Group Title: sun.
Title: The sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075914/00006
 Material Information
Title: The sun
Uniform Title: sun
Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sun Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: December 16, 1905
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tallahassee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Leon County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Leon -- Tallahassee
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.451667 x -84.268533 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 18, 1905)-v. 3, no. 47 (Sept. 12, 1908).
Numbering Peculiarities: Published at Tallahassee, Fla., June 23-Sept. 12, 1908.
General Note: Claude L'Engle, editor.
General Note: "If it's right, we are for it."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075914
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33400104
lccn - sn 95047216
 Related Items
Other version: Morning sun (Tallahassee, Fla.)
Succeeded by: Dixie (Jacksonville, Fla.)

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N**


1'19t


=1


7


A Journal of Cartoon and Comment


If It'sllht, We Are For It


II I I
Volume 1-No. 5 JAGKSONVILL,, LORIDA, DCGEMBEIR 16. 1905 Single Gopy 5 Gents
ImUI II.I I-


/


NAVAL 6TORES 61TUATION--THCe LION AND THE LAND HAVe LAID DOWN TOGCTIIR-RIU"L MD TIIB









If

CLAUDE L'ENGLE
Editor


IT'S RIOHT, WE ARE IOR IT


T+HE-.O
TITEI
m -


SUN


A. K. TAYLOR
Cartoonlst


-. -- -- WL Ad AILd~ m --mam m U.A i TFUIHSET Jqp P4f~


5mY Wail a" WL U if 1 U TrI- w r .* -' 1---- ,_.....r
___ -JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, DECEMBER 16, 1905 5 Cents upercqy wr
i. on m~~ t h~ 9Pot Office in JcauonVfle, Fli., for admiion to% the mails A weo mdld "m

IN MEMORIAL.
This little headstone is
erected to the tender memory
of an ad. printed in this space
last week. Its duty was to
nou*l this journal, which
gives the people a voice. Right
well was the little ad. doing
its duty.
It died from an overdose of
"Gum."
For further particulars of
this sad demise see editorial
pages of this issue.
R. I. P.



THE SOUTHERN FRUIT CO. 0 0 E
Fruit, Produce, Grain and Provisions, Commnision Merchants. Send us your orders
and ship Oranges, Pineapples and Vegetables.


Iow 36 West 00 .00 Jacko0nvlle ," pw i, e. .b.
ome*, SW !Forsyth Street FlorTla O l pNw mma u
8- 18---m THE FLORIST 1. feW,..L
tI
*
i STOVES; HOUSF NISHINGS,
TOr WEB S' HARDWARE CO. 0oggsgPBS
We have an interesting Price List on Sash, Doors and Blinds. Write for it and it will bW yours by mail.
Send also for our specially attractive Price List on Stoves.


FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS

Is the amount we will invest in our 1905-1906 Catalogue, describing every
clais of Furniture. If you are interested in finding out how to get cu prices
on this class of goods, send for a Catalogue to'


John A. Cunningham, Jacsonville, Fla.
I-g I Ik I iIaI


HENRY'S


PLACE


501 West Bay and 16-18 Clay Streets


*** JckmvHeftdd


PARTIAL PRIG LIST


Oonirem Rye .................................................. f 50
Henry's Select................................................ 2 00
Henry's Bet ................................................. 8 00
Old Monom............................................... 4 00
Mr Choice Rye........................................ 00
Holland Gin .............................. to 8 50
Corn Whisky..................................... 1 50 to 3 50
We guarantee al our woods and
HENRY F R


Hen u a' e .... .................. .......
oe n ... .....""............. ...
bOU to .................................... ........ 40.
olnad Gin, w .................................. 2
eaed Gin, el ad NC..Com......... 42D
Kenry's Speelal Brawd N. 0. COrm................. I Ma


refund money If not satisfactory.
., Pn letor


IN MEMORIAL.
This little headstone is
erected to the tender memory
of an ad. printed In this spew,
last week. Its duty was to
nourish this journal, which
gives the people a voice. Right
well was the little ad. doing
its duty.
It died from an overdose of
"Gum."
For further particulars of
this sad demise see editorial
pages of this issue.
R.I.P.


4~
.4'
'A.


THE ONLY UP-TO-DATC MAIL
ORDER HOU6C IN THE SOUTH









December 16, 1905


THE SUN


NE Y


I


S


P


PLENTIFUL


This Desirable Condition Has Been Brought About by the Taking Over of Large and Unsold Accu-
mulations of Naval Stores, Being Bought by the Big Four and the Money Turned Over to
Those Banks Which Had Advanced Money on Naval StoresIOollateral.


Money is plentiful in Jacksonvil'e.
This healthy condition has been brought about
by the treaty of peace recently negotiated between
the warring powers in the world of gum.
This peaceful situation is presented on the cover
of this issue in the cartoon drawn by Artist Taylor.
In this lying down together of the Lion and the
Lamb, the relative posit ons of the two principals
in the interesting drama is an incident which affets
people more or less in direct proportion to their
interest in the lamb.
Sympathy for the lamb will no doubt fill the
hearts of a large majority of those who look on this
picture. It is a noble sentiment that honors the
man who harbors it. The writer asks that he may
be recorded as one of these.
BUT, THE THING. THAT CHIEFLY CON-
CERNS the merchant, the land owner, the workman,
the real estate dealer, and all others engaged in
business pursuits is that-
THE BANKS NOW HAVE PLENTY OF
MONEY to lend to all who can make a satisfactory
showing of their worthiness of credit.
Last week, before the enormous holdings of naval
stores in the hands of the Naval Stores Export Com-
pany were turned into cash, there was a tightness
in the money market that was keenly felt tby the
business men of Jacksonville.
Business was beginning to feel the strain, and
it was welcome news to those engaged in other pur-
suits, when the announcement was made that the
large accumulations of naval stores had been turned
into cash by the arrangement entered into between
the rival buyers.
When the Naval Stores Export Company made
the agreement with the old exporters, by the terms
of which the old exporters bought the stock of tur-
pentine and rosin held by the new company, about
two and a half millions of dollars were turned loose.
A large part of this enormous amount went into
the vaults of Jacksonville banks, and is at the ser-
vice of Jacksonville business men who may have use
for it, and proper security to offer for the use of it.
To describe the present condition the words of


Dr. Hy Robinson, president of the Commercial Bank,
are, with his permission, quoted. He said:
"The Commercial Bank did not have any naval
stores paper, and was not affected by the change in
the naval stores situation. Money is easy now,
while last week it was tight."
rTo describe the condition that prevailed last
week requires the citation of but one out of many
instances of like character.
A man of ample fortune was compelled to aban-
don the contemplated purchase of a valuable piece
of real estate at a bargain price, because he could
not get the cash to pay for it, although he offered
eighteen thousand dollars' worth of securities for a
two thousand dollar loan.
A prominent real estate dealer described the con-
dition last week as critical, adding that transactions
aggregating a large amount negotiated by him could
not Iw consummated last week because loans that
could have been secured without difficulty, ORDI-
NARY CONDITIONS PREVAILING, could not be
secured.
It is not dliflcult to locate the cause of this money
tightness in Jacksonville. Jt lies in the same direc-
tion as the cause of the relief. It can be writ within
the compass of a couple of consonants and a vowel.
G-U-M.
It was known to the publishers of this journal
at the time of the writing of the "Story of Gum,"
which was printed in these column last Saturday.
It was not included in that history weause it was
feared that its publication might cause a financial
disturbance that would injure the business interests
of this city.
Now, that the situation has been relieved and
this effect is no longer to be feared, it may be of
interest to present a little pen-picture of THIS
part of the "Story of Gum."
When a celebrated statesman was asked what was
necessary to carry on a successful war, he said:
"Three things. The first is money, the second is
mone and the third iN money."
This rule applies, with equal force, to commer-


cial wars and to wars between nations.
When the Naval Stores Export Company joined
battle with its rivals for control of the naval stores
market, it needed money, then more money, then still
more money.
For example: Say that the company under its
agreement with the producers to take all shipments
of naval stores at Jacksonville at Savannah prices,
used up its capital in purchases and was unable to
sell as fast as the goods came in. It was then
obliged to pay for the next consignment with hor-
rowed money. If It had on hand $1,000,000 worth
of naval stores, it could borrow on warehouse re-
ceipts, under the rules governing these transactions,
about 80 per cent of the- market value of the com-
modity at the time the loan was applied for. When
this money was put In goods still arriving, 80 per
cent of the last investment could be borrowed. This
in turn being invested and still more goods arriving,
another loan of 80 per cent might be secured. This
process being continued, the time was bound to come
when NO MORE MONEY COULD BI HAD.
This was the time for an agreement which was so
euphoneously described by that conservative Times-
Union and that dear Met. as "an amicable agree-
mento by which the Naval Stores Export Comnmny
won a great victory for Jacksonville."
This little illustration, which comes very near
being a record of what did happen but which is not
put forth as such, may explain why It required two
and a half millions of dollars to take over the hold-
ings of a CASH (X)MMODITY of a million-dollar
company when the "amicable agreement" was
reached.
This little illustration may offer some light on
the question of what caused the tightness in the
money market last week. It may also explain to
the other business men of Jacksonville why the banks
were turning down loans last week. It looks like the
money market was "gum stuck."
But now all this is past. The "gum" has been
loosened up and thin story can be ended with the
same sentence that began It-
Money is plentiful in Jacksonville.


PLA YED


PRETTY


GAME


AND


LOST


How Things Went When the News Got Out That the Export Company Had Reached Its Limit-It
Was a Capitulation


There being NO REAL INFORMATION in the
carefully censorized notice sent to the press by the
gentlemen who so recently agreed about naval stores,
which carefully censorized notice was published in
both daily newspapers here, the following from the
Savannah Morning News of Monday lant Is pre-
sented to those who may be interested in knowing
what did happen.
It follows the main points of the "Story of Gum"
that was printed in this'lournal last week, no part
of which has been denied.
Though the details of the agreement reached by
the warring interests have not been made public by
the persons chiefly interested, it is understood from
well informed circles that the stock taken over con-
sists in part of about 45,000 casks of spirits of tur-
pentine, taken on a basis of about 01 cents a gallon,
the market price at the close of trading Saturday;
and that the remainder of the holdings, consisting
of roein, was taken at a figure slightly under that
quoted for the various grades at the close of last
week's market.
It is further believed that the agreement in-
eludes a clause relative to a minimum price, to which
the market shall be allowed to go. In fact, it was
stated yesterday by one of the members of a factor-
age firm largely interested in the settlement, that
producers are guaranteed for the future a much bet-
ter price for their stuff than the average price it has
brought In during the last five years, though it is
not to be expected that the price of rosin will ever
again reach the level that obtained just before the
break a few weeks ago, this level being possible only
through the abnormal conditions that prevailed at
the time, as the result of the fight that has just been
ended.
In the transfer of the holdings to be delivered by
the Naval Stores Export Company, it is understood
that the agreement ge into effect at onee, and that
the change of ownership, that is the actual delivery
of the goods into the posesios of the new per


chasers, is to be made as rapidly as possible, to be
completed, in fact, in thirty days.
According to those in a position to know some-
thing of the terms of the new agreement, the trans-
fer of the holdings of the Naval Stores Export Com-
pany does not mean that it will go out of business,
though it .ia reported that the recently announced
plans for an increase of its capital from $1,250,000
to $2,000,000 have been abandoned, and that its
advice to producers to keep their stuff off the'mar-
ket may also be rescinded.
The expression of satisfaction made in the official
declaration of the consummation of the agreement
will probably be felt not only by those interested
in the companies directly interested, but as well by
the producers, for it is understood that while a
large number of "the men in the woods" were stock-
holders in this company, the high prices that they
received for their product while the fight was on,
will be more than an offset to any loses that might
have accrued in other directions.
Probably the greatest source of loss is to be
found in the tendency of some of the operators to
take on new timber leases and making other prep-
arations to extend their operations, at prices that
were based on the high values at which the market
has been held. Factors, well knowing the Instability
of the fictitious level that had been reached, discour-
aged as far as was possible these ventures, and in
many cases refused to make new connections or to
advance money on schedule* based on current prices.
Of more than ordinary interest to the general
public, as well as to the naval stores man, producer
or consumer, will be a brief review of the causes,
conduct and consequences of this fight between the
warring interests that have just been reconciled.
When the allied exporters of Savannah refused
in the spring of last year to renew the contracts
by which they had taken, at Savannah prices, the
receipts of Florida ports, the Naval Stores Export
Company was organized, among the factors and pro-
ducers, by a series of meetings held at Jacksonville,
Savannah, Pensaeola, and even as far west in the
belt as Uattlbarg, Miss. The original plan, as


announced, was to start with a capital of $1,000,000,
but at the meeting for organization this was in-
creased by $250,000..
The fight was precipitated almost at the moment
the former contracts with the Savannah exporters
expired, and an a result early in June the prices of
spirits of turpentine went up by leaps and bounds
to 70 cents, and prices in the rosin market likewise
advanced sharply. To meet these tactics the Flor-
ida shipments were diverted, at the instance, it was
understood, of the Naval Stores Export Company,
to this market, and, under the weight of this load
trading was almost to a standstill until a heavy
accumulation of spirits had been piled up.
Then prices broke sharply an the Forida com-
pany came in and cleaned the market of offerings,
king an amount of stuff, of which the price paid
represented, up to the present deal, the record for
the trade. At the lower level the greater portion
of the diverted receipts returned to their former
channels and trading resumed something of a normal
basis.
The conditions governing the naval stores trade
make it peculiarly susceptible of manipulation.
Spirits of turpentine after the initial guns in the
fight had been fired, ceased to be the point of attack,
and further operations, in the light of recent develop-
mefts, seem to have been directed against the rosin
stronghold.
Prices in this market were advanced day by day.
almost, until not only all 'former records were left
away behind, but the basis reached caused misgiv-
ings in the minds of even the factors and producers,
who were the chief beneficiaries. The sign icance of
this will be understood when it Is known that under
the terms of the agreement with producers the Naval
Stores Exprt Company was to take all the Florida
receipts a Savannah prices. Thus, in taking com-
paratively a small stock at Savannah the allied in-
teremte were loading up their competitor with a very
much heavier stock and at the same prices.
This would have been no great hardship on the
Florida interests had a market been tonad for the
(Codaaued on ixthb Pae)


MO


a


,"t, ,
:..Ai'.li..'i|lf 'if'. '^ ,















BY


THE


SUN


OF


December 16, 1905




L TE


In Atlanta, Ga., there wak a meeting this week
of policy holders as to "What to do." There was a
division, same as existed in a similar meeting here
at. Jacksonville, as to whether Thomas W. Lawson
should or should hot be given the proxies. A com-
mittee has been appointed to report at a public meet-
ing to be held in February.
S* *
Only recently adequate announcement was made
by the press of the increased capitalization of the
Southern Bell Company, yet at Tampa this company's
plant has been absorbed by and merged into that of
an independent company, the Peninsular Telephone
Company. However, the Bell people will retain their
long-distance toll lines. They also propose a much-
needed innovation, the establishment of a connection
between Jacksonville and Tampa, at an early date.
*0 *
While Secretary Taft of the War Department
and Theodore P. Shonts, chairman of the Canal Com-
mission, wanted an appropriation of $16,500,000 for
the Panama canal, the Senate committee on appro-
priations decided to report on an appropriation
measure of $11,000,000.
*
And now New Yorkers--those suburmnlites whose
homes are in Staten Island-have come forward with
complaints and tears. The municipal rerrynots are
a source of great aggravation. Engagements, busi-
ness, social and otherwise, cannot be kept, due to
the erratic timetable in operation. Many useless
employes, it is said, have been placed on the boats.
In other words, it is a ease of greater cost and poorer
srIe,


The valuation of Volusia County property in-
creased this year $573,200.6 over that of last year.
The total assessed valuation of the county for 1904
was $3,822,030; this year it is $4,396,842. This
valuation exceeds any before the freezes. Property
in .Florida for taxation is assessed at about one-third
its value. The real value of the property of the
county, therefore, is over $13,000,000.
*
The work of ballasting the Florida East Coast
Railway with rock between Jacksonville and St. Au-
gustine is under way, and before the winter sched-
ule is put on they expect to have the thirty-seven
miles complete. A faster schedule will be main-
tained between Jacksonville and St. Augustine.
*
At Daytona there is every indication of progress.
Building operations in and around that city this fall
have been very good. and the indications are that the
town is on an era of great prosperity. Many hand-
some residences have recently been completed, and
there are no less than a dozen homes of handsome
architecture under course of construction. These
residences vary in price from $2,000 to $10,000, and
they are being fitted up in elegant style, commen-
surate with the progress of Daytona.
*
Thomas F. Ryan's attitude of refusal, at first, to
answer questions put to him by the representatives
of the insurance investigation committee, has been
changed and now he is telling some things. He says
that E. H. Harriman threatened to exert political
and other influences against witness if the witness
did not turn over to him one-half of the 502 shares


Italy has taken steps by which she expects to force
Venezuela to agree to settle Italian claims.


|lM-----~~ ^*..-.. .m-


.4


31EN1


THE SUN


Moo""


(the contoling interest) of stock of the Equitable
Life Assurance Society, which he, Ryan, had acquired
by purchase from James H. Hyde. President John
F. Dryden of the Prudential Life Insurance Company
of America, who has also been on the stand this
week, testified that $20,000 had been paid to tihe
IRepublicai campaign fund, "but that never to the
extent of qpe dollar had his company contributed to
any corruption fund."
*
Chas. V. McQucen of Lexington, who is an ex.
tensive contractor and has had a contract for grading
on the Jap~ionville & Southwestern extension of the
Atlantic Oast Line from Newberry west, states that
he has finished his work, with the exception of about

five miles, 'having reached a point about ten miles
west of the Suwannee river. The iron has been laid
to the Suwannee river, and trains are now running
to that point. A large force of workmen are en-
gaged on the other side, in Lafayette and Taylor
Counties, qad the completion of the extension to
Perry is bring pushed as rapidly as possible. Work
is also progressing nicely on the railroad bridge
spanning the Suwannee, which it is expected will be
finished in a few weeks.
*
Further developments in the life insurance inves-
tigation are most notable. For instance: Geoige
W. Perkins, vice-president of the New York Life
Insurance Company, has resigned and has been suc-
ceeded by Alexander E. Orr, president of the New
York City Rapid Transit Commission. Former Pres-
ident Richard A. McCurdy of the Mutual Life Insur-
ance Company has been succeeded by Charles A. Pea-
body, at a saving of $100,000 per annum to this com-
pany, the new president's salary being $50,000 per
year, against $150,000 of that of the former presi-
dent. E. H. Harriman wants a chance to go again
on the stand, evidently with a view to rebutt the re-
cent testimony of Thomas F. Ryan.

