Group Title: sun.
Title: The sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075914/00004
 Material Information
Title: The sun
Uniform Title: sun
Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Sun Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: December 2, 1905
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tallahassee (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Leon County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Leon -- Tallahassee
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.451667 x -84.268533 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 18, 1905)-v. 3, no. 47 (Sept. 12, 1908).
Numbering Peculiarities: Published at Tallahassee, Fla., June 23-Sept. 12, 1908.
General Note: Claude L'Engle, editor.
General Note: "If it's right, we are for it."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075914
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33400104
lccn - sn 95047216
 Related Items
Other version: Morning sun (Tallahassee, Fla.)
Succeeded by: Dixie (Jacksonville, Fla.)

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MONSIEUR BEAUCAIRE,


THE GREAT DRAMATIC STORY


e 1-No. 3 JAGKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, DECEMBER 2. 1905 Single Gopy 5 Gents

.^ /^ ^^m


T


- 4


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TNU DOG HAS TO SGRATGH ALL THE TIME IN FLORIDA


6 0
47---d


.77








IF IT'S RIGHT, WE ARE FOR IT


CLAUDE L'ENGLE
Editor


AN LLIISTRA~


Volume I-No. 3


CONTEND


THE


SUN


WEEKLY WITH A WRLL Its W, PMa TED M THE PMagp OF NFL MA, Y T SUN COMPANY, AT JAMoKS
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, DECEMBER 2, 1905 5 Cei
Application made at the Poet Office in Jacksonville, Fla., for admidlon to the mails as second-elam matter
4TS CONTENTS .COI
-- ----nA d T E orialU...................... Claude L'Engle How To Get Settlers .


Monsieur Beaucalre ............ Booth Tarkington
Seen by The Sun ................. ......... By Us


Theodore: A Poem .....................*..By Us
Agriculture ..........................W. E. Pabor


Impressions of the Fa


A. K. TAYLOR
Cartoonist


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)ecember 2, 1905


THE SUN


ABA UCAIRE


CHAPTER I.


The young Frenchman did very well what he had
anned to do. His guess that the Duke would cheat
roved good. As the unshod half-dozen figures that
ad been standing noiselessly in the entryway stole
softly into the shadows of the chamber, he leaned
oross the table and smilingly plucked a card out
the big Englishman's sleeve.
"Merci, M. le Due I" he laughed, rising and step.
ing back from the table.
The Englishman cried out, "It means the dirty
ork of silencing you with my bare hands! and
me at him.
Do not move," said M. Beaucaire, so sharply
t the other paused. "Observe behind you."
The Englishman turned, and saw what trap lihe
d blundered into; then stood transfixed, impotent.
ternately scarlet with rage and white with the
tal shame of discovery. M. Beaucaire remarked,
indicating the silent figures by a polite wave of the
lnd, "Is it not a compliment to monsieur that I
rocure six large men to subdue him? They are
ite devote' to me, and monsieur is alone. Could
be that he did not wish even his lackeys to know
e play with the yo'ng Frenchman who Meestaire
[ash does not like in the pomproom? Monsieur is
fortunate to have come on foot and alone to my
apartment "
The Duke's mouth foamed over with chaotic
evilement. His captor smiled brightly, and made
Slight gesture, as one who brushes aside a holster-
us insect. With the same motion he quelled to
tony quiet a resentful impetus of his servants
toward the Englishman.
"It's murder, is it, you carrion!" finished the
)uke.
M. Beaueaire lifted his shoulders in a mock
hiver. "What words! No, no, nol No killing!
nd such word to a such host! No, no, not mur-r-der;
ly disgrace!" He laughed a clear, light laugh
ith a rising inflection, seeming to launch himself
pon an adventurous quest for sympathy.
"You little devilish scullion!" spat out the Duke.
"Tut, tut! But 1 forget. Monsieur has pursue'
is studies of deportment among' his fellow-
ountrymen."
"Do you dream a soul in Bath will take your
aord that I-that I-- "
"That M. de Due de Winterset had a card up his
leeve ?"
"You pitiful stroller, you stablehoy, born in a
)table-- "
"Is it not an honor to bw born where monsieur
nust have been bred?"
"You scurvy foot-boy, you greasy barber, you
cutthroat groom-- "
"Overwhelm'I" The young man bowed with
imperturable elation. "M. le Due appoint' me to all
Ithe office' of his household. "
"You mustachioed fool, there are not five people
of quality in Bath will speak to you-- "
"No, monsieur, not on the parade; but how many
come to play with me here? Because I will play
always, night or day, for what one will, for any
long, and al-ways fair, monsieur."
"You outrageous varlett Every one knows you
came to England as the French Ambassador's bar-
ber. What man of fashion will listen to you? Who
will believe you?"
.'All people, monsieur. Do you think I not cal-
culate', that I shall make a failure of my little
enter rise?"
"Bah!,"
"Will monsieur not reseat himself?" M. Beau-
caire made a low bow. "So. We must not bI too
tire' for Lady Malbourne's rout. Ha, hat And you,
Jean, Victor, and you others, retire; go in the hall-
way. Attend at the entrance, Francois. So, .now
we shall talk. Monsieur, I wish you to think very
cool. Then listen; I will be briefly. It is that I
am well known to be all, entire' hones'. Gamblist?
Ah, yes; true and moo' profitable; but fair, al-
ways fair; every one say that. Is it not no? Think
of it? And-is there never a w'isper come to M. le
Dl)ue that not all people belief him to play al-ways
hones'? Ha, ha! Did it almond' be said to him las'
year. after when he play, with Milor' Tappin'ford
at the chocolate house-- "
"You dirty scandal-monger!" the Duke burst out.
"I'll-"
"Monsieur, monsieur!" said the Frenchman. "It
is a poor valor to insult a helpless captor. Can he
retort upon his own victim? But it is for you to
think of what I say. True, I am not reco'nize on
the parade; that my frien's who come here do not
present me to their ladies; that Meestaire Nash has
remoff' me in the pomp-room; still, am I not known
for being hones' and fair in my play, and will I not
be belief', even I, when I lif' my vroicee and charge


By Booth Tarkington

you aloud with what is already w'isper'? Think
of it! You are a noble, and there will be some hang-
dogs who might not fall away from you. Only such
would he lef' to you. Do you want it tol'? And
you can keep out of France, n onsieur? I have let'
his service, but I have still the car of M. do Mirepoix,
and he know' [ never lie. Not a gentleman will play
you when you come to Paris."
The Englishnman's white lip showed a row of near-
let drops upon it. "How much do you want?" heo
said.
The room rang with the gay laughter of Beau-
caire. "I hol' your note' for seven under' pound.'
You can have them, inonsioulr. Why does a isuchl


great man come to play M. Beaucaire? Because no
one else willing' to play M. le Due-hle cannot pay.
Ila, hal So he come' to good Monsieur lheaucaire.
Money, ha, hal What I want with money "
Ills (race of Winterset's fe1atture's were set awry
to a mister pattern. lHe seat glaring at his compiinion
in a snarling silence.
"Money? Pout!" snapped the little' gambler.
"No. no, no! It is that MA. le Due, impoverish.'
somewhat in a bad odor as he is, yet ,conimmind the
entree nny-where-onless I- IIn. hil IhEli. nmon-
sieur ?"
"Ital You dare think to force me-- "
M. Beauneaire twirled the tip of his slender minus-
tache around the end of his white forefinger. Then
he said: "Monsieur and mne going' to Lady Mial-
bourne's ball to-night-IM. de Due and men!"
The Engllshman roared, "Curse your imipudence!"'
"Sit quiet. O()h, yes,. lhat's nill; we going' to-
gether."
"No! "
"Certain. I make all my little plan'. 'Tis all
arrange'." He paused. and then salid gravely, "You
goin' present me to Lady Mary Carlisle."
The other laughed in titter s torn. "Lady Mary
Carlisle, of all women alive, woull 1t the first to
prefer the devil to a mnLn of no birth, harbor."
"'Tin all arrange'; have' no fear; nobody question
monsieur's guest. You going' take nme' to-night-- "
"No!"
"Ye's. And after-tlwn I have the entree. Is
it much I ask? Thi one little favor, and I never
w'isper. never breathe that-it is to say, I am al-
waya forever shlent of monsieur's misfortune."
"You have' the entree!" sneered the other. "(lo
to a lackeys' rout and dance with the kitchen maids.
if I would, I could not present you to Hath society.
I should have (arteIs from the fathers, brothers, and
lovers of every wench and madam in the phince even
I. You would le thrust from Lady Me'llburne's door
five minutes after you entered it.1'
"No, no, no!"
"Hlalf the gentlemen in hlath have been here to
play. They would know you. wouldn't they, fool?
You've had thousands out of lhantison. ltakell. (iuil-
ford and Townbrake. They would hlive you lishl'edl
by the grooms as your ugly doesrts itre., You to
speak to Lady Mary Carlislel 'Od' hbloodl! You!
alo., dolt, she' would know if you escaped the others.
She stood within a yard of you when Nash expelled
you the pump-room.


M. lleaueaire flushed slightly. "You think I did
not see4'" he asked.
"I)o you drriaim that ,.benute Winterset introduces
a low fellow Ithe will It, tolerated-that Iiatni will
receive a iharlier?"
"I have tihe distinction to call monsieur's atten-
tion," replied tihe young miinin gayly, "I have renounce'
that profession."
ool II"
"I anm now ai man of honor!"
"FIaugh!"
"A mlan of the parts," (continued the young
l"l'rnelhiIl. "1d of deportmentl; is it not o? Ilive
yolu se'ilen lle of a hiuster, or gross ever, or, whllt
shall I se t'v-boulirg(eoiso ? S1i111 you le shame'" for
your guestI manner? No, no! And limy nplpeareance,
is it of tit'he MlopleY Clearly, no,. l)o I not comparn
inl taste of ipprel with your yo'ng ln,'glishman?
I In, hil To be hope'. Iia. ha NSo 1 eanl going' talk
with Laady Mary Carlisle."
"BlalI" T'lihe Duke nide a savage burlesque.
ladyly Mary Carlisle. niny I presumne the honor of
presenting tle he rber or the Nhtrequis de Mire|poix?'
So, is it.Y"
"No, llmoinsieur," smiled th(e yunlg mnn. "Quite
not so. 'o Yu shall have nothing to worry you, noth-
ing in the worl' '. I ail gill' to asstilssilnateo ily poor
mnustachio-also remove this horrible black peruke.
anld eilieirge in lmly own hair. ol0hol'l" liH swept
the lieavy, curled m'uss from hil hihead ts he Itoke,
and his hair, oile'd under the great wig, fell to
his shoulders, anid sparkled yellow in thie candle-
light. lie tossed his head to shake the hair back
from his cheeks. "When it is dreis', I an trans-
form'; nobody ('lilt know nie; you hall observe. S441
lihow little I ask of you, how very little bit. No one'
slitll reeo'nlie 'M. Iheau'ire,' or 'Victor.' Ila, hal
"'is all Iltrritge''; yo linve i iVothinlg to fear."
"Cu'lrse you," S'id the Duke. "Ido you think I'mn
going to I-' sthddled with you wherever I go as long

"A mistake. No. All I reiqui--ill I li g-l this
one evening. "Tis lOf sloill IM' niessiry. After, I
sh1 ll not neil Inoisi ,r."
'"ike lheed t yoiuriself-after vou(hslafehd the
'llglishil Imlin btwi' le hls teeth.
"'Co('lniiere'ld" riield M. lhillencilire, land clap|ld his
hlndis gle'fully. "('oniluredl for the nightly Alha, it
is rix'nn'ible' I shall niert what you wnd-after.
O1ne cannott Ihop' too Imuclh of our'l patiiencei. It is
buti natural viyou should ut tentip a little avelgenlllnt
for t(he rii snti tlp I wis sluch iL wicked fellow to s't
for you. I shIlll Ieit oi'e stritlnge' friend's of yivours
after to-night; not so? I must try to be not too
iimuch frighten'." le looked itt the DIuke 'uriously.
"Yoii winut to kiinow why I 'rei'tt this tragedy, why
I am so iunikial s to iutr p monsieur?
Ifis racee of \iite'rs et replied with a chill
ghnllec i nI pulse' in thle nohlemian's elMeek Isent less
relthlessly; his ,eye raged not so bitterly; the steady
purple' of his own color Wt4s retiirnilg; his vioic'
was le'ss hoiirse: he wias reg4ainig his hiAbit. 'Tis
ver thle mininer oif lthe vilIgar," Iihe oirvedl. "to
wish to I' seen with people of fashion."
"Oh., llo. n l. no!" The Frlechmali lnugued.
"l'is niot thit. .A~in I not iilreiildy one of t hei' w
'men of fashion'? I lnek only the reptatiion of
liirth. Monsieur ii going' sitlpply that.. Ihi. lint I
shlll In. noble from tlo-ight. 'Victor.0' the iirtis'.
is condemnlli'iit' to delillt; his throiit shall Is' ctut with
his own rizor. 'AL. hvlienire'-" Hlere the young,
lmani spring to his feet., night ulip the Iblak wig.
(liilpjs'd into it a di'el ibox from h'll- table le, anld hlirled
it violently through the open indoor. 'M. lieanultire'
shall In' choke' with is oitn dlice-box. Who is thie
I'lhnix to remaiii? What jadvivataige have I not over
other men of rank who i re merely born to it? I niay
choose my own. No! Choose for ine, imionsieulr.
Shall I hie n chievniie'r, conite, vicomte, minarquis,
what? Nonei. ()hit of compliment to monsieur c-nilt
I wish to IW' inytillilng he is not? No. no, I shll
I' M e DueM.I I. Ie Due de--d ('hataurien. lia.
hal You see.1' f You are nl y confrere."
M. lihumcire trod a dainty htep or two, waving
his hImnd politely to the D)uke. is though in invita-
tion to join the ce'.lerntioni of his rank. The ln^g-
lishnmn wntchedl, his eiye still and harsh, already
gatheriiug in craftinet'ss. Itieau<'nire stopped snllddeinly.
"Hlut how I forget my igi el I am twenty-three," he
salid, with i sigh. "1 rejoice too much to be of the
qualityy It lias lswen too great for lme, and I had
always Iw'lie.f' myself free of such ambition. I
thought it wts enough to behol' the opera without
wishing to sing; but no, England have teach' me
I hnve those vulgar desire'. Monsieur. I am goin'
tell you a secret; the Ildies of your country are very
dir'runt than ours. (One may adore thl demoiselle,
one must worship the lady of Englandl. Our ladies
have the-it is the I'nuty of youth; yours remain
(Continued on Twelftih P'age)


ONSIE UR













B.Y


THE


SUN


OF


December 2, 1905



LATE


J. D. Shaw of Madison, who has purchased 45,000
acres of timber land near Luraville, and leased 6,000
sores more in the same section, will engage in the
manufacture of naval stores on an extensive scale.

Live Oak citizens stood strong for bonds at the
recent election, and will easily dispose of the bond
issue at a price above par. In fact, from all over
the United States inquiries are being already made
as to the bond issue, Indicative of the fact that there
will be more than several bidders.

The Sumter County Times has commenced the
issue of its twenty-third volume. For the past seven
years the Times has been under the present manage-
ment, and has been greatly improved. It is now
housed in its own building, and the appointments
and arrangements are conceded to be the best of any
country newspaper in Florida.

At Carrabelle the citizens are interested in the
necessity of deep water, inasmuch as Captain Cav-
anaugh and others will be at Carrabelle, December
11, to investigate that city's claim for an appropria-
tion to deepen the harbor.

State Engineer J. W. Newman, with his headquar-
ters at Fort Lauderdale, is engaged in a survey of
both forks of New River, to locate the route for the
canal to be cut through the Everglades to Lake
Okeechobee. By means of this canal thousands of
acres of valuable lands will be drained and reclaimed
by the State.

In West florida the work on the now railroads
is being rushed all it will stand, especially so in the
case of the Applachicola Northern, the Quincy and
Chattahoochee connections building southward, andi
those at Apalachicola building northward. Before
Christmas the line grade and all fills will be com-
pleted between Apalachicola and St. Joseph Bay.
January 1 the G. F. & A. spur track will be com-
pleted from Hinson to Quincy, which line will open
up and develop one of the finest tobacco growing sec-
tions to be found anywhere.

It is estimated that the lettuce crop in this State
will be fully as large as last year, though the tomato
output will be materially cut down, truck farmers
planting less of this vegetable this year than ever
before. The pineapple growers along the east coast
have every reason to feel holwful over the situation,
as the plants are now in excellent condition, and
next season's crop promises to be very good.

