Group Title: sun.
Title: The sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075914/00008
 Material Information
Title: The sun
Uniform Title: sun
Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sun Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: December 30, 1905
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tallahassee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Leon County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Leon -- Tallahassee
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.451667 x -84.268533 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 18, 1905)-v. 3, no. 47 (Sept. 12, 1908).
Numbering Peculiarities: Published at Tallahassee, Fla., June 23-Sept. 12, 1908.
General Note: Claude L'Engle, editor.
General Note: "If it's right, we are for it."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075914
Volume ID: VID00008
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33400104
lccn - sn 95047216
 Related Items
Other version: Morning sun (Tallahassee, Fla.)
Succeeded by: Dixie (Jacksonville, Fla.)

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Full Text


IN THIS NUMBER THE
PAGE 3


MECCA


OF


THE


TOURIST


Volume


1-No. 7


JAGKSONVILLE. FLORIDA. DGCEMBER 30. 1905


Single Gopy 5 Gents


4, C
K. <.:


4 -'t










.IF IT'S RIGHT, WE ARE POR IT-


CLAUDE L'ENOLE
Editor


A. K. TAYLOR
U Cartoonist


U WMam mWti Wil A WUL WO %W, P M FUWI PLS WPMU FLM, 11 SN NMW, AT BI Wr MgWSyiATr1MII, JMSItIU.,f
VoehM --No. 7 JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, DECEMBER 30, 1905 5 Cents per Copy, $2 per Year
Aptionmrt the Pot Offioe In Jacksonville, PFla., for idmimion to the mails U sMoond-c- matter


EMANCIPATION


PR CLAMA TION


This ii the season when the thoughts of all men, dwelling on past performances and seeing their imperfections, turn to the
days Oiat are to come with hope for better things. We, The Sun, whose mission is to diffuse light, to give warmth and to
proclaim truth; by the authority vested in us by the people of Florida, whose voice we are, do hereby reaffirm the principle
laid 4own by the fathers of this republic, "that all men are and have a right to be free." And do solemnly proclaim that,
durlft the year 1906, and as lont thereafter as The Sun lives, all men shall be free. To this end, and in order that this
proclamation shall be a living truth, a vital force and power in the land, we do most solemnly declare that The Sun shall be
free. We further declare, that the people of thp State of Florida are entitled to the best of all things, and that the best can
not be more worthily bestowed than by giving it to this people. To this end, and in order that" tlyis bestowing shall come to
pass in things literary, we hereby tender to the people our promise that The Sun shall live, and grow brighter and better while
life 1asts. To bring this promise iorne to each person who reads it, we print below a


PARTIAL PROSPECTUS FOR 1906


Gartoons
Mr. A. K. Taylor, the acknowledged leader of
cartooning in the South, has hit his stride, and
with no weights on his saddle and no handicap of
blue pencil pulling on the bit, lie will, by a series
of lcintlllatl4 caricatures, distance his pnat per-
fornnances, which have left all ollihers at the pomt.
Agriculture
8ince the death of the lamented Stephen .
lowers, no writerr on agriculture has appeared who
ten-ed wort~ly to wear his mantle until W. E.,
lPalbor made c known his talents through the me-
dium of T'l Sun. Mr. I'alaor will continue, as
editor of th4IAgricultural page of The Sun, and his
articles will e of practical blneit to the fnriner,
whowe 1)ro icto are the greatest source of the
State's wealth.


Woman's Department


Special attention will be given to this depart-
ment, in order that it may serve Its purpose to en-
tertain and Instruct the real rulers of the nation.
Interesting gossip about subjects feminine, and
newsy bits about things to eat and wear, will con-
tinue to be the feature of this department.


Fiction
After lekaucaire is concluded, a new serial will
be begun. This will be by a noted author, and
published for tlhe first time in The Sun. We have
two under final consideration, after rejecting fifty
or more. One is a great detective story, the other
a love story of today. Both are absorbing, vivid
portrayals of lifo as it is.
A sum of SI t Strih, complete in each issue.
These will be about Florida life, scenes and inci-
dents, written by Florida people.
The Nens Summary
Crisp paragraphs, containing the meat of the
subject, will park tdhi sumniary of the news of the
world for a week. This is lnot a summary of the
ready-made ordir which can be bought of enter-
prising news syttlcat's by tho yard for a few cents
per-it is made, in The Sun offike from material
gathered from newspapers published all over the
world, which The Sun subscrilxs to for this very
purpose.
The Editorial Pages
Will contains comment on topics that are inter-
eating the people. This comment will not he
tinctured by any flavoring whatsoever. It will be
for the greatest good to tihe greatest number as we
See it.


Short Humorous Sketches
That brilliant series, by Charles Battle Loomis,
will be continued for some time. They are illus-
trated by our Mr. Taylor, in the inimitable and
original Taylor style.
A new writer, whose nom de plume is T. Willie
Rockingham, has been enrolled on The Sun staff.
His "Essays in Common Time" will add a new
page to the vehicle of Carlyle and Emerson.
Other short sketches, by authors known and to
Ie known, will be added to this department.


Special Articles


Have been promised us by such well known
men as (ov. N. B. Broward, Hon. B. E. McLin,
HIon. Charles Dougherty, Gen. W. D. Ballentine,
Mr. C. E. Garner, Mr. Edwin Brobston, Mr. H.
HI. Buckman, Hon. Frank Clark, Mr. Z. C.
Chambliss, Mr. G.-H. Gaitskill, Editor Isaacs of
Fort Myers, and others. These articles will deal
with subjects of interest to Floridians at this par-
ticular time.
Opinions of State Editors
Will be presented each week. The reader can
keep in touch with the best thought of the State
by reading the extracts printed under the head
" Some Thinks by the Brethren."


We promise to do the best we can to make The Sun as you would like to have it. Write us about it, if you see anything in The
Sun that does not suit you, or that you think can be improved, and suggest things now left out that you think should be put in.
A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR TO ALL.


SUIT


FOR


$50,000


DAMAGES


Has been started by The Sun against those of the "Gum
. Bunch" who sent the clerk, Richard Sassnett, out to start
the boycott against The Sun. The best legal talent of the
city has been retained by The Sun to fight its battle in the
courts against illegal oppression.
iU I


THE










December 30, 1905


THE SUN


THE


MECCA


OF


THE


TOVRISJ


Palm Beach the Beautiful-The Land of Summer-Where Flowers and
Sunshine Plentifully Abound-Auspicously Has This Season Opened


Hundreds of readers of THE SUN will he inter-
e stled in the opening of the east coast winter season,
which took place Saturday evening, Decemler 23,
when, at the dinner hour, the doors of the Hotel
Breakers were hospitably opened wide.
To those hundreds of our readers who have vis-
ited Palm Beach during its season time, this an-
nouncement is of more than ordinary import, as it
calls up visions of beauty, grandeur and enjoyment
as are to be experienced nowhere else in Florida.
Palm Beach is the great center at which the
representative wealth and culture of the land gather
during the winter months. To have been there once,
in the full enjoyment of those pleasures which this
place affords, means a second visit, followed by other
regular visits, for it is undeniable that Palm Beach
truly has an irresistable charm, decidedly its own.
As usual, each year there is some marked inno-
vation or improvement at Palm Beach for the benefit
of the patrons of the two
large hotels, the Hotel
Royal Poinciana and the
Hotel Breakers, and thin
wason is no exception to
the rule.
At present many men are
at work engaged in the pro-
cess of giving additional
width to the bridge across
Lake Worth. By means of
a series of brackets, made of
heavy timber, which are
fastened to the piers of the
bridge, the width of the
bridge has been widened six
feet on the south side of the
structure.
This change will enable
automobilists ample room
to cross the bridge with
their machines, and for
them to pass each other in
crossing.
Along the lake front,
Broadway will be widened
and repaved for' the benefit
of the automobilists, and
for the first time in the his-
tory of Palm Beach the
means of conveyance about
the resort will be other
than by wheel chair. With
this, the first Palm Beach
season to afford the motor
enthusiasts the opportunity
to speed their machines, the
renowned gayety of Palm
Beach will take on added
luster and brilliancy. Many
tine and magnificent ma-
chines will be seen there this season, and to accom-
modate them a commodious garage is now being
erected.
This large structure will be on the Pahn Beachl
side of Lake Worth, and will be near the grounds
of the Beach Club, this being a splendid location,
easily accessible and most convenient. The founda-
tions will largely be laid in the lake, as the west
end of the arage will extend a hundred feet or more
into Lak Worth. The foundations and walls are of
coquina, upon which the superstructure will be
erected. In every way the arrangements and appoint-
ments will be such as to accommodate the most fan-
tidious tastes and the requirements of those whose
patronage the garage will enjoy. The building will
present a handsome and picturesque appearance,
with the greater part of its walls arising from the
waters of the lake.
The electric launch equipment has been increased
this year, and there will he some improvements of
an ornamental character to the Venetian basin, into
and from whleh the swift, easy-going launches glide
in a continuous parade all day long during the sea-
non. This life on the water feature of Palm Beach
in one of its leading delights and pastimes, and espe-
cially attractive has it been to the very wealthy
class of visitors.
OTHER ATTRACTIONS.
The Casino, at the ocean side, is pretty in its
new adornments and with its new cost of Colonial
yellow paint with white trimmings.
The jungle trail has ben widened in places; new
side trails haw been established, and the trail proper
has been atxt.we la a few weeks from now the


jungle trail will present a lively scene, with the
comfortable wheel chairs saptling to and fro with
their fashionably-dres7l passengers.
At the Beach Club all preparations are about com-
pleted for the entertainment of its patrons.
The musiv, cuisine and attractions at the Beach
('Chl will this season ex e l those of the past. The
grounds surrounding the building are prettily laid
out and attractively eneholished with rare and trop-
ical plants.
The famous Palm Walk, from the Hotel Royal
Poinciana to the Hotel Breakers, never showed to
Is'tter advantage, a view of the walk being shown
in this issue. The tall stately palnms are now
crowned with magnificent fronds overlapping each
other in tropical profusion, while the rows of mam-.
moth hibiscus bushes are riotous in their gay gar.
ments of flaming, dazzling scarlet blooms, in many
CKases aImost completely hiding the bright, vigorous
green of the beautiful leaf of the plant. last week


INTEII)lt Vil'W' 1"' TillHE, Itltl;EAKEi't..
the line of incandescents along this walk was turned
on at night, and the' sene presented was that of a
veritable fairyland. Thet Australian pine walk alsoim)
shows what care and attention will accomplish in
the complete and perfect ensemble of landscape gar-
dening.
At the Gun Club grounds and on the golf links
devotees of those forms of sport and game will find
new and added attractions.
HOTEL BREAKER OPENS.
For the opening of the Hotel Breakers, last Satur-
day, preparations had been going on in advance, and
the hotel presents its irresistable attraction of com-
fort and charm to visitors and patrons as they enter
its hospitable portals. Early last Saturday morn-
ing the starry banner was raised on one of the two
flag poles of the two massive towering turrets of
the hotel, while from the other flag pole floated the
white banner of the hotel with its "The Breakers"
in large red capitals.
In the main rotunda the moss-green carpets had
been laid, the white wicker furniture grouped and
the stately palms and potted plants, in their jardi-
nieres, placed at attractive vantage points of decor.
ation.
Patrons of this hotel have been waiting in this
city. St. Augustine and other points along the east
coast, so that The Breakers Is daily filling with
patrons as each train arrive
When dinner was served last Saturday evening
the red ad white dining room was brilliant witl


electric lights, and those who were present gave the
hint of the merry mene soon to be witnessed, within
a few weeks, when the hotel will be filled.
The music, as usual, will be under the direction
of Signor Miglionico, who has already been at Palm
Beach for several days, his band of fine musicians
to arrive to-day.


REGULARS EN EVIDENCE.


Among the well known regulars who registered
at the opening were noticed the names of Charles II.
Hall of New York City, D. E. 'Rhumaker of Atlanta,
(Ia., and W. 1). Iarkee of New Jersey. They came
early, the first to register being Captain Hall, who
always reaches Palm Beach a day or two before open-
ing day. As usual, he is awaiting the arrival of the
other members of the Pinnochle Corner, several of
whom are now on route to Florida.
Amtdng the other regulars noticed were Mr. and
Mrs. Otto Young of Chicango,
with their attractive daugh-
ter, Mrs. Catherine .'anny
Hobart, andti their golpden-
haired anid pretty grand-
daughter. They have con11
early in thire seasemil, Iae'rdl-
Ing to their ecustomn and will
remain until late spring.
Mr. Young is proprietor of
The Fair, the hig depart-
nment store of Chicago, and
the "Macy" of that city.
Charles i (Uragin aliso
nlte i(early, having been at
him ettage up the lake. Mr.
Cragin came for the open-
ing of The Breakers, ant
was joined by Mrs. ('ragin,
who reached Pahlim leach on
a the night train. They will
entertain niany friends this
season, as wil also a numn-
Iin rof the other cottage s.
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene M.
O'Neil of Pittshurg, wimae
have been abroad, visiting
mainly in England and Ne*t.
land, are at Palm Ileatath
and enjoying winter life' at
their ocean front cottage,
the "Ocean Vidtew." Mr.
,tlld Mrs. Charles Ilingham
of Buffalo were the first ar.
rivals of e winter colony,
and have, been in their
ocean front cottage, "The
Nautilus," since early No.
venber. Mrs. Ilingham's
health is much improved,
and she has been men out
oft en in her wheel chair. Mr. Bingham will, as is
his customni, devote much time to pileatorial sports.
It in hardly likely that the adjoining cottage,
"The Reef," in which Joe Jefferson lived, will be
e'cupied this season, as Mrs. Jefferson will probably
remain in New York City this winter on account
of her youngest son, who has entered into business
there.
The other cottagers to arrive are Mr. and Mrs.
Frederick Rohbert of New York City, who have already
Ien for several weeks at their cottage, "Fleur d'Eau.

GETTINGO THE RIO HOTEL READY.
Over at the Hotel Royal Poinelana, the closedl
appearance of thin mammoth structure Is rather de-
IJptive to the general observer until he learns that
within this earavansary an army of men is at work
Iumily engaged, day and night, in attending to the
work of detail incident to the opening of the largest
hotel in the world. The work of this army of men
is supplemented by that of several hundred women,
who are under the direction of the head housekeeper,
and are enaed in getting the various apartments
and suites in complete readinem.
Supervising all the work is Manager red W.
Sterry, who arrived at Palm Beach ten days ago in
his private ear "Signet," and to whose remarkable
eneutive ability and phenomnal management are
due the great success whlh Palm Beach enjoys as
a wonder water resort. Mr. Stny be seen,
seemingly, everywhere over the lage M d f
ints. w Msk legwlrm M. # I 15 5s7 .,'
(Cp I aui

















THE


SUN


OF


4--.
* 0-~ *
A;.


December 30, 1905



L TE


LE BLOYI 60T U5 Oh THE HERD,
D tS [IADE U5 DIZY, BUT
THE IIIIOCEn T SPECThTOR ,
IU5UAL GOT THE FULL FORCE
-OQf REIN THE o05E.


I-


An attempt was made to stab Cardinal Casanas
y Pages at Bereelona, Spain.
*
The fighting in Moscow Sunday assumed the na-
ture of butchery by machine guns.
ft
Raymond Prefountaine, the Canadian Minister of
Marine and Fisheries, died suddenly in Paris.
t
President Morales has left Santo Domingo city,
his destination being generally unknown.
t *t
For the first time, so far as known, Moorish
native workmen of Tangier have gone on strike.
*f
It is estimated that not less than 200,000 of New
York's needy were supplied with Christmas cheer by
public and private charity.
t *t
King Victor Emmanuel has expressed himself to
President Tucker of the Jamestown Expoqition Com-
pany as favorable to the participation ofthe Italian
Government in the exposition.
ft t
At St. Augustine subscriptions are being taken
for stock in a $28,000 gas company to be organized
by romlinUt citizens of that city. Gas is to be fur-
anuld for lighting and fuel purposes.

Prparations for the celebration of the jubilee
is 19s of the ordination of Pope Piufs X.. as a
priest. are now benlg made. According to his views
Wa 'wishes the celebration will be strictly of a relig.
lous character.


Improvements to 'the electric light plant at Day-
tona, amounting to nearly $20,000, have been almost
completed.

At Miami the trend of business has been so satis-
factory and money so plentiful that the merchants
have by far exceeded any previous holiday business
on record.

Miami is to have a new industry within a short
while. A plant is to be erected at which artificial
brick will be manufactured from crushed native rock,
blended with cement.
*f
The managers of the Hotel Ormond are pushing
the scheme to have a depth of at least four feet of
water at the intersection of the Halifax and Tomoka
rivers. In this wprk they will have the cooperation
of all boat owners in Daytona.
*
The strike of the post and telegraph employees
at Warsaw is at an end, the men resuming work to-
day. The strikers accepted the conditions of the
Government. The Military Governor has issued an
order prohibiting the street sales of newspapers, the
singing of revolutionary songs, the holding of meet-
ings and the organizing of processions.
0 0
At Tampa the manufacture of cigars continues
weekly on the increase. Shipments of cigars from
Tampa for the week ending December 16, were 5,135,-
000. Previously reported shipments for this year
were 206.785,000. Total shipments from January 1
to December 16 were 211,020,000. Total shipments
for the corresponding period of last year were 190,.
(195,000. The increase of shipments for this year to
date is 21,225,000 cigars.


0 *


The nineteenth annual session of the Florida State
Teachers' Association has been held this week at Mi-
ami, with a large attendance of prominent men and
women present, President A. A. Murphree presiding.
At the opening of the session prayer was offered by
Rev. W. W. Farris, D.D. Those in attendance were
welcomed by Hon. Mitchell D. Price, the other speak-
ers being Prof. W. W. Hall and Dr. Andrew Sledd.
President Murphree delivered his annual address, isr
which he spoke of conditions and needs, and gave
valuable advice as the result of his experience. The
session was the best attended of any ever held by the
association.

The site, for the Governor's mansion has been
selected, as the commission has formally accepted
the site for the mansion so generously offered by
Hon. Geo. W. Saxon, president of the Capital City
Bank, of six lots in the Long Grove Addition to the
city of Tallahassee, which lies directly at the head
of Adams Street, the street the west side of the
State capitol. The very handsome property thus ac-
quired is covered with a thick growth of large trees
of the natural forest, and comprises an area approx-
imating one and one-half acres. The commission
also secured at a low price an option on the two lot.
lying immediately north of the accepted site, which
would make the entire area about two and a half
acres in extent,


Sf EE


TR S UN~


The Winter Haven Cooperative Company of Polk
County has begun operations on the construction
of a large warehouse at Winter Haven. In this same
town the capacity of Florence Villa has been in-
creased, due to the growth of its fashionable patron-
age.

Work on the county rock road between West Palm
Beach and Miami progresses, and the gap between
Delray and Fort Lauderdale will be completed by
the first day of January, 1906. This will make a
continuous hard-surface road from a point three
miles north of West Palm Beach to Cutler.
S* *
The renewal of old markings and the making of
a new and complete geodetic survey of the east coast
is the work in which Isaac Winston, C. E., and his
staff are engaged. Mr. Winston, who is an assistant
engineer of the United States Coast and Geodetic
Survey, will resurvey the coast and channels and
replace the markings.

