the most selfish man who ever rode a farm wagon
into Boston it is surely high time that your family
stopped being selfish.
Oh, yes, the minute study of family histories is
diverting, stimulating, useful-and shocking.
An express system is the latest development of
municipal ownership in Manchester, England, where
the street car lines are owned by the city. The local
express companies protested against the city going
into the business, but to no avail, and the service is
becoming very popular, the charges being reasonable
and delivery Is prompt. The example of Manches-
ter will undoubtedly be followed by other English
cities, as the plan of municipal ownership is gaining
much headway.

Fined $100 for contempt of court by Judge Obr-
don of the Criminal Court of Tampa, was the fate
of C. R. Hawk, editor of the Herald of that city.
Mr. Hawk had made editorial utterance concerning
the sentencing of gamblers, and the Judge consid-
ered that the dignity of the court had been impaired.
The following are the paragraph. which the Judge
construed as offensive:
"The Herald believes that reserving decision
means that the court wants to know what public
sentiment really is regarding this evil. The
court knows the law and knows the situation, and it
is now quite evident that the course of the court will,
more o' less, be swayed by public sentiment.
If the court is given to understand that men of stand-
ing and influence in this community really want thewe
laws enforced, then the court will come very near
doing its fully duty."
Mr. Hawk was called into court on the charge of
contempt. Admitting that he was the author, he


was fined $100, which was paid.
The day following the Herald printed articles


showing a large number of cases of gambling and
violation oflilquor law where the sentences imposed
by Judge Gordon which, were not only light, but
were also suspended. From this it would seem that
while the action of the Herald was perhaps irregular,
yet its editor felt that a reform was necessary, and
it also seems that public sentiment is on the side of
the Herald, despite the haste of Judge Gordon to
repair the alleged insult to his court.


What's Agltating

People These Days
(Coptinued from Third Page)
get all about the extravagant earnings of the com-
pany, because the stowk will only be paying moderate
dividends. The people can nearly always bhe fooled
by juggling the securities, which represent earning
power.

The Yellow Peril is no myth. So declares Mr.
James F. .1. Archibald, war correspondent and stu-
dent of conditions in China and Japan, and who, in
a lecture in Baltimore, gave his reasons for such
belief. ,
"The worst that hai been said about the Eastern
question in not too strong," was the positive assertion
of Mr. Archibald.
"There are 400,000,000 Chinese alone, to say noth-
ing of the Japanese and Filipinos, all Imbued with a
deadly hatred of the white race. The great danger
iA not in the Chinese, but in the Chinese led by
.Japanese. The Chinese wish to be let alone. They
say they have gone though the stages of civilization
through which we are now passing and prefer to re-
main in their present semi-primitive state. But 'The
Orient for the Orientals' is the watchword of the
Japanese."
In comparison of the Chinese and the Japanese,
the lecturer said: "They are entirely different. The
Chinese are the soul of honor in their personal and
business dealings, but they have no love of country.
They would sell the Emperor or a part of their prov-
ince an you might sell a cast-off garment. The Japan-
ese are intensely loyal, with a patriotism founded on
at fanatical religion. Every big business house in
Japan has a Chinese cashier, who handles all the
money. The Japanese do not trust their own peo-
ple."
Concerning the missionaries the following opinion
was offered: "1 am cenvinoed that the Chinese and
Japanese were better off before the missionaries
went among them. I have a great respect for mis-
sionaries, but I believe there is plenty of work at
home for them. It is impossible to make an Ori-
ental mind reason as we reason."

A matter of public interest now being stirr-d
in Tampa, and may be carried to Tallahassee at the
next session of the Legislature is that of child labor.
The subject was agitated in that city by a recent
lecture, and the remarks of Rabbi Htollnits on the
evil were criticized vy a Tampa newspaper, which
said: "Outside of the Southern cotton mills, there
is no child labor in thiq section."
Replying to the criticism, Rabbi Stollnits says:
"At sessions of the Legislature of the State of Flor-
ida in recent years efforts were made to have intro-
d(uced a bill restricting child labor, but owing to its
detrimental effect on erttain interests in Florida, and
particularly in Tampa, no such law has been enacted.
The interests in Tampa opposed it for the reason that
it would affect the cigar industry, at which children
of all ages are employed, and their work is as ardu-
ous and in many ways more to be restricted than
that of the sweat shops on the east side of New
York. Therefore child labor does exist as well
among the orange groves as in the cotton mills of
the South."
There seems to be no doubt that child labor does
exist in Florida, and the assumption holds good that
powerful interests, placing the dollar above the value
of child life, succeeded in preventing the enactment
of a law prohibiting child labor in this State. Every
now and then there la a call in the country press of
Florida for those institutions which spel poverty
and wretclhmemlnM of their employew-cotton milll--
and before the youth of a community be sacrficed
the people, regardless of financial interest, should
compel the legislature to give the proper safeguard.

The liberal papers of Paris recall tim elaborate
wqglwf, Witte made to the Jews of the Umited
States about protecting their e rit "Il
light of present devsloputm, U
it is charged. ,.
.. .,";- ***-*. ~ ~* :". ^ ^ ^


NH


G











Saumay, February 24, .1906


THE SUN


sr


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IT


"Yours for Immutabilty---George "
When Mark Twain followed the Equator he noted in his diary the varied
scenes through which he traveled, and gave his impressions to the world in a
large volume which stands without a rival in vivid portrayal of personal expe-
riences gained by travel, and in descriptive writing.
To read Mark's book, "Following the Equator," is to turn a kaleidoscope to
the mental eye, and to peer into a verbal panorama of swiftly changing scenes.
Mark confesses that he saw so many different things in so short a time, that
he figured out the world as a huge patch-quilt, on which time was constantly
adding a new patch.
At last, one day, he stood in the presence of the huge image of Buddha, which
pious Hindoos had erected in the city of Benares, in India. Gazing into the fea-
tures of the gigantic statue the humorist was awed by the unchanging expression
of the Hindoo Divinity. "Here," thought Mark, "is the exemplification of the spirit
of quiet and repose. Here is the visible refutation of the theory that all things
change. For centuries has this colossal figure remained the same; silent, fixed,
and awe-inspiring in its immobility."
Bo much was Mark impressed with the majesty of the Hindoo god that he
marveled not at the zeal of the devotees who worshiped it.
No wonder Mark was impressed. That same statue has caused the same
emotion among thousands of travelers who preceded and followed him.
Great is the power of the unchangeable thing to impress the human mind.
But the thing that never changes had not then been found.
If the author of Tom Sawyer had gone a little closer to Buddha he would
have observed that the mouth of the image was worn down by the kisses from the
lips of the thousands of worshipers who in the passing of the centuries had thus
poured out the devotion of their hearts.
The face of the impenetrable sphinx, which so long defied the elements on
the Theban plain, now shows signs of wear and a change has come over that, for
so long, impassive countenance.
History records one instance of a change in the laws of the Medes and Per-
sians, which every one knows could not be changed.
In the last year of the reign of the Roman Tarquin the Colossus of Rhodes
lost the first joint from the middle toe of the left foot.
We know that Joshua made the sun stand still and so changed the regular
course of day and night. Astronomers tell us that the sun changes once or
twice in a thousand years, and in one million two hundred and seventy-six thou-
sand years it will go out.
No one who has beheld the grandeur of Niagara Falls can escape the impres-
sion that such a stupendous work of nature will endure for all time-yet we
know that Niagara is doomed.
Gibraltar is wearing away; Pike's Peak loses an inch of altitude with
the passing of a century; the granite slab that guards the tomb of an emperor
crumbles into dust as time succeeds time, and the stars lose their luster as the
cycles pas-
SBUT-
It has been left to this humble pen to record the one unchangable, fixed
and determinate thing hitherto unknown to all the learned scribes that have
gone before us.
IT IS THE DECISION OF OUR BROTHER, THE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
OF THE TIMES.-UNION.
Like all great finds of science and history it came to us by accident.
At a meeting between a committee from the Typographical Union and the
Editor-in-Chief, at which an adjustment of the differences between them was
sought, Mr. Wilson said:
"Gentlemen, I have made my decision, AND IT IS AS IMMUTABLE AS
A LAW OF NATURE."
Oh! you ever changing moon, get thee behind a cloud. And you, oh! stars
that shine for millions of years and are doomed to fade, cease your twinkle.
Talk not to us of immovable mountains, nor of the motionless solitudes
of the ocean's depths-
We have IMMUTABLE GEORGE, and on him do we fix our gaze when we
would contemplate the unchangeable.

Let This Project Be Rushed.

Of all subjects important to Jacksonville and the State, there is not one
that is AS IMPORTANT as deep water from the docks to the ocean.
Therefore, the meeting held in this city Monday last, the object of which
was to make plans for obtaining twenty-four feet of water at mean low tide
up to the docks, was a MOST IMPORTANT MEETING.
The meeting was called by Major Francis R. Shunk of the Corps of En-
gineers, U. S. A., who has, for some years been in charge of the harbor improve-
ment work.
It was attended by those of our citizens who are most familiar with the
subject, and the decision that the Government should undertake this improve-
ment was unanimous.
Meetings like this are productive of much good. They bring the citizens and
the Government officers in closer touch, and by personal contact and interchange
of views concord of action is brought about, and it is the pull all together that
produces results.
We are all agreed that the work should be done.
The thing to do now is TO HASTEN ITS ACCOMPLISHMENT.
As the gateway to all Florida, this city commands the trade of the State.
As the nearest Atlantic seaport, Jacksonville is in line for most of the
trade of southeast Georgia and Alabama, and a large part of Mississippi, Lou-
isiana and Texas.
Jacksonville now has all the essentials necessary to handle the business
of a vast territory to the south and to the west, EXCEPT DEEP WATER.
Brains and capital are here in abundance.
Railway terminals built and building are equaled by few and surpassed
by no Southern city.
DEEP WATER WE MUST HAVE.
Given deep water from the docks to the sea
And Jacksonville will soon take its place among the great cities of this
country.
See that an actress is suing the new and tardily acknowledged husband of
Mrs. Yerkes for breach of promise. This places Mrs. Yerkes on easy street in
regard to the man of her second choice. It will take some months to decide the
sut. When it is decided she will know whether she likes her new husband or not.
If she likes him, she has the coin to pay for the privilege of keeping him. If
she doR't like him, she can let the access have him. Happy Mrs. Yerkest


Sixt-eight Maltese goats have been Imlprted by Uncle Sam, who has an-
nounced that they will be distributed all over the country. We protest against
ths fer are already too many "butters-in" going around looe.