St. Petersburg is to have a new and complete
director, the work on which is now in the hands
of the St. Petersburg Times, which means that the
publication will be a fine production. The directory
is to be ready for the winter visitors.

Large property owners and prominent citizens
of St. Lucie County are interested in Itonding the
county, this proposition wing under serious discus-
sion. The good results noticed in other sections
where bonding has been resorted to, has made those
who have St. Lucie's interest at heart determined to
give the bonding movement a strong impetus and
bring about its adoption. .lust watch St. Lucie
jump and grow when she gets bonds.

Efforts will soon be made to have the St. Marys
river improved so that it will be navigable the greater
part of its length. Fertile and productive lands on
the Georgia and Florida sides of the St. Marys
remain idle by reason of the fact that there are no
shipping facilities. The shoals of the river need
dredging and trees and snags need removal from the
upper river as far as Bloliver Hill. The river has
never had any appropriation for its improvement,
and on account of the crying need of a navigable
stream stress is to be brought on Congress. The
Fermnandina Board of Trade is very active in this
proposition.

The Theater Bernhardt in one of the new propo-
sitions for New York City. The theater, to be named
after the famous French actress, Mme. Sarah Bern-
hardt, will cost $300,000. It will be one of the finest
theaters in New York, and Madame Bernhardt, who
will have an interest in it, will play an inaugural
men Mit in the new house, which is to be comn-
pmi by aed year. Therefore the inference is that
he pre nt "farewell tour" of Madame Bernhardt
i a~,suh after all, at least not as far a New York


Thus far the shipments for the year of cigars
from Tampa show an increase of twenty million over
the shipments for the corresponding term of last
year. Recently 5,000,000 cigars were shipped in one
week. It is estimated that with the output of this
week there will have been shipped as many cigars,
190,500,000, as was the output for the year 1904.

Citrus fruits are now going forward at a rapid
rate, and big, heavy shipments will be in order to
meet the heavy holiday trade demands of the North,
WVest and other sections. The fruits are now ril|m
and in fine juice and flavor, sustaining Florida's rep-
utation for the finest citrus fruits in the market.

Jacksonville Dam, No. 23, Independent Order of
Heavers, is considering the advisability of the pur-
chaset of river front property on which to build a
dam. The structure is to be sufficiently large and
adequate for a meeting room in which the elaborate
initiatory ceremonies are to be conducted, while at
the same time all the accommodations and requisites
are to be provided for that a clubhouse will demand.
A particular feature will be a boathouse and dock,
when launches, rowboats, sailing boats and yachts
may be kept. The outlook is most encouraging for
the culmination of this proposition of the Beavers.

Baptists ended a fight of a hundred years when
they settled differences over open and close commu-
nion, for no longer will there be close communion
in the Baptist denomination. After an existence of
more than a century, beginning in New England, its
recognition ceased Wednesday, when representatives
of three national organizations-the American Bap-
tist Home Missionary Society, the American Bap-
tist Missionary Society and the Baptist Publication
Society-met in the Lee Avenue Baptist Church, Lee
Avenue and Keap Street, Williamsburg, N. Y. The
action of the conference recalls the time in 1871,
when the late Rev. John Hyatt Smith of the Lee
Avenue Church. now Payton's Theater, who afterward
became a Representative in Congress, was, with his
church, excluded from the Long Island Baptist Asso-
ciation because he believed in open communion. The
congregation struggled along for years before it was
forced to disband.

At the close of the convention of the American
Federation of Labor, held last week in Pittsburg, a
resolution to restrict immigration in the United


States and its possessions was presented. It showed
that over 1,000,000 immigrants had landed in this
country last year, and were now filling our charitable
institutions and hospitals. It alleged that the pres-
ent immigration laws were inadequate and demanded
from Congress the enactment of suitable laws exclud-
ing undesirable persons from this country. It asked
that only ports on the Atlantic, Pacific and Gulf
Coasts be the places for accepting European immi-
gration.

Marion County decided to stay wet. So say the
returns from the vote on the dry and wet question,
the election being held Tuesday of this week.

Dr. Charles Lee Mercer has been formally inau-
gurated as president of Mercer University, Macon,
Ga. He said that with filial devotion Mercer Uni-
versity has served, and will continue to serve, the
Commonwealth. But as a child of the State, it
looked to the State for deserved recognition and
equitable treatment. It made no request for public
funds-it merely asked to be protected against the
establishment of an unfair State competition, which
would take from the young men of Georgia an incent-
ive to individual initiative and self-help. Any form
of aid which tended to influence its recipients to look
to the government rather than to their own efforts
for support and advancement, he said, should not
be tolerated oy an enlightened public.

Nathan Meyer Shaikewitz Schomer is dead. This
fact is of no particular significance to the English
reading public, but to Hebrews of high and low de-
gree it is of the greatest importance. Schomer was
the friend of all Jews and their best known author
and dramatist. His death has caused universal
mourning among his people. Shaikewitz, who was
better known by his pen name of Schomer, wrote
so many novels that he himself could not remember
all of them. Some of the work he did in Russia
was resurrected after his popularity became great
here. All his plays seemed to be successful. He
was called a realist, and it seemed to be equally easy
for him to make people laugh or cry. That he has
not left a fortune behind him was the fault of him-
self and his unwillingness to be bothered by business
details. His play, The Jewish Emigrants, made
more money for its producers than any other play
ever put on the Yiddish stage in New York City.
Schomer sold that play outright for $f00. The buy-
ers of it cleared $30,000 up to a year ago, and the
play is still on the boards. Next to this play the
two most successful ones were Haman the Second,
a historical comedy, and The Golden County, a
satirical comedy on Jewish professional life in New
York City. Schomer became too ill to work nine
months ago. Up to that time he was one of the
hardest worked writers that ever lived. He has
written over three hundred novels and plays, and
in addition lie found time to write considerable
poetry. That his writings were of a high character
isevidenced by the title his readers conferred upon
him. They called him "the Yiddish Dumas."

Inquisitor Hughes of the insurance investigating
committee has brought to light hidden syndicate
deals. With them was revealed the fact that "Judge
Andy" Hamilton, lobbyist, had gotten $59,310 of tlhe
$87,187 profits due to the New York Life in one
deal. It was the firm of J. P. Morgan & Co. that
paid this money. From Milton M. Madison, a book-
keeper of the New York Life, Mr. Hughes wrung
this startling information. Incidentally he proved
that the list of syndicate deals previously furnished
by the company are incomplete, and it is up to Presi-
dent McCall and Vice-President George W. Perkins
to explain. It was also developed that the partici-
pation in the syndicate of the New York Life was
effected through the New York Security and Trust
Company, by which one-fourth of the profits of the
former company were retained.

The John B. Stetson University football team has
won the football championship of the State of Flor-
ida. Its team played an intercollegiate schedule,
also the strong Jacksonville team, and was not
scored on in a single game. The Stetson baseball.
team last spring won the baseball championship,
winning fifteen out of sixteen games played. The
Times-Union has presented the champions with a
trophy cup.

The Japanese are restive, as the prolongation of
martial law leads to much opposition. The agitation
ngninst tie Government for its non-abrogation of
martial law and its suppression of the liberties of


the press is gaining strength at Tokio. Many
sympathizers with the opposition party can be found,
even among the members of the House of Peen.


SEEN


THE SUIN


aq L










December 2, 1905


.SUMM4R Y


OF


THE SUN




THE


WEEK'S


NEWS


Chicago parties have visited White Springs and
the surrounding country with a view of buying large
tracts of land on which to raise heavy crops of
cassava. This will mean a large starch factory and
the employment of many hands.

Dowling Park, one of the "suburbs" of Live Oak--
for Live Oak is assuming city airs and progress
these days-is on a boom. The Dowling mill, which
has been for fifteen years in the eastern part of the
city, has been closed permanently and the new mill
will be on the new mill site, eighteen miles from the
city, on the line of the L. 0. P. & G. R. R. A mam-
moth commissary will be operated in connection
with the mill.

New Smyrna has taken on a building spurt, con-
tracts being let for the erection of twenty-four new
residences, stores and buildings.

Titusville has a new boat company, with J. Loril-
lard, Jr., nephew of the late well-known multi-mil-
lionaire, Pierre Lorillard, as principal owner.

" The Bradford Telegraph, published at Starke, has
adopted a splendid style in setting forth Starke's
advantages, as well as those of Bradford County.
Seven families from Kentucky have decided to make
their homes there. The Venable-Jones Company,
turpentine operators, will establish two new turpen-
tine stills in the county. A new ice factory is a n
assured enterprise for Starke, with an organized
company on a firm financial basis. The Bradford
County Cotton Growers' Association, 300 strong, has
just been organized, with 0. L. Mizell as president.

The Daily Citizen is to be published at Perry,
commencing Monday, Decemlwr 4, as an experiment
in the running of a baby edition. The paper will be
a welcome visitor to many in the State from lDecem-
ber 4 until January 1, 1900, inclusive. The paper
will appear every afternoon except Sundays.

Tampa's big fair closed Thanksgiving Day, and
it was at great success. Interest is now directed to
Jacksonville, where the next fair, the Manufacturers'
Pure Food and Industrial Exposition, will be held
from January 4 to 18, inclusive.

With the jury returning a verdict of "not guilty,"
lion. W. M. Holloway, State Superintendent of Pub-
lie Instruction, has been acquitted of the charge
which grew out of the last campaign.

W. B. Fuller, president of the Tampa Board of
Trade, has, through his efforts, secured for Tampa
the next joint convention of the railroad lines south
of the Potomac and Ohio rivers and east of the
Mississippi river. The meeting will convene -January
15, and the headquarters of the convention will be
at the famed Tampa Bay Hotel. For several years
past the annual convention has been held on the
east coast.

With the quarantine raised and the business out-
look brighter and better than ever, Pensacola has
good reason to rejoice. Therefore, the appreciative
people of the Deep Water City enjoyed a well-
rounded and happy Thanksgiving this week. The
prospects for Pensacola are of the most exhilarating
kind, and the indications are tatt the very seeming
setback the yellow fever epidemic gave the city this
past summer will but urge on the loyal citizens of
Pensacola to greater achievements than they would
perhaps have otherwise dreamed of or accomplished.
Pensacola goes onward now, and that, too, with an
infusion of accentuated energy and marvelous busi-
ness activity unsurpassable.

Asa Paine, president of the Florida East Coast
Automobile Asociation, has arrived at Daytona from
Minnearepolis, Minn. Interest in automobile affairs
will now show increased activity. Mr. Paine states
that many residents of the Flour City will attend
the races to be held on the Ormond-Daytona beach
in January, and that he looks forward to the most
successful meet ever held in the world's history of
automobile sport.

A legal Imttle involving the annulment of the
charter of the Chicago & Alton Railroad Company is
imminent. A hearing is set for December 11. at
which, it is said, attorneys for the railroad will be
asked to explain alleged excessive capitalization.


,U.. .._... 1 I.

To inaugurate Theodore Roosevelt President of
the United States last March cost $145,4111-a greater
sum than was ever spent for any previous inaugu-
ration. The details of the cost have just been made
public in a report by General John M. Wilson, chair-
man of the inaugural committee. Notwithstanding
the large expense, the committee has turned over a
balance of $4,730 to the Auditorium Association. It
cost $17,009 to decorate the Pension Building for
the inaugural ball. The committee raised $150,221,
more by $14,000 than any previous inaugural fund.

(Cresceus, the former trotting king, has been sold.
The famous horse brought the comparatively small
price of $21,000 when sold at auction in Madison
Square Garden to M. W. Savage of Minneapolis. At
one time the owner of Cresceus refused $(0,000. The
mark of 2:02 1-4, made by Cresceus, was for two
years the world's record, until Lou Dillon first ac-
complished her wonderful feat of trotting a mile in
2.:00 flat at Readville, Mass.

Kingdon Gould, son of George J. Gould, has bleen
blackballed. In other words, he has been turned
down by The King's Crown, a secret student society
of Columbia College. Although nominated by the
president of the society and passed by the council,
he lost out when it came to electioneering. And all
this because, it is said, he is held responsible for
orders against hazing and for killing class rivalry.

It is not unlikely that the National Automobile
Company T)f Indianapolis will make a strong bid for
the American championship at the Ormond-Daytona
meet.
*
Call a weed a "garden huckleberry," and you will
finil a good many inquisitive gardeners who will wish
to try it. I have something of this sort on the place,
and shall probably find in it a "Physalis" of little
or no practical utility.-T. Grenler, in Farm and
Fireside.

Prof. Jacques Loeb, the scientist of Berkeley,
Cal., is completing a set of experiments into the
secret of the origin of life. His recent experiments
have caused him to revise theories previously held.
In his laboratory work in maturing eggs of the
lolis gigantea, a mollusk, he believes that fertiliza-


tion is by a chemical nature, and not of a physical
nature, as heretofore opinionated.

'Melville E. Ingalls of Cincinnati uses plain ian-
guage in referee to the investigations of the large
insurance companies. He says: "We must have
laws that will put and end to this form of gambling
insurance. I can call it by no more polite name.
We must wipe out this system of deferred payments
which create a large surplus. The line between a
mutual insurance company and an insurance com-
pany run for the benefit of stockholders should be
clearly defined by law and the law should be
enforced. An insurance company should not be
Allowed to work the hocus-pocus of running its affairs
ostensibly for the policy holders and then twisting
the business around to the advantage of the stock.
holders."

While radical action on the future of football In
expected to be made by Columbia University, other
universities have decided that the "brutal game"
must go. Chancellor Day of Syracuse University,
President A. Y. Y. Raymond of Union College, Pres-
ident F. S. Luther of Trinity, President Merrill of
Colgate University and President Elliot of Harvard
have all expressed themselves against the game as
now played.

From Chicago conimes word that there is an organ-
ized movement on foot to obtain concerted action
against the ltoomsvelt idea of rate legislation.

Presidhlnt Itoosevelt has decided to recommend
to Congress that a lock canal be constructed at Pan-


The Sultan has announced to the Ambassador of
Austria-Hungary that Turkey accedes to the demands
of the Powers regarding the financial control of
Macedonia. Ti'ls was,,, however, not made known
before the lleiet of the allies had gone to Mitylene
and mseied the customs ofilees and also those of the
telegraph.

To avoid the taking of "tainted money," a plan
has IeWen proposed by Rev. Wa'shington Gladden of
Columbus, Ohio, moderator of the National Couneil
of the Congregational Churches, in an address before
the Congregational Club in the First Congregational
Church at Washington, he said: "Every church
should he a contributor to every one of our causes,
and every member of every church a contributing
member. If we can even approximate to this we
shall have all the resources we require, and there
will be no need to replenish our treasury by ques-
tionable alliances."'

In the New York City "Battle of the Ballots"
William R. Hearst has scored a point, as Justice
Amend has ordered the Inspectors of five election
districts to o)m>n ballot boxes and recount ballots.
llearst men now iexpet that practically every ballot
cast in the mayoralty election will Ie recounted In
about 1,200 of the 1,948 election districts of the
city.

The oilicially announced new Japanese loan of
$125,000,0O)0 wits issued on Tuesday. The price is
1)0 and the interest rate. 4 per cent. Only $16,250,000
is allotted to the United States, subscriptione to the
remainder being ofteried in England, France and tir-
many. Only one-half of the authorized look will be
issued at prwnt to be used by the Japanese Govern-
ment in redeeming high-rate Internal loans.

Statistics just completed and issued at Washing-
ton show that at the close of 1004 there were 284,302
inmates in the 4,207 benevolent institutions in the
United States, the total cost of maintenance being
fifty-two and one-half millions of dollars. The sup-
port was wholly or in part by public taxation and
private means. The rate of admission into ternm-
Iorary homes was highest in New Jersey amnd lowest
n North Carolina. The outlay on behalf of the
dleaf and blind is noticeably large In some of the
Southern States.

It is expected that another fine American Cath-
olic eollege-a Jehuit university-will bx onm
erected in Chicago. This will probably be the largest
Catholic institution of learning in the United States.
The plans, it is said, will follow action said already
to have Iben taken by Archbishop Quigley in author*
izing a third Jewish parish for Chicago.













SEEN B.Y

J. D. Shaw of Madison, who has purchased 45,000
acres of timber land near Luraville, and leased 6,000
-aTme more in the same section, will engage in the
manufacture of naval stores on an extensive scale.