Hon. James A. Donelly, now Vice-Consul at New
Orleans, has been appointed to fill a similar position
at Pensacola, and is expected to arrive there next
week. During the week Pensacola has seen two im-
portant meetings held, when the Escambia Medical
Association, also the Catholic Knights and Ladies
of America, were in annual session.

To protect the property-owners from loss; caused
by the theft of fruits, flowers and vegetables; the
Protective Association has been organized' at St.
Augustine. The society will pay a reward of $25
and will also bear the cost of the trial of any person
found guilty of committing any depredation upon
the property of members of the association.

The steamer St. Lucie has arrived at Miami, and
will be used by her owners, the Florida East Coast
Railway Company, in the construction of the exten-
sion of this railway to Key West. A fleet of six
additional steamers, from Mobile, has been engaged
for use in the work of completion of this formidable
engineering project.
ft *
The city fathers of the Ancient City have framed
an ordinance which will relieve the congested con-
dition of St. George Street, one of the narrowest
streets in the world. A system has been proposed
by which wagons and carriages will follow certain
routes to insure the convenience of the public, and
especially that of the tourists during the busy winter
season now at hand.
*
An injunction suit has been brought against the
trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund of Flor-
ida by the Tallahassee Southeastern Railway Com.
pany, which seeks to enjoin said trustees from dis-
posing of, paying out or otherwise appropriating any
money now in their custody or control arising from
the* sale of about 110,000 acres of land situated in
the counties of Taylor and Lafayette, and sold b
the trustees to the Tallahassee Southeastern Rail-
way Company, deeds being placed in escrow in the
First National Bank of Tallahassee.












December 30, 1905


SUVMMdR Y

As a precautionary measure to protect French
residents, the French North Squadron has been
ordered to the Baltic.
*
Henry Labouchere, the well known Liberal, has
decided not to be a candidate for re-election to Par-
liament owing to advancing age.
*
President Castro withdrew the note to M. Tlagny,
which gave offense to the French Government, and
the incident in regarded as closed.
1 *
Quarantine restrictions have now been removed
between Cuba and all Florida points, and travelers
and tourists can now visit Cuba without incon-
venience or interruption of any kind.
**
At Pittsburg an effort is being made to form a
combination of the iron and steel interests, to have
a capital stock of about $150,000,000. Large con-
cerns in the South will be greatly interested in the
combine.

Uric La Fontaine, Police Justice, has been dis-
missed from the position as extraordinary commis-
sioner by the Dominion Government. La Fontaine
issued writs of extradition in many cases, among
them being the Gaynor-Greene proceedings.
0 *
The cigar industry is assuming increased propor-
tions at Miami, where those now engaged in the in-
dustry are enlarging their shops. New factories are
also being started, among these being B. B. Tatum,
who recently secured the street franchise there.

The bankers' great dread at St. Petersburg is that
of a financial crisis, which may be precipitated if
Berlin should decline to extend paper due January
1. At the capital of the German empire large
amounts of Russian commercial paper are held.

Justice Greenbaum, in the Supreme Court, has
garnted a writ of mandamus to Clarence H. Venner
ind one hundred other pl licy-holders. Thie writ di-
rects President John A. McCall of the New York
Life to furnish them with a complete list of policy-
holders.

Manager Frazier of the Florida Ostrich Farm, in
this city, has not only increased his fine collection
of tame birds and animals at the farm, but has ex-
tended the scope of the attractiveness of the place
by the addition of a superb menagerie of wild ani-
mals.

Abraham H. Hummell, the lawyer convicted of
conspiracy in the Dodge-Morse divorce case, and re-
leased on $10,000 bail, was rearrested Tuesday. He
was released again immediately on $10,000 new bail
on a writ of habeas corpus. Hlummell was arrested
in order that the District Attorney might question
the right of the Supreme Court to admit him to bail.
*0
In Moscow the situation remains unchanged, and
the guerilla warfare continues between the troops
ana the revolutionists. The Government expects to
crush the revolt there within the next few days.
In Poland the people feel that the time has come
to throw off the autocratic oppression under which
they have so long chafed, and a rebellion is immi-
nent.
*
The authorities and citizens in Dad(le County,
particularly at Coacoanut Grove and Miami, have
placed a patrol on the public roads. After 10
o'clock at night the best known and most popular
citizens will have to give an account of themselves
to the special patrolman wherever he may be en-
countered as will also have to be done by the un-
known visitor stranger or any citizen. This meas-
ure has become necessary on account of recent mur-
der and atrocities perpetrated in that section by
unknown criminals and is considered as the only
method by which the communities there can be
kept free from an undesirable class.
0 0


In anticipation of a run, two financial institu-
tions at Memphis. Tenn., have been forced to suspend
business. The officials of the two concerns involved,
the Merchants' Trust Company and the American
Savings Bank and Trust Company, have made the
statement that the depositors will be protested. Re-
eivers have been appointed. W. BhvJte, pres-


OF


THE SUN




THEt


dent of the Memphis Clearing House, stated that
"*represmptatives of the large banks of New York,
Chicago and St. Louis are in the city, with great
quantities of money in furtherance of the legitimate
business interests of the city. Old and experienced
bankers and memlners of the Memptis Clearing House,
Association have the situation well in hand. No
danger is apprehended, and the commercial interests
of the city are competent to meet any situation that
is liable to arine."

Francis Hendricks, State Superintendent of the
State Insurance Department of New York, hasil ien
on the stand during the past few days, and has lWen
probed by the committee of investigation. lie ad-
mitted that the whole effort of the department was
directed toward ascertaining the solvency of compa-
nies, and that he regarded the department as power-
less to check extravagance or other abuses whieh
did not affect the soundness of the company. Ilsl
testimony showed that little serious effort was made
to get beneath the surface of conditions, and there
was every indication that he depended largely upon
his subordinates.

No expense has been spared by the management
of the Manufacturers' Pure Food Expisition in its
efforts to make the event not only successful in every
way, but in its provision for the comfort, pleasure
and entertainment of the thousands of visitors who
will be in attendance. The exposition will he opened
this next week, and the immense amount of detail
work to finish, decorate and exhibit is now being
done with wonderful dexterity and rapidity. It bha
been found necessary by President MeMilIan of the
exposition to make a number of changes in the spe-
.al feature days so as to suit all concerned. Owing


NEWS


to the fact that the State Retail Grocers' AMoc-a.
tion havq their annual convention Tuesday, January
1), the date having been arranged esweially for the
Pure Food Ex ioition, the Jacksonville Retail (ro-
vcru' D)uy has Ieen changed from Friday, January 5,
to 'lTuslay, Janniiury 1), und the Wholeale (irocers'
Day Ilhas iWen changed from Wednesday, January 10,
to 'Tluesdl, ,laniury I). A Fraternal Day will be
s' t41lishIit1 idlring tiw second week of the exposition.
Thl'' d(lit Mill Ihe st by the commnnittie latA'r. Munici-
pal Day lhain bl'ien t for Monday, January 18.

At the ofilee of August lBelmont of New York
City a stateiient lits lxmn given out as to the con-
olidiation of the InterlOrough and Metropolitan in-
tornsts. The statetnent was: "Mr. Belmont and
Mr. Ityan, after consultation with their respctve
amwiilatAe, have approved a plan for the union of
the Interborough and Metropolitan interests, which
will le formally submitted to the stockholders of the
corporationss involved as soon as the lawyers have
completedd tlhe nece wary papers. The plan cotem-
iplatcM the organization of a new company, which
shall ix sie its securities in acquiring tie shares of
the Interlorough, Metropolitan Street Railway and
.Metropolitan Flecurites Company's upon the follow-
ing turnls: For every share of Interborough stock
new collateral trust, 4 1-2 per cent bonds, secured
Iy the deposit of Interborough stocks, $200; new
common stock, $00. For every share of Metropolitan
Street RalHway stock, new 6 per cent cumulative pre-
fyerred stark. $100; new common stock, $80. For
every share of Metropolitan Securities stock (with
$75 per lhre paid), new common stock, $8U. It is
confidently believed that the proposed arrangements
will not 9ly be beneficial to the stockholders of the
corporation involved, but that it will be advan-
tageous to the city and to the publo."


WEEK'S















THEI


SUN


OF


December 30, 1905



L TE


The Winter Haven Cooperative Company of Polk
County has begun operations on the construction
of a large warehouse at Winter Haven. In this same
town -the capacity of Florence Villa has been in-
creased, due to the growth of its fashionable patron-
age.

Work on the county rock road between West Palm
Beach and Miami progresses, and the gap between
Delray and Fort Lauderdale will be completed by
the first day of January, 1906. This will make a
continuous hard-surface road from a point three
mile north of West Palm Beach to Cutler.

The renewal of old markings and the making of
a new and complete geodetic survey of the east coast
is the work in which Isaac Winston, C. E., and his
staff are engaged. Mr. Winston, who is an assistant
engineer of the United States Coast and Geodetic
Survey, will resurvey the coast and channels and
replace the markings.

Hon. James A. Donelly, now Vice-Consul at New
Orleans, has been appointed to fill a similar position
at Pensacola, and is expected to arrive there next
week. During the week Pensacola has seen two im-
portant meetings held, when the Escambia Medical
Association, also the Catholic Knights and Ladies
of America, were in annual session.


* *


THE BLOTI OT U3 Oh THE HERD,
RND MftS M[DE US DI2ZY, BUT
THE INIIO(ETIT SPECTATOR,
USUAL (GOT THE FULL FORCE
f, "IRE IN THE 05E.


I-


An attempt was made to stab Cardinal Cassanas
y Pages at Bercelona, Spain.
*
The fighting in Moscow Sunday assumed the na-
ture of butchery by machine guns.

Raymond Prefountaine, the Canadian Minister of
Marine and Fisheries, died suddenly in Paris.
*
President Morales has left Santo Domingo city,
his destination being generally unknown.
*
For the first time, so far as know. Moorish
native workmen of Tangier have gone on strike.
*
-It is estimated that not less than 200,000 of New
York's needy were supplied with Christmas cheer by
public and private charity.
*
King Victor Emmanuel has expressed himself to
President Tucker of the Jamestown Expo"ition Com-
pany as favorable to the participation of the Italian
Government in the exposition.
*
At St. Augustine subscriptions are being taken
for took in a $85,000 gas company to be organized
by prominent eitiaens of that city. Gas is to be fur-
nised for lighting and fuel purposes.

Preparations for 'the celebration of the jubilee
ia IiO of the ordination of Polpe Plus X., as a
priest are now being made. According to his views
'wishe. the celebration will be strictly of a relig.
lousy crater.


Improvements to 'the electric light plant at Day-
tona, amounting to nearly $20,000, have been almost
completed.

At Miami the trend of business has been so satis-
factory and money so plentiful that the merchants
have by far exceeded any previous holiday business
on record.

Miami is to have a new industry within a short
while. A plant is to be erected at which artificial
brick will he manufactured from crushed native rock,
blended with cement.
*


The managers of the Hotel
the scheme to have a depth of
water at the intersection of the
rivers. In this wprk they will
of all boat owners in Daytona.
*


Ormond are pushing
at least four feet of
Halifax and Tomoka
have the cooperation


The strike of the post and telegraph employees
at Warsaw is at an end, the men resuming work to-
day. The strikers accepted the conditions of the
governmentt. The Military Governor has issued an
order prohibiting the street sales of newspapers, the
singing of revolutionary songs, the holding of meet-
ings and the organizing of processions.
0
At Tampa the manufacture of cigars continues
weekly on the increase. Shipments of cigars from
Tampa for the week ending December 16, were 5,135,-
000. Previously reported shipments for this year
were 20,.785,000. Total shipments from January 1
to December 16 were 211,920.000. Total shipments
for the corresponding period of last year were 190,-
695,000. The increase of shipments for this year to
date is 21,25,000 cigars.


To protect the property-owners from loss, caused
by the theft of fruits, flowers and vegetables; the
Protective Association has been organized* at St.
Augustine. The society will pay a reward of $25
and will also bear the cost of the trial of any person
found guilty of committing any depredation upon
the property of members of the association.

The steamer St. Lucie has arrived at Miami, and
will be used by her owners, the Florida East Coast
Railway Company, in the construction of the exten-
sion of this railway to Key West. A fleet of six
additional steamers, from Mobile, has been engaged
for use in the work of completion of this formidable
engineering project.

The city fathers of the Ancient City have framed
an ordinance which will relieve the congested con-
dition of St. George Street, one of the narrowest
streets in the world. A system has been proposed
by which wagons and carriages will follow certain
routes to Insure the convenience of the public, and
especially that of the tourists during the busy winter
season now at hand.
4 *


An injunction suit has been brought against the
trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund of Flor-
ida by the Tallahassee Southeastern Railway Com-
pany, which seeks to enjoin said trustees from dis-
posing of, paying out or otherwise appropriating any
money now in their custody or control arising from
the* sale of about 110,000 acres of land situated in
the counties of Taylor and Lafayette, and sold by
the trustees to the Tallahassee Southeastern Rail-
way Company, deeds being placed in escrow in the
First National Bank of Tallahassee.


* *


The nineteenth annual session of the Florida State
Teachers' Association has been held this week at Mi-
ami, with a large attendance of prominent men and
women present, President A. A. Murphree presiding.
At the opening of the session prayer was offered by
Rev. W. W. Farris, D.D. Those in attendance were
welcomed by Hon. Mitchell D. Price, the other speak-
ers being Prof. W. W. Hall and Dr. Andrew Sledd.
President Murphree delivered his annual address, in
which he spoke of conditions and needs, and gave
valuable advice as the result of his experience. The
session was the best attended of any ever held by the
association.
*
The site for the Governor's mansion has been
selected, as the commission has formally accepted
the site for the mansion so generously offered by
Hon. Geo. W. Saxon, president of the Capital City
Bank, of six lots in the Long Grove Addition to the
city of Tallahassee, which lies directly at the head
of Adams Street, the street the west side of the
State capitol. The very handsome property thus ac-
quired is covered with a thick growth of large trees
of the natural forest, and comprises an area approx-
imating one and one-half acres. The commission
also secured at a low price an option on the two lots
lying immediately north of the accepted site, which
would make the entire area about two and a half
acres in extent.


SEEN


TH~ Stl?#


Bt Y











December 30, 1905


SUVMMR Y

As a precautionary measure to protect French
residents, the French North Squadron has been
ordered to the Baltic.
**
Henry Labouchere, the well known Liberal, has
decided not to be a candidate for re-election to Par-
liament owing to advancing age.
*S
President Castro withdrew the note to M. Tiagny,
which gave offense to the French Government, and
the incident is regarded as closed.
0 *
Quarantine restrictions have now been removed
between Cuba and all Florida points, and travelers
and tourists can now visit Cuba without incon-
venience or interruption of any kind.
*
At Pittsburg an effort is being made to form a
combination of the iron and steel interests, to have
a capital stock of about $150,000,000. Large con-
cerns in the South will be greatly interested in the
combine.

Uric La Fontaine, Police Justice, has been dis-
missed from the position as extraordinary commis-
sioner by the Dominion Government. La Fontaine
issued writs of extradition in many cases, among
them being the Gaynor-Greene proceedings.

The cigar industry is assuming increased propor-
tions at Miami, where those now engaged in the in-
dustry are enlarging their shops. New factories are
also being started, among these being B. B. Tatum,
who recently secured the street franchise there.

The bankers' great dread at St. Petersburg is that
of a financial crisis, which may be precipitated if
Berlin should decline to extend paper due January
1. At the capital of the German empire large
amounts of Russian commercial paper are held.

Justice Greenbaum, in the Supreme Court, has
garnted a writ of mandamus to Clarence H. Venner
and one hundred other lolicy-holders. Tlhe writ di-
rects President ,John A. McCall of the New York
Life to furnish them with a complete list of policy-
holders.

Manager Frazier of the Florida Ostrich Farm, in
this city, has not only increamsd his fine collection
of tame birds and animals at the farm, but has ex-
tended the scope of the attractiveness of the place
by the addition of a superb menagerie of wild ani-
mals.

Abraham H. Hummell, the lawyer convicted of
conspiracy in the Dodge-Morse divorce case, and re-
leased on $10,000 bail, was rearrested Tuesday. He
was released again immediately on $10,000 new bail
on a writ of habeas corpus. Hlummell was arrested
in order that the Distriet Attorney might question
the right of the Supreme Court to admit him to bail.
0
In Moscow the situation remains unchanged, and
the guerilla warfare continues between the troops
ana the revolutionists. The Government expects to
crush the revolt there within the next few days.
In Poland the people feel that the time has come
to throw off the autocratic oppression under which
they have so long chafed, and a rebellion is immi-
nent.
*
The authorities and citizens in Dade County,
particularly at Coacoanut Grove and Miami, have
placed a patrol on the public roads. After 10
o'clock at night the best known and most popular
cltisens will have to give an account of themselves
to the special patrolman wherever he may be en-
countered as will also have to be done by the un-
known visitor stranger or any citizen. This meas-
ure has become necessary on account of recent mur-
der and atrocities perpetrated in that section by
unknown criminals and is considered as the only
method by which the communities there can be
kept free from an undesirable class.
0 5


In anticipation of a run, two financial institu-
tions at Memphis, Tenn., have been forced to suspend
business. The officials of the two concerns involved,
the Merchants' Trust Company and the American
Savings Bank and Trust Company, have made the
statement that the depositors will be protected. Re-
eivers hav been appoiatd. 0. W. Bchulte pre-


OF


THE SUN



THE


dent of the Memphis Clearing House, stated that
"represetatives of the large banks of New York,
Chicago and St. Louis are in the city, with great
quantities of money in furtherance of the legitimate
business interests of thie city. Old and expericncede
bankers and mnemlNwrs of the Mlemphis (Clearing House
Association have tle situation well in hand. Nio
danger i appreendd, nded, and the commercial interests
of the city are competent to meet any situation that
is liable to arise."

Francis ilendricks, State Superintendent of tihe
State Insurance Department of New York, has been
on the stand during thie past few days, and has ls'sn
probed by the committee of investigation. eit ad--
mitted that tihe whole effort of the department was
directed toward ascertaining the solvency of compa-
nies, and that he regarded the department as power-
less to check extravagance or other abuses whieh
dlid not affect the soundness of the company. Hlis
testimony showed that little serious effort was made
to get beneath the surface of conditions, and there
was every indication that he depended largely upon
his sultordinates.