ReIncarceration of looarez.
The fact that young Alvarez of Starke, who was granted a pardon on con-
diton that he lead a correct life, committed another lawless act and was ordered
book to prison to serve out his life sentence, is no argument against the grant-
ing of conditional pardons.
Twentieth century civilization does not demand the blood of the offender
as an atonement for his crime. That idea was abandoned when enlightenment of
the mind rescued the souls of men from the passions and prejudice of ignorance
and developed man's spiritual side at the expense of his animal nature.
Punishment of criminals is now viewed by intelligent people, as corrective
and reformatory, instead of vengeful, in its operation.
The object of criminal laws is to take criminals into custody to restrain




Wouldn't you be surprised


-after knowing that the storms of ages were pedking the Sphinx
away, and-


-that Noaaralls Is changiin Its course, If-

them from harming others and to WORK A REFORMATION IN THE CRIMI-
NAL, in order that he may again became a good citizen and a true man.
Divine punishment is reformatory, and no better model can be found for
punishment by human hands.
Alvarez was given a chance to reform. He threw it away. He is again
restrained.
This is proper and entirely in accord with sound principles of justice
tempered with mercy.
The failure of Alzarez does not prove that the patrol system is wrong. it
only proves that THE MAN ON WHO M IT WAS TRIED was wrong.
here may be better systems than this, but they have not yet come out
of the unknowable.
God forbid that we should be one of its citizens when Florida writes above
its portals the legend that Dante saw over the gates of Hell.


01












RI


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s,


THE SUN


NINTH 'PAGE
Saturday, February 24, 1906


Let's Have Tax Exemption for Factories
Florida's manufactured products last year amounted to $50,241,078, turned
out by 1,410 manufacturing establishments, capitalized at $32,958,482, employing
41,961 persons and paying a total of $15,736,222 for their labor.
This is a good showing compared with the one made' five years ago, for it is
AN INCREASE OF 47 PER CENT.
Getting into the details of the Government report, from which the forego-
ing totals are taken, we find that $22,443,278 of the total came from the pine
tree, $12,592,105 from lumber, and $9,851,173 from naval stores.
Nearly one-half the total manufactured products of the State last year
was taken out of the forests.
At the present rate of consumption all the timber available for manufactur-


-that the sun, according to
200,000,000 years, and-


scientists, Is changing, and will to out In


The Governor Will Dig.
We have noticed, during the past four weeks, much discussion of Governor
Broward's Everglade drainage scheme.
Very little of it ham gone into the merits of the proposition. Most of it
has been colored with the personal views of those discussing, and some, we
fear, has been infected by the germ of DIRECT INTEREST IN. DEFEATING
THE PLAN.
We, long since, recognized this as a proposition of vast importance to the
people of Florida, and have sought every opportunity to get posted, so that
we might join the very few WHO HAVE discussed it on its merits.
There is one oi two things the matter with us in regard to this scheme.
We have either been denied access to sufficient information, or we are lacking
in mental power. We have not been able thus far in our pursuit of information
to decide whether the plan is a good one or a bad one for Florida and its people,
so, we reserve, for some future time, our comment, hoping either to get MORE
FACTS or a BETTER UNDERSTANDING of the facts we already have.
We have reached a conclusion on one or two points involved in the scheme,
and will give them just as they strike us.
The question of Broward's right to carry on the project cannot be properly
raised. He has the BEST OF ALL RIGHTS. It was given him BY THE PEO-
PLE DIRECT, when a majority of them cast their ballots for him in an election
in which the drainage proposition was an issue made by him.
An appeal to the people answered in' the affirmative CONSTITUTES A
RIGHT STRONGER THAN any which legislatures or courts can give. It is
the ONLY WAY TO ABSOLUTELY DETERMINE A RIGHT.
We pronounce all discussion of what this legislature did, or that court
ordered, and even the act of Congress itself, irrelevant and not germane to the
question.
The people have said "drain the everglades," and this dictum closes the dis-
cussion as to the right of the Governor to do it.
Let us suppose that the people had not passed on the question, in order to
take up the acts of lesser tribunals. We have been cited, by one of our brothers,
to an act passed by the legislature of 1003, which directs tWe Trustees of the
Internal Improvement Fund to use the money now on hand to build hard sur-
face roads. But this was an act of 1903, there is an act of 1905 which authorizes
the use of the fund for draining the everglades, and this act has a clause
WHICH REPEALS ALL LAWS or parts of laws in conflict with it. then, the
act of Congress by which the lands were added, to the State, expressly directs
that all money derived from the sale of the lands shall be used SOLELY FOR
THE PURPOSE OF DRAINING THE LANDS.
So, if the people had not, by ballot, directly given the Governor the right
to put through his drainage plan, he would have the right by legislative enact-
ment both, national and State.
THIS SETTLES THE QUESTION AS TO THE RIGHT TO DRAIN THE
EVERGLADES.
As to whether the plan is practical and feasible, the opinion of an engineer
has been given considerable publicity. This engineer, who bases his dlaim to
speak with authority on his intimate knowledge of the conditions gained by per-
sonal survey; says that the taking off of so large a body of water will so lower
tho temperature that a vast area that now produces fruits and early vegetables
will know them no more. He also says that removing the water will expose the
vegetable matter underneath to the sun, which matter becoming dry will buirn up.
This man may be right. But so may other engineers, equally eminent in
the profession and with equal opportunity to judge, who assert DIRECTLY THE
CONTRARY.
Governor Broward has studied this question for fourteen months. He has
had access to the reports of United States engineers covering a period of fifty
years, and we know that he has been diligent and untiring in his study of them.
liHe has made a personal inspection of the ground. He is thoroughly posted on
all phases of the question, He asserts that the plan is both practical and
feasible, and can produce abundant confirmation of his views, by showing reports
of engineers of high standing in the profession.
We frankly confess our lack of knowledge to equip us to enter into the dis-
cussion of the merits of the question, and we are determined TO DISCUSS NO
QUESTION OTHERWISE THAN ON ITS MERITS.
Viewing the question from the outside, we say that Governor Broward has
as MUCH EXPERT CORROBORATION OF HIS OPINION as have those who
hold an opinion contrary to his.
Even if we felt prepared to intelligently discuss the merits of this question,
we would curb whatever inclination we might have to do so-
Because we have no desire to waste our ammunition on dead birds.
BROWARD IS GOING TO MAKE THE ATTEMPT TO DRAIN THE
EVERGLADES.
He has the money, he has thirteen months before him of non-interference by
the Legislature, and there is no other power under heaven that can stop him.
If the suits now pending, or that may be brought, should all be sucssful,
THERE WILL TILL BE LEFT SUFFICIENT MONEY AVAILABLE to test
the practicability of his scheme.
We have gathered some data on this question and will present it from time
to time, with a view to giving the people an opportunity to Judge of its merits.


-you run aalinst somethinA really Immutable-
WOULDN'T YOU GET A SETBACK!

ing purposes will be gone in twenty years. Some woodsmen place the end at
fifteen years.
It is of vital importance to get factories in this State to exploit Florida's
wealth of natural resources other than its forest wealth.
Hardwood factories, cotton factories, fiber factories, furniture factories, fruit,
vegetable, fish and oyster canneries and the like, are needed to put money into
Florida's purse.
Every inducement consistent with prudence should be offered to capitalists
to locate factories here.
An exemption from taxation for a reasonable length of time would be a
great inducement.
One of the best laws that could be put on the statute books would be a law
to exempt properly equipped and financed factories from State, county and mu-
nicipal taxation for a term of years,


In a pamphlet issued by the society for juvenile prison reform, the story of
the rescue of a thirteen-year-old boy is told. It is illustrated by pictures show.
ing the hardened face of the boy before his reformation, and the bright features
of the youth after he had been rescued from his evil life. Reformation of juvenile
criminals is a great work. It is also hard work, and those engaged in it will
suffer much discouragement. But if nothing else be done, if no other result be
obtained than the rescue of this one boy, it is worth all the effort that has been
expended, and the work has been crowned with success.
Uncle Sam has no money to pay the elevator men in his public buildings,
and the elevators have stopped. Not a very elevating spectacle for a great nation
to present, but we must learn to be patient. Those shipments of grand pianos,
silk underskirts, and ladies' fine cambric nightdresses (or was it fine ladies'
cambric nightdresses?) must continue to be made to Panama, and it takes cash
to get these things.
"Clean sheets in hotels" is the sloan of the Georgia drua.ezs. Ever hbar
of such impudens*?