Live Oak citizens stood strong for bonds at the
recent election, and will easily dispose of the bond
issue at a price above par. In fact, from all over
the United States inquiries are being already made
as to the bond issue, Indicative of the fact that there
will be more than several bidders.

The Sumter County Times has commenced the
issue of its twenty-third volume. For the past seven
years the Times has been under the present manage-
ment, and has been greatly improved. It is now
housed in its own building, and the appointments
and arrangements are conceded to be the best of any
country newspaper in Florida.

At Carrabelle the citizens are interested in the
necessity of deep water, inasmuch as Captain Cav-
anaugh and others will be at Carrabelle, December
11, to investigate that city's claim for an appropria-
tion to deepen the harbor.

State Engineer J. W. Newman, with his headquar-
ters at Fort Lauderdale, is engaged in a survey of
both forks of New River, to locate the route for the
canal to be cut through the Everglades to Lake
Okeechobee. By means of this canal thousands of
acres of valuable lands will be drained and reclaimed
by the State.

In West lorida the work on the now railroads
is being rushed all it will stand, especially so in the
case of the Apalachioola Northern, the Quincy and
Chattahoochee connections building southward, and
those at Apalachieola building northward. Before
Christmas the line grade and all fills will be com-
pleted between Apalachicola and St. Joseph Bay.
January 1 the G. F. & A. spur track will be com-
pleted from Hinson to Quincy, which line will open
up and develop one of the finest tobacco growing sec-
tions tq be found anywhere.

It Is estimated that the lettuce crop in this State
will be fully as large as last year, though the tomato
output will be materially cut down, truck farmers
platig les of this vegetable this year than ever
before. The pineapple growers along the east coast
have w r re to ffrl hopeful over the situation,
as the ats are now In excellent condition, and
anet sam's cr"p premies to be very good.

RI. P~L4 ur in to hav a m'w and complete
ditr, th week m whi kiss anm in the hands
of th. M. ,PsIIg Ttem., whkh manMs that the
ib w i hl a predutwin. The directory
S- a to the winter visftsru.

owmu mad M prmi rnt citizens
Wl M. op mubdtm d s Iin ding the
MV q m m r seuri ikN discus-
SIM %alleb mue sed I other mectionse
Whim=4 *t% wem etet%. has made those
sh a *t a ba rt Adet4rmiad to
o bemo a tdomt impetus and
0ls m Jed watek Mt. Lucie


In h e h to h w ah. N. Mary.

& dbs of the 041. Mary.
sigr M eMM eW-t he frir theed
w r -me Mfuu NU. Th river te


iib he InThe
iJp Rw To H 1 my M la t s f


w monk isawof Uew pewm
w Yt~ CWl. Theip UeWe. hloe aid
m Va" a s"86 sm. tbeak .'-

v~skM ms wI bequ

sem boom Nim bbit e
one64 si ml e rsenub"
g od A adof b as m T0


THE SUN1



THE SUN


Thus far the shipments for the year of cigars
from Tampa show an increase of twenty million over
the shipments for the corresponding term of last
year. Recently 5,000,000 cigars were shipped in one
week. It is estimated that with the output of this
week there will have been shipped as many cigars,
100,500,000, as was the output for the year 1904.

Citrus fruits are now going forward at a rapid
rate, and big, heavy shipments will be in order to
meet the heavy holiday trade demands of the North,
West and other sections. The fruits are now ripe
and in fine juice and flavor, sustaining Florida's rep-
utation for the finest citrus fruits in the market.

Jacksonville Dam, No. 23, Independent Order of
Beavers, is considering the advisability of the pur-
chase of river front property on which to build a
dam. The structure ai to be sufficiently large and
adequate for a meeting room in which the elaborate
initiatory ceremonies are to be conducted, while at
the same time all the accommodations and requisites
are to be provided for that a clubhouse will demand.
A particular feature will be a boathouse and dock,
where launches, rowboats, sailing boats and yachts
may be kept. The outlook is most encouraging for
the culmination of this proposition of the Beavers.

Baptists ended a fight of a hundred years when
they settled differences over open and close commu-
nion, for no longer will there be close communion
in the Baptist denomination. After an existence of
more than a century, beginning in New England, its
recognition ceased Wednesday, when representatives
of three national organisations-the American Bap-
tist Home Missionary Society, the American Bap-
tist Missionary Society and the Baptist Publication
Soetety-met in the Lee Avenue Baptist Church, Lee
Avenue and Knp Street, Williamsburg, N. Y. The
action of the conference recalls the time in 1871,
when the late Rev. John Hyatt Smith of the Lee
Awas Church, now Payton's Theater, who afterward
brome a Repreentative in Congress, was, with his
dcrtck, ezeluded from the Long Island Baptist Asso-
eatimo beesuse he believed in open communion. The
.e.wagtioW struggled along for years before it was
forem to disbad.

At the lose of the convention of the American
drvmtis of Lbor, held last week in Pittaburg, a
m.arnts a teo Wi tt migration in the United


flecemiIer 2, 1905


OF LATE

States and its possessions was presented. It showed
that over 1,000,000 immigrants had landed in this
country last year, and were now filling our charitable
institutions and hospitals. It alleged that the pres-
ent immigration laws were inadequate and demanded
from Congress the enactment of suitable laws exclud-
ing undesirable persons from this country. It asked
that only ports on the Atlantic, Pacific and Gulf
Coasts be the places for accepting European immi-
gration.

Marion County decided to stay wet. So say the
returns from the vote on the dry and wet question,
the election being held Tuesday of this week.

Dr. Charles Lee Mercer has been formally inau-
gurated as president of Mercer University, Macon,
Ga. He said that with filial devotion Mercer Uni-
versity has served, and will continue to serve, the
Commonwealth. But as a child of the State, it
looked to the State for deserved recognition and
equitable treatment. It made no request for public
funds-it merely asked to be protected against the
establishment of an unfair State competition, which
would take from the young men of Georgia an incent-
ive to individual initiative and self-help. Any form
of aid which tended to influence its recipients to look
to the government rather than to their own efforts
for support and advancement, he said, should not
be tolerated oy an enlightened public.

Nathan Meyer Shaikewitz Schomer is dead. This
fact is of no particular significance to the English
reading public, but to Hebrews of high and low de-
gree it is of the greatest importance. Schomer was
the friend of all Jews and their best known author
and dramatist. His death has caused universal
mourning among his people. Shaikewits, who was
better known by his pen name of Schomer, wrote
so many novels that he himself could not remember
all of them. Some of the work he did in Russia
was resurrected after his popularity beceo e great
here. All his plays seemed to be successful. He
was called a realist, and it seemed to be equally easy
for him to make people laugh or cry. That he has
not left a fortune behind him was the fault of him-
self and his unwillingness to be bothered by business
details. His play, The Jewish Emigrants, made
more money for its producers than any other play
ever put on the Yiddish stage in New York City.
Schomer sold that play outright for $400. The buy-
ers of it cleared $30,000 up to a year ago, and the
play is still on the boards. Next to this play the
two most successful ones were Haman the Second,
a historical comedy, and The Golden County, a
satirical comedy on Jewish professional life in New
York City. Schomer became too ill to work nine
months ago. Up to that time he was one of the
hardest worked writers that ever lived. He has
written over three hundred novels and plays, and
in addition lie found time to write considerable
poetry. That his writings were of a high character
is evidenced by the title his readers conferred upon
him. They called him "the Yiddish Dumas."

Inquisitor Hughes of the insurance investigating
committee has brought to light hidden syndicate
deals. With them was revealed the fact that "Judge
Andy" Hamilton, lobbyist, had gotten $59,310 of the
$87,187 profits due to the New York Life in one
deal. It was the firm of J. P. Morgan & Co. that
paid this money. From Milton M. Madison, a book-
keeper of the New York Life, Mr. Hughes wrung
this startling information. Incidentally hlie proved
that the list of syndicate deals previously furnished
by the company are incomplete, and it is up to Presi-
dent McCall and Vice-President George W. Perkins
to explain. It was also developed that the partici.
pation in the syndicate of the New York Life was
effected through the Tew York Security and Trust
Company, by which one-fourth of the profits of the
former company were retained.

The John B. Stetson University football team has
won the football championship of the State of Flor-
ida. Its team played an intercollegiate schedule,
also the strong Jacksonville team, and was not
scored on in a single game. The Stetson baseball
team last spring won the baseball championship,
winning fifteen out of sixteen gamines played. The
Times-Union has presented the champions with a
trophy cup.


The Japanese are restive, as the prolongation of
martial law leads to much opposition. The agitation
naninst tle Government for its non-abrogation of
martial law and its suppression of the liberties of
the press is gaining strength at Tokio. Many
sympathizers with the opposition party can be found,
even among the members of the House of Peer.


ll -',^i A. .


y*,









December 2, 1906


SUMMERR Y

Chicago parties have visited White Springs and
the surrounding country with a view of buying large
tracts of land on which to raise heavy crops of
cassava. This will mean a large starch factory and
the employment of many hands.

Dowling Park, one of the "suburbs" of Live Oak-
for Live Oak is assuming city airs and progress
these days-is on a boom. The Dowling mill, which
has been for fifteen years in the eastern part of the
city, has been closed permanently and the new mill
will be on the new mill site, eighteen miles from the
city, on the line of the L. 0. P. & G. R. R. A mam-
moth commissary will be operated in connection
with the mill.

New Smyrna has taken on a building spurt, con-
tracts being let for the erection of twenty-four new
residences, stores and buildings.

Titusville has a new boat company, with J. Loril-
lard, .Jr., nephew of the late well-known multi-mil-
lionaire, Pierre Lorillard, as principal owner.

" The Bradford Telegraph, published at Starke, has
adopted a splendid style in setting forth Starke's
advantages, as well as those of Bradford County.
Seven families from Kentucky have decided to make
their homes there. The Venable-Jones Company,
turpentine operators, will establish two new turpen-
tine stills in the county. A new ice factory is an
assured enterprise for Starke, with an organized
company on a firm financial basis. The Bradford
County Cotton Growers' Association, 300 strong, has
just been organized, with 0. L. Mizell as president.

The Daily Citizen is to be published at Perry,
commencing Monday, December 4, as an experiment
in the running of a baby edition. The paper will be
a welcome visitor to many in the State from Decem-
ber 4 until January 1, 1906, inclusive. The paper
will appear every afternoon except Sundays.

Tampa's big fair closed Thanksgiving Day, and
it was a great success. Interest is now directed to
Jacksonville, where the next fair, the Manufacturers'
Pure Food and Industrial Exposition, will be held
from January 4 to 18, inclusive.

With the jury returning a verdict of "not guilty,"
Hon. W. M. Holloway, State Superintendent of Pub-
lic Instruction, has been acquitted of the charge
which grew out of the last campaign.

W. B. Fuller, president of the Tampa Board of
Trade, has, through his efforts, secured for Tampa
the next joint convention of the railroad lines south
of the Potomac and Ohio rivers and east of the
Mississippi river. The meeting will convene January
15, and the headquarters of the convention will be
at the famed Tampa Bay Hotel. For several years
past the annual convention has been held on the
east coast.

With the quarantine raised and the business out-
look brighter and better than ever, Pensacola has
good reason to rejoice. Therefore, the appreciative
people of the Deep Water City enjoyed a well-

kind, and the indications are that the very seeming
etlmack the yellow fever epidemic gave tihe city this
past summer will but urge on the loyal citizens of
Pensacola to greater achievements than they would
perhaps have otherwise dreamed of or accomplished.
ensaeola goes onward now, and that, too, with an
infusion of accentuated energy and marvelous busi-
ness activity unsurpassable.

Asa Paine, president of the Florida East Coast
Automobile Asociation, has arrived at Daytona from
Minneapolis, Minn. Interest in automobile affairs
will now show increased activity. Mr. Paine states
that many residents of the Flour City will attend
the races to be held on the Ormond-Daytona beach
in January, and that he looks forward to the most
successful meet ever held in the world's history of
automobile sport.


A legal battle involving the annulment of the
charter of the Chicago & Alton Railroad Company is
imminent. A hearing is set for December 11, at
which, it is said, attorneys for the railroad will be
asked to explain alleged excessive- oapitallation.


OF


TEE BUN



THE


To inaugurate Theodore Roosevelt President of
the United States last March cost $145,491-a greater
sum than was ever spent for any previous inaugu-
ration. The details of the cost have Just been made
public in a report by General John M. Wilson, chair.
man of the inaugural committee. Notwithstanding
the large expense, the committee has turned over a
balance of $4,730 to the Auditorium Association. It
cost $17,9009 to decorate the Pension Building for
the inaugural ball. The committee raised $150,221,
more by $14,000 than any previous inaugural fund.

Cresceus, the former trotting king, huas been sold.
The famous horse brought the comparatively small
price of $21,000 when sold at auction in Madison
Square Garden to M. W. Savage of Minneapolis. At
one time the owner of Cresceus refused $60,000. The
mark of 2:02 1-4, made by Cresceum, was for two
years the world's record, until Lou Dillon first ac.
complished her wonderful feat of trotting a mile in
2.:00 fiat at Readville, Mass.

Kingdon Gould, son of George J. Gould, ha been
blackballed. In other words, he has been turned
down by The King's Crown, a secret student society
of Columbia College. Although nominated by the
president of the society and passed by the council,
e lost out when it came to electioneering. And all
this because, it is said, he is held responsible for
orders against hazing and for killing class rivalry.

It is not unlikely that the National Automobile
Company of Indianapolis will make a strong bid for
the American championship at the Ormond-Daytona
meet.

Call a weed a "garden huckleberry," and you will
find a good many inquisitive gardeners who will wish
to try it. I have something of this sort on the place,
and shall probably find in it a "Physalis" of little
or no practical utility.-T. Grenier, in Farm and
Fireside.

Prof. Jacques Loeb, the scientist of Berkeley,
Cal., in completing a set of experiments into the
secret of the origin of life. His recent experiments
have caused him to revise theories previously held.
In his laboratory work in maturing eas of the
lofti gigOties, a mollusk, he believes that fertilia


NEWS


tion is by a chemical nature, and not of a physical
nature, as heretofore opinionated.

'Melville E. Ingalls of Cincinnati uses plain lan-
guage in refernee to the investigations of the large
insurance companies. He says: "We must have
laws that will put and end to this form of gambling
insurance. I can call it by no more polite name.
We must wipe out this system of deferred payments
which create a large surplus. The line between a
mutual insurance company and an insurance com-
pany run for the benefit of stockholders should be
clearely defined by law and the law should be
enforced. An insurance company should not be
Allowed to work the hocus pocus of running its affairs
ostensibly for the policy holders and then twisting
the business around to the advantage of the stock-
holders."

While radical action on the future of football is
expected to lbe made by Columbia University, other
universities have decided that the "brutal game"
must go. Chancellor Day of Syracuse University,
President A. Y. Y. Raymond of Union College, Pres-
ident F. S. Luther of Trinity, President Merrill of
Colgate University and President Elliot of Harvard
have all expressed themselves against the game as
now played.

From Chicago comes word that there is an organ-
ised movement on foot to obtain concerted action
against the Roosevelt idea of rate legislation.

President Roomevelt has decided to recommend
to Congress that a l(wk canal be constructed at Pan-
ama.

The Sultan has announced to the Ambassador of
Austria-lungary that Turkey naccedes to the demands
of the Powers regarding the financial control of
Macedonia. This was,/, however, not made known
before the fleet of the allies had gone to Mitylene
and seized the customs offices and also those of the
telegraph.

To avoid the taking of "tainted money," a plan
has Ien proposed by Rev. Washington Gladden of
Columbus, Ohio, moderator of the National Council
of the Congregational Churches, in an address before
the Congregational Club in the First Congregational
Church at Washington, he said: "Every church
should be a contributor to every one of our caunes,
and every member of every church a contributing
member. If we can even approximate to this we
shall have all the resources we require, and there
will be no need to replenish our treasury by ques-
tionable alliances."'

In the New York City "Battle of the Ballotn"
William R. Heart has scored a point, as Justice
Amend has ordered the inspectors of five election
districts to olwn ballot boxes and recount ballots.
learst men now ex pect that practically every ballot
cast in the mayoralty election will be recounted in
about 1,200 of the 1,948 election districts of the
city.

The officially announced new Japanese loan of
$125,000,000 was issued on Tuemday. The price is
1)0 and the interest rateA 4 per cent. Only $16,20,000
in allotted to the to the d State, bsrpt to the
remainder WIing offered in England, France nd Ger-
many. Only one-half of the authorized loeA will be
imNued at present to hb used by the Japanese Govern-
ment in redeeming high-rate Internal loans.