Conditions in Russia show no improvement. Over
its vast area with its many cities and towns, there
continue outbreaks at new points, and murder and
massacre follow fast and furious. In certain sections
land owners have organized volunteer battalions. As
the Government is unable to afford protection, this
measure was made necessary. It is reported that at
Livonia, where there was an outbreak recently, the
people have set up a provisional Government. Also
that the insurrectionists have won over the troops,
while at Riga, the port, it is reported, is now held by
the insurrectionists.
*
In the recount of ballots contest in the Mayoralty
campaign in New York City, the decision of the
Court of Appeals is against William Randolph
Hearst. The latter is, however, undaunted in his
efforts for ,justice and right, and has announced
through his counsel that at the January meeting of
the Legislature an appeal will be made thereto to
pass a bill which shall provide specifically for a re-
count of all ballots east in the recent election.
*
The contract for two of the university buildings
has been awarded to W. T. Hadlow by the State
Board of Control, which body was in session this week
at Gainesville. The.contracts are to erect and com-
plete a college building and dormitory by September
1, 1906, the college building to be ready by August
1, 1900.

While preparations along the east coast for the
care of the winter visitors who will flock from the
North are almost completed, yet there is evident
those intense finishing touches which are now being
made. West Palm Beach is especially active, and
numerous changes in the hotels there have been made.
At Palm Beach The Breakers will open with supper,
Saturday, December 23. As usual, many patrons
are now in Jacksonville, St. Augustine, Daytona and
Ormond awaiting this opening.
*










December 16, 1905


SUMMdR Y


OF


THE SUN



THE


WEEK'S


NEWS


Prof. P. H. Rolfs of Miami, who has been path-
ologist in charge o fthe sub-tropical laboratory, will
be succeeded by Ernest A. Bessey of Nebraska, a
pathologist in the bureau of plant industry of the
United States Department of Agriculture. Professor
Rolts will take charge of the Florida State Experi-
ment Station.

In New York City an appeal has been issued by
the board of managers of the Evangelical Alliance
for contributions for the relief of the riot victims
in Russia, in co-operation with the work already
undertaken by the Jewish committee. The aplpal,
which is addressed "to the people of America," is
signed by Leander Chamberlain, president, and Chis.
A. Stoddard, chairman of the executive committee,
and requests that contributions be ent to Jacob If.
Schiff, treasurer of the American committee, for the
relief of the sufferers. The appeal, in part, follows:
"The awful violence continues and appears to in-
crease. The existing American committee of relief
declares, with full knowledge of the facts, that help-
less men and women and children must perish from
hunger and wounds and exposure unless relief is con-
tinued. The appeal is to our common humanity. Let
the followers of the Christ loyally remember llis
words: 'Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of
the least of these my brethren ye have done it unto
Me.'
"The work of the American committee is nobly
effective, and it is certain that our gifts will be ap-
plied in the same breadth of spirit in which they are
given."
The Jewish national relief committee has received
a letter from Baron Horace Gunzberg, at St. Peters-
burg, telling of the plans made by the international
committee, of which Dr. Paul Nathan of Berlin is
chairman, for the distribution of the large relief
fund at its disposal. The letter said in part:
"A conference took place this afternoon between
the members of the committee here and ourselves at
Baron Gunzberg's house, when the following unani-
mous conclusions were come to:
"In order to facilitate the collection of all par-
ticulars, the affected places will he divided into dis-
tricts, with a central committee in touch with them
and located in the largest town in their vicinity.
"Our commission will visit all the towns in which
a central committee will be established, and have
already in all these places been recommended to per-
sons of standing, well known to gentlemen compos-
ing the St. Petersburg committee, who have been
active in distributing the money hitherto sent for
urgent requirements.
"So far as possible after the first needs for food,
etc., have been met doles will not be distributed, but
endeavors will be made to place the sufferers on a
sound commercial basis by means of advances from
savings banks or otherwise.
"Influences will be brought to bear on the Rus-
sian Government to assist the sufferers by remitting
taxes, school fees, etc. The relief fund now amounts
to $1,113,502.333."
0 *
Experts declare that Manhattan Island is likely
to be swept at any time by a conflagration which
would wipe out hundreds of millions of dollars'
worth of property value. That this has not yet hap-
pened is due to the great vigilance of the fire depart-
.'tent. Captain John Stephen Sewell of the United
States Army, an expert engineer who was detailed
by the War Department to assist in the investigation,
is inclined to go even further than the members of
the committee of twenty. He declares that the per-
sonnel of the fire department is the only thing which
has saved the city so far, saying: "The type and
occupancy of buildings prevailing in the worst sec-.
tlons, their mutual exposures, the narrowness of .the
streets, inadequacy of water supply and distribution,
together with the enormous values involved, combine
to make the situation in Manhattan by far the most
serious fire and conflagration hazard I have ever seen.

The conclusion is inevitable that the magnificent
personnel of the fire department has been the only


L thing which has prevented sweeping conflagrations
in the past. The existing physical editions not to


mention inefficient engines and a deteriorated alarm
system, constitute a handicap under which any mere
human agency, however perfect, must ultimately fail.
In view of the enormous interests involved andl thi
almost international character of the catastrophe
which would be represented by a sweeping confligra-
tion in Manhattan, no time should lie lost in putting
into effect all proposed improvements. In my judg-
ment, the description of existing dangers in this re-
port of the committee of twenty is, if anything, too
conservative; the hazard is at least real and serious.
The adoption of the recommendations of the commit-
tee in full would reduce it to a practical Iulinimum,
and no lesser measures will suffice."
S* *
At East Orange, N. J., the race question, relative
to children at the public schools, hais resulted in tthe
negroes starting schools of their own. Clauses for
the colored children of Fast Orange who have been
taken out of the local public schools because of the'
organization of special .Jim Crow classes by the Board
of Education, have been started by the colored people
in Mount Olive Baptist Church, in Ashland Avenue
and Calvary Baptist Church, in Maple Avenue to-
day. A committee of negroos will go to Trenton to
make an appeal to Governor Stokes and Charles J.
Baxter, State Huperintendent of Schools, to ascertain
to what extent the Board of Education is justified
in placing their children in separate clanes. Dr. J.
A. Stilwell will head the delegation. The negroes
believe the local board has violated the law. There
are eighteen children in the Mount Olive school, and
there is an attendance of twenty-three at Calvary
Church. The Ea. George W. Lpryr, who is ia


charge, says all the children will be accommodated
in a few days, as soon as the parents can be in-
formeid. Josephine Curtis. Daisy Travis and Ellf
lRied, all colored yming women, who have each re-
(Pivedil tA achiers' education, have been placed in
cihargi' of the l classs. A white man, whose name
is not divulged, gave sufficient money to buy the
IiOoks and stationery.
Farmner' hlulletin No. 234, just issued by the
UIriited Sta(te, apartmentt of Agriculture, is entitled,
"The guiinei fowl and its use as food." The old
(;rreks and ll*naius priled these flowl as we do the
turkey, and it vould seem, from the contents of this
little bulletin, that it might be made more of in
Florida than it Is; for, from its probable African
nativity, our wirm limate should be favorable for
them. They minlht be used as watch-fowls for the
poiiltry yard, ati their harsh cry warns off marauders,
while tihMy show fight against hawks and other ene-
Iniei of our domestlcated fowls. This bulletin can
Isw had free of charge by addressing the Secretary
of Agriculture, Washington.
To keep lemnon juice ready for use squee,' out
tlh juice in the usual manner, strain free front
pulp and pits, add white powdered sugar In the
proportion of one pound to a pint of juice, stir it
until the sugar is quite dissolved, then put it away
in a very small bottle. Put a teaspoonful of alad
oil in the top and cork it close. When wanted for
uwe take out the cork earteflly ad talo up the


oil with a bit of cotton wool. To UsN
add one Igp a


forIuMcm8

d M,.V'


,r~.
* '*






|| g ^ -y.,^. -' ---- ______


THE SUN


I
















I

























I~



I







I











F,


PRELUDE.
"The sun, with one eye, vieweth all the world."
-Shakespeare.
*
"Then sinks the nebulous star we call the sun."-
Tennyson.
*
"The farmers are the founders of civilization."-
Daniel Webster.
*
"Heap high the farmer's wintry hoard I
Heap high the golden corn!
No richer gift has autumn poured
From out her lavish horn."
-Whittier.
0
"In the age of Acorus, antecedent to Ceres and
the royal ploughman Triptolemus, a single barley.-
corn had been of more value to mankind than all
the diamonds that lay in the mines of India."-
Brooks.
*
"Spake full well, in language quaint and olden,
One, who dwelleth by the castled Rhine
When he called the flowers, so blue and golden,
Stars, that in earth's firmament do shine."
-Longfellow.
The crop on an acre grove of tangerines, near
Orlando, was sold this season on the trees for $1,750.
This shows Florida soil is good for something, and
is probably the largest amount of money thus far
obtained from e single acre.
Reports from California indicate that next year's
shipment of oranges will fall off at least 1,250 car-
loads. This is the estimate made by the Redlands
Citrograph, which means nearly a quarter of a mil-
lion silver dollars loss to orange growers.
A writer in the Palm Beach News advocates the
culture of the mango in Dade, St. Lucie and Brevard
Counties; but a near market is needed for so perish-
able a fruit, of which the general public know but
little and for which their taste must be educated
up to.
Two hundred and sixty crates of eggplant, shipped
at one time by one person at West Palm Beach, would
seem to imply a large area cultivated by the shipper.
The crop about that vicinity is said to be unusually
good this season.
De Soto County was not represented at the Tampa
fair by any of its products; but its editors were in
force at the banquet on the opening night. Six
papers, all published in the county, and five of their
hay-seed editors put in an appearance, one of them
showing a collection of sandspurs on his pantaloon
legs, as if he had been astray en route to the hig
hotel.
The farmers about Hastings are preparing for an
extensive planting of Irish potatoes for a spring
crop. Several hundred acres of new land have been
plowed for this purpose.
The marsh grass lands near Savannahl are to Im
utilized and the wiry grass, heretofore held to be
useless, is to lie transformed into a useful product,
though just how or what the -outcome, does not
appear, unless fiber of some sort. As three promi-
nent editors, one in New York, one in Philadelphia
and one in Chattanooga are the principal promotes
of the project, perhaps printing paper may result
from the experiment.
An interesting and instructive bulletin on okra,
its culture and uses, has been issued by the United
States Department at Washington, as Farmers'
Bulletin, No. 232. In the North only one crop can


be grown in a year, but along our Gulf coast country
it is somewhat of a perennial, and gumbo soup is in
evidence all round the rolling year.
Wauchula holds up its end of the orange growers'
boast that Do Soto County is the banner one of the
State, as far as the golden fruit is concerned. The
shipments of the season will reach one hundred thou-
sand boxes. (;God for the Wauchula district and
the town, which bids fair to rival Bartow on the
north and Areadia on the south border line. And
the Advocate, over which Brother Goolsby so ably
presides, is a splendid advocate of this section of
grand old D Soto.
Seven crops of alfalfa in one season since April
seems an extraordinary yield for Florida. In the
far West only tl0ree, as a general thing, can be had.
But the editor of the l-esburg Commercial is author-
ity for this ,v4en-crop story. He further says it
was raised by it man 78 years old, in connection with
other crops.
In a leading editoritil, the editor of the Orlando
Reporter has this for his opening paragraph: "The
greatest need of Florida to-day is an agricultural
population. [n fact, this is the crying need of our
whole vast country. Millions of acres of tillable
land unoccupied, and other millions farmed in huge
lumps, in wasteful fashion, offer to the American
citizen the biggest opportunity of the age. The soil
makes men; thoroughbred men; Independent men;
men strong in body and in soul; men with convic-
tions, and the ability to stand up for them-in short,
men who are producers, who make financial wealth,
as well as the wealth of the truest and best citizen-
shi p." The entire article was republished in the
daily Tallahaseoe Capital, with proper credit, but
the above quoted matter found its way into the edi-
torial columns of the Times-Union, credited to the
Tallahassee paper. Which goes to show that even
the great Jove sometimes nods, and in snoozing, the
moving finger goes astray. But every paper in Flor-
ida will indorse the sentiment expressed, except, per-
ha ps, those vitally interested in opening up other
millions of acres.

The puissant knights of old who battled bravely
for their opinion as to the color of the shield set by
the wayside were each in the right and the advo-
cates of the green and the gold of the orange and
grapefruit in the early market season may also be
right-from their point of view. It is the middle-
man who is the factor in the case, as a writer in the
Fruitman's Guide clearly indicates. The buyer of
the fruit on the trees is eager to get the extra price
it will bring before the market is glutted both with
the home and Cuban product. Here is what he says:
."Take an instance. I was in Fort Meade on the
22d inst. They were then starting in to clip and
pack two cars of green oranges, some of them just
beginning to show a little color. Of course I took
them to task about it, when what was my surprise
to learn that this fruit had all been sold on the
trees early in the season, to be delivered when ripe!
But lo and behold, the buyer had offered them 25
cents a box more for this fruit if they would clip
it now rather than to wait till ripe."
Now, it may be true that such premature ship.
meant imay send to the Northern markets "oranges
green as grass and bitter as gall," though we doubt
the ease being quite as bad as the Guide makes it
out to be. But the extra 25 cents per box is a great
inducement to many growers, and changes the green
to gold for him. And why blame Florida for Just
exactly what Cuban shippers are doing?
The wise man waits, watching the market re-
ports and, just as closely, the weather. Who knows
what the Dakotas have in store for us during the
next three months? The pineapple grower in Flor-
ida and the banana man on the keys or islands


Dceombor 16, 190,


Sfklture -- Florida 's

Conducted by W. E. Pabo


TOBACCO IN FLORIDA.