.fl~..
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'-,Y- ~ -. -s


THE BUN


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February 24, 1906


P


Dy Chevalier William Le .ueux


We sat for a long time discussing the
strange affair. In order to betray no
eagerness to get away, I offered the big
Highlander a cigar from my caw, and
we smoked together. The inquiry would
be held on the morrow, he told me, but
aa far as the public was concerned the
body would remain U that of some per-
son "unknown."
"And you had better not come to my
uncle's house, or send anyone," I said.
"If you desire to see me, send me a line
and I will meet you here in Dumfries..
It will be safer."
The officer looked at me with those
keen eyes of his, and said:
"Really, Mr. Gregg, I can't quite make
you out, I confess. You seem to be ap-
prehensive of your own safety. Why?"
"Italians are a very curious people,"
I responded quickly. "Their vendetta
extends widely sometimes."
"Then you have reason to believe that
the enemy of this poor fellow Santini
ma1 be your enemy also?"
One never knows whom one offends
when living in Italy," I laughed, as
lightly as I could, endeavoring to allay
he suspicion. "He may have fallen
beneath the assassin's knife by giving
quite a small and possibly innocent
offense to somebody. Italian methods
are not English, you know."
"By Jove, sir, and I'm jolly glad
they're not!" he said. "I shouldn't
think a police officer's life is a very safe
one among all those secret murder so-
cieties I've read about."
"Ah! what you read about them is
often very much exaggerated," I assured
him. "It is the vendetta which is such
a stain upon the character of modern
Italy; and depend upon it this affair in
Rannoch Wood is the outcome of some
revenge or other-probably over a love
affair."
"But you will assist us, sir?" he urged.
"You know the Italian language, which
will be of great advantage; besides, the
victim was your servant."
"Be discreet," I said. "And in return
I will do my very utmost to assist in
hunting down the assassin."
And thus we made our compact. Half
an hour after I was driving in the dog-
cart through the pouring rain up the
hill out of gray old Dumfries to my
uncle's house.
As I descended from the cart and gave
it over to a groom, old Davis, the butler,
came forward, saying in a low voice:
"There's Miss Leithcourt waiting to
see you, Mr. Gordon. She's in the morn-
ing-room, and been there an hour. She
asked me not to tell anyone else she's
here, sir."
"Then my aunt has not seen her?" I
exclaimed, scenting mystery in this un-
expected visit.
"No, sir. She wishes to see you alone,
sir."
I walked across the big hall and along
the corridor to the room the old man had
indicated.
As I opened the door and Muriel
Leitheourt in plain black rose 'to meet
me, I plainly saw from her white, hag-
gard countenance that something had
happened-that she had been forced by
circumstances to come to me in strictest
confidence.
Was she, I wondered, about to reveal
to me the truth?


CHAPTER IV.


TH GATHERING OF THE CLOUDS.


"Mr. Gregg, exclaimed the girl with
agitation, as she put forth her black-
gloved hand, "I-I suppose you know-
you've heard all about the discovery to-
.day up at the wood 1I need not tell you
aythg about it."
Yes,fiaes Leithomurt, I only wish you
would tell me about it." I said gravely,
inviting her to a chair and eating my-
elf., *"r heard some extraordinary
story about a man being found dead, but
I've be In Dumfries nearly all day.
WhIs tha e man?"
"Ah that w dat't know," she replied,


pale-faced and anxious. Her attitude
was as though she wished to confide in
me and yet hesitated to do so."
"You have been waiting for me quite a
long time, Davis tells me. I regret that
you should have done this. If you had
left word that you wished to see me, I
would have come over to you at once."
"No. I wanted to see you" alone-
that's the reason I am here. They must
not know at home that I've been over
here, so I purposely asked the man not
to announce me to your aunt."
"You want to see me privately," I said
in a low, earnest voice. "Why? Is there
any service I can render you?"
"Yes. A very great one," she re-
sponded with quick eagerness, "I-well-
the fact is, I have summoned courage to
come to you and beg of you to help me.
I am in great distress-and I have not
a single friend whom I can trust-in
whom I can confide."0
"I shall esteem it the highest honor
if you will trust me," I said in deep
earnestness. "I can only assure you that
I will remain loyal to your interests and
to yourself."
"Ahl I believe you will, Mr. Greggl"
she declared with enthusiasm, her large,
dark eyes turned upon me-the eyes of
a woman in sheer and bitter despair.
Her face was perfect, one of the most
handsome I had ever gazed upon. The
more I saw of her the greater was the
fascination she held over me.
A silence fell between us as she sat
witif gloved hands lying idly in ner lap.
Her lips moved nervously, but no sound
came from them, so agitated was she, so
eager to tell me something; and yet at
the same time reluctant to take me into
her confidence.
"Well?" I asked at last in a low voice.
"I am quite ready to render you any ser-
vice, if you will only command me."
"Ah I But I fear what I require will
strike you as so unusual-you will hesi-
tate to act when I explain what service
I require of you," she said doubtfully.
"I cannot tell you until I hear your
wishes," I said, smiling, and yet puzzled
at her attitude.
"It concerns the terrible discovery
made up in Rannoch Wood." she said in
a hoarse, nervous voice at last. "That
unknown man was murdered-stabbed to
the heart."
"Well ?"
"Well," she said, scarcely above a
whisper, "I have suspicions.'
"Of the murdered man's identity?"
"No. Of the assassin."
I glanced at her sharply and saw the
intense look in her dark, wide-open eyes.
"You believe you know who dealt the
blow ?"
"I have a suspicion-that is all. Only
I want you to help me, if you will."
"Most certainly," I responded. "But
if you believe you know the assassin you
probably know something of the victim."
"Only that he looked like a foreigner."
"Then you have seen him ?" I ex-
claimed, much surprised.
My remark caused her to hold her
breath for an instant. Then she an-
swered, rather lamely, it seemed to me:
"I saw him when the keepers brought
the body to the castle."
Now, according to the account I had
heard, the police had conveyed the dead
man direct from the wood into Dum-
fries. Was it possible, therefore, that
she had seen Olinto before he met with
hie sudden end?
I feared to press her for an expla-
nation at that moment, but, neverthe-
less, the admission that she had seen him
struck me as a very peculiar fact.
"You judge him to be a foreigner?" I
remarked as casually as I coulo.
"From his features and complexion I
guessed him to be Italian," she re-
sponded quickly, at which I pretended
to express surprise. "I saw him after
the keepers had found him."
"Besides,' she went on, "the stiletto
was evidently an Italian one, which
would almost make it appear that a for-
eigner was the assassin.-
"Is that your own suspicion T"


"No."
"Why?"
She hesitated a moment, then in a
low, eager voice she said:
"Because I have already seen that
three-edged knife in another person's
possession."
"That's pretty strong evidence," I de-
clared. "The person in question will
have to prove that he was not in Ran-
noch Wood last evening at nightfall."
"How do you know it was done at
nightfall?" she asked quickly with some
surprise, half-arising from her chair.
"I merely surmised that it was," I
responded, inwardly blaming myself for
my ill-timed admission.
"Ahl" she said with a slight sigh,
"there is more mystery in this affair
than we have yet discovered, Mr. Gregg.
What, I wonder, brought the unfortunate
young man up into our wood?"
"An appointment, without a doubt.
But with whom?"
She shook her head, saying:
"My father often goes to that Apot to
shoot pigeon in the evening. He told us,
at luncheon to-day. How fortunate ne
was not there last night, or he might
be suspected."
"Yes," I said. "It is a very fortunate
circumstance, for it cannot be a pleasant
experience to be under suspicion of be-
ing an assassin. He was at home last
night, was he?" I added casually.
"Of course. Don't you recollect that
when you called he chatted with you? I
did some typewriting for him in the
study, and we were together all the
afternoon-or at least till nearly five
o'clock, when we went out into the hall
to tea."
"Then what is your theory regarding
the affair?" I inquired, rather puzzled
why she should so decisively prove an
alibi for her father.
"It seems certain that the poor fellow
went to the wood by appointment, and
was killed. But have you been up to the
spot since the finding of the body?"
"No. Have you?'
"Yes. The affair interested me, and
as soon as I recognized the old Italian
knife in the-hand of the keeper, I went
up there and looked about. I am glad
I did so, for I found something which
seems to have escaped the notice of the
detectives."
"And what's that?" I asked eagerly.
"Why, about three yards from the
pool of blooa where the unfortunate for-
eigner was found is another small pool
of blood where the grass and ferns
around are all crushed down as though
there had been a struggle there."
"There may have been a struggle at
that spot, and the man may have stag-
gered some distance before he fell dead."
"Not if he had been struck in the
heart, as they say. He would fall, would
he not?" she suggested. "No. The po-
lice seem very dense, and this plain fact
has not yet occurred to them. Their
theory is the same as what you suggest,
but my own is something quite different,
Mr. Gregg. I believe that a second per-
son also fell a victim," she added in a
low, distinct tone.
I gazed at her open-mouthed. Did
she, I wondered, know the actual truth?
Was she aware that the woman who had
fallen there had disappeared?
"A second person!" I echoed, as
though in surprise. "Then do you be-
lieve that a double murder was com-
mitted ?"
"I draw my conclusion from the fact
that the young man, on being struck in
the heart, could not have gone such a
distance as that which separates the
one mark from the other."
"But he might have been slightly
wounded-on the hand, or in the face-
at first, and then at the spot where he
was found struck fatally." I suggested.
She shook her head dubiousnly, but
made no reply to my argument. Her
confidence in her own surmiNes mnde it
quite apparent that by some unknown
means she was aware of the second vi-e.
tim. Indeed, a few moments later she
said to me:


"It is for this reason, Mr. Gregg, that
I have sought you in confidence. No-
body must know that I have come here
to you, or they would suspect; and ai
[Continued on Fourteenth Page]