Statistics just completed and issued at Washing-
ton show that at the cloe of 1004 there were 284,302
inmates in the 4,2607 benevolent institutions in the
United States, the total cost of maintenance being
fifty-two and one-half millions of dollars. The sup-
port was wholly or in part by public taxation and
private means. The rate of admission into tem-
porary homes was highest in New Jersey and lowest
in North Carolina. The outlay on behalf of the
deaf and blind is noticeably large in some of the
Southern States.

It is expected that another fine American Cath-
olic college-a Jesuit university-will be soon
erected in Chicago. This will probably be the largest
Catholle institution of learning in the United Rtates.
These plans, it i. Maid, will follow action maid already
to have been taken by Arohbbishop Quiglcy in author-
ding a third Jewish parish for Chicago.


WEEK'S





- -. I _Ow -


December 2, 1905


Agriculture


mm- m


Florida's


Opportunity


Conducted by W. E., Pabor


!' Among the hills, along the blue,
Round the bright air with footing true,
To please the child, to paint the rose,
The gardener of the World, he goes.
-Robert Louis Stevenson.
*
"And lot in a flash of crimson splendor, with
blazing scarlet clouds running before his chariot
and heralding his majestic approach, the sun
rises upon the world." -Thackeray.
*
And so, in its weekly entrance, with bright and
up-to-date departments in all that apldwrtains to the
home, the farm, the grove, the vineyard, tihe garden,
nito the houmeliohld of tihe land Tl' E SUN rises and
goes forth upon its mission. May its shining in tlhe
reading world Ibe as welcome as is that of its proto-
type in the material sphere.
PRELUDE.
The farmers are the founders of civilization.-
Daniel Webmter.
0 *
He who owns the soil, owns up to the sky.-
Jewenal.
0 *
An agricultural life is one eminently calculated
for iuminan happiness and huninu virtue.-Josiah
Quincy.
0 0
The sun, which ripens the corn and fills the suc-
culent herb with nutriment, also pencils with beauty
the violet and the rose.-J. C. Abbott.
0 *
Where grown ?-where grows it not? If vain our
toil
We ought to blame the culture, not the soil.
-Pope.
A Colorado exchange tells of a wonderful dis-
covery "by certain parties connected with the ,lorti-
cultural Kociety of that State, while visiting tlhe
Western Slops. "At Palisade the inembers of the
part discovered something new that has not yet
reached the market. They are raising a cantaloupe
that has the flavor of hbannanas andti is known as the
banana cantaloupe. It is in appearance like a



Femininity


squash and has a thick flesh inside. Samples are to
be sent to the State house." An old, old story. The
banana muskmelon has been in the seedsmen's cat-
alogues for a score of years. The writer of this
raised them-as a novelty-in Grand Valley. So
the "something new" is something old, after all,
There seems to be an opinion abroad that sugat
can be extracted from the sweet potato aIs asily
andl as profitably as from the beet ot the cane, pro-
vided it is bred up to a e oteht of treble its present
content of saccharin. e The Philadelphia Public
Ledger has called attention to this, and efforts are
rting made by the Landreths of Philadelphia and
other parties to get the Department of Agriculture
to experiment with it.
0 *0
Peacherine. Sounds like a drink, don't it? But
it isn't. One John Phillpott of Lodi, Call, has mar-
ried a peaca to a nectarine, with this result: A
firm, sweet-meated fruit, with a palpable blend of
the two fruit flavors of its parent. Wonder if it
will grow in Florida? Then we can call for peacher-
ine and cream in ours, and get it-may be.
Of *
This is what a sweet singer of songs has to say
of the farmer:
"Ilia throne is a stack of the sweet-smelling hay,
Ilia crown is the gold of the carrot and corn,
his scepter a sheaf of his newly-cut wheat,
1His audience chamber the meadows of morn.
The oats and the barley await his command
Their slender green spears from the darkness to
bring;
The orchards drop apples of gold at his feet,
And all nature proclaims that the farmer is
king."
But Edwin Markham of The Man With the Hoe
fame seemed to have a different opinion of him. It
all depends on the point of view-the independence
of the one and the depndence of the other marks the
difference between the "king" and the "clod."
*
Will the drainage of the Everglades decrease the
alligator crop as well as the depth of water in Lake
Okeechobee? One man alone recently brought into
Fort Myers 1,270 hides, while a month previous his
load was 800. So in four weeks he must have


and


the


rounded up his thousand and more, for which he
received nearly as many silver plunks. Of course,
he was the "middle man" between the 'gator hunter,
Indian and Florldian, and the merchant who bought
of him, to the profit, no dotbt of all ftqt.
But at ,this tW hbW sb&n wi the allh gato be
aktictk ih Flohddi
Secretary Wilson has a new fad-the education
of the negro; teaching him to work. A Government
experiment farm is to be established in Virginia,
where knowledge of the soil will be carefully taught
to negroes. Cotton picking is to give way to pickles
and onions. Wonderful scheme.
*
Says Edison, the inventor, in a recent interview:
"The country is food-drunk. I have investigated the
subject enough to discover that a man can't do good,
clear, logical brain work with his stomach full of
undigested food. The fact is, people eat too much,
and don't work enough. Men eat and sleep them-
selves stupid. Sometimes they eat and sleep them-
selves into the grave." But something could be said
on the other side of the question.
*4
The fact that more than five hundred mowing ma-
chines have been needed in Columbia County this
season to harvest the hay cro is a gratifying one;
it tells that the farmers there are learning to
keep their hay money at home, which is a sign of
progress in the right direction,
The Times-Union Short Talks man says that
"The horny-handed agriculturists will now soon pro.
ceed to excavate from the bosom of Mother Earth
the 'taters' whose running vines have through all the
good old summertime covered the long rows in the
'cow pen' with a mantle of living green. When dug,
the crop will be carefully deposited in the usual
'tater bank,' upon which the aforesaid agriculturist
will 'draw' as occasion requires." But the fact is
the sweet potato crop this season is a short one,
owing to the flooded condition of vast areas of the
flatwoods land, and there will be many "horny-
handed agriculturists" who are short on sweet spuds
to an extent not experienced for many years.
(Continued on Fourteenth Page)


Home


Conducted by Helen Harcourt


Circle


cIIusTMAAS (xIF'rS.


Everybody in busy these days "getting ready for
Christinmas," and many are tihe anxious ones who are
seeking to solve the problem of "how to do it." Not
only what to give, but how to give it. This last is
a problem that comes e specially within te province
of those who are in clhrge of large numbers of chil-
dren, sucH am schools. Sundinv or lnv i.aInd h)n.. ...1


the funnier, scraps of rags, and all sorts of things
of no value. But, as Santa calmly explains, all is
fish that comes to his mill, and all these queer things
will I presently transformed by the magic grind-
stones into nie gifts and candies for little folks.
Others of the Brownies are playing tricks on each
other and on the busy ones, even dumping some of
the latter into the hopper as they bend over it


secured. A second circular piece will be needed on
the inside, with a rim that will hold a belt.
A bicycle resting on a frame that just clears
the floor, will furnish the motive power for the arms.
One tire should be removed, so that an endless rope
or belt may be placed in the rim and connected with
the wooden wheel inside the mill, which must be


THE SUN









er 2, 1905'


THE SUN


HEOD ORE


---EVER MORE


By Us


Dedicated to Those Who Love the
Limelght


We used to think Columbus was a mighty man
at sailing,
For he it was who first sailed to this shore;
But now we know his number comes among
those that are trailing,
And Christof isn't in it anyi more.
We have now a husky man
Who plunges to the land
That lies beneath the ocean's mighty roar-
lie does all things with ease
That others vex and tease.
His mother named this wonder -
THEODORE.


IV.


go Washington was fondly called the
father of his country-
D did some things that seemed to earn this
name;
when it comes to fatherhood he's not now
one-two-th ree,
id Gecorgies lost his strangle hold on fame.
e is.a chesty man
puts a solemn ban
i what he calls race suicide galore-
B families lie pleads
what this country needs.
is this man? Why ask it?-
IEODORE.
III.
great Napoleon used to wear the champion
belt as fighter-
3 fit sonic fights that looked like the real
thing,


Abe Lincoln once was known to fame as great
Emancipator
By setting free the "niggers" long ago,
But poor old Abe is now ranked as a second or
third rater;
To hold first place lie doesn't stand a show.
For now we have a hero
Who stands up for thlie negro,
And tries to put him where lie don't IlK'onug--
He dines with Bookcr T.,
Nor holds his nose-not lie.
THEODORE again. Please ring the chest-
nut gong.


The love of Peace was wont to sit a(nd never
moult a feather,
Whilst bloody wars she caused to stop off-
hand;


VI.
There use i to ihe n rough-aild-tumble gaille
played on the campus --
To play football timook courage, strength iilnd
haiir--
But now, Thank (MdIlirnssl all one nleds is.
lungs built like a graiipus,
To holler, "lDo I)o clcrefulll I land "h, dear!"
For again this hiuy lHy,
Ills spare time' to employ,
Has said dlo not ihe lrutal uiiy more.
"Be'g lpardon; )plh'ul excuse me;
Do not, I pray, misuse lle,"
Is the language nIow advised ly-
THEODORE.
VII.
In pace or war, on land or sea, in play or in
life's struggle
We find this maiiin of teeth and strenuouii
ways;











Saturday, December 2, 1905


sr


THE SUN


ED


71T(


0 UR desire is to make The Sun a great state paper.
We want the people of Florida to feel that, how-
ever much they might admire any of the great weeklies
printed in other cities, they have in Florida a journal
of which they are a part.
We want stories written by Floridians to print in
,this paper, which is read by Floridians.
We want good stories. We will not print the other
kind. The best is good enough for Florida people.
In order to get the good stories we are willing to
pay for them, so, we make

An Offer to Florida Writers
We will pay $20 for the best story, with scene laid


in Florida, sent us by January 1st, 1906.


The story


must be written by a resident of Florida, and must not


be less than 2,000 words nor more than 3,000.


We


reserve the right to print all the stories submitted that
do not win the prize at regular rate of $2 per thousand
words, paid on publication.
We will select three competent judges to read the
stories and award the prize.
Mail copy to The Sun, Prize Story Contest, Jack-
sonville, Fla.

Wanted-A New Constitution
When the Constitution adopted by the Constitutional Convention of 1885,
went into effect in 1887, it was a fairly good instrument, a fairly good cradle for
the infant which was then committed to its sheltering care.
But in twenty years the infant has grown to be a man and the cradle no
longer suffices for the repose of its full statured frame.
For this reason it appears to us that a new Constitution for the State of
Florida is necessary.
Florida h~s developed more in population, in resources, in trade, in com-
merce, in manufactures, in industries, and in all other lines that make a State
a place for people to live in, than IN ALL THE YEARS that have elapsed since
Ponce de Leon came in search of the fountain.
A fundamental law that would serve to safeguard the rights of the people
in a small State where the interests of its inhabitants, because of their fewness,
are not diversified, becomes a misfit when the population increases and develop-
ment follows the increase, and the State has grown great.
The Constitution of 1885 was not a perfect document when it came from the
hands of its makers. Many of its provisions were vague in meaning, doubtful
in purport, and capable of diverse constructions. Added to these objections is
the one that has frequently been flung about in debates in legislative sessions,
and in arguments in legal battles-that so much of the Constitution is statutory
and not basic in character, it is difficult to determine what part is fundamental
law and what part is enacted law.
We need a new Constitution to clear up this doubt.
Nine Legislatures have come and gone since the present Constitution was
adopted. Each tacked on amendments, which changed it; and the sum of these
amendments is now a burden on the instrument which WAS NOT STRONG in
the first unhampered stages of its existence.
A new Constitution is necessary to get these improvements in concrete form.
Supreme Court decisions handed down for eighteen years have so patched
the Constitution that very little of the original cloth is now visible.
A seeker after right in the State's organic law, wades through a mass of
earned opinions, sets one against the other, weighs them, sees the bright ray of
Constitutional truth across his weary path, AND MEETS "PER CURIAM,"
which demolishes the structure so patiently reared, shuts out the light and leaves"
him again groping in darkness.
A new Constitution is needed to clear up the Supreme Court adjudications.
The present Constitution is more legislative enactment and Supreme Court
dictum than it is the WILL OF THE PEOPLE in convention assembled.
ALL FUNDAMENTAL LAW SHOULD BE THE DIRECT VOICE OF THE
PBOPIB.
When it ceases to be this it ceases to be fundamental law.
Th Contitution of 1885 has ceased to be fundamental law.
It i ti to call a Constitutional Convention.


Sroward Starts SomefAg
"We are afflicted with a sprinkling of editors WHO BELL i s RItAL FOR
SO MUCH AN INCH-sentiment thrown in." Governor Broward in THE SUN,
November 18, 1905.
We thought that this statement from the Governor of the State would
cause some of the brethren of the press to sit up and take osea .
the Governor BOLDLY STATES what other have for me* time been whis-
pering in selected corners to discreet acquaintances.
The Monticello News, commenting on this charge of prostitution of the presx,
made by the Governor, suggests the compiling of a list of the guilty ones.
the Tallahassee True Democrat, shocked by this charge of baseness, demands
publicity and punishment for those whom the cap fits.
Far be it from us to judge our brothers, but we agree with the editor of the
Monticello News that a list SHOULD BE PREPARED, and we agree with the
editor of the True Democrat that those guilty of this corruption should be
EXPOSED AND PUNISHED.
So young are we in this journalistic life, that we are not disposed to take up


I THOT OAT VVUV,
Hl RNGOvtR
DuV YIN 1HNK6YNIN.
Buy to PIT(NUR ru
$N iO OU tNITUVuuteote


'IHE CONSTITUTIONAL (ONVEN-
TION(1868) SUPPLIED R COOP
AMPLY LRR&E FOR THL TURKEY
AT TT TTIMt OB T


THE TURKE4Y (PL1'V ANDO
cOtl5TIruTiONiL (.ON'vEIN-tl(.
1885 E M L RR (YED TH L f(001
BUT


this cudgel against those who are so much stronger than we are, when the evils
are of past committing and no particular good can be accomplished by laying
them open to the public gaze.
Of evils that HAVE BEEN we will not speak, unless by keeping silence we
should become a party to their continuance and their menace to the future.
Collier's Weekly, in its great expose of the patent medicine fraud, has shown
how advertising contracts have influenced the editorial expressions of the presA
of the country, as to the merits of bills introduced in State Legislatures to reg-
ulate the sale of, and to prevent the use of harmful ingredients in, these nostrums.
Our beloved primary law, under the operation of which the press has become
a prime factor in political campaigns in this State, has opened wide the door of
temptation to the editors, to throw their editorial columns on the bargain counter.
SOME HAVE NOT PUT THIS SATAN BEHIND THEM.
But, as we have written, this is a past evil, and will not be made to feed the
mill now grinding, unless the good of the future is threatened by it.
WE HAVE A LITTLE LIST
Which we will keep in a safe place, and if we see those whose names are on
it sinning again, we will give it to the editor of the Monticello News, and to all
others who read this journal.
Come, brothers, let us not do a merchandising business.
Let us print the news, and keep our editorial page like the wife of Caesar.

The Orlando Reporter admonishes its readers to "Beware of he Stroller,"
meaning the fakir who comes to your home with things to sell, that can be
bought cheaper and of better quality from the local dealer. We suggest a bull
dog without chain or muscle.


5,

~i4


. r1 "


r' ," C "1"1, ''5 L


i










LS


THE SUN


NINTH PAGE


sr


Saturday, December 2, 1905


77 Th Hollwo Case
After W. M. Holloway was elected in the primary over W. N. Sheats, who
had charged him with forgery and had commenced suit against him for criminal
libel, there came a suggestion from several people that the case against Holloway
be dropped.
We did not Indorse this suggestion.
If sufficient evidence was at hand, before the primary election was held, to
bring Mr. Holloway, before the courts on a criminal charge, we thought that the
necessity for a trial was THE MORE URGENT after the result of the primary
.election had placed the accused among those to be trusted with public office.
If Holloway the candidate, was charged with crime, Holloway the ofice-
holder should not be allowed to continue to serve the people without being purged
of the charge by a competent court acting on the verdict of a jury of his peers.
We were pleased to note that the case against Holloway was not dropped.
We are glad that the case went to trial. We were also pleased when the
array of legal talent on both sides offered proof that nothing would be left undone
to got at the truth.