The Kissimmee Valley Gazette says that next sen-
son the growing of tobacco will be entered upon by
the Peters brothers of Wisconsin, who think they
have found, near Narcoosee, just the soil suited
for it.
"It is the intention of these gentlemen to grow
onions, cabbage and Irish potatoes during the fall
and winter months, and tobacco during the spring
and summer months. Mr. George Peters is both
a scientist and practical gardener. Within the
short period of four weeks he has made his seedbeds,
sowed his seeds and transformed a neglected grassy
field into a shape fitted nicely for transplanting his
innumerable thousands of seedlings."
A few years ago tobacco culture was extensively
engaged in about Fort Meade. There was no trouble
about raising the plant, and no doubt large acres
in Florida are well adapted to its culture. But in
the proper curing lies the secret of commercial sMu-
cess, and our summer weather is a factor to be taken
into consideration by those intending to enter upln
its culture. Two years ago only two counties-
those of Gadsden and Leon-reported growing to-
bacco, and perhaps next year Osceola may be added
to the list. The necessity of growing under shnil'
is a disadvantage, and only the finer Vuelta Abm.ijt
variety, possibly, will pay. Gadsden's crop in 1903
from 839 acres-under shade-was 908,522 pounds,
valued at $416,068; a little over one thousand pounds
to the acre.
(Continued on Fifteenth Page)


Played


JOontinued from Third Page]
stock, but, as it is now admitted, their connections
and organization for disposing of holdings were not
to be compared with those of the older companies,
and as a result, judging by the price paid for their
holdings, these must have accumulated rapidly.
The older companies, according to trade gossip,
had carried over from the previous season large
stocks bought at a much lower price than those at
which the Naval Stores Export Company had been
forced to take the Floridas receipts and were, there-
fore, able to undersell it, their average price being
lower than that of th aw concern.


Game


In this way the market continued until about a
month ago, when the load being carried by the Flor.
ida company became so large that again shipments
were diverted to Savannah, with the result that buy-
ers remained out of the market until a congestion
of unsold rosin that had never before been equaled
had accumulated in factors' hands. The amount at
one time was something over 50,000 barrels.
After the market had been quoted "nothing do-
ing" for weeks, until the quotations became almost
stereotyped on the board, a break came in prices that
carried all grades lower, and which ranged, on the
first sale, from 65 cents on water white to $1.95 on
F. The greater cut was on the common grades, of


and


Lost


which by far the larger part of the receipts conl
listed. Again the Naval Stores Export Company
came to the rescue of the market, and by buyitig
several thousand barrels caused the market to i'
quoted at split prices. The second day after tlhe
break another quantity was bought at slightly highit'
prices, and then after some hesitancy the trade Ie-
came general at an average price between the t wo
sets of prices.
Shortly afterward came the first rumors of neg(.
tiations between the rival export interests. These '
negotiations were continued, all of the chief men in
the factorage and the producing businesses taking
part or being on the ee until the final agreement,
just annumnced.


Opport**fty

r
sends-the one when in the first flush of colorin&
the other in a perfectly green stato-his crop to th
markets of the world, near and distant; they ripe:
on the road, and by the time the fruit gets to th
consumer it is ready for the table.
If there is loss, on whom does it fall? Not oi
the grower, but the shipper who who has bought ani
demands an early picking, backing it up with t
silver lining on the shield of traffic. If his side o
it proves golden, well and good. If not, the lesson
learned will, in time, cure him of the early bin
and the worm. business, and he may go to the othe
extreme.
BOSTON ON FLORIDA ORANGES.
There are many things we get from the Bosto,
journals that are not always acceptable to the South
ut once in awhile-when digestion is good, perhaps-
there come down to us words that are as balm tc
wounded souls, so appreciative are they.
For instance, the Transcript says: "To mania
tastes there is no orange grown that compares witl
the product of Florida.'" Pitted against the world
we stand, you see, at the head. Our people havy
always claimed it and so accept the verdict thai
comes from Boston with equanimity.
"California is our great orange producer, bul
though the fruit from that section is of fine quality
it does not equal the best of*that which comes to uk
from the older source of supply, Florida." This ex
tract is not likely to appear in the Riverside or LoI
Angeles papers, where the Washington Navel flour
dishes and is really the only good orange that come
from the Golden West.
So much for the orange. Now for the pomnelo.
"To some extent the taste for grapefruit is umi
acquired one. The high prices asked for it through
a large part of the year limits consumption .
The Florida fruit easily bears comparison with
that of California, when measured by quality.'
Florida sends her best bow to Boston, and will
continue to merit approbation along the line of cit-
rus fruits. May the time soon come when the
pomelo on the Boston breakfast table-as an apl'-
tizer-be as common and be relished as well as the
time-honored dish of baked beans.


Pretty










THE SUN


MONSIEUR


ByE
"Barber or no barber," answered Molyneux, "I smote so swif
wish I had warned him. lie fights as few gentle- showed no pro
men could. Ah-ahl Look at that! 'Tis a between non-cc
shame I" They charged
On foot, his hat gone, his white coat sadly rent caire, and brok
and gashed, fleekcd, too, with red, M. Beaucaire, leal|ed to the )
wary, alert, rTilliant, seemed to transform himalf swerving, scarn
into a dozen feneing-masters; and, though his skill hbre on upon
appeared to lio in delicacy and quickness, his play went down xe-i
being continually with the point, sliheer strength cursing manful
failed to beat him down. The young man was laugh- "Our just d
lag like a child. full of dust an
"Believe me," said Molyneux, "he's no barber! Sir Hugh
No, and never wasI" literally ridden
For a moment there was even a chance that M. Pinned under
Beaucaire might have the best of it. Two of his from the first
adversaries were prostrate, more than one were party had fled
groaning, and the indomitable Frenchman had combatants, ch
actually almost beat off the ruffians, when, by a wrath, were p
trick, he was overcome. One of them, dismounting, lackeys.
ran in suddenly from behind, and seized his blade Guilford's
in a thick leather gauntlet. Before Beaucaire could the coach; so
disengage the weapon, two others threw themselves gling to rise, a
from their hormcs and hurled him to the earth. "A haid to bhaul
moil A moi, Francois!" he cried as he went domin, two small, colt
his sword in fragments, but his voice unbroken and dialating eyes
clear. of tihe fright a
"Shame!" muttered one or two of the gentlemen M. le Due (
about the coach. the aid of his
"'Twas dastardly to take him so," said Molyn- Mary.
eux. "Whatever his deservings, I'm nigh of a mind "I make t(
to offer him a rescue in the Duke's face." suchl a smelvei
"Truss him up, lads," said the heavy voice, turning to Fr.i
"Clear way in front of the coach. There sit those scoundrel! A
whom we avenge upon a presumptuous lackey. Now, Franmois k
Whiffen, you have a fair audience, lay on and baste don!" lie said,
him." low far in the
Two men began to drag M. Beaucaire toward a imalignantly I1
great oak by the roadside. Another took from his "See what
saddle a heavy whip with three thongs. his master, p<
"A moi, Francoisl" would have Ii
There was borne on the breeze an answer- them. A shun
"Monseigneur! Monseigneur!" The cry grew the utter hiorr
louder suddenly. The clatter of hoofs urged to an fellows.
anguish of speed sounded on the night. M. Beau- "Oili, nions
care's servants had lagged sorely behind, but they tossed his ari
made up for it r.ow. Almost before the noise of their "But it didl
own steeds they cane riding down the moonlit aisle "It could I
between the mists. Chosen meni, these servants of "No. And
Beaucaire, and like a thunderbolt they fell upon the the young atiol
astounded cavaliers. nmow," he coliti
"ChateaurienI Chateaurienl" they shouted, and ing in Englis


E A VUCAIIRE


ooth Tarlington
tly that, through lack of time, they
paper judgment, discriminating nothing
iombaants and their master's foes.
first into the group about M. Beau-
;e and routed it utterly. Two of them
young man's side, while the other four,
Ve losing the momentum of their onset,
the, gentlemen near the coach, who
neath the fierceness of the onslaught,
lly.
oleerts," said Mr. Molyneaux, his mouth
d philosophy.
Guilford's horse fell with him, being
Pn over, and the baronet's leg was
the saddle. In less than ten minutes
attack on M .Beaucaire, the attacking
d in disorder, and the patrician non-
ioking with expletives, consumed with
ri.moners, disarmed by the Frenchman's
discontflture had freed the doors of
it was that when M. Beausaire, strug-
assisted by his servants, threw out one
ke himself, he found it sealed between
d palms, and he looked into two warm,
, that were doubly beautiful because
ind rage that found room in them. too.
Chateaurien sprang to his feet without
Slackeys, and lowed low before Lady
'n tiousan' apology to be the cause of
in your presence,' he said; and then,
Incois, lie spoke in French: "Ah, thou
little, and it had bwen too late."'
nelt in the dust before him. "Par-
. "Monseigneur commanded us to fol-
rear, to remain unobserved. The wind
ilew against monseigneur's voice."
it might have cost, my children," said
minting to the ropes with which they
aund himnt and to the whip lying beside
idder passed over the lackey's frame;
or in his face echoed in the eyes of hin
'igneurt" Francois sprang back, and
I to heaven.
I noit happen," said M. Ikaucaire.
not!" exclaimed Francolis.
you did very well, my children-"
a smihied lhenevolently-"very well. And
inuted, turning to lady Mary and speak-
h, "let me be asking of our gallants


yonder what make' them to be in cabal with high-
waymin. One should come to a polite understand-
Ing with them, you think? Not so?"
He bowed, offering his hand to conduct her to
the coach, whore Molyneux and his companions, hav-
Ing drawn Sir Hugh from under his horse, were
engaged in reviving and reassuring Lady Rellerton,
who had fainted. But lAdy Mary stayed Beaucaire
with a gesture, and the two stood where they were.
"Monneigneurl" she said, with a note of raillery
in her voice, but raillery no tender that he started
with happiness. Ilis movement brought him a hot
tpast of pain, and he clapped his hand to a red
titain on his walitcoat.
"You are hurt!"
"It is nothing," smiled M. Ileaucalre. Then, that
she might not see the stain spreading, he held his
handkerchief over the spot. "I am a little- hut jun'
a trifling-bruise': 'tip all."
"You shall ride in the coach," she whispered.
"Will you be pleased, M. de Chateaurien?"
"Ah, my beautiful She seemed to wave before
him like a Ahining mist. "I wish that ride might
lan' for al-wayil Can you say that, mademoiselle T"
"Monseignpurt" she cried in a passion of admir-
ation. "I would what you would have be, should
be. What do you not deserve? You are the bravest
man in the world"
"Ha, hal" I anm jus' a poor Frenchman."
"Would that a few Englishmen had shown them-
selves aI ':oor' to-night. The vile cowardly, not to
help you!" With that. suddenly possessed by her
anger, she swept away from him to the coach.
Sir Hugh, groaning loudly, was being assisted
Into the vehicle.
"My little poltroons," she said, "what are you
doing with your fellow-craven, Sir Hugh Guilford,
there ?"
"Madame," replied Molyneux humbly, Sir llngh's
leg is broken. lady Rellerton graciously permits
himn to be taken in.
"I do not permit itl M. de Chateaurien rides
with us."
"But--"
"Hir! ILeave the wretch to groan by the road-
side," she eriid fi crcely, "which plight I would were
that tall of you I But there will Ih a pretty
story for the gos4ips to-morrow I And I could almost
find pity for you when I think of the wits when you
(Continued on Foarteenth Page)


Helpful


Hints


for


Her


Ladyship


Lace, and plenty of it, is what you want for the
decoration of your modish frock. Irish lace has
been by all odds the first favorite, while in great de-
mand are Venetian laces, the real or immiation.
Cluny lace enjoys an immense popularity, which may
also be said of the heavy, handsome laces.
If you would use the silver and gold laces, which
are extremely modish though in rather dull tones,
be sure you have them used skilfully and sparingly
on your gowns. By their use some charming effects
are also obtained when used by the milliner.
Ribbon trimming is much in evidence, from plain,
flat band effects to handsomely embroidered ribbon
garniture.
Gorgeous flowered ribbons are used for girdles
and sash ends.
Velvet ribbons are favored trimmings for the
full skirts, though on the circular skirts, so popular
at the moment, bias bands of piece velvet are more
easily made to lie flat.
The demand for good quality broadcloth is unpre-
cedented, for it is the first favorite for street frocks.
Even the house frock and evening frock are made of
this material, due to its present suppleness and light-

SECRET OF CHARM.
One must be unconscious of self in order to be con-
sidered charming. Following the Golden Rule en-
titles a woman to be called charming. She must
be good, or she cannot be charming, not on a long
acquaintance. That is, where there is a lack of
sincerity, it is easily discovered, perhaps not in the
course of a few visits, but later on.
There is a difference in the true and the false
ring of a coin. Think not to deceive. It is impos-
sible. All exert an influence for good or evil upon
those with whom they come in contact. Why not let
Jt be the former? It is much the happier way.
A pleaunt Impresdonever works harm to any


by Eleanore du Bois
one, and lingers Jn the mind as long as the memory
of the person lasts, says Woman's Life.
A charming woman takes a broad view of life.
She cannot Is, narrow. MIhe wounds not her friends
with unkind words. If she chides it is with a gentle
manner.
To des.trve to be c aled a charming woman, one
must Is, charming to women as well as to men, other-
wise the charm would be a very one-sided thing, so
to spleak. It is easy to charm a man in many cases,
not so eaIsy a wonmain.
Is there a woman so unfortunate as not to be
charming to some one
110W To (COK A IIUSBAND.
The flrst thing to be done is to catch him, and
while you are about it, try to be sure that you are
getting a good one. After that a great deal depends
on your own management and on your skill in cook.
ing him. A good husband in apt to be rare, more's
the pity. Many who might have become nice anti
tender, are spoiled in the cooking. Ho are some who
were good and tender to begin with. So much de.
penids on the cook, you see.
Some women keep their husbands constantly in
hot water, and then get into a stew themselves, which
don't help matters at all. Other women freeze them
with conjugal coldness; others smother them in a
cloud of contention; while still others keep them in
a pickle all the time. These women serve up their
huslnands with tongue sauce, seasoned with ppper
and vinegar, and other sharp and spicy ingredients.
Now, it is not to be expected that husbands can
Ie made soft and tender by such treatment. "Many
cooks spoil the broth." says a well-known proverb;
but in this ca ese it takes but one cook to make all
the mischief.
lookedd with wpeper and vinegar, or frozen stiff,
husbands are sure to become ard and tough, and
altogether unpalatable. So is the ook her e.L If


the husband is cooked properly he will become a very
delicious morsel--something that it is handy to have
in the house all the while. This is the way to do it:
(et a large jar-not a "family jar;" there have
W'en too many of thme used in the previous way
of cooking, most likely. But get a large jar, the jar
of ci.rfulness antd gentleness. Place your husband
in this and stand it near the fire of conjugal love.
Keep .the fire quite hot, but not so as to be uncom-
fortable. Above all, let it burn clearly,. and let it
burn steadily, not flAshing iqto a scor thing blase at
one time and smonouldering at another. Cover your
husband with affection and garnish him with the
splces of pleasantry and variety. It will not he
amiss to atdd to the dish kisses and other confections,
mixed with a sufficient portion of secrecy, prudence
and moderation. Just enough of the "sweeties" of
life to make a nice dessert, but not enough to cloy
the appetite. Now, if your husband is rather tough
and hard to manage, Just try this method of cook.
ing him, and see what will happen.
Most persons think that because they cannot
pass a great deal of time In physical culture it is
useless to attempt anything of the sort, when if
they would follow a few simple rules of exercise
they would find themselves much les tired at the
end of busy days. There are two physical exercises
which should never be dispensed with by the woman
who wishes to keep in good health and retain a
freshness of face and grace of figure. Deep breath-
ing is the first and more necessary of these, as it
will Insure perfect circulation, prevent colds, prove
restful when one is tired, give a healthy glow to the
skin and strengthen the action of the heart. Next
to this stands the exercise of raising the hands
able the head, then touching them to the floor
in front, without bending the knees. This move-
.iMt will r0du1e the heipse d lengthen the walst
i gra nd MpplsleM to the body.
(O-faIM-d on if t On umt" a)