No expense ias bieen spared by the management
of the Manufacturers' Pure Food Expisition in its
efforts to make the event not only successful in every
way, but in its provision for the comfort, pleasure
and entertainment of the thousands of visitors who
will Ih in attendance. The exposition will ti opened
this next week, and the immense amount of detail
work to finish, decorate and exhibit is now being
done with wonderful dexterity and rapidity. It hma
been found necessary by President MeMIllan of the
exposition to make a number of ehages in the e-
al fatura day o aw to alt all &Uow


NEWS


to the fcet that the State Retail Grocers' Amnoila-
tion havo their annual convention Tuesday, January
1f, thle date having bwen arranged especially for the
Pure KoHid Ex smition, the Jacksonville Retail (Iro-
ucirm' Day Jias IMn'i changed from Friday, January 5,
to TiiMiday, .Janiiury 1,. and the Wholesale (roexrs'
)ay lihs ten' changed from Weldnesday, January 10,
to TIiesdly, Jaminumary A Fraternal Day will be
established during the ,emeond week of the exposition.
ThIe late will be sot by the committee later. Munici-
pal Day has l1ein met for Monday, January 15.
*
At the office of August Ihelmont of New York
City Ia statemeniit has Ibeen given out as to the con-
solidation of the Interli)rough and Metropolitan in-
te'restP. The statement was: "Mr. Belmont and
Mr. Ityan, after consultation with their repective
iiMo4eiite4s, have approved a plan for the union of
the Interborough and Metropolitan Interests, which
will Ie, formally submitted to the stockholders of the
corporations involved as soon as the lawyers have
co|mpletA)el thie necessary papers. The plan coutem-
plates the organization of a new company, which
shall isnsM its securities in acquiring te shares of
the Int4erlNrough, Metropolitan Street Railway and
Metropolitan Securities Company's upon the follow-
ing terms: For every share of Interborough stock
.new collateral trust, 4 1-2 per cent bonds, secured
ly the deposit of Interborough stocks, $200; new
common stock, $00. For every share of Metropolitan
Street Raiway took, new 6 per cent cumulative pre-
ferred ato%*, $100; new common took, $50. For
every shal of Metropolitan meourIties stock (with
$75 per kre paid), new comwan stock, 186. It is
conidently believed that he 9 arran iemats


WEEK'S




'" -'"I
t -- :'- "fi
--"' *V .-" ','i
^> -'* y
i n **----^^^-


.6 THE SUN



AgrIculture Florida's


Conducted by W. E. Paho
PRELUDE. Wilson's report, the farmer must be convinced that
he is rich, even if he wears one gallus and his prin-
What, then? Shall we sit Idly down sad say qip"set In a yellow dog."
mThe niht hath p a t et is a yellow dog."o


m W"os MW %ge )&oj JUp r anyT
The night hath not yet coIne; we are not quite
Cut off from labor by the failing light;
Something remains for us to do or dare,
Even the oldest trees some fruit may bear,
For age is oprtunity no less I
Than youth itIelf, though in another dress;
And as the evening twilf ght fades away,
The sky is filled with stars, invisible' b day.
ngfellow.


Had and solemn are the cadences of the dying
year. Only a few months ago, how full of life and
vigor was the new year, now grown old and ready
to drop into the irrevocable past. It has spent its
life on earth, for good and ill, and its footpr nts are
eternal. Nothing can be altered, nothing recalled.
It has left its ineffaceable marks and they cannot
be removed. **-Macauley.
His face is growing sharp and thin.
Alack l our friend is gone.
Close up his eyes; tie up his chin;
Step from the corpse and let him in
That standeth there alone
And waiteth at the door;
There's a new foot on the floor
And a new face at the door
My friend,
A new face at the door.
-Tennyson.
To one and all, both great and small, we wish
goodl cheer all through the year.
Turn over a new leaf, if you will; but let the
moving finger trace upon it pure thoughts and noble
resolves.
We have done it so often in the past; we hope
to do it many times in the future; but how stands
the record of results?
Are we any wiser by our experience? Can we
look backward and see,' at the parting of the ways,
that we took the right path and not the wrong?
Question the Oracle if you will, as to what shall
happen as the days of the New Year go by; but base
not your hours of happiness upon Hope, for it hath
Disappointment for a twin sister.
The Tallahassee Capital hit the nail squarely on
the head when it said: "After reading Secretary


Editor Jordan of the Punta Gorda Herald re-
cently acknowledged receiving a Ponderosa, or Won-
der lemon, that was half as large as a peck measure
and "a beauty in shape and color." This beats the
Miami eggplant story, so Deo Soto County can, for the
present, crow over her sister county on the east
coast.


General Albert W. Gilchrist of De Soto County,
who is prominent politically before the people. not
long ago brought with him from New York City an
okra rel pe, obtained probably from the chef of the
Waldorf Astoria, which he commended to the wives
of his constituents in the count and to his friends
elsewhere. He now comes to the front with a so-
called petrified orange which he has added to a cer-
tain museum of natural and un-natural curios nhe
maintains at his Punta Gorda home. It was found
five years ago on one of the creeks down there. Why
it has been kept so long from public notice is not
stated, but we have the assurance of the Herald that
it is a perfect specimen, showing the bud and stein
ends and all the natural markings of the rind, and
weighs just about as much as the ordinary orange.

No more sensible advice could he given to the
farmers of the South, on the subject of cotton raios-
ing, than that contained in the circular letter issued
by President Jordan, advising no increased acreage
but making a strong appeal to "plant an abundance
of small grain, corn and side crops" as well as "more
hay, cattle and hogs that the farms may become more
self-sustaining." This advice d.,,s not apply to
Florida, for year by year diversified field crops in
connection with groves have increased their acreage,
and nowhere south of Mason and Dixon's line can it
be said that prosperity is more pronounced than with
us, and the keystone of this arch of prosperity has
engraved on it "Diversified Crops."

The South, says the Southern Pariner, iineeds
iomeinekers and if it can get the ready-made Ameri-
cans to come down from the Middle West it would
prefer them to foreigners. Yes, but with the (overn-
ment opening up millions of the most fertile land
in the world, under irripgtion canals in the olt'ky
Mountain region, the Middle West farmer will be,
sure to go there instead of coming where the race


0


JHelpfu l


Hin ts


for


Her


Ladyship


Already the week of wonder and of joyous expec-.
tation for the little folks and the grown-ups has run
its course, and we face the coming year.
Standing on the threshold of the year 1900, I
wish all my readers a most prosperous season and
with the realization that each day will bring its
quota of work for each one of us, I express the hope
that this work may be simplified as much as possible
(and yet be thorough), and that each bit of work
will be a pleasure and delight, instead of a drudgery.
Let aus make work and duty beautiful and attrac-
tive, a good habit, indeed, so that we can look them
square in the face and so have won our fight against
the old-time fear of drudgery and slavery which
household progress implied and demanded.
Let us concentrate and simplify along all lines,
even though an intense desire to do as our more
wealthy friends and acquaintances may possess us.
In the ordinary vernacular, "cut it out," for if you
do not, you are going to heap upon yourself an un-
limited amount of care, worry and misery, which
combination is going to prove to be like a canker,
that will either need the dissecting knife of that
physician known to but few as Doctor Common-
ense, or that will make you a very sick woman,
not physically, but mentally, until all your friends
will sadly exclaim as they sympathetically shake
their heads: "I do not know what is the matter
with her. She is so changed. All the sunshine has
gone from her. She looks as unhappy and
miserable as she always says she feels."
You will find with the adoption of some system
that you can do away with much unnecessary work,
nad that, too, without your house having the appear-
ance of negt. 'l'hings will look justlAi "spic-and-
aIn" if you (oitentrati.
Pack away carefully all things you $o not need.
And remember where yo pack them, so you can get
them should you need t Do not have too much



.4


By Eleanore du Bols
bric-a-brac on display, as if each room were the sales-
room of some big department store.
If you desire an outing once a day set your hour
for your walk. Then look upon that time of the
day as if you had to catch a train at that very time.
With this suggestion well grounded you will have
that daily walk just as sure as the very hour itself
is bound to be reached.
By similar suggestion and system you will make
other "appointments with yourself" to do other
things', suen as joining the Village Improvement
Association of your city or town, of joining the
Ladies' Aid Society of your church, of taking up the
reading of your favorite authors and keeping abreast
with current literature. Most of us have been-
and too many of us still are-slaves to household
nicety details which have kept us indoors all day
long, fussing about stooping, bending, climbing and
working until night was gladly welcomed and day-
break was feared. For it was a continuous per-
formance.
Without being the least bit selfish, let the fullness
of each day be our own. By such an absorption of
good-will are we enabled to radiate health, cheerful-
ness and good-will about us, and so do our work
most completely and thoroughly. We will be most
helpful to others while having been thoughtful to
ourselves. We will have placed ourselves in the
attitude wherein our hardest tasks will be met with
seemingly the least effort.
And I hope all will find each day of 1906 filled
with profit and comfort, health and harmony, and
with tasks quickly and satisfactorily accomplished.
Everywhere, during the past week, the Yule-
tide spirit was evident; everyone carried bundles and
packages and looked happy, and in the shopping dis-
tricts of Jacksonville it seemed at times almost like
solid walls of humanity on the streets. There was,


of course, some jostling, but it was all accepted in
the spirit of the season. The hint I gave last week
for 1906 ('hristmas preparation has already been
a-e ipted. One letter, received this week, informs
me that the making of several gifts has already been
started(. and that this mother is determined that as
soon as they are finished she will put them away
until ('hristmas time, and in the meanwhile she will
1i dd. ly purchase and by her handiwork, to her col-
lection so that she will know all the year through
that all her dear ones and friends will have been
provided for in ample time.
Another letter tells me that the writer has two
presents finished. The letter reads, in part:
"While looking over an illustrated New York
paler, I enme across some excellent black and white
reproductions of handsome cats and beautiful dogs.
"Now, I had only shortly before finished reading
your talk about your Aunt Hannah in THE SUN
of December 23. and it came to my mind that I had
two friends, who loved pets and always had them,
who could be provided almost on the spot with
Christmas presents. So up I jumped and procured
my scissors and at once carefully cut out the pictures.
Then I quickly found some green and also some red
eardlmoard, and with the aid of paste I had two hand-
some panel pictures completed within a half-hour's
time.
"I followed Aunt Hannah's method, and wrapped
up each panel carefully and put it in a pretty box,
around which I placed a wrapper with the name
of each friend on each box.
"Why. I think it is just fine, this idea, and I
am going to work and commence to embroider a
cushion design I've decided to buy. I certainly will
not find it diffilhult to hide my gifs away for a whole
year, because I've just made up my mind to do it.
(Continued on Fourteenth Page)


December 30, 1905




Opportunity

r
problem is a most serious one in the cheap black
labor that is retarding the South more than any other
cause. The South needs white laboring men as much
as it needs fore-handed white farmers; and, if the
native-born cannot be had, let the foreigner come
and be made welcome.

An orange, weighing three pounds, measuring
twenty-two inches in diameter (?) was recently
taken from a tree in the grove of Senator McConkey,
near Winter Park. The pulp and juice filled three
quarts, while the skin surface covered a little over
a square foot. The variety was that of California
specialty. Washington Navel; but we doubt if the
Golden ( Coast county has ever shown up such a
prodigy. Seeing is believing, you know; but there
are cv .- when one must take the word of another,
so we shift the responsibility for this story on the
shoulders of the editor of the Herald, in which we
found the statement.
The Tropical Sun printed recently an interview
had with some gentlemen from New York who visited
('ulm to investigate conditions that: existed in the
line of oranges and pineapples. They announce that
the pineapple outlook is one from which Florida
growers need have no fear. The output is deterior-
ating in quality as well as quantity and size. The
iklorida grower has quicker transportation, a better
quality of fruit and no duty to pay. All this may
he truev. yet should Americans carry on in Cuba
plantations as carefully cultivated as they are in
Florida, the situation might change. We probably
have nothing to fear from the native element, but we
may have from intelligent culture, backed by abund-
ant capital.
The $1 fruit rate per 100 pounds from California
to London and other European ports, announced so
ihrl'fully by the San Francisco papers as having
I'en secured, turns out to 1w. untrue. No such rate
has been granted by either of the great railway
systems-the Santa Fe and the Southern Pacific-
that reach Eastern connections. An effort, however,
is being made to secure this figure to New York on
fruit intended for export. But few California or-
inges reaehI European markets, but it is hoped that,
if the new arrangement is completed, shipments
would greatly increase and prevent all fears of over-
production. which appears to be the trouble, just now,
on the (olden ('oast. Florida, at least, has no occa-
sion to worry over this possibility, for'many years
to come.
(Continued on Fourteenth Page)









December 30, 1905


THE SUN


MONSIEUR EAUVCAIRE


By Booth Tarkington


.CHAPTER VI.
In the outer room, Winterset, unable to find
Lady Mary, and supposing her to have joined Lady
Rellerton, disposed of his negus, then approached
the two visitors to pay his respects to the young
prince, whom he discovered to be a stripling of seven.
teen, arrogant-looking, but pretty as a girl. Stand-
ing beside the Marquis de Mirepoix-a man of quiet
bearing-he was surrounded by a group of the great,
among whom Mr. Nash naturally counted himself.
The Beau was felicitating himself that the foreigners
had not arrived a week earlier, in which case he and
Bath would have been detected in a piece of gross
ignorance concerning the French niobility-making
much of de Mirepoix's ex-barber.
'Tis a lucky thing that fellow was got out of
the way," he ejaculated, under cover.
"Thank me for it," rejoined Winterset.
An attendant begged Mr. Nash's notice. The
head bailiff sent word that Beaucaire had long since
entered the building by a side door. It was sup-
posed Mr. Nash had known of it, and the French-
man was not arrested, as Mr. Molyneux was in his
company, and said he would be answerable for him.
Consternation was so plain on the Beau's trained
face that the Duke leaned towards him anxiously.
"The villain's in, and Molyneux hath gone mad!"
Mr. Bantison, who had been fiercely elbowing his
way toward them, joined heads with them. "You
may well say he is in," he exclaimed, "and if you
want to know where, why, in yonder card room. I
saw him through the half-open door."
"What's to be done?" asked the Beau.
"Send the bailiffs--"
"Fie, fie! A file of bailiffs? The scandal I"
"Then listen to me," said the Duke. "I'll select
half a dozen gentlemen, explain the matter, and
we'll put him in the center of us and take him out
to the bailiffs. 'Twill appear nothing. Do you
remain here and keep the attention of Beaujolais and
de Mirepoix. Come, Bantison, fetch Townbrake and
Harry Rakell yonder; I'll bring the others."
Three minutes later, his Grace of Winterset flung
wide the card room door, and, after his friends had
entered, closed it.
"Ahl" remarked M. Beaucaire quietly. "Six
more large men."
The Duke, seeing Lady Mary, started; but the
angry signs of her interview had not left her face,
and reassured him. He offered his hand to conduct
her to the door. "May I have the honor ?"


"If this is to be known, 'twill be better if I leave
after; I should be observed if I went now."
"As you will, madam," he answered, not dis-
pleased. "And now, you impudent villain," he be-
gan, turning to M. Beaucaire, but to fall back
astounded. "Od's blood, the dog hath murdered and
robbed some royal prince!" He forgot Lady Mary's
presence in his excitement. "Lay hands on him! lie
shouted. "Tear those orders from himIl"
Molyneux threw himself between. "One word!"
lie cried. "One word before you offer an outrage
you will repent all your lives!"
"Or let M. de Winterset come alone," laughed
M. Beaueaire.
"Do you expwet me to fight a cut-throat harlb-r,
and with mbare hands?"
"I think one does not expe monsieur to fight
anybody. Would I fight you. you think? That was
why I had my servants, that evening we play. I
would gladly fight almost' any one in the worl'; but
I did not wish to soil my hand with a- "
"Stuff his lying mouth with his orders!" shouted
the Duke.
But Molyneux still held the gentlemen back. "One
moment," he cried.
"M. de Winterset," said Beaucaire, "of what arre
you afraid You calculate well. Bleau'aire might.
hitve ( en i'lief'-an imposter that you yourself
expoew'? Never! But I was not going reveal that
secret. You have not absolve me of mly promise."
"Tell what you like," answered the Duke. "Tell
all the wild lies you have time for. You have five
niinutes to make up your mind to go quietly."
"Now you absolve me, then? lla, hal Oh, yes!
Mademoiselle," he bowed to Lady Mary, "I have the
honor to reiquem' you leave the room. ou shall mlisx
no details if these frien's of yours kill me, on the
honor of a French gentleman.'"
"A French what?" laughed Bantison.
"Do you dare keep up the pretense?" cried lAird
Townbrake. "Know, you villain Iharler, that your
master, the Marquis de Mirepoix is in the next
room."
Molyneux heaved a great sigh of relief. "Shall
I-' He turned to M. Ileaucaire.
The young man laughed, and said: "Tell him
come here at once."
"Impudent to the last!" cried Bantison, as
Molyneux hurried from the room.
"Now you going' to mwe M. leauearir,'s materr"
said Ieaucaire to I ady Mary. 'Ti true what I
say, the other night. I cross from Franco in his


suite; my passport say as his barber. Then to pass
the ennui of exile, I come to Bath and play for what
one will. It kill the time. But when the people
hear I have been a servant they come only secretly;
and there is one of them-he has absolve' me of a
promise not to speak-of him I learn something he
cannot wish to be tol'. I make some trouble to learn
this thing. Why I should do this? Well-that is
my own riszon. So I make this man help me in a
masque, the unmasking it was, for, as there is no
one to know me, I throw off my black wig and he-
come myself-and so I am 'Chateaurien,' Castle No-
where. Then this man I use', this Winterset,
he--"
"I have great need to deny these accusations?"
said the Duke.
"Nay." said lady Mary wearily.
"Shall I tell you why I mum' ib 'Victor' and
'lkeucaire' and 'Chateaurlen,' and not myself?"
"To escape from the bailiffs for debts for razors
unII) soap," gibed Lord Townbrake.
"No. monsieur. In France I have got a cousin
who is a man with a very bad temper at some time',
and lie will never enjoy his relatives to do what he
does not wish-"
Hle was interrupted by a loud commotion from
without. The door was flung open, and the young
Count of Heaujolais hounded in and threw his arms
about the neck of M. Beaucaire.
"Philiplpel" he cried. "My brother, I have come
to take you back with me."
M. de Mirepoix followed himn, bowing as a court.
ier, in deference; but M. Beaunaire took both his
hands heartily. Molyneux came after, with Mr.
Nash, and closed the door.
"My warmest felicitations," said the Marquis.
"T''ere is no longer need for your incognito."
"Thou best of masters!" said Beaucalre, touch-
ing himi fondly on the shoulder. "[ know. Your
courier came safely. And so I am forgiven! hlut
I forget." He turned to the lady. She had begun
to tremble exceedingly. "Faires' of all the English
fair," he said, as the gentlemen bowed low to her deep
courtesy, "I beg the honor to present' to Lady Mary
Carlisle, M. le (3omte do Beaujolais. M. de Mire-
poix has already the honor. IAdy Mary liasf een
very kind to me, my frien's; you mus' help me to
nmake my acknowledgment. Mademoimelle and gen-
tlemen, will you give me that favor to detain you
one instant' I"
(Continued ol Tenth Page)


Florida Editors on the Gumocracy Boycott


Last week's Jacksonville Sun is full of the
fight between it and the Naval Stores com-
bine, and in the spaces once filled with ads
but taken out through the influence of the
Naval Stores men, prints "In Meimoriatms."
Fight it to a finish, L'Engle, if it takes all
winter.--Gainesville Elevator.

Editor L'Engle stirred up a hornet's nest
when he published in The Sun the story of
"Gum." The power of money has never
been more shamefully displayed than the
appearance of The Sun last week, which
contained many headstones erected to the
memory of advertisements which had been
appearing in the spaces, but which, hccause
of the Gum story, had been peremptori-
ly discontinued.-Madison New Enterprise.