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With our Spring offerings


ALL THIS AT


RENFROE9S

. Corner Bay and Clay


10


T


Y


.. *'* .
-.1










THE SUN


IN THE SUN'S CHARIOT
Intimate Talks Between Publisher and Reader
We thought those two new departments which we opened last week
would make a hit.
We rather expected a mild sort of a killing, because we knew that
the subjects were well chosen, and had determined to see to it that they
were properly treated.
We were not prepared for the wave of popular approval that
Whelmod us as soon as the mails began coming in this week.
"Shaking the Old Plum Tree" and "What's Agitating People
These Days," under which heads are marshaled crisp nOWS about
things political and carefully culled comment on interesting topics,
stand a good chance of qualifying for the front rank in the collection of
good things gathered by The Sun for the pleasure and profit of Chariot
riders.
On the first dash we stirred up our worthy friend Gen. Ed. Bailey
of Jefferson, who comes promptly at us with a communication, which
we feel it our duty to print.
We invite all our friends to follow the General's example, with the
single caution that brevity must be a distinguishing feature of future
letters to the editor. We have made an exception in the General's case
this time, because he did not get the warning. But even he must
"boil it down" in the future if he wants to see it in The Sun.
We desire to say that the General should have taken our little
pleasantry of last week in the spirit in which it was put and meant.
He has been several times a candidate, and should have by this time
become accustomed to the gibes of scribes. We also desire to say that
if there lives on this earth a bigger hearted, more unselfish,, honester
man than Ed. Bailey, we have never laid eyes upon him.
While on the subject of candidates, we may as well say that we
have not in anywise departed from our formerly conceived notion as to
the proper way to deal with them in these columns.
We will not sell them space in that part of the paper devoted to
the entertainment of our readers. If we deem it a matter of interest,
we will print stories about candidates as we print other stories, and we
will do the selecting in all cases.
But we are not unmindful of the fact that the possession of the
largest and most diversified circulation in Florida has its obligations,
and we recognize that we have not the right to deny to candidates the
opportunity to reach the voters all over the State, which space in The
Sun will surely give them.
Realizing, therefore, that candidates will demand Sun space for
the presentation of their claims to the people, bIKcausC In no othfr way
can they get to all the people with promptness and certainty, we have
decided to open another department, which we will head with this
legend:
"Paid Political Advertisements," printed in bold tylxp clear across
the page.
Under this head we will run such matter as each candidate may
desire to submit to the people-
Provided-
It be not libelous;
It be in polite English;
It be paid for in advance.
As we have determined to adhere, at all hazards, to the one price
plan for our space, we will charge candidates exactly the same rate we
charge other advertisers, and this price is-
One dollar per single column inch per insertion.
We do not say to candidates-
"You must advertise in The Sun.
We make the simple statement-which we are ready to prove-
You can reach more voters than by any other means whatso-
ever-If you do.


Florida-Georgia Syrup Company, Jacksonville, Fla.

Rectifyers and Distributors of


PURE FLORIDA CANE SYRUP
Put up in airtight cans of convenient size.

ASK YOUR GROCER FOR R GOODS---


11


Some Thinks by the Brethren


DADE COUNTY'S GOOD ROADS.
In another article mention is made of
the opinions automobilists and others
have expressed in reference to Dade
County's rock road. An a sample we
publish the following from A. 0. Batch-
elder, a noted automobilist, secretary of
the American Automobile Association,
and consequently an advocate and an
expert judge of what constiutes a good
road. In the Times-Union interview of
him he says:
"I made the trip Friday from Palm
leach to Miami and return over the new
road recently completed between those
points. It is a good road and is fast
lhecoming Igpoular with owners of auto-
mobiles. If it was a little wider it
would he better, but it is a start in the
right direction, and the authorities who
built the road have done more to adver-
tise their section of the State than you
would think possible. It will be talked
about, and the owners of automobiles
who travel over the road this season will
influence others to bring their machines
to Florida netxt winter."
And we would add that the narrow-
.nessM of the road that Mr. Batchelder
claims in its only fault, will probably be
remedli(d by next winter-at least that
i what the County Commissioners in-
tend to have donor if possible. Their
main, or rather, primary object, was to
get the road through at some width an
quickly as they could and to improve and
widen it as soon thereafter as possible,
and also extend it toward and eventually
to the northern boundary of the county.
Mr. liatehelder and all other auto-
uiobilists can rest assured that Dade
County intends to have as good and an
many rock roads as necessary, and to get
them as fast as the county road tax will
allow.--Palm Beach News.
WE MUST HAVE SETTLERS.
The tourist business is again proving
unreliable. Florida will never have a
permanent, lasting, substantial prospier-
ity until we get more settlers who make
their-living from the soil and the prod-
ucts tihereoif-who produce something.
The tourist business is all right. We
should continue to cater to our friends
from elsewhere and everywhere. They
are good lejople. We want them. We
nimust have then. We must not fail to
exert every effort to get them. With
more settlers and improved fields and
fitrns, this section would be more at-
tractive to visitors-and they would stay


Taza Char

A Ceylon Tea of the
very beet quality

For the price it has no equal-double
the strength of the higher priced Team.


iMek r xi 5 0 Gents


If you cannot buy from your
grocer send us his name and
we will see that you get it.
If you will write, naming tids
paper, we will send you a
U"f S r o. P6guN.O


Morton & Deane

Grocery Co..
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA


Olea 0-le i or f dFlbf


longer when they did come than they do
now, but-
We must have more settlers. Every
organization in the State should try to
induce settlers to locate with us. We
can secure them only after demonstrat-
ing that money can be made here by in-
dustry and hard work. This fact must
be demonstrated by our own people-
and the settlers will quickly follow.-De
Land News.
The Jacksonville Metropolis clipped
Frank Clark's letter, from the News and
then credited it to the Fort Pierce News.
After its little experience with Annie
Oakley, it does appear as if the Metrop-
olis would be a little more careful about
credits.-De Land News.

For Boys nd Girls
Every boy and girl may not rise to
wealth and affluence, may not be able
to lay up treasure of gold and silver,
but every boy and girl may lay up much
treasure in tWe storehouse of knowledge.
Banks may fail, property be destroyed
by fire ur storm, thieves may rob and
steal, but nothing can break through
and steal from that priceless treasure
stored in your mind. In youth we
undervalue the great opportunities we
have for acquiring knowledge. We are
careless oft times as to our studies, and
think it quite a trial to be forced
through the tedious, tiresome routine of
daily study; but we must build from
the foundation up. It is easy to calcu-
late the money value of a man's educa-
tion. If you boys would prefer to plod
along through life at $251 or $30 per
month, rather than to have a salary of
$100, $125 or $200, then you will be
satisfied to remain in ignorance.
And you, dear girls, you, too, may
find it necemsary to go out into the world
and work for a living. No true man
wants his daughter to do this unneces-
sarily, but when it Ibecomes necessary
would you rather stand behind a counter
all d(lay long for a mere pittance, or
would you not prefer the counting-room,
the office, the schoolroom, with thrice the
salary ?
There are opportunities that come to
us only once in life-if we do not grasp
them thely are gone forever.
Remember this column is for your
good. Do not hesitate to seek its help-
fulness. Yours to command,
UNCLE HENRY.


Bread Winning


Man cannot live by bread alone,
The honored Prophet said,
But man's whole life Is put In tone
By eating Puckhaber's bread.

ALWAYS FRESH -o ALWAYS PUNK
ALWAYS NOD


PUGKHABER


Jade=Wonlle


a 0swm


If It's Drus
Bettes Has It

Fi Lim UTid t AisLls



Beues Drug Store
Cr. Ie ra, U amuw, hh.
ANT nl A LuiM


February 24, 1906










THE w


February 24, 1906


LETTER

Monticello, Fla., Feb. 19, 1906.
Editor Sun:
I thank you for sending me a marked
copy of your last issue, containing ref-
erence to my candidacy for Railroad
Commissioner. I take no exception to
your statement of facts, that I was the
frAt to make announcement, and that it
does not denote my position "at the fin-
ish;" or that I contributed "on more
than one oooasion" ,to the gayety of the
Senate chamber. Your suggestion that
I introduced resolutions "foreign to the
work of the Florida Senate" is absolutely
untrue.
I did, in 1895, introduce three mem-
orials to Congress. One was suggesting
that steps be taken by our national Gov-
erament to establish an international
court. Since then The Hague Tribunal,
participated in by different nations, is
an accomplished fact, and no doubt has,
and will avert war, and settle disputes
in many instances. Another memorial
to Congress, suggesting that in event of
Providential disasters, such as the
Johnstown flood, Charleston earthquake
Michigan prairie fres, Southern yellow
fever epidemics, where the most acute
suffering is at first, before the charitably
inclined can get together and find out
what is needed and collect, the national
Government could promptly furnish
necessary aid. Another memorial to
Congress, suggesting that as the South
is taxed to pension Federal soldiers, and
also Confederate soldiers, that some pro
vision be made by which each State pen
sion the soldiers enlisted in the wai
from that particular State. As Generali
Grant and Sherman each were of thi
opinion, soon after the war, that thi
pension roll would in time amount to the
enormous sum of twenty-five million dol
lars a year, and it has reached one hun
dried and forty million per year, th
South has paid in the shape of a war in
demnity, as pensions to Federal soldiers
the sum of one billion dollars, a sur
equal to the indemnity exacted by Ger
many from France, though France ha
twice the population of the South, an
had humiliated Germany time and tim
again in the previous one hundred years
and they speaking a different language
a sum within the ability of France t
promptly pay. The South lost in set
ling the question of slavery another bi
lion in slave property, guaranteed under
the Constitution, and the South ha
paid the North (who carried on th
slave trade) for those slaves, when th
North found they were not adapted
either to their climate or their instint
tons. The South lost another billic
through the robbery of the "carpe
bagger" and resultant depreciation
property. Can you conscientiously sa
t.ere was anything discreditable
either my brain or heart in these mem
orials?
Memorials are passed at each wessio
and always contain the "whereas," s,
ting forth the reasons for favorable u
tion. A most renowned lawyer prepare
the memorial I presented in 1003 for ii
peachment of Judge Charles Swayne.
In 1877 the Monticello Town Coun
invited refugees from Fernandina
come here; some died of yellow feve
others recovered, and no harm to t
community. In 1888, when the ei
demio was announced in your city,
Democratic club meeting was turned ii
a mass meeting, and a demand made
the Council to prohibit refugees fr<
coming here. I pleaded for them
come, and said if they were not allow
I would invite them to my plantation
No harm came from their stay he
Hhen your lamented fire occurred
1001 (May 3), a mass meeting of
liens was called by the Mayor on May
and a committee appointed. On the 7
we canvassed in a body and expressed
h'opr of collecting $200, believing i
people would respond liberally. We c
leted $400. Not one of those citing
would have paid, through a national t


one-tenth the amount of the contril
tieO for such purposes during the ent
My little daughter, ten years o
a st received $20 as a present, a
,t n1 allU her tax would not have be
Me oaet, ad she would have had