A


December 16, 1905












Satubqy .ember 161 1905


sr


THE SUN


5,


ED


~v. 9~~* .)~




IT


The Gumocracy Boycott
N. B.-YOU MUST ALLOW YOUR JOURNAL TO BE PROSTITUTED OR
YOU CANNOT DO BUSINESS IN JACKSONVILLE.
This is the gauntlet that certain persons who are known .as the "Gunil
Bunch" in Jacksonville, have thrown down to us.
Right gladly do we pick up this gauntlet, and right blithly do we join battle
on this issue.
Last Saturday we exercised our perogative as a journal and printed a story
that the public was entitled to have.
When we announced to the public that we were publishing a journal we then
and there entered into a contract with the public to keep it informed about
ALL MATTERS that concerned it.
The public had a right to expect, and it did expect, us to furnish correct
information and FULL INFORMATION.
The public HAS NO OTHER MEANS of getting information except through
the public press.
The public relied on us, who announced thqt we were publishing a public
journal, NOT TO SUPPRESS any information tiat touched the concerns of the
men who make up the public.
If we had allowed any consideration whatever to induce us to deceive the
public by suppressing facts that the public had a' right to know, at that same
moment we would have allowed this public journal to be prostituted.
The naval stores interests centered in Jacksonville, and these men are few
in number and have grown rich, proud and arrogant by HANDLING THE PROD-
UCTS OF THE MEN WHO MAKE THE NAVAL STORES INDUSTRY, tried
to prevent the publication of the true story of tAe naval stores situation which
we printed last Saturday. ,
It makes no difference what means was used to accomplish the "Gum Bunch"
desired end of "fixing the press;" whether the appeal was made to friendship, to
the affections, to self-interest of the publishers, to love of lucre, or what not.
Any appeal except an appeal to naked justice and abstract right, was none the
less an attempt to prostitute this journal. ,
This is the reason why we use the words "you must allow your journal to
be prostituted," in the opening sentence of this editorial.
Now, let us see about the last clause of thit. opening sentence, viz., "or you
cannot do business in Jacksonville."
Failing in their efforts to induce us to betrafthe public by suppressing infor-
mation which DEEPLY CONCERNED IT, and, which it was ENTITLED TO
HAVE, the "Gum Bunch" determined to "fix us" another way.
Mr. Richard Sasnett, a clerk in one of the subsidiary companies of the
mistletoe contingent on the naval stores oak, called this week at the store of Mr.
E. L. Stevenson, whose ad. was printed in last Saturday's SUN. He informed
Mr. Stevenson that HE REPRESENTED THE NAVAL STORES INTERESTS
OF JACKSONVILLE. He gave Mr. Stevenson to understand that his ad. must
come out, and stay out, of this journal, or he (Stevenson) would feel the weight
of the naval stores influence against his business. He told Mr. Stevenson that
he had visited every advertiser on Bay Street and made the same talk.
WE KNOW that this clerk DID VISIT many business men who had ads. in
our last issue, for many business men have told us so.
Some of these business men frankly told us that they did not approve of the
"Story of Gum." This did not trouble us. We do not expect all men to agree
with us. If we should wake up some day and find that we agreed with every-
body, we should send for the cap and bells, and reach for the bauble of the fool.
Some of these men said that they agreed with us, but that it would be busi-
noess suicide to incur the enmity of the naval stores crowd; that these men were
too strong. We have no quarrel with these merchants. We are not unreasonable
enough to expect a merchant to drive money away from his cash box.
Some of these men told us that they cared not to be dictated to by any per-
son or persons; that an ad. in the SUN brought them business; and that what
THE SUN printed was up to the public. We have no (quarrie with these men.
They did what they thought was right. *
It is true that the Jacksonville "Gum IBunch," the self-constituted princes
of naval stores, the purse-proud parvenus who dash with dare-devil abandon in
benzine buggies and diamond-bedizened shirt frqnts through the streets of Jack-
sonville, it is true, we say, that the "Gum IBun1h" seeks to destroy our business
by declaring a boycott, and we repeat our opening sentence with all the emphasis
that truth gives to written speech, declaring it to be the slogan of the Jacksonville
turpentiners-
"You must allow us to corrupt your journal, or you cannot do business in
Jacksonville."
Already do we feel the heel of these men. of day before yesterday on our
necks; already are we gasping for breath as the sticky hand of this gum-created
Frankenstein clutches our windpipe; groggy from the bewildering blows from the
gold-weighted pocketbooks of these products of the pines, we toe the scratch as
the bell rings for the second round with heart eating strong with the courage
that comes to him whose cause is good and who has written on his banner the
device that has always prevailed over the powers of oppression-"ALL MEN
SHALL BE FREE."
Because we dared to print the truth about the condition of an industry that
affected thousands of business men in this State when the self-constituted bosses
of the industry did not want the people to know the truth, we are treated to a
taste of oppression that would do credit to a Turkish Sultan.
Because we did not choose to betray the confidence that the people place in
a free press, we are boycotted by the men who were interested in keeping their


Plans Mcret.
We believe that we will win this fight, hpuse we HAVE THE PEOPLE
WITH US. *
NO MAN, OR SET OF MEN, IIAS EVER BEEN ABLE TO WIN AGAINST
THE PEOPLE.


A Cure for Hysteria
Once upon a time three little Cheapside tailors who lived on Tooley Street
in the reat city of London, met by accident at the shop of one of the three.
A loquacious, vivacionus lot were these three little tailors, and there was no
dearthA of wordsnor lack of animation in the talkfest that ensued. It required
but a short time to exhaust such interesting and important subjects as the latest
styles in waistcoats and the proper length of cutaways. They were quite speedily
agreed on these and other points in apparel that doth of ocai m their r of an.
Now, these three little tailors, whose total sum reach the third part of a
inon, were not at all perturbed about the rumor that it takes nine tailors to make
it man, s, from lack of other subjects, they turned the sartorial attention to the
imperfections of the Government then existing.
Being well versed, as all busy-bodies are and ever will be, in things they
know nothing about, these knights of the tape and shears soon worked themselves
up to a high pitch of indignation over the wrongs which the imperfect system of
Government in Great Britain inflicted on the long-suffering people.
So great did their indignation become, as the discussion waxed warm that
thy then and there resolved that not another minute of delay should be tolerated.
then see to it that the gap was "sewed up" with thread of their providing.
With tailors, to resolve is to do, so, forthwith did these three little heapside
tailors retire to the back alley-bounded room and prepare a memorial to King and


Parliament that would shake the throne and strike terror to the hearts of the
vacillating Lords and Commons.
These tailor-made resolutions started out thiswise:
"WE, THE BRITISH PEOPLE--"
No one ever knew what other words the resolutions contained. Histo
tradition records them not. The oningor clause, "We, the Britih le,
the only part of the lengthy preamble and resolution of the Cheapelde tailors that
rescued them from oblivion.
This clause has served as a model for bombastic arrogance ridiculous assump
tion of importance and cheap vanity, for more than a hundred years.
Whenever an example is wanted to illustrate.how eay its for peope long
on vanity, to OVER-ESTIMATE THEIR OWN IMPORTANT, the legend of
the three little tailors of Tooley Street is cited. tn e legend of
It seems to us that it was made expressly for an episode thatoccurred in this
city last week, and we present it to the people as a cap that fits the GENTLE-
MEN OF GUM.
Last week we printed a story that set forth as clearly as we were able to
express it, the naval stores situation.
It contained no libelous nor incorrect statement.
It was not colored to suit our views.
It had nothing in it that appealed to the prejudice of any man.
It was well thought out and carefullyworded so as to guard against possible
injury to the businws interest, of i s cityl Mb










LS


s,


THE SUN


NINTH PAGE


s,


Saturday, December 16, 1905


AInd Tightness of the Hat Sand
Its tone was sane and in entire accord with the ultimate good, the prIsent
and future greatness of Jacksonville.
It conveyed no information THAT THE PEOPLE WERE NOT ENTITLED
TO HAVE.
There was nothing in it but what conferred a benefit to the passes of the
people, in that, the better the people are informed the better off they are.
Yet, THIS PUBLICATION OF FACTS has been called an attack on Jack-
donville.
It has been PASSIONATELY PROCLAIMED a blow at this city.
Let us not be hysterical. Come, let us throw the light of reason on this
subject and search for the kernel of truth amid the husks of emotional blindness.
The only persons whose interests COULD HAVE BEEN AFFE(CTEDI) by the
publication of this true story are the persons DIRECTLY CONNECTEI) with
the Naval Stores Export Company.
Do these few persons make up Jacksonville?
Remember the three little Cheapside tailors who exclaimed, "We, the British
people."
The naval stores industry is THIRD ON THE LIST of Florida's sources of
wealth, and is therefore of great importance.
Do the persons who direct the affairs of the Naval Stores Export Company
make up the naval stores industry?


WE


TH


BRITI 5H


PE OPLE,


They are only officers in A HANDLING COMPANY, and in no senne does
their success or failure to add more dollars to their goodly store affect the nine
million dollars of naval stores produced by the men in the woods.
Again remember the bombastic "WE" of the three little tailors.
Besides, what did the story we printed contain but an explanation of the
causes of a failure to accomplish an end they desired, that HAD ALREADY
BEEN ANNOUNCED by the officers of the Export Company.
Did WE do anything to hurt Jacksonville or the naval stores industry when
we gave causes for a failure that HAD BEEN FREELY CONFESSED by the
people who made that failure
Let any one recall the announcement that Jacksonville WOULD'BE MADE
AN OPEN PORT, which was printed THE WEEK BEFORE our story appeared,
and then let that person recall the announcement made in the press last Monday,
that the (Coachman) Export Company had sold its holdings to the OLD LINE
EXPORTERS (meaning the Savannah companies) and he will need no further
proof of who hurt Jacksonville, if Jacksonville was hurt.
All we did was to inform the people what was meant by "open port," what
caused the failure, and what would he the result.
Does it hurt Jacksonville when WE SAY that "open port" means that this
port cannot be a great naval stores port until deep water i secured, and is
Jacksonville not hurt when Mr. Coachman and his business associates say
IDENTICALLY THE SAME THING?
. We do not have to go further than to the officers of the (Coachmam) Export


Company to find CONCLUSIVE PROOF of the correctness of our statement.
In a statement given to the press last Monday, these men say that the OLD
EXPORTERS will handle the naval stores exports.
The OLD EXPORTERS are doing business in Savannah.
No, friends, WE HAVE NOT HURT JACKSONVILLE by printing the truth
about Jacksonville.
Jacksonville is too great a city to be afraid of the truth.
If (DNCEALMENT OF FACTS has to be resorted to in order that Jackson.
ville may not be hurt, God help Jacksonvillel
If an industry relies for success on the ability of those managing it to keep
the truth from being known, there's something wrong with it.
Now for a secret-
Our story of last week stripped off a few royal robes, and showed the mere
nmain Ineath; our story X-rayed a sprinkling of puffed-out pocketbooks, and
exposed their real contents; our story knocked off a few halos, kicked over an idol
or two, pricked a small bunch of vanity balloons, and scratched off a few layers
of conceit.
THESE ARE THE SPOTS WHERE TIE SHOE PINCHES.
All this "halloo-ba-loo" about hurting Jacksonville is what the partridge hen
does when she makes a noise in that spot where her nest is NOT to attract atten-
tion away from it.
Jacksonville will continue on its career of greatness undisturbed by the excla.
nations of ipe le who adopt the style of the tailors of Tooley Street, and say-
"We are Jacksonville.'
As soon as there is twenty-four feet of water from this city to the sea, Jack-
sonville will add the jewel of naval stores supremacy to her crown of success.
AND NEXT YEAR WILL BRING TWENTY-FOUR FEET.

Troubles of an editor
Reader, bear with us. '
Do not accuse us of too much writing about ourselves.
We are fighting for our lives.
We must fight HARD RIGHT NOW or we will not live to fight long.
What you now see on this page Is all we will have to say. If this wins the
light, well and good.
If it does not we will rest quiet in our grave, and not come forth to haunt
you.
I wish you to take a little journey with me along the pat h whi h I trod lust
week, in order that you may know what it means to assume the responsibility of
journalism, and knowing it give nme your sympathy if you think I deserve it.
Lant Thursday week I was visited by my brother, who told me that another
blood relative was much perturbed about information that had reached him that
this journal would print in its next issue a story about the naval stores situation;
that he had been asked to see me and induce me not to print the story.
My answer was that I conceived it to be my duty to print the story, because
a statement of facts in my possession was due my readers, who relied on me to
keep them informed about all things that concerned them; that a suppression of
these facts might work an injury to the people who were interested in the naval
stores industry.
My brother asked to see the story, and I showed it to him. After he had
read the story hlie said that he did not see how its publication could hurt Jack-
sonville's interests.
At my brother's request I went with him to the office of our relative. lie
was shown the story, and at once said that its publication would damage him
and others in this city.
"Convince me of that," said I, "and I will not print it."
Hle then asked me if I was prepared to stand the charge that would be made
by evil-minded persons, that I had been paid to publish the story by Shotter.
I told him that I was prepared to stand the consequences of the bringing
of this charge against me.
lie asked me if I was not trying to get even with the naval stores crowd for
wrongs, real or imaginary, inflicted on me.
I told him that I always tried to remember those who had wronged me.
"Is this not the only reason why you are going to print this story" said he.
I told him him that the first and principal reason was, that it was a story
that the public should know, and which it was my obligation as a newspaper man
to give it; the second reason was that it would make the paper widely and favor.
ably known, which was the great desideratum of all papers; that the third reason
wan that I, personally, and those who had suffered with me, liked to handle the
medicine spoon once in awhile.
Every argument was used by this relative except the one that it was wrong,
and after telling him that I would not print the story If I were convinced that he
or Jacksonville would be hurt by it, I left with my brother.
My brother then proposed that we should seek the advice of some level-
headed business man who did not have any naval stores notes.
We did see two of the most important business men in the city-men of
great responsibility and large interests. The question was asked these men-
"Will, in your judgment, the publication of this story hurt Jacksonville?"
Each man answered "No. It may interfere with the plans of some people,
but it will not hurt Jacksonville."
With these answers I was satisfied, and my brother expressed himself the
same way.
But this was not the end of it by any means. Friends called at the office
until late Thursday night, and all day Friday.
To each one in turn I said:
"Show me how the story will hurt Jacksonville, and I will not print It."
Not one could make a satisfactory showing.
I then said to these friends:
"Are you trying to protect Jacksonville, or certain men who have assumed
to be Jacksonville ?"
I told them that an industry that was in so critical condition that the pub-
lication of the truth about it would destroy it was built on wrong lines, and
would soon topple of its own weight.
I then reminded them that these very men whose aets they were trying to
save from publicity were then trying to make a treaty SECRETLY with Shotter,
the enemy of Jacksonville, in order to save themselves.
I reminded them that they did not know the truth, and were entitled to
know it, in order to decide intelligently and in a business way whether or not
to invent in the new stock of the Export Company.
It was my duty to let the publile know ALL THIlE FACTS, and then the
ucodle could decide what to do with their money.


But this was not all. These men who so greatly desired to keep the public in
the dark made an appeal to my affections.
And, lastly, they twisted the tail of the golden calf to let me know that he
was there.
A carefully guarded and ddelately veled hint, don't yr know. ,,


I


A


Ir








December 16, 1905
............ -1 0 l 1


THE SUN


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FL OROD ORA


Some attention is begin given in
western Florida, especially about Monti-
cello, to the raising of this variety of
cotton as being adapted to our soil and
as profitable as sea island cotton, which
brings In an income of over two million
dollars annually to the farmers of Ala-
chua, Bradford, Levy, Marion and other
counties. There are those who are en-
thusiastic over it, though both at the
Georgia and the Plorida experiment sta.
tions the opinion of the farm superin-
tendents does not seem to be favorable.
In the interest of the farmer readers
of THE SUN, correspondence has been
had with Monticello parties and the two
experiment stations we have mentioned,
and below will be found the replies re-
ceived. We shall be pleased to hear
front other raisers of Florodora in Flor-
ida, briefly-since the space in this de-
partment is limited-giving their ex-
perience. Some brokers have given
higher prices for it than regular mar-
ket quotations, in order to attract the
attention of growers to it.
The first is from the director of the
O(orgia Experiment Station:
"Mr. Claude L'Engle, Jacksonville,
Fla.-My Dear Sir: In reply to yours
of the 12th I send you a marked copy
of Bulletin 66, in which you will find
the result of variety tests of last year
of twenty-four varieties of cotton, in
% hch appears the Florodora in point of
lint and seed value stood twenty-third
in the list. This was on a basis of 10
cents a pound for lint and 80 cents per
hundred weight for seed. At the foot
of page 209, among the 'notes on leading
varieties tested,' you will find my con-
cllsion in regard to Florodora as based
upon a year's test. I may add that I
was induced to request that seeds of
this variety be sent me for testing, by
the extraordinary claims made of its
productiveness by the originator, and by
the vendors of the seeds. This year the
variety has not been so extensively ad-
%ortiped, so far as I have observed, and
se"d were not offered me for testing.
Very truly yours,
"R. J. REDDING, Director."
The "conclusion" referred to appears
ih Bulletin 66, issued December, 1904, on
Cotton Culture, and is as follows:
"No. 23. Florodora. Extra Staple
LUpland. First Test. Not productive.
Medium as to maturing. Lowest in per-
centage yield of lint. Seeds a little
similler than average. Expert cotton
men in Augusta and Savannah, to whom
snmples ginned in a roller gin were sub-
aiitted, report that, in lots of twenty
bales, if ginned on a saw-gin, it would
bring 2 to 3 cents per pound more than
ordinary short staple uplands. The Sa-
%annah experts advise that this variety
should not be ginned on a roller gin.
. What it lacks is productive.
n(I' and percentage yield of lint."
The next letter is from our own sta.
tione:
"The University of Florida Agricul.
tural Experiment Station, Lake City
Fla., Oct. 30, 1905.-Mr. W. E. Pabor
Avon Park, Fla.: My Dear Sir-Reply,
lrg to yours of October 23 regarding
Florodora cotton, I beg to' say that thit
iM a ihort staple cotton adapted to th(
(but represented by) central and north,
ern part of Georgia, and is not suited
to this section of the country. In Geor
gin test of varieties as published in Bul
letinA 66 in December, 1904, it stand
twenty-third in the list In the Nortl
Carolina test, as published in the report
of the Department of Agriculture foi
February, 1905, it stands at the foot ol
the list. This variety of cotton is a
very much advertised variety, but it hai
nut' special merit over many other sho
staple varieties. With kindest regards
I amn, very truly yours,
"A. M. CONNOR."