Fifteen ads were removed from the col-
umns of The Sun (L'Engle's and Taylor's
paper) last week, because they (The Sun)
would not "bow the pregnant hinges of the
knee that thrift might follow fawning."
Well, brothers, we've been boycotted once
ourselves, but today the Index is stronger
than it ever was, and it has the satisfaction
of seeing the ideas that it advanced and for
which it was boycotted adopted by practi-
cally a unanimous vote of the citizens of
Ipke City. The Sun adopted the policy of


the Index: If it's right, print it; no mat-
ter who it hurts." The Index suggests
that a list of the firms that boycotted The
Sun hb kept standing in nill tle papers ofif
the State, with the request that the people'
allow it to work the other way.-Lake City
Index.

The Sun, Jacksonville's bright weekly,
has plunged into a sea o(if trouble by daring
to say oume things about certainn turleintine
oix rators' swheines. Only the rich can af-
ford to be brave, dear brother. Soinetimnes
the pior dare, but they must be able to (do
their own drudgery and live on grits if they
survive. And we wonder nometinmes if the
dear public, whose cause the brave editors
(espouse, are, after all, worth the sacrifice,
for they seldom appreciate it at its full
value.-Arcadia Champion.

The Jacksonville Sun last week makes
the editorial announcement that a numluer
of its advertisers have been forced to drop
out by threats of a boycott from the turpen-
tine interests if they did not do so, and
backs it up with a copy of a letter from tihe
proprietor of the Aragon Hotel to that effect.
If this allhgatio)n be true, things have come
to a pretty pass, and The Sun will be the
gainer in the long run if it has the backing


to hold on with. The matter that Thie Sun
alleges brought this about was the disclosure
last week of what purported to be the inner
history of the deal whereby the Export
Company, which was the company organized
by the o(xlrators, was knocked out of busi-
ness by the naval stores trust. Such aec-
tions will go far to convince the people who
had their money in the Export Company of
a Wsll-out, a thing that was more than hint-
ed at during the recent meeting in Jackson-
ville.-D)eFuniak Breeze.

The Jacksonville Sun is now being boy-
cotted by a number of the businew men of
that city. The boycott was brought alxut
by the naval stores operators as a punish-
ment for publishing an article two weeks
ago. The Sun claims that an agent of the
operators went around to the various adver-
tisers and demanded that they take their
advertisements out of the paper. Several
complied with the request, and The Sun
filled in the spaces made vacant by with-
drawing the advertisements by "erecting
monuments sacred to the memory of," etc.
This is probably Claude T'Engle's first ex-
p'rienme with a lbycott.
The boycott is an old weapon in Volusia
county and has been used against The News
for Id hik many years.












TEN SUN December 30, 1905


culture --- Florida 's


Conducted by W. E. Pahoi


PRELUDE. '
What, then? Shall we sit idly down and say
The night hath come; it is no longer day?
The night hath not yet come; we are not quite
Cut off from labor by the failing light;
Something remains for us to do or dare,
Even the oldest trees some fruit may bear,
For age is opportunity no less -
Than youth itself, though in another dress;
And as the evening twil ght fades away,
The sky is filled with stars, invisible Iy day.
-Longfellow.
Sad and solemn are the cadences of the dying
year. Only a few months ago, how full of life and
vigor was the new year, now grown old and ready
to drop into the irrevocable past. It has spent its
life on earth, for good and ill, and its footprints are
eternal. Nothing can be altered, nothing recalled.
It has left its ineffaceable marks and they cannot
be removed, -"'-Macauley.
His face is growing sharp and thin.
Alackl our friend is gone.
Close up his eyes; tie up his chin;
Step from the corpse and let him in
That standeth there alone
And waiteth at the door;
There's a new foot on the floor
And a new face at the door
My friend,
A new face at the door.
-Tennyson.
To one and all, both great and small, we wish
good cheer all through the year.
Turn over a new leaf, if you will; but let the
moving finger trace upon it pure thoughts and noble
resolves.
We have done it so often in the past; we hope
to do it many times in the future; but how stands
the record of results?
Are we any wiser by our experience? Can we
look backward and see,' at the parting -of the ways,
that we took the right path and not the wrong?
Question the Oracle if you will, as to what shall
happen as the days of the New Year go by; but base
not your hours of happiness upon Hope, for it hath
Disappointment for a twin sister.
The Tallahasaee Capital hit the nail squarely on
the head when it said: "After reading Secretary


Wilson's report, the farmer must be convinced that
he is rich, even if he wears one gallus and his prin-
cipal asset is a yellow dog."
Editor Jordan of the Punta Gorda Herald .re-
cently acknowledged receiving a Ponderosa, or Won-
der lemon, that was half as large as a peck measure
and "a beauty in shape and color." This beats the
Miaml eggplant story, so De Soto County can, for the
present, crow over her sister county on the east
coast.
General Albert W. Gilchrist of De Soto County,
who is prominent politically before the people, not
long ago brought with him from New York City an
okra recipe, obtained probably from the chef of the
Waldorf-Astoria, which he commended to the wives
of his constituents in the county and to his friends
elsewhere. He now comes to the front with a so-
called petrified orange which he has added to a cer-
tain museum of natural and un-natural curios he
maintains at his Punta Gorda home. It was found
five years ago on one of the creeks down there. Why
. it has been kept so long from public notice is not
stated, but we have the assurance of the Herald that
it is a perfect specimen, showing the bud and stein
ends and all the natural markings of the rind, and
weighs just about as much as the ordinary orange.

No more sensible advice could be given to the
farmers of the South, on the subject of cotton rais-
ing, than that contained in the circular letter issued
by President Jordan, advising no increased anreage
but making a strong appeal to "plant an abundance
of small grain, corn andl side crops" as well as "more
hay, cattle and hogs that the farms may hseome more
self-sustaining." This advice duos not apply to
Florida, for year by year diversified field crops in
connection with groves have increased their acreage,
and nowhere south of Mason and Dixon's line can it
be said that prosperity is more pronounced than with
us, and the keystone of this arch of prosperity has
engraved on it "Diversified Crops."

The South, says the Southern Farmer, needs
homeseekers and if it can get the ready-made Ameri-
cans to come down from the Middle West it would
prefer them to foreigners. Yes, but with the Govern-
ment opening up millions of the most fertile land
in the world, under irrigation canals in the l wky
Mountain region, the Middle West farmer will be
sure to go there instead of coming where the race


Opportunity


r
problem is a most serious one in the cheap black
labor that is retarding the South more than any other
cause. The South needs white laboring men as much
as it needs fore-handed white farmers; and, if the
native-born cannot be had, let the foreigner come
and be made welcome.

An orange, weighing three pounds, measuring
twenty-two inches in diameter (?) was recently
taken from a tree in the grove of Senator McConkey,
near Winter Park. The pulp and juice filled three
quarts, while the skin surface covered a little over
a square foot. The variety was that of California
specialty, Washington Navel; but we doubt if the
Golden Coast county has ever shown up such a
prodigy. Seeing is believing, you know; but there
are cases when one must take the word of another,
so we shift the responsibility for this story on the
shoulders of the editor of the Herald, in which we
found the statement.
The Tropical Sun printed recently an interview
had with some gentlemen from New York who visited
Cuba to investigate conditions that, existed in the
line of oranges and pineapples. They announce that
the pineapple outlook is one from which Florida
growers need have no fear. The output is deterior-
ating in quality as well as quantity and size. The
Iflorida grower has quicker transportation, a better
qualityy of fruit and no duty to pay. All this may
txe true, yet should Americans carry on in Cuba
plantations as carefully cultivated as they are in
Florida, the situation might change. We probably
have nothing to fear from the native element, but we
may have from intelligent culture, backed by abund-
ant capital.
The $1 fruit rate per 100 pounds from California
to London and other European ports, announced so
gleefully by the San Francisco papers as having
In'en secured, turns out to be untrue. No such rate
has been granted by either of the great railway
systemi-s-the Santa Fe and the Southern Pacific-
that reach Eastern connections. An effort, however,
is being made to secure this figure to New York on
fruit intended for export. But few California or-
anges reach European markets, but it is hoped that,
if the new arrangement is completed, shipments
would greatly increase and prevent all fears of over-
production, which appears to be the trouble, just now,
on the (olden Coast. Florida, at least, .has no occa-
sion to worry over this possibility, for many years
to come.
(Continued on Fourteenth Page)


IlelpfuI


Already the week of wonder and of joyous expec-
tation for the little folks and the grown-ups has run
its course, and we face the coming year.
Standing on the threshold of the year 1900, I
wish all my readers a most prosperous season and
with the realization that each day will bring its
quota of work for each one of us, I express the hope
that this work may be simplified as much as possible
(and yet be thorough), and that each bit of work
will be a pleasure and delight, instead of a drudgery.
Let us make work and duty beautiful and attrac-
tive, a good habit, indeed, so that we can look them
square in the face and so have won our fight against
the old-time fear of drudgery and slavery which
household progress implied and demanded.
Let us concentrate and simplify along all lines,
even though an intense desire to do as our more
wealthy friends and acquaintances may possess us.
In the ordinary vernacular, "cut it out," for if you
do not, you are going to heap upon yourself an un-
limited amount of care, worry and misery, which
combination is going to prove to be like a canker,
that will either need the dissecting knife of that
physician known to but few as Doctor Common-
Se orethat will make you a very sick woman,
not physically, but mentally, until all your friends
will sadly exolaim as they sympathetically shake
their heads: "I do not know what ii the matter
with her. She is so changed. All the sunshine has
gone from her. She looks as unhappy and
miserable as she always says she feels."
You will find with the adoption of some system
that you can do away with much unnpe~ary work,
nad that, too. without your house having the appear-
ance of neglect. Things will look just 1 "spie-and-
span" if you co'ewntratI
Pack away carefully 11 things you 0o not need.
And remember where yo pack them, a you can get
them should you need t Do not have too muoh


for


Her


By Eleanore du Bois
bric-a-brac on display, as if each room were the sales-
room of some big department store.
If you desire an outing once a day set your hour
for your walk. Then look upon that time of the
day as if you had to e(ateh a train at that very time.
With this suggestion well grounded you will have
that daily walk just as sure as the very hour itself
is bound to be reached.
By similar suggestion and system you will make
other "appointments with yourself" to do other
things, suen as joining the Village Improvement
Association of your city or town, of joining the
Ladies' Aid Society of your church, of taking up the
reading of your favorite authors and keeping abreast
with current literature. Most of us have been-
and too many of us still are-slaves to household
nicety details which have kept us indoors all day
long, fussing about stooping, bending, climbing and
working until night was gladly welcomed and day-
break was feared. For it was a continuous per-
formance.
Without being the least bit selfish, let the fullness
of each day be our own. By such an absorption of
good-will are we enabled to radiate health, cheerful-
ness and good-will about us, and so do our work
most completely and thoroughly. We will be most
helpful to others while having been thoughtful to
ourselves. We will have placed ourselves in the
attitude wherein our hardest tasks will be met with
seemingly the least effort.
And I hope all will find each day of 1906 filled
with profit and comfort, health and harmony, and
with tasks quickly and satisfactorily accomplished.
Everywhere, during the past week, the Yule-
tide spirit was evident; everyone carried bundles and
pacekages and looked happy, and in the shopping dis-
tricts of Jacksonville it seemed at times almost like
solid walls of humanity on the streets. There was,


Ladyship


of course, some jostling, but it was all accepted in
the spirit of the season. The hint 1 gave last week
for 1906 ('hristmas preparation has already been
iwcepted. One letter, received this week, informs
me that the making of several gifts has already been
started. and that this mother is determined that as
soon as they are finished she will put them away
until Christmas time, and in the meanwhile she will
ildd. by purchase and by her handiwork, to her col-
lection so that she will know all the year through
that all her dear ones and friends will have been
provided for in ample time.
Another letter tells me that the writer has two
presents finished. The letter reads, in part:
"While looking over an illustrated New York
paper, I came across some excellent black and white
reproductions of handsome cats and beautiful dogs.
"Now, I had only shortly before finished reading
your talk about your Aunt Hannah in THE SUN
of December 23. and it came to my mind that I had
two friends, who loved pets and always had them,
who could be provided almost on the spot with
Christmas presents. So up I jumped and procured
my scissors and at once carefully cut out the pictures.
Then I quickly found some green and also some red
cardboard, and with the aid of paste I had two hand-
some panel pictures completed within a half-hour's
time.
"I followed Aunt Hannah's method, and wrapped
up each panel carefully and put it In a pretty box,
around which I placed a wrapper with the name
of each friend on each box.
"Why. I think it is just fine, this idea, and I
am going to work and commence to embroider a
cushion design I've decided to buy. I certainly will
not find it difficult to hide my gifts away for a whole
year, because I've just made up my mind to do it.
(Continued on Fourteenth Page)


,6


Hin ts










December 30, 1905


THE SUN


MONSIE UR EA VCAIRE

By Booth Tarkington


.CHAPTER VI.
In the outer room, Winterset, unable to find
Lady Mary, and supposing her to have joined lady
Rellerton, disposed of his negus, then approached
the two visitors to pay his respects to the young
prince, whom he discovered to be a stripling of seven-
teen, arrogant-looking, but pretty as a girl. Stand-
ing beside the Marquis de Mirepoix-a man of quiet
bearing-he was surrounded by a group of the great,
among whom Mr. Nash naturally counted himself.
The Beau was felicitating himself that the foreigners
had not arrived a week earlier, in which case he and
Bath would have been detected in a piece of gross
ignorance concerning the French nobility-making
much of de Mirepoix's ex-barlbr.
"'Tis a lucky thing that fellow was got out of
the way," he ejaculated, under cover.
"Thank me for it," rejoined Wintermst.
An attendant begged Mr. Nash's notice. The
head bailiff sent word that Beaucaire had long since
entered the building by a side door. It was sup-
posed Mr. Nash had known of it, and the French-
man was not arrested, as Mr. Molyneux was in his
company, and said he would be answerable for him.
Consternation was so plain on the Beau's trained
face that the Duke leaned towards hint anxiously.
"The villain's in, and Molyneux hath gone mad!"
Mr. Bantison, who had been fiercely elbowing his
way toward them, joined heads with them. "You
may well say he is in," he exclaimed, "and if you
want to know where, why, in yonder card room. 1
saw him through the half-open door."
"What's to be done?" asked the Beau.
"Send the bailiffs--"
"Fie, file A file of bailiffs? The scandal!"
"Then listen to me," said the Duke. "I'll select
half a dozen gentlemen, explain til matter, and
we'll put him in the center of us and take him out
to the bailiffs. 'Twill appear nothing. Do you
remain here and keep the attention of Beaujolais and
de Mirepoix. Come, Bantison, fetch Townbrake and
Harry Rakell yonder; I'll bring the others."
Three minutes later, his Grace of Winterset flung
wide the card room door, and, after his friends had
entered, closed it.
"Ahl" remarked M. Beaucaire quietly. "Six
more large men."
The Duke, seeing Lady Mary. started; but the
angry signs of her interview had not left her face,
and reassured him. He offered his hand to conduct
her to the door. "May I have the honor?"


"If this is to be known, 'twill be better if I leave
after; I should be observed if I went now."
"As you will, madam," he answered, not dis-
pleased. "And now, you impudent villain," he be-
gan, turning to M, Beaucaire, but to fall Iack
astounded. "Od's blood, the dog hath murdered and
robbed some royal prince!" lie forgot lady Mary's
presence in his excitement. "Lay hands on him!" he
shouted. "Tear those orders from himI"
Molyneux threw himself between. "One word"
he cried. "One word before you offer an outrage
you will relent all your lives
"Or let M. de Winterset come alone," laughed
M. Beaueaire.
"Do you exixN't me to fight a cut-thront barber,
and with bare hands?"
"I think one does not expl*c' monsieur to tight,
.nyhlody. Would I fight you, you think ? That was
why I had my servants, that evening we play. I
would gladly tight almost' any one in the worl'; but
I did not wish to soil my hand with a-- "
"Stuff his lying mouth with his orders" shoutld
the Duke.
But Molyneux still held the gentlemen back. "One
moment," he cried.
"M. de Winterset," said Beauenire, "of what are
you afraid? You calculate well. Iteaucaire night,
liave been beilief'-an iimposter that you yourself
expose'? Never! But I was not giin reveal that
secret. You have not absolve me of my promise."
"Tell what you like," answered the Duke. "Tell
all the wild lies you have time for. You have ivei,
minutes to make iup your mind to go quietly."
"Now you absolve nme, then? Ilia, hat Oh, yes!
Mademnoiselle," Ihe bowed to l ady Mary, "I have thel
honor to request' you leave the room. ou shall m1isx
no details if these friend's of yours kill me, on thief
honor of a Freneh gentlemann'
"A French what?" laughed llantison.
"Di) you dare keep up the pretense?" cried lord
Townbrake. "Know, you villain barlwer. that your
master, the Marquis de Mirepoix is in the next
room."
Molyneux heaved a great migh of relief. "Nhall
1- He turned to M. lihaucaire.
The young iman laughed, and said: "Tell hims
come here at once."
"Impudent to the last!" cried Ilantison, as
Molyneux hurried from the room.
"Now you goin' to see M. IBiaiuairese master,"
said Beaucaire to Lady Mary. "I'is true whlit I
say, the other night. I cross from France in his


suite; my passport say as his barber. Then to pass
the ennui of exile, I come to Bath and play for what
one will. It kill the time. But when the people
hear I have been a servant they come only secretly;
and there is one of them-he has absolve' me of a
piromiie not to speak-of him 1 learn something he
cannot wish to be tol'. I make some trouble to learn
this thing. Why I should do this? Well-that is
my own riuon. So I make this man help me in a
nmamque, the unmasking it was, for, as there is no
one to know nme, I throw off my black wig and Ie-
come myself-and mo I am 'Chateaurien,' Castle No-
where. Then this man I une', this Wintersit,
he--"
"I have great need to deny these accusations?"
said the Duke.
"Nay." said lady Mary wearily.
"Shall I tell you why I mus' I 'Victor' and
'llueairei and ''hateaurlen,' and not mIyself?"
"To esea|pt from the bailiffs for debts for razors
and moap," gibed Lord Townbrake.
"No, monsieur. In France I have got a cousin
who is a man with a very bad temper at some time'.
and he will never enjoy his relatives to do what he
does not wish--"
11i was interrupted by a loud coimmnotion from
without. The door was fI ung open, and the young
Count of Ikeaujolais bounded in and threw his arms
about the neck of M. Beaucalre.
"Philipel" he cried. "My brother, I have come
to take you back with me."
M. de Mirepoix followed him, Iowing as a court.-
ier, in deference; but M. Ieaucaire took I'ith his
hands heartily. Molyneux came after, with Mr.
Nash, and closed the door.
"My warnnest felicitations," said the Marquis.
"There is no longer need for your tinognito."
"Thou Ibet of master" sa id leauealnr, touch-
ing himt fondly on the shoulder. "I know. Your
)ourier came safely. And mo I am forgiven I Hut
I forget." 11 e turned to the lady. MSle had begun
to tremble exceedingly. "Fairm' of all the Knglish
fair," he said, as the gentlemen bowed low to her deep
courtesy, "I1 beg the honor to present' to lady Mary
Carlisle, M. le Comte de Ik'eujoals. M. de Mire-
poix has already the honor. Lady Mary haI lieen
very kind to mie, my frien'.t you mus' hmelp, m'e to
nitke miy ieknowledgment. Madmnoielle anid gen-
tlheni., will you give me that favor to detain you
onu0 instan' t"
(Continutal on Tenthi 'Page)


Florida Editors on the Gumocracy. Boycott


Last week's Jacksonville Sun is full of the
fight between it and the Naval Stores com--
bine, and in the spaces once filled with ads
but taken out through the influence of the
Naval Stores men, prints "In Memoriamns."
Fight it to a finish, L'Engle, if it takes all
winter.-Gainesville Elevator.

