Group Title: sun.
Title: The sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075914/00011
 Material Information
Title: The sun
Uniform Title: sun
Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sun Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: January 20, 1906
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tallahassee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Leon County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Leon -- Tallahassee
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.451667 x -84.268533 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 18, 1905)-v. 3, no. 47 (Sept. 12, 1908).
Numbering Peculiarities: Published at Tallahassee, Fla., June 23-Sept. 12, 1908.
General Note: Claude L'Engle, editor.
General Note: "If it's right, we are for it."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075914
Volume ID: VID00011
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33400104
lccn - sn 95047216
 Related Items
Other version: Morning sun (Tallahassee, Fla.)
Succeeded by: Dixie (Jacksonville, Fla.)

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Full Text




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Volume 1-No. 10


JAGKSONVILL, FLORIDA, JANUARY 20, 1906


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ORMOND-D YTONA


BEACH


RACES


Novel Features for the Florida Meet Next Week-Two-Milep-a-
Minute Cars Will Have the Calls on the Famous Florida Beach


.-iy TEDDY


A special to THE SUN by its New York representative says:
The official announcement of the Omnond-Daytona entries which have just
been made have created great interest.
Henry Ford, Alfred 0. Vanderbilt, Waiter Christie, F. E. Stanley, C. A. Coey,
R. E. Olds and A. L. Keell are the only Americans who have had sportsmanship
and patriotism enough to enter the lists against the crack Europeans.
The chief cause of complaint is not that owners and makers of racing cars
failed to come forth In their full strength; but that the high-powered touring care
of proven speed are absent from the touring car events, and especially the Ameri-
can thirty-mile championship. In the last named contest there was a chance for
our big touring cars to show their paces, yet only three cars, all racing machine.,
wore nominated.
The entries for the Ormond-Daytona races are as follows:
100-mile international race for the Minneapolis $2,000 trophy-George W.
Young, New York; C. A. Coey, Chicago; 8. F. Edge, London; Hollander & Tanga-
man, New York (two cars); J. R. Harding, Boston, Alfred G. Vanderbilt, New
York; Walter Christie, Napier Motor Company, Boston; English Daimier Corh
pany, New York; A. Darracq & Co., Paris (two cars); A. L. Guiness, London.
One-mile international race for the Sir Thomas R. Dewar trophy-A. P
Guiness, Dublin; A. Darracq & Co., Paris; Alfred G. Vanderbilt, Ford Mort0r


One-mile middleweight championship (gasoline)-Hollander & Tangeman, A.
Darracq & Cb., Roe Motor Car Compiny, Wayne Automobile Company..
Five-mile middleweight championship (gasoline)-Same entries -as in one-
mile championship.
Ten-mile middleweight championship (all powers) -Hollander & Tangeman,
Stanley Motor Car Company, A. Darracq & Co.
Ten-mile open handicap-George W. Young, Hollander & Tangeman, J. R.
Harding, English Daimler Company, Hollander & Tangeman, Wayne Automobile
Company, Napier Motor Company, Reo Motor Car Company, Hollander & Tange-
man.
Fifteen-mile price handicap foir American touring cars, fully equipped-Stan-
ley Motor Car Company, Wayne Automobile Company, J. E. Bristol, Brooklyn;
Stanley Motor Car Company.
Thirty-mile free-for-all championship of American-built cars-Stanley Motor
Car Company, Alfred G. Vanderbift, Walter Christie.
Word has been received in New York that S. F. Edge, the English automo-
bilist, has decided to come over for the Ormond-Daytona meet, and his entry has
been made for twelve races during the tournament. Clifford Earp, his racing
partner, who will also drive a six-cylinder Napier, is now at Ormond, and says
that Hemery, the winner of the Vanderbilt cup race, and Jenatzy, the Mercedes


Janetay, In his 110 H.-P. Mercedes. lHemnry, in his Darracq.


Car Company, Holla4e,~A Tangeman (two cars); S. E. Edae. London; Stanley
Motor Car Company, Boeton, and George W. Young.
Two-mile-a-minute race-Alfred G. Vanderbilt, Walter Christie, A. Darrneq
& Co., A. L. Guineas, Ford Motor Company, Hollander & Tangeman (two cars),
Sttnley Mutor Car Company, A. C. Coey'and George W. Young.
Five-mile open championship race-Hollander & Tangeman (two cars), S.
F. Edge, Stanley Motor Car Company, A. L Guineas, A. Darrarq & Co., Alfred
G. Vanderbilt and George W. Young.
Ten-mile open championship race--Sane as in five-mile race.
Fifteen-mile open championship race-4s. F. Edge, Hollander & Tangemnun
(two cars); A. L. Guiness, A. Darracq & Co. (two cars), Walter Christie, Alfred
G. Vanderbilt and George W. Young.
On'e-mile heavyweight championship race (gasoline)--Hollander & Tango-
man (two ears), G. W. Young, Alfred G. Vanderbilt, Walter Christie, A. Darracq
A o., A. L. Guines, J. R. Harding and S. F. Edge.
Five-mile heavyweight championship (gasoline)-S. F. Edge, J. R. Harding,
A. L. Guness, Hollnder & Tangeman, A. Darraca & Co., Walter Christie, Alfrel
G. Vanderbilt, Hollander & Tangeman, George W. Young.
Ten.mile heavyweight chamn onship (all powers)-George W. Young, Hol-
landr T s Alfred G. Vanderilt, Napier Motor Company, A. Iarracq
A. al a Lnuis, Hollander & Tangeman, J. R Harding, Stanley Motor Car
Compap ILI. 3r


driver, will Ioth come over for the carnival of speed on the wave-washed Florida
coast.
The numerous reservations mnde Iy railroads running from New York and
from tlie \et to Florida. indicate lth't the attendance at the automobile tourna-
ment will be far greater 'than ever before.
It iscf intere-t to note that a party of Detroit automobilints, including the
offlIer. of the Packard and Ford Motor Car Com anies, with their families, have
res,,rv(d one entire eur on the train that leaves New York next Sunday morning
for Florida, via the Seaboard Air Line.
A. I. Kull, president of the Wayne Automobile Company of New York, has
secured a special car in which he and a party of friends will not only make the
trip to Ormond and return, but will also make it their home while in Florida.

ORMOND-BY-THE-SEA, January 13, 1906.
Ormond's official observance on the occasion of its fourth annual automobile
season, January 22 to 28 inclusive, is about to be made, and the season offers out
of ordinary -attractions, there being no onissioni of opportune inducements to the
opulent auto enthusiast to bring his machine to this delightful winter resort, where
the oceanside speedway and race course can not be overrated and where ozone-
laden breeses from Old Neptune's aqueous domain so ordinarily prevail, to all of
which Ormond owes its outre and original odds.


- #4 ~


CLAUDE L'ENOLE
Editor


A u m O mLY wTUN A MU wI m t oW, Pmat mm PWLX nmA, n IT m MilMY. AW 11 Wes FOTH STm JMi.ms, fNAm
Voune I-No. 10 ^ JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, JANUARY 20, 1906 5 Cents per Copy, $1 per Year
AppleUtion made at the Poet Office in JacksonvUle, Fla, for admimion to the mails u eoond-ola matter


IF IT'S RIOHT, WE ARE FOR I


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tary 20, 1906


THE SUN


Nature Is unceasingly smoothing out the beach more and more as if she is
stermined that each caress of wave after wave on the shore is intended to keep
Sperfection what experts have proclaimed the superstructure in automobile rawce
ack requirements. The restlessness of the snow-caplxl surf as it dashes against
ie hardened sand might almost be construed as an Indlation of impatience that
very automobilist is not here to take a'dvamtage of the treat in store for thlin.
However there is no lack of machines here, and daily the idler on the IaIchI
ew automobiles whirring by at regulation speed to and from Ormond. The ap-
*oach to the beach, through the deep cut in the scrub palmetto embankment, "is
1 attractive downgrade curve. Thus coming to face the ocean, its energy and
rce seem to riuih toward one and give the vim that makes the desire to race at
lest speed northward or southward along the extremely inviting hard yet sufll-
ently flexible beach.


mious all over the world. lie is here to drive the fast machine of the Napier
Motor Company.
The advance men are beginning to arrive and the different automobile man-
ufacturers an sealding their rnprtwntativws who are to take part in the raus- and
who are getting the mat'hihum ready for trial seeds on the beach this corning week
so as to get tihe machines in the best condition.
J. C. Conway of Brooklyn, N. Y., is here with his tine Pope-Toledo machine,
and he is accompanied by his chatfeur.
During the early part of the week a party of fifty from Ohio spent several days
at the IHotel Ormond while en route to Cuba.
Mrs. A. B. Beal of Lynn, Mass., a regular patron at the (Ormond, and Cham.
E. Clark, also of Lynn, another regular, are at the Hotel Ormond. On their ar-
rival they received a welcome by their inany friends here,


L &


Foxall Keene, in his 110 H.-P. Mercedes.


The Hotel Ormond, with its first-class accommodations for six hundred pa-
ns, is well prepared to handle the throngs which will begin to gather this week,
r from now on the many reservations made will be taken up, an unusually large
umber of patrons coming down in parties this season for the races. Since tlhe
otel Ormond was enlarged two years ago its capacity has been continuously
xed. In connection with the hotel there is conducted the picturetmiuely situattn!t
nd attractive Bretton Inn on the beach with ample accommodations for ninety
atrons.
Ormond and its vicinity abounds in magnificent roadways and driveways, and
he season is always memorable for its costly automobiles and stylish turnouts and1
carriages to be seen in almost constant procession and parade. This season, tlie
work on road building during the past nine months in the county makes it possi-
ble to enjoy a. continuous twenty-milo drive southward to New Smyrna along the
western shore of the Indian river. Nowhere in the State can a more deliigtful or
attractive ever-varying or captivating driveway be found. Especially leautifil is
the stretch of curves in and out through the bayous of Turnbull bay and Howse lay,
south of Daytona, where tropical growth and verdure can le seen in a prolific tnd
impressive display, only such as nature makes in her mo:t generous inoodis. It is
t driveway which will rival the beautiful and invigorating beach course.
On account of the heavy and increasing demands made each Haseison on the
livery, the hotel management, with its usual foresight and interest in thle comfort
its patrons acid of the traveling public, has provided for thie installation, main-
tenance and operation of a dozen autos for public use.
Thie bookings at the Hotel Ornond are larger than ever and in every wiy the
season ahead promises to be magnificent. Tile hotel continues under tie able
management of Anderson and Price, who manage tile Mt. Washington andl mito
thie Mt. Pleasant hotels at Bretton Woiods, N. II. The traveling public, and Flor-
ida tourists gill be pleased to know that D). J. Trudeu luhas returned us head clerk,
a position he has filled most admirably and successfully for many w.,sN;ans past.
Swift's Orrch'tra of Boston renders several programs of music daily, and there


Landa' In the flat.
Mr. iiiad Mrs. K. 1. IBellman of Madison, N. J., and their son, Master Don-
ald, have arrived and have hluad the hldsomne Pan-American auto sent here.
Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Hathaway of Boston, regulars to Florida for the past fif-
teen seasons, have 'coni early, as Is their custom and will remain late. Mr.
I lathaway is an enthiusia stic autoist, and has his valuable Stanley machine here.
C. \\ lhodes of New York City is here on his first visit, and will sOind tilhe
entire month of January.
S. 4 Davison land IMr. and Mrs. .. U. laml1per of Lynn, Maws., are here to
stqy tih' ason. Tie ll amperi are enjoying the beach ,lco urs and thile many at-
tractive hard roads, as they have brought the Peerless machine iouth.
Mrs. K. W. Smith and maid of Lou isville, Ky., and also V. W. Dennis of the
sam1" city are among the regulars who have already arrived.
Mr. andl Mrs. A. T'. Patterson of Montrail, Canada, andl their daughter, who
spent last winter season abroad, ialsoi received a happy wel'cmne. They will he
here all season.
Mrs. Thomas Newbold of New York City las come for a long stay this season,
this being i r fourth visit to Ormond.
Prof. ('liihrl. K. Inhimilton of New York City, of "kite fanme," has arrived, and
is having a marvelous kite cointruAted of light and strong buinb oo Imls, held
together with heavy galvaniwd wire., The framework will it' covered with can-
vas, anid tihe kite is to Iw ready in timet for the week of the rae.4.


Walter GClfford-Carp, in the Napier.


are already several hundred patrons on hand to enjoy the splendid selections, clas-
sical and popular.
The arage, which accommodates sixty large machines, in in charge of I. A.
Lamont.
F. E. Stanley of Newton Maps., where lie manufactures a steam automobile,
has wired that three cars and men are on the way to the Ormnnond-D)aytonia beach.
Among the arrivals today are Mr. and Mrs. W. Clifford-Earp of London. Mr.
Clifford-Earp has made records as a chaffeur and racer that have made him fa-


Walter Christie, In his Christie Gar.


Professor Hamilton will get into the kite and it will be towed along the beach
by tin automobile, the kite rising from the sands and beginning to soar. As noon
am it has the needed momentum and play of rope, it will he cut leone from the car
and it i expected will ascend to a height of 2,500 feet, and will be suplendled
over the city of Daytona.
From the kite Professor Hamilton will display records in a novel manner.
The construction of this kite-built on thi plan of the aeroplane--is attracting
the greatest attention of the many visitors parent ,


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attempt was ma in St. Peters.
the Coran Minister of War.


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Peking say that the Chinese author-
erushlau the boyoott on American


Sla"s 'prW di. *' ..
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Ai aiaital dividend 'of 10 per eiqt was declared
at the aumting this week of the directors of the
Florida Ostrich Farm.
Sud'tpsr, at lavonna 4 d lded that Greene
and Gyamor must he trl$ upon a consolidation of the
indictments against them.


Architect H. J. Klutho of this city was, at Talla-
hassee this week, and submitted for inspection and
approval the plans and estimates for the Governor's
mansion.
The American cigarmakers at Key Wet have gone
to work. Bight of the strikers of the Oban union,
who had made threats, were ordered to leave the-city,
and they sailed for Cuba. .
Tuesday of this week vwa made mem6table Ina
Fa y the election, on first ballot, of M. Clement
Armtan Flliere as Presideat of that ,public, by
the National Assembly, which met at Vetsilles.
Another day's polling in Great Britain showed
a obatinunce of the Liberal victories lthe new Gov-
erament and the Labor party together obtained sixty-
two out of seventy-six seats, the Liberal gains being
forty-to and the Labor' gains seven. LordHugh
OsCel was defeated.
The torpedo flotilla arrived at St. Augustine
j a b t.eain several days. The boats of the
d~ -the eomamanders are: Porter, in command
I Lisutemmt Willis McDowell; Dupont, Lieutenant
J. IL Toab; Blakeley, Lieutenant Charles E. Court-
My, Nihlsae, Liutemant W. S. Miller; Rodgers,
..&teUi A. T. Johnson. The torpedo boats while
oft JaiMville were visited by hundreds.


Wednesday of this week la various motions of
the country the 200th anniversary of the birth of
Benjamin Franklin was celebrated.
M. Y. Patrick of Jtokson County, who was on
trial before the United States Court at TensMaola
on the charge of peonage, was a uitted by the jury.
' No orders have, yet lIeen ten-to M. Taigty, the
French iApree Mtatlve at Carac,' to dmandti his
passport, an i Flidlie.dimtlin W' ell he" hope that
Venesuela will seek to keak. terms.
A. J."balf6ut, leadi-'of the 'Unrotlst party and
former Prime Minster, has bee defeated; in the'elee;
tion for member of Parliament for the East Division
of Manchester by T. G. Horridge, Liberal and Free
Trader. The Liberal majority was 1,980.


The prosecution of Torqnto plumbers individually
for conspiracy and combination in restrain of trade,
resulted in 134 men pleading guilty. The fines
amounted to $10,600. .
Yesterday, the anniversary of the birthday of
Robert Edward Lee, was befittingly observed through-
out the South, Florida being to the fore in its tribute
of honor to the memory of the South's beloved gen-
eral.
The Grand Lodge, F. & A. M., met in annual ses-
sion this week in this -city. The Mystic Shrinears
assembled Friday night and had their usual big time.
Action on the erotica of a new Masonic building in
this city was deferred until next year.
There has been delay pf action on the Hepburn
railway rate bill by the House committee on Inter-
tate and foreign commerce. As the real battle is to
be fought in the Senate, but little interest is taken
as to what will be done with the bill in the House.
Governor Higgins ot New York at Albany, through
his legal adviser, issued a memorandum asking for
"definite charges by responsible parties" against cer-
tain State departments, against which many charges
have recently been made. The Legislature had no
right to investigate executive public officials, it was
stated.


January 20 J g


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OF


Prof..W. M. Wolfe
a sensation in Mormon
the Mormon faith and
with Brigham College,
theology.


LAe

of Logan, Utah, has : ted
circles, a he has re n'ed
has severed his con lion
where he was profec of


AdvMirses fro
itles, 4" sklowl


At Gainesville information has been received of
the destruction by fire, at Fort Fannin, of the saiw-
mill, commissary and warehouse owned by I. L.
Tison, the loss amounting to about $12,000. iMr.
Tison is said to be a heavy loser, as he carried IlIt
a small amount of insurance. The plant wai ,i,'
of the finest located along the Suwannee river.
Macedonia is now considered internationalil',l
territory almost entirely separated from the Turkili
empire. The French Government has issued a vl-
uminous Yellow Book on Macedonian affairs. sh-,
ing that France pursued a policy of conciliating Ohr
conflicting interests represented by the Russin.- A".
trian group as against the liberal Powers, (;Gilv
Britain, Italy and France.
At the meeting of the Georgia and Florida L'
mill Association, held in Brunswick last Tu',l.a;. :1
committee of nine was appointed to meet FebrI.i I
with the railroad representatives at Old Point ( ,'
fort and consider the demand that the compl.i -
equip cars with movable stakes and binders. I '
association will endeavor to have a closer alliliti
as to grading, inspection and prices.
Yew York is in danger of an epidemic of sn' t
fever from an infected dairy near Binghamton.
cording to advices received from the State Boi I
Health at Albany. The State Board has been ,
fled by Health Officer Hix of inghtmton that
from the infected dairy has already been shipr
New York. How long this has been going on
yet known, nor by what road it iS being deliv
Women of the Municipal League at Ne ,
City have indorsed Lewis tuyvesant Ch;',
charge of "persecution and not prosecution"
District Attorney's office by their decision t ">llk
a campaign against irregularities in the adnint-'
ing of justice. Mr. Chanler, a lawyer, recently '
in contempt of court, made radical assertions i n
address before the league at the City Club. le -
indict.ents were returned on insuafient causO.
maintan e4 that when the District Attorney di',
a conviction he picked his jury and his Judge. I
nocent people, he declared, were urged to plead gil
because of the lighter sentence that would foil'
Mrs. Rosalie Loew Whitney proposed an appeal
the Bar Association. Miss Margaret L. Chan r
president of the league.