There is no uncertain sound about
Mr. Connor's letter. It gives Florodora
no commendation whatever: it appar-
ently never having been tested at the
station, the opinion is not based on ex-
perimental knowledge, but from the
Georgia and North Carolina bulletins.
The names of two gentlemen at Mon-
tiollo having been given u as being fa-


COTTON


miller with Florodora, letters of request
for information were sent and promptly
replied to. These gentlemen are well
known in the community where they re-
side. Their expressions are in strong
contrast to the station experts:
"Monticello, Fla., Oct. 28, 1905.-Mr.
W. E. Pabor, Avon Park, Fla.: Dear
Sir: Your@ of 23d received. I had
about ten bales of the Florodomr variety
of cotton last year, and it sold 2 to 4
cents per pound above the short staple
cotton. The market for Florodors does
not seem to fluctuate as does the com-
nmon cotton. It produces well, and in
good land well manured it will yield
more per acre than any other cotton, I
believe. I will have sixty to seventy
balec of it this year, about fifty now on
hand, and am advised that it is worth
12 1-2 cents per pound in Savannah,
middling basis, with staple measuring
1 1-4 to 1 3-4 inches. A few bales fnem
this county have been sold in Charles-
ton this-season at 13 and 14 cents. Cl.-
tivation name as other cotton; mucb
more cheaply picked than is the seo
island cotton. Yours truly,
"E. B. BAILEY."
"Monticello, Fla., Oct. 31, 1905.-W.
E. Pabor, Avon Park, Fla.: Dear Sir-
Your letter to Mr. A. Semosi relative
to Florodora cotton has been handed
to me for reply.
"I am of the opinion that this cotton
is an excellent variety to grow in Flor-
ida It is a rank grower, a heavy
fruiter of lint, 1 1-8 to 1 1-2 inches
long, of very fine quality; does not blow
nut in stormy weather, but its large
boils are easily picked, and under like
conditions will yield as heavily as reg-
hlexr upland cotton; requires distance,
usually 5-foot rows, and one stalk every
1-2 to 4 feet; on good ground can be
planted closer in row; on poorer ground,
not less than 2 feet, though.
"Present price in Charleston, S. C.,
12, 13 and 14 cents per pound. Prior to
this year it has ranged from 1 1-2 to 2
cents per pound higher, but sea island
cotton (so called) being about 5 cents
a pound lower this year, has had a ten-
dleney to reduce price on Florodora.
"This cotton is superior to upland in
the extra price it brings, and to long
cotton in the greater weight and yield
per acre. I have planted it two years,
with satisfactory results, and shall con-
tinue. This cotton yields but about
twenty-eight pounds per hundred pounds
of seed cotton; can be ginned on a saw
gin, but must be well dried and gin run
at minimum speed for best results.
I "I trust this covers the subject to the
extent of your expectations; if not, write
me and ask further questions. Very
truly, 11. A. BARROWS."
From the foregoing there seems to be
Stwo sides to the Florodora cotton prob-
lem', as there is to almost everything else
that belongs to soil culture, and this
article has been prepared for the sole
Purpose of eliciting further pro and con
, information.
. "I AM YOUR FATHER NOW," SAIDl)
z POPE TO CHILDREN.


One of the ladies who helped conduct
before Pope Plus the 160 orphans, robbed
of parents and home by the Calabrian
earthquake, said, describing the moving
scenes:
"When the holy father came in, his
eyes were full of tears. and his attitude
was so hearty and jovial that the chil.
dren lost all shyness, and ran to kiss his
hands and gown. He talked to them
like a loving father, and they appreci-
ated his words when he said: 'I am
your father now; rely on Father Pio;
he will look after you. When one of the
children said she would like to have his
picture the pope sent for a box of silver
medals. He insisted that blue or pink
ribbons be attached to them and that
each child wear one around his or her
neck. When seated among the children
and listening to their prattle, the pope
gave orders that a photographer be sent
for. 'I want to have a picture of this
blessed scene,' he said, 'a good picture,
that I may remember the faces of my
little ward."


*
I- U


IN MEMORIAL.
This little headstone is
erected to the tender memory
of an ad. printed in this space
last week. Its duty was to
nourish this journal, which
gives the people a voice. Right
well was the little ad. dob
its duty.
It died from an overdose of
"Gum."
For further particulars of
this sad demise see editorial
pages of this issue.
R. I. P.


Should It Become a Staple Florida Product
y WI. L. PIBOR


IN MEMORIAL.
This little headstone is
erected to the tender memory
of an ad. printed in this space
last week. Its duty was to
nourish this journal, which
gives the people a volie. Right
well was the little ad. doing
its duty.
It died from an overdose of
"Gum."
For further particulars of
this sad demise see editorial
pages of this issue.
R. I. P.


a


IN MEMORIAL.
This little headstone is
erected to the tender memory
of an ad. printed in this space
last week. Its duty was to
nourish this journal, which
gives the people a voice. Right
well was the little ad. doing
its duty.
It died from an overdose of
"Gum."
For further particulars of
this sad demise see editorial
pages of this issue.
R. I.P.


I i


, 9









December 16, 1905


THE SUN


IN MEMORIAL.
This little headstone is
erected to the tender memory
of an ad. printed in this space
last week. Its duty was to
nourish this journal, which
gives the people a voice. Right
well was the little ad. doing
its duty.
It died from an overdose of
"Gumn."
For further particulars of
this sad demise see editorial
pages of this issue.
R. I. P.


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21l Way St.
JaksuivMle, FIN,
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SEND FOR PRICE USTS

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Southern

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228 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.

Christmas
utlery


bor N hm


Pocket, Table
Workbasket


Florida Hardw'e Co.
Jakwtonfy, na.
210 8 *9


IN THE SUN'S CHARIOT

Intimate Talks Between Publisher and Reader


When the time came to count up our
street and news stand sales last week
we expected to be surprised, but our ex-
pectations did not begin to reach the
evidence presented by the figures.
We are obliged to use big figures
when we tackle SUN circulation.
It in just about the BIGGEST THING
OF THE KIND in the big State of Flor-
ida.
It is growing like the troubles of the
Czar of Russia.
Every time the postman calls he brings
orders for THE SUN from friends in
Florida, who have availed themselves
of our clubbing offer with one of the
sixty papelrs on our lint.
thesee orders are coming in faster,
now that the people have heard their
neighbors talk about THE SUN.
Our friends in Jacksonville are writ-
ing us nice letters in which checks are
inclosed to pay for a year of SUN-shine
in their homes.
But, as we were saying, it was the
street demand for SUNS last Saturday
that agitated us.


It was fierce.
It was constant.
It was unceasing.
And, in it our expectations were so
Jcmpletely whelmed that there was
not a vestige of them left showing above
the waters that engulfed them.
We did not complain. No, not we, for
we produce SUNS for the people to buy,
and when the people buy them we know
that we are carrying out our destiny.
We have reconciled ourselves to the
conviction that WE WILL SELL MORE
SUNS THIS WEEK THAN WE DID
LAST WEEK.
We have about concluded that this
sort of thing is going to haPlpen all this
year and all next year too.
So. we have borrowed the phrase of
a well known seller of cream candy who
used to be on the corner of Bay and
laura Streets, and say concerning the
SUN-
"The more you get the better it gets,
Wte more you buy the longer it lasts.
"UET THE HABIT."


Some Thinks by the Brethren


Without a doubt there is the shortest
crop of Irish lK)tatoes in the country this
fall that there has leen before in many
years. We see in Northern papers that
in many sections they are not worth
digging and prices are higher now in
all potato-growing sections than they
have been before in many years at this
time of the year; selling now for 70
cents per bushel, where last year at
this time they were selling for 25 cents
a bushel. In many places the farmers
will not get what they will require for
seed next spring. Now is the opportu-
nity for Clay county farmers to make
some money on Irish potatoes. Next
spring the buyers will he right here with
the cash, n1d they will be anxious to
buy. They will not be asking you to)
shipi to our house on commission."
They will buy and pay cash down; there
will I. lbig comnlJetition among them,.
and all who have potat(oes to sell will
tind ready buyers.
Lant spring many farmers declared
they would never plant another crop of
Irish potatoes. These farmers will make
the biggest mistake of their lives if
they do not plant this year. Put in all
you can, and get your seed soon as psa4i-
ile, for seed potatoes are going to he
high when planting time comes. They
uare not discouraged over at llastings.
There will be 200 acres more planted
there this year than last, and Clay
county slihuld plant double the acreage
it did last year. As to how much of a
crop you can piake we do not know, but
we do know that what crop you do make
will bring the biggest prices ever before
obtained for the Florida Irish potato
crop.-The Spring. ..


One ought to believe in discipline. In
the home. In the school. In the church.
In the city. 'Tis a rare good thing. Our
mothers dealt it out to us with a lov-
ing. but nevertheless firm. hand. Our
fathers laid it on with a good, strong
hickory. Our teachers touched it up with
a nice flat ruler. And we have noticed
that in the long run some pretty decent
specimens of humanity were turned out.
Sometimes it seemed just a little rough
on the boy or girl, and maybe on rare
occasions the dose wan a trifle too
strong, but, considering the many times
one slipped clear altogether, when it was
needed, it was good medicine.
But if good old-fashioned alopathic
doses were given in the olden time, in
too many instances little, ineffective,
homeopathle dosen are promised by the
parents of today, and even them- are
,Aldom administered. Roughnem,*s cruelty,
inhumanity are not to Ie commended.
Nay, even the child heart should not be
necessarily hurt nor his feelings in-
jured. but firmness, truth. must not Ibe
sairifleed for a poor. weakikh sentimen-
talitv.
This in no sermon. Nor is it intended
as a moral essay. It is the natural de-
duction gained from the every-day ob-
p~e'v p of the inefective, mamby


painby way those in authority deal with
the souls and the lives committed to'
their care. The subjects of ouch meth-
ods soon learn to despise their parents,
their eshool teachers and all others who
pretend any guardianship over them.
The girls who make good women and
the boys who make strong men are
those who are not coaxed and cajoled
and iwtted and coddled, but thoms who
grow up to respect the genuine loving
authority over them.
The parent should .uphold the school
teacher, the school teacher should enlist
the interest of the parent, and both
should engage the honest thoughts and
co-operation of the child.
Children cannot hbe oaxed or pounded
Into useful, manly men and womanly
women, but "No" should mean no, and
"Yes" should mean yes, and thorough-
nems should he expected.-Daily Re.
porter.
MTORIHS OF THlE CHAAE.
Hig Hear Played Ponsum and Discon-
certed Three Veteran Hunters.
Surviving the ruthless slaughter of
ga me a few bear are scattered over the
country, but many residents remember
the time when monster bears were fre.
(tlently brought to town as trophies of
the hunt. The following in quite an in-
terneting and somewhat humorous so-
count of a bear hunt in this county dur-
ing the palmy days when this game
lchimed the woods within a mile or two
of the city.
Memrs. .John and Allbrt Itogero and
lPnul Weidman determined to rid this
M'etion of a cunning old black bear that
hiad lwen preying on their hogs. They
took up the trail and finally brought
their quarry to bay at McCullough
ranch. All veteran hunters, the trio
4.4,ot straight and poured loads of lead
into the huge brute, which dropped with-
,ut a struggle and lay quiet. Making
sure that the beast was dead the hunters
4at on the carcass and congratulated
themselves on the easy victory. After
some time elapsed they prepared to re-
riove the carcass, and one of the hunt-
ere, giving vent to his feelings, drew his
knife and plunged it into the motion.
les body, saying: "You will not carry
oiT any more hogs." The dogs were lying
around the careass enjoying the result
of the chase when the knife was plunged
into the bear. Imagine the consterns-
tion of both men and dogs when bruin,
% ith a lightning-like move, sprang to his
feet and attacked everything in sight.
The dogs were whipped in the twinkling
of an eye, and the hunters were so dis.
oAncerted that they were unable to come
Io the assistance of the four-footed
friends for some moments. Finally Mr.
Albert lRogero thought of his gun, and,
seizing it, poured a load of heavy shot
:it elpse range into the brute's body.
This time bruin was killed for keeps.-
St. Augustine Becord.


* 1


* U


11


IN MEMORIAL.
This little headstone is
erected to the tender memory
of an ad. printed in this spaeo
last week. Its duty was to
nourish this journal, which
gives the people a voice. Tight
well was the little ad. doing
its duty.
It died from an overdone of
For further particulars of
this sad demise see editorial
pages of this issue.
R. I. P.


IN MIMORIAM.
This little headstone is
erected to the tender memory
of an ad. printed in this space
last week. Its duty was to
nourish this journal, which
gives the people a voice. Right
well was the little ad. doing
its duty.
It died from an overdose of
"Gum."
For further particulars of
this sad demise see editorial
pages of this iesue.
R. I. P.



































































FOOD FOR THOUGHT


THE GREAT GUM GAME


y A. A. A. SILDE, of The Sun Staff


Dreaming, like John Bunyan (only
that I was not in a dungeon cell but in
a free country and in the enjoyment of
God's free air) "I dreamt a dream."


THE DREAM.


Together with another man, I was
aboard a shaky coach. My traveling
companion was a fine-looking, sensible,
elderly man. He introduced himself as
the LEADER of the WISE and NOT
HOODWINKED PEOPLE.
He said:
S"Now that the happy holidays are
at hand, toys and games are being
bought for the Mhildren, and it will not
be amins to provide the dear, grown-up
boym with a newly devised and interesting
saw. the Great Goo-Goo Gum Game."
0 a I have one, too?" I pleaded in
tq, for it sounded mighty good to
ftWalt, my on," said the reverend
allbenign man, "perhaps when
Uear all you will strongly realize
AF Vany ty all *is vanity.'
I.M lng along right
soethboftr and so inter-
OtW di I bom I felt most -


rene and satisfied. My curiosity and
interest were never before so aroused.
"To begin with," said the speaker,
"a bunch of little wooden ninnies,
painted green, represent the men of the
woods, and strong, stubby-looking men
are they.
"You locate them in specially provided
sections of a field, on a yellow pine
board redolent of the woods, these sec-
tions representing the woods. These
ninnies are the workers, who, by the
player juggling a little box of dice, are
be moved forward in crowds to a great
central square.
"This' start is an interesting part of
the play, and each ninny brought into
the big square is replaced by the player
with a stock-y pile of coin, made of
heavily gold-plated metal in the form
of piled up gold pieces.
"Then the player juggle the dice
again. He must ge the ninnies back to
the woods. By keeping them there and
shifting them about certain moves made
permit the player to bring upon the
board, near the big central square, cute
little casks and barrels, fashioned in
perfect imitation of turpentine and rosin
barrels,. nd made of a translucent amber
and brown shade of lacquer, strongly


Florida East Coast Hotel Company


HOTEL PONCE DE LEON
SL Auipmts
Opens Tuesday, January 9, 1M';
Closes Saturday, April 7, 11m


HOTEL ALCAZAR
SL AiMeft
Now open
Closes Saturday, April 21, HINt

HOTEL ORMOND
O9mwlHM--Ha.iu


Opens
Closes


Tuesday, January 9, 1906
Monday, April 9, 1906


HOTEL THE BREAKERS
POi Ile"hy-.t*M
Opens Saturday, December 23, 19056
Cloam Saturday, April 7, 190o


HOTEL ROYAL POINCIANA
Palm hl m Lake Wet
() nepO Tlh,,,ura T.... J ....