Editor L'Engle stirred up a hornet's nest
when he published in The Sun the story of
" Gum." The power of money has never
been more shamefully displayed than the
appearance of The Sun last week, which
contained many headstones erected to the
memory of advertisements which had been
appearing in the spaces, but which, lIecause
of the "Gum story, had been peremptori-
ly discontinued.-Madison New Enterprise.

Fifteen ads were removed from the col-
umns of The Sun (L'Engle's and Taylor's
paper) last week, because they (The Sun)
would not "bow the pregnant hinges of the
knee that thrift might follow fawning."
Well, brothers, we've been Ioycotted once
ourselves, but today the Index is stronger
than it ever was, and it has the satisfaction
of seeing the ideas that it advanced and fior
which it was boycotted adopted by practi-
cally a unanimous vote of the citizens of
Ike City. The Sun adopted the policy of


the Index: If it's right, print it; no mat-
ter who it hurts." The Index suggests
that a list of the firm that bolycottedd The
Hun Ilh kept standing in all the IpIIMTrs of
the State, with tle request that thie pIople
allow it to work the other way.-- ake (City
Index.

The Sun, Jitcksomville'm bright weekly,
hias plunged into a ait of trouble ly daring
to say siome thing about ce(rtaint turpentine
olrMratotrs' sehmn. Only the rich can iaf-
ford tWo !e brave, dear brother. aulnetimnes
the [poor dare, but they mustt Io able to do
their own drudgery and live on grits if they
survive. And we wonder snietimes if the
dear public, whnm. cause the brave editors
sMpouse, are, after all, worth the nacrifle.,
for they meldon appreciate it at its full
value.-Arcadia Champion.

The Jacksonville Sun last week makes
the editorial announcement that a number


of its advertisers have been for
out by threats of a boycott from
tine interests if they did not
tacks it up with a copy of a let
prlop)rietor of the Aragon Hlotel t
If this allegation Ie. true, thing
to a pretty pass, and The Sun
gainer in the long run if it has


rced to drop
the turiN'n-
do sO, w and
ter from thle
'a that effect.
4 iave (come
will IN- thel
the backing


to hold on with. The matter that The Hun
alleges brought this almout was the disclosure
last week of what purixorted to Ie their inner
history of the deal whereby the Export
Conilnty, which was the company organized
by the cilerators, was knocked out of husi-
nnes by the naval stores trust. Such ate-
tions will go far to convince the people who
had their money in the Export Comipany of
ta sell-out, a thilig that was more than hint-
ed at during the recent meeting in Jackson-
ville.--De)Funiak Breezo.

'rThe .acksonville Hun is now being boy-
cotted by a number of the business men of
that city. Thie boycott was brought about
by the naval stores operators as a punish-
muent for publishing an article two weeks
ago. The Hun claims that an agent of the
aimrators went around to the various adver-
tisers and demanded that they take their
advertisements out of the paper. Several
complied with the request, and The Sun
filled in the spaces made vacant by with-
drawing the advertisements by "erecting
monuments sacred to tho memory of," etc.
This is prolibhly Claude L'Engle's first ex-
Iwri.inct' with a itoycott.
The boycott is an old' weapon hi Volusia
county and has been used against The News
for l4 thWe many years.


N


WANOM




'V iiii~i~ i ^i m


StGH Q30,190
Saturdow, !Decmbpr30, 1905


s,


THE SUN


Er


ED


ITO


Lamar Did Exidy Right
We have had a choice selection of ne*s tnd comment on the Lamar-Wil-
liains row in the National House of Representatives, for our mental grazing,
and we have absorbed about all the facts la thp ease and the comments thereon.
We are fully aware of the fact that or 'opinion of John Sharp Williams
will not have any effect on the political fortnes of Congressman Williams, and
would have kept it screened from the public gae if the remarkable perform-
anoes of the gentleman had not reached eross the Florida border and
TOUCHED THE PEOPLE OF FLORIDA though one of their servants now
doing duty in Congress. '
Because he has done this, we now gile,.utterance to the opinion we
formed sometime ago, and pronounce the gentleman from Mississippi an in-
competent leader; a compromising, easy going, power worshiping Democrat;
and a small, biased, unjust man.
He stood convicted of all three counts in our indictment against him
when he left Mr. Lamar, and Mr. Shackleford off the Interstate Commerce
Committee because these two gentlemen did' not agree with him last session
on the rate regulation question.

Mr. Williams showed his incompetency as a leader by committing so impo-
litic an act as this open and flagrant insult to lwo of the small minority he has
undertaken to lead to the accomplishment of good to the country through the
adoption of Democratic principles.
It is an unwise leader who chastises his soldiers when the enemy is so
much stronger in numbers, and the fight ib Just about to begin. When
Napoleon took command of the army of Italy, 6e did not find fault with a single
man for his ragged appearance or his breacles of discipline. He overlooked
their faults and kindled their enthusiasm by pointing to the fertile plains of
Italy and inviting them to the' feast. ,-
Napoleon lead HIS MINORITY to glorious victory and enormous heaps of
spoils taken from the enemy.
Williams has lead HIS MINORITY to defeat and has seen THEM DES-
POILED by the victorious enemy.

The minority leader has several: times shown himself a compromising,
easy-going, power-worshiping Democrat.
In the last Democratic national convention ,he was found in the ranks, and
was mouthpiece for the Belmont-Ryan-McCarrdn Wall Street brand of Democ-
racy, that saddled the placid, colorless, leatnid one of Esopus on the Demo-
cratic host, that needed a Saul, not a Daniel, to lead them against the foe.
In the last Congress Mr. Williams exhibited his right to the title of com-
promising, easy-going, power-worshiping Democrat when he so complacently
fell into the not that his Republican friends spread for him on the tariff reform
question and the rate regulation question.

The Mississippi statesman read his title clear to the charge we bring
against him as a small, biased, unjust man, in his action against Messrs. Lamar
and Shackleford.
It was small because he used the power vested in him by his party to pun.
ish two of hisparty whose views WERE NOT HIS VIEWS on a matter of
party policy.
It was binsed because he was unable to see merit in the view taken by
Lamar and Shackleford on the rate regulation question, when that view was
not his view, although the view of Lamar and Shackleford HAS BECOME THE
VIEW OF A MAJORITY OF CONGRESSMEN.
The action was unjust, because Mr. Williams accused the two gentlemen
of breaking the rule of a Democratic caucus, when Mr. Lamar proved clearly
that NO CAUCUS HAD BEEN CALLED QN THE RATE REGULATION
QUESTION when the rule was made. On the, contrary, the meeting was held
for the purpose of considering a matter personal to Mr. Williams-the question
of his resignation of his leadership.

Mr. Lamar DID PERFECTLY RIGHT TO PROTEST against the unjust
action of this discredited leader, and the proper time td do it was the VERY
FIRST TIME HE HAD A CHANCE.
As to the Williams remark that Demnocratic dirty linen should not be
washed in presence of Republicans-this womes under the head of buncomb,
and belongs on the list of high.soundqg but cheap clap-trap used by persons
SHORT ON LOGIC AND LONG ON WIND.
If the Immaculate shirt front of Dpmocracy was soiled, Mr. Williams was
the man who put the dirt on it, and being soiled, let us not be too particular
about the place of the cleansing; lehb be sure that the washing is done
PROMPTLY AND WELL.
Some of Mr. Lamar's critics have hurled the terrible accusation against
him that be was thrusting himself into the limelight. Well, THAT'S WHAT
WB PAY HIM ORL
The calcium glare is a good thing to turn on Congressmen, and when it
shows them FIGHTING FOR A POSITION ON AN IMPORTANT COMMIT-.
TEN WHERE THEY CAN DO GOOD SERVICE FOR THE PEOPLE THEY
REPRESENT, as did Mr. Lamar, lucky is the State that has a limelight-loving
servant


See "In The Suu's OCsqaW papeI 11, ftr ex-
tension of time of Prize Story ontt


Thanks for the Buckman Law
It will only be sometime hence when the utility, practicability, benefits and
good common-sense of Harry H. Buckman's school bill will be fully understood
and comprehended by the masses, for unfortunately a good measure, such as
his is, is slow to be accepted and assimilated by the public.
Hard has been the fight as to the constitutionality of his bill by which the
State colleges are consolidated, but Mr. Buckman, when lie framed that bill,
knew exactly what he was about and that the bill would stand the test and live.
It is again a case of the survival of the fittest.
It was a signal triumph that the bill passed. By far greater is the tri-
umph of its passage through the courts and its acceptance on the ground that
it is constitutional.
Now that the bill has become a law its opponents will know that their
wrath and abundant indigfiation availed not, and they will have time to grad-
ually absorb this bill's good points and rejoice over this measure.
It is a measure of COMPLETENESS, FULLNESS AND WHOLESOME-
NESS.
It is a measure which means CONCENTRATION; the establishment of a
university in its true and full senpe; the uniformity of grades in every county
of the State.
In addition to this, it eliminates the worry, care, excitement and friction
caused by local and sectional bickering and disagreements. It SAVES
MONEY FOR THE STATE OF FIORIDA, for it has brought about radical
changes by a saving to the taxpayer.
Its greatest benefit will be the concentration of the funds of the State


upon a system of higher education. In this direction alone, aside from aill
other benefits, Florida will feel the greatest beneficial results as the youth of
the vArious counties reap the advantages which this bill brings to them.
Especially will the public free school system of Florida show a healthy
improvement and a higher standard, for the Buckman bill assures the public
school system that care and attention in the future which it has been wanting
in 'the past.
Local feelings and interests in certain towns of the State, which will
feel what their enthusiasts have termed "a hard .blow to our (local) commu-
nity," will soon rally front the seeming shock. The citizens will find that time
will heal that wound--be it a deep one or only a scar--and they will rejoice
in their enforced surrender of their institutions the quicker they realize and
understand the vast benefits IN GENERAL which will accrue to the entire
State. Then, too, will they be in a thankful spirit for WHAT THEY HAVE
HAD.
The very condition of things demanded a Buckman bill. The condition has
been met and the results of the new order of things will soon and ever after-
ward prove and be acknowledged as for the very best for all concerned in the
vast and important field of education in Florida.

Former-President Richard A. MeCurdy of the Mutual Life Insurance
company has developed a bad cough, so his physician says. It cannot be more
serious than the cough-up spell he recently had when he gave up that big fat
job aa president of the Mutual Life.


I !











ALS


THE SUN


NINTH 'PAGE


si


Saturday, December 30, 1905


A Pioneer We Have S.eeded
With all his boasted power to achieve new things, for all his vaunted
ability to advance by the sheer force of mind which leads hinm, by its vigor
and activity into new fields of action, man is largely the creature of custom
and the slave of habit.
The Chinese carry this to excess, and ancestor worship is the highest
rilegious and moral law of the land. But the American who has made for him-
self a reputation as an innovator is not free from the thraldom of custom.
We sit on the right-hand side of a vehicle when driving, although this
places the driver away from the vehicle he passes on his left, for no other
apparent reason except-custom. We eat three meals a day whether we want
them or not, because people have been doing this for so many years that it has
grown into a custom.
These ate samples of the daily life of us all, and the principle pervades all
human affairs. *
Particularly has custom fastened itself on the law; hoary-headed precedent
has often clogged the wheels of justice and established rules, WITH NOTHING
BUT THEIR ANTIQUITY TO RECOMMEND) THEM, that have many times
prevented the truth from coming out in the court room.
We travel comfortably along in our old-fashioned vehicle of custom, until
we get a jolt from an unseen rock, the vehicle breaks down and we abandon
it, and afterward wonder why we rode in it so long.
Such a rock to the lumbering old legal coach wag .Judge Aleck lBoarnian
of Louisiana, who has been sitting ont the Federal bench in this city the past
week, during the trial of an important damage suit.


THE JD& CRF


:RIE5 Hw15OYIri &LA55E5


Judge Boarman's rulings have done more to brush away the cobwebs that
have gathered in the court room to obscure the principle of truth, than all
the new law books that have pointed the way for two decades.
This Judge has not hesitated to break away from precedent when precedent
stood in the way of abstract truth.
He has declared that he has very little respect for the rules of evidence,
saying that most of them were made for the purpose of concealing the truth.
Ohl shade of the immortal Greenleaf, whose shrine has been the holy place to
the student and the practitioner for lo, these many years. What, WHAT do
you think of that?
This blazer of a new path through the jungle of legal forms and procedure
has made a judicial trial conform to the common-sense rule when the estab-
lished rule was in conflict with it.
This thrice welcome iconoclast in judicial statuary 'hall has broken up
so many of the idols so long bowed down to by gentlemen steeped in the spirit
of the law as brought out by the old masters, that we hold out our hands to
him as a friend we have long wanted to meet. Here is a sample of how Judge
Boarman does things:
Counsel was objecting to a question being put to a witness on the
ground that it was contrary to the rules of evidence. The Judge said
in effect: "We are organized here for the purpose of getting at the
truth. We will do it scientifically and technically if possible, if not,
by main strength and awkwardness." Again, when counsel objected
to a certain question being put on; drect examination, the Judge


said in effect: "We will let everybody ask all the questions he wants,
and when the time comes that nobody wants to ask any more ques-
tions, that is the time to stop asking questions."
Judge Boarman has declared that he is the thirteenth juror, and that he
must be informed of all the facts as well as the jury in order that a true
verdict shall be rendered.
Another remark by the Judge was that he was appointed for life and
could qpend as much time on the case on trial as was necessary to get at the
truth.
This is a valuable hint to our State law-makers when they direct their
attention to Florida's judiciary system.
We have been told that a Federal Judge has more latitude than a State
Judge, and our State Judges could not make the rulings that Judge lBoarman
did and have them stand.
We say to this, that it would be well for the cause of truth and justice
to give this latitude to our State Judges.
We welcome Judge Boarman. lie has done us good. lie has started the
lawyers thinking.
Good is bound to follow in the wake of so worthy a pioneer.

Insurance Feature in Unionism
Samuel Uompers, president of the American Federation of Labor, is one
of the strong men of this country. Strong in brain power, strong in human
sympathy, strong in executive force, and strong in the quality that gains the
confidence of his brothers in toil, and holds it to the extent of keeping together
and directing to one purpose a body of men whose ideas are as different as their
occupations are diversified.
Mr. Gompers has done a great work for the workingmen of the country.
lie has formulated many plans for their betterment and put them in operation.
For a quarter of a century this man has given his best thought to the unlifting
of the men who do the work of the country, and we hope many more years of
usefulness are before hint.
Of the many plans he has promulgated anti seen through to successful
issue, none excels in wisdom and is more likely to enjoy the popularity and
interest which is presaged for his new and latest plan, that of insurance of
the working class by the unions.
It is expressed most ably in his trite saying, "LET THE UNIONS INSURE
YOU."
With his usual spirit of energy and determination, President Gompers has
decided to begin a national agitation along this line as an aid to add the
insurance feature to the American labor movement.
One of the contentions im that the unions can and will give greater returns
for dmw pamid thin any other institution on earth, and there is no reason why
this fait should not Ibe borne out conclusively by an experience which will be
that of one of cooperation, a iDECIDEDLY MUTUAL insurance combine.
The movement is aiso started not as antagonistic to the large and estab-
lihhed insurance companies, but as a means to furnish to the wage-earners of
our country just as good insurance without an excessive premium being
incurred.
With all the labor unions represented by one hundred and twenty-two
national and international organizations, which have $40,000,000 capital in
their treasuries, a plan to use $10,000,000 or more of this sum with which to
organize an insurance company, is not only most feasible but offers every
indication that it will soon become a reality.
Thus will labor, through its own efforts, become its own protector.
Thus will labor become a guarantee to its own members for the payment
of benefits by reason of illness, unemployment, loss of tools, as also by reason
of traveling, superannuation or death.
In Baker City, Oregon, there will be some weeping and gnashing of teeth
since President Roosevelt has said he wants no $800,000 public subscription
gift inade his daughter on the occasion of her approaching marriage. It will
be Alice in Wonderland, anyway, without this big, unwieldy gift, and while
there will be much temporary agony and suffering in Baker City, that will be
as nothing compared to work, worry, complications, annoyances, fuss of comn-
inittees, chagrin and disappointment which the Strenuous Man has nipped in
the bud this frosty December.
Sarah Bernhardt, tragedienne that she is, has essayed a new role. Her
managers are not in the theatrical trust and because of alleged discrimination
which bars her from theaters in Texas and Louisiana, her wrath is not only up
but has become expressive. It is a tragical situation. Let Madame Sarah have
the leading lady's part and she will do the rest, in this dramatic situation
and then: Who says she will not acset in Texas and Louisiana?
Frank Work, father of Mrs. Burke-Roche, has had a quarrel with his
daughter. Mr. Work, although a millionaire, cannot understand why his
daughter will spend $200 a day when he allows her $,000 per month. Evidently
Mr. Work has not moved in the smart set or else he has no conception of what
the demands of fashionable life are.

They are talking it over at Miami-the teachers. The little boys and
girls at school in the State are going to get the benefit of it all-advanced
ideas and methods.


See "In The Sun's Chariot," page 11, for ex-
tension of time of Prize Story contest.