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THE SUN


A. L. Cuesta, head of the cigar manufanoi,,rin
firm of Cuesta, Rey & Co. of Tampa, estimated ,,ht
the clear Havana cigar factories of Tampa will I1r11
out two hundred and thirty. million igars this tii .
whether the Cuban crop is good or bad.
All the delegates of the Powers have reaclh e ',
geoiras and the conference will begin its s ,
today There are no signal of tension, and it is
that 'ermany will oppose only an internntii.,I
guarantee of the predAminance of any' one Power
Morooeq.
The motion of the attorneys for Mrs. Helen \\i!
mans Post, who made motion to quash indictitint
No. 176 returned against their client, was denied ii,,
Judge Aleek Boarman in the United States Cirun,
Court. The celebrated case will come up for trial
Monday next.
One of the German delegates to the conference ;it
Algeciras expressed the opinion that the session,
would last two months, and that the longer tli,.
lasted the better would be the results obtained. Ru.
sian officials seem convinced that the future of Mo
rooco will be settled without serious, difficulty.
French bankers have decided to make a short-tim
advance of $50,000,000 to Russia at 5 1-2 per cent
interest, plus 2 per cent commission, the loan to b16
guaranteed by the Russian state railroads and to
be reimbursed from the proceeds of the proposed new
loan should the latter be floated within a year.
Secretary Root's inquiries have brought out th6it
the delegates chosen for the Morocco conference are'
substantially agreed on the principles of the "open
door" and equal trade privileges. The rub will coint
over the question of whether the Powers will under-
take to police Morocco's frontier or let France do it.
The Vatican has abandoned, for the. moment, tlie
idea of presenting to- the Morocco conference nt Al-
geciras a proposition for religious liberty in Morovo,.
. It fears a repetition of what happened in the Madrid
conference of 1880, when a similar proposition wis
not approved because it was regarded as outside tihe
business of the conference.


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January 20, 1906


THE SN


S.VMMAR Y

t.l. John Trice and -on. E. M. Hendry of Tampa
have been to Fort Myers, where they assisted in the
organization of the Bank of Fort Myers. The new
bank has $50000 capital, and among its stockholders
and officers an the leading business men of Lee
County. Colonel Trice is president, H. E. Heitman,
vice-president; and J. E. Foxworthy, cashier. Mr.
Hendary is a stockholder and a member of the board
of directors.
session t P h D
Marshall Field, millionaire and merchant of Chi-.
Sago. aedjuesday at the Holland House, in New
York City, of pneumonia. His career was remark-
able, and success early in life crowned his every ef-
fort. LWst November his only Bon died from the
wound received by being asoidentally shot while clean-
ing a gun. The business interests of the firm of Mar-
hal eld & Co. wYill, it is said, be looked .a(ter by
J. Niyell-, brother, of tloe deceased.

At Arcadia a stock company has been organized
for the purpose of manufacturing cement blocks for
building purposes with which to rebuild the burned
district of Arcadia. It is the aim of this comn pany
to manufacture block cement, which is considered
superior to brick as far as safety from fire is con-
cerned, at less than the cost of brick. The machinery
the company has ordered is of the best and latest
improve pattern, and the plant will be second to
none of its kind.

Preparations are well under way for the annual
session of the St. Petersburg Chautauqua. Dr. W.
L. Davidson, the superintendent, has been busy for
months securing contracts with notable platform peo-
ple and has met with unusual success in securing
didanyw ell-known attractions, and the program prom-
ises to be in every way the most attractive which has
been offered. Music will be made a principal fea-
ture, and to that end the Otterbein Male Quartet
has been secured for a stay of a number of days.

A certificate of reasonable doubt has been granted
to A. H. Hummel by Justice John Woodward of the
Appellate Division, in Brooklyn. The certificate ap-
lies to the lawyer's conviction of conspiracy in the
Sodge-Morse divorce case. Hummel was convicted
and sentenced to one year's Imprisonment and a fine
of $500 several weeks ago. He is still out on $10,-
000 ball, and will not be locked up before the Court
ofTAprpeals so orders. He was admitted to bail when
Justice Woodward granted him a stay of execution,
pending the argument for the certificate of reason-
able doubt.

The suit for divorce brought by Prince Philip of
Saxe-Coburg and Gotha against his wife, Princess
Louise, eldest daughter of King Leopold of Belgium,
was concluded th is week, when the Divorce Court
granted a decision providing for an absolute divorce.
The princess will bear the costs of the litigation.
The question of guilt was not raised. The princess
accepts the decision She receives a lump sum of
$80,000 and $1,400 monthly from Prince Philip, and
wilt also receive an annuity of $10,000 a year from
King Leopold.

Senators Foraker and Dick have given notice
that they will defeat Richard Austin of Tennessee
for Consul to Glasgow, to succeed Samuel McArthur
Taylor of Ohio. In this fight against the Administra-
tion the two enemies became friends. Taylor is a
Dick appointee. The nomination of Austin was made
by the President without consulting Foraker or Dick,
who considered the office Ohio patronage. When the
nomination of Austin came to the Senate, Mr. For-
aker notified the committee to which it was referred
to hold up the case. Then Senator Dick went to the
Department of State and told Secretary Root that
the nomination could not be confirmed. Secretary
Root promised to try to find another place for Aus-


Football is on probation at Harvard, pending a
reform in the game that will be acceptable to the
board of overseers, according to an official announce-
ment to-day. The discontinuance of the game is a
result of a vote taken last week at a secret meeting
of the board of overseers, when it was decided that
inatercoll egia te football at Harvard would not be
permitted until the rules and regulations had been
so changed and amended as to remove what the over-
seers regard as the evils of the present game. Pres.
dent Eliot of Harvard has taken a stand squarely
against any intercollegiate football at Harvard next
year. In a recent interview he said: "I, for one,
shall never consent to intercollegiate football being


resumed at Harvard until it has been demonstrated
,in actual play that the objectionable features of the
game have been ruled out A mere paper reform of
the game will not secure my sanction of the resump-
tion of intercollegiate football at Harvard." Yale


OFr


THE


will soon follow Harvard in some action on the foot-
ball question. Last Saturday a general faculty
meeting was held and the subject was thoroughly
canvassed and the sentiment taken. Just what this
was is not known.

At a meeting of the Merehants' Association of
Miami, recently held for the. purpose of deciding
whether or not the asswistion should contribute
toward sending a delegation to Washington in tue
interest of securing an additional, .ppropriatio n to
carry on the deepening of the chnnel into Miami
harbor, it was unanimously, d dad. tat it would
be unwise to send a delegation there at this time un
less it be in cooperation with the East Coast Rail-
way and our Senators, and Congressmen, who secured
the first appropriation.

The well-known clear Havana house of Manrara
Bros.' Company will remove its big establishment
from New York to Tampa in the next fortnight. They
own a fine building at the latter place, and will be-
gin work there before shutting down in New York,
so as to keep in touch, with their metropolitan trade.
The move was decided upon last spring, but the
heavy business of the firm in 1905, the heaviest in
their history, prevented the carrying out of their
plans until now. The firm will. occupy the La Rosa
de Cuba factory, which is now being prepared for it.

A certificate of incorporation of the American
Consolidated Copper Company, organized in Portland,
Me., with an authorized capital of $150,000,000, has
been filed at the office of Secretary of State. The in-
corporating officers were Larkin T. Trull of Lowell,
Mass., president; Timothy E. Hopkins of Danielson,
Conn., treasurer; and David W. Snow of Portland,
clerk. Hiram M. Burton of Winchester, Mess., and
the president and treasurer are named as directors.
It is understood that J. A. Corain is actively identi-
fled with the corporation, which plans to buy in
Western copper mines.

A new swindle by the use of crooked scales by
merchants has been uncovered in a report sent to
Mayor McClellan yesterday by Patrick Derry, chief
of the bureau of weights and measures. The use of
crooked scales, Derry declares, was until a short
time ago widely prevalent, but the activity of his
assistants has somewhat checked the evil. lHe says
butchers attach putty or some other substance to
the bottom of the scale pan, thus cheating each (cus-
toner out of from one to four ounces in weight. Sim-
ilar tricks, he declares, are practiced by grocers and
coal dealers.

In New York City: The chairman of the West
End Association announced that the upper part of
the city was thug-ridden, and that he was going to
call a meeting of the association to protest against
inadequate police protection; it was said that Mayor
McClellan intended to "annex" Mr. Murphy of Tam-
many Hall, and reorganize the Democrats of this city,
in order to forestall any move which Congressman
Hearst might make to control the party in this
State; more than three hundred persons have signed
the petition to examine the books of the Society for
the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, and demand-
ing the resignation of President Haines.

The St. Petersburg Mid-Winter Fpir Alsociatton
has made preparations for ope of. the largest, and
what promises to be one of the.most successful fairs
in the history of the association. The building ha
been enlarged by the addition of a new building,
which will be used for the exhibition of citrus fruits,
farm products, etc., leaving the former fine building
for the use of the schools, fine arts and ladies' de-
partments. The Woman's Town Improvement Asso-
ciation will have a kitchen finished off in the south-
west corner of the new building, and will have a fine
booth in the main building. The fair opened yes.
terday, and will close February 10.

The Organization of the General Slocum Surviv-
ors has sent a petition, which is signed by thou-
sands of people, to Congress, urging it to support the
bill introduced by William Sulser of New York for
the relief of the General Slocum disaster. This bill
invested the Court of Claims with jurisdiction to hear
and determine the claims of the victims of that ca-
tastrophe, and award to the heirs of the victims such
damages in the premises as may be meet and Just.
The trial of William H. Van Sehaliek, captain of the
General Sloeum, continues before Judge Thomas in
the criminal branch of the United States Circuit
Court. After the jury was completed Special Attor-
ney Baldwin began his opening argument. He re-
viewed the ease, declaring that a fire drill was un-
known to the crew, and that the men were employed
regardless of their ability to do seaM duty. In the
court room where Mr. Baldwin made his address
wers many survivors of the disaster.


NEWS


Commodore William P. McCann, United States
navy (retired), died from paralysis Monday at' lis
home in New Rochelle, after a long illness. He had
lived in New Rochelle about ten years. He leaves a
wife. The funeral arrangements are in charge of
his brother-in-law, Prof. H. 0. Vulte, of Columbia
University. The funeral will be held at the McCann
cottage, n .Park Avenue, New. Rochelle, .to-morrow
morning, The body will be taken to Washingtop for
a military burial in Arlington Cemetery. Commo-
dore Wil am Penn McCann, was born in. Pariq Ky.,
May 4, 1830, He was a on of Jame Harveq. M-
Can and Jeoan Rusk Lowery McCan. .T. origVial
American representative of his family was his grand-
father, Jonb MeKeand, a native of Whitborna, the
county of Wigtown, Scotland.

A bill to Oheok or prevent "wildcat" inorporation,
stock waterin, speculatl6n, bribery and ftud was
introduced at rAlbany by AssAmblimanuTompkins of
New York.- Corporations newly organued, consoll-
dated or assoelated, which offer their shares for sale
to the public ,ae required by the terms of the means"
ure to make public the names and addresses of the
promoters and their compensation, the interest of the
directors in the 'organization, the estimated amount
of preliminary expenses, prices at which the stock
is to be solk, bad whether there is to be any bonus
of any kind to any person;. names and addresses of
persons from whom property is to be acquired, a de-
scription of the property and the consideration to
be paid. "For the first time in this country," said
Mr. Tompkinp, "I propose to have reognied by law
the existenoe.of a promoter, to define his relation to
the public ,and the corporation, and to fix his re-
sponsibility in case of misrepresentation." The bill
Inmnaliws directors, promoters and incorporators for
any misrepresentation.

At the Greens and Ottnyor hearing in the Federal
Court, Judge Slr. fined A. A. Lawrence, of counsel
for the accused $100 for contempt of, court. Mr.
Lawrence witas arguing that the court had exceeded
its rights jn the appointment of the special Jury
c minisioners, one of' whom was T. F. Johnson, clerk
of the court#and the other W. S. West of Valdosta,
who has oq-ly been engaged in a bitter political
controversy yth W. W' Oborne, Mr. Lawrence's
law parthet. ,The language of Mr. Lawrence to which
the court tpbk exception was in part as follows:
"Otle otrcumesatice aone erve to Illustrate the pos.
sibility for'wrin and injustice opened up by this
extraordinary innovation into what we conceive to
be the law 'of procedure. It is a curious coincidence
that in the ,oase at bar the court, unwittingly, of
coiure, appointed as a jury commissioner a gentle-
man who was at that time and still is an open, pub-
lie and notitlously avowed enemy of the defendants
counsel." Jdflga Speer then said "Mr. Lawrence,
your renmarl' are exhpedingly improper and out of
order. The c*dprt has no knowledge that he appointed
as a jury cbmatslsioner a gentleman who was at that
time and stilPli an avowed enemy of one of the dd-
fendants' coupswl. Enter a fine of $100 against Mr.
Lawrence for contempt of court."

"i
While inspecting his game preserve Saturday
afternoon, Robert (. Erwin of Hartford, a director
of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company, with
offices at No!.71 Broadway, New York, dropped dead
from heart dielase. He was apparently in excellent
health when he arrived at Saybrook, Can., last
Saturday morning from Hartford. Although the
offices of the company are in New York, Mr. lhwin
had made anis home in Hartford for some time, He
was about sixty-five years old. With United States
Senator 1Morgan .0. Bulkeley and. other maenp, Mr.
Erwin in theAst few year* hd boug thousand of
acres of woodland between New Lndon and West-
brook, to be turned into a vast hunting d. My.
Erwin left a wife and two sons, one o wom is in
the United States army and the other at West Point.
Robert G. Erwi was a prominent figure oa the trans-
portation circles along the Atlantic seaboard. In
addition to being a director of the Atlantic Coat
Line Railroae, of which he was until quite recently
president, he was promJiently connected with a num-
ber of other railway and steamship companle. He
was president and director of the Wiqs1t s Bone
Valley Railway, a director of the Peninular O ci-
dental Steamship Company, of the Louisville & Nash-
ville Railr.ed, director of the Charleston Terminal
Cormpay and a director of the Belt Line Railway
of Monig m. Ala. He was a lawyer, sad was a
member of the Manhattan Club of New York City.
Mr. Erwvn)a. President of the Atlantic Coast Line
Ralfroad Compny up to November 31 last, when he
retired. In addition to his.Hartford house and the
Saybrook estate, Mr, Erwin la he at Savannash,
(a. Throughout the !ta., j Mr. wip
was well known, as he siteod aprsl
eaeh year durlag his preuldeM of Atlatie Com t
Line.


* I .. .. -
.4 ,


V. -


'~ '4,


b. -


WEEK'S


I.





'I.


.... 4







~&'~ 4Wva-


Em SUN


Agriculture --- Florida s


January 20, i(;


Opportunity


Conducted by W. E. Pabor


PRELUDE.
We expect everything and are prepared for noth-
. ing.-Madame Swetchine.
*
The craving for a delicate fruit is pleasanter
than the fruit itself.-Harder.
*


Expectation whirls me round;
The imaginary relish is so sweet
That it enhances my senses.


* *


-Shapekspeare.


There are many things that are thorns to our
hopes until we have attained them; and envenomed
arrors to our hearts when we have them.-Mirabeau.
'*
It is when to-morrow's burden is added to the
burden of to-day that the weight is more than a man
can bear.-George Macdonald. -

A late issue of the Scientific American gives an
account of two freaks, one in the animate, the other
in the inanimate world. The first is a turtle with
two heads, the other a pepper with another pepper
inside of it. Nature plays many fantastic tricks,
but can generally be relied upon as being true to type.

Another item reaches us from Manatee County of
a lettuce acre yielding $1,000 net profit. These
stories should be substantiated by actual figures as
to labor, fertilizer, crop shipper's expenses and com-
mission men's per cent. A general statement does
not cover the ground.

The editor of one of the Lake City papers declares
that its citizens are determined to hold the State
Agricultural College, the Buckman bill and the re-
cent decision of the Supreme Court to the contrary
notwithstanding. As the Titusville Star pointedly
says:- "If the citizens of that place are back of this
movement, and are in earnest, as the paper states,
they will find that they will receive the righteous


denunciation of the people of Florida; indeed, they
will invoke an indignation that will appall them."
Once there was a bull that planted all its four feet
between the rails and snorted defiance at the on-
coming engine. It pawed the dirt between the sleep-
ers till the cowcatcher caught it, and then?
The irate bullock, where was he?
Ask the woods, the winds, the crows,
But don't ask me.

Recently a dozen Arizona Navel oranges reached
a resident of a town on the Indian river. They were
fine specimens, said to rival any grown along the
river. At the same time they were no finer than
specithens of the Pineapple orange grown near town.
There is no doubt that Arizona, with irrigation, can
produce excellent citrus fruits, but Florida need not
fear any competition from thereaway. The dozen
specimens cost the receiver $1.25 for the oranges and
$1.25 express charges. The market for the Arizona
orange and pomelo lies along the Rocky Mountain
ranges of Colorado, Wyoming, Utah and the Na-
vadas.

A Japanese colony, it is reported, will settle in
Texas, having secured a large tract of land in what
is known as the "San Antone" section, about the
ancient town of San Antonio. These colonists will
plant mulberry trees and tea bushes, and their
knowledge and experience will go far toward mak-
ing tea culture more of a succe.4,s than it seems to be
at present in the South. Then, who knows, says a
Northern paper, the time may come when "real tea
may be as common on our tables as is the stuff that
is now sold for tea, but which consists largely of
willow leaves, chips, old grounds, and nobody knows
what else." Which is a consummation most devoutly
to be wished, down here in Florida.
Reports. from Havana indicate that the tobacco
erop in the Vuelta Abajo province is practically
ruined, the torrential rains of the last week in De-
cember having proved fatal to the growing plants.
The Cuban Government has been appealed to in be-


half of the poorer class of planters, to take
ures necessary to enable these to replant.
greater damage, of course, was done in thle
lands. As the variety of tobacco grown in
province is the choicest known, tobacco smoker .
the near future may find, as Mocha coffee drii, v
have long done, that the name does not carry i:
true flavor with it.