-loses,
clooee


...u'raou J, uUAiry II, 1u06
Monday, April 2, 1906


HOTEL ROYAL PALM


Opens Monday, January 8, 1906
Closes Tuesday, April 3, 1906


HOTEL COLONIAL
smse, L P. (bam I Mi)


Opens Tuesday, January 9, 1906
Chloa Monday, April 2, 1096


HOTEL THE CONTINENTAL
MAftfHeel


Opens Thrsday, March 15, 190
ChMsU during August


-- I


mummmoommumm


m


M


^ -, **"









December 16, 1905

imitative of rosin. The appearance of
thee casks on the board cause the coin
stacks to vanish.
"To the juggling of the dice the nin-
nies keep moving about in the woods,
and the player attempts to get the amber
and brown lacquered casks to a seaport,
painted on the board, and then jump
them across a 'pond' into the Home-Safe.
at-Last square. That's THE GAME.
"In order to accomplish this the great-
est nerve-lots of nerve-my son, and
skill, are required, for it can be done,
but there are many thousand chances
against the play, yet so exciting and in-
teresting is the game that once you be-
gin it you can hardly stop it-that is, if
you can afford to purchase the outfit.
"Some happy children of fortune, boys,
though grown, have had the pleasure re-
cently of playing this game before Santa
Claus brought them an outfit, but they
did not win the game, and they have
laid aide the board for awhile.
"They made splendid progress and got
five piles of the coin pieces, each pile
representing 250,000 on the board. Fol-
lowing this, and by the most promising
maneuvering, the rules of the gaine per-
mitted the casks to appear on the board
in sufficient quantity to offset the
5x250,000 equals 1,250,000 limit.
"Then came the chase across the
board for the seaport town square, and
the effort to jump the casks across the
pond into the Home-Safe-at-Last square.
To do this the dice must be so juggled
that the casks, each and all of them, can
be passed safely through a maze wherein
lie four big squares, marked 'The Big
Four.'
"When you reach the maze and can-
not get through, you can get a chance
to *start again, but you must put your
casks in pawn, and then you introduce
a little block of marble prettily shaped
and hewn like unto a bank. This is
called the Rescuer.
"Again the dice fall and the Rescuer
must make certain moves, which are
SURE and CERTAIN, and entitle this
cold bit of stone to be placed with the
set aside casks. Then only can the
player introduce upon the board a bit of
metal, which is heavily embossed in
rhinestone letters, 'Loan.' Like the
'Open Sesame' of the fairy tale, this ex-
change of collateral (the rosin-like bar-
rels) for this piece of metal (marked
'Loan') the doors are opened for the
player to bring into the big central
square another set of rosin-like barrels,
the meanwhile the player being obliged,
by keeping things busy-I mean the dice
rattling and falling-so as to have the
green ninnies move about harmoniously
in the woods.
"Now, the player has, it would seem,
all that he can do, but the game grows
more interesting and exciting. He must
keep in mind that the bank-guarded
piles of casks may have a chance to slip
through the Maze of the Big Four and
into Home, and at the same time he
must get the new lot of casks, bought
with the 'Loan' figure of the game, up
to the Maze of The Big Four. Should
this consignment fail to get through,
then another, but slightly smaller Res-
cuer bit of marble, shaped like a bank,
is set aside with this second and
smaller lot of casks.
"And so you see how intricate the
game becomes, for now, to continue, you
draw a second 'Loan' to purchase a see-
end lot of casks by this means-the first
you must remember having been bought
by the 62560,000 equals 1,250,000 of the
green ninies. The player now has two
lots of asks pawned to and guarded by
the marble bank, while a third lot comes
on the board. According to the rules of
a 1,260,000 game, the number of 'Loan'
*piee ARE NOT ONLY LIMITED,
BUT GROW SMALLER EACH TIME
YOUR ARE OBLIGED TO DRAW ONE,
and at the same time the consignment
of casuks received is, by the Law and
Rules of this great Geo-GOo Gum Game,
of dwindling signifcanee. Like the num-
ber of 'Loan' pieces, so, too, are the
Bank pleosp limited, and there are the
same number of each.


"It all depends, like the turn of the
wheel in the gambler's den, on the
throws of the dice by the player, for if
the throws fail to get the casks from
their storage square on the board-a
prettily Jnted and 'fair fleld'-and
thence thro gh the Maze and into the
Home-Safe-at-Last square, then you lose
the game, or, in other words, you
.'BUST.'"


F Just then the coachman managed our
vehicle badly, and we were given an aw-
ful bump against some obstruction,
which we found were FOUR BIG
BOULDERS IN THE ROADWAY.
"A novel attachment to the Great
(Goo-Goo Gumin Game board," said my
friend, "is a little spring which you are
required to press when your casks go
into pawn. By an ingenious mechanical
arrangement the pressure on the spring
releases a. prettily colored rubber bub-
ble which ascends about eighteen inches,
while from directly above the upward
moving bubble there descends a strong,
iharp-pointed needle attached to a rod.
So accurately is this adjusted that the
needle and the bubble meet, and the
pretty, INFLATED TIlING SHAKES-
SHIVERS-AND IS NO MORE.
"But the player with nerve and
gum-ption smiles his own little smile
and plays the game. It is known, my
son, that one player played one solitary
(reat Goo-Go(o nm Game for seven
months, but failed to win it.
"It is also known that his friends
were so interested in him and his gum-
game that they were ready to get an-
other outfit for him, not quite so elab-
orate, nut nearly so; that is, instead of
having Ux250,000 (euals 1,250,000, with
which to start, lie was only to have
4x250,000 equals 1,000,000.
"But one Saturday the penetrating
rays of the sun shone so severely on the
pine board of the gum game that the
player decided to play no more."
My friend vanished, and I heard a
pleading voice cry:
"Get back my first bunch of casks."
I trfed. it was but in vain.
Always and forever a massive white
marble wall would rise between me and
the coveted amelr-colored casks. Yet,
unlike the Sphinx, this mass of stone
would talk. It said:
"This much is mine. Let the player
produce the sum loaned and the inter-
est, and all will be well."
Then came more cries of help to rescue
other stored amber casks, but ever and
ever a marble wall would arise to utter
the uniform saying, "This much is
mine."
Suddenly my friend was at my side
again.
"My son," said he, "you may begin
this game with one and a quarter, and
store up these pretty amber-colored
casks.
"If you then hypothecate, for less, of
course, than its value, you can play
again, but on a smaller scale. And so
you can continue to play, by hypotheca-
tion, a smaller and smaller game, until
you reach the end, when your marble-
earted friend owns all you had."
"And you never get back any of the
pretty amber-colored casks?" I sighed
n query.
"No. Not any. If some one sala the
players sold their holdings (started with
your 1,250,000) for 2,500,000, it was
because they either did not know any
better or that possessed with that knowl-
edge they did not give the public what
belonged to it.
"You saw in that game that the green
ninnies brought 1,250,000 to the big cen-
tral square go as to start the game. Go
to the woods and ask the stock-y men
of the game if they ever got back any of
THAT ORIGINAL ONE-AND-A-QUAR-
TER."
Like the vanished casks, my friend
disappeared for ever more, and then I
awoke from a most refreshing sleep,
and, as the scales had been taken from
my eyes, SOME THINGS appeared to
me in a DIFFERENT and PROPER
LIGHT.
THE SOUTHERN FUEL AND SUPPLY
COMPANY'S AD.
ihe following letter was received after
the part of te paper containing the ad.
had been printed. \s it wag too late
to comply with Mr. Munnerlyn's re-
quest, the letter is printed in justice to
him. As soon as we are able we will
return the $100.
"Jacksonville, Fla., Dec. 13, 1905.-
Mr. Claude L'Engle, City: Dear Sir-
I herewith inclose certificate of stock in


the Sun Company for one hundred dol-
lars ($100), also amount due for adver-
tising, which we desire discontinued. In
view of the recent policy of your paper,
which we consider antagonistic to the in-
terests of some of our bhet friends and
city, we cannot afford to be identified


18


with it In ay way. Young respectfully,
"The SOUTHERN FUEL & SUPPLY
COMPANY.
"J. K. Munnerlyn, President."

THE EVERETT HOTEL AD.
The following letter was received too
late to comply with the request it con-
tained. The part of the paper contain-
ing the ad. had been printed when the
letter was received. The letter in
printed in justice to Mr. Mason:
"Claude L'Engle. Esq., Jacksonville,
Fla.-Dear Sir: Front advice which I
have received since seeing you the other
dlay, I find it absolutely necessary to in-
struct you to withdraw my ad. in your
paper. Regretting the necessity, I beg
to remain, yours, etc.
"GEO. MASON, Mgr."

RETIREMENT OF REV. .1. I. LEY AS
EDITOR OF TIlE CHRISTIAN AD-
VOCATE.
(From Live Oak tDenoerat.)
The Democrat and our citizens gener-
ally bid a regretful farewell to Rev. .1.
B. Ley, Dr. Pasco's predecessor in the
editorial chair, and his charming fam-
ily. Mr. Ley has impyeTed. his rare
gifts and acquirements as a writer and
thinker upon every issue of the Christian
Advocate while he was its editor, and
the paper has taken high rank among
the religious periodicals of the country.
His grace and force and feeling have im-
parted a marked and peculiar value to
his work, and it has been widely recog-
nized in the secular no less than the re-
ligious press. His assignment at the
Ocala Conference to the pastorate of the
McTyeire Memorial Church at Jackson-
ville was a most distinguished compli-
ment to his qualities as a man and a
minister, for that station, considered the
most desirable in the conference jurisdic-
tion, is a prize awarded by a discriml-
nating bishop only to a minister of su-
perior qualifications. Mr. Iey will fully
realize the high expectations of him
based upon his new assignment, and the
Democrat extends to him its cordial good
wishes for his 'success in his Jackson-
ville field of labor.

IRAND )UKE FIRED AT ACTOR.
Nardi, the tenor attached to the im-
Ip'rial opera, had a narrow escape from
death recently, when lie lost his way on
the enormous stage and accidentally en.
tered the box of Grand Duke Vladimir.
Being afraid to show himself to the pub-
lie, his Highness occupied a box, the
very existence of which is unknown to
thenter-goers, as it is inclosed on all
side, the only opening being toward the
stige. The tenor, as indicated, got lost
in the wings, and drawing aside a cur-
tinin found himself face to face with the
Grand Duke and a soulbrette. HI*s
Highness, naturally, a%%the air full ot
bombs and dynamite, and taking a brace
of revolvers from a table began to pour
bullets into the wings, emptying a dozen
chambers successively ere he could be
persuaded that his life was not in dan-
ger. The actor, of course, had fled the
moment he perceived Vladimir's well.
known whiskers, and the adventure made
him so ill that he could not continue his
part. The performance ended before
empty benches, as most of the audience
ran away on hearing the fusillade.

MAKING "CECELIA JEALOUS."
The schoolgirls of Berlin have com-
lined to make Cecelia "jealous." Wlhn
ever the Crown Prince travels about
town in his auto or carriage, they fire
his favorite flower, red pinks, at him,
and this is practiced to such an extent
that the price of that commodity has
very greatly risen. Sometimes the
Crown Prince takes the flowers from the
hands of the girls, and the Gretchens
so favored never ease talking of their
good luck.


IN MEMORIAM.
This little headstone in
erected to the tender memory
of an ad. printed in this space
last week. Its duty was to
nourish this journal, which
gives the people a voice. Right
well was the little ad. doing
its duty.
It died from an overdoes of
"(utn." m
For further particulars of
this Mad demise sewe editorial
pages of this issue.
R. I. P.





New York

Fashions

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Furni 1hn 1, we'll put
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for "EFF-EFF" and


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Refugees ........................$4 25
Extra Early Refugee......... 4 25
Earliest Valentine ............ 4 25
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Black Wax ..................... 7 00
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6 *. MELSON & SONS
Corner Forsyth and Celar NtO. Jacksonville, lM.












ti
al


FOOD FOR THOUGHT


THE GKEAT GUM GAME

y A. A.A S a, The sun Staff
Dreaming, like John Bunyan (only rene and satisfied. My curiosity and
that I was not In a dungeon cell but in interest were never before so aroused.
a free country and in the enjoyment of "To begin with," said the speaker,
God's free air) "I dreamt a dream." "a bunch of little wooden ninnies,
painted green, represent the men of the
THE DREAM. woods, and strong, stubby-looking men
are they.
Together with another man, I was "You locate them in specially provided
aboard a shaky coach. My traveling sections of a field, on a yellow pine
companion was a fne-looking, sensible, ord redolent of the woods, these see-
elderly man. He introduced himself as tions representing the woods. These
the LEADER of the WISE and NOT ninnies are the workers, who, by the
HOODWINKED PEOPLE. player juggling a little box of dice, are
He kidd to be moved forward in crowds to a great
Now that the happy holidays are central square.
at hand, toys and games are being "'This start is an interesting partof
bought for the children, and it will not the play, and each ninny brought into
be salmi to provide the dear, grown-up the big square is replaod b the player
boy with a newly devised and interesting with a stock-y pile of corn, made of
M i the Great Goo-Goo Gum Game." heavily gold-plated metal in the form
'*a I harve one, too?" I pleaded in of piled up gold pieces. .
jptyq, for It sounded mighty good to "Then the player jugg es dice
again. He must ge the ninnies back to
S Wat, y on," mid the reverend the woods. By keeping them there and
Sand benin man, "perhaps when shifting them about certain moves made
hear all you will strongly realize permit the player to bring upon the
qSe, ,B .0t W.-Jr rubat near- A cenitai 'square, cute
oa, pr "AftL i little casks and barrels, fashioned in
Smlong right perfect imitation of turpentine ~nd rosin
one t an d so inter- arrels, and made of a translucent amber
w did I bwWe a I felt most *e- and brown shade of lacquer, strongly


florida East Coast Hotel Company


HOTEL PONCE DE LEON
StL Augipatle
Opens Tuesday, January 9, 1'M00
Closes Saturday, April 7, 1906


HOTEL ALCAZAR

Now open
Closes Saturday, April 21, 11iNi


HOTEL ORMOND
M *M*he.HalNax
Opens Tuesday, January 9, 1906
Closes Monday, April 9, 1906


HOTEL THE BREAKERS

ouens Mtturdiy, Ilecember 23, 19056
Closes Saturday, April 7, liI9


HOTEL ROYAL POINCIANA
Pal te, m L*a Wem


Opens
Closes


Thursday, January 11, 1906
Monday, April 2, 1906


nultL KUYAL PALM


Opens Monday, January
Closes Tuesday, April 3,


8, 1906
8,1906
1906


HOTEL COLONIAL
NU, L. P. (B1mmhaMN )


upens Tuesday, January 9, 1906
Cloew Monday, April 2, 10960


HOTEL THE CONTINENTAL


Opens Thursday, March 16, 1906
Clokes during August


-~1~~ A~.t-


m


X


a


I


77


U








December 16, 1905


THE SUN


imitative of rosin. The appearance ol
thee asks on the board cause the coin
stacks to vanish.
"To the juggling of the dice the nin
niales keep moving about in the woods
and the player attempts to get the amber
and brown lacquered casks to a seaport
painted on the board, and then jump
them across a 'pond' into the Home-Safe
at-Last square. That's THE GAME.
"In order to accomplish this the great
east nerve-lots of nerve-my son, and
skill, are required, for it can be done
but there are many thousand chance@
against the play, yet so exciting and in
teresting is the game that once you be
gin it you can hardly stop it-that is, if
you can afford to purchase the outfit.
"Some happy children of fortune, boys
though grown, have had the pleasure re
gently o playing this game before Santa
Claus brought them an outfit, but they
did not win the game, and they have
laid aide the board for awhile.
"They made splendid progress and got
five piles of the coin pieces, each pii
representing 250,000 on the board. Fol
lowing this, and by the most promising
maneuvering, the rules of the game per.
mitted the casks to appear on the board
in sufficient quantity to offset the
5x250,000 equals 1,250,000 limit.
"Then came the chase across the
board for the seaport town square, and
the effort to jump the casks across the
pond into the Home-Safe-at-Last square.
To do this the dice must be so juggled
that the casks, each and all of them, can
be passed safely through a maze wherein
lie four big squares, marked 'The Big
Four.'
"When you reach the maze and can-
not get through, you can get a chance
to-start again, but you must put your
casks in pawn, and then you Introduce
a little block of marble prettily shaped
and hewn like unto a bank. This is
called the Rescuer.
"Again the dice fall and the Rescuer
must make certain moves, which are
SURE and CERTAIN, and entitle this
cold bit of stone to be placed with the
set aside casks. Then only can the
player introduce upon the board a bit of
metal, which is heavily embossed in
rhinestone letters, 'Loan.' Like the
'Open Sesame' of the fairy tale, this ex-
change of collateral (the rosin-like bar-
rels) for this piece of metal (marked
'Loan') the doors are opened for the
player to bring into the big central
square another set of rosin-like barrels,
the meanwhile the player being obliged,
by keeping things busy-I mean the dice
rattling and falling-so as to have the
green ninnies move about harmoniously
in the woods.
"Now, the player has, it would seem,
all that he can do, but the game grows
more interesting and exciting. He must
keep in mind that the bank-guarded
piles of casks may have a chance to slip
through the Maze of the Big Four and
into Home, and at the same time he
must get the new lot of casks, bought
with the 'Loan' figure of the game, up
to the Maze of The Big Four. Should
this consignment fail to get through,
then another, but slightly smaller Res-
cuer bit of marble, shaped like a bank,
is set aside with this second and
smaller lot of casks.
"And so you see how intricate the
game becomes, for now, to continue, you
draw a second 'Loan' to purchase & see-
end lot of casks by this means-the first
you must remember having been bought
by the 5250,000 equals 1,250,000 of the
green nidnies. The player now has two
lots of eoask pawned to and gurded by
the marble bank, while a third lot comes
on the board. According to the rules of
a 1,250,000 game, the number of 'Loan'
*pieces ARE NOT ONLY LIMITED,
BUT GROW SMALLER EACH TIME
YOUR ARE OBLIGED TO DRAW ONE,
and at the same time the consignment
of casks received ii, by the Law and
Rules of this great Goo-Goo Gum Game,
of dwindling signifcanoe. Like the num-
her of 'Loan' pieces, so, too, are the
Bank pieces limited, and there are the
same number of each.