I













- I a= I SU DomhI 80, IOmni,


ESSA YS IN COMMON TIME

By T. Wie RtckaMhA M

CLOTHES


Clothes are pieces of cloth so put to-
gether that they create an impression
varying inversely as the asie of the
clothed. In other words, large male per.
sons wear striped effects to make them
appear thin, and abbreviated individuals
wear solid colors in a vain endeavor to
seem large.
"Clothes make the man." This is
true. They make him sad and cynical
if they are not paid for, and otherwise
if he has the receipt. Clothes are gen-
erally made by tailors. Sometimes the
head of the family is forced to wear a
suit manufactured by his loving spouse.
This cures a man of talking economy at
home.
People at the North Pole and other
summer resorts of like nature wear
sacks. Folks at the Equator don't wear
sacks. The latter state of affairs is
sad, because it shows a very low order
of economic achievement. There is
that fine long Equator laying out there
that needs only two poles to convert it
into a clothesline-and no use for it.
Oh, it is sad.
Some people wear clothes because it is
the thing to do. Others, for protection.
Still others wear them because it affords
a convenient means of carrying tobacco.
Adam and Eve began the custom of
wearing clothes, many years ago. Like
all great institutions, clothing had a
very small beginning; but now they nave
reached such perfection that we are con-


Mons. BeaucaIre
[Continued from Seventh Page]
"Henri," he turned to the young
Beaujolais, "I wish you had shared my
masque-I have been so gay!" The sur
face of his tone was merry, but then
was an undercurrent, wveary-sad, tc
speak of what was the mood, not the
manner. He made the effect of address
ing every one present, but he looked
steadily at Lady Mary. Her eyes were
fixed upon him, with a silent and fright.
ened fascination, and she trembled more
and more. "I am a great actor, Henri,
These gentlemen are yet scarce convince'
I am not a lackey! And I mus' tell you
'that I was jus' now to be expelled for
having been a barber!"
"Oh, noI" the ambassador cried out,
"He would not be content with me; he
would wander over a strange country."
"Ha, ha, my Mirepoixt And what
is better, one evening I am oblige' to
fight some friend's of M. de Winterset
there, and some ladies and cavaliers look
on, and they still think me a servant.
Oh, I am a great actor! Tis true there
is not a peasant in France who would
not have then known one 'born'; but
they are wonderful, this English people,
holding by an idea once it is in their
heads-a mos' worthy quality. But my
good Molyneux here, he had speak to me
with courtesy, jus' because I am a man
an' jus' because he is al-ways kind.
(I have learn' that his great-grandfather
was a Frenchman.) So I sen' to him
and tell him everything, and he gain
admittance for me here to-night to await
my friend's.
"I was speaking to messieurs about
my cousin, who will meddle in the af-
fair' of his relative'. Well, that gen.
tleman, he make a marriage for me with
a good and accomplish' lady, very noble
and very beautiful-and amiable. (The
young count at his elbow started slightly
at this, but immediately appeared to
wrap himself in a mantle of solemn
thought.) "Unfortunately, when my
cousin arrange' so, I was a dolt, a little
block-head; I swear to marry for my-
self and when I please, or never if I
like. The lady is all things charming
and gentle, and, in truth, she is-very
much attach' to me-why should I not
say it? I am so proud of it. She is
very faithful and forgiving and sweet;
she would be the same, I think, if I-
were even-a lackey. But I? I was a
dolt, a little unsensible brute; I did not
value such thing' then; I was too
yo', las'June. So I saytomycousla,


stantly overheated in summer, and in
winter we have pneumonia, bubonic
plague and other ailments because we
are insufficiently clad.
Some men have but one suit of clothes.
When the representative of the pressing
club comes around they have to stay in
bed. There is but one condition less de-
sirable than this, and that is to have no
suit.
Suits, like all Gaul, are divided into
three parts-pants, cost and vest. Pants
are the most important. You can be
seen in public without a coat or a vest,
but without pants-never. Sometimes
pants are called trousers. Like every.
thing else, it is a matter of money.
Trousers cost from $10 up; pants from
$10 down. Boys, and devotees of the
Scotch national game, wear knee pants.
in the latter case it is simply an en-
deavor to become boyish-and is highly
unsuccessful.
Some ladies would like to wear pants
and vote. The kind that have such as-
pirations could do neither with any de-
gree of success.
Volumes could be written about vests,
but the demand for such literature is so
slight that the proceeds therefrom would
not clothe an ant-and you know how
little it takes to clothe an ant. I wish
I were an ant.
There are many other kinds of clothes
besides the varieties mentioned, but 1
won't go into detail.


'No, I make my own choosing!' 'Little
fool,' he answer, 'she is the one for you.
Am I not wiser than you?' And he was
very angry, and, as he has influence in
France, word come' that he will get me
r put in Vincennes, so I mum' run away
quick till his anger is gone. My good
rien' Mirepoix is jus' leaving for Lon-
don; he take' many risk' for my sake;
his hairdresser die before he start,' so
I travel as that poor barber. But my
cousin is a man to be afraid of when he
Is angry, even in England, and I mus'
not get my Mirepoix in trouble. I mus'
not be discover' till my cousin is ready
to laugh about it all and make it a joke.
; And there may be spies; so I change my
name again, and come to Bath to amuse
my retreat with a little gaming-I am
al-ways fond of that. But three day'
ago M. le Marquis send me a courier to
say that my brother, who know where
I had run away,, is come from France
to say that m cousin is appease'; he
need me for his little theater, the play
cannot go on. I donot ot need to espouse
mademoiselle. All shall be forgiven if
I return, and my brother and M. de
Mirepoix will meet me in Bath to felici-
tate.
"There is one more thing to say, that
is all. I have said that I learn' a secret,
and use it to make a man introduce me
if I will not tell. He has absolve' me
of that promise. My friend's, I had not
the wish to ruin that man. I was not
receive'; Meestaire Nash had reboff
me; I had no other way except' to use
this fellow. So I say, 'Take me to Lady
Malbourne's ball as "Chateaurien." I
throw off my wig, and shave, and behol',
I am M. le Duc de Castle Nowhere. Ha,
ha I You see?"
The young man's manner suddenly
changed. He became haughty, menac-
ing. He stretched out his arm, and
pointed at Winterset. "Now I am no
Beaucaire,' messieurs. I am a Freonm
gentleman. The man who introduce' me
at the price of his honor, and then bet
tray me to redeem it, is that coward,
that card-cheat there l"
Winterset made a horrible effort to
laugh. The gentlemen who surrounded
him fell away as from pestilence. "A
French gentleman!" he sneered savagely,
and yet fearfully. "I don't know who
you are. Hide behind as many toys and
ribbons as you like; I'll know the name
of the man who dares bring such a
charge!"
"Sirl" cried de Mirepoix sharply, ad-
vancing a step towards him; but he
dJMIed himself at ones. He made a low
Of state, rst to the young French.


man, then to Lady Mary and the com-
pany. "Permit me, Lady Mary and
.-Nemen," he said, "to assume the
honot of presenting you to His Highness,
Prince Louis-Philippe de Valois, Duke
of Orleans, Duke of Chartres, Duke of
Nemoura, Duke of Montpensier, First
Price of the Blood Royal, First Peer
of France, Lieutenant-General of French
Ifapntry, Governor of Dauphine,
K*ht of the Golden Fleece, Grand Mas-
ter of the Order of Notre Dame, of
S4olnt Carmel, and of St. Lazarus in
Jerusalem; and cousin to His most
Christian Majesty, Louis the Fifteenth,
King of France."
"Those are a few of my brother's
names," whispered. Henri of Beaujolais
to Molyneux. "Old Mirepoix has the
long breath, but it take' a strong man
two day' to say all of them. I can sup-
pose this Winterset know' now who
brdbg the thargeI!"
"Castle Nowhere!" gasped Beau Nash,
faHing back upon the burly prop of Mr.
Bantison's shoulder.
"The Duke of Orleans will receive a
message from me within the hour!"
said Winterset, as he made his way to
the door. His face was black with rage
and shame.
"I tol' you that I would not soil my
hand with you," answered the young
man. "If you send a message no gentle-
man will bring it. Whoever shall bear
It will receive a little beating from
Francois."
He stepped to Lady Mary's side. Her
head was bent low, her face averted. She
seemed to breathe with difficulty, and
leaned heavily upon a chair. "Monseig-
neur," she faltered, in a half whisper,
"can you-forgive me? It is a bitter-
mistake-I have made. Forgive."
"Forgive?" he answered, and his voice
was as broken as hers; but he went on,
more firmly: "It is-nothing-less
than nothing. There is-only jus' one--
in the-whole world' who would not have
treat' me the way that you treat' me.
It is to her that I am goin' to make rep-
aration. You know something, Henri?


If ItR's Oliver's-


I am not goin' back only because the
cing forgive' me. I am going' -W please
him; I am going' to espouse mademoi-
elle, our cousin. My friend's, I ask
your felicitations."
"And the king does not compel him!"
exclaimed young Henri.
"Henri, you want to fight me?" cried
iis brother sharply. "Don' you think
the King of France is a wiser man than
me ?"
He offered his hand to Lady Mary.
"Mademoiselle is fatigue'. Will she
honor me?"
He walked with her to the door, her
hand fluttering faintly in his. From
somewhere about the garments of one pf
them a little cloud of faded rose-leaves
fell, and lay strewn on the floor behind
them. He opened the door, and the
lights shone on a multitude of eager
faces turned toward it. There was a
greatt hum of voices, and, over all, the
fiddles wove a wandering air, a sweet
French song of the voyageur.
He bowed very low, as, with fixed and
glistening eyes, Lady Mary Carlisle, the
Beauty of Bath, passed slowly by him
and went out of the room.


THE END.


The few factories in St. Petersburg
working by aid of scabs, are now pro-
tected by female outposts. The factory
owners, it seems, hired the scabs' wives
as well, and armed them to protect their
husbands and the factory property. They
,arry revolvers and swords, and have au-
thority from the police to use them
against all interfering with the work.
As a consequence the Russian walking
delegates and strikers have a very un-
happy time, for the women indulge in
no parley and shoot and stab at anybody
whom they suspect of interfering with
their bread and butter. Count Witte in-
formed the police of other cities of the
innovation, and an Amazon army to pro-
tect scabs is forming in many parts of
Russia.


You'll Want Mole


Gandy Jacksonville,
Sent by Mal i L. C. Oiver i florida

PARTIAL PRICE LIST OF

Wines, Whiskies, Beer and Malt


KWOpKE -lpAN
rdtli"al Bm 4VA 60 It te
Hunting Club tye................1265 $400 1700
Neom County Rye ............ 2 0 425 750
Mon Rye .................. 8 0 4 50 8 00
Hnne'"44" Rye............... 8 75 5 00 9 50
ocil D ................ 450 60 12 00
Malt Whiy..................... 8 76 5 00 9 50
Peah Brandy.................... 8 75 00 950
Apple Brandy..................... 85 500 960
Holand G ...................... 80 4 25 7 2
Geneva Gin ........................ 75 5 00 9 50
North Carolna orn.......... 266 400 700
Mountain Oorn................... 875 5 00 9 50
J Rum..................... 280 425 725
M dfr um..................... 8 75 00 950
Grape Brandy............. 8 5 00 950
King of Kentcky Bourbon 8075 o0 950
Amutdaro dtmplpMabeh


MLK UIM---U FrK-nU PIIIPN

Rye, Gin, Corn. good irade........ ......1..... 50
ye, Gin, Corn, Rum ine quality...........2 00
VeGin, Co Rum.,best forthemone......250
4Rye, Pesch and Apple BradLy, mellow.
e g by .............. ..... ... .......*... .. 8 00
Victoria Rye -ocisal Drops R'ye. mecina 00
quality ................... ... ... ............ ......... 4 00
LMWST.LoMML -reo
Falstaff Beer ............................ ............. ,
tra Pale.............................................. 110
SMat a d rk........ .............. 00
S** .. ... 00
Goiuiner. itoedt...............pt .... ...........2. 2
NMmot m. m ma..mmmt


1246426uskUI ni
w. A&= 3t. UI~LA BROSS


JaiovLk,


Bre onfaoupstok iam o
HORSS FO 8AjE~iouriandXentck-


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arcro am
41


December 30, M5










December 30, 1905


THB UN


IN THE SUN'S 'CHAR RIOT

Intimate Talks Between Publiher and Reader
Our prize story and prize poem contest has proven a sure enough winner.
Stories and poems have been sent in from all parts of Florida. We have themI
by the dozen, and the hasty perusal we have given them has confirmed us in our
opinion that Florida authors are not surpassed by those of any clime or country.
They have lacked but the opportunity for expression that this offer of ours has
given them.
We announced this contest December 2, and set the time for January 1, 1906.
Since then we have been convinced that the time was too short, by numerous
requests for more time to prepare stories and poems that have come from authors
wishing to enter the contest.
Then, Christmas time, and the necessity to prepare for its celebration came
on, to prevent aspiring authors from completing their labors.
Again-press of other matter prevented us from printing the announcement
in the last two numbers, and the contest did not have publicity sufficient to give
every one a chance to compete.
For these reasons we have concluded to extend the time of closing for both
the prize poem and the prize story contests to January 10, 1900, and publish the
corrected announcements:
Our desire is to make THE SUN a great State paper. We want the people
of Florida to feel that, however much they might admire any of the great weeklies
printed in other cities, they have in Florida a journal of which they are a part.
We want stories written by Floridians to print in this paper, which is read
by Floridinns.
We want good stories. We will not print the other kind. The best is good
enough for Florida people.
In order to get the good stories we are willing to pay for them, so, we make
AN OFFER TO FLORIDA WRITERS.
We will pay $20 for the best story, with scene laid in Florida, sent us by
January 10, 1000. The story must be written by a resident of Florida, and must
not be less than 2,000 words nor more than 3,000. We reserve the right to print
all the stories submitted that do not win the prize at regular rate of $2 per
thousand words, paid on publication.
We will select three competent judges to read the stories and award the prize.
Mail copy to THE SUN, Prize Story Contest, Jacksonville, Fli.
POEMS WORTH READING.
We are quite sure that Florida holds within its bhorders many persons, nule
and female, who have the souls of ixxets and lack but the opportunity to ignite
poetical fires within their breasts.
We would like to have these fires illumine the pages of THE SUN, and in
order that this much-desired illumination may begin we offer a
PRIZE OF $10.00 IN (GOLI)
for the best original poem sent us by Jangary 10, 1900.
We will pay. for all poems we print at our regular space rates, and will print
the prize winner in the issue next following the day of award.
None but residents of Florida are eligible to enter this contest.
January 10, at 12 noon, these two contests will positively close. THERE
WILL HE NO MORE EXTENSIONS.
On the day of closing the manuscripts submitted will 1x- sent to the comitit-
tee of award for decision. This committee will hi composed of the following
gentlemen, who have kindly consented to act: Rev. T. H. Blenus, Rev. .1. B. Ley,
Rev. J. Lawton Moon.
Each manuscript will be numbered and the same number will be placed on
a slip of paper containing the name of the author. The name slips will be kept
in THE SUN office, so that the committee will not know the name of the author
of any story or poem submitted.
The award will be made by number and name of the prire winners will I1!
announced in our issue of January 20, and checks for thie prize money will bIe
mailed to the winners the same day.



Some Thinks by the Brethren


In the first issue of L'Engle's Sun editors who sell editorials for so much
Governor Broward voices a sentiment an inch, sentiment thrown in. Some of
that will find a response echo amongour people are not aware of this, and

take for granted that the writings of
all honorable members of a profession some wise man-wiser than themselves.
whose standard of honor is of the high- Did the people know that these news.
est. Unfortunately, as in every other paper writers did not investigate the
profession, there are those who disgrace matter of which they write at all, they
the calling of journalism by peddling would not be so credulous." .
their editorial columns to the highest As a matter of fact, such scribblers
bidder. Referring to this class the Gov- as are described by Governor Broward-
ernor says: and Florida is said to be not wholly
"To be the editor of a newspaper is to free from them-command no respect in
occupy a position that is supposed, or their person or Influence in their papers.
ought to be, a high and lofty one, and An intelligent public quickly detects the
the editor ought to give expression to a trail of the.serpent and rewards those
high public sentiment upon a higher Judas Iscariots of the press with the
plane, if the plane is not already high. contumely they so richly deoerve.-Lake.
We are afflicted with a sprinkling of land News.


The


Mecca


of


the Tourist


(Contfnuud from Third Page)


I *


OUR BOARD OF TRADE.
The city of Tampa-her citizens-
should be proud that we have such a
patriotic organization as the Board of
Trade. Pride should permeate the soul
of every citizen.
A Board of Trade may accomplish
much for a city. But it will not do
much unless it has a membership of
men who are public-spirited.
The Tribune takes pleasure in at-
testing its appreciation of the work that
has been accomplished during the past
year by the Tampa Board of Trade, under
the able, vigorous, yet conservative di-
rection of its president, Mr. W. R. Ful-
ler.
Every member of the Board of Trade
has been faithful in unbuilding the best
city in the South.-Tampa Tribune.
THE BUCKMAN BILL IS CONSTITU-
TIONAL.
The Supreme Court of the State of
Florida, without a dissenting opinion,
has declared the Buckman bill to be
constitutional and this much mooted
question is now settled, and we hope
will never again be subjected to any dis-
turbing influences.
If Florida provides a public school in
every country district, a high school at
every county seat, a university for boys
and a university for girls at aonvennt


localities, she will have done her duty
toward the youth of the State, and this
is what she is now doing.
Florida, in the last twenty years, has
not made much progress along the line
of higher education, but now having her
feet planted on solid ground, we hope
her two universities will grow into pro-
l)rtions that will become the pride of
Floridians and will ever be pointed to
with love and veneration.-Ocala Ban-
ner.
We had the misfortune recently to be
drawn into controversy with one of those
wormy individuals who "don't believe"
in anything or anybody. He doesn't be-
lieve in the public school system, he
doesn't believe in churches, he doesn't
believe in advertising, and we doubt not
that if he was told that he was a worm.
eaten fool he would say that he didn't
believe in worms. We refused to afflict
ourselves with his company long enough
to find out whether there was anything
that he did believe in or not.-Plant
City Courier.
De Funlak in growing, but not Ms
rapidly as it ought or no rapidly as it
would if there was more action in that
direction. We want factories-large
ones if we can get them, but at least
small ones. To get them we must go
aft them.-Br.oe


Palm Walk from Lake Worth to tVe Oean.


the indications are that the business of
this season will far exceed that of any
Previous seasons, and that the Hotel
Royal Poinciana will open earlier than
usual, the date for the opening being
Thursday, January 11, 1006.
Mr. Sterry has surrounded himself
with competent help, prominent among
these being:
Fred C. King, chief clerk, who has
been at Palm Beach ten consecutive win-
ters, and who this season begins his
eleventh year of popularity and success
at Palm Beach, Mr. King being one of
the best known and well liked clerks
known to the wealthy traveler. He has
been in Florida for several weeks. L.
W. Mason and T. M. Lennehen have
also been In the State for some time.
Mr. Maxson Is auditor at the Royal
Poinciana and Mr. LAnnehen is book-
keeper. Both young men have a thor-
ough hotel experience, and have been
with Mr. Sherry for several consecutive
seasons. They have won the favor of
hotel patrons by their talent and ability.
At the IHotel Ilreakers, Ieland Sterry
will look after the comfort of patrons
and exert a supervising influence, he be-
ing thoroughly familiar, from the ex-
perince of verbal oonsecuUme m s,


with the needs and requirements of the
patrons of the big seaside hotel.
Frank Simpson of New York City has
started as room clerk, his first season
at Palm Beach.
George Hopkins returns as cashier
for his seventh season, an always wel-
come announcement to his many friends.
W. C. Skinner will act as front clerk,
C. V. Cook as mail clerk and F. Pierce
as night clerk.
Popular Frank McGuirk has been re-
tained as steward, and will be assIsted
by Charles Hodges. Miss Sadie Balwin
will be head housekeeper, and Jules
Charter is the new ohef, he being a
Frenchman of great renown as an expert
de cuisine.
Frank C. McDonnald continues in the
important position of private ,Mecretary
to Manager Fred W. Sterry, and he will
this season not only supervise the pub-
lication of his bright and exceedingly
popular Daily Program, but will enlarge
the name and extend its scope.
Along all lines the patrons who will
visit Palm Beach this season will be
eared for in the best style, and will have
attractions and pleasures provided for
their enjoyment to surpass all breeding
records.


11










*PRn mil


December 30, 1905


-1 -hb wo wo .