FROM GA

satisfaction of knowing that the most
acute suffering was promptly relieved.
The New Orleans World's Fair prom-
ised $50 for the best bale of cotton from
Florida. I received the diploma
promptly, but the money not reaching
me until the Charleston earthquake,
sent it to them; my proportion of a na-
tional tax would not have been 5 cents.
This memorial for national aid pased
the Senate; it was defeated in the House
by the suggestion of too much "paternal-
ism," and that from a Government that
does sometimes act in a niggardly way,
and if that is justifiable, then to do
what is necessary would be. And ouar
citizens are ready to sacrifice their lives,
if need be, for that Government.
I voted for a two-mill tax for pensions
in May, 1897, and knew that my prop-
erty would sell for taxes. It was cut to
one-half mill in the House. On the joint
committee, in 1903, I suggested and ad-,
vocated a three-mill tax for pensions. It
passed the committee; they met in my:
absence and reconsidered it.
In 1905, when the administration was
blamed for a deficiency of $140,000 for
pensions, I properly placed the blame on
the Legislature of 1903, and the criticism
t ceased in the Senate.
S You refer to the harsh treatment of
me by Hon. Chas. Dougherty and Judge
D Hicks. Your informant was not well
posted. The "fun" occurred when the
d reading clerk was somewhat puzzled over
- my hurriedly written manuscript, and
after having read one, I relieved him,
r and when I completed the third the
a Judge thanked me for having read my
e memorial the second time! He promptly
8 suggested that for the balance of the ses-
e sion all that was necessary to secure his
. support was for me to advocate the
. measure I
e This is not the first time your paper
- has misrepresented me, though I believe
, not intentional on your part, Mr. Editor.
m When in 1003 you were expelled from
r the House, while I do not question the
d justice or propriety of the act, you had
d my sympathy, and you were not ex-
te pulled from the Senate. (The Jefferson
s, Senator did extend to Mr. L'Engle the
; courtesies of the Senate, and in this he
o was not behind the thirty-one other Sen.
t- ators.-dFitor The Sun.) In 100I when
-l. a Senator asked that you be expelled for
ir insulting him while lobbying for a bill
d in behalf of the press, and you en-
ie deavored to address the Senate, when to
he listen to you was "foreign to the work
id of the Florida Senate," I was about to
u. ask that Citizen L'Engle be allowed to
m explain, when the Senator withdrew him
)t- request.
of (Mr. Bailey is a little mistaken aboul
my the facts of this episode. Senator Me
to Creary did request the Senate to exclude
m. Mr. L'Engle from the floor, but no othey
Senator paid any attention to him, anc
n, the motion died from lack of a second.-
et. Editor The Sun.)
le- In 1905 your paper stated that I ha(
ed received a "solar plexus blow," etc., ir
m. investigating the charge against Senato
C. Ma Brown for riding on a free pass
I denounced on the floor of the Senat
t your informant as a malicious liar, an,
r; asked each member of the committee t
ho correct me if I made any statement tha
no they were not satisfied with the corred
Pl ness of. I did not ask the Senate to e
,a Pl the corresondent, I would attend t
ho is case! I ave never discovered th
on man that so informed you.
to In 1889, when a brilliant correspond
red ent, representing the largest dally papei
ns. was very harsh on one of my opponent
re. to a measure, though his paper sound
in my praises, I gave notice on the floe
it. of the Senate that if he did not cease hi
0, attack I would move his expulsion; tha
th my adversary was as much entitled t
I a his views as I was to mine. The attack
the ceased, but my side won.
ol- Before introducing the resolution
ens asked Mr. Brown to resign. He asked


ax, me to wait until next morning, that h
hu- wofild talk to his attorney. That nigh
ire his attorney, a bright and able lawyer
ld, eame to me and suggested that it migl
tnd be some other C. M. Brown. I told hh
sen I was a living witness to the fact; tha
the Brown had oonfesed to me that it we


W.


E.


B.


li. Mr. Brown asked me to wait until
the investigation in regard to his right
tb his seat was closed. I did so, and if
the committee had reported promptly
and unseated him, I never would have
introduced it. When I did so I re-
grett]d the occasion for it, but claimed
I wal in a position to "cast the first
sone"? Mr. Brown "courted" investi-
gation, but on a viva vooe vote he voted
against it. I called for a record vote,
and It was unanimous.
I was chairman of the committee, and
when his attorney criticised the action
ofthe Senate for appointing such a com-
nttee, I told him I cared nothing for
his opinion as to the propriety of the
Senate's action, which was unanimous,
and the investigation would proceed. The
fact was established by the sworn record
in the Railroad Commission's office, and
Mr. Brown virtually pleaded guilty by
refusing to be sworn, and the next day
was unseated by the committee investi-
gating his right to his seat.
: After the adoption of the report of the
committee that investigated the Insane
Asylum, I introduced a resolution, which
was unanimously passed, for the courts
to investigate the conditions at the
asylum, to exonerate all that were inno-
cent and punish any that might be
guilty, for the good name of the dtate
demanded it.
In 1905 there were three opponents to
my candidate for sergeant-at-arms. One
of them, a one-armed Confederate sol-
dier, an ex-member of the House and
sergeant-at-arms at previous session, had
all the hold-over Senators to work on,
also the new ones until January, when
I brought out my candidate, who did not
khow a single member, and could not
help himself. Another opponent was an
ex-member of the House; another was
once sergeant-at-arms and had a brother
who was a Senator. He was a Confed-
erate soldier, and all of them capable
men, good citizens and excellent gentle-
men. I won the most complete victory,
against the most overwhelming odds,
that ever confronted a candidate in that
I capital. This shows ability as well as
loyalty to a friend, and I challenge you
or any other man, to cite another such
victory. I could not have won, except
Sfor Hon. Chas. Dougherty and Judge
r Hicks, with six others of Mr. Floyd'%
nine friends coming to me on the second
ballot, when Mr. Floyd was defeated. I
c llenge you, or any man, to cite a
s stole instance of any man's vietoriei
equaling mine at my first session, mn
3 1889, or my last session, in 1905.
s In matters of legislation, I challenge
t you to investigate the records and say i
one-eighth of the members wo n whale
they advocated or opposed, oftener thai
r I. While there were plenty of my asso
Sciates as honest and conscientious as I
I challenge you to produce one that wil
- say before an audience that he neve:
rode on a free pass, or received a cent o
d rebate in freight, or ever cast other thai
n a conscientious and unselfish vote; whi
r will refuse to say that I have his un
'. bounded respect and good will. If yoi
e can find one such man that has woi
d oftener than I, you will please me b;
o letting me know it. If you can fin(
Sany man who by any methods woi
oftener than I, you will please me.
o" I have never asked to be placed on an
o particular committee, have served faith
e fully wherever placed. If I had asked
as a condition for voting for Presiden
L- of. Senate, I could not say that I neve
r, cast other than an unselfish vote. If
* had ever asked in advance any favo
d whatever of a candidate for Unite
ir States Senate, I could not so claim.
s never asked the President of Senate o
t Speaker of House to appoint any pai
o ticular members on committee to inspect
k convinet camps, or any member to get o
those committees, yet every report wa
I complimentary to my management.
d I favor "universal peace," and hope i
e will come in time. I doubt if any ma
it in Florida (I challenge them to prove
r, it) has ever been a more fmcessfi
it "peace-maker" than I. The champion
m peace-maker of Jefferson County, who I
it a Confederate soldier, honorable Chrit
rs tan man, honored official for twent