In connection with the establishment and con-
tinuance of rural letter routes, the Government in.
tends to follow in the line of the old adage, "thi
Lord helps those who help themselves," and make
those who get mail do certain work in the way of
keeping the roads in good condition, providing "ap.
proved" rural mail boxes, removing dead trees that
may have fallen across the road, filling up mud holes,
etc. Otherwise, the department will conclude that
the service is "not appreciated;" it also says it
policy will be to discontinue if such is the case, or
where the patronage does not warrant the expendi-
ture. All of which goes to show that "R. F. D." is
in danger of a curtailment of service.

Seretary Wilson of the National Nut (pecan)
Growers' Association advises us that the proceedings
of the third annual convention will shortly be pub-
lished in pamphlet form, 150 pages, and a copy sent
to each member of the association; but that a copy
will be sent to any one interested in pecan culture
on receipt of 25 cents, plus 4 cents for postage. "The
third annual session was fully up to the high stand-
z~rd of efficient work and enthusiasm which has
characterized former gatherings. The attendance
wa. large and representative, ten States being repre-
sented. With few exceptions, the published program
was carried through, though several papers were
read by title in order to give more time to discussions
and the transaction of important business." Flor-
ida is represented by Dr. J. B. Curtis of Orange
Heights, who is first vice-president. Mr. J. F. Wil-
son of Poulan, Ga., is secretary.
(Continued on Fourteenth Pan)


Helpful


Iin ts


for


Her


Ladyship


We often wonder why people buy popular novels.
What makes the novel populara" is one of those
strange occurrences for which it is difficult to ac-
count.
It is a curious fact that no theatrical manager
can tell whether a play will fail or succeed, nor can
tne shrewdest publisher predict the fate of a book.
The public simply takes the bit in its teeth and
now and then runs away with the play or book-
.why, ztobody knows.
Some time ago, when the public had taken to
Gilbert Parker's The Right of Way, the Messrs.
harper, in order if possible to ascertain why, printed
several advertisements in the daily press of the
country asking readers to kindly say why they read
this book. From all over America and Canada came
letters-1,486' in all.
These were carefully tabulated with this result:
Seven hundred and eleven said they had heard it
favorably spoken of by friends who had either read
it serially or in book form; 468 had seen it adver-
tiwed, or both advertised and reviewed; 114 had read
reviews of it; 86 had read something the author
had written previously and liked his style; 84 had
read the serial themselves, and wanted the book in
consequence; 23 replies gave frivolous reasons-"hei-
cause they had the price." because "a fool and his
money are soon parted." because "they were dull and
wanted something exciting," because "they wanted
something to talk about," because "they read all the
new books," "they wanted to be tip to date," etc.
All this leaves the publisher pretty much where
.e started. But one thing is clear. While readers,
in the long run, are the best advertisers, it is the
review, and in some cases, as in this one, the serial
publication at the outset, that sets them talking.
n other words, the first vogue of the popular novel
is 'due, apparently, to the man-or, .woman-who
reviews it.
It is gratifying to note how, more and more, sys.
temr in the household has grown from a manifestation
into a tality. Happy the woman who has this
reality ad s thus fortified against worry, care' and
trouble; happy the woman who has commmnoed to
manifest system in her household, the manifestation


By Eleanore du Bois

being the determined, willful step from out of chaos
and darkness into ofder, light and sunshine.
We often smile and laugh and make fun of the
young people who start out doing "light housekeep-
ing" and of those who, married many years, engage
in this same line. It may be a specialty, but as I
have seen it. quite frequently, it is anything but
"light" housekeeping.
It is a diversion from the legitimate line of house-
keeping that requires an artist and experienced
housewife to make it a real and satisfactory success.
It requires the very essence of the concentration of
system.
Many a woman who begins housekeeping and(
thou nnuds who are keeping house, wonder why it is
"do hard" and "such an ordeal." This is only a
natural mcqu'nee of their not having been taught
early what housekeeping is. Some of them had to
legin almost without a moment's notice or prep-
aration. Others have Ien at it for years, but they,
these very ones, have never been made to understand
what experience teaches-that if you want comfort
and success you must take up household duties with
regularity and carry them out according to correct
system.
Thousands of issues of THE SUN could be filled
with a dissertation on this important subject: you
may read book after book along this line, and you
may go to lectures innuinmrable, nnd yet you will
only be thoroughly benefited when you awake fully
to a realization of your own special case.
After that, no matter where you may be or in
what country or condition you may find yourself,
you will always be mistress of the situation.
There is nothing so gratifying as to be inde-
pendent of servants; to know just exactly what
everything really is that comes to the table, and how
it has been prepared; to know that it is just right
ana that simple and frugal though the meal may be,
that even kings and queens cannot have better.
I never knew what delight and genuine fun and
pleasure housekeeping really is until I came to a
full realization and adoption of a definite day and
a definite timetime to do things, without becoming a slave
to "getting in the rut."
1i wu a growth. The condition of which I write


is not one into which you will just accidentally drop,
Not a bit of it. If you are not in the enjoyment of
the experience I mention don't worry any longer.
Size up your situation and determine to begin to
have system. Get into this growth.
A practical training in the art of successful
housekeeping should be an essential element in tih'
education of our girls.
It is a regrettable fact that the domestic edu(it
tion of a girl is too often neglected. If there is owm
thing above another that will disturb the peace anii
harmony of a family that has in it the elements to,
make a happy home, it is the inefficiency of the wif,'
or mother to properly conduct the affairs of th.i
household. The importance of a woman being
equipped with a knowledge of how best to meaning'
her house and guests and servants is manifold.
The average young unsophisticated girl of ti
day believes her worldly education to be at an elCl
when site has gained a mastery of an art, or has woni
a certificate for proficiency in some foreign lamI
guage.
In this conclusion she errs.
There is still much to be learned, would she lit
herself for the more important domestic duties 1,
which nine out of every ten girls are sooner or aInter
called in their lives. The woman, the mother, may
properly be called the mainspring of the home. It i'
she who dictates the policy of the household and pre
sides over the destiny of its inmates.
It is important, therefore, that the natural in
stincts and gifts of the woman's nature should lI'
carefully fostered and developed, that the Insst in
them may be utilized to build an education that will
serve well the girl who has been instructed in tl
art of housekeeping.


THINGS WOMEN SHOULD KNOW.


Fortunately she can be just as dainty, pretty an"'
altogether feminine while knowing the principles of
designing, building, plumbing, ventilating, heating
lighting and protecting from dampness the home, tli
making of firem, the disposing of garbage, disinfect
(Continued on Fourteenth Page)


-- "'p'-


, 4.4


'*,.


Wk"wmww


^*,''' "






January 20, 1906


.THE SUN


I'VE


a EEN


T II IIKIN


By Charles Battle Loomis


Now is the time of year when, as Chaucer said,
"longen folk to gon on pilgrimages" and these good
Americans go abroad and visit strange lands.
And some of them never forget that they are good
Americans, but proclaim it wherever they go so that
the foreigner laughed in his sleeve and says "There
are those boastful Americans again. Methinks they
do protest too much."
If you are sure deep down in your heart that on
the whole you belong to a country that is a leetle
the best on earth, you will do well to say nothing
about it while you are abroad.
Just act so well that perfection of manners will
come in time to mean something distinctively Amer-
ican, and then, when the foreigner sees a sober, well-
behaved, kindly man walking along the streets of
his town he will say, "Ah, it is easy to see lie is an
American. There are no people in all the world as
fine as they-not even my own countrymen."
I often wonder what would happen if some of
the ladies who unblushingly meet our gaze in the
advertising sections of our best magazines, and who
dress no more warmly in winter than in summer,
were to invade the body of their respective publica-
tions.
I think that there would be a general rush for the
tall timber on the part of the self-respecting heroes
and heroines and general utility men and women
of the stories, because the standard of proper dress-
ing is very different in the first hundred pages of
the magazine from what it is in the remaining two
hundred and fifty.
In the matter of language I think that the gen-
eral average is higher in the advertising sections,
because dialect is practically unknown there, but the
way the ladies (don't) dress would be enough to
cause a flutter in the pages of the most unconven-
tional story that one could find in a reputable mag-
azine.
No one ever seems to be shocked at seeing ladies,
walking around in the advertising sections in patent
underwear, and perhaps no one ought to be shocked-
unless it is bachelors-but suppose you read in a
serial of Howell's that "Anna Hamlin was in no
danger from pneumonia because she always wore com-
mon-sense wearing apparel underneath that which is
visible to the outer world" (see how carefully one has
to express himself in the body of a magazine?) and


a picture of Miss Hamlin were inserted at that place,
one taken from the advertising section and with
which the whole reading public is familiar. What a
chorus of indignant protests would go up from out-
raged readers at the vulprism of the magazine.
I tell you that oirquinstances will continue to
alter cases whenever they can-that's what circum-
stances are for! and if an impudent young hussy
strays in from the advertising pages and dares to
stand for Anna Hamlin she will be shown her place
at once because the American public will not stand
for anything vulgar.
No, indeed!
What would happen if another leading novelist
said in the course of his serial "that Grace Hastings
attributed her good health to the fact that she always
took a cold bath very morning," and the art editor
in order to save expense put in that familiar cut of
a lady bathing in the Jinkins' Portable Celluloid
Bath Tub?
Why, Anthony Comstoek would foam at the
mouth. And rightly so. But we are all so grate-
ful at the absence of dialect in the advertising sec-
tions of our magazines that we let that lady stand
in her tub throughout the twelve months without
uttering a word of protest.
When I was a child I was taught, that it was
not nice to speak about corsets. If I had to men-
tion them I must call them bodices or stays or-I
forget what the third alternative was. I know I
used to go out into the backyard and holler "corsets"
just because I thought it was pretty awful.
But our advertising men have changed all that.
They not only talk about corsets, but they show us
pictures of them, and, to go still further, they show
us pictures of taem in use.
The old convention as to the mention of corsets
has also disappeared from fiction, and one might
easily come across such a sentence as this: "Miss
Postlehwaite had a wasp-like waist and there were
not wanting those who said her corsets caused her
agony."
But what would happen if a picture of Miss
Postlehwaite's boudoir were shown with rouge et
noir (for the cheeks and eyebrows) on her bureau
and she herself fitted into one of Hugem's papier-
mache corsets?
I know I'd stop my subscription at once.
Suppose, for an instant, that an artist were told


to go to the Metropolitan Opera House and draw a
picture of the Four Hundred in their boxes, six in
a box, making something like sixty-seven boxes-with
the lids off. Suppose that instead of drawing them
in proper evening dress-a dress requiring 85 de-
grees Fahr.-he used a lot of pictures from the ad-
vertising section and put them in Jigger flannels,
would he keep his position on the staff a moment ?
No, of course not. That would be a case where to
put on more clothes would be to spoil the picture,
and no one would recognize the Four Hundred at an
opera with arctic habiliments upon them. An artist
must be true to nature and he must not be vulgar.
Nothing is more confusing to a person's sense of
propriety than to turn quickly from the advertising
section to the body of the magazine and back again
as I have seen persons do. The mental picture of the
young lady who is braving the weather for the sake'
of showing that a bath tub can be. ornamental as well
an useful is transferred to the bucolic New England
story, and we Anglo-Saxons are shocked. There in
no other name for it. It is very demoralizing to
turn the pages rapidly back and forth. One should
read the stories first and take comfort in the thought
that no deent editor will allow any artist to picture
any kind of vestiture that would not go at Arbury
Park. Then let him brace himself and turn the
leaves that lead to the tropic ladies. It is still
Anglo-Saxon, but it is advertising, and the conven-
tions are different in that world.
A friend of mine who has no regard for people's
feelings actually cut out a number of the advertise-
ments in the back of a magazine that has led us
on to a higher civilization for fifty years or more,
and when I saw he had done it I applauded him. 1
said: "Good, old man; they're better out." But the
graceless clp with diabolical ingeunity fitted each
flannel lady and each custodian of the bath into draw-
ing rooms devised by the staff artists of that mag-
azine, and I blushed for a good half-hour. We Amer-
icans will not stand for semi-nudity in the wrong
place. it's all very well at the opera or at a ball or
a swngger dinner, but in the body of a reputable
magazine the day will never come when it will be
considered respectable. And the advertisers them-
selves will Ibe the first to agree with me.
Back to your celluloid tub, oh, lady of the bath!
We who are reading the serials will not look upon
you.


The


Jeffersonian Rip

By A. A. A. SILVER


Van


WinLkle


Closely and si ug has the mantle of But the time had come. The Jefferson strain, the Jefferson art,
the late and dearly beloved Joseph To the faithful watchers at his bed- are there.
Jefferson fallen upon the shoulders and side the murmur and dash of the waves The culmination will comic with time;
over the form of his son, Thomas Jeffer- on the nearby ocean beach sounded it will come rapidly, for the love, vener-
son. mournful and prophetic. ation and desire of the son are strongly
When the shadows of night began to It was the voice of the deep-a voice reflected and intensely throb in the work
deepen and fall one day in last mid- which Mr. Jefferson had always so of ThomaN Jefferson.
April at Palm Beach, in this State, the dearly loved in his lifetime. 'Those of us who have sen Joe effer-
According to his wishes, his dramatic son, bring with us a bright, unfading
work, whenever it should end, shouhlM l memory ias we enter the playhouse to swe
taken up by his son Toim. the son. 'IThomans Jefferson. It Is quite
I As sure ats was the arrival of the difllhilt to forget Toe Jefferson, andti we
Girim lHeaper that April eve at thi sea oiincnielec to (cmpare the father with
sid' cottage Reef, occupieeid by theI Jeffer- the sitn as the play progresems.
Sso(I family, just so sure did the son at lBut we soon realize that Thomasn
that moment enter upon the I colinLence- .Jeffrson is the worthiest successor of
S(nt of the fulfillment of the wishes of his father. We intuitively feel that Joe
hi father. hJiefferon's hoip and discernment were
HlHwed with grief sat that moment, well fouind'ii d when he confidently said to
non", perhaps. realized this ehange--that his lison Tom:
ithe mantle of the father had fallen to "I want you to take my place."
his heir, his son Tom. Yet it wl as Ri 'T- I 'nrimng the first week of the cold and
tiin, as def ite ats ('It(onh l a t of wavVn chilly r optionn Thomans Jefferson was
u upon the, o(ean mands. given in New York City last October, I
i'ntr several months pa.st the pi.ibli. msaw t hima nt the rollicking, humorous
hIrs had the. han, to s'ee' the son ( arry-. ndi sympatheti role of old Rip. lie had
ing out his father's wishes. recovered from the shotk of that "atmoe-
%Vhio shall any that wit:. the il(fin- Ih hegret,', and wit.more than ever heart
ablet art of the father, e'er dl's r aniI anid :'cil in his work.
close in his st n's memory; that witO thi, It wIis artist '. It was bordering
love and de, ire to make the father's cloI ely unto wrhfettion.
wish and knowledge that he, the ron. ,a WhI, shouldn't the l men's voie, his a,-
I omild arry on his art in the role of Rip timONi, his every little turn and touch of
Van WVinkle. that this son shall not it arir.Is, -trongly remindiful of the father?
the success his father was? Many inflections o(if the volve, many (iof
No one. the witty sayings of the classic play are
True, Tom Jlferson is not Joe Jheffer- given so spontaneously that one -emns
country was waiting, even at that crit- son. There is a difference quite appar- to again hear the very voice of the ven-
ieal hour, to hear that the veteran actor, ent now; and yet there ir the all too erable Joseph Jefferson.
Joseph Jefferson, would win another tri- apparent certainty that Tom Jefferson Yes. Thomas Jefferson will live to be
umph that he would recover from his will, at no far distant date, be just what the great sucess ais father was, and In
riou llness, his father waL that he will have kept brighter M ad


brighter the fame of that father, ants
will increase our love and admiration
oif Jowsph Jefferson, whome memory will
be all the more beautiful for this very
sueeess of the son.
.


A


Mr. Jefferson will spend part of this
moihtt and the early part of February
in this State with Ids brother Charles
at hik water hoar at Hobe Sounad.