TNH ,LLING .,,,


OR I WILL B
((|IWTITUTIONAL m"k. I

sMEL TE^ itilM,


1/


L *


..T.ILL THE TURKEY
(rREfI -RAD 155 TILL
G.ROYYING !I


We are delighted that the trial resulted in the acquittal of Mr. Holloway.
With this satisfactory ending we are in full accord with all men who can
now with all propriety say:
"Let the Holloway case be dropped from topics that are discussed."
Congratulations are due THE PEOPLE whose cause has been unheld in the
trial of one of their servants charged with crime, and who has been found worthy.
Congratulations are due Mr. Holloway, who has triumphed in his fight to
clear his name.


The count of
ago, showed that
$1,259,508,278.fi8.


the actual cash in the National Treasury, made two months
the Government had on hand in greenbacks, silver and gold,
There is now a shortage. We have annexed the 58 cent..


Last November, the day after the election William Randolph Hearst, pub-
lished an editorial under the head )Democracy Is Defeated But Not Discouraged.
The result of the elections in Ohio and New York one year later, shows that
Mr. Hearst spoke a parable.


It has again leaked out that the cotton growers have organized to hold the
price of the staple to 15 cents. In the meantime the farmers of Hanover Square
are putting the price up or down as of yore.

Tatum of Miami will start a Keely Institute in Jacksonville. Now in the
time to get on that last periodical before the gold spigot is turned on.


No Womenw


in Politics, Please


Pressure was lately brought to hear on Governor Broward to induce him to
appoint a woman to the office of Superintendent of Public Instruction for Duval
County.
WE ARE GLAD THAT HE DID NOT YIELD TO IT.
We think it would he a misfortune to society to have a woman hold a politi-
cal office in this State.
In this hustling commercial age, we see one by one our cherished ideals go
by the board.
Let us hold to as many as we can, as long as we can.
Our Northern neighbors laugh at us in the South, because we cling to sonme
of the ideals that our fathers loved and handed down to us as precious heir-
loomls.
Lm.ET THEM LAUiGH.
We may not gather as many acorns under the industrial oak. as our North-
ern brothers do (although we are not so sure about that given an equal chance)
but, we are transported by the beauties of the delicate fern leaf growing among
the acorns, which our more vager brother entirely misses.
The ideal by which we of the South are most honored is THE DEFERENICE
WE PAY TO WOMAN.
It has long been a part of the Southern ideal that our women should Im
guarded against the buffets of the world; t)at they should be made safe and
secure in the home circle in which we have built them a shrine, and of which they
are the soul and brightest ornament.
It would be a shock to this Itautiful sentiment if a woman should be
appointed by the Governor of the State to an ollice that carries the duties that
this one( does.
The woman superintendent would be compelled to visit negro schools, exam-
ine negro applicants, mnale and female, for teacher luositions, and otherwise come
in contact with negroes.
While contact with negroes as servants does no violation to Southern senti-
ment, contact with them in any way that brings them on an equality does.
lknsides all this, which we confess is sentiment pure and simple, we do not
believe that it woman is ILIKELY' TO IIAVIE the training necessary to fit her for
the duties of an office which requires great executive ability for its Iproler eoin-
duct.
Some particular woman may have had this training which would prove lier
an exception, but the chances are against it.
The appointment of Mrs. Denarlbrn, clerk of the circuit for Dade County, is
not it good precedent, neither dio's it fit all cases. Mrs. Dearborn is the widow
of the late clerk, and needed the salary, for her support. Ilesides. Mrs. Dear-
lorn's iN an ollkce position, NOT A FIELD) ONE.
Unfortunately our soieal syMt4em is so Imiperfect, that women are compelled
to go out in the world to support themselves. This is unfortunate, it is not,
therefore a good argument in favor of women holding public omfl.
The world wduld xe a Ibetter plaer to live in, if women eould iem saved from
the necessity of earning their bread.
ILet us approach as near as l)osmible to this ideal arrangemen t.
Appoint women to office and we will soon find them running in a primary
election.
Save us front this catastrophe!



POEMS WORTH READING

We are quite sure that Florida holds within its bor-
ders inany persons, male anld female who have the
souls of poets and lack but the opportunity to ignite
poetical fires within their breasts.
We would like to have these fires illumine the pages
of The Sun, and in order that this much-desired illum-
ination may begin we offer a

PRIZE Of $10.00 IN GOLD

for the best original poem sent us by January 1, 1900.
We will pay for all poems we print at our regular
space rates, and will print the prize winner in the issue
next following the day of award.
None but resi(tnts of Florida are eligible to enter
ti8s contest.


I


A


IV


! 7 1




'I


* ~A -


qv 13 0 OTT


December 2, 1905


How to Secure Immigration

y J. IA. Stephens.


No. III.
Assuming that we want immigration,
and that we have something to offer
which should Induce honmeseekers to
come among us, the next most important
matter is, how is this to be accom-
plished?
Almost every county in the State in
past years has from time to time made
an expenditure of the people's money for
this object. Sometimes it has been used
to promote an agricultural and horticul-
tural exhibit of their resources-limited
generally to that county; sometimes in
the form of a special advertisement in
snome prominent State paper, and often
in the form of a pamphlet setting forth
the special advantages of some partle-
ular section. To say that this money
hats beel uselessly squandered would
not be the exact truth, but all must
agree that results have not been pro-
portionate with expenditures.
A careful study of the requirements
and of satisfactory results elsewhere
must convince the most skeptical that
only in cooperation can we hope to sue-
ceed.
We must have a State law which will
cover the whole question.
We must have a Commissioner of
Immigration, not merely a politician;
but a man thoroughly qualified for the
duties, one who has had experience and
who understands the possibilities and
wants of every county in the State.
Such Coinissioner should have suitable
assistants to visit every part of the
State and obtain pledges which could
we broadly advertised to the world, and
there should be, if necessary, legal ma-
chinery for the redemption of such
pledges during a given time. There
should be an appropriation sufficiently
large to publish a conlensed statement
of opportunitiess for homes' at least
once each year, and to cover thle cost of
distribution, and such distribution
should be at the hands of trusted and
honorable men who are in thorough sym-
Spathy with the object. Crowded agri-
cultural sections of more populous States
should be visited, and our resources
made known by a personal canvass.
Literature is read and forgotten for
the reason that some unexplained ob-
jection arises in the mind of the reader;
If there was some one to explain and
emphasized published statements great
good would be accomplished.
We should never claiw impossibilities
for any section of our State, and be ever
ready to give the proof of what we do
claim.
We should give to our would-be home-
seeker ita lear conelception of the actual
relations existing letween law-abiding
members of different races, and just at



THE GREAT


By W.L
There are fairs, and fairs. To make
comparisons is unjust, as environments
have much to do with their success or
failure, both as to attendance and ex-
hibits. It is altogether probable that
one held in a large city. like Jackson-
ville, would gather larger crowds than
when exploited in a town like Tampa.
Railway facilities have something to do
with it; the director the passage the
easier for the passenger; transfers aret
often tedious and involve delays.
To se a fair during the first two or
three days after opening doe's not give
the visitor the pleasure that follows
when seen after all the rubbish con-
nected with arrival of exhibits has beenm
eh-ared away and everything is in order
and neatness characterizes each section.
The writer labors under the impressions
received at the opening and not when
it was at the wnith of display.
Interested mainly in the agricultural
features of the fair, most of my time
was spent in the building devoted to
products of the soil, as shown in the
oanty exhibit.


this point will require a delicacy of ex-
pression and evidence of a full concep-
tion of prevailing conditions which
should emminently characterize the
traveling immigrat on agent, as well as
his superior, for it is at this point lies
our greatest difficulty in obtaining such
immigrants as we desire and must have.
The general Government is now spend-
ing millions of dollars to irrigate un-
productive lands in the West that home-
seekers may find conditions which we
have in great abundance, and at a cost
far below that of such irrigated lands
in the West.
The money necessary to properly make
known our wants and resources will not
tax our people heavily, as cooperation
will minimize the cost, and every town-
ship in the State will be represented in
hoth the sinews and results. It is true
that the various railway systems enter-
ing and traversing the State have done
something to stimulate immigration in
the territory along their lines. Such
appropriations should be placed in the
coffers of the Stati for general promo-
tion. Has not the State-the whole
State-donated to our several railroads
each a princely domain to aid in their
construction, anm have you ever heard
of a Florida railroad giving away its
lands to settlers?
I think a careful study of this ques-
tion must result in a decision that the
railroads should aid in bringing immi-
grants into the State, and that they
should do this in such manner as to
benefit the entire State, and I do not
for a moment bIlieve they would resist
a law imposing a reasonable tax for this
s peific purpose. I would not be under-
stood that this specific tax would super-
sede the local effort of each line as now
conducted, for, as the transportation
lines are the greatest IKneficiaries of in-
creased population, they cannot afford
but to promote immigration and prog-
ress.
Florida should spend at least thirty
thousand dollars at once in the proper
distrllution of truthful literature, and
within two years the tax for the immi-
gration department would be more than
offset by increased values of property.
We should also solicit foreign immin-
gration and in such manner that we may
he able to discriminate as to the class
invited. This may be easily accom-
plished by the employment of an honest
agent who would be compensated ex-
actly in p)roporiton to the families se.
cured. and such families would only be
received by the department. and the
agent conij'nsated when all require.
ments are complied with. Foreign immi-
grants should Ibe honest and intelligent
citizens, with sufficient means to care
(Continued on Page Twelve.)



STATE FAIR


o Pabor.
Of the forty-five or so counties only
eleven were represented. These were
lake, Manatee, Baker, Alachua, LTAe,
Orange, Hillsboro, Marion, Polk, Pasco
and Osceola. A glance at the map of
the State shows that nearly all of these
counties are in the central part of the
peninsula, and near the place where the
fair was held. This may, and may not,
have had something to do with time in-
difference shown by such far-away
counties as Dade and Brevard, on the
southeast coast, and Nassau, Duval.
Leon and those on the extreme northern
and western border touching the Georgia
line.
D)eSto, that had such a fine exhibit
last year, was wholly unrepresented.
Thue banner orange county of Florida
must. have had some cogent reason for
its lahk of enterprise when sumch liberal
prniunms were offered as prevailed this
yo'i r.
The counties having the largest space
and showing the most varied collection
of fruits and vegetables were Hillsboro,
Onccola, Lee, Polk and Alachua.


As the description of one display will
nearly cover the others, as san my sl)pac
is limited, 1 will take two counties-
those of Lee, from the extreme south,
and Polk, half-way down the peninsula
and also between gulf and ocean.
The Leo County Commissioner was
Philip Isaacs, editor of the Fort Myers
Press. He has the distinction of pub-
lishing the only paper in his county,
and the exhibit he managed to get to-
gether was a splendid tribute to his
energy. He had a space of about 40xl00
feet, well filled, railed about with bam-
boos fifty feet or more in length, as
evidence of the tropical character of
the Calowahatchic valley; there was
a cocoanut tree twenty feet high, show-
ing the fruit from the blossom up to
the ripening nut; there were other trop-
ical fruits, such as papaya or pawpaws,
bananas, mangos, sapadillos, avocado
or alligator pears, shown upon the trees
or in groups attractively displayed upon
tables, benches and in groups.
Pyramidal in form, the grapefruit
section made a center so golden in here
as well to bear out the claim of their
county that the pomelo is, par excel-
lence, the pride of the county. All the
citrus fruits, of course, the orange,
lemon, lime, citron, kumquats, were
there. It seemed to me that these last
were small in size, as, indeed, were all
that I noticed in the display of other
counties. In pineapples, both those
grown in the open air and those under
shed, were shown; the dilferenwe in
flavor of the shedded varieties was
clearly marked.
Farm products were fairly well rep-
resented, such as sugar cane, sweet po-
tatoes, rice, peanuts, pumpkins, etc.;
while the vegetable kingdom was not
far behind, proving that fall and winter
truck can be raised in abundance at a
time of the year when vegetables com-
mand the highest price in the markets
of the North; and, now that an all-rail
route by the Atlantic Coast Line is in
operation along the river border, full
carloads of tomatoes, eggplant and
beans could quickly reach New York
by way of rail to Savannah and ocean
steamship.
Judging front what I saw, I conclude
that the "jumping off" county of Flor-
ida is a good one to "jump into," for,
though there are large areas of swamlpy
land, there are also large areas of ex-
tremely fertile soil.
Polk County, great in area, for it
has over a million and a quarter acres
of land surface, not to mention its thou-
sand or more sparkling and pure lakes,
was, of course, also great in the display
of grains,, vegetables and citrus fruits.
A full list of exhibits was promised
me, but at this writing has not reached
me. This, however, does not matter as
it would be merely duplicating that of
, sceo, (ceo, Hilslloro and Manatee
counties s in citrus fruits and farm iprod-
neuts.
I noticed that the velvet hean held a


prominent place. It is only recently
that much attention has been given to
this field crop. but farmers are begin-
ning to realize that it is a source of
revenue not to he despised.
The citrus fruit shown gave proof
that Polk, while bordering on the frost
line, was not materially affected by the
freeze of February last; in quantity,
quality, variety, it proved itself fairly
safe as a county suited to the orange
and the pomelo. Its lake area, no
doubt, has had something to do in
crowning success along this line, but
the people of DeSoto, on its southern
border, will, I fan'y, dispute the claim
for it lately made by one of its citizens,
that it embraces nearly all of what
is known as the 'Lake Region' of Flor-
ida." It is true they are almost num-
bI'rless; but these lovely lakes extend
for seventy miles or more south of the
south line of Polk ,and go down to the
()keectholee country.
I was told that the appropriatioYn
:;tdet by the county y ('onumissioners to
lprelpare ni exhibit was greatly below
that of sonicm other counties. If so. the,
extensive and varied display reflect,
great credit upou the commissioners, of
whom W. 11. McLean w n nt the 1whd,
with J,. W. (arson as one of his most
,active assistants. If. when. the county
premiums ar are awarded Polk does not
(Continued on Page Fourteen)


Dr. E. H. Armstrong


AND


Staff of Specialists


aN TWI


HUMAN


EYE


Eye and Nervous Diseases


11 Laura St.

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

Neurology and Osteopathy
lkhlivlng that tlhero is good in all methods
of treating diseases, weo have taken all that
has beun proven by the difforont schools
of medicine and combined it under tiue
head of neurology. The system embraces
all that is good in the old schools of medl-
clue-osteoimthy, chlropractlcs, hydropa-
thy, physital culture, dietetics and hy-
glone, We handle chronic diseases, al-
though tihe system is ust as applicable to
acute as to chronic troubles. and we spe-
cialize on diseases of the eye, nervous sys.
teom, stomach and howel troubles, constl-
pation, epilepsy, spinal troubles. piles,
prostatic and female diseases.


I i
Write niotr
to p ces

Wholesale and Retail
ON
CHINA GLASS TINWARE
CROCKERY
WOOD AND WILLOW WARE
Larpgest took esut l lalMhu
amd PRICES EQUALLY AS LOW

Knight Crockery Co.
Jdicksonville, Fla.

LET THE-

Consolidated Fruit Co.
DISTRIBUTE YOUR

FRUIT AND VEGETABLES
----
*
Car Lots and Less tham Car Lots.
WALTER HAWKINS.
228 West Bay Street, Jackwmiville, Fla.


Building Material m

Foundation to Finish

Our Prims a Right
Our oeds are Right
We'il Treat You Right
Thefore to Buy Right

By Right fomm

'H. H. RICHARDSON & CO.
Jacksonville, Fla.

GONOVER'6 DRUG STORE


PAY %N.D JULIA
JACKSO NVILLE.
SEND I'S MAIL


STREETS
FLORIIDA
ORDERS


ECVRYTHING IN DRUGS


1 A


LV .a~aa in~'&'~


I

.5


I









Oecemhbet* i108

0dd crop eiadi
Refugees ........................$4
Extra Early Refugee......... 4
Earliest Valentine ............ 4
Stringless Green Pod......... 6
Davis Kidney Wax............. 5
BBIack Wax ,,...,..,,,,,,,,..i 7
Wardwell's Kidney Wax ... 6
Um -L*


10fN IL. AI10 t SONS
Jacboville, Fla.

ong and enduring
OLD HICKORY and
WHITE HICKORY WAGONS
STihe My rdniot erunnlng,
L rwell wZlng
0olumbus Buggies

Jacksonville, Florida


I'MURRAY& BAKER


7red. E. Rankin
MRACTICAL ACCOUNTANT
koI Opehed, Cosed ad Kepit

And all Other Statenments gotten
off quickly and accurately. Best
references
W. Fersyl St., uptlar, or P. 0. Box O0
Jacksonville, Fla.