A ILEY

years, will not deny that I have made
peace where he failed (and in some re-
markable cases) though he has been
with me twice when I expected to fight
duels. I never refused a challenge and
always prove my denunciation of wrong,
and never retract a word, even after
fisticuffs. I never had an enemy but
what under oath would say (in my opin-
ion) that he was wrong, and not one but
what an audience (anywhere) will say
they are wrongly I am willing to test
the matter. If I was wrong, it would
be more satisfactory to me to know it
than to receive the plaudits of my fel-
low-men.
I have never participated in a lynch-
ing, but have several times saved men
from being lynched.
My platform will not be like that on
a railroad coach-"made to get in on,"
and not expected to "stand on," but I
hope one that will prove satisfactory to
the people of Florida. I never did as a
legislator tcose my eyes for a night's
sleep without repeating the Lord's
Prayer and thanking God for the preser-
vation of my life and keeping me in the
path of duty. I never used methods less
clean than God's sunbeams, and while
my enemies have used villainous meti-
ode to try to ruin me, my weapons have
been arrows of truth. If in a clean con-
test, with honorable opponents, I am de-
feated "at the finish," I am perfectly
content. But have you encountered a
man who is truthful, honest and God-
fearing, who expresses a belief in that
result, and can state good grounds for
that belief? At any rate, I expect my
next circular to be satisfactory to the
people of Florida.
I loaned more money than any indi-
vidual in this county, and sold more
goods than any merchant in this section,
Sin the largest store, and collected closer
(credit system), yet in 1896 received
every ballot in this town and precinct.
Can you name any other man in any
county in this State, or any other State,
' who received the ballot of every "gold-
bug" and every "silver bug?" When a
merchant I bought my goods through
S"drummers," and each year in New
1 ork, with the world for a market, I
bought through "drummers" to help
them. Are you surprised that they are
now helping me?
In 1895, though I paid on every con-
vict sentenced in the State after sen-
tence, I voted against reducing fees (for
s feeding prisoners) of Sheriffs, who
risked their lives, and in 1897 voted to
restore it. The Sheriffs sent a commit-
tee to me afterward and thanked me, and
e told me they would not charge me any
I increase. I told them they were entitled
t to and welcome to it.
n My next circular will impress the
voter, by absolute proof, that I am not
Only conscientious and unselfish, honest
and truthful, but incorruptible and God.
r fearing. In the unprecedentedly bitter
f fights on me since 1896, in return for my
n kindness, it has only been said that I
o had squandered three fortunes helping
` others. Now I ask Democrats to help
u me secure the salary attaching to the
n office of Railroad Commissioner. I would
y rather die between the plow handles, be-
d hind a blind ox, than do any opponent
n an injustice, so secure any office, and I
have always been prepared at any time
y to "die in my tracks in the discharge
i- of duty, and when I stand with one
1, foot in the grave snd the other on the
t brink (and it caving), I still intend to
r denounce wrong and uphold right. Yours
I truly, E. B. BAILEY.
d
I NINE-HOUR DAY IN SWITzEKLAND.
r- Geneva.-The nine-hour law has been
*t enforced since January 1. Workmen re-
n joice, and there are no complaints from
.s employers. The law provides that on
the days preceding Sundays and holidays


it work must be stopped no later than 56
n m. In the following industries only
re may the work be extended for an hour
Il or two on the days mentioned, but only
n during one or two weeks at a time:
Is Tailoring, shoemaking, canning, book-
s- binding, carbonated water and artificial
I manure.


12













February 24, 1908


THE BUN


ESSAYS IN COMMON TIME


ON STARTING


VwA. WAV-


Ever skate? It's fine. I didn't like it
at first, though. Most people don't,
either. The trouble about learning to
skate is the fact that it must be done in
a place that has a floor. If some one
could invent a skating rink without a
floor, he could make a fortune. The
floor is the ultimate destination of all
who are learning to skate. It is as inev-
itable as a boarbill. This, then, being
the case, one with skatatorial ambition
would naturally inquire ding the
most satisfactory way in which to fall.
I would say speakingn from experience)
that the best way to fall is to fall flat. I
might tell you some other way, but you
would not take my advice.
Skating is the finest exercise in the
world. It combines all the good points
of football, baseball, roulette and flinch.
Skating reduces the size of those suffer-
ing from a superfluity of adiposity, and
causes those who are thin to accumulate
flesh by the swelling of various parts of
the anatomy which come in contact with
the floor.
There is much difference between being
a spectator and a performer. Sometimes
a performer becomes a spectator-for
awhile. It is always best fur a spectator
to withdraw from active operations. I
know one temporary spectator who did
not withdraw, and he got kicked in the
spine seventeen times. This person now
does not approve of skating. It is funny
how narrow-minded some people are.
From the point of view of a spectator


proper, it would seem rather difficult to
learn to skate backward. Even a nov.
ice, however, finds this easy, sometimes
doing it entirely involuntari y.
Now, people have been seriously injured
by a chronic pursuit of this form of
amusement, but it is clearly the result of
lack of experience. It is always a mis-
take to learn anything. The thing to do
is to know how before you begin. Such
knowledge is easily obtainable by Christ-
ian Science methods. Make up your
mind while you are putting on your
skates that you know all about it and
when you get on the floor jump right in
and skate. You may fall; but then the
best of skaters fall, and you cannot hope
to be better than the best. If you are so
unfortunate as to collide with some one,
the other party to the collision will keep
you from falling if hlie knows how to
skate, and if ie (oes not, you can explain
to your friends that you fell because of
the ignorance of the other person. If
you see that you are going eo fall, grap
the nearest person firmly by the collar,
and you will fall together. If two pWople
fall, there is always a chance of you fall-
ing on top. The old theory that, unitedd
we stand, divided we fall," is reversed in
skating.
The writer of this article is an expert
skatist, and any questions which a reader
may care to ask will be cheerfully an-
swered.
All communications should be address-
ed to the Skating Editor, care The Sun.


Out in Kansas a man cut his throat
with a razor; therefore razors should be
abolished. In Oregon a man died of de
lirium tremens; therefore the distilling of
whisky should be prohibited. A despond-
ent lover in New York threw himself
from a ninth-story window and was
killed; therefore women and modern
buildings should be exterminated. An-
other man suicide by asphyxiation on
account of reverses in business; therefore
illuminating gas and commercialism ap-
pear as an impediment to Wman's prog-
ress. A woman was secretly placing in


her husband's coffee an advertised cure
for the whisky habit; in her anxiety to
speedily effect a cure she administered a
double dose, and he was taken to the
place where all good people must in time
go-the cemetery; therefore chemist and
medicines should be relegated to the rub
bish heap.
Thus it has been always and will for-
ever be. Were it possible to completely
eradicate all the evils contributing to
man's almost imperceptible degeneration
and final downfall, humanity in general
would be infinitely worse off.


Poor Queen of

Spain-To-Re
[Continued from Fifth Page]
their ears you may be sure. The same
"service" is performed by twelve gentle.
men in the opposite ante-room, that is
the one adjoining the side of the bed,
when Alfonso reposes. The chief watch-
ers, male and female, have keys to the
door leading to the King's and Queen s
joint bedroom, and it is not only their
privilege, but their duty to look in when-
ever they hear an unusual commotion.
Aside from the inner guards, a senti-.
nel watches every single door in the pal-
ace, while the Colonel of the Swiss Body
Guard makes the rounds once an hour, a
naked sword in his right, a bunch of
keys and a lantern in his left hand.


THE QUEEN'S BODYGUARD.


The Queen of Spain has, for ordinary
use, a bodyguard consisting of a bat-
talion of infantry, a battery and twenty-
five mounted men. This little army
watches over her safety when she drives
out, or promenades in the park, and she
never durst set her foot out of doors
without giving notice to the armed con-
tngent responsible for her welfare. If
her only child was dying, she would not
be allowed to leave the palace to go to
his bedside until her household troops
have been posted along the route her
carriage must take.


AT THE


BIRTH OF ROYAL CHIL-
DREN.


Delicacy must prevent a description
of the outrageous ceremonies which at-
tends the birth of royal children in the
Madrid palace, how the poor mother is
subjected to the impertinent gaze of
*hundreds of officials and nobles; how
the doors of the lying-in chamber must
be kept ajar, etc., A well penciled report
of the birth of the present King Alfon-
so must suffice.


BORN A KING.


The phrase "Born a King," is rather
frequently used, but it is a fact that


during tho last two or three centuries
only one sovereign really deserved the
title, namely Alfonso XIII., whose
mother, Marie Christina, gave birth to
him six months after his father's death.
At the critical hour hundreds of car-
riages were seen rushing to the palace,
and the ante-chambers to the Queen's
bedroom were filled with a motely
crowd of heriditary councillors, cour-
tiers, nobles, bishops, prelates, army
officers, ministers, parliamentarians,
relatives and friends, together with pla-
toons of llalbardiers, guards and gen-
darinme.
A minute, by the clock, after the child
was born, the Infantas Isabel presented
it stark naked to the prime minister,
the late agasta. Fearing that the babe
might catch cold, the midwife had
thrown a tiny lace shawl over his
shoulders, but the grand master of the
palaee tore it away and threw it on
the floor.
Sagasta looked the bit of humanity
over an(d then said in a loud voice: "The
Queen has borne a King-long live tne
l(ing." Then the words were repeated
by all present. Sagasta, for a minute or
two, held up the King, for all to see.
Then he returned the babe to the In-
fant Inhel, who brought him to his
mother.
%QUEEN WILIIELMINA MAI)D.
Thelo Ilague.-Queen Wilhelmina has
written a furious letter to the Minister
of War, saying that the army is guilty
of neglect of her royal person. "When
I called at the palace of my mother,
Queen Erma, the other day, the palace
guards were so busy playing card., or
otherwise amusing themselves, that they
absolutely paid no attention to my car-
riage. I came and went without salute
either from sentinels or the officer on
duty. The guards were not called out,
and no one but her Majesty's servants
took any notice of me."
As a consequence of the complaint, the
Minister fined the offending guardsmen
a mnionth's pay and sent their com-
mander to the Dutch West Indies "to be
eaten by tigers or die of malaria."