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"Ann tihaw poru m ash fre thWhite ad, I do not doubt,
dir *Irom the lips of the Pr l ,ot
Thus spoke senator Tilllaa In the Unilt 5 1nasto last Wednesday,
errin to the newspaper rorts publishead ab tt'Aylggs and doings of the
= eWarpeo.n who now wields the people's power.fom the Chief Executive's
a A s national capital. .
,., ls tbli sentence, dear ,e*a ds, the ever- senator from South Caro.
; li~a-4mhedte very foundtiok stonMe tht suppottIe temple of fame of Theo-
do*e Rsevelt as a statesman and a man of wisd1
SThne wspapers haew made him what he iS," said Senator Tillman, and
thebuplg out '
rA it o4 remarI~-4tno one wh6 is not blinded b the light
th atie S b fo a thron/" o wrped by the ite0a6 for favors dispensed by
the t W O IN. a i to "
This an utters th most commonplace platitudes, and they are repeated by
the press until they seem to gems of original thoeht presented in a setting
of epirthimatie language.
o Th PresidentTAMXS MORE and DOES LESS than any President preced
Sl him, and unless we e a phonograph next time, he will never be equaled in
:* h Bt to 1et back to our subjet-Rooseveltd What Has He Done ?-We will
try toreall a few things.
He has stirred up the rae question by his unwise expressions and undue
advertisement of a dinner invitation to one of the negro race, AND HE HAS
LEFT IT UNSETTLED.
He claimed, and was by the press duly given credit for bringing about peace
between two nations who were butchering some thousands of excess population
on the othet side of the world, when American citisen were killing each other in
Chi and Colorado, without his exercising his padwlr tendencies and lo, and
behol IT IS NOW KNOWN that he was used as a eat's paw to pull some chest-
nuts out of the fre for some European bondholders, who wanted the war stopped,
in order that THEIR BONDS MIGHT BE MADE GOOD INVirrMENTS.
He issues his railroad rate regulation manifesto, andflourishes his big stick
to give it emphasis-when the last Congress failed to pass the bill he favored;
when all he has to do is to compel his Attor*y General TO ENFORCE THE
LAWS against discrimination already on the statute books to get all the rate
regulation that fairness and honesty demand.
He talks loud and strong about a "square deal," when he disgraced the
incautious Bowen, who told on his superior, and rewarded the easy-going Loomis,
who told a story about his $10,000 check from the Asphalt Trust, that belongs
among the tales about Jack the Giant Killer, and other friends of our childhoodPs
innocent and happ days.
He gets off ihutin sentences about c-v- res-p-o-n-s-b-i--i-t-y with
that magied and araotoatristic dental stress on each letter making up the words;
and keeps Cortelyou in his Cabinet-Cortelyou, who was collector and disburser
of the funds stolen by Mecall, M Curdy and other thieves of the money of widows
and orp hans, TO ELECT THEODORE ROOSEVELT PRESIDENT OF THE
UNITED STATES.
He launches wordy denunciations against the T-R-U-8-T-8 (pronounce this
with the lips skinned back and the teeth clenched) that have the country in their
gr p; when he approves the findings of the complaisant Garfield, his official
vestigator of the Beef Trust, and drops the matter after the Federal Court
assese a ee OF A FEW CAR FARES AGAINST THESE MEN OF MILLIONS.
He gives strong talks to admiring crowds on his junket trips through the
country, on the subject of upholding the civil laws of the country; and then sets
aside his elev titution by cat trying out a treaty with San Domingo, which the
Senate refuse ed to ratify.
But hy continue theso maenumeration of his plays to the gallery, and the record
of his failures to at As Senator Tillman said in his speech last Wednesday,
So, would we rt be the Rorecrder of the deedf Prknows the value of a press him work overlt, if
time.
President Roosevelt HAS SPENT MORE TIME AWAY FROM WASHING-
TON since his elevation to that high offices than any othor President.
He has dipne into eve 6ing that touches human affairs.
He hask made so manyswer thelarations that he has no time to give to the carry-
ing of them outh-too busy m new ones.
Far be it from us to from any man's fame, We are not hero wor-
So, would we fain be the recorder of the good deedi-pf President Roosevelt, if
somebody would point them out We speak of him not as a man, but as a public
We ask anyone to answer these questions, and request that he take plenty
of time to think and to investiTOtR T
WHAT HAS PRESIDENT OOEVELT DONE TO EARN THE SALARY
WHICH HE REuMIVJlS FROM THE PEOPLE? ,
WHAT REFORMS HAS HE MADE?
WHAT GREAT PROBTNiMS THAT NOW CONFRONT THIS REPUBLIC
HAS HE SOLVED? .
WHAT HAS HE DONE FOR THE HAPPINESS ,AND WELFARE OF THE
PEOPLE WHO .HAVE DELEGATED TO HIM THEIR INHERENT POWER
O GOVERN?
;, "80MEBODY PLEASE TELL US.


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4n Interrogahin
Our representatives to the Moroccan conferehes are at Algeciras, Spain, ready
'dip In" the roceedings. The American dletion was sent there by the
ldent of the United States. -"
He, President Theodore Roosevelt, said thetbhquld go, and he said so with-
ouWsultaton with the Senate. That they w t Isevident. Are they goihg to
,Ith Germany, and so make France, and pof W England, very angry with
}.OW theO going to pat France, and thu 5m an enemy of Germany?
t proper question, however, is, "Whatase they doing at that confer-
-y, when they have no business there ?".
Pr'. (<'


SThe Pmnf D wraw sZ
Ss no doubt, was the news to many that our Pr eident of the United States,
hio posevelt, cannot accept the invitation to e*te# the Ormond-Daytonas
S ile races Very sad must Senator Taliaferro have felt to send such a sad
It is gatifying to note that Presidnt Roosevelt feels that, having
Seoord for a traveling President of the United States there is no
3r this trip, and that as the Chief Executive of our nation is not
tvsilt roes, he can say, "Nay, nay." Besides, there are attractions
W event without aa in the- Preseldent of the United States.
Bi look otoo h lke a se of too any woks who spoil the
k+ ," .
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It Was for the Be
It is a certainty that since Saturday, December 9, 1905, there has been no
depression in business in Jacksonville, and that EVER SINCE THAT DATE
money has been more plentiful than it was previously.
Tis proves that the "Story of Gum" which we printed that day DID NOT
HURT JACKSONVILLE.
The turpentine market is firm at 65 cents, and rosins are advancing. The
prices of naval stores are higher and better than they have been since June last,
when that organisation, the Naval Stores Export Company, was perfected WHICH
WAS TO DO SUCH WONDERS.
This proves that our story DID NOT HURT THE NAVAL STORES INDUS-
TRY.
THE SUN is as firm in its conviction NOW as it was THEN, Saturday,


Prize Poem a S


THE PRIZE


MRS. M. M. LITTLE, 115 VWexo)
Prize Story, "The ]oi t


ALMEDA


WRIGHT DRISC'0
Prize Poem, "Bab'


'I


MR. CLAUDE L'ENGLE,
Editor The Sun, Jacksonville, Fla. k
Dear Sir: We take great pleasure in handing you herewith our
Prize Story Contest, which is that Number 65 is the winner of the P)


of the Prize Story contest.


Whoever the winners are is unknown to


number) of poem and story each marked serially from 1 to 73 ii
contribution presented there were quite a number seemingly of ilin<
, re-reading and comprehensive criticism, we decided finally upon the
entirely from a point of literary merit.
We are pleased at the general good quality 'of Florida talent y
decided that it will also be fair to give honorable mention tolthe foll
test, and Numbers 38, 47, 14, 50 and 21 in the Story Contest.
We trust our decision will be eminently satisfactory to all, andl t'


be repeated,


Very truly yo,


HONORABLE


STORIEt
No. 38-Story of a Dollar-Margaret S. ( ral
No. 47-Incidents of the Spanish War-4 -vrft
No. 14-The Avenging Brother-D. S. Itolh'r
No. 50--Out in a Nor' Wester-0. L. Ohlds,
No. 21-Story of King Citrus---Mrs. A. L. F

POEMS
No. 52-Afterward.--Anonymous.
No. 16-Mother and Child--Edgar P. Winll
No. 11-The Storm--.0. L. Olds, Marco.
No. 5-The Greatest Thing-- Mrs. N.' W. I


In the next issue of The Sun we


December 9, 1905, that the TELLING OF THE TRUTH about the gumocracy
(its exposure and the true inwardness of the conditions) was for the benefit of
Jacksonville and the industry.
Evcm since the story appeared the banks of the city have been on Easy
Street, and those who knew THE THEN STATE OF AFFAIRS were truly thank-
ful in their hearts that THE SUN relieved the intense situation existing at that
time.
These paragraphs are written to reiterate the position of THE SUN, which
has been misrepresented by the gumocrawy, and to still emphasize this upon the
mind of the public, BECAUSE 8OM OF THE PUBLIC MAY STILL BE
T.AORTNG IN TE DAMB.


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.THE SUN


The Pure Fake Shon
We are glad that the "show," the Manufacturers' Pure Food and Industrial
I:xposition, is almost over and that the lights are about to be extinguished.
This will occur to-night.
The public was to have had two weeks of it, but the management made it two
weeks and two days.
On another -page of thib issue we present in brief some of the glaring detrac-
tions with which this affair was encumbered. We went to the show, and were
not only impressed, as in the manner in which we have given expression, but we
were sustained in our impressions by what has been told us by many others.
The "thing" presented to the public, and for which it paid admission, was
by no manner of means what the advance local notlees had intimated. The glow-


! ston,


I


JACKSONVILLE, January 18, 1906.


i vision in regard to the Prize Poem Contest and tho
4'i Poem Contest, and that Number 61 is the winner
11, as you sent us the contributions (seventy-three in
ic sive. In our very careful examination of every
s eual .merit, and by a process of careful sifting,
selections numbered 61 and 65. Our decision was

oid brought forward through this contest, and have
>4ng: *Numbers 52, 15, 11 and 5 in the Poem Con-

4i' this stimulus you have given to Florida talent may


REV. T. HENRY BLENUS,
REV. EDWARD F. LEY,
REV. J. LAWTON MOON.


INTION



1,J per.
I ialyneki, Jacksonville.
illette.

i and.


Svon Park.

., 'llahassee.


prize poem and the


prize story.


descriptions of what it was to be differed most materially from what was
resented.
The general shoddy appearance of the show in its entirety was made more
laring by the dirty and beifmed, as well as greasy and repulsive-looking tents
nd stands on the outside, which very features had been heralded as attractions.
When the young women members of the Empire Orchestra of Boston rendered
program several them showed by their facial expression that they were much
ispleased and annoyed at the terrific noises that would often prevail during the
ndition of a program. If they and others go away from "fair and beautiful
aeksonville" and carry with them impressions that we are a set of semi-civilised
in or barbarian, just say "Thank you" to the management of this so-called
t"exposition." v I t
It would have given THM S thMW go latest u to have aid in teese


. r


columns that the affair was a great success; that there was an abundance of
delightful features which offset the little annoyances and complaints incident
upon so great an undertaking such as this affair was to have been.
But we can by no means do it.
It would not be fair and honest.
We do say that there were just a very few real attractions that bore the
hallmark of merit. We were glad to note them, and only regret that they were
not immensely in preponderance of the conglomeration presented.
The percentage of space devoted to sideshows and attractions of that char-
acter and money-making schemes, was in excess of that devoted to the very few
industries and pure food exhibits.
The fakir was essentially prominent.
Therefore, it was, in its entirety, decidedly a pure fake, and not a pure food
show.
It is time the merchants-all of them-were given a rest from this sort of
thing.
It is doubtful if even a small percentage of those few represented this time
will go into another. They will probably rest SHOULD SUCH AN OCCASION
EVER AGAIN ARISE.
It is to be hoped that this, the THIRD ANNUAL TRIBUTE to a non-paying,
non-satisfying business proposition, will be the last.

Perfection in Target Shooti
Again' has Annie Oakley, the professional crack rifle shot, who is known in
private life as Mrs. Frank E. Butler, taken aim and hit the bull's eye.
She has of late been as much before the public eye as in those days when she
was with Colonel Cody's Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show, during which days her
aim was unerring, no matter how difficult the shot or whether she were standing
or if she were riding a spirited horse at dashing speed-SHE ALWAYS HIT THE
MARK.
Recently her target has been a series of newspapers which printed a certain
incorrect and damaging account, which involved her name. She has won every
case.
Several weeks ago she came to Jacksonville and believed she had an easy
mark, the Metropolis, the publishers of which she sued for $10,000.
Through her attorneys she took aim, and with what result is shown in the
columns of this issue of THE SUN.
Our only comment is that it may be said that as the account which was pub-
lished in the Metropolis was acknowledged to have been taken from the Cinielu-
nati Enquirer, and NOT CREDITED to that paper, IT WAS A THEFT, and that,
therefore, the afternoon sheet stands in the ludicrous position of having STOLEN
A LAWSUIT for itself.
Whether she had lost or won we would feel just the same about it-THAT
SHE IS TO BE CONGRATULATED UPON THE STAND SHE HAS TAKEN
IN THE ATTACK UPON HER NAME AND REPUTATION, especially so when
she asserts that the account which appeared in the Metropolis was four or five
times more lengthy than the item in the Cincinnati Enquirer, from which it was
"manufactured," and that as it appeared in the Metropolis it showed an injection
of someone's "creation" bristling with mendacity and showing the ruling passion
of this "writer" to make a sensation when he deemed it safe to do so. In the
language of the immortal Bill Devery, he was caught with the goods, and his
employers will have to pay $2,000 for it.


It Rotates Well


That a good weekly newspaper in a large city seldom ever escapes EVENT-
UALLY becoming a daily, is again en evidence. THIE SUNDAY GLOBE, owned
and published at Tampa by A. F. Lovering & Son, has completed it cycle of rev-
olutions, and Sunday last began its first revolution as THE DAILY GLOBE. It
gathered unto itself a plentitude of splendid news items, general and -local, and
presented them in an attractive manner ENTIRELY NEW TO FLORIDA JOUR-
NALISM. It comes to the files of THE SUN as an enterprising and acceptable
seven-column, eight-page NEWSPAPER.

A Card of Thanks
THE SUN wishes to thank Rev. T. Henry Blenus, Rev. Edward F. Ley and
Rev. J. Lawton Moon, the members of the committee which passed on the con-
tributions of poetry and prose submitted by readers of THE SUN in the prime
contest which has been on for several weeks past. We know that the task was
not easy, and further, that the work was done with care, and that it took much
time. We therefore wish to express our sincere thanks to these gentlemen for
what they have so kindly and thoroughly done, appreciating above all the interest,
sincerity and kindness they have shown THE SUN.
Tampa was to be represented 600 strong this week at the show here.
One of the distinguished visitors remarked that "there are only fifteen of us
here." Well, it's juat this way: TAMPA CAN SEND A 600 STRONG DELE-
GATION, AND B TTER, but down at the thrifty west coast town they have had
THE REAL THING in the exposition line, and, besides, they are not slow; and
then, too, they are wise, no it must have been painfully evident to the Pure Food
Exposition management that the so-ealled "great suooess" and the "wonderful
attractions" of the show in this city had reached them, and 585 expected travelers
to Jacksonville remained at home. They saved money and are not now suffering
wear and tear and aggravation.
Our esteemed contemporary, the Washington Post, says that the farmers hive
formed a trust, the evidence presented being the recent action of the Cotton
Growers' Association to hold cottop for 1 cents. It's about time the farmers
were learning the lesson taught by their experience in buying about everything
they need. They will go out of the trust business as soon as theit Northern
brothers set the example, and be glad of it, too.
James Hazen Hyde, who has been vice-president of the Equitable Trust Com-
pany, was recently dropped from that position. There have been some somewhat
similar "drops" within the past few weeks from concerns in this city. Like Mr.
Hyde, thee parties will also go traveling for the benefit of a much-needed rest.
Perhaps the hardest blow to fall on the devoted head of Editor Mann of Town
Topics since Fads and Fancies put him on the pan, was the one delivered him by a
talesman in his libel case against Collier's. This juror said that he had never
read Town Topics because he always shaved himself.
Talk no more about the sleepy Oriental t The Cbinamms in San Franeisco
have formed A Chop Suey Trust. Slumming parties in the big oltlms will now
be expected to eat less "junk" or bow to the new Jos. .


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NINTH PAGE
Sattud January 20, 1906