7' T7~
N W
w
2


AEEN


TIHINKI


By Charles Battle Loomis


Are you socially your husband's inferior or his
superior?
If you are his inferior he is probably too much
o., a gentleman to hav told you so, but if you are
his superior I am very much afraid that you have
let him know it.
But if you are and i you, bve, dqn't let it seot
at ,.at .. rby ~l the W ean in your power to lift
/ ,ti 1, .


him up to your social level. If your table manners
are better than his; if you cannot eat a dinner with.
out t use of from two to three forks, while he is
prone to get along without any, try to educate him.
If he wont use three promlse on one. That will
be a beginning.
It will be a great pity If you let him drag you
down to his level It is always a pity when a man
or, a Woman coasts from birth instead of olilabing
from birth. Let your motto be, "Ever upward.
Don't you want to be superior socially to anyone
on earth? How can you become so if you do not
climb and drag your husband along tool
Lift him up and teach your children to be a little
better than either of you. This will not be hard,
as they already feel they are-that is, if they are
good 'Americans. If they are Chinese they are be-
coming humble and think that the sun rises and sets
in you and your husband. But it is safe today that
your children are not Chinese. They want to move
on a higher social plane than you moved, and on a'
much' higher plane than their father moves.
And when they have reached what they have
striven for, ust use them to pull you and your hus-
band up and the end of your family will be some
Blue Book. I
It's a great ambition.

I think -it was Zagwill who maid that, like a
post, a gentleman was born, not made. The same
aphorism can be applied to the opposite sex. A true
lady is born, not made.
Being born a lady she can be Improved by edu-
oation and by reining influence, but she will not
suddenly begin to be a lady, she will always have
been one; while if she was not born a lady no amount
of education or refinement or stimulating environ-
ment will make her a true lady.
She may educate herself to become a very pass-


able imitation of a lady by cultivating her sense of
.blJ taom to her brother ad istersn this world.
mw my act te part so often aad o werll that
S tivs shed will convince people that she I s a
f bt only tak thetroubltm to be Sorn


one, if she will only choose for her ancestors kindly,
unselfish people, she will lie apt to start er life with
the chief requisites, and then, no matter what her
education may or may not be, her heart will every
day incline her to ladylike chtifos, and people will
say when she dies, "She was a true woman if ever
there was one."
And to be a true woman is to be the best possible
kind of lady.

Have you ever heard about that business man
who In advertising his particular brand of breakfast
fodder increased the circulation of the paper in which
he advertised a hundred-fold? '
Well, it was this way. His name was Wise, and,
he had unlimited money to spend. He had formerly
owned a sawmill and he naturally had a large quan-
tity of sawdust on hand. It struck him that if he
could buy a low-priced molasses, and could make an
amalIgm of molasses and sawdust and advertise it
as the only nutritious food, good alike for brain,
brawn, cuticle, and hair, he could make a fortune
in a month or two.
So he called in an advertising man, and put him
on a prineely salary at once, ant said:
"Go ahead. Advertise Sord Ust in any way you
like, as long as you get the people's attention.
Now, the advertising man *as a genius and he
said to himself "If I advertise this thing a little
in every paper people will only think a little of it,
but if I bend all my energies on one paper, and that
a very important one, and advertise it there uni-
quely for a month or so, the very oddity of the thing
will attract attention."
So he went to the office of. the Daily Howler and
said:
"I want to buy every page in your paper for ad-
vertising purposes."
And the business manager told him it couldn't
be done.
So the advertising man showed him what a large
check he could write, and then the business manager
said it was possible, and the next day Mr. Man had
every page in the Daily Howler. There was not a
murder, not a bit of editorial speculation, not a
thing of any sort in the paper, except the name and
the date and the subscription price.
And of course there was no advertisement. And
that plqed eurloity.
Well, this thing happened next day and the next,
and then on the editorial page was printed in very
small letters,


TRY SORD UST


Now you may well believe that subscribers began
to rush in, for here was a paper that could be intro-
duced into the most bigoted home in the land. There
were no tiresome politics in it; no dreadful murders;
nothing but Sord Ust. .
Every one said it was the cleanest paper that had
ever been issued, and more and more p14e sub-
scribed to it. It got to be quite a fad. Tobe sure,
the subscribers did not know what was going on in
the world except by hearsay, but they had that much
more time for other things, and they were, conse-
quently, far happier, and, reading about no murders
or steamship trusts or Presidential possibilities, they
finally came to the conclusion that the millennium
was at hand.
But, of course, the thing that made the most im-
pression on them was this Sord Ust. They began to
inquire for it in the stores and they found that no
one kept it. No one had ever heard of it. It was
impossible to buy a box of it anywhere because the
clever advertising man had given orders to his em-
ployer to refuse to sell it for at least six months.
People did not even know whether it was a new
kind of soap, or a breakfast food, or the latest thing
in stove polish.
What was the result? Why, people were mad to
get it. They would have it. The very idea that in
a free country they were not allowed to buy anything
they wanted Was this Maine with a prohibitive
law on something the people really wanted?
And all this time the editor of the Daily Howler
kept on increasing his edition, and all the time Mr.
Wise went on buying sawdust and cheap molasses
until he had a whole county in Northern New York
heaped hikh wit it and five large mills hard at work
compressing it into cakes.
And at last, seemingly on amount of the pressure
of public opinion, but really because the advertising
man said it was high time, Mr. Wise put an adver-
tisement on the first page ,of the Daily Howler to
the effect that Sord Ust was a breakfast food and
that all you need do to it was to pour a little hot
milk on It; and if your grocer wouldn't get it for
you change your grocer at ooesl
Was it a su l cs .
Well, I gus. .. ,...... ., .;-.


Why, they had one long freight train stretching
from the mills to New York, moving all the time on
a special track, and as fast as a car was unloaded at
the Manhattan end a car was filled at the other end.
Motive power? Electricity, of course.
And the man became a millionaire ten times over
before the year was up and before the Sord. Ust
had kicked up any racket in the insides of tle jpop-
uld now the advertising man began to adverse.
And now the advertising man began to advertise


in all the papers, and the Daily Howler name before
its millions of subscribers with murders and edi-
torials once more, and they, after their long fast, were
only too glad to learn that the world was not as
good as they had suspected, and the Daily Howler
was a bigger success than ever.
But the editor had got the tip, and he didn't use
Sord Ust on his home menu.
And he's alive yet.

I know it is none of my business, but are you
going to let Jane grow up with that unpleasant
voice?
Haven't you read the praise of Southern women's
voices to some advantage?
I don't suppose that Jane's speaking voice could
ever be made really melodious, although, strange to
say, her singing voice is not at all unpleasant.
But you could eliminate that strident quality.
The other day I was sitting in the seaward end
of a ferryboat when Jane came in from the slip.
The boat was full and every one was talking, but
Jane's voice rose above all the others and almost
every one looked up.
I'll venture to say that most of them were re-
minded of a beautiful macaw.
For there is no denying that Jane is a handsome
girl.
And she's a bright girl and she says bright things,
but they are all screeched at you.
If Jane marries let her pick out a phlegmatic
man, unless she uses a file on that voice. It would
be cruelty to animals to let her marry a sensitive
soul, say a painter or a writer, because to be shut
up in the same ca e day after day with the most
beautiful macaw imaginable would be to have one's
nerves de-insulated.


She may be disobedient and outgrow it; she may
be disrespectful and outgrow it.
But if your daughter has an unpleasant voice
she won't outgrow it unless you keep at her all
the tim %


.19


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up~


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L


* 1











December 30, 1905


THU BUW


UNION


PROTECTIVE


ASSOCIA TION


Its Alms and Objects

-Ary Fr. O R T -----


To the General Public Reading:
A short time ago the Builders' Ex-
change circulated a letter, asking the
support of all good citizens in their
fight for freedom from union dictation.
I feel utterly incapable of presenting
the situation in its true light, but can
state irrefutable facts. The Builders'
Exchange is nothing more nor less than
an arm of the National Manufacturers'
Association, and this airm is banded to-
gether for the express purpose of dis-
rupting the union, and making Jack-
.sonville an open or scab city. The
Builders' Exchange say they are sat-
isfied with wages and hours, but want
.to work on the open shop basis. I won-
der if the loss of several hundred dol-
lars-since the inception of the strike-
is based on a mere sentiment? I think
not. Business men, remember, if the
policies of the Builders' Exchange pre-
vail, we will, in the near future, have
the ten and twelve-hour day, and wages
from 75 cents per day up. It is up to
you to indorse the union in this indus-
trial crisis. It is an array of capital
against labor, and the fight is now on
(or a movement is now on) that will
relegate our enemies to political and
commercial oblivion.
This flight will be the survival of the
fittest. Don't lose sight of the fact
that every little you do to favor the
capitalist places more money in the
banks, and you, as the business man,
lose the benefits of its circulation; it is
to your interest to help us in this fight
for living wages. We, the middle or
working class, are the consumers, and
constitute at least 75 per cent of the
population, and you can readily see if
you indorse the policy that would out
the wage of every mechanic in this city
only 50 cents, you would be taking out
of circulation at least $1,000 per day,
.or the enormous sum of $30,000 per
month. This is a question worthy of
-your most serious consideration, because
the result will effect our commercial
and industrial future for years to come.
I want to say, as intimated above,
that an association is formed, or be-
Ing formed, in this city that knows no
organization, politics, religion or creed;
it is being formed and made up of the
most conservative element, and to han-
dle all questions affecting the industrial
situation.
When our forefathers, in the days of
'76, after writhing under the heel of
despotic tyranny and violence, made up
their minds to organize and crush thfs
spirit, and they acted, and acted with
a purpose. The same old blood that
gave the ire to the steely eyes of your
grandsiress, when they looked through
the sights, and caught the red-coated
:symbol of oppression, still flows through
your veins and through the veins of
many and many an honest workman to-
.day. Such organizations as the ex-
'change, wfth its present policy, denying
the right of labor to organize for ita
protection, while doing that identical
thing itself, breeds anarchy, tyranny,
and mob violence. All this must and
shall be put down by organized labor,
acting in concert, not in the near or dis-
tant future.
I candidly believe that a large ma-
jority of the Builders' Exchange are
honest and conservative men. For such
we have the profoundest respect. The
Union Provtecti Asolation will take
care of the balance.
We wat to see employer and employee
join hands under the flag of justice, free
dom, and liberty. There is no room in
this free country for any system or cornm
bination that either by violence or us
of wealth robs theim American citizen ol
his God-given personal liberty. The right
of employ to discharge imoxpetnln
or unsatisfactory employes, la not, non
ever has been, denied by any laboi
union. Now, when this prerogative ii


conceded by the unions to the employer,
why this inconsistency in same? "We are
satisfied with hours and wages, we will
not employ you if you carry a card." In
the gradual solution of this all-import-
ant question-the rights of both parties
-labor unions are an absolute necessi-
ty to curb the selfishness and injustice
of dishonest, avaricious, grasping manu-
facturers.
I, one of the promoters of our asso-
elation. was in favor of a union or or-
ganization with the underbrush cleared
out; an organization that would stand
for good and affect our prosperity. We
do not deny the fact that abuses have
crept in-miserable abuses on both
sides-capital and labor, and it is our
aim and purpose to correct them as far
as we are concerned, and you, the pub-
lic's business men, to stand by and help
us correct the capitalist or trust side.
Right down in the heart of every man
lies a strong admiration of honesty,
justice and fairness. That is why we
invite you to watch the policies of the
Union Protective Association.
The evils, you as a third party, or
public, have witnessed on the labor
side, are those of management and not
of constitution. I am reliably informed
that several members of the exchange
used to work at the bench and carry
cards, and that these same members
have been associated with movements
to better their condition, that is, in-
crease wages and shorten hours. It
seems to me another case of the "tail
wagging the dog," or that same spirit of
selfishness that actuates every individual
when he acquires wealth or position, or
both-he entirely forgets how he at-
tained them, and Is constantly reach-
ing out for more, until we find him In-
dorsing a policy of coercion and intimi-
dation over all crafts, dictating to the
press and politicians, strangling inde-
pendence of thought and American man-
hood.
The open shop system is one that will
inevitably impoverish the worker. It
is one that is hopelessly bad, a bar to
true progress, a damage to the city, and
a menace to civilization. Organied
capital or amalgamation of capital, in
post cases, knows but one law-the law
of money. Their purposes are accom-
plished by either the power of money
or the threat of physical force, and I re-
peat, fellow-workers, that the continu-
ance of the Builders' Exchange on its
present line of policy to, destroy union-
ism, will only result in confusion and
disaster. It is, therefore, the sublime
duty of every loyal workingman and citi-
zen to uphold the principles we repre-
sent, and help us to save our beautiful
and prosperous city from industrial ruin.
I say to union men in particular, stand
by your convictions manfully-let the
guidepost of this, the Union Protective
Association, be the utter annihilation
of any and all attempts on the part of
any man, or set of men, to undermine
and disrupt our union.
This is a vital question with us.
i Heretofore it has been handled M-
I ively on one side and with timidity on
, the other, until now the time has come
I when men should no longer be silent;
when unionism must be substituted for
cowardice; when we must stand to-
gether with a common purpose. This,
* our association, must get in the lime-
light. We must call things by their
real name, and the searehlighst so train-
Sed by us will reveal to the public eon-
Sditions as they actually are. Let the
purpose of our asesolation be to deal
With facts and not with faneles. In
* view of the gradual encroachment of
Capital on labor, prudence and self-pre-
Sservation dictates the adoption of some
Decisive measures looking to the main-*
f tenance of those fundament*I prinielples
t to which we owe our present high prog-
t ress and elvilization. The day of indi-
r vidual isolation is past; the time has
r gone when the workman ean stand
s alone. Orgaluntios is the modern


machine for accomplishing results bene- t
filal to all. V
In many ways can our association set 0
about the task of pulling up root and
branch these un-American institutions, I
backed by unlimited capital and a legal- v
lsed power to rob us of a fair day's

pay. It is to be thoroughly understood, v
however, that I do not mean that the u
Builders' Exchange in itself, or the in- t
dividuals composing same, should be
made the object of attack, but rather
those selfish. pernicious theories and i
practices which go to make up what ins
known as Manufacturers' Associations, I
Exchanges, etc. .
The right of capital to organize can c
not be questioned, but the misuse of its i
power is a legitimate object of attack.
Talk about labor organizations and a I
boycott; what are they compared to the I
trusts and black-list? Who ever heard of a
a law being enacted for a labor union?
There are laws that prohibit my saying, i
"You, my fellow workers, must not
spend your money in an establishment
whose proprietor belongs to an organi-
zation, whose principles are to starve o
us into submitting to their dictum." It F
is unlawful for us to protect ourselves.,
Their weapon, and a formidable one to
be sure, is the dollar; ours, the boy-
cott. We simply say: "Don't spend
your money there; he is sworn to 1
ruin us." That is unlawful. The
employer can tell all other em-
ployers not to employ John Smith,
and place him on the black-list; that
is all right. We are denied intelligent
retaliation. Now, what are we going to
do about it? That is the question that
concerns us all. Must we submit tor
this dictation? Must we bow our head
and hold up our hands in recognition of
its dignity and might? Must we surren-
der our citizenship on the dictum of a
mere handful of men, who in five min-
utes' time perfected an organization
which threatens the disruption of or-
ganizations that were in existence when
I rst saw the light? Not A thousand
times, Nol Would we as a nation tol-
erate such impositions from any other
country? We would not. We would sao-
rifice our lives and the lives of our
sons, our time and our savings, in de-
stroying or attempting to destroy an
enemy who would dare to inflict upon
us, as a nation, the wrongs and oppres-
sions which the trusts and local em-.
ployers' associations are daily heaping
upon us as individual workmen of the
United States.
Where, then, is the remedy? For reme-
dy must come from some source. My
conclusions are that the only remedy will
be found in the Union Protective As-
sociation, whose cardinal principles shall
be to protect and encourage the wage-
earners in the exercise of their rights,
and to make grand old Jacksonville a
welcome home for honest, sober, reliable
workingmen, men who *have families to
support, children to send to school, boys
to raise to good citizenship. Can this
be done in a scab town? No, and I chal-
lenge any employer in the city of Jack-
sonville to meet me individually and
prove that an open town is to the best
interest of all parties concerned.
The bet way for our association to
accomplish good is to conduct the policy
along the fine of truth and justice, and
thus administer an antidote of common
sense for the benefit of these unseerupu-
lous agitators, representing capital, and
who are now poisoning the minds of so
larae a mas of people.
In this country, governed as it is by
public opinion, the great public is the
final court which determines the righ,
of any matter saffecting the'general wel-
fare, and it should be one of the highest
duties of this, our association, to give
a proper presentation to this court of
our side of this most talked-of and least
understood queetion-the open shop.
The efforts of the Union Protective As-
soeation must stand for good. We have
plated our standard for the right, and


there it should remain, as frm as the
rock of Gibraltar. The cause is too
acred to falter or temporie now.
In closing, I say, mark well this fact--
I know that the union men, as a large
majority, are manly and upright,' and
condemn the acts of violence done by
vicious men, who, under the guise of
unionism, commit these depredations in
the excitement of a strike.
To this great third party, the public,
we plead for the cause of human liberty
n a struggle against corporate greed
nmd tyranny, those old enemies of man.
kind. We plead for the children in the
public schools, who will, if the ex-
changes' policy prevails, have to take
an active part in the struggle for bread.
We plead for the hundredW of honest,
hard-working people, whose best efforts
bring them only enough to feed, clothe,
and house the little family, and to whom
the doubling of the cost of wood, bread,
meat, clothing, ete., means suffering,
sickness, and frequently death. We
plead for the anxious father, forced from
his work by the starvation wage and
other obnoxfou dictums of the trust em-
ployern. We plead for the women who
are compelled to aid their husbands and
fathers, to eke out an existence. We
plead for the mother and children, trem-
bling in the agony of terror through the
long nights alone, while the husband
and father is away bravely asserting his
right and liberty to earn bread to keep
life in their bodies. We plead for the
white slave of todayI he may be en-
slaved by circumstanes, may h-be the
slave of a local employers' trust, is in
truth and in fact more abject than the
negro slave of the past. There may
have been some brutal and tyrannical
slave owners in the South, but I ask
you if ever, in all the history of negro
slavery, did there exist such a condition
of oppression as now exists under the
acts of the exchanges, ete., of today.
I trust no one will take this article
as a personal affront; it is a polley, and
not an individual, I am combating.

STEALING EDITORIALS.
There are very few editors who enjoy
having their editorial etuff lifted by
some other fellow and used without
credit, simply because he is either too
Ignorant or too lasy to write anything.
One difficulty about this busien Is that
some people may not observe dates care-
fully, and may get the idea that the real
author of the articles is the one who is
stealing from the other fellow.
While we are not conceited enough to
imagine that any editor would steal our
stuff because of any liters merit or
depth of thought contained Farein, we
have noticed frequently of ate in one
of our nearby exchanges editorials from
the Courier for which no credit was
given.
As there are many people la this see-
tion who read both papers this contin-
uous purloining of our stuff makes the
situation a little bit embarrassin. .ow,
if our brother likes our editorial utter-
anees and seconds our ideas be should
at least give us proper credit. for the use
thereof, or, as some of the brethren of
the preq do, he dight MNd for a few
copies of the Editor's Friend. Thea. he
could serve them uB ot and original (?)
We have always had a temptt for a
sham. we always like for a mana to
stand months own rgt, to stand or fall
if his fate be to fallU, blaming only him-
self. .
If there ever appears anything of
merit in tihe editorial column of our
paper the credit therefore is due to. none
other than be whoe name at the mast-
head proclaims him editor.
If we never write a thing worth read-
ing, If we tll a thoumad editotiAl lies,
if we teach a false doetre, we are the
responsible party, sal itand ready to
saesmW the l Wmepeslbllity thenfor.
-Pleat City Ourter.


p


- tNlml


^ /
..