IIOTEL AWGAAR ST. AUGU6TINC, !KAk


Countess Wanda's
Palace Overran
By Go-Detweens
Countess Wands Lubienska of Vienna,
a noblewoman of twenty-two, was com-
plimented in court "for moral and phy-
si who had grossly insulted her, were sen-
tenced to long terms in Jail.
Countess Plays Policeman.-Countess
Wands, who ,though unmarried, lives
alone in her palace, repeatedly corn-


plained to the police that she was over-
run by go-betweens, who importuned her
by visits and letters to give rendezvous
to rich bankers and aristocrats. The po-
lice thereupon advised the young Coun-
tess, who is unusually pretty, to call a
policeman by phone the next time one
of these women approached her. In-
stead, the Countess took the law in her
own hands, arrested Lena Berger and
Baroness Ilka von Schick, and carried
them in triumph to the station house in
her auto. To the Judge she told the fol-
lowing story: One morning while she
was attended in her boudoir by her hair-
dresser and masseuse, Lena Brger sent


in her card. Though she did not know
the woman, she decided to receive her at
once. Lena said Baroness Sohick had
sent her to ask the Countess to call at 2
o'clock in the afternoon and meet a very
rich suitor.
The Countess, suppressing her indig-
nation, said she didn't know the Baron-
ess, and didn't care to meet any man not
properly introduced to her.
"Oh, there can be no question of pro-
prieties," said the woman, "the man I
speak of don't want to marry you."
Athletic Countess.-"I was so mad,"
said Countess Wanda, "that I grabbed
her and pushed her Into the bathroom
sad looked the door. 'You shall stay


there until I can take you to the sta-
tion house,' I said. At that moment
Baroness Schick was announced. Evi-
dently the two women acted in concert.
I received her in the saloon and she re-
peated the insulting offer. Meanwhile
my servant announced that the automo-
bile was ready, and I arrested the
Baroness, too. We packed them in the
auto and drove straightway to the sta-
tion."
The two women confessed that they
had made a mistake. They said they
did not know that Countess Wands was
rich in her own right, and noticing her
style of elaborate dress and equipage,
approached her.


18


OH EVILS










TE SUN1


490 M m___-__-- Nmbm


The Cjar's Spy
(Continued from Tenth Page)
suspicion fell %ipon me it would bring
upon me a fate worse than death. Re-
member, therefore, that my future is en-
tirely in your hands."
"I don't quite understand," I said,
rising and standing before her in the
fading twilight, while the rain drove
upon the old diamond window panes.
"But I ean only assure you that what-
ever oonfldenoe you repo ein me, I shall
never abuse, Mis Leitheourt."
"I know, I know I" she said quickly.
"I trust you in this matter implicitly.
I have come to you for many reasons,
chief of them being that if a second vic-
tim has fallen beneath the hand of the
assassin, it is, I know, a woman."
"A woman! Whom?"
"At present I cannot tell you. I must
first establish the true facts. If this
woman were really stricken down, then
her body lies concealed somewhere in the
vicinity. We must find it and bring
home the qrime to the guilty once."
"But if we succeed in finding it, could
we place our hand upon the assassin "
I asked, looking straight at her.
"If we find it, the crime would then
tell its own tale-it would convict the
person in whose hand I have seen that
fatal weapon," was her clear, bold an-
swer.
"Then you wish me to assist you in
this search, Miss Leithcourt?" I said,
wondering if her suspicions rested upon
that mysterious yachtsman, Philip
Hornby, the man to whom she was en-
Yes, I would beg of you to do your
utmost in secret to endeavor to discover
the body of the second victim. It is a
woman-of that I am certain. Find
her, and we shall then be able to bring
the crime home to the assassin."
"But my search may bring suspicion
upon me," I remarked. "It will be diffi-
cult to examine the wood without arous-
ing the curiosity of somebody-the
keeper or the police."
"I have already thought of that," she
said. "I will pretend to-morrow to lose
this watch-bracelet in the wood," and
she held up her slim wrist to show me
the little enameled watch set in her
bracelet. "Then you and I will search
for it diligently, and the police will
never suspect the real reason of our in-
vestigation. To-morrow I shall write to
you telling you about my loss, and you
will come over to Rannoch and offer to
help me."
I was silent for a moment.
"Is Mr. Woodroffe back at the castle 1
I heard lie was to return to-day."
"No. I had' a letter from him from
Bordeaux a week ago. He is still on
the .Continent. I believe, indeed, he has
gene to Russia, where he sometimes has
business "
"I asked you the question, Mis
Muriel, because 1 thought if Mr. Wood
roffe were here, he might object to oui
searching in company," I explained
smiling.
Her cheeks flushed slightly, as though
confused at my reference to her engage
ment, and she said mischievously:
"I don't see why he should object ii
the least. If you are good enough to
assist me to search for my bracelet, hI
surely ought to be much obliged to you.'
It was on the tip of my tongue to ex
plain to that dark-eyed, handsome gir
the eirqumstances in which I had me
her lov r on the sunny Mediterraneai
shore, yet prudence forbade me to refe
to the mater, and I at once gladly ac
tei)ted her invitation to investigate th
curious disappearance of the body o
poor Olinto's fellow-victim.
What secret knowledge could be poc
seaed by that smart, handsome girl b
fore me That her suspicions were in th
right direction I felt confident, yet if th
dead woman had been removed and hid
den by the assassin it must have beel
after the discovery made by me. Th
fellow must have actually dared to re
turn to the spot and carry off the vk
tim. Yet if he had actually done tha<
why did he allow the corpse of the Ital


ian to remain and await dliscovery? H
might perhaps have been disturbed an
compelled to make good his escape.
**f the woman was really removed th
assassin must surely have had some as
ist*wce," I pointed out. "He could nol
Ivae carried the body very far unaided.
- 8e greed with me, but expressed


- (CONTINUED NEXT WEEK.)
ra (CONTINUED NEXT 11WEEK.)


W ANTED-Lady Solicitors for Popular Fla.
voting Extract. and P'rfiu'e. liberall
salary to right parties. E. MOULIE,.nearOstrich 1
arm,.Jacksonville. Fla._
W ANTED-Orange .loumsoms on twigs and
loose petals. Write for inatnict on, asuld
p rie to MOULIE. Perfumer, near (ttrich
Fan, Jacklonvlllo. Fla.


belief that the double crime had been
committed alone and unaided.
"Have you an idea as to the motive ?"
I asked her, eager to hear her reply.
"Well," she answered nesitatingly, "if
the woman has fallen a victim, the mo-
tive will become plain; but if not, then
the matter must remain a complete mys-
tery."
7You tell me, Miss Muriel, that you
suspect the truth, and yet you deny all
knowledge of the murdered manl" I ex-
claimed in a tone of slight reproach.
"Until we have cleared up the mys-
tery of the woman I can say nothing,"
was her answer. "I can only tell you,
Mr. Gregg, tha if what I suspect is true,
then the affair will be found to be one of
the strangest, most startling and most
ingenious plots ever devised by one man
against the life of another."
"Then a man is the assassin, you
think?" I exclaimed quickly.
"I believe so. But even of that I am
not at all sure. We must first find the
woman."
She seemed so positive that a woman
had also fallen beneath that deadly
miserieordia that I fell to wondering
whether she, like myself, had discov-
ered the body, and was therefore certain
that a second crime had been committed.
But I did not seek to question her fur-
ther, lest her own suspicions might be-
come aroused. My own policy was to
remain silent and to wait. The woman
sitting before me was herself a mystery.
Then, when the rain had abated, I told
Davis to send her trap a little way up
the highroad, so that my aunt and uncle
should not see her departing; and after
helping her on with her loose driving-
coat, we left by one of the servants' en-
trances, and I saw her into her high
dog-cart and' stood bareheaded in the
muddy highroad as she drove away into
the gloom.
Rannoch Wood was already in its gold-
en-brown glory of autumn, and as I
stood with Muriel Leithcourt on the edge
of it, near the spot where Olinto Santini
had fallen, the morning sun was shining
in a cloudless sky.
True to her promise, she had sent me
a note by one of the grooms asking me
to help her search for her bracelet, and
I had driven over at once to Rannoch
and found her alone awaiting me. The
shooting party had gone over to a dis-
tant part of the estate, therefore we
were able to stroll together up the hill
and commence our investigations with-
out let or hindrance. She was sensibly
) dressed in a short tweed skirt, high
shooting boots, and a tam-o'-shanter hat,
while I also had on an old shooting suit
I and carried a thick serviceable stick
with which I could prod likely spots.
On arrival at the wood I asked her
opinion which was the most,,likely cor-
I ner, but she replied: ,
"I know so little of this place, Mr.
Greg. You have known itf for years,
While this is only my, first season here,"
"Very well," I answered. "Lot us
r place ourselves in the position of the
, murderer, who probably knew the wood
and wished to conceal a body in the vi-
Scinity without risk of conveying it far'.
* On this, the left side, the w mod has'bten
thinned out for nearly half a mile, anl
n therefore affords but little cover, wld,
0 here, to the right, it slopes down gently
, to the valley and is very,, thick a~id
partly impenetrable. There, can there-
- fore have been no two courses open to
1 him. He would look for a likely p'as
t to the right. Let us start here. and first
n take a small circle, examining every
r bush carefully. The body may hav~
Seasilly been pushed in beneath a thi,'kt
e and well escape observation."
f And Ho together, after taking nr
hearings, we startled off, working our
' way into the thick undergrowth, wtut-
'- ing with our sticks, and making minute.
e examination of every bush or ha') of
e dead leaves. In parts, the great spir.x,1-
L- ing trees shut out the lisht. rendering
n our investigations very difficult; hut wt
e kept on, my compamnion advanemin with
" an eagerness which showed that thi fac:
' of the woman's body being there aus to
t, mere surmise. .