PRICE LIST


i. Muller & Co.


P.acksonvill. Flor N4
Jaoksonvlls Florida


WHISKIES


val Rye, XX,
*val Rye, XX:
1 Geo., per ga
)nogram, per g
leum, per ga
erokee. per ga
Ilagher & Bur
L. Adams, pe
1 Columbia, p
rd Baltimore,

w Englanil, pt
malica, per gal
imaica, Import

I Iure to enc
Expris
-de wlth us
trade WIH

hristma,
F utlery

I



Florida


IN THE SUN'S CHARIOT
Intimate Talks etVeen Pufblisher and Header


The editorial dignity and poise came
lwrilously near going by the board when
the maill-carrier, that bringer of joy
iid sorrow, acorditng to from whom the
iett r '6II10ei, WhAhtlir from your sweet-
heatti ot yotr ctedlto', thit first bearing
tlt' ljfrline of violets atd catUsing ting-
litg ,1t$iiiiso litidet your ishilrtwaist;
the In ttt4,o tilg he a'eit of the
butcher shop all c&iirfl. siftking in
that selfsame organ-well, as h'e were
saying, when the mail-carrier brought
us letters from our renders in answer
to our invitation to tell us amout our-
sevOs, whlichr we printed in this coliinnil
ltst week, we felt just like we did when
we put on our first pair of red-top, cop-
mper-toed boots, aind could barely restrain
oulrsMElv's front juiniping around ai \we
did thlnl.
'Thes'e letters whicl we r eeltVrd tis
wtek-and there were many of them-
proved to us that our readers are our
frietlds and are trying hard to 1help us.
we were quite frank in asking for criti-
cislt last week, and wo meant it when
wt Hi( d WI' WaitItA it. M1pmatt,-las l all
Imortai i ath limited by space or the lack
of it-prevellts Uts froin printing all the
letter's we received. ottry Itlollt thin--
all are good and all friendly. ~noMle ar
sharp, but we mind not the acid when it
is applied by friendly hands for our
healing.
lere is one that particularly pleasld

I i13'ECIPLY 1 AMED.
E'ditoir sitin:
Dear Sit: With miellh piiatir' lhave
I remd the two first issues of TIM HITN,
and what appealed to me most favorably
was the entire albence of criminal
I was perfectly p)lteads and delighted
to get a newsl)palxr at last which prom-
ises to I' free of "trunk mysteries, "di.
vorce proNwedings," "scandals" (in high
life as well itas among those of tih' lower
chasess, and all the vast array of mis-
domds so thorouguiy served and elabor-
ately garnished by the premm of now-a-
duay, as though it were a most desirable
dish, and with each such article most
highly seasoned and made palatable to
it morbid, craving taste.
Habit makes us, almost inadvertently,


read these storiess" when once the eye
catches the -headlfie and the first para-
graph is read.
In thews days of suggestion anld auto-
sugTestion, I am firmly convineed that
quite a percentage of crime can be traee-
able to the printed stories ia the inewsm-
papers. That is to iy. ioe pe lople
are led Itto doing bad things by the very
m ,t'Htiontsu Illud to them by reading
of crime,
Fot ihe spze of 'TifM HMN, your news
Maunna1'1 is fro4 ofly a sone, but .Ieatl, fifislif, afd ilp-to-date.
With IM'st wishes tfor yVt'if stnt('(ss.
MISS SCIlOOL 'I'VAtilltt,
Jacksonville, Fla., Nov. 20.
This is the kind of letter that makes
us fe in Gilead.
We will print sotme more Sonm othiler
time. IDo not Ibe afraid that your let-
ters will not tb rmad and appreielated.
Every one we get will u" carefully
petrused and thought over, and if we ei tt
ainke use of a suggestion contniivdtl in It
to Improve THE SUN we will do st
quick.
Juist now we are too full of a piit"
of tiews we have for you to hhld it a1
lnoinifilt loilgetr.
We have It good thing ,coming. Such
a good thing that you'll be joyfully jlst
to hear it mentioned.
here it is-
Charlie Dougherty will write ~., vihl's
of Florida's great iand siiil polite iciians,
and these sketches will e I iudlli. hed ex--
clusively in THE SUN, begliniiiing ry
Mr. 1)ougherty has Ixeuni in the' ".ilin
of poIlile's for it tlartr of (; cent ltrvy,
and his habits of ob msrvatioii, retentive
memllory and alert mind comlbille to iiinike
him a storeliouse of interesting inform.
nation, which his m iuaint, iniinhitll,
slyle will enable him to presilt tl r
yoll't dE'hlet.il ')11n.
In p' ..*.'ting the 1)oi'rty srl:'is. w'
feel sur tl.hat we will 4a i i t niew i ill
an absorbingly interesting page in tlhe
annais i of himorouEi character writiig.
Watch for the Dougherty stori.'s.
They'll beI a real treat.
Ily all means--
Watch THE SUN'S chariot go round.


Some Thinks by the Brethren


Super gal $1.50
X, pe. gal 2.00 EVERYBODY CAN HELP. And the small enterprises, which give
employment to a few pIeople-thes' are
l . 2.00( Every citizen of a town can do some- worthy your considertltion. Aid in
.al . 2.00 thing for his town. One way he' can building theint up )o they can give em-.
. . 2.(X00) help is to help those who are helping. plloymnent to iimore people. A number of
S. .. 2.25 If you see a man with grit and such small iniiterpriseK in a town const i-
to, per gal 3 5 Energy. who is trying by honorable und tute a most important eleienwnt in its
ton, per gal K...() straightforward methods to build up commercial activity.
r gal . 4.(X) a prossplrous business-help him. Give Every citizen van do the things hiere
er gal . 4.00 such men your patronage in preference outlined. A man anny not be in lnsi-
per gal . 5.(X) to tle cainm who sits around and waits ness; lie may not own large interests;
for business. Energetic, active business but as long as he makes his lome in ai
RUM i men are the kind who build up a town; towni-unlhss he polit ssss it very narrow
and they attract others of their own and sellfh soul--hl is iinterested in that
er gal 1.75 class. town's advancement. And. no matter
. 1.75 If you have a citizen who taken a how humble a citizen lie may be, Ihe can
we, per gal 5.00 pride in the town and an interest in its htl-I-by spending all his money atA
affairs, and if Ihe be capable, put him home, and uby si.nding it in sMuch it way
forward in a position where he can ac- that Ite helps th i helpers.--liakeland
lose either Potoffilce or complhish something. Enthusiasm will News.
w Money Order bring about wonders where indifference --
will do nothing at all. VIAPCKS( ( I'.l M MAILRYIAND.
sen, you'll Don't It jealous. JDon't bI afraid
h us alwas-that's anylody will become too pronigrous. Among tle |tliople wihoI conwi to Flor-
P Iroisprous men are the only kind that ida, and them who are investors inl the
SeCan carry out projects and enterprises StRate, it in to Wi noticed that wherever
by which all are benefited. All can the man from Baltimore apllm ars, at at
help; hy encouragement, by counme, by ,general rule. lie in a good citizen nd tian
good will. But it requires money to important factor in the industrial de-
efftect tangible results. Therefore, don't v'lopnrent of the State.
[IK afraid to patronize any public-spirited M We notice that the Palmetto lhios-
fPocket, Table and iman Ix-eauit' he in getting along. Rther phate Cominpay, cn,,,om|4d of iBa timore.
withhold your patronage from the skin- liteopl, lha; IMiught 4211 aitren of i|.o .-
Workbasket flitt, who will do the town no goid., phate land in Polk (Coutity for $42.(M ).
whetluer hlip g'ts along or not. Another ale, is reported of fuller's
With the' man who in progreisive-- earth lands for $124.(mi toi a lialti-
Swh o in maninking improvements in hist more party by a dealer in Ilartow. It
naruw e Co business. Note the struggling young in one thing to sell lands to lie idle and
0 man, who is bending every energy to sue- another thing to sell to develop them.
wnvdllA ('. These are town builders. Help Likely these Baltimore folks will live
JdckovilI, I. them--by encouragement and by giving up to their reputation.-Orlando Re-
'N them your patronage in their lins. porter.


John N. C. Stockton


REAL

ESTATE
STOCCAND

hImpIn keMwflMd v IME IPIf



Southern

Fuel and Supply Co.
Jacksonville, Fla.,
CONTRAC'TO1I FORl

.GRAVEL ROOFS
SELLEtS OF
ROOFING r MATERIALS.

Your Christmas Cheer
can be secured from

J. J. WIlliams 'A Co.
I11 W.eIyIt.
JaoksonvMl, Fla.
AMAS FINE STOK OF
Whiskies, Wines and Beer

Mail Orders sMlpd ttl day
weN 0t them
SEND FOR PRICE USTS


J. J. WILLIAMS & CO.
Ill W. my Kt j0-1,11-1111ldiMs

How Muoh Dos Your
e insurno Cost You
=m uOVUms mUIY Ur N
Penn Mutual Life Ins. Co.

SIT Ii UALLY
Age 25 . . $11.45
Ag 30 . . $12.00
Age 35 . . $14.15
Ago 40. . $16.15
Age 45 . . $19.90
Age 50 .. . $26.05
Without ay restrictions m to travel, rei-
idence or occupation.
No limitation. Can be carried a long
as you live, without re-examination.
Div)iitlond declared annually. All formi
of i insurance polices ismued in Bumm from
fl,(MX) to $100),(X). Incorporated 1847.
A \.shs $70000XX),XO. No other company
in Florida imuei this policy, so don't ak
oiler agents about its good points. Nat-
nrmilly t hey are not telling them. Write
1,s direct for particulars.
ACOSTA a BAHL
STATE A11%S
4.-g.g8 I.Up.Mij I JUUiIl,Fa.


The Guaranty Trust
and
Savings Co.
bay and O SlMi Stret jsmvMle, Frtl.
HI ndue wh fldily loftV
AmlUtI Md Trmst ImlbMss
i)l;;l;' 'lit:--llion II. LBarnett, E. W.
IAta,, W\. M. Ilrntwick, Jr., J. D. HIolnw,
E. larkihleinmer, Hlarlow Barnett,
J. W. spratt.


11


- -- SUN




-r "v ~- 1 -.r


December 2, 1905


Stories of College
By Janet Vfllnigha Howard


THE MIDNIGHT RAMBLE.


The "salting" of Freshmen is, in this
institution as in other colleges, the pas-
time of the Sophomores.
One of the favorite "cures" is known
as the Midbight Ramble, the unlucky
girl being awakened from her slumbers,
escorted by a grimly silent Soph to the
roof of the studio, where she attempts
various unique "stunts" at the sugges-
tion of her delighted audience.
Sometimes, however, the meekest of
worms will turn.
One year there were two unusually
verdant Freshmen straight from n
"prep" school, where they had grown
wise beyond their years.
Two Sophs were appointed to escort
these Freshmen (who lived in different
campus houses) to the studio roof, where
a few choice spirits would be in wait-
nuring the day Miss Adams (one of
the appointed Sophs) almost repented.
She had seen one of the victims wander-
ing pensively by the pond, and, as she
told her roommate, "her back looked
decidedly homesick."
The chapel clock struck 12; Miss
Adams and her roommate hurried to
their duty.
Up the stairs, down the corridors, the
door opened easily-"foolish child, why
did she shut out that beautiful moon-
light"-across the room to the little
white bed against the wall-"would shoe
scream ?"-now-
The question of the scream was soon
decided, as was also the lpensive wander-
ing.
The "homesick" one was under, in-
stead of on her bed, and just as tlhe
Soph's hands touched a nice clammy
frog, she felt her ankles grasped by two
firm hands
That was all, but it was enough. The
Sophomore gave one muffled yell,
wrenched herself free, and raced down
the corridor in a manner which put even
her field day record in the shade.
Meanwhile, her friend was proceeding
with greater caution, as her Freshman
roomed in the same house with several
newly-installed members of the faculty.
Tho floor of the long hall creaked un-
pleasantly under her feet, but she
reached 101 safely.
A mild snore greeted Miss Adams as
she opened the door; evidently her vic-
tim was sleeping the sleep of the un-
righteous.
One shake of the sleeping figure, a
low command, then blank astonishment,
for with "Ach, mein child, vat would
you?" a gray head turned slowly on the
pillow, and the sleep-dimmed eves of
the new Fraulein gazed at her in the
moonlight.
She didn't stop to explain; she flew,
as her chum had flown.
The six Sophomores were very quiet
the next day. Even the "frog girl" was
forgotten-but nothing happened.
At dinner Miss Adams found her seat
taken, so took an empty chair at the
Freshman table. The fat, bobby curls
of the girl at her right seemed strangely
familiar-they recalled curls which she
would forget. When their owner gig-
gled convulsively and choked on her
desert, Miss Adams turned to quell
such levity with a cold stare, which
widened to one of understanding. The
black waist of the offender was dusty
with powder which shook from the
hobby curls at every turn of their
owner's head.
Late that evening a huge box of Huy-
her's found its way to 101-a pipe of
peace, for in the next mail thle sender
fougd a wee note:
"We'll never tell. Thank you."
And they never did-until now.

LADY MACBETtH.
One of the Juniors was a sleep-walker,
and gave the matron and her room-
mate endless trouble. Once she had
been found nla the laboratory mumbling
over her lesson for the morrow, and once
she had just escaped falling down the
elevator shaft.
The report of her escapades had been
eqaerly aborbed by a little Freshman


Life


witli a taste for the uncanny, who main-
tained that all knowledge was useful.
One night the Freshmen, afterward
known as the "Six," decided to have a
spread.
The hour arrived. The feasters be-
took themselves (with the noise which
comes from lack of practice) to the
gym. Here they discovered that the
olives-an important item at all spreads
-had been left behind.
Miss H. volunteered to go for them.
She crossed the campus in safety, but
on the way down the hall leading to her
room she saw tne matron (whose prac-
ticed ear had detected the disturbance)
coming toward her, candle in hand. It
was a hair-raising moment; what should
she do? To run would be but to attract
attention. At this critical moment, as
she explained to her roommate after-
ward, "her massive brain gave one throb,
and the law of association began to
work." She remembered the famous
Junior. Closing her eyes as tightly as
nature would allow, and spreading out
her hands, "like Nydia in the picture,"
she grouped her way toward the aston-
ished matron.
Possibly it was because sleep-walkers
as a rule are not clad in red sweaters
and gym "sneakers;" possibly it was the
unpei weful expression of the small act-
ress' face; at any rate, the matron
"didn't lose any time" in bringing the
trnnee to an ignomanious end.
The feasters never saw their olives,
and for weeks afterward one of the
"Six" was greeted on all occasions with
smprading hands and ejaculations of
"Out, damned spot. Out, I say."


Immigration
(Continued from Tenth Page)
for themselves one year perhaps, at least
enough to tide them over to the prep-
aration for and production of some crop
which would provide for their neces-
sities.
For such people the State could af-
ford to make some advances to assist in
the establishment of homes. The money
necessary to the establishment of a per-
manent bureau of immigration could,
as suggested, be raised by a small direct
tax, but by far the best method would
he the issuance of "immigration bonds,"
which should run for thirty years or
more, and let postertly assist in the de-
velopment of a grand country which
very soon will be devoted to their ex-
elusive benefit, and afterward to the use
of their children.
With such method of providing funds
the work could begin at once, and as
property values increased the rate re-
quired for interest and sinking fund
would steadily decrease.
This is a matter which should interest
every citizen of Florida, and one which
should be carefully considered by every
applicant for legislative honors in years
to come, as next to a first-class system
of free schools, immigration is most im-
portant to Florida.
This subject, as before stated, is of
vital importance to our general progress,
and we sincerely hope that the press
throughout the State will take it up and
advocate with such modification of plan
as may be suggested by experience and'
knowledge of local conditions.
Our State press is strong, it is man-
aged by progressive people and men of
intellectuality far above the average-
men who are working not alone for
"bread and butter," but who are also
looking to the upbuilding of every de-
partment of our social, political and in-
dustrial development, and to all Fue.I
I appeal in the full confidence that each
will have something good to say and
some feasible plan to suggest for the
promotion of this very desirable end--
the introduction into Florida of two
million industrious and intelligent
honmeseekers.


lee County seems to be the leading
one in orange shipments, often eight
carloads leaving Fort Myers in one day.
Over 40,000 boxes have already been
shipped up to November 1.