"It all depends, like the turn of the
wheel in the gambler's den, on the
throws of the dice by the player, for if
the throws fail to get the casks from
their storage square on the board--a
r 11W t Wt VW &V tAfr j6b)'-ftrlf
thence thiobgh the Maze and into the
Home-Safe-at-Last square, then you lose
the game, or, in other words, you
,'BUST.'"


"Jacksonville, Fla., Dec. 13, 1905.-
Mr. Claude L'Engle, City: Dear Sir-
I herewith inclose certificate of stock in
the Sun Company for one hundred dol-
lars ($100), also amount due for adver-
tising. which we desire discontinued. In
view of the recent policy of your paper,
which we consider antagonistic to the in-
terests of some of our best friends and
city, we cannot afford to be identified


f Just then the coachman managed our
i vehicle badly, and we were given an aw-
ful bump against some obstruction,
. which we found were FOUR BIG
, BOULDERS IN THE ROADWAY.
"A novel attachment to the Great
, Goo-Goo Gum Game board," said my
friend, "is a little spring which you are
* required to press when your casks go
into pawn. By an ingenious mechanical
* arrangement the pressure on the spring
releases a prettily colored rubber bub-
, ble which ascends about eighteen inches,
s while from directly above the upward
* moving bubble there descends a strong,
* sharp-pointed needle attached to a rod.
f So accurately is this adjusted that the
needle and the bubble meet, and the
, pretty, INFLATED THING SHAKES-
- SHIVERS-AND IS NO MORE.
I "But the player with nerve and
gum-ption smiles his own little smile
and plays the game. It is known, my
4on, that one player played one solitary
t great t Goo-Goo Glum Game for seven
months, but failed to win it.
- "It is also known that his friends
were so interested in him and his gum-
game that they were ready to get an-
other outfit for him, not quite so elal-
orate, but nearly so; that is, instead of
having 5x250,000 equals 1,250,000, with
which to start, he was only to have
4x250.000 equals 1,000,000.
S "But one Saturday the penetrating
rays of the sun shone so severely on the
I pine board of the gum game that the
player decided to play no more."
My friend vanished, and I heard a
pleading voice cry:
"Get back my first bunch of casks."
I trfed. it was but in vain.
Always and forever a massive white
r marble wall would rise Iwtween me and
the coveted amber-colored casks. Yet,
I unlike the Sphinx, this mass of stone
would talk. It said:
"This much is mine. Let the player
r produce the sum loaned and the inter-
est. and all will be well."
Then came more cries of help to rescue
other stored amber casks, but ever and
ever a marble wall would arise to utter
the uniform saying, "This much in
mine."
Suddenly my friend was at my side
again.
"My son," said he, "you may begin
this game with one and a quarter, and
store up these pretty amler-colored
casks.
"If you then hypothecate, for less, of
course, than its value, you can play
again, but on a smaller scale. And so
you can continue to play, by hypotheca-
tion, a smaller and smaller game, until
you reach the end, when your marble-
hearted friend owns all you had."
"And you never get back any of the
pretty amber-colored casks?" I sighed
n query.
"No. Not any. If some one saia the
players sold their holdings (started with
your 1,250,000) for 2,500,000, it was
because they either did not know any
better or that possessed with that knowl-
edge they did not give the public what
belonged to it.
"You saw in that game that the green
ninnies brought 1,250,000 to the big cen-
tral square so as to start the game. Go
to the woods and ask the stock-y men
of the game if they ever got back any of
THAT ORIGINAL ONE-AND-A-QUAR-
TER."
Like the vanished casks, my friend
disappeared for ever more, and then I
awoke from a most refreshing sleep,
and, as the scales had been taken from
my eyes, SOME THINGS appeared to
me in a DIFFERENT and PROPER
LIGHT.
THE SOUTHERN FUEL AND SUPPLY
COMPANY'S AD.
'he following letter was received after
the part of the paper containing the ad.
had been printed. \s it was too late
to comply with Mr. Munnerlyn's re-
quest, the letter is printed in justice to
him. As soon as we are able we will
return the $100.


GHANI)D DUKE FIRED AT ACTOR. t, Uom p ny
(Olio PrI o
Nardl, the tenor attached to the im-
;Irial opera, had a narrow escape from 17-19 W. B St.
delith recently, when lie lost his way on
the enormous stage and accidentally en- J*kif*O *riot
terei the box of Grand Duke Vladimir.
Being afraid to show himself to the pub- ,.
lie, his Highness occupied a box, the
very existence of which is unknown to
theater-goers, as it is inclosed on all 1905 Crop IU s
sides, the only opening being toward the
stage. The tenor, as indicated, got lost RAfIugeet ........................14 25
in the wings, and drawing aside a cur- Extra Early Rofugew......... 4 25
t.:!in found himself face to face with the Erliest Valentin.. 4 25
Grand Duke and a soubrette. His r"i't V"aentin' ........... 4
Highness, naturally, I 'the air full ot Stringless G(reon Pod......... ( 00
bombs and dynamite, and taking a brace D)avis Kidney Wax........... 5 00
of revolvers from a table began to pour Black Wax ..................... 7 00
bullets into the wing, emptying a dozen Wardwell'w Kidney Wax ... (00
chambers successively ere he could be Wrdwy ...
persuaded that his life was not in dan- MOG.
ger. The actor, of course, had fled the
moment he perceived Vladimir's well- BURTON IL BARRS I SONS
known whiskers, and the adventure made
him so ill that he could not continue his Jac avbilT FIL
part. The performance ended before I
empty benches, as most of the audience
ran away on hearing the fusillade. Building Material ..

MAKING "CECELIA JEAIDUS." Foundation to Finish
The schoolgirls of Berlin have com-
bined to make Cecella "jealous." When- O MM P m IS
ever the Crown Prince travels alnMut Ogr ge weg 1
town in his auto or carriage, they fire
hib favorite flower, red pinks, at him, W91 Tru Tm T O1
and this is practiced to such an extent T'rb f ts *s IW
that the price of that commodity has
very greatly risen. Sometimes the i
Crown Prince takes the flowers from the l U i ID A A
hands of the girls, and the Gretchens Us Ie U RI lKIARDjON & CO.
so favored never cease talking of their
good luck. J lKrM ri L



HODRSFS FRD i% F Brel on famous stock forma of
n itiUKO I Olrt Mimourl and Kentucky.
Our guaranteU means your money back if yon don't like your trade.
& I. MESU9 /tN
Corner Forsiyth and (0dar Mts. Jacksonville, NU.


18


with it in any way. Yours respectfully,
"The SOUTHERN FUEL & SUPPLY
COMPANY.
"J. K. Munnerlyn, President."

THE EVERETT IHOTEI Al).
The following letter was received too
late to comply with thel request it tcon-
tained. The part of the paper contain-
ing the ad. had been printed when the
letter was received. The letter is
printed in justice to Mr. Mason:
"Claude L'Engle, Esq.. Jackmonville,
Fla.-Dear Sir: From advice which I
have received mince seeing you the other
day, I find it absolutely necessary to in-
struct you to withdraw my ad. in your
paper. Regretting the necessity, I beg
to remain, yours, etc.
"GEO. MASON, Mgr."

RETIREMENT OF 1REV..1. It. LEY AS
EDITOR OF THE CHRISTIAN AD.
VOCATE.
(From Live Oak Democrat.)
The Democrat and our citizens gener-
ally bid a regretful farewell to Rev. J.
IB. ley, Dr. Paseo's predecessor in the
editorial chair, and his charming fainm-
ily. Mr. Ley has impressed his rare
gifts and acquirements as a writer andti
thinker upon every issue of the Christian
Advocate while he was its editAr, and
the paper has taken high rank among
the religious periodicals of the country.
Ilia grace and force and feeling have im-
parted a marked and peculiar value to
his work, and it has been widely recog-
nized in the secular no less than the re-
ligious press. His assignment at the
Ocala Conference to the pastorate of the
McTyeire Memorial Church at Jackson-
ville was a moat distinguished compli-
ment to his qualities as a man and a
minister, for that station, considered the
most desirable in the conference jurisdie-
tion, is a prize awarded by a discrimi-
nating bishop only to a minister of su-
perior qualifications. Mr. Ley will fully
realize the high expectations of him
based upon his new assignment, and the
Democrat extends to him its cordial good
wishes for his' success in his Jackson-
ville field of labor.


IN MEMORIAL.
This little headstone is
erected to the tender memory
of an ad. printed in this spaoe
last week. Its duty was to
nourish this journal, which
gives the people a voice. Right
well was .the little ad. doing
its duty.
It died from an overdose of
"(un1." 4
For further particulars of
this %ad demise see editorial
page of this issue.
R. I. P.





New York

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In Florida

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for "EFF-EFF" and


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We do not bm what other com-
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am, ljfi s Wecontract, and have
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for your loved onem, it will
S tome or write to me first.
SJ. & COLr JRm., ftr.
) Xqultable Life Amurance Society,
f r Duval Building,
# vr nevyile, Florida.
1 ,**. I 11------^


"No, no," laughed M. Beaucaire, some,
what unsteadily, as he stood, swaying
a little, with one hand on the coach
door, the other pressed hard on his side,
"he only oversee'; he is Jus' a little
bashtul, sometime'. He is a great man,
but he don' want all the glory I"
"Barber," replied the Duke, "I must
tell you that I gladly descend to bandy
word with you; your monstrous impu-
dence is a claim to rank I cannot ignore.
But a lackey who has himself followed
by six other lackeys- "
'Ha, ha! Has not M. le Due been
busy all this evening to justify me? And
I think mine mus' be the bes' six. Ha,
hal You think!"
"M. de Chateaurien," said Lady Mary,
"we are waiting for you."
"Pardon," he replied. "He has some-
thing to say; maybe it is bes' If you
hear it now."
"I wish to hear nothing front him-
ever!"
"My faith, madam," cried the Duke,
"this saucy fellow has paid you the last
insult I He is so sure of you he does not
fear you will believe the truth. When
all i, told, if you do not agree he de-
served the lashing we planned to--"
"I'll hear no morel"'
"You will bitter repent it, madam.
For your own sake I entreat--"
"And I also," broke in M. Beaucalre.
"Permit me, mademoiselle; let him
speak."
"Then let him be brief," said Lady
Mary, "for I am earnest to be quit of
him. His explanation of an attack on
my friend and on my carriage should
be made to my brother."
"Alas that he was not here," said the
Duke, "to aid me I Madam, was your
carriage threatened? I have endeavored
only to expunge a debt I owed to Bath
and to avenge an insult offered to your-
self through--"
"Sir, sir, my patience will bear little
more!"
"A thousand' apology," said M. Beau-
cairo. "You will listen, I only beg, Lady
Mary?"
She made an angry gesture of assent.
"Madam, I will be brief as I may.
Tw'o months ago there came to Bath a
French gambler calling himself Beau-
oifre, a desperate fellow with the cards
or dice, and all the men of fashion went
to play at his lodging, where he won
considerable sums. He was small, wore
a black wig and mustachio. He had the
insolence to show himself everywhere
until the Master of Ceremonies rebuffed
him in the pump-room, as you know, and
,after that he forbore his visits to the
rooms. Mr. Nash explained (and was
confirmed, madam, by indubitable infor-
mation) that this Beaucalre was a man
of unspeakable, vile, low birth, being, in
lact. no other than a lackey of the
Freinch king's ambassador, Victor by
nawie, do Mirepoix's. barber. Although
his condition was known, the hideous
impudence of the fellow did not desert
hins, and he remained in Bath, where
none would speak to him."
"Is your farrago nigh done, sir ?"


\


M. Beaucaire stepped close to her. Her
pale face twitched.
"ILookl" ho said.
"O0h. oht" she whispered with a dry
throat, and fell back in the carriage.
"Is it so?" cried the Duke.
"1 do not know-I--cannot tell."
"One moment more. I begged these'
gentlemen to allow me to wipe out the
nsult I had unhappily offered to Bath,
but particularly to you. They agreed
not to forestall me or to interfere. I
lft Sir John Wimpledon's early, and
arranged to give the sorry rascal a lash-
ing under your own eyes, a satisfaction
d'e the lady into whose presence he had I
dared to force himself."
"'Noblesse oblige,?" said M. Beau.
care in a tone of gentle inquiry.
(CONTINUED NEXT WEEK.)


DAVIS


CALLED "LUCKIEST
COVERED."


DIS-.


Albert Oayet, in an important article
published by La Revue, calls Davis, the
American millionaire engaged in the un-
burial of Thebes, "the luckiest discoverer
of the period."-


December 16,1905


OWN


Mons. Beaucaire
(Continued from Seventh Page]
return to town. Fine gentlemen you
hardy braves, by heaven to leave one
Sman to meet a troop of hoe saingle-
handed, while you huddle in shelter until
you are overthrown and disarmed by
servntel Oh, the wital Heaven save
y u from the wital"
"'Madam "
"Address me no more I M. de Cha-
teaurien, Lady Rallerton and I will
greatly esteem the honor of your com-
pany. Will you come?"
Sh stepped quickly into the coach,
and was therbng her skirts to make
room for the Frenchman, when a heavy
voice spokelfrom the shadows of the tree
by the way side.
"Iady Mary Carlisle will, no doubt,
listen toa word of counsel on this
point."
The Duke of Winterset rode out into
the moonlight, composedly untying a
mask from about his head. He had not
shared the flight of his followers, but
had retired into the shade of the oak,
whence he now made his presence known
with the utmost coolness.
"Gracious heavens, 'tis Wintersetl"
exclaimed Lady Rellerton.
"Turned highwayman and cut-throat,"


"A few moments, madam. One even-
ing, three weeks ago, I observed a very
elegant equlage Traw up to my door,
e.nd the Duke of Chateaurien was an-
nounced. The young man's manners
were worthy-according to the French
aeceptance-and 'twere idle to deny him
the most monstrous assurance. lie de-
clared himself a noble traveling for
pleasure. He had taken lodgings in
Bath for a season, he said, and called
at once to pay his respects to me. His
tone was so candid-in truth, I am the
simplest of men, very easily gulled-
.nd his stroke so bold, that I did not
for one moment suspect him; and, to
my poignant regret-though in the hum-
blest spirit I have shown myself eager
to atone-that very evening I had the
,hanie of presenting him to yourself."
'The shame, sirl
"Have patience, pray, madam. Ay,
t.lo shame! You know what figure lihe
hath cut in Bath since that evening.
All ran merrily with him until several
days ago Captain Badger denounced him
as an imposter, vowing that. Chateaurien
was nothing."
"Pardon," interrupted M. Beaucaire.
"'Castle Nowhere' would have been so
much better. Why did you not make
him say it that way, monsieur?"
,Iady Mary started; she was looking
it the Duke, and her face was white.
He continued: "Poor Captain Badger
was stabbed that same day--"
"Most befitting poor Captain Badger,'
muttered Molyneux.
"-And his adversary had the marvel-
mus insolence to declare that he fought
in my quarrel! This afternoon the
wounded man sent for me, and imparted
i very horrifying intelligence. He had
discoveredd a lackey whom he had seen
waiting upon Beaucaire in attendance
st the door of this Chateaurien's lodg-
ings. Beaucaire had disappeared the
lay before Chateaurien's arrival. Cap-
tain Badger looked closely at Chateaur-
len at their next .meeting, and identified
hint with the missing Beaucaire beyond
the faintest doubt. Overcome with in-
dignation, he immediately proclaimed
the imposter. Out of regard for me, he
Jid not charge him with being Beau-
3airv; the poor soul was unwilling to
put upon me the humiliation of having
introduced a barber; but the secret
weighed upon him till he sent for me
Ind put everything in my hands. I ac-
epted the odium; thinking only of
atonement. I went to Sir John Wimple-
don's fete. I took poor Sir Hugh, there,
ind these other gentlemen aside, and told
them my news. We narrowly observed
this man, and were shocked at our sim-
plicity in not having discovered him
before. These are men of honor and
.ool judgment, madam. Mr. Molyneux
had acted for him in the affair of Cap-
tain Badger, and was strongly prejudiced
in his favor; but Mr. Molyneux, Sir
Hugh, Mr. Bantison, every one of them,
in short, recognized him. In spite of his
smooth face and his light hair, the ad-
venturer Beaucaire was writ upon him
amazing plain. Look at him, madam,
it he will dare the inspection. You saw
this Beaucaire well, the day of his ex-
pulsion from the rooms. Is this not
he ?