Take Fairfield Cars


Two Performances Daily


-i
PARTIAL PRICE' LIST OF

Wines, Whiskies, Beer and Malt


MIxUM PRPAID
P'ull qurtl Moms 4 Q t ItQof
Hunting Club Rye...............2 65 $4 00 $7 00
Nelson County Rye ....... 2 W 4 25 7 50
Monogram Rye .................. 3 4 50 8 00
lHanne's "44" Rye.................... 75 5 00 9 50
Social Drops....................... 4 r) 6.50 1200
Malt Whiskey.................. 3 75 5 00 9
Pach Brandly.....................3 7.5 h r NI N 9 o
Apple Brandy..................... 3 75 500 9 0
Holland Gin ....................... 2 sO 4 2" 7 2
Geneva Gin .................... 3 75 5 00 9 50
North Carolina Corn.......... 2 (1 4 00 7 00
Mountain Corn.................... 3 75 600 9 50
Jamaica Rum ................... 2 ) 4 25 7 25
Medford Rum............. ... 7.5 5w 9 0
Grape Brandy.................... 3 7 5 00 9 50
Kint of Kentucky Itourlonm 3 75 5 00 9 50
AMWtMMt lm ea man f stoam i *


BULK WoO--jM NF--WOT PEPAD
Rye, Gon, Corn, good grade...................... 1 60
Rye, Gin, Corn, Rum, fine quality................. 2 00
Rye, Gin, Corn Rum, best for the money...... 2 50
"44 Rye, Peach and Apple Brandy, mellow.
ed by age.................................................. 3 00
Victoria Rye, Social Drops Rye, medicinal
quality ................................................. 4 00
LIMP ST. LV Pr n
Falstaff Beer .................................................. 1 25
Extra Pale ..................................................... 1 10
Standard ...................................................... 1 00
Malt Extact, dark ......................................... 1 10
Coburger, imported.....................................2 00
Guinneus Stout, pints ................................. 2 25
PrMaw h f M-sla aplats


w.12461258. HANNE BROS.
W. Adams St.


Jacksonville
.Fla.


I~


February 24, 190c


Florida East Coast Hotel Company

HOTEL PONCE DE LEON HOTEL ROYAL POINCIANA
SL Auuxne Pal sm h, en Lake Wertl
Now open Now open
Closea Saturday, April 7, 190M1 Closes Monday, April 2, IO)

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Closs Monlay, April 9!, IKVX Closes Monday, April 2, 1006

HOTEL THE BREAKERS HOTEL THE CONTINENTAL
Pa m IM.tbysm.l e IMenSa ft"
Now open Opens Thurmlay, March 1, 1908
Cho Saturilay, April 7, I. 1 Closes (luring August

L-4


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JAGKSONVILLE'S ONLY
AMUSEMENT PLAGE

A Novel, Instructive, ntertaining Feature. A Lar8e
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Seen in Action Morning and Evening


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IN ADDITION WE PRESENT
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*









February 24, 1906


TH SUN~


0 0 0


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Jacksonville's finest
and florida's Largest
and Best Year-Round


Hotel


. DODGE & GULLINS
Owners and Managers


-
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JOSEPH ZAPF a CO.
AKmUOLsm ILA


Sole Distributors of the Celebrated
ANHIUSIR-BUISCH KRS, King of All
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If you want Pure and Reliable Goods, if you want
the Best in Every Resect, call on us.

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HARWARE, ELI.A M USHL
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FOSTER'S Bay &Julia

N.W. Cor. NEW CLYDE


Agricultural Department
Conducted by W. e. Pabor


A recent bulletin issued by the De-
partment of Commerce and Labor is de-
voted to the cattle industry in Cuba,
showing its climatic and other advan-
tages and the inducement for good
financial returns for American invest-
ors in cattle ranches.
It is a document that might well be
sent out by the Cuban authorities who,
no doubt, are extremely grateful for
such kindly interest in the welfare of
the island by the American Government.
The shipment of cattle from Florida,
especially from the lower counties, Is
large, and has increased since the late
unpleasantness to such an extent as to
make the business an important one,
hence, this bulletin should be in the
hands of every cattle-raiser. A copy can
be had by any one by addressing the
secretary of Agriculture at Washing-
ton, asking for No. 2420, issue of Dec.
1, of the Consular and Trade Reports.
Before the Cuban war there were
nearly two and a half million head in
the pastures of the island. The latest
report now gives less than two million,
appraised at about $25 per head. The
province of Camaguey is said to be one
vast pasture land that can be leased
at from 50 cents to $1 per acre, accord-
ing to the nature of the grasses grow-
ing on the tracts, and the facilities for
water; guinea or pavana grasses com-
mand the highest rates, as they give
the best results. It might be said, in
passing, that this guinea grass is a spe-
cies of sorghum, thrives well in Florida
and is worthy of more attention than is
given it by our farmers. The sucrose in
it has high fattening qualities. The pa-
vana grass does best on wet lands, is
more prolific, sending out new roots
from the stem wherever it comes in con-
tact with the soil. These two named
grasses are natives of South and Cen-
tral America.
The indigenous grasses are a poor
Quality and do not fatten stock welt. In
this regard, they are like our own native
grasses, good when the growth is young
and tender. Some authorities state that
one acre will fatten a steer, but expe-
rienced cattlemen do not verify this.
Ten head of cattle, it is computed, will
easily find sufficient pasture on a cab-
alleria (30 acres) and be kept fat the
year round. The reader will note the
vast difference, in this respect, between
Cuba and Florida. Here twenty acres
to the head will hardly get an animal
ready for the market.
The cheapness with which a cattle
ranch can be carried on is commented
on. Labor, $22 per month; overseers,
$55 per month, with board. Scrub and
cacti often serve as fences and one rider
can take care of these enclosing a typ-
ical Cuban ranch of 1,000 acres.
As horses are scarce on the island,
oxen are the main reliance for draft
animals. The natives do not regard with
favor those coming from the States, but
look to Central and South America for
their supply, which is, however, of an
inferior quality. A good yoke of oxen
will bring $150 for labor use, while not
commanding more than one half as much
for beef.
The coast districts of Texas and Flor-
ina, in connection with Mexico, Jamaica,
Porto Rico, Venezuela and Colombia,
furnish most of the imported stock.
As yet but little attention is paid to
selection of breeds, though it is begin-
ning to be realized by the Spanish and
Cuban cattle" men that better stock
should be had. It is said that, at pres-
ent, Texas sens the best American
cattle to the island; those from the fever
districts, away from the coast border,
are shunned. Animals that have been
raised near salt water are said to be
better adapted to the island pastures
than those raised other places.
The report speaks highly of Florida
stock; "cattle fatten quicker than any
other of those imported. In five months'
time they are ready for the market.
Accessibility to the Cuban market
has increased the values of the Florida
stock over one hundred per cent."
Certain classes of cattle are admitted
free of duty. In this free list are placed


bulls for breeding pu poes of their best
races, such as Jeey, Guernsey, Durham
and Hereford. Bulls f Florida, weigb


more than 500 pounds, pay $1 per head;
those from Honduras, over 600 lbs, $5;
those from Mexico over 700 $7. Cattle
from any section not reaching the above
named weights, $2 per head.
As to diseases, Cuba lies within the
Texas fever zone, and it prevails all
over the island. Black leg, the screw
worm, the blowfly are also to be named
as sources of annoyance and some loss.
But the "cattle tick" is the most for-
midable enemy known to the trade.
Newly imported and animals in a poor
condition are especially liable to this
pest. The tick and Texas fever go to-
gether, and those interested in the in-
dustry are urging the Government to
take measures to rid the country of the
pest which bids fair to take full pos-
session of the pastures as is reported to
be the case in Jamaica.
Mr. Janes, the writer of the report,
who is Secretary of Legation at Havana,
concludes it as follows:
"Cattle raising in Cuba affords many
inducements to the investor. It should
be noted in the outset, however, that the
rancher makes nothing on the 'first
cost' of the cattle, the only profit be-
ing on what is added to the weight of
the animal by feeding. This is partic-
ularly true for the months of July, Au-
gust, September, and October, when fat
cattle are more plentiful. During the
rest of the year feeders usually count
on a profit of one-fourth of a cent per
pound over and above what is made on
the -increase in weight.. A natural in-
crease in the herd of from 75 to 80 per
cent annually can be reckoned.
"Summing up the whole situation,
and taking a very conservative view of
the many peculiar advantages that Cu-
ban conditions offer, 10 to 15 per cent
can always be assured the investor on
capital placed in steers and calves, and
a profit of 20 and 25 per cent is not an
unreasonable return realized from a well
handled ranch."

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Reference, National Bank of Jacksonville

H. ROBINSON, Pros. H. OAILLARD. Cashier
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F W. HOWlT, VIm.P-lMML
m l P. Amm% heow.
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Capal nd SurplusA 5W000.00.



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Resources over s,500000.00



YOM ACUNT


CHASE.
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15









EIGHT


CHOICE


LOCATIONS


HOGAN STREET
Half lot close in, $2,500. Can sell thirty-five feet for $1,800


DUVAL STREET
Near Liberty, choice location, size 40x105, a bargain at $2,000


MONROE STREET
Between Maip and Laura, lot 87x105, price $4,000


ADAMS STREET
Near Market, full half lot, $3,500


MONROE STREET
Half lot near Newnan, faces south, price $3,500


ASHLEY
Between Main and Laura,


STREET
choice half lot for $4,000


HOGAN STREET
Near Windsor Hotel, full corner lot, $8,000


CHURCH STREET
Half lot near Market, facing south, $3,150


If these locations do not suit you, let us know
as we have them in all parts of the city.........


GCHRISTIE


DYAL-UPCHURCH BUILDING


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CHR ST E


For a Home in City Proper


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