Mons.!Beaucalre
(Continued from Third Page)
comely at thirty. Ours are flowers,
yours are stars l See, I betray myself,
I am so poor a patriot. And there is
one among these stars-ah, yes, there is
one-the poor Frenchman has observe'
from his humble distance; even there he
could bask in the glowing I" M. Beau-
caire turned to the window, and looked
out into the dark. He did not see the
lights of the town. When he turned
again, he had half forgotten his prisoner;
other pictures were before him.
"Ah, what radiance!" he cried. "Those
people up over the sky, they want to
show they wish the earth to be happy,
so they smile, and make this lady. Gold-
haired, an angel of heaven, and yet a
Diana of the chase I I see her fly by
me on her great horse one day; she
touch' his mane with her fingers. I buy
that clipping from the groom. I have
it here with my dear brother's picture.
Ah, you I Oh, yes, you laugh I What
do you know! 'Twas all I could get.
But I have heard of the endeavor of M.
le Due to recoup his fortunes. This
alliance shall fail. It is not the way-
that heritage shall be safe' from himI
It is you and me, monsieur! You can
laugh The war is open', and by me!
There is one great step taken: until to-
night there was nothing for you to ruin,
to-morrow you have got a noble of
France-your own protege-to besiege
and sack. And you are to lose, because
you think such ruin easy, and because
you understand nothing-far less-of
divinity. How could you know? You
have not the fiber; the heart of a lady
is a blank to you; you know nothing of
the vibration. There are some words
that were made only to tell of Lady
Mary, for her alone-bellissima, divine,
glorieusel Ah, how I have watch' her!
It is sad to me when I see her surround'
by your yo'ng captains, your nobles, your
rattles, your beaux-ah, ahl-and I
mus' hol' far aloof. It is sad for me-
but oh, jus' to watch her and to wonder!
Strange it is, but I have almost' cry out
with rapture at a look I have see' her
give another man, so beautiful it was,
so tender, so dazzling of the eyes and so
mirthful of the lips. Ah, divine co-
quetryl A look for another, ah-i-mel
for many others; and even to you, one
day, a rose, while I-I, monsieur, could
not even be so blessed as to be the groun'
beneath her little shoe!
But to-night, monsieur-ha, ha!I-to-
night, monsieur, you and me, two
princes, M. le Due de Winterset and M.
le Due de Chateaurien-ha, ha! you
see?-we are goin' arm-in-arm to that
ball, and I am going' have one of those
looks, I! And a rose! It is time. But
ten minute', monsieur. I make my
apology to keep you waiting' so long
while I go in the nex' room and execute
my poor mustachio-that will be my
only murder for jus' this one evening-
and inves' myself in white satin. Ha,
hat I shall be very gran', monsieur.
Francois, send Lois to me; Victor, to
order two chairs for monsieur and me;
we are going' out in the world' to-night!"


CHAPTER II.


The chairmen swarmed in the street
at Lady Melbourne's door, where the
joyous vulgar fought with muddled
footmen and tipsy link-boys for places
of vantage whence to catch a glimpse
of quality and of raiment at its utmost.
Dawn was in the east, and the guests
were departing. Singly or in pairs, glit-
tering in finery, they came mincing
down the steps, the ghost of the night's
smirk fading to jadedness as they sought
the dark recesses of their chairs. From
within sounded the twang of fiddles still
(Continued on Page Thirteen]
M


r1


P.1 lmmi WMreeON* Edby TMe
Iqdl UahbWeAsmmone suhtb.


Reorganized, cleaned and purified.
Rigid economy inaugurated. Present
publicity of its affairs guaranteed in
the future by Prsident Paul Morton.
It nrmains still the strongest assur-
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CHAS. BLUM a CO.

Jaoksonvlllg, Fla.


0 0 f


Windsor Hotel


Jacksonville's finest

and florida's Largest

and Best Year-Round


Hotel


DODGE & GMULLENS
Owners and Managers


''ill


For Real Istate

Rents and Loans


1 BUCKMAN


22 1-2 Hogan St
Jacksonville, la.


Thr QnKATT Au f Assman
for the LAMST M y, ithe
STRONGEST Oesnpany In
the WodM.
We will sell a man, aged 35, our
GUARANTEED Annuit Bond, Life
Contract, Tea el M for
$10SM Think of it! Only $10.28
per $1,000.00. Other ages in propor-
tion.
We do not kiew what other com-
panies are doing, but we do know we
are selling this contract and have
Ibeen for some time. Before buying
IPrMtetl for your loved ones, it will
pay yu to see or write to me first.


J. S. GOLES, JR., Mgr.
Equitable Life Assurance Society,
Duval Building,
Jacksonville, Florida.


J


*


",,mNam



... :. iw


I ,


1a


v










er 2. 1905


THU SUIel


lIE CHILDREN'S SOCIETY


ad while we are planning some
)y times for the fortunate little
Ie who have homes of their own, and
|g parents to provide not only corm-
L but luxuries and Christmas gifts,
r not forget those others who nave
tor home nor parents, but are en-
dependent on strangers for the
that shelters them, for the food
keeps them alive, for the clothes
eep them warm.
Children's Home Society is doing
its power for the succor of these
ones. But it needs assistance,
a it very much. A plea has al-
gone forth that Our Home Circle
rs and sisters should inaugurate
birth by contributing a Christ-
ft to aid this noble society in its
of rescuing of souls. For it means
less than that, this saving of
children and placing them in
lan homes.
lie old days Our Homo Circle did
charitable work. From time to
t raised money for St. Luke's Hos-
for the Daniel Memorial Orphan-
and for individual charities. Let
bt fall behind our old record. Let
ot weary of well-doing. Doubtless
I are many who know little or noth-
I this Home Society, or of the good
it is quietly doing in our midst.
neficent deeds are limited only by
ek of means. Its coming to this
is a comparatively new thing, and
s why it is not more widely known
sisted.
ing the past ten months it has
good homes for thirty homeless
Snes, and many of these have been,
I be, legally adopted. The State
ntenuent, Mrs. Seaton, has done
ork almost single-handed, herself
ing over the State, seeking and
ng the helpless little ones-some
m babies in arms-and bringing
safely to the shelter awaiting
in Jacksonville, and later takes
to the homes offered. Besides this,
s done all the office work and has
most of the funds expended. All
ause every dollar, and more,
more, is needed for her little
There are none to spare even


Ons. &Baucaire
ontinued from Twelfth Page]
manfully at it, and the win-
ere bright with the light of many
When the door was flung open
the chair of Lady Mary Carlisle,
was an eager pressure of the
to see.
all, fair gentleman in white satin
out upon the steps, turned and
before a lady who appeared in
rway, a laay whose royal loveli-
as given to view for a moment in
lowing frame. The crowd sent up
y English cheer for the Beauty
h.
gentleman smiled upon tnem de-
y. "What enchanting people "
"Why did I not know, so 1
have shout' with them?" The
oticed the people not at all;
t, being pleased, the people
Again. The gentleman offered
hand; she made a slow courtesy;
the tips of her fingers upon his
"I am honored, M. de Chateaur-
he said.
no !" he cried earnestly. "Behol'
r Frenchman whom emperors
envy." Then reverently and with
de of his gallant office vibrant in
line of his light figure, invested
te satin and very grand, as he had
lied, M. ie Due de Chateaurien
SLady Mary Carlisle down the
an achievement which had figured
Ambitions of seven other gentle-
aring the evening.
I to be lef' in such onhappiness ?"
in a low voice. "That rose I
eg' for so long--"
ver!" said Lady Mary.
I do not deserve it, I know so
But--"
Wverl"


is the greatness of my onworthi-
t alone can claim your charity;


for needed assistance for the over-worked
superintendent.
Don't you think we all ought to do
all we can to help this noble worker, as
well as the waifs she saves? She has
the support of an enthusiastic and cap-
able board of directors, but something
more is needed. The work is too great
and pressing for a few, however willing,
to support it financially. The Children's
Home Society is not a local or private
society. It is authorized by law to res-
cue children from debasing surround-
ings, and how many of these there are
waiting to be saved we all know. The
society reaches out all over the State
and gathers in all it can grasp.
And there are homes, good, kindly
homes, and loving hearts anxious to wel-
come the waifs; empty homes and hun-
gry hearts waiting to be filled. But the
children to fit into these empty niches,
where are they to-day? Still in the
slums, still adrift, homeless, parentless,
or worse, because the money that is
needed to snatch them out of their
Slough of Despond is missing from their
rescuer's treasury. Only a few weeks
ago the Children's Home Society had
sixty-five applications on file, sixty-five
good homes offered for children, and-
just think of it-only six of them could
be filled. Why? Not because there
were not plenty of suffering waifs to fill
them all, aye, and ten times as many,
but because there was not money enough
to send out the laborers to gather up
the harvest.
And this is why I would like to see
Our Home Circle "do itself proud" by
making its first Christmas gift for a
beautiful cause that means the saving of
human souls.
There is another way, too, in which
every one of our Circle can help the
Home Society. This is by reporting
cases of homeless, or worse than home-
less, little ones that come to their knowl-
edge. Write to your editor all about
them, and then the rescuers will soon
know all about them too. One word in
closing, the Children's Home Society has
not requested this appeal, nor has it any
knowledge of it, save from these col-
umns.

let your kin' heart give this little red
rose, this great alms, to the poor beg-
gar."
"Never!"
She was seated in the chair. "Ah,
give the rose," he whispered. Her
beauty shone dazzling on him out of
the dimness.
"Neverl" she flashed defiantly as she
was closed in. "Never!"
"Ah I"
"Never I"
The rose fell at his feet.
"A rose lasts till morning," said a
voice behind him.
Turning, M. do Chateaurien looked
beamingly upon the face of the Duke of
Winterset.
"'Tis already the daylight," he re-
plied, pointing to the east. "Monsieur,
was it not enough honor for you to han'
out madane, the aunt of Lady Mary?
Lady Rellerton retain' much trace of
beauty. 'Tis strange you did not ap-
pear more happy."
(CONTINUED NEXT WEEK.)

Letter to the Editor
Editor Sun:
Sir: By the newspapers I observe
that the President and Postmaster Gen-
eral have determined to bring postmas-
ters of offices of the first elass under the
merit system, thus placing them beyond
the power of removal for political pur-
poses.
As an old employee of the postal ser.-
vice I desire to express the belief that
no one act can do more than this to im-.
prove the service.
There has been no stability in the
management of postoftices, as, in the
past, postmasters have been well edu-
cated in their duties just in time for re-
moval.


It has been truly said that "an ex-
cellent' or 'good' postmaster should be
retained so long as be an maintain such


a rating; a 'fair' or 'bad' one should
quickly be exchanged for a 'good' or
'excellent' one." Therefore, with the
present system of removal for political
purposes only, there is not much en-
courageiment for a postmaster to devote
his best talents and energies to his of-
fice. FORMER EMPLOYEE.
Mandarin, Fla.,.Nov. 27.


The Equitable ULfe Assurancel
&0Giety Reorganised,
COleansed and
Purified.
lts taisIt have ln ctI ('1unt1 l ret'at-
(clly, and. found all right. Its t'X|niIHs
an salarihe rtl'etl. Its mWe(rt tsnuiadde
public. Its nelw niuianagileit lilts
pl4gl to tlthe public an annual x-
aniination lhy itnile'ndm lent iIhartenl
act'ountantts, After all the attacks it
stands to-day the strongest lift' assur-
ance Coptanill in the world. There is
no reason wly the most timlid and
careful shlumh delay further making
inmurant in thlt l,:quitable.


FULLER'S EARTH.
Floridia and Arkansast are the States
leading in the production of this ma-
terial, of which some forty million tons
are used in various useful ways, other
than in candy adulteration, every year.
Of this amount Florida furnished 21),-
480 tons of this rare and valuable earth,
since it is now wing extensively used
in place of boneblui'k for refining pur-
Ioses. Recently an important report
has Wen issued by the geological survey
of the Government, which aiys it it in-
teremting to note that Florida-a State
whilh is not ordinarily connected with
mining in any form--conmes first in thel
production of fuller's earth. This posi.
tion has been assumed by Florida within
the past few years, and tilhe entrance of
the State in the industry immnnedilately
brought it forward as one of the lead-
ing factors in the world.
COTTON ENEMIES IN TEXAS.
It would seem, from a itrecent bulletin
on Miscellaneous Cotton Insects in
Texas, issued by the United States I)e-
partment of Agriculture, an if the Lone)
Star State has more than the usual in-
sects to light than any of the States
raising cotton. The list given comprises
six which affect the young plants, Heven
which injure the leaves, three the stalk,
and nine injurious to the sinuarms nd
Khlls-twenty-flve in all. The differen-
tial locust in said to be by far the most
injurious of them all. As the bulletin
is fully illustrated, gives history and
remedies for prevention, as well as ex-
ternmination, it should be in the haniid
of every cotton grower, not alone in
Texas, but in all the (hiulf State-s.

The Fruitman's Guide of New York
City says the orange crop of Lee and
IN1Soto Counties ihams ben pretty well
shiplwd. Not more than one-fifth Ihas
gone out of the Zolfo district and, if
this is a criterion for the rest of tlhe
'ounty-as wre sl litvre it is-we doubt
if 25 per cent has yet been stripped
from the treens.
Mrs. N. C. Martin of Laurel Hill has
raised c(ane to Mome profit this se inon.
From 500 joints planted last spring she
has banked 4,000 'need and also mahde
a lot of syrup. A woman thins able to
raise cane deM'rves a laurel wreath.

Zolfo is not a very big town down in
I)eSoto County, but it has leen figured
out that at least 100,000 boxes of or-
ainges will be shipped from its railway
station this season.

| Ti' IQUITABIL LII I
A6SURANOG SO6ITY


New York

Fashions

In Florida

For Smart Styles in
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Furnishii s, we'U nput
you ll'ext. ,Sole A 't
f.r "IFI -EFF" and


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Over ,taits al Rain-hl-
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Yomnig' $3.Nl I haits,
also S'ttsonI aHiIl No-
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f'atioi guaraunitt l.

Standard
Ciothin

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Jacksonville, florida


Lot us Supply that

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You Intend Givln your
Boss, your friend, your
Husband or Brother
All Gholce Brands at
GorreOt Prices......

E. L. STEVCNSON
lA i agsy AMmm eft.k Fieftdi



Your order
FILLED FROM
STOCK
when sent to

THE

S. B. Hubbard
CO.

Jacksonville, Fla.

HARDWARE
PAINTS AND OILS
GUNS AND PISTOLS
Iowa Farnning Tools
Plows and Plow Shpes
NILL SUPPLIES and
PLUMBING GOODS
Doors Sash Blinds

THE

S. 5. Hubbard Co.


Jacksonville, R.

J. HI. Livinpton, May. the Arcadia
News, has a half-acre of sugar cane
whose stlks stald eleven eet high.



f /


18


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Examinedl, Invetigatdl, Purged,
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6TRON6rST IN THEC WORLD.




77"UY A~-


ow~ F-, -, -'( wom -omoml- ,- 4 po


mr'E'cri-TrTft


December 2, 1905


A GOODMCAL1
18 ASSURED


when you stop at


The Duval
Go. Fa orsyth
Jackeonvile, ria.


Ret.itor at


THE


ARAGON


Jacksonville, Fla.
And your comfort and convenience
is asurnl. Ample aceomnimoda-
tions. Superior service. Cuisine
unexcolhml

THE ARAGON H.'

Convenient to business
EI Tt


Everett Hotel


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
i ad Matf.


TNHI PLAC TO POP
ATSI ARK RfOUT

A Telephone In Your Room
if You Stop at

The Park Hotel
Jacksonville, Fla.
STEAM HEATED
NEWLY FURNISHED
CAFE SERVICE


Florida Electric Co.
JOBBERS
Electric Apparatus t Supplies
IIeapu arters for everything electri-
cal. Complete telephone exchanges
and private lines. Isolated ehletric
lighting and power plants.
22, 24, 26, 28 W. Forsyth St.
Jacksonville, Fla.

The Citizens Bank
OF JACKSONVILLE


D. U. FLETCHER
D. H. DOIG


- President
V'ie President


IDEa ~j~.&i


Agriculture
(Continued from Sixth Page)
Speaking of apples, what do you think
of one, just one, for which $1,500 has
been offered and refused, its owner
wanting $4,000 for it. It grew sixteen
feet under ground and petrified; hence
its value. Found in a mine near
Guadalajara, Mexico, by a Denver min-
ing engineer. The Chicago University
and the Smithsonian Institute each want
it. Who knows? the Garden of Eden
may have been located over there and
this apple one left behind by those inno-
cents over whose supposed grave Mark
Twain wept.
0 *
"Hllappy are they who can create a
rose tree," said Gray. Then surely Herr
Wehrle of Freiburg must be at the pin-
nacle of happiness, since he has the
largest rose tree in Europe-possibly
in tlw world. In 1s 1 on some collmmon
stock he grafted a tea rose. In one year
it gave 27 buds; at the end of six years,
(1.2100, and now it has over 10,000 in
bloom. What a beautiful display the
tree must make. But, alas! as brief as
beautiful. What said Hlerriek?
"Gather ye rosebuds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles to-day
To-morrow will be dying."