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I THE SUN


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January 20, 1906


P


Y


Dy Chevalier William Le Queux


CHAPTER II.
That day was an active one in Questura, or police
office, of Leghorn.
Detectives called, examined the safe, -and sagely
declared it to be burglar-proof, had not the thieves
M Id the key. The Foreign Office knew that, for
supply all the safes to the Consulates abroad.
in order that the precious ciphers shall be kept from
the prying eyes of foreign spies. The Questore, or
chief of police, was of the opinion that it was the
ciphers of which the thieves had been in search, and
was much relieved to hear that they were in safe-
keeplng far away in Downing Street.
His conjecture was the same as my own, namely,
that the reason for Hornby's call upon me was to
ascertain the situation of the Consulate and the
whereabouts of the safe, which, by the way, stood in
a corner of the Consul's private room. Captain
Mackintosh, too, had taken his bearings, and prob-
ably while I sat at dinner on board the Lola my keys
had been stolen and passed on to the scarred Scots-
man, who had promptly gone ashore and ransacked
the place while I had remained with his master
smoking and unconscious.
But what was the motive? Why had they ran-
sacked all those confidential papers? 0
My own idea was that they were not in search
of the ciphers at all, but either wanted some blank
form or other, or else they desired to make tise of the
Consular seal. The latter, however, still remained
on the floor near the safe, as though it had rolled out
and been left Unheeded. As far as Francesco and I
could ascertain, nothing whatever had been taken.
Therefore, we rearranged the papers, relocked the
safe and resolved not to telegraph to Hutcheson and
unduly disturb him, as in a few days he would return
from England, and there would be time enough then
to explain the remarkable story.
One fact, however, was established. The de.
tective on duty at the' railway station distinctly
recollected a thin middle-aged man, accompanied by
a lady in deep black, passing the barrier and enter-
ing the train which left at 3 o'clock for Colle Sal-
vetti to join the Rome express. They were foreign-
ers, therefore he did not take the same notice of
them as though they had been Italians. Inquiries
at the booking office showed, however, that no pas-
sengers had booked direct to Rome by the train In
question. To Grossetto, Cecina, Campiglia and the
other places in the Maremma, passengers had taken
tickets, but not one bad been booked to any of the
great towns. Therefore it was apparent that that
the mysterious pair who had come ashore just prior
to the sailing of the yacht had merely taken tickets
for a false destination, and had rebooked at Colle
Salvetti, the junction with that long main line which
connects Genoa with Rome.
The police were puzzled. The two fishermen who
*. sighted the Lola and first gave the alarm of her dan.
ger, declared that when they drew alongside and
S proffered assistance the captain threatened to shoot
the first man who came aboard.
'"They were English!" remarked the sturdy,
brown-faced- toileM of the sea, grinning knowingly.
"And the English, when they drink their cognac,
kiow not what they do."
"Did you get any reward for returning to harbor
and reporting?" I asked.
"Reward I" echoed one of the men, the elder of
the pair. "Not a soldot The English only cursed
us for interfering. That is why we believed that
they were trying to make away witn the vessel."
Jhe description of the Lola, its owner, his guest,
and the captain were circulated by tne police to all
the Mediterranean ports, with a request that the
yacht should be detained. Yet if the vessel were
really one of mystery, as it seemed to be, its owner
would no doubt go across to some quiet anchorage on
the Algerian coast out of the track of the vessels,
and calmly proceed to repaint, rename and disguise
his craft so that "it would not be recognized in Mar-
seilles, Naples, Smyrna, or any of the ports where
private yachts habitually call. Thus, from the very
first, it seemed to me that Hornby and his friends
Shad very cleverly tricked me for some mysterious
purpose, and afterwards ingeniously evaded their
watchers and got clean away.
Had the Italian Admiral been able to send a
torpedoboat or two after the fugitives they would
no doubt soon have been overhauled, yet circum-
stances had prevented this and the Lola had conse-
quently escaped.
For purposes of their own the police kept the
affair out of the papers, and when Frank Hutcheson
stepped out of the sleeping car from Paris on to the
platform at Pisa a few nights afterward, I relatel
to inm the extraordinary story.
"The scoundrels wanted these, that's evident,"
he responded, holding up the. small, strong, leather
' hnd-bag he was carrying, and which contained has
ieJ.lyguarded ciphers. "By Jove !" he laughed,
dpoited they must have been"
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"It may be so," I said, as we entered the mid-
night train for Leghorn. "But my own theory is
that they were searching for some paper or other
that you possess."
"What can my papers concern them?" exclaimed
the jovial, round-faced Consul, a man whose courtesy
is known to every skipper trading up and down the
Mediterranean, and who is perhaps one of the most
cultured and popular men in the British Consular
Service. "I don t keep banknotes in that safe, you
know. We fellows in the Service don't roll in gold
as our public at home appears to think."
"No. But you may have something in there
which might be of value to them. You're often the
keeper of valuable documents belonging to English-
men abroad, you know."
"Certainly. But there's nothing in there just
now, Axcept, perhaps, the registers of births, mar-
riages and deaths of British subjects, and the pa-
pers concerning a Board of Trade Inquiry. No, my
dear Gordon, depend upon it that the yacht running
ashore was all a blind. They did it so as to be able
to 'get the run of the Consulate, secure the ciphers,
and sail merrily away with them. It seems to me,
however, that they gave you a jolly good dinner and
got nothing in return."
"Perhaps it would have been better if they had.
You'd at least have had the satisfaction of knowing
what their little game really was I"
"But the man and the woman who left the yacht
an hour before she sailed, and who slipped away into
the country somewhere! I wonder who they were?
Hlornby distinctly told me that he and Chat'r were
alone, and yet there was evidently a lady and a gen-
tleman on board. I guessed there was a woman
there, from the way the boudoir and ladies' saloon
were arranged, and certainly no man's hand decor-
ated a dinner table as that was decorated."
"Yes. That's decidedly funny," remarked the
Consul thoughtfully. "They went to Colle Salvetti,
you say? They changed there, of course. Expresses
call there, one going north and the other south,
within a quarter of an hour after the train arrives
from Leghorn. They showed a lot of ingenuity,
otherwise they'd have gone direct to Pisa."
"Ingenuityl I should think sol The whole
affair was most cleverly planned. Hornby would
have deceived even you, my dear old chap. He had
the air of the perfect gentleman, and a glance over
the yacht convinced me that he was a wealthy man
traveling for pleasure."
"You said something about an armory."
"Yes, there were Maxims stowed away in one of
the cabins. They aroused my suspicions."
"They would not have aroused mine," replied my
friend. "Yachts carry arms for protection in many
cases, especially if they are going to cruise along
uncivilized coasts where they must land for water
or provisions."
I told him of the torn photograph, which caused
him some deep reflection.
"I wonder why the picture had been torn up.
Had there been a row on board-a quarrel or some-
thing?"
"It had been destroyed surreptitiously, I think."
"Pity you didn't pocket the fragments. We could
perhaps have discovered from the photographer the
identity of the original."
"Ah I" I sighed regretfully. "I never thought of
that. I recollect the name of the firm, however."
"I shall have to report to London the whole
occurrence, as British subjects are under suspicion,"
Hutcheson said. "We'll see whether Scotland Yard
knows anything about Hornby or Chater. Most
probably they do. Not long ago a description of
men -on board a yacht was circulated from London
as being a pair of well-known burglars who were
cruising about in a vessel crammed with booty which
they dared not get rid of. They were, however, not
the same as our friends of the Lola, for both men
wanted were arrested in New Orleans about eight
months ago, without their yacht, for they confessed
that they had deliberately sunk it on one of the
islands in the South Pacific."
"Then these fellows might be another pair of
London burglars !" I exclaimed eagerly, as the start-
ling theory occurred to me.
"They might be. But, of course, we can't form
any opinion until we hear what Scotland Yard has
to say. I'll write a full report in the morning if
you will give me minute descriptions of the men, as
well as of the captain, Mackintosh."
Next morning [ handed over my charge of the
Consulate to Frank, and then assisted him to go
through the papers in the safe which had been ex-
amined by the thieves.
"The ruffians seem to have thoroughly overhauled
everything," remarked the Consul in dismay when
he saw the disordered state of his papers. "They
seem to have read every one deliberately."
"Which shows that had they been in search for


the cipher books they would only have looked foi
them alone," I remarked decisively. "What on earth
could interest them in these dry, unimportant ship-
ping reports and things?"
'Goodness only knows," replied my friend. Then,
calling Cavendish, a tall, fair young man, who had
now recovered from his touch of fever and had re-
turned to the Consulate, he commenced to check the
number of those adhesive stamps, rather larger than
ordinary postage stamps, used in the Consular service
for the registration of fees received by the Foreign
Office. The values were from sixpence to one pound,
and they were kept in a portfolio.
After a long calculation the Consul suddenly
raised his face to me and said-
"Then six ten shilling ones have been taken!"
"Why? There must be some motive!"
"They are of no use to anyone except to Consuls,"
he explained. "Perhaps they were wanted to affix
to some false certificate. See," he added, opening
the portfoilio, "there were six stamps here, and all
are gone."
"But they would have to be obliterated by the
Consular stamp," remarked Cavendish.
"Ahl of course," exclaimed Hutcheson, taking
out the brass seal from the safe and examining it
minutely. "By Jovel" he cried a second later, "it's
been used! They've stamped some document with
it. Look! They've used the wrong ink-pad! Can't
you see that there's violet upon it, while we always
use the black pad!"
I took it in my hand, and there, sure enough, I
saw traces of violet ink upon it-the ink of the pad
for the date stamp upon the Consul's table.
"Then some document has been stamped and
sealed!" I gasped.
"Yes. And my signature forged to it, no doubt.
They've fabricated some certificate or other which,
bearing the stamp, seal and signature of the Con-
sulate, will be accepted as a legal document. I
wonder what it is?"
"Ahl" I said. "I wonder!" And the three of
us looked at each other in sheer bewilderment.
"The reason the papers are all upset is because
they were evidently in search of some blank form
or other, which they hoped to find," remarked my
friend. "As you say, the whole affair was most
carefully and ingeniously planned."
We crossed the great sunlet piazza together and
entered the Questura, that sun-blanched old palace
with its long cool loggia where the sentry paces day
and night. The Chief of Police, whom we saw, had
no further information. The mysterious yacht had
not put in at any Italian port. From him, however,
we learned the name of the detective who had seen
the two strangers leave Leghorn by the early morn-
ing train, and an hour afterward the police officer,
a blackeyed man short of stature, but of an intelli-
gent type, sat in the Consulate replying to our ques-
tions.
"As far as I could make out, signore," he said,
"the man was an Englisman, wearing a soft black
felt hat and a suit of dark blue serge. He had hair
Just turning gray, a small dark mustache and rather
high cheek-bones. In his hand he carried a small
bag of tan leather of that square English shape. He
seemed in no hurry, for he was calmly smoking a
cigarette as he went across to the ticket office."
"And his companion?" asked the Consul.
"She was in black. Rather tall and slim. Her
hair was fair, I noticed, but she wore a black veil
which concealed her features."
"Was she young or old?"
"Young-from her figure," replied the police
agent. "As she passed me her eyes met mine, and
I thought I saw a strange fixed kind of glare in
them-the look of a woman filled with some unspeak-
able horror."
Next day the town of Leghorn awoke to find itself
gay with bunting, the Italian and English flags flying
side by side everywhere, and the Consulate standard
flapping over the Consulate in the piazza. In the
night the British Mediterranean fleet, cruising down
from Malta, had come into the roadstead, and at the
signal from the flagship had maneuvered and
dropped anchor, forming a long line of gigantic hat-
tieships, swift cruisers, torpedoboat destroyers, tor-
pedoboats, dispatch boats, and other craft extend-
ing for several miles along the coast.
In the bright morning sunli ht the sight was both
picturesque and imposing, for from every vessel flags
were flying, and ever and anon the great battleship
of the admiral made signals which were repeated by
all the other vessels, each in turn. Lying still on
those calm blue waters was a force which one day
might cause nations to totter, the overwhelming
force which upheld Britain's right in that oft-dis-
puted sea.
A couple of thousand British sailors were ashore
on leave, their white caps conspicuous in the street
(ConuInaedlonFourteenLPage)


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'IftSUN


IN THE SUN'S CHARIOT
fInmate Talks Between Pblisher and Reader


AN ODE TO CHAUNCEY.
Ohl Chauncey Depew,
What they're doing to you
Is more than a few.


I










r


we have described above, write another one right away and inclose
therein one dollar for a year's subscription to The Sun. If you are al-
ready a subscriber, send the dollar anyhow, and direct the paper sent
to one of your friends.
If you have not written us a letter of encouragement, sit right
down and write, and while you are about it send the dollar along.
Listen I If every man, woman and child in this State who wishes
us well would send us a dollar for, a subscription, we would be so flush
that the Gumocracy Boycott would not cut a bit of ice with us. We
could do without advertisements for awhile.
Just think about this for awhile.
And then send your dollar.

The "Czar's Spy" began in the last number. This is far and away
the best story that has appeared for a long time. It will not appear iu
book form until we finish it. You cannot afford to miss this chance to
get the best kind of fiction, together with all sorts of other good things,
when they are at your disposal in The Sun.
YoU can depend on The Sun to have the best of everything liter-
ary and to give them to you as fast as you can digest thm.
Get on The 6un's Chariot
It's the fashion this winter, and, bIsides,
Its the proper thnS to do.


11


Some Thinks by the Brethren


GOOD FOR THE GOVERNOR.


The failure of the effort to oust Sher.
iff Jackson from the office to which he
was elected by a large majority against
some of the strongest opposition ever
faced in this county, is a matter for
congratulation, .not only for the Sheriff,
but for the people of Hillsboro County
and for the Governor, who refused to be
swayed by the demands of politicians.
Sheriff Jackson is an immensely popular
man throughout Hillsboro County. This
was demonstrated by the sise of the pe-
tition which went to the Governor jpro-
testing against his proposed decapita-
tion. He is not over-popular with, the
professional politicians. This fact con.
stitutes one of his chief recommenda-
tions.
The professional politicians were be-
hind the movement to oust Sheriff Jack-
son. There is no room for doubt on
this point.
These politicians had no special griev-
ance against Bob Jackson.
They merely wanted his job for one of
their friends. V
The funny thing about the proceed.
ings was that there were several differ-
ent cliques of politicians and several
different friends.
The Governor doubtless sized up the
situation without much difficulty.
It is to his credit that he rose above
the dictates of factionalism and refused
to set aside the people's will.
It is altogether, the most commend-
able, the most refreshing thing that Na.
hlx)lon B. Broward has done since he be.
came Governor of Florida.-Tampa Trib-
une.
BROWARD IS EASY.
And now comes word that the great
elhetion frauds case in Volusia County,
wherein the irrepressible and irrispon-
nible Joems Alexander claimed to have
Iben defrauded by votes, and for neglect
to prosecute which Governor Broward
recently removed from office Court So-
licitor James W. Perkins, has been tried
and the deposed noliietor has been ex-
onerated. You see, they knew Jeems in
De Land; they knew his post-election
claims were on a par with his ante-elec-
tion predictions of a clean sweep; they
knew also that he didn't carry a.single


election precinct in the district; they
knew Jeems only as a standing joke.
But the Governor took him seriously.
He disqualified Judge Stewart from hear-
ing the case and sent Judge Bhaylor of
Jacksonville up to De Land to try. Re-
suit: "In ten minutes the jury re-
turned a verdict of not guilty. The de-
fense put in no evidence at all, for wee
State was unable to prove that more
votes were cast for Alexander than the
returns showed." Now Governor Brow-
ard should come out in manly fashion
and acknowledge that he has been bun.
coed.-Palatka News.
In speaking, of Governor Napoleon
B. Broward and his reflection upon the
integrity of the Florida editors, the
Tampa Herald makes the following com.
ments:
"The Herald does not believe that
there is a paper or a man in the State
who can point to a private or official act
of Governor Broward which would Indi.
cate that he has ever been untruthful,
and therefore no one can justly accuse
him."
The remarks of the Herald are re-
spectfully referred to Meore. John T.
Lewis of Moss Bluff and John ID Robert.
son of Ocala, who did more fbr him in
this county in the last campaign than
any other two men.-Ocala Banner.
It is time public sentiment asserted
itself against the filthy and suggestive
advertisements appearing in most daily
papers from quack doctors trading upon
the ignorance of the diseased poor. Pretty
stuff, this, to put under the eyes of your
growing sons and daughters every day
of their lives; lovely, literature for your
curious innocent children to spell out as
part of their educations. Heaven knows
that the yellow dailies with their ob-
scene daubt are doing their full share
toward the mental prostitution of the
young without adding purieat details of
unspeakable disase to their choicest
menus. The harm the quaok themselves
do to their credulousf votims is probably
no greater than the evil done by the pa*
pen permitting them space. If parent
declined to subsoribe to such publioea
tons, publishers, ever quick to detect
changes in the popular pulse, would soon
cease to accept of this lucrative "busi-
ness."-Winter Garden leoohet.


HORSES FOR S Missouri and Kentucky.
Our guarantee means your money back if you don't like your trade.
S. J. MELSON & SONS
Corner Formyth and Cedar Sta. Jackonville, Fla.
......------- ------ -- __ ,



Florida East Coast Hotel Company

HOTEL PONCE DE LEON HOTEL ROYAL POINCIANA
St. Aqueim Pthm It, Ms Lae WMar
Now open Now open
Clooes Saturday, April 7, 11W)C Oloses Monday, April 2, 1906

HOTEL ALCAZAR HOTEL ROYAL PALM

Now open Now open
Closes Haturday, April 21, 101f Closes Tueeday, April 8, 1006

HOTEL ORMOND HOTEL COLONIAL
Omi**.*ts.la x besBo, I. P. (lMi s lhiM)
Now open Now open
Closes Monday, April 9, 1906 Closes Monday, April 2, 1096

HOTEL THE BREAKERS HOTEL THE CONTINENTAL

Now open Opens Thuraday, March 16, 1906
Close Saturday, April 7, 1906 Closes during August


,1'


1~


January 20, 1906


For years you've talked,
Nor balked
At nothing thrown your way.
It seemed,
'Twas even deemed,
That you had come to stay.
At festive board,
Where wine was poured,
You've lingered long and oft,
And you never
Could discover
A job that wasn't soft.
At melon cutting
You always butt in
And got your little slice.
Fat retainers
You explain as
Things not naughty but real nice.
Oh Chauncey,
Just fauncy
What a shock to Jinnmie Hyde
When you loosened,
Made restitution-
It is said that Jimmie cried.
Now they're after-
H--st, no laughter-
That toga which you got from lBn Odell.
To get fired
Or retired
From the U. S. Senate it is simply li-l.


low,


Every day we get letters of encouragement from people who believe
that we have justice on our side in our fight with the ,(uni Bunch."'
Some of the letters are from people we know, but most of them are
from people whom we have never had the pleasure to meet.
In all the letters the sentiment is strongly expressed that we did
perfectly right not to submit to the dictation or listen to the request of
those people who had a selfish object in desiring to keep from the peo-
ple information they were entitled to have.
All these letters mean that the people want a free press, and are
glad to recognize a paper that belongs in this class when they see it.
This is very nice indeed, the getting of these letters, and we are
unfeignedly thankful for them. Just alxut now we are pursuing the
rocky road, as far as material benefits are concerned, and while on this
road it is a great comfort to have words of goo( cheer to carry along.
Now, we desire to make a sueestion.
If you are one of those who have written us a letter like the ones


11




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U '. AL.