* -4
a.


THU ~V


December 30, 1905


b oonktaste
Wienswad Loans


BUCKMAN
..!. .


. I


BURTON K. IRS SONS
1iqmavh, Via.


Building Material ..

Foundation to Finish



WON Tm RhN



H. II. RICHARDSON & CO.





S ettesi Has It


Mm .AuI1 YTldAMU



4oW6rg sA tow
IW i -Liu I F-


Agriculture
(Continued from Sixth Page)
People in the North, who may have
seen that Pensacola had weather in the
first week of Deeember that reached one
degree below irmaing point will per-
haps conclude that such a condition pre-
vails all ovqr the State l. whih of soure,
is not true. A difference of from 10 to
20 degrees prevails between the northern
border of Florida and where its sandy.
southern line is swept by the waters of
the Gulf. When one is shivering in
Jacksonville, others are sweltering in
Key West and in the lower counties.
Writers on Florida climate get their Im-*
presslons from the environments that
surround them; these, being local, vary
with the latitude of location. Roses
bloom and berries ripen in one section,
while in another a thin coating of ice
robs vegetation of its beauty and useful-
ness.
Three crops a year, off three-quarters
of an acre of Polk County land, is the
story told by W. R. Griffin of Pebble to
the editor of the Bartow Courier-In-
formant. Turnips, selling for $128;
then potatoes, $100; then sugar cane,
stalks and seed, $135, to which is to be
added 200 gallons of "delicious syrup,"
valued at least 50 cents per gallon, or
$100, making a sum total of $460. But
it will be hard to make the Northern or
Western farmer believe that Florida sand
is ood for anything. Yet it Is on rec-
ordthat one acre along the Georria bor.
der -line has produced 738 gallons of
syrup, thus showing that Mr. Griffin
might have done very much better than
he did. Here's "opportunity" for lots
of new settlers to siese and succeed In.
As alfalfa is now being advocated by
many interested in Florida agriculture,
the conductor of this department has in
preparation a brief, but comprehensive,
article on the subject for early publica-
tion in THE SUN.
The Courier-Informant of Bartow de-
clares, as the result of personal test by
the editor, that the syrup made from
Japanese cane is of the finest quality
and superior to that made from the com-
mon varieties of cane now planted in
Florida. At the same time, having
tasted a sample bottle of syrup made
from the Simpson (or white) variety,
he declares no syrup made elsewhere in
the country can beat it. He thus safely
balances himself on the tetering plank
of courtesy to subscribers who contrib-
uted to his taste for saccharine stuff and
sits ready to have some more from
others that would be equally as sweet.
EXPERIMENTING WITH ORANGES.


Says an enthusiastic exchange:
"Think of orange gardens around the
home in Norfolk, Richmond, Lynehburg,
Lexington, Louisville, Cairo and per-
haps In Cincinnati, St. Louis, Jefferson
City and Kansas City." Just so, why
not add Chicago, Boston, Minneapolis
and Portland, whtle one is about it? A
hardy orange. And botanists in the De-
partment of Agriculture "hope to bring
into being an orange tree that will be
as the apple tree;* an orange that will
not perish in the chill of Northern win-
ter." All this by crossing the Florida
orange on what the writer calls the
sturdy Japanese species, to-wit, Citrus
Trifoliata. May we all live long enough
to see this triumph over nature and its
laws of climate. The good traits-the
bitter and the sweet-are to be com-
bined. And pray, what good traits has
the Trifoliata, save as a stock on which
to bud the kid-glove family of oranes?
In experimental work, many curious
results are produced that are interest-
ing to specialists, but of little value to
the general public. For Instance, one
enthusiastic horticultural specialist
crosses the blackberry on the raspberry
and thus "mixes the breed" but im-
proves upon neither. And we note in
the new catalogues now being scattered
abroad by seedsmen and nurserymen,
that a "strawberry-raspberry" is being
introduced. A strawberry with a rasp-
berry flavorn Think of it, ye who hold,
and Justly, that no finer fruit than the
strawberry w, isor will be given us by
nature Oter instances might beted,


..22142 lo n6t
IJacaove, ri,


Florida ectric Co.


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1905 Crop ,Bains
Refugees ... ........... ..........$4 25
Extra Emrly Refugee......... 4 25
Earliest Vlentine ............ 4 25
Strfi 4leseoroen Pod......... 6 00
Davis Kidney Wax........... 5 00
Black Wax .,..........,. 7 00
Wardwel's Kidney Wax ... 6 00
U T K. "S SN


beauty?
I have been thinking somewhat along
this line, but it never came to me so for-
eibly as this week, when I read of Mrs.
Jeanette Pomeroy of London, whose
mission on earth is to make women
fairer.
Do not think that I am advertising a


but t i e ino ned to multiply them.
There at racial differences in fruits as
well as in mankind.
PROG FARMING.
Florida, with its numberless swamps,
bayheads and bq.ou., ought to be a good
place for the frog farmer, now that the
grown-up pollywog offers part of its
anatomy a sa delilous morsel to the'
epicure. Up in Pennsylvania the State
Board of Agriculture takes such an in-
terest in the matter that its Fish Com-
missioner has been experimenting, and a
crop of 800,000 frogs have been raised
a4d sent out to applicants. At two
points in the State the frog hatcheries
were failures; in one an epidemic broke
out; in the other snakes got away with
a hundred thousand of the pollywogs.
So all is not gold that glitters, even in
frog farming.
"he raising of frogs, says a Philadel-
phia dispatch, is easier than the raising
of poultry. "A frog a week old planted
now will be fit for the table in a year,
and in two years will be a monster,"
but not quite a Behemoth in size, we
fancy. The "greenheads" are the favor-
ite variety, and it is possible to grow
two million to the acre.
It was a Frenchman, we believe, who
first discovered the economic value of
the hind legs of this croaking denison
of swamps and low lands; but now in
New York, Boston, Chicago and other
large cited the chefs of clubs and mil-
lionaires and high-toned restaurants
count on them as indispensable.
And, what quantities could be raised
in Florida, adding another to its list of
home industries.


Helpful Hints
(Continued from Sixth Page)
At Green Cove Springs, the home of
Florida's village improvement asso-
ciations, the members of the association
recently gave their Christmas reception.
Mrs. E. G. .G. Munsell, the president,
gave a few words of Welcome, following
which a short but very interesting pro-
gram was rendered. Ihe occasion will
be made an annual event, inasmuch as
Green Cove Springs again enjoys a re-
newal of life and activity after a season
of almost Rip Van Winklelan sleep.
The V. I. A. of Green Cove survived
disintegration and stands to-day, as of
old, as ai force for the accomplishment
of great good. At the recent Christmas
reception Mrs. Holt said: *
"Mrs. President, Ladies of the V. I.
A., and Friends-This is the first real
Christmas the V. I. A. has enjoyed for
many years, and I take this opportunity
in the name of the club of making it a
fitting occasion of tribute to our beloved
president, who has with untiring energy
and devotion guided our working band
always for its best good, and for the ever
advancement of our town and its peo-
ple.
"8o, with our appreciation of her
great worth and with our united love, I
present this token with the wish for her
of every good gift that God and Christ-
mas can bestow.
"So here's to our loyal president.
Three cheers for her always. With a
loving hand she will guide our band
this working V. I. A."
Mrs. Munsell responded very feelingly
with words of deep appreciation, and
after Christmas refreshments and a
merry chat, the company dispersed, all
pleased with their Christmas celebra-
tion.
Why not let me hear from all the im-
provement soeleties throughout the
tate? Thus can we get in touch with
each other through the columns of THE
SUN, where there is a niche and wel-
come corner for the "V. I. A.'s."
Did you ever think of it, how your
surroundings affect you?
Of course you know how it works on
your mentality, but did you ever think
about iti effects on your good looks and


SOLE AGENT

Jacksonville, Fa.
Me noR MI0 L MIk ma T


141


"beauty doctor," "a masseur" or "der-
matologist." Mrs. Pomeroy will come
to this country soon, and will not only
give a series of lectures, but will also
give practical demonstrations of her
views and systems, and all free of
charge. She feels she is engaged in do-
ing good work, and being a woman of
more than ample means, she intends to
tell us some things for our own good
without the tinkle of the dollar coin to
be heard.
By the conviction that certain laws
and rules affected the appearance of her
own sex, she began to give the subject
intense, deep and thorough study.
Charles Hemstrett, an author, who re-
cently went to Europe in the interest of
the American Institute of Social Science,
says of Mrs. Pomeroy's visit:
"Mrs. Pomeroy is really coming to
America to do a great and good work;
she is going to spend a vast sum of
money, and in return she will not re-
ceive a single cent. It is a philanthropy,
pure and simple. Mrs. Pomeroy has a
standard of measurement which approx-
imates the beautiful. She has given
twenty years of her life to the study
of the question, and she has shown that
she is able to raise the standards of
beauty in her own sex by the methods
that she employs.
"To speak generally, her theory is
that the things that affect the senses
react on the features and the bodies of
those affected. Thus people who live in*
unsightly surroundings, where every
sense is assailed by unpleasant things,
become unsightly themselves. Constant
living where bad odors exist, gradually
causes even a beautiful nose to become
ugly. Poor and badly-cooked food
makes the mouth ugly; glaring colors,
ugly pictures and crude sights disfigure
the eyes; discordant music, raucus
sounds and offenses to the sense of hear-
ing cause the ears to become badly
shaped. And all of these affect the
body as well as the special features.
The complexion, the color of the hair
and eyes, everything, in fact, that goes
to make up personal appearance, is gov-
erned by the way the senses are affected.
If the sensations are ugly, then physical
ugliness will result; if sensations are
beautiful, then beauty will follow in
natural sequence. This in brief is Mrs.
Pomeroy's theory.
"But she is not merely coming to
America to preach this gospel. She is
coming to make a scientific study of
American women."

RUSSIA'S ALLIES CHARGE JAPS
WITH INHUMANITY.
*, A special from Tshanpon says: "A
Manchurian merchant, about to return
to his home after the war, with his fam-
ily, consisting of seventeen persons, was
set upon by a band of Jap marauders,
who would not recognize their Russian
passes. The Japs looted the caravan,
stripped the Manchurians, men, women
and children, and buried them alive."
No confirmation of the above has been
received, and it is more than probable
that the crime was committed by Chi-
nese robbers.


Try


"Green Brier"
Tennessee Whisky



ITS PURE

THAT'S SURE

Robt.W. Simms
a lan sJ egh


A,.


6.1











December 0S, 190


'rnsus ,


Dr. F. H. Armstrong


New Year at the White House


BY Durows Ileykhag


him the propaganda-making irreuistable-
nemS of imen wedded to great ideas. He
is a shining example of the promise that
idealinin will win in the raw.


A MATTER OF FACT MAN.


Staff of Specalists
$$ AF (I


0 m


HUMAN EYE

Eye and Nervous Diseases


11 Laura St.


JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

Neuroloiy and Osteopathy
Bellevin that there is good In all methods
of treating diseases, we have taken all that
has been proven by the different schools
of medicine and combined It under the
head of neurology. The system embraces
all that is food In the old Mhools of media.
cine-aoteopathy, chiropractics, hydropa-
thy, physical culture, dietetics and hy.
rlene. We handle chronic diseases, al.
though the system is just as applicable to
acute as to chronic troubles. and we spe.
ctalise on dimeases of the eye. nervous sys.
tern, stomach and bowel troubles, consti.
patron, epilepsy, spinal troubles. piles,
prostati and female disease.



New York

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for "EFF-EFF" and

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Standard

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Company
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17-19 W. Bay St
JakiconvI0e, Florida



The Citizens Bank
OF JACKSONVILLE
D. U. FLETCHER President
D. H. DOIG Vice Prmldent
0. H. MANN Vice Preident
J. DENHAM BIRD OChier
Offer to depoitors every facility con.
intent with sa"e and conservative bank.
ing, nsurinmg absolute security.

4 phr Ni lin I mIf Pm




aCor y, Jacks,


Her Ladyship, Baroness Heyking, now
stationed at Sofi as the wife of the
Kaiser's*Ambassador, has probably the
most intimate knowledge of diplomats
of any living woman, having been sta-
tioned successively in Pekin, Washing-
ton, Mexico, Constantinople and several
German courts. Certainly no woman has
ever taken such liberties with the diplo-
matic personage of the day.
In her writings the Baroness calls her
heroes and heroines by the nicknames
current in the diplomatic corps at Wash-
ington.
"Attention, Comtesse, righ about face,"
whispered little Pogarell," attache of the
XX embassy. He was walking behind
"Baby," enfant terrible of his Excellency
of Austria. "Attention, Comtesse, we
are about to approach the spot where
the holiest of holy of the republic is
exhibited to shake the hands of the
worthy and unworthy alike."
"Baby," Pogarell and the rest formed
part of the big crowd pressing slowly
and painfully forward through the hot,
splendidly lit parlors of the White
House to pass in review before the Pres-
ident of the United States.


MASTER OF CEREMONIES.


At the entrance of the Blue Room we
were met by the master of ceremonies, a
military gentleman, who asked the
names of those people he did not per-
sonally know and passed them on to
Mr. Roosevelt. The President stood a
little further on, surrounded by his fam-
ily and official household. In front of
him ran a colored silk rope, marking the
narrow path his friends, admirers and
mere curiosity seekers lave to toe.
HAND SHAKING AND FLOWERS.
The President shook the hands of all,
man, woman and child, and had a few
pleasant words for everybody, "De-
ighted," or something of the sort. And
the ladies, Mrs. Roosevelt and Alice,
smiled sweetly the while, clutching at
their enormous bouquets, which they held
in front of them like shields. .
The diplomats and other persons of
prominence were privileged to remain in
the Blue Room, a spate being reserved
for them on the other side of, the silk
rope, opposite the head of the republic.


UNIFORMS, DECORATIONS,
COAT.


FROCK


There the various uniforms of Eu-
rope assembled in proud artay-scarfs
and colored ribbons, crosses and half-
moons, eagles and decorations of all
sorts, rescued from camphor boxes and
safe deposit@ in honor of the man in the
black frock coat. We waited, looked on
and marveled.


TYPES OF MANY STRIPES.


Every possible type was represented
by the hundreds and thousands of
passersby. All wanted to look Ameri-
can, but many gave away their origin
in physiognomy, gait or manner of
speech. Close observers might have
allotted each to his or her gold-laced
diplomatic representative on the other
side of the line, as their fatherland lay
on the other side of the ocean.
As the diplomats viewed the crowds
they saw, in their mind's eye, the enor-
mous fleets that, year in year out, carry
from the country of their birth thou-
sands and thousands of useful citismes,
all eager to become Americans.
Here were a hundred, a dosen or more,
of every nation of Europe, symbolizing
as it were, the millions that went before
and will come after them, men and wo-
men, the old country lost forever, and
they were not their worst citizens.


ARRAY OF MILLIONAIRES.


And then the array of millionaire--
men with whom money-making is not a
business, but a new form of revelation.
Their leader, Stonetower Night, boes of
the trust of trusts, was the eynosure of
all eye, posseesing for the smaller


money bags the fascination that the eter-
nal snow region has for the passionate
mountain climber. In their heart of
hearts all these mammon-grabbers were
convinced that some day they would be
as rich and powerful as Stonetower.


POLITICIANS.


Politicians galore, one could distin-
guish the Congresmen-elect from the old
hands; the new brooms made so much
noise in sweeping, acting as if the eyes
of all their constituents were upon them,
demanding that they perform some spe-
eial stunts to please those who voted
for them. There were many Senators,
too, all that wield influence, to be sure.
Many of them had seen great changes in
their lifetime, and I noticed two or three
looking rather wistfully at the spot oc-
cupied by Roosevelt. Perhaps they calr
culated their chances to stand there
themselves-some day.
REMINISCENCE OF MARK HANNA.
But there was one who did not, who
thought it greater fun to make Presi-
dents than to be one. His face, recalling
the iron mask of the great Napoleon,
was pale. He stood by himself, this
American king-maker, occasionally quizs
zing, with a suspicious eye, his last
creation, the new man grown to he a
tower of mysterious strength.


INVENTORS IN THE CROWD.


I heard the master of ceremonies muen.
tion the well known names of several
great technical inventors. Rome of them,
I know, began their career by adding
a little improvement to a piece of ma-
chinery, an apparently unimportant
wheel within wheels, a little screw, or
something of the sort. But that little
screw, or whatever it was, maide them
master manufacturers, killed competi-
tion in a thousand ways. And they grew
to be powers, powers in the machinery
progress that slowly but surely abholves
the human race of its numerous imnper-
feetions.
AMERICAN ARMY OFFICERiS.
Many army officers had come to salute
their generalissimos, the head of the na-
tion, some of them as poor as church
mice, no doubt, but like the millionaires
they seemed to ask: "How much for
the world?" As the emitdiment of for-
ward-pressing strength, they struck men,
and many a Democrat eyed those bun-
dles of gold lace, spurs and swords
rather anxiously. "The army is grow-
ing too fast; it may become a danger to
the republic in time."
But the President and his men wel-
comed them with open hand and heart.
Roosevelt takes great pride in the army
he commands. To his mind the officers'
corps is necessary for expansion, the de-


WHAT DIPLOMATS SAID.


Looking full at the man who for hours
and hours continued shaking hands and
smiling and saying pleasant nothings,
Isa said: "He knows what he wants,
and therefore will succeed."
And Brinken, who is the literary ad-
viser of all the diplomats in Washing-
ton, added: "And upiting will-power
with idealism, he will doubly succeed;
all his writings prove his devotion to
lofty ideals."
Isa, who sla a newcomer in the United
States, replied "But in this country,
where everybody is chasing after the dol-
lar, idealism would seem to be a handi-
cap, rather than a political advantage."


ROOSEVELT


WILL SHAKE TIHE
WORLD.


"It is-to a certain extent," said
Brinken; "Roosevelt encounters much
opposition and has many enemies, but
he is buoyed up by the conviction that
it's his destiny to shake the world so-
oording to his own free will. And his
enthusiasm for the measures and things
he eousiders right, makes him triumph
over most diUaulties. Roosevelt has in


"let me add," continued Brinken,
"that Roosevelt is not a dim-sighted
optimist either; on the contrary, he re-
gards the world and men in their true'
colors, good, had and indifferent, but be-
lieving as he does in the ultimate tri-
umph of the good principle, he thinks
eve body and everything capable of re-
form. Most of the world's great men
have thought that way.
"Whon I see Roosevelt I always think
of Luther; he has the hearty, enthu-
siastie and, if need be, warlike aspet of
the great reformer of Wittenberg.'

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