Jacksonville's finest

and florida's Largest

and Best Year-Round


Hotel


DODGE & GULLENS
Owners and Managers


I I d''I .9


Convenient to business


Everett Hotel


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
I"*


THS PlsTO oT
I UTM AMI! H.


rovIN IaId


IN MEMORIAL.

This little headstone is
erected to the tender memory
of an ad. printed in this space
last week. Its duty was to
nourish this journal, while
gives the people a voice. Right
well was the little ad. doing
its duty.
It died from an overdose of
"Gum."
For further particulars of
this sad demise we editorial
pales of this issue.
R. I. P.


I U


IN MEMORIAM.
This little headstone is
erected to the tender memory
of an ad. printed in this space
last, week. Its duty was to
nourish- this journal, which
gives the people a voice. Right
well was the little ad. doing
its duty.
It died from an overdose of
"Gum."
For further particulars of
this sad demise see editorial
pages of this issue.
R. I. P.


IN MEMORIAM.


This little headstone Is
erected to the tender memory
of an ad. printed in this space
last week.. Its duty was to
nourish this journal, which
gives the people a voice. Right
well was the little ad. doing
its duty.
It died from an overdose of
"Gum."
For further particulars of
this sd demise ae editorial
paog of this leus.
I. P.


__I I


T/ IUIAT T meA A subme s

sTiioumT k9uy b

We will sell a man, aged 35, our
GUARANTEED AnntyBoi d, Life
IlaN Think of itI Only $10.28
1,OlOO.U00. Other ages in propor-


IN MEMORIAL.
This little headstone is
ere.td to the tender memory
of an ad. printed in this space
last week. Its duty was to
nourish this journal, which
gives the people a voice. Right
well was the little ad. doing
its duty.
It died from an overdose of
" urnm."
For further particular of
thiA sad d(mie see editorial
1Ial..'V of this i ssu.
It. I. P.


'i i l 0


m


Windsor Hotel








t~eo ;a-& 90in


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This offer holds good only for our
'nM LUODs N a w1a8
PIANO CLUB--ust forming for one hundred
NEW SCALE 400 LUDDEN & BATES PIANOS to
one hundred Club members at $287 cash or 8$7
on temus of 110 cash and 18monthly withinterestt.
IaLrer payments for quarterly or yearly terns..
Call at the store or write for nmemnbership
blan and full particulars-this Club will soon
Our two Clubs Just cQmpleted saved two hun.
dried members In all 2,00 and madn us two
hundred more ends. We would like your
friendship ats o

LIIM M S. N. N. (un)
Jekusmilles, Fl.(
Gentlemen-Please send me full particlars
of your third Plano Club and FREE LIFE
INSURANCE PLAN.
N am e ..............................................................
P 0O ...............................................................
State ...............................................................
L8 LW N S Sa Jkin 0le, Fla.
I.Lt WLLS, Mmpr
*i Ull^ -^f ~l9I


IN MEMORIAL.


This little headstone is
erected to the tender memory
of an ad. printed in,this space
last week. Its duty was to
nourish this journal, which
gives the people a voice. Right
well was the little ad. doing
its duty.
It died from an overdose of
"Gum."
For further particulars of
this sad demise see editorial
pages of this issue.
P. I. P.


Stmind ad urt
OLD ICKORYu and
WHITE K01r WAGONS



Columbus Buies






PNIIRRAY&BAKER


Agriculture
(Continued from Sixth Page)
COWPEAS AND VELVET BEANS.
Up in Delaware they have been trying
to raise alfalfa for years, but without
encouraging results. Scarlet clover
prown there and does better. Lately
some attention has been given to the
cowpea and the velvet bean, both for soil
effect and for fodder. They thrive in
the warm, sandy soil of the peninsula,
even as in our own sandy sorls, where
some 25,000 acres are used every year
for the various varieties of field peas
and about 20,000 acres for the velvet
Iwan. Florida farmers should raise
mor-. of these to be used as a green ma-
nure, saving cost of commercial fertil-
ixers. An acre of cowpeas so turned
under at the proper time is said to be
equal to ten loads of stable manure, hay-
ing at value of at least twenty dollars.


A COCOANUT YARN.


What do you think of this cocoanut
yarn? It Inats that of the sea serpent
all to pieces. The suspicious part of it
is that it is clipped from a rural paper
I-'jlished up in Minnesota:
"Captain Durie of the British steamer
Lillie now in port from Port Maria and
Port Antonio, says that twenty-five miles
north of Cape Maysi his vessel passed
a solitary cocoanut tree standing up-
right in the ocean as though an anchor
held it. The branches were sixteen feet
above the water and bore ripe fruit. The
tree when first sighted was thought to
be an island."
Ariosto tells of Neptune's white herds
lowing o'er the deep, but here is one
who sees fruit trees bobbing up, as well.
RIut what a big tree it must have been
to he mistaken for an island at first.
An'l what a pity he failed to cast an-
chor, gather some of the "ripe fruit" and
concoct a cocoanut cocktail.


THE PHILIPPINES FOR
CULTURE.


ORANGE


A staff correspondent of the Denver
Republican, writing from the Philippine
Islands regarding their commercial pos-
sihilities, says, among other things:
"The same amount of money that would
buy five acres of orange land in River-
side, Cal., will secure one hundred acres
here. It is said that this climate and
soil are capable of producing as good
oranges as can be raised in either Cali-
fornia, Florida or Sicily." Just nso. But
why go 6,000 miles or more when such
land at such cost can be had in abund-
imnce in Florida? Hundreds of thou-
sands of acres of high pine land in south
Florida can be had for $10 per acre, and
even less, in isolated localities. Why,
then, go so far away from cheap land,
gcod land, good climate, good water,
o(uick transportation to market?
Again, the idea of putting the Sicily
orange or than those of California upon
the same plane as Florida's unequaled
product. If the said correspondent has
ever sampled the three sorts and, doing
so, could find no difference in Juiciness
and flavor, he is self-confessed as one
unable to judge of quality.
There is one fruit, possibly, it would
pay an American syndicate or even indi-
viduals, to engage in there. This is the
cocoanut, touching which he says:
"The culture of cocoanuts is one of
the inviting industries of the Philip-
pines. Science has discovered nearly a
hundred distinct uses to which the sub-
taance of this wonderful tree may be put,
and its propagation has had such a boom
that the farmers of the islands are now
deriving as much revenue from it as the
combined total of the tobseoo and sugar
crops. The Philippines undoubtedly con-
tain one of the best cocoanut belts in the
world. Although the groves in exist-
ence here have been planted in a hap-
harard manner and allowed to shift for
themselves, their profit averages with
those of Ceylon, our only formidable
competitor."
Only one county-that of De Soto-
reports cocoanuts as a product in 1903.
The- came, doubtless from the keys on
its southern border. Fifty-three trees
were reported; yield, twenty nuts; value,
one dollar. The item looks lonesome on
page 148 of Commissioner McLin's ex-
cellent biennial report.


Helpful Hints
(Continued from Heventh Page)
i A pretty and useful sent ease can be
contrived from a cardboard box, some
rose-colored quilted satin, a piece of
brownish tawny velvet, a yard of cotton
wool and some mixed silk and tinsel
cord. Take the box to pieces and cover
with cotton wool placed under sateen,
to which it is firmly sewn. Next out the
rose-colored satin to the aim of the
cardboard pieces and sew it firmly to
them; after you have done this sew all
the pieces together as strongly as pos-
sible, and put a small piece of sarsenet
ribbon between the lid and the box to
allow freedom of movement in opening,
the ribbon being about a quarter of an
inch wide. Now cover the outside with
your velvet, being most careful about
measuring and fitting; sew neatly over
at all the pins, and finish off the bot-
tom with a piece of sarsenet pasted
over it. This completed, take the cord
and sew it all round the joints and lid,
making three loops in the center to
open by. The lid can be decorated with
a long, fiat ribbon bow, or the initials
of the recipient appliqued on the vel-
vet and cut out of gold or silver tissue.
Small gilt knobs glued under the box
can be added for it to stand on, and
they certainly give a pretty finish. The
idea is charming in any materials and
the box useful for scent or odds and
ends of every description common to
the dressing table.


PRESERVING KUMQUATS.


This is an excellent recipe, and is
used by some of our beat confectioners.
While given for kumquat oranges, it an-
swers equally well tor sweet oranges,
which latter, however, if large, should
he cut in pieces and cooked until tender:
Carefully pick ten pounds of kum-
quats free from leaves, stem and dirt,
and place in a boiler with two gallons
of cold water. Bull until the skin of
the fruit is tender, which will be about
twenty-five minutes, over a very hqt fire;
then drain the water off the fruit by
pouring into a sieve. Now put on the
lire one and a half gallons of water
and six pounds of granulated sugar, and
Ioil to a thin sirup, about five minutes;
then add the fruit and continue the boil-
ing about thirty minutes. Take off the
fire, pour the fruit into a stone jar and
let it stand about six days. Drain the
sirup from the fruit, add four pounds
of sugar to the sirup; boil for five min-
utes, add the fruit and boill all together
down to a heavy sirup. Pack while hot
in large-mouthed glass jars.
This recipe calls for a hot fire. Use
a copper or porcelain kettle; iron discol.
ors the fruit.

SOUR ORANGE MARMALADE.

Forty sour oranges. Peel, and set
aside the pulp till next day. Boak the
peels in water-rainwater preferred-
for twenty-four hours, changing the
water four times. Then boil the peels
in a porcelain-lined kettle til tender,
changing the water three times, and
using boiling water each time, and keep-
Ing the last water removed, for use as
follows:
Take out the peels, drain and spread
out on a flat dish or waiter. Put into
the kettle the orange pulps, squeezing
each piece in the hand, then add three
pints of the water saved from the peels,
and boil for one hour. While this is
boiling serape off all the white from the
peels, then shred or chop the yellow
portion Into fine pieces. Next strain
the contents of the kettle several times,
until it Is as clear as amber. There
should be about seven and a half pints
of juice; if there is not, add enough
water in which the peels were boiled,
to make up the difference. To this
quantity add ten pounds of white sugar.
Let it come to a boil, then add the
shredded peels, about five pints, and boil
all together for about one hour and a
quarter, until it begins to Jelly.
Be careful not to let the contents of
the kettle get scorched. It is always
safer in making any kind of preserve
to place an asbestos mat under the ket-
tle.


Dr. E H. Armstrong
fm-


Staff of Specialists


m Ta


HUMAN


EYE


Eye and Nervous Disass


11 Laura St.


JACKSONVILLE,. FLORIDA

Neurology and Oateopathy
Btolloving that there to Is good In all methods
of treating disease, we have taken all that
him been proven by the dilerent schools
of medleine and combined It under the
head of neurolo., The system embraced
all that is sood In the old schools of medl.
ehin-osteopathy, chiropractics, hydrop*.
thy, phyilcal culture, dietetic and hby.
glono. We handle chronic diseases, al-
though the system is Just as applicable to
acute as to chronic troubles. and we spe.
ciallo on diseases of the eye, nervous y0s
tomr stomach and bowel troubles, consti.
patron, epilepsy, spinal troubles, piles,
prostatic and female diseases.

.


i-------





[N MRMORIAM.
Thin little headstone is
erected to the tender memory
of an ad. printed in this spate
last week. Its duty was to
nourish this journal, whioh
gives the people a vois. Right
well was the little ad. dolag
its duty.
It died from an overdose of
"Gum."
For further particulars of
this sad d ise me editeia
pages of this issue.
R. I.P.


4 *~..-


~t1j ~


IN MEMORIAL.


This little headstone ls
ertedto to the tender memory
of an ad. printed in this space
last week. Its duty was to
nourish this journal, which
gives the people a voice. Right
well was the little ad. doing
its duty.
It died front an overdose of
"(hum."
For further particulars of
this sad demise we editorial
Iages of this Imue.
R. P.


I1I


m









TM


CHRISTIE -


GROOVER


DRUG


CO.,


WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
STATE AGENTS FOR J. HUNGERFORD SMITH l CO'S HOT SODA WATER SUPPLIES


HOLIDAY


TRADE


THil TABLET


Is erected in honor of the Man who paid for this space
because he believed that a journal which dares to do
right should be supported by the business men
of the community. He did his duty to the
public by supporting the people's paper.
He did his duty to his family by


withholding


his name from


the space, because the
Gum crowd told him


that he would lose their trade and have their
influence against his store if he did not order


the ad. out and keep it out.


All fair-


minded people will honor this Man.


--


The Florida

Ostrich Farm
Mo a fit *W
AMUSEMENT AND INStRUCTION
PLUCKINGS MADE DAILY
BUY FROM PRODUCES AND SAVE
TWO PROmT
THE
Florida OschFarm
jackIeoelle. Floifda
*MB r-nte&W ^A l-- A


YOU GAN'T DO
BETTER THAN TO SE6GT
YOUR GHRISTMAS
PRESENT FROM OUR
STOGK

Feather Boas
Feather Fans
Ostrich Plumes
Ostrich Tips


If It's Oliver's-


Gandy
Sent by Mal


s L. C. Oliver s


Jackasonv~le,
Romakf


PARTIAL PRICE LIST OF
Wines, Whiskies, Beer and Malt


qMrtmuMr 4"u 1" It"s
iunUdn ClubRe...............65 t 00
Velson County ye ............ 90 4 25 7 50
Aonognun Ryoe.................. 3,20 4 50 Bo 0
ioclatDroir ...................... 4 0 650 1200
, lt Whlkey..................... 3876 6 00 9 0
"% h Brandy ..................... 83 75 600 950
pple Brandy ..................... 3 75 600 950
Sold GIn ....................... 280 4 25 7 26
Geneva Gin..................7..... 75 5 00 60
North O'olnas Corn.......... 2 66 400 00
Mountain Corn.................... 8 76 600 950
J aIUSC 2Rum ..................... 280 425 726
Medford Rum..................... 3 76 6 00 90
Grape Brandy.................87.... 5 6 00 90
Koff Ketucky Borbo 3 76 6oo00 950
1246-1258 AM
W. AdM St. il IL


EuLK S-S FMI-,T PWMi
Rye. Gin. Corn od i ...................1 60
Rye, Gin, Corn.umDe Oualo ................ 200
Re1Gin, CornR O,
44 Re Pweach ad Apple Brndy, mellow.
S y e........ ........ .. .... ..... 3
Victoria Rye, Social Drop Rye, medlclnal
quality ....... ........................ ............... 4 00
U MST. WM m-- Pan
Falstaff Beer ..............126...........
Ext le................................................ .....1 10
8t da rd ......................... ............................. o
Malt ExtIct, dark........... ...... 110
oburggr. Imported............ ....................... 2 00
u lnnemU Stout, pint .................................... 2 26

BROS. 41


'.


*


You'll Want More


Joseph Zapf & Co. -t


Anheuser-Busch Beers


U N WAMT PtM ANU RAL ZS FY U WAMT THE BT IN
rw IV m Ramm f w AL ww ON


qww lum- anw, "W vw W


-- A m m


0.'R'D !.'R


FOR


THE


EARLY




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