WAS


GREAT


EXPOSL


A Bit Outline of Why Many Are Disappointed and Angry and Some Are
Eot Mad With the Pure Food Exposition, Which Was to Have Been a First-
Class Afltr of Its Kind, but Which Was Well, Read for Yourself


wJvy TEDDY-


,,+, / -- 1.
Si the lat laue of THE SUN I had some commendable things to say about
t ekhbit in the Pure Food snd Industrial Exposition for the reason tbt the
ezpotio Ws still ln progress, and that the TRUTH. ABOUT THE 'MATTER
m afht Iae the chae to get some return for expenditures made by merchants
who had been Induced to pst-ronlso it.
I q0 de4sriubW sAome of the booths with a puff extravagance which even
J aeme. In a, very few awes you will find the extravagance was well mnerited;
several other cases you will know that attempt at, decoration wa& but common
0a ordinary, and very mudh so at that. To-day the "great exposition" becomes
a thin of the past. Now the public may know the truth about the miscellaneous
riomeration which was foisted upon it, the conglomeration being a very
dore show which had been dignified with the highfalutin and comprehensive


title of the Pure Food and' Industrial Exposition, but which has been dubbed by
many-and evidently with no jest in the remarks-as "THE PURE FAKE
SHOW," "THE PURE FOOL SHOW," and the "POOR FOOD SHOW."
Each of these titles is a correct one. Each is a suitable measuring stick
for the good presented to the public.
PURE FAKE SHOW-Outside and inside the fakirs and sideshow people
were as noisy and insistent a lot as ever were grouped.
STHE PURE FOOL SHOW-If you will but ask hundreds who gave up money
for the, expectancy of something grandly magnificent, which alluringly column
after column of advance notices .n the two local dailies led the public to expect.
Also if you ask some of the exhibitors what "they" think. There are no few of
them who will honestly tell you, as they have told others, "Well, to be frank, I
'was badly fooled."
TH POOR FOOD SHOW-Because it fell far short of a food exhibit, even
on a small scale.
The of thw opening paragraphs of last week's report of the "Great Expo-
sition" were:
"Thpee merchants who made exhibits entered the plan with evident interest
and ethusasM ,,of ,, e
"In a great many eases unusual expense was incurred to make the exhibits
most attraive and beautiful "
Walkig through .t labyrinth of passages, the visitor feels as if he were in
- .T" fa.' la, so very beautiful and pleasing is it all."
f- n tsmhas DID ENTER WITHIN INTEREST AND EN-
i4t they wi 1lNever again enter another. They have had enough.
.,.-Iw that is 'epresentative of a most highly unpleasant experience.
m ma s WA-S &OURRIm by Mbitors. TIT aquas foot spao


was sold at a nice sum per. Decorations done by the management were charged
for at no reasonable rates.
I said the visitor to the show felt "as if he were in dreamland, aye, fairy-
land." Yes THE 30-CENT VARIETY. I had that in mind but I did not tell
the public this, asJ hoped it "read between the lines."
Some few of'the booths were quite well and somewhat carefully decorated,
while others presented a hit-and-miss style which can hardly be said to have been
attractive even. It is not the purpose of this resume to individualism or .ingle
out anyone or more tacky or mediocre exhibits as viewed from! the critical ind-
point of what an exhibit should be. '" .
Carefully following the famous "Board Walk" (which was ONE OF THE
FEATURES of the show), the visitor beheld a bizarre arrangement and grouping
of booths, stalls and basars, while all sorts of possible and impossible color
schemes and combinations delighted and-mostly jarred.
Just where these startling effects were to. be found it is not needful to spe-
cialize-the trained, sensitive and artistic eye of those who went detected quite
readily this, another "feature."
The unfinished interior of the building looked pitiable. A few tiny attempts
had been made to cover and hide the nakedness of beams, columns, trusses and
timbers. The bare look and skimpiness were depressing. You could not get
away from it. It was glaring, ubiquitously there.
The presence of so distinguished a woman as Mrs. Sarah Tyson Borer will
ever be remembered as perhaps the very best the management did in giving the
public opportunity to thank it for one bit of merit.
Mrs. Rorer was seen at a disadvantage, however.
As all intelligent people know, she is a woman of talent, skill and ability,
and in giving lectures on cooking and other allied topics, that she is ALWAYS
ACCUSTOMED TO BE SURROUNDED BY THE BEST that is to be had'. 'The
best, seemingly, that was to be had for her in this case, was the very poorest and
most unsatisfactory imaginable.
IT WAS ENTIRELY SUGGESTIVE THAT MRS. RORER WAS EQUIPPED
TO GIVE A SERIES OF LECTURES ON THE NEW ART OF COOKING YOUR
MEALS OUTDOORS AND UNDER THE MOST DISADVANTAGEOUS CONDI-
TIONS.
In fact, I heard her say so twice.
On the first occasion that I dropped in at the OPEN-OUT-DOORS-BARN-
LIKE "CORNER" where she gave her lectures, the very first words I heard her
say were these:
"IN FACT, I HAVE NO CONVENIENCES AT ALL HERE."
On another occasion I heard her repeat this remark, the two only occasions
I had to visit there, and each time for a brief period. Mrs. Borer impressed me
as being a woman who does not hesitate to call a spade a spade, ard I am musQ
inclined that if she were to frankly express her opinion about things as she foumd
them at this "show" they would not be at all complimentary to the management.
Of course the eminent and very sensible visitor has been entertained and
made to feel quite at home here in Jacksonville, and so there may be reason, as
a matter of tact, why she will not express her mind, for which the management
should be most truly grateful, and next November, when Thanksgiving Day
arrives, remember that this is one of the most important things to them for which
to give thanks.
Perhaps the inconveniences and the miserable outfit for her lectures and
demonstrations will be looked upon by Mrs. Borer as so ridiculous and silly that
it may take on a humorous and funny side, and she may have occasion to men-
tion it in her forthcoming lectures as one of the funniest experiences of her life.
It will be mighty nice of her to overlook it thus, even though it must be
ever distressing to her to recollect that her department was directly alongside
the entrance to the "Moonshiners'" sideshow.
Even into the classroom of the public schools did the spirit of the further-
ance of the fake show business find its way. Evidently the percentage of the
concessions must be made the most of, and no chance must be passed by to
increase the attendance, even if half rates had to be given. Therefore, it was a
wise and commendable stroke of business to give tickets out so that a teacher
could say to a pupil:
"Here, little one, take' this colored piees of pasteboard and present it,
together with 5 cents; this will entitle you to admission to a sideshow, where you
can increase your knowledge and where you can see a monstrosity of nature."
It is to be hoped that the teacher was innocently unaware of what she was
The fact that no one was hurt in walking over the wretched board walk that
was so abominably laid, may also be a source of congratulation to the manage-
There were palmists galore, and spinning-wheel games promiscuously dis-
tributed throughout the building, and in many cases they detracted from exhibits
close by that had been arranged with care and interest and at expense.
One exhibitor, who had gone to quite an outlay, and who particularly
depended on quiet*and freedom from noise to make his exhibit a success, received
his money's worth by having his booth close to an incessant noise, and where
yowling and howling prevailed.
He has undoubtedly put up a big howl with the management, but with what
good results, as far as he is concerned, has not yet been learned.
There have been many unpleasant experiences reported to THE SUN-
experiences had by exhibitors and by visitors. They have been heard on many
sides.
One prominent person connected with this great "affair" threatened to
return home (having come from a great distance) but was prevailed upon to
reconsider, though nothing better was offered. The management will know Just
who this was, and how it was ACTUALLY FRIGHTENED that this party
MIGHT CARRY OUT THE EXPRESSED INTENTIONS. Had this been done
it would have been a very black eye to the show.
One visitor, who has traveled abroad, gave expression of what the show was.
Said this visitor, speaking of the Manufacturers' Pure Food and Industrial
Exposition: "I have been in London and Paris, and THIS AWFUL THING
is just about what they would get up in the slum section there."
A prominent citizen had his experience with one of the managers of one of
the sideshows that will be remembered by the party who was impolite to the
visitor. Many may be able to "judge" who this was.
This presentation of a few of the facts along this line, as known to THE
BUN, will support the headlines of this article.


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January 20,1908


THESUN


I&waft


PHILOSOPHICAL AMD)


PSYCHOLOGICAL


Conducted by Leatherberry


- A fw neam Feature f The SUa
Spiritual Deelopment and Growth


In the parable of the Sower, to the disciples who inquired why lie spoke in
parables to the multitude, Jesus replied: "Unto you it is given to know the
mystery of the kingdom of God; but unto them that are without, all these things
are done in parables, that seeing they may not see, and hearing they may not
underplad."
f -you have ever taken the copenordance and traced the word "mystery" in
the tlle,ithen applied Webster's definition of "mystery," and it has not set youth
to thinking, then you must be an anomaly in these days of knowledge and power.
In the face of these strong, explicit references to the mystery of the kingdom
of God which is within man, we are told that the gospel is simple, that a child
may grasp it; that the wayfaring man, though a fool, shall not err therin, and
so on. t
It is true that the gospel is simple.
It is likewise true that it is complex. The gospel has its A, 1I, C, and its
PROBLEMS IN EUCLID.
The day of the simple gospel is well-nigh past. There is now a restless
demand for the complex, or the mysteries of God, which is man's province and
privilege to learn-hence his duty. For in these higher things of life duty and
privilege are correlated; one necessarily implies and includes the other.
This does not mean that we are to dispense with or deny the simple gospel,
but we are to build upon this inspiring foundation a higher and nobler structure,
even the knowledge of God's beautiful and innumerable laws that are working on
this physical plane, while man goes blundering along, striking a law here and
calling It chance, and a law there and misnaming it superstition.
While it is pathetic it is also humorous, and reminds one of the two men who
went into a famous cafe one day when the menu was almost bursting its sides
with delectable viands. Having a meager purse between them, they ordered a few
of the simplest dishes, while their eyes and hearts looked longingly upon that
tempting menu. On finishing the meal and .asking for the check, they were told
that the proprietor was free lunching everybody that day.
"Just think," exclaimed one with a groan, "of my eating turkey hash when
I could have gone that whole bill of fare blind."
Man is eating turkey hash when he kas now unfolded to that stage where he
may run the whole gamut of UNIVERSAL SUPPLY, not blindly, but understand-
ingly and enjoyably. Man must know that he is no longer one of the withoutts"
There is the a, b. a of every upward step; the orderly way of entering theo
temple of knowledge, and to begin with some of the simpler laws is wise and
orderly.
There are two' qualities that are absolutely essential to every manifestation,
and these kre form and color. Primarily these exist in Mind, must always exist
there, in fact draw their sustenance or manifestation from Mind, thence their
law and power. This is explicitly so stated in Gen. ii,, 4-6:


S A Coluama n ctedto New Thought
f OneOpen Only to Optmistic Opinions


"Thwee are the generations of the heavens and of the earth when they were
created, In the day that the Lord God made the earth and the heavens, and every
plant of the field before it was in the earth, and every herb of the field before 1t
grew."
Cherubim and seraphim may not be bothering their heads about pink, an
blue and green, but KNOW RIGHT HERE AND NOW that they never attained
to chlrubimslip until they knew and used the law and power of pink, and blue,
and green. But man does use these colors, and, since this is so, let him use them
with knowledge and for a definite purpose.
HAVE AN AIM IN ALL THINGS.
KNOW WHY YOU DO THE SMALLEST THING, and so begin to learn and
touch the keys of the divine mechanism.
Let no one suppose that the first steps are all that immediately the heavens
will open and the dove of peace descend, but he may know that the dove has
begun its flight to himward.
These steps must be taken at some time, for Ignorance will never land us
into the presence of all knowledge. The joys of heaven are for those who know,
The mere saint when he leaves his body finds himself very near the earth,
and looks in vain and wonderment for the streets of gold, his harp and his crown.
To-day the cry of the world is for knowledge, and if one listens from within
he may hear heaven prolonging the cry.
THINGS BELOW PREFIGURE THINGS ABOVE.
The old saying, "as above so below," may be reversed.
Speaking of a woman who passed on the street bedecked in all the colors ol
the rainbow, and askew at that, a negro man remarked:
"Well, some folks don't know how to dress, I declare."
Now, what was the matter with that woman? Why, there was a hunger for
the attributes characterized by those colors. In her ignorance she knew not what
she wanted or was ready for, so she grabbed' for them all. The result was not
only a disastrous conglomeration, but nothing was accomplished, and she was none
the Wiser nor more attractive.
If one does not know the color best suited to his disposition and occupation,
let him force himself to one color with the avowed purpose of holding himself open
to divine guidance (for God, who made colors, is interested in the appropriate use
of them, you may be sure), and the knowledge and satisfaction will come and
things will be expedited.
For every man has everything in his own nature. All things are within.
Even the kingdom of all good.
The question of humanity, the bride, and the answer of God, the bridegroom,
are within man.
The time is ripe to bring these two together with harmonious and satisfactory
results.


ANNIE


Mrs. Frank E Butler of Atlantic
Highlands, N. J., who is best known,
professionally, to the public as Annie
Oakley, the world-famous rifle shot,
won her case against the Carter-Russell
Publishing Company of this city.
The jury awarded her $2,000 damages.
Mrs. Butler, who brought suit for
$10,000 damages against the mentioned
company, which publishes an afternoon
sheet in this city, was at her home in
New Jersey when several papers in the
country published a story about her,
using her professional name, Annie Oak-
ley, to the effect that she was at that
time in Chicago, and had been, arrested,
coupled with the story being other facts
and statements that do not read very
nice in the family circle.
The afternoon sheet of this city pub-
lished this story one August day, some
few years ago, or, to be more specific,
August 13, 1903, and palmed it off as
one of its "great telegraphic stories" of
the day.
This account came to Mrs. Frank E.
Butler.
She considered it most damaging, as
she is the one and the same Annie Oak-
ley known to the world who was sup-
posed to have been meant in the pur-
ported telegram, and of whom the sheet
aid that "DOPE CAUSED HER
DOWNFALL," the big, glaring head-
line of the article being startlingly in
evidence.
The man who furnished the "copy"
for this so-called news item was on the
stand this week.
He said that he got the story from an
issMe of the Cincinnati Enquirer, from
which he clipped it. This, pazathti-
tally, being a new source of telegraphic


OAjKLEY


information, and
with the Western
Commercial.


WINS


perhaps in rivalry
Union or the Cable


This. witness, with the utmost com-
posure, said that he had taken the item
"verbatim" from the Cincinnati En-
quirer, and that he had done it volun-
tarily, and that he had no malice against
the plaintiff.
He admitted that the article appeared
in the sheet he represented as a tele-
gram, for the issue showed that.
He said that he was surprised at this,
and that it had not been credited, in-
stead, to the Cincinnnati Enquirer.
He started at another occasion to re-
iterate that he "was surprised," but
Hon. J. N. Stripling, for the plaintiff,
said:
"I don't care anything about your sur-
prise," and the talkative witness was
quiet.
While telling that he had written the
headlines and that he had used the
article verbatim from the Cincinnati En-
quirer, and that "there was nothing in
the article of my own creation," Mrs.
Butler leaned over to her attorney, and
was heard to say that the article that
appeared in the Cincinnati Enquirer was
a very small affair, and with scarcely
any headline to it, as against a good
half-column which appeared in the local
afternoon sheet August 13, 1903.
Unfortunately, Mrs. Butler did not
have a copy of the issue of the Ohio pa-
per with her to point out in court this
discrepancy, which she stated existed.
The president of the company against
which the suit was instituted, was also
on the stand. He sat there mostly with
folded arms. He said be was a news-


paper" man. Later on he said he was
an editor.
lie was very quick to answer the ques.
tions propounded him by his attorney,
and at those times when objection by
counsel for plaintiff was sustained the
witness never failed to remind his at.
torney quickly:
"What was your question?"
Ile wore a haggard and careworn ex-


THE FOUR HUNDRED IN EUROPE.
The tendency of the present day is to
extremes, and to absurd variations upon
original schemes. Every now and again
some prominent young society woman
seems to become seized with an irresist-
ible desire to do something ridiculous,
and she proceeds to do so with sublime
indifference as to what the rest of the
world may think. Then it is that an
indignant public arises to point the fin-
ger of scorn, and adduces new and cogent
reasons for condemning the devotee of
fads to the company of fools and the
blind. Yet those who are gentle and'
charitable in their views will no doubt
find much to commend in anything the
Four Hundre may see fit to do.
A belated copy of the New York Jour-
nal announces, with pleasing regard to
effeminate detail, the approaching mar-
riage of Miss Helen Benedict to Mr.
Thomas Hastings, and Gotham society
is up and astir over the startling an-
nouncement. According to the Journal,
Miss Benedict is the most athletic young
woman hi the entire Four Hundred. One
whole freak page of the Sunday Journal
is devoted to an exquisite description
of Miss Benedict's wedding trousseau,
with muscular illustrations suiclent to
convince an properly belaed person
that Miss nt s d be doing the
stronguaa stAit 's a diame mausm.
Ageording to tohe Journal, Ms MDe-


C. *


pression, and when not talking kept his
thin lips tightly compressed. He also
gave the jury several dramatic looks ot
ap peal.
lie said his company had, during the
month following the publication of the
original article, published another in
the form of a retraction.
The case required three days for its
disposition.


diet "sits a horse to perfection," "han-
dles a tiller like an old skipper," and
"can handle a four-in-hand like a profess
sional whip" (drive an obstinate akass
like an odoriferous nigger, would be too
shocking to the fine sensibilities of the
Journal's readers, donoher know). To
further demonstrate her rowess in the
field of mannish ascompishmenti Miss
Benedict will astodish her friends and
co-faddists by hereelf manipulating to
the railway statl6na on the day of her
wedding a gigantic automobile of sub-
dued (7) color, where, in all probability,
they will be met by a horde of open.
mouthed monstrosities who will loudly
cheer them for the heroic and edifying
performance.
Miss Benedict undoubtedly poseses
peculiar advantalme over the lems ath-
letle of her sex, for she can linger in the
parlor and play A Hot Time on the
planner while awaiting habs, .return
after a night of revelry' at the "club,"
and, as he saunterse aje y in, Helen
can throw up her daiqt, Udtt. jab him
in the wind, paste biea hitm'Mo in the
Jaw, cross-counter, swang and deliver a
solar-plexus that would do credit to the
class of profelsiosa brq who .walk '~ t
with a swagger and talk out of the cor-
ner of their mouths.
Out of all this depressia elrcumstance
emerges the cheering fae that, after the
wedding is over and the bottles have been
cleared away, there will b e more spots
o the oo, the Uds will b o hige,
and the suma will saine In its sestomedm
Al of Iwhih is latM y amusiB.


t, 1J


-4I


18


3~4


In Suit for $10,000 Damages Against The
Metrool---Jury Awarded Her $ 2,000




- .


z--77


January 20, 1908


!ZPSTi0


WAS


GREA T


EXpose


A Brief Outline of Why Many Are Disappointed and Angry and Some Are
Hot Mad With the Pure Food Exponition, Which Was to Have Been a First-
lass Aftrir of Its Kind, but Which Was Well, Read for Yourself


-Sy TEDDY-


In the ast issue of THE SUN I had some commendable things to say about
the khibits nla the Pun Food and Industrial Exposition for the reason that the
exposition was still in progress, and that the TRUTH ABOUT THE MATTER
might injure the obanoes to get some return for expenditures made by merchants
who had been induced to patronize it.
I alpo described some of the booths with a puff extravagance which even
aden. In a vety few cases you will find the extravagance was well merited;
M1veral other ease you will know that attempt at decoration was but common
an ordinary, and very much so at that. To-day the "great exposition" becomes
a tlnag of the past. Now the public may know the truth about the miscellaneous
onglomeration which was foslted upon it, the conglomeration being a veky
mediocre show which had been dignified with the highfalutin and comprehensive


title of the Pure Food and' Industrial Exposition, but which has been dubbed by
many-and evidently with no jest in the remarks-as "THE PURE FAKE
SHOW," "THE PURE FOOL SHOW," and the "POOR FOOD SHOW."
Each of these titles Is a correct one. Each is a suitable measuring stick
for the goods presented to the public.
PURE FAKE SHOW-Outside and inside the fakirs and sideshow people
were as noisy and insistent a lot as ever were grouped.
THE PURE FOOL SHOW-If you will but ask hundreds who gave up money
for the expectancy of something grandly magnificent, which alluringly column
after column of advance notices in the two local dailies led the public to expect.
Also if you ask some of the exhibitors what "they" think. There are no few of
them who will honestly tell you, as they have told others, "Well, to be frank, I
was badly fooled."
Ta POOR lFOOD SHOW-Because it fell far short of a food exhibit, even
on a mall scale
Three of the opening paragraphs of last week's report of the "Great Expo-
sition" were:
"Thpee merchants who made exhibits entered the plan with evident interest
and enthusiasm."
"In a great many eases unusual expense was incurred to make the exhibits
most attractive and beautiful."
"Walking through t o labyrinth of passages, the visitor feels as if he were in
aye, ftla~, so very beautiful and pleasing is it all."
'yof aerhants DID ENTER WITH INTEREST AND EN.-
bt they will never again enter another. They have had enough.
kkid" that is epeentative of a most highly unpleasant experience.
ua1sml mDMeWAS INOURRIen by thibitors. Thr square foot space


- -04


A
I
i


mA.


~4 ..,.


1,*


.


24*.(,. ~


(4


IL.


was sold at a nice sum per. Decorations done by the management were charged
for at no reasonable rates.
I said the visitor to the show felt "as if he were in dreamland, aye, fairy-
land." Yes, THE 30-CENT VARIETY. I had that in mind but I did not tell
the public this, as.I hoped it "read between the lines."
Some few of 'the booths were quite well and somewhat carefully decorated,
while others presented a hit-and-miss style which can hardly be said to have been
attractive even. It is not the purpose of this resume to individualize or |ingle
out anyone or more tacky or mediocre exhibits as viewed' fromn!the critical tand-
point of what an exhibit should be. ',_I
Carefully following the famous "Board Walk" (which was ONE OF THE
FEATURES of the show), the visitor beheld a bizarre arrangement and grouping
of booths, stalls and bazars, while all sorts of possible and impossible color
schemes and combinations delighted and-mostly jarred.
Just where these startling effects were to. be found it is not needful to spe-
cialize-the trained, sensitive and artistic eye of those who went detected quite
readily this, another "feature."
The unfinished interior of the building looked pitiable. A few tiny attempts
had been made to cover and hide the nakedness of beams, columns, trusses and
timbers. The bare look and skimpiness were depressing. You could not get
away from it. It was glaring, ubiquitously there.
The presence of so distinguished a woman as Mrs. Sareh Tyson Rorer will
ever be remembered as perhaps the very best the management did in giving the
public opportunity to thank it for one bit of merit.
Mrs. Rorer was seen at a disadvantage, however.
As all intelligent people know, she is a woman of talent, skill and ability,
and in giving lectures on cooking and other allied topics, that she is ALWAYS
ACCUSTOMED TO BE SURROUNDED BY THE BEST that is to be had. The
best, seemingly, that was to be had for her in this case, was the very poorest and
most unsatisfactory imaginable.
IT WAS ENTIRELY SUGGESTIVE THAT MRS. RORER WAS EQUIPPED
TO GIVE A SERIES OF LECTURES ON THE NEW ART OF COOKING YOUR
MEALS OUTDOORS AND UNDER THE MOST DISADVANTAGEOUS CONDI-
TIONS.
In fact, I heard her say so twice.
On the first occasion that I dropped in at the OPEN-OUT-DOORS-BARN-
LIKE "CORNER" where she gave her lectures, the very first words I heard her
say were these:
"IN FACT, I HAVE NO CONVENIENCES AT ALL HERE."
On another occasion I heard her repeat this remark, the two only occasions
I had to visit there, and each time for a brief period. Mrs. Rorer impressed me
as being a woman who does not hesitate to call a spade a spade, and I am muoh
inclined that if she were to frankly express her opinion about things as she found
them at this "show" they would not be at all complimentary to the management.
Of course the eminent and very sensible visitor has been entertained and
made to feel quite at home here in Jacksonville, and so there may be reason, as
a matter of tact, why she will not express her mind, for which the management
should be most truly grateful, and next November, when Thanksgiving Day
arrives, remember that this is one of the most important things to them for whith
to give thanks.
Perhaps the inconveniences and the miserable outfit for her lectures and
demonstrations will be looked upon by Mrs. Rorer as so ridiculous and silly that
it may take on a humorous and funny side, and she may have occasion to men-
tion it in her forthcoming lectures as one of the funniest experiences of her life.
It will be mighty nice of her to overlook it thus, even though it must, be
ever distressing to her to recollect that her department was directly alongside
the entrance to the "Moonshiners'" sideshow.
Even into the classroom of the public schools did the spirit of the further-
ance of the fake show business find its way. Evidently the percentage of the
concessions must be made the most of, and no chance must be passed by to
increase the attendance, even if half rates had to be given. Therefore, it was a
wise and commendable stroke of business to give tickets out so that a teacher
could say to a pupil:
"Here, little one, take' this colored piece of pasteboard and present it,
together with 5 cents; this will entitle you to admission to a sideshow, where you
can increase your knowledge and where you can see a monstrosity of nature..
It is to be hoped that the teacher was innocently unaware of what she was
The fact that no one was hurt in walking over the wretched board walk that
was so abominably laid, may also be a source of congratulation to the manage-
There were palmists galore, and spinning-wheel games promiscuously dis-
tributed throughout the building, and in many cases they detracted from exhibits
close by that had been arranged with care and interest and at expense.
One exhibitor, who had gone to quite an outlay, and who particularly
depended on quiet*and freedom from noise to make his exhibit a success, received
his money's worth by having his booth close to an incessant noise, and where
yowling and howling prevailed.
He has undoubtedly put up a big howl with the management, but with what
good results, as far as he is concerned, has not yet been learned.
There have been many unpleasant experiences reported to THE SUN-
experiences had by exhibitors and by visitors. They have been heard on many
sides.
One prominent person connected with this great "affair" threatened to
return home (having come from a great distance) but was prevailed upon to
reconsider, though nothing better was offered. The management will know just
who this was, and how it was ACTUALLY FRIGHTENED that this party
MIGHT CARRY OUT THE EXPRESSED INTENTIONS. Had this been done
it would have been a very black eye to the show.
One visitor, who has traveled abroad, gave expression of what the show was.
Said this visitor, speaking of the Manufacturers' Pure Food and Industrial
Exposition: "I have been in London and Paris, and THIS AWFUL THING
is just about what they would get up in the slum section there."
A prominent citizen had his experience with one of the managers of one of
the sideshows that will be remembered by the party who was impolite to the
visitor. Many may be able to "judge" who this was.
This presentation of a few of the facts along this line, as known to THE
SUN, will support the hliAl, of this article. *


*.A* ;-' .y


%K










January 20,


1906


THE SUN


PHElOSOPHiC4L AND


18


PSYCHOLOGICAL


Conducted by Leatherberry


A New Suneam Feature of The Sun
Spiritual Development and Growth i

In the parable of the Sower, to the disciples who inquired why Hle spoke in
parables to the multitude, Jesus replied: "Unto you it is given to know the
mystery of the kingdom of God; but unto them that are without, all these things
are done in parables, that seeing they may not see, and hearing they may not
understand."
If,.you have ever taken the copeordance and traced the word "mystery" in
the JlJ4e,ithen applied Webster's definition of "mystery," and it has not set you
to thinking, then you must be an anomaly in these days of knowledge and power.
In the face of these strong, explicit references to the mystery of the kingdom
of God which is within man, we are told that the gospel is simple; that a child
may grasp it; that the wayfaring man, though a fool, shall not err therin, and
so on. t
It is true that the gospel is simple.
It is likewise true that it is complex. The gospel has its A, 1, C, and its
PROBLEMS IN EUCLID.
The day of the simple gospel is well-nigh past. There is now a restless
demand for the complex, or the mysteries of God, which is man's province and
privilege to learn-hence his duty. For in these higher things of life duty and
privilege are correlated; one necessarily implies and includes the other.
This does not mean that we are to dispense with or deny the simple gospel,
but we are to build upon this inspiring foundation a higher and nobler structure,
even the knowledge of God's beautiful and innumerable laws that are working on
this physical plane, while man goes blundering along, striking a law here and
calling it chance, and a law there and misnaming it superstition.
While it is pathetic it is also humorous, and reminds one of the two men who
went into a famous cafe one day when the menu was almost bursting its sides
with delectable viands. Having a meager purse between them, they ordered a few
of the simplest dishes, while their eyes and hearts looked longingly upon that
tempting menu. On finishing the meal and .asking for the check, they were told
that the proprietor was free lunching everybody that day.
"Just think," exclaimed one with a groan, "of my eating turkey hash when
I could have gone that whole bill of fare blind."
Man is eating turkey hash when he has now unfolded to that stage where lie
may run the whole gamut of UNIVERSAL SUPPLY, not blindly, but understand-
ingly and enjoyably. Man must know that he is no longer one of the withoutts"
There is the a, b. o of every upward step; the orderly way of entering the
temple of knowledge, and to begin with some of the simpler laws is wise and
orderly.
There are two' qualities that are absolutely essential to every manifestation,
and these hre form and color. Primarily these exist in Mind, must always exist
there, in fact draw their sustenance or manifestation from Mind, thence their
law and power. This is explicitly so stated in Gen. ii,, 4-5:


0 A Column Devoted to New Thought
SOne Open Oanly to Optimistic Opinions

"These are the generations of the heavens and of the earth when they were
created, in the day that the Lord God made the earth and the heavens, an every
plant of the field before it was in the earth, and every herb of the field before it
grew."
Cherubim and seraphim may not be bothering their heads about pink, and
blue and green, but KNOW RIGHT HERE AND NOW that they never attained
to chlrubimship until they knew and used the law and power of pink, and blue,
and green. But man does use these colors, and, since this is so, let him use them
with knowledge and for a definite purpose.
HAVE AN AIM IN ALL THINGS.
KNOW WHY YOU DO THE SMALLEST THING, and so begin to learn and
touch the keys of the divine mechanism.
Let no one suppose that the first steps are all; that immediately the heavens
will open and the dove of peace descend, but he may know that the dove has
begun its flight to himward.
These steps must be taken at some time, for ignorance will never land us
into the presence of all knowledge. The joys of heaven are for those who know,
The mere saint when he leaves his body finds himself very near the earth,
and looks in vain and wonderment for the streets of gold his harp and his crown.
To-day the cry of the world is for knowledge, and if one listens from within
he may hear heaven prolonging the cry.
THINGS BELOW PREFIGURE THINGS ABOVE.
The old saying, "as above so below," may be reversed.
Speaking of a woman who passed on the street bedecked in all the colors of
the rainbow, and askew at that, a negro man remarked:
"Well, some folks don't know how to dress, I declare."
Now, what was the matter with that woman? Why, there was a hunger for
the attributes characterized by those colors. In her ignorance she knew not what
she wanted or was ready for, so she grabbed' for them all. The result was not
only a disastrous conglomeration, but nothing was accomplished, and she was none
the wiser nor more attractive.
If one does not know the color best suited to his disposition and occupation,
let him force himself to one color with the avowed purpose of holding himself open
to divine guidance (for God, who made colors, is interested in the appropriate use
of them, you may be sure), and the knowledge and satisfaction will come and
things will be expedited.
For every man has everything in his own nature. All things are within.
Even the kingdom of all good.
The question of humanity, the bride, and the answer of God, the bridegroom,
are within man.
The time is ripe to bring these two together with harmonious and satisfactory
results.


ANNIIE


Mrs. Frank E. Butler of Atlantic
Highlands, N. J., who is best known,
professionally, to the public as Annie
Oakley, the world-famous rifle shot,
won her case against the Carter-Russell
Publishing Company of this city.
The jury awarded her $2,000 damages.
Mrs. Butler, who brought suit for
$10,000 damages against the mentioned
company, which publishes an afternoon
sheet in this city, was at her home in
New Jersey when several papers in the
country published a story about her,
using her professional name, Annie Oak-
ley, to the effect that she was at that
time in Chicago, and had been arrested,
coupled with the story being other facts
and statements that do not read very
nice fn the family circle.
The afternoon sheet of this city pub-
lished this story one August day, some
few years ago, or, to be more specific,
August 13, 1903, and palmed it off as
one of its "great telegraphic stories" of
the day.
This account came to Mrs. Frank E.
Butler.
She considered it most damaging, as
the is the one and the same Annie Oak-
ley known to the world who was sup-
posed to have been meant in the pur-
ported telegram, and of whom the sheet
Mid that "DOPE CAUSED HER
DOWNFALL," the big, glaring head-
line of the article being startlingly in
evidence.
The man who furnished the "copy"
for this so-called news item was on the
stand this week.
He said that he got the story from an
iMue of the Cincinnati Enquirer, from
which he clipped it. This, parentheti-
cally, being a new source of telegraphis


OA4KLEY


WINS


information, and perhaps in rivalry
with the Western Union or the Cable
Commercial.
This witness, with the utmost com-
posure, said that he had taken the item
"verbatim" from the Cincinnati En-
quirer, and that he had done it volun-
tarily, and that he had no malice against
the plaintiff.
He admitted that the article appeared
in the sheet he represented as a tele-
gram, for the issue showed that.
He said that he was surprised at this,
and that it had not been credited, in-
stead, to the Cincinnnati Enquirer.
He started at another occasion to re-
iterate that he "was surprised," but
Hon. J. N. Stripling, for the plaintiff,
said:
"I don't care anything about your sur-
prise," and the talkative witness was
quiet.
While telling that he had written the
headlines and that he had used the
article verbatim from the Cincinnati En-
quirer, and that "there was nothing in
the article of my own creation," Mrs.
Butler leaned over to her attorney, and
was heard to say that the article that
appeared in the Cincinnati Enquirer was
a very small affair, and with scarcely
any headline to it, as against a good
half-column which appeared in the local
afternoon sheet August 13, 1903.
Unfortunately, Mrs. Butler did not
have a copy of the issue of the Ohio pa-
per with her to point out in court this
discrepancy, which she stated existed.
The president of the company against
which the suit was instituted, was also
on the stand. He sat there mostly with
folded arms. He said he was a news-


paper" man. Later on he said he was
an editor.
lie was very quick to answer the ques-
tions propounded him by his attorney,
and at those times when objection by
counsel for plaintiff wa sustained the
witness never failed to remind his at-
torney quickly:
"What was your question t"
lie wore a haggard and careworn ex-


TIlE FOUR HUNDRED IN EUROPE.
The tendency of the present day is to
extremes, and to absurd variations upon
original schenwm. Every now and again
some prominent young society woman
seems to become seied with an irreslt-
ible desire to do something ridiculous,
and she proceeds to do so with sublime
indifference as to what the rest of the
world may think. Then it is that an
indignant public arises to point the fin-
ger of scorn, and adduces new and cogent
reasons for condemning the devotee of
fads to the company of fools and the
blind. Yet those who are gentle and'
charitable in their views will no doubt
find much to commend in anything the
Four HIundred may see fit to do.
A belated copy of the New York Jour-
nal announces, with pleasing regard to
effeminate detail, the approaching mar-
riage of Miss Helen Benedict to Mr.
Thomas Hastings, and Gotham society
is up and astir over the startling an-
nouncement. According to the Journal,
Miss Benedict is the most athletic young
woman in the entire Four Hundred. One
whole freak page of the Sunday Journal
is devoted to an exquisite description
of Miss Benedict's wedding trousseau,
with muscular illustrations sufficient to
convince any properly balanced person
that Miss Benedit should be doing the
streomgmaa stant In's dime museum.
According to the Journal, Miss Beee-


presion, and when not talking kept his
thin lips tightly compressed. He also
gave the jury several dramatic looks of
appeal.
lie said his company had, during the
month following the publication of the
original article, published another in
the form of a retraction.
The case required three days for its
disposition.


diet "sits a horse to perfection," "han-
dies a tiller like an old skipper," and
"can handle a four-in-hand like a profess
sional whip" (drive an obstinate ackass
like an odoriferous nigger, would be too
shocking to the fine sensibilities of the
Journal s readers, doneher know). To
further demonstrate her prowess in the
field of mannish accom pshmenth Mil
Benedict will astodlsh her friends and
co-faddists by herself manipulating to
the railway statilan on the day of her
wedding a gigantic automobile of sub.
dued (?) color, where, in all probability,
they will be met by a horde of open-
mouthed monstrosities who will loudly
cheer them for the heroic and edifying
performance.
Miss Benedict undoubtedly possess
peculiar advantapgs over the less ath-'
letie of her sex, for she can linger in the
parlor and play A Hot Time on. the
planner while awaiting hpbbs. return
after a night of revelry at the lub,"
and, as he saunters maJtiely iS, Helen
can throw up her dainty m ii .Jah him
in the wind, past him, a sttB in the
jaw, cross-counter, swig and deliver a
solar-plexus that would do credit to the
class of profemioja .b.ru 'who .wslk j
with a swagger and talk out of the cor-
ner of their mouths
Out of all this depr" ei circumstance
emerges the cheering faMt that, after the
wedding is over and the bottle have been
cleared away, there will he morn spots
on the moo, the tid will be higno,
and the sm will shine tIs It a utoed
alher.
All of which is imleusely amlig


4 f'


di i


", F
,,1.,


In Suit for $10,000 Dmages Against The
Metropolls---Jury Awarded Her $2,000




'.5..,.,


THE SUN


January 20, 1906


'DrE.*tAmL-mni


Staff of MOh



HIUHA.N. EYE


I I ra.sSt.


JACKSONVILLE,. -, FLORIDA

Nomurooy and Odtopathy
Beliovl that theme is od In all method
of trnutib doIs we te tO all tha
he been proven by the difmat mohools
of medldine snd ombiantd it under th
had of neaologr. The rstm esemb
all that Ioed4 In the old Mbohol of medl.
el-o.stoapthy. lbtrowmettes, hbrd, "
thy, pilam omitme, deertlis and by.
gitMs. WO handle oneAMl diame, al*
though the a te st M applable to
oMas to hrone troubles.and we p.W
dtlae on dims of th eye, nervous a.
te, stamanoh nid bowl trobles, oonuI.
5on0l, epUlpy. pi trgabjl, pileo
protatieo mad female di .e.

IW .T I i I


New York

Fashions

In Florida

For Smart tyl, in
Fun Phi we'll put
you next. o Agents
or "EFF-EFr' and

"Hijh-Art" Suits

Overooats and Rain.'
coats, Hawes and
Younl' $8.00 Hats,.
also tmon and No.
Name Hats Mail or-
ders solicited. ais-
faction guaranteed.

Standard
GlothinAg

Company
(One Price)


* uwhe Citiens Rank


The Cyar's Spy
(Continued from Tenth Page)
everywhere as. they walked orderly in
twos and three and fours to inspot the
town. In the square outside the Con
slate a squad from the agshil were
setting up a temporary bandstd,
where the ship's bdm was to playwhen
evening fell, while Hutoheson, perspir-
ing in his uniform, drove with the ad-
miral to make the palls of courtesy upon
the authorities which international eti-
quette demanded.
Myself, I had taken a boat out to the
Bulwark, the gret battleship lying the
admiral's flag. and was sitting on deck
with my old friend Captain Jack Durn-
ford of the Royal Marine. Each year
when the fleet pu t into Leghorn -we were
inseparable, for in long years past, at
Portsmouth, we bad been close friends,
and now he was able to pay me annual
visits at my Italian home.
He was on duty that morning, there
fore could not get ashore till after
luncheon.
"I'll dine with you, of course, to-night,
old chap," he said. "And you must tell
me all the news. We're in here for six
days, and I was half a mind to run home.
Two of our chaps got leave from the
admiral and left at 3 this morning for
London-four days in the train and two
in town I Gone to see their sweethearts,
I suppose."
The British naval officer in the Medi-
terranean delights to dash across Eu-
rope for a day at home if he can get
leave and funds will allow. It is gen-
erally reckoned that such a trip costs
about two pounds an hour while in Lon-
don. And yet when a man is away from
his fiancee or wife for three whole years,
his anxiety to get back, even for a brief
day, is easily understood. The young-
sters, however, go for mere caprice--
whenever they can obtain leave. This
is not often, for the admiral has very
fed views upon the matter.
"You time't soon up, isn't it?" I re-
marked, as I lolled back in the easy
deck chair, and gazed away at the white
port and its background of purple
Apennines. -.,:',., ,,
The dark, good-looking fellow in his
smart summer uniform leaned over the
bulwark, and said, with a slight sigh, I
i"ought-
"Yes. This is my last trip to Leg-
horn, I think. I go back in November,
and I really shan't be sorry. Three
years is a long time to be away from
home. You. go next week, you, say?
Lucky devil to be your own master! I
only wish I were. Year after year on
this deck grow* confoundedly wearisome,
I can tell you, my dear fellow."
"Durnford was a man who had writ-
ten much on naval affairs, and was ac-
cepted as an expert on several branches
of the service. The admiralty do .not
encourage officers to write, but in Durn-
ford's case it was recognized that of
naval topics he possessed a knowledge
that was of use, and, therefore, he was
allowed to write books and to contribute
critical articles to the service magazines.
lie had studied the relative strengths of
foreign navies, and by keeping his eyes
open he had, on many occasions, been
able to give valuable information to our
naval attaches at the embassies. More
than once, however, his trenchent crit-
icism of the action of naval lords liad
brought upon his head rebukes from
headquarters; nevertheless, so uni-
versally was his talent as a naval expert
recognised, that to write had never been
forbidden him as it had been to certain
others.


.... "How's Hutcheson7" he asked a mo-
OF JAKSONVILE meant later, turning and faring me.
TP d -pLient "Fit as a fiddle. Just back from his
D. U. Prudent month's leave at home. His wife is .till
.* .Vie Prsi dent tup in Scotland, however. She can't
0. D MNAM W Ve PrW dent stand Leghorn in summer."
J. DENHAM BIRD Cuher "No wonder. It's a perfect furnace
Ofters to depositors every facility con- when the weather begins to stoke up."
*dtent with safe and oonrvatve bank- go as moon as you've sailed. I only
ing; insuring absolute sourity. stay because I promised to act for
-- Frank," I said. "And by Jove I a funny
*ii pm i t Im- thing, occurred while I was in charge-a
4 :W am- r~ ih real first-dam mystery."
"A mystery-tell me," he exclaimed,
suddenly interested.
KWPU LMT A SA Tm "Well, a yacht-* pirate yacht, I be-
M l L M R M liHee it was-called heri"
"A pirateI Wbat do you meanV .
"Well, she was RM lih. Listen, and
~Ce^Iriq J15 U I'rll tell you the wbele affair. It'll be


something fresh to tell at mess, for I
know how you chaps get played out of
conversation."
"By Jove, yesl Things slump when
we get no mail. But go on-I'm listen-
ing," he added, as an orderly came up,
saluted, and handed him a paper.
"Well," I said, "let's cross to the other
side. I don't want the sentry to over-
hear."
"As you like-but why such mys-
tery?" he asked as we walked together
to the other side of the spick-and-span
quarter-deek of the gigantic battleship.
. "You'll understand when I tell you the
story." And then, standing together be-
neath the awning, I related to my friend
the whole of the curious circumstances,
just as I have recorded them in the fore-
goin pages.
"onfoundedly funny!" he remarked
with his dark eyes fixed upon mine. "A
mystery, by Jove, it is! What name did
the yacht bear?"
"The Lola."
"WhatT" he gasped, suddenly turning
pale. "The Loa? Are you quite sure
it was the Lola-L-O-L-A ?"
"Absolutely certain," I replied. "But
why do you ask? Do you happen to
know anything about the craft?"
"Mel" he stammered, and I could'~ee
that he had involuntarily betrayed the
truth, yet for some reason he wished to
conceal his knowledge from me. "Me!
How should I know anything about such
a craft? They were thieves on board
evidently-perhaps pirates, as you say."
"But the name Lola is familiar to you,
Jack, I'm sure it is, by your manner."
He paused a moment, and I could /see
what a strenuous effort he was making
to avoid betraying knowledge.
"It's-well-" he said hesitatingly,
with a rather sickly smile. "It's a girl's
name-a girl I once knew. The name
brings back to me certain memories."
"Pleasant ones-I hope."
"No. Bitter ones-very bitter ones,"
he said in a hard tone, striding across
the deck and back again, and I saw in
his eyes a strange look, half of anger,
half of deep regret.
(CONTINUED NEXT WEEK.)


EKXEPS M PW
l mI mm ulums O 4s Is Its 4
llunting Club Rye........2.. 66 $4 00 87 00
vulson County e ...... 290 4 Z 750
Monoran Rye.................. 4 o 0 00
lHnne's "44" Rye.............. 7A ? 00 9 60
orlal Drops............ 4 0 50 1200
Malt Whiskey................. 375.... 7 00
Peach Brandy........................ 3 00 950
Apple Brandy................. 3 75 6 00 950
Holland Gin .................... 2 W0 4 25 7 25
Geneva Gin ........................ 375 600 950
North Carolina Corn.......... 265 400 700
Mountain orn ............ 8 75 6 00 9 0
Jmnaica RUM 280 42 725
Medford Rum.................. 8 75 6 00 9 50
Omps Brandy .................... 8 75 6500 9
KIn of Kentucky Bourbon 875 6500 950


Building Materialm

Foundation to Finish


o1w pIISUwe PLvh
ow 6S"ifatligh
Wei Trea T RYu
Thsrdemb NY l RMh
I" Rhtbm


H. RICHARDSON & CO
Jackspoylfle, II


-''. .*(


'''I'


Windsor Hotel


Jacksonville's Finest
and florida's Largest
and Best Year-Round


Hotel


DODGE & GULLIENS
Owners and Managers


-
''II'


EULK MSS--S FRl-NOT PMPAMD
Rye. Gin. Corn. raoo d ...........................8... o
Rye. in1., Corn. Rumn, ane quality....... 20
tre. (in, (oni. Itum, best for the money ...... 2 ,0
"44" IKo. Pth and Applo ranildy, mellow.
ed by w. .................... ................ 3.. s
Victoria Rye, Social Drops Rye, medicinal
quality ................................................... 4 o00
LW IST.LM 1MIU pr1un
Falsiafl Beer................................. 25
extra e ..Pale........................... 1 10
Malt Extact, dark................. .... 110
Oobu er, imported ........... ........ ........... 2
Guinnems Stout, IU................... 225.......
MMsfty t- lrn hui.a"


W. Ada S. HANNE BROS


FlL,


4W7
RTI ItI.


14


.1
*


t. "


161,


d's


Florida-Georgia Syrup Company, Jacksonville, Fla.
Rectiyen ad Ditrilmton of

PURE FLORIDA CANE SYRUP
Put up in ahtidlt can of convenient size.
ASK YOUR GROCER FOR OUR GOODS--------.

Everythin I n Leather
Requisite Br Travelerst
TRUNKS, CAUS AND FANCY
LEATHER GOODS

Florida Trunk Mig Co.
JACKSONV AL, FL.U


PARTIAL- PRICE LIST OF

Wines, Whisles, Beer and Malt


17-19 W. Bay 8t.
Jacksonvll, lorida


A.


low-


, L*


' "* **


I










iuary 20, 1908 THE SUIQ 15


Try

"Green Brier"

ennessee Whisky

ITrS PURE
THAT'S SURE


t W Sim ms
SOLE AGENT


PtF&


FOR. GMaNIMAP. PRIme L

Real Cstate
ents and Loans


BUCKMAN

21-2 1-2 Hoan St
Jacksonville, Fla.

'Ida Electric Co.
JOBBERS
Ic Apparatus 9 Supplies


trters for everything electri-
nplete telephone exchanges
ate lines. Isolated electric
ing and power plants.


26, 28 W. Forsyth St
JitcktopvVlle, Fla.

L HE-
sodated Fruit Co.
DISTRIBUTE YOUR
PT AND VEGETABLES

( ts and LeTA than Car Lots.
WALTER HAWKINS.
^2 4t Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.

stmas


Pocket, Table and
Workbasket


Ida fiardw'e Co.
Jacksonville, Fla.
WW pMSpiN.


S Crop Beans
gees ........................$4
a Early Refugee......... 4
iest Valentine ............ 4
igleas Green Pod......... 6
s Kidney Wax ... ........ 5
k W ax ..................... 7
swell's Kidney Wax ... 6
M so Iw

~ 3A mS 0


Agriculture


(Continued from Sixth Page)
Willett M. Hays, Assistant Secretary
of Agriculture, declares in this number
of The Country Calendar that "the
farmer has come into his own." He
comprehensively reveals the tremendous
advance, that Amerioan opportunities
and ideals have brought to the Ameri-
can farmer. But these gentlemen in
the department at Washington, who sit
in easy chairs before big roller-top
desks and, between whiles, utter opin-
ions and predict possibilities, are not
just the persons to know exactly whether
the farmer has a secure grasp on "his
own" or whether some trust octopus is
not enfolding him and his in a slimy
embrace.
Florida is not the only place where
the beautiful but baneful water hya-
cinth is giving trouble to those who
dwell by still waters. Mexico City has
near it a large lake, used as a pleasure
resort and as a commercial avenue for
the great haciendas or estates in the
vicinity which is likely to be rendered
useless by the vast quantities of hya-
cinths upon its surface. It is reported
that the Government has made an offer
of $10,000 to any one who will present
a successful method of effectually clear-.
ing the lake, but thus far no one has
come forward with a proposition that
seemed feasible. In three years, it is
predicted, the lake will be destroyed, if
the hyacinths are not.


Helpful Hints
(Continued from Sixth Page)
ing of rooms and general hygienic and
sanitary requirements, as shie could be
were her whole mission in life to look
pretty,
That a few wide-awake, practical wo-
men have taken a stand against dark
houses is evidenced by the better pro-
visions for good lighting that may be
noted in a large number of the newly
built houses and flaN.
When such protests Ibcomo far-reach-
ing enough to make the renting of dark
houses difficult, then they will disappear
completely and forever.
The storeroom should be one of the
prides of the housewife.
Here, on her well-fiil.ed shelves, she
has material that. with skill and judg-
ment in preparing, will bring gladness
and cheer to her household and friend.
In her buying she has ,considered the
varying needs of her family, and her
stores represent and reflect herself.
A well-filled storeroom suggests hos-
pitality and plenty. It is a regrettable
fact that storerooms are falling into dis-
use in our larger cities.
There many families are living in
apartments where storerooms are not
considered in the building plans, and
food is bought as needed each day.
When entertaining is to be done a
caterer is called upon, and the result is
an unfortunate sameness in the menus.
But the country still has hundreds of
storerooms, and let us hope that they
may increase rapidly in the near future.
LADIES1 I make from $15 toS30 per week and
want you to have tbe name opportunity. The
work is very pleasant and will pay handsomely
for even your spare timen. I speak from expe-
rience. as I have often made $10 In a single lay.
This is no deception, I want no money, and will
ladly send full partlenlars free to all. Addr MRS. W. W. MITCHELL, Box 10. Portland, Me.

PARTNER WANTED


25
25 I Saem Eushem, Restamunt a
25 OnedI A oi the hoMt ba
00 juagj g u- iA& ep pod
00 dly I- I% WJto wk
00
The Clyde Saloon
NS L. mPOst mop.
sB Aab SteO. juk*clMls, f.


Strong and enduring


OLD HICKORY and
WHITE HICKORY WAGONS



T Ae amM
FiT *-y Tii An Mo








Columbuettes BuHas Ites
If Its Dr gs M

Aou. for Huiyle', Oumv .

Bettes Drug Store
ea. My ftam Law J m tws, F Mi.
%UM JT WMlT A LUTTU


JOSEPH ZAPF t 00.
Ifimam- 9A-


Sole Distrlbutors of the Celebrated
ANMNMSrUMUSON Mt, 'm of A
Also Wholeamlo Wines, Liquon,
Mineral Waters, Etc.
If you want Pure and Reliablo blood If rou want
the Beat In Every Respoct, call on us.

When Short of Cash
See Uncle Neal
He will help you out
personal property
BUSINESS CONFIDENTIAL

The Pawn & Loan Office
01 W. Ilyi, r. IrMp JuvM4-ls Fb.

DeSoto Pure Rye Whiskey


buv 16Mmh. 10 Ys tu ei


"U'oo for the shik-Not bad for the well."


4 Full Quarts, i.00-Ex)riem
1( Full Quarts, 7.(X0-Exprn
12 Full Quarts, 12.75--Expnr4
12 Full Quarts, 12.00-Freight


PrpWd
Prepaid
Prepaid
Prepald


Slima~


CHAS. BLUM a CO.
Jakaonvlle, Fa.

Something to Heat
Your Irons On


J. J. WILLIAMS
NMU m
P. 0. fls f41 j kmnOriMt

Beerine, Beerine,

What Does It Mean?


Thaf' Whatt Mo ulm:


Use Chips or any other Old
Thing for FueL
LASTS A LIFETIfME
HOLDS EIGHT IRONS

Costs You $2.25

Pellerin Furniture

14 mL St anmi, Flu.


To the nuind-Exhilaration
Without intoxication.
To the tIxly-l-ilaxation,
The end of constipation.
To the tast--A revelation
Of pricklinr.like sensatlon.
To the eye-An invitation
To quick invaigtliatlon.
To the weak-Invlgoration
And health's full rntoratlon.
To the stronr-A rereatloin,
A harmhwl stimulation.
To the young-An educatIon
To thrift and moderation.
To the old-RJbijuvonation,
Return of aspration.
To the traekr-Rich compensation
And wealth's arcunulatioln
To "Uncle Haina"-m*-q k1aUo 'til fr-e from all taxation.
telftitf-~ifilt


Coco Cola Bottling

Company
JACKSOIVILLI, RMflIIA


2~ .
~ b-~
9


rk


4'*&


I--, # ft


- 4


nuary'20, 1906


15


", ;?>:^.


TH- SUN








;~ *.,; :~.


.4


.4'.


rite and i exi our maT order syst of seo

Wit and x -d e x" ... our" ordersystemo t 'HInT "
i~ii exPin "" soiln i.o


< d JOIN THI PALMETTO PIANO GIUB AND SAVE C$13, s


94 4l
FenkE. Ch M AS


Manager


44


The Cale1 Company


Jacksonville,


Flodida.


SlJTURN FRIT Co'1
1too PP~irodue., G'ananro"4" -vvsom M oM]MI uion M --erhats.8~d uyour oOr
-U ~p'Orm" Mniappw diiVeMMtibe.~


all


4IE HOUSFURNIBHINGE
TOWERS HARDWARE CO..j NSACI
O O nn
We have an interesting Price List on Sash, Doors and Blinds. Write for it and it will be yours by mail.
Send also for our specially attractive Price List on Stoves.


I T I I I I I I / I i i .


41


$125' .. MH y IVIN
. IN MON N AWAY
To each subscriber of this paper ordering one of the fol-
lowing Grocery Assortmente, if order is received on or
before February 10. A certain number of these Assort-
ments will be sold at this special price. We reserve the
right to return your money if received too late. Ev-
erything is fresh and of the best quality.


.0 lbs best Granulated Sugar..................
2 lbs best Patent Flour ........................ 80
& lb carton Prepared flap Jack Flour.... 15
& lb carton Om ak ........ 1
: amcnI8 lb Tomhoe..............................
t cams Creamp u orn....................-
lage bottle Englah PlckleL..............
SIb pall pue Leaf Lard......................
- b h m eylon Tea ...................
p at bottle Tom o ( p.....................
Sb can 8tited pkln ..................... 15
' bcan Eg Plums In heavt syrup....
S8. b can BostonBa d Beans............. 15
1 boxes Sandtnei In o .................... 10
1 ean Poed Ha.-...............................
1 can PoUed Th6UU........ .. 5
I l-lb can o Om Beef .....................
Scan Chipped Drid.Bef........................ 15
I l.lb can O i ................................. 15


1 S.lb oan Peach Buntter....................... 1A
1 l.lb carton Golden Persian Datiw ......... 15
1 lb London Layer Raisins ................. 20
1 lb Mixed Nuts. new crop.................. 25
1 lb Clover Leaf Jersey Butter, nothing s
better ..................... ........... m
I glla jaar Pruit Jam.................. 15
1 lb Our 8pecal (lofee delicious ...........
4 lar b bar best Laudry oap........... 20
I Itbset Lump Sarch ........................... 1
1.4 lb best Black Pepper.......................
SIlbs Peawl Meal................................... 1.
Tlb Pearl (4rit.................................. s,
La our cash gift to you............... 1 '
Net P" .....................$g
*


In tion to this remarkable Hlberal offer M WUL PPAY
S--Ui i ii& STAfMM Order
at onoe that you may not Il to mere this great b~ un.
Write your name and railC station plainly, ramnitting $86.3&
by money order or registered letter to

Morton 't Depne Grocery Co.
b Mei emieN. (Me-_ -g mi-)
21 Ocen SI., Jacku ublUsheof th saPer.Bak
"- i ._ _-~ -- _. _- -i


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