Home Circle
(Continued from Sixth Page)
ding dish, be it here remarked, is the
lower half of a big barrel or hogshead,
without top or bottom. Its sides are
covered with white or yellow paper or
cloth, and the top with brown paper to
simulate the crust, on which are many
dark splot(ches to imitate raisins. This
pudding dish stands on a big box, draped
to the floor, like a table. The box is
open at the back, and must be large
enough to conceal Santa and the gifts.
When the jolly Santa Cla( s seems to
fall into the pudding dish, he really
drops down Ix'ehind it, and as soon as
the curtain drops he creeps into it and
arranges the gifts in a big pasteboard
pa'k, such as peddlers carry. There is
no top to the box where the pudding
dish rests. When the lights are turned
on again for the shadows, Mrs. Santa
is seen to approach the pudding flourish-
ing a big Knife. With this she makes
an energetic slash at the crust, and in-
stantly Santa pops up, with the knife
sticking up in his cap, which is made of
paper, by the way. Mrs. Santa runs
away in terror, and Santa is seen to hold
his sides with laughter as he steps out
into the open with his pack full of toys
on his back. And now the pantomime
is over. tnd the gifts are to be given to
their owners. If a few Brownies can
be had, to appear at this time and de-
liver the gifts, so much the better.
In the home circle, where there are
several children, the mother may give
them a nice little surprise 4)y hiding
so4me of their smaller gifts in little
pies. Not real pies, of course; that
would be rather on the order of "too
iuch of a good thing." These pies are
nmide on thin wooden pienle plates, cov-
ered with stout light brown paper cut
two inches larger than the plates, and
pasted to the bottom. This imitation
ernst is to he slit at intervals all around
the edges, and marked with brown
crayon or ink, to look like a real pie.
Before this paper crust is put on, can-
dies, raisins and other small gifts should
Is' put inside.

The State Fair


J. H. MANN R Vice 'Preident (Contotinul from I'age Ten)
J. DENHIIAM BIRD Caollshier stind at thle head of tilhe list, it will be
Offern to depodtor every facility con- ry close to it.
de nt wid oe and onstervativelank- I wish I could mention each county
ing, withWe and conu e rative bank lwore( in detail. but it would be merely
S ningut repetition of the names of the various
i fruits, grains and vegetables that make
4 PWi I MNJ NInWM quarterly, paid up, the agricultural products of the
m toV U I t S.t::te. Eittmach county. with large or small
.,11en of display, had its exhibit so ar-
Ira ngld as to show, even to those who
E 2SlI M2M Y I SA Y S t only passed down the aisle, what was
r M R W O'CLOCK thlrem. Osceola, from the eastern coast,
Nwas located directly opposite from Hills-
Si11o, from' the gulf side; Polk, repre-
Co..ridjt D a ,Y, ,JacSOnVlelH.i-unting the central part, had over


Studebaker Wagons

Florence Wagons

Babcock Buggies


SABEL


BROS.


If It's Drugs
Bettes Has It
TheSg o I
Funl Urn Tellt ArtlelMU
Agent for Huylr's Candy
Surgload lntrumuISt
Bettes Drug Store
Cor. By and Laura, Jaoksenvlle, Fla.
JUST WHITE A LITTER


M. A. Dzialynski

AUCTION AND
COMMISSION
MERCHANT
TermIs trialy eash. I LE. Bay St
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Vehicle Emporium and
Harness Manufacturers


Cay, Shine & McCall
FIRE INSURANCE
S1i Dyal.-Upelrl IMg, Jamokonvlo, Fla.
pIn-, I1


O F O Bred on famous stock farms of
H O'0uE rF1OR SAbE Missouri and Kentucky. 1


Our guarantee means your money back if you don't like your trade.
S. I. MELSON & SONS


Corner Foruyth and Cedar Sts.


Jacksonville, .Fla.


For Highly Profitable Results
u"S Florida's Favorite Fertilizers


FFF


SANDERS FERTILIZER COMPANY
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
We oarry a nemplete so k of ForUlilng Material and Poultry Feeds
Your orders wi reivo prompt attntin. Your hMquirlo te same. Ageto wanted

PARTIAL PRICE LIST OF

Wines, Whishies, Beer and Malt


KXPRKE PREPAD
MUQumrlMiUN M 40Qte IQs IttQ
Hunting Club Rye............8...2 65 84 00 87 00
Nelson County Ryt ............ 2 90 4 '2 7 0
Monogram Rye............... :1 20 4 50 8 00
Ilanne's "44" Rye.............. : 75 5 00 9 50
Social Drops................... 4 50 6 50 1200
Malt Whiskey.................. 3 75 5 00 50
Peach Brandy.................. 3 75 5 00 9 50
Apple Brandy..... ............ 3 75 5 00 9 50
Holland Gin ...... .......... 280 4 25 7 25
Geneva Gin........................ 8 75 500 950
North Carolina Corn........... 2 65 4 00 7 00
Mountain Corn.................... 8 75 56 00 9 50
Jamaica Rum..................... 2 80 4 25 7 25
Medford Rum...................... 375 600 9 50
(rape Brandy...................... 8 75 5 00 9 50
King of Kentucky Bourbon 8 756 5 00 9 50
al~Ml ai ad geio el oIo piwao


BULK 000--JUU FREE-NOT PRPAID
Rye, Gin. Corn. good grade.................. ........ 1 )
Rye, ()in, Corn, Ruin, flnoe quality................. 2 Lt)
Rye, Gin, Corn, Rtim, Ihst for the money...... 2 50
",I" Rye, 'Peach and Apple Brandy, mellow-
ed by ageo............................................... 3 00
Victoria Rye, Social Drops Rye, medicinal
quality ................................................. 4 00
LIP ST. LAUs N Paer bgO
Falstaff Beer ...............................................1... 1 25
Extra Pale ..................................................... I 10
Standard ...................................................... 1 00
Malt Extact, dark .... ...................................1 10
Coburger. Imported..................................... 2 00
Guinness Stout, pints................................. 2 25
Prim byh f I. ap Sumi


1246-1258 HANNE BROS.
W. Adams St. IMN'BROS.


Jacksonville,
Fla.


If you must buy


Why not -save money?
A LINE TO" -


PELLERIN FURNITURE CO.
"AyMi&g aMd overylthiW at pue b a e ee"
WILL TELL YOU JUST HOW
Don't put t off, WRITE TODAY, Tomrrw may do as wd


I'A


JACKSONVILLE, FLU


ri


I









iber 2, 1905


THE SUN


diamondss

Watches

ess & Slager
.U c'T. Jacksonville, Fla.
VWN W IN" o ow IIIIslo




Electrical Engineers

e to
Standard
Electric Co.
Forsyth St., Jacksonville, Fla.


he Second Club
II be filled inside of two weeks, to take
Hundred New Scale $41M) Ludden &
Pianos at $287 cash or $287 on pay-
ntv of $10 cash and $8 monthly (8 |i'r
it interest.)
I yI won L OClu m d huy
r PlMa rw OsOp.m
Splan Yi save $111.


&


L a Pia anme arMtud w MraN ms..
Rlunty-nine other nwmilx'rs Join with you.
ir'by purchasihlirg at ther-saviiig all imIil,.l
i andi atrents' prollts, ex iis4m, et. You luy
quanltitles on a rash bIsel. Tak timno If you
e-monthly, quarterly or yearly by merely
Vinf interest. Write at once or call at the
i, for details and application for menilMrship.
Snot wait.
udden & Bates S. M. H.
KPATM MT "A"
Iast bly iest .* JaMkNvl, Fra
;*


Tr)

"Green

Tennessee


ITS PU
THAT'S


bt. W.


. 6LEAM


Jacksonvl
suEND oSr KNEN


against it Lee, the far-away southern
county, whose western borders are
washed by the waters of the gulf. Next
came Alachua and Marion, adjoining
neighbors; while Manatee held a choice
position between Lake and Baker, with
no rival on the opposite side of the aisle
to detract attention to it.
*
The question is often asked by people
from the North what can a man do in
thile way of garden truck for home use
or for market, while he is waiting for
grove or orchard to bring in an income.
To persons of small means this In a
matter of importance, raised as they
hanv been where the garden furnishes
so large a proportion of table supplies.
And this question was so well supplied
with the answer in tile individual ex-
hibit made by Mr. J.1. W. Hudson of
Paseo County that I procured a list of
what he had, as follows:
Various kinds of vegetables, such am
squish, sweet and Irish piotatos, l)es.
beans, okra, melons, eutditlMwrs, onions,
turnips, beets, cabbage, tomatoes, egg-
plant, etc.; six varieties of tropical
fruits; fit varieties of sugar cane;
three kinds of hay; corn. of which he
itowed two donn ears that weighed
twenty pounds, running from 000 to
1,000 grains to the ear; specimen jars
of sugar and syrup and lard gave evi-
dence that these necessaries could It*
relied upon; a dozen or more jars
showed jellies, jams and preserves; six
kinds of forage or pasture grasses, aside
from the hay, proved that the horse and
cow were properly provide! for; chickens
and turkeys were in the poultry in-
clostiur, so that eggs are not wanting
in the i hoe economy; a palmetto three
thirteen feet high, an orange eleven
feet, a pt'-Can twelve feet, were shown.
competing for the premium for msinples
of trees of one year's growth, though
it was hard for one to believe in such
!i growth itl one year.
Is there t nyv dotbt, therefore, about
raising garden stuff in Florida? But,
as there is no rule without an excep-
tion, so there may he said that there
is one section of the State where garden
stuff cnnot bI raised to any extent for
market purposes or home iuse; the high,
sandy ridge stretching through Polk
and DeSoto Counties, where the lake
system prevails, is not favorable. Tlhe
latwoods lands, on either side, are all
right; but the sun heats the sand to
such an extent as to make vegetable
growing more or less a failure. Yet in
this same sand-in many places' 25 to
40 feet deel)-tho orange, iomielo, lemon,
lime, guavat, camphor trees flourish in
at way surprising even to those who have
lived in Florida for years and know
thle capabilities of the soil.
The variety of lands in the State
make it possible for any newcomer to
find such as he thinks he needs for de-
.iding upon thte place where he will
make his home. Their general classill-
cation may beI said to Ise first, second
iand third-class pine lands, sand hill
lands, high and low hammncwk and
swamp lands.


* 4 *


Wa'ts the, State Fair a success?
and no. Yves, because, as straws
the way the winds blow, so the


Yes.
show
few


county exhibits proved conclusively that
FIlorida is an agricultural State. though
y,.t in its infancy of develo )mnent. Tim
exhibit t (of any one county demonstrated
SBri 99 ti. Had the" nmnlx,'r lben doubled
ir the building g provided would not have
bIoen large enough. It can be assumed
that the State appropriation for pay-
nS* nt of premiums had much to do with
the excellent county exhibits made. Had
this been lacking I doubt if the fair
,would have lt6-n more creditable than
IhR lIst year. And the query arises, lack-
IRE ing this inducement next year, will the
11906 fair bring out the exhibits?
SURKbE Wia the State Fair a sneless? No.
in that ail se.-tions were not represented.
It was more a Central Florida Expos.i-
t^timmn thm a" it(,m'ra State Fair. 'The
,lmunti-,i clowp's to the point of loImtion
WmI re all ir e.nintnt, save ono--l)e'to.
IM M'(It Inly I-.Le, from extreme south Florida,
imshowed an interest, and nobly did it
ENT show what it could do. All honor to it*
pcmnllIIimionPr, who, though only an ldi-
ie, I F tor. as shown that hle is also a, publie-
lie, li s,.pirite'd citi'en, giving time. lalowr alnd'
S m i money to advance the interests of his
County.


The Florida

OstrichFarm
O f oes Is as VIIW
AMUSEMENT AND INSTRUCTION
PLUCKING MADE DAILY
h-111,a1 1 a4l almfIt
BUY FROM PRODUCERS AND SAVE
TWO. ROFmITS
THE
F6lrida Ostrich Farm
Jacksonville, Florida
TAKB FMAInMUM AM


If Art's Oliver'so


i


YOU CAN'T DO


BETTER THAN TO SELECT
YOUR GHRISTMAS
PRESENT PROM OUR
STOGK.


Feather Boas


Feather Fans


Ostrich Plumes
Ostrich Tips


You'll Want Mole


Gandy Jackonville,
Sent by Mail L. C. Ofiver g ..orida

Consolidated Grocery Co.
HU(I ;SKHOIR4 TO
C. 11. Rogers (Compmny, Florida Grocery Company, Florida Naval Htores
and Commisslon Comlpany, Mutual Naval Mtorn Company of Jacksonville,
(iulf Naval Stonm Company of I'ennsaola, Wwt Coast Naval Storme Comnpa.
ny of Mavannah, G(a.
Will handle everytqnig In Heavy and Light IrMbel, w8l, PrWvlieIm, Imes
ie Mid ImptNed Greeele, Turpetine Tels,
Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest for the customer
through tie l)ranchli tor the Company, and prompt attention to all onlers
through the main oillic and branches.
Mo Ssad wagg al sesoos JidnauMvlO. aoo: TaMp Posam IN MAvNuuft.
N WD in every town In orida
AGENT8 WANTED 't oel" "l "r
MONUMENTS, HCADSTONCS AND IRON FENGES
Write for 306 Main St.
WriterfOr The Geo. W. Clark Co. J .o M noS.
Terms I e J acksonvlle, oda

"Chadwick Pays the Freight"


V


20


0 0 arle INNs


By giving this (discount from plain figure
cash prices to all purclasers who hitvo


goods shipped to them in Florida .


B. H. Chadwick Furniture Co.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
Cam land ee ie gNd'WO IiMuM mel CaaegamN.


Joseph Zapf & Co. L



Anhouser-Busch Beers
KMW AMLL
vA war VnsKE V nnJs vr Wa m
A g WhibMimi Whims LkW b "Mhl Wu%%fty i
F YOU WANT PURE AMOND ARIMEJI O, IF YOU WANT TMK MT
| KWIRwT iRN C, OALL. N 8


15


I


F 494rw





TEN


THOUSAND


DOLLARS


Has been speoit by us in getting up a catalogue whVich lists, describes and prices the unequalled
line of FURNITURE, carried in Florida's Largest- Furniture Sture. Catalogue sent for the
asking. Write to-day to


Fet


Furniture


22, 24, 26, 28, 30 WEST BAT STREET


Pl. Orders receive
Prompt.
and Careful Attention
J l I


kldlswsisforaldSesuls
We gIsfta df
hwmalumePam
a bldkmbunun Visb


GREENLEAF %


Company


Jacksonville, Florida


CROSBY CO.


JEWELERS AND IMPORTERS


41 WEST BAY STREET


36 West


Forsyth Street


Write Now for our
New Catalog.
Satisfaction Guaranteed


a JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


ooTI LORISToo
THE FLORIST


Ja~k~sonvlle


Florida


Polypli -I a No sw
dszu,$IASSpri 14%L s, I
SoWS u&IUUS.bib~f
od SMIKysfl osw wubs
g% dzo $1 W lOSLfe. L


THE CHRISTIE-GROOVER DRUG
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
STATE AGENTS FOR J. HUNGERFORD SMITH I CO'S HOT SODA WATER SUPPLIES


CO.,


ORDER


EARLY


FOR


THE


HOLIDAY


TRADE


Mail Order
Deparment


FURC HlOTT'S


Bay and Main
Jacksonville, Fla.


Order


Holiday


Goods


Now


IMMENSE
STOCK


SUPERIOR
QUALITY


VARIED
SELECTION


RIGHT
PRICES


WHOLESALE
LOTS


GRAND


CLEARANCE


SALE


NOW GOING ON-HIG6H-GRADE PIAN6O-ow GOING ON


/0 W. BAY
STREET


The CableCorn Ay JACKSONVILLE
,Ihe Cable Cor npany A.


Fj


I
A'
j


U
'V


=--- .7


6 A n FOR A BOX OF
) 1O N. GO.L D ORANGES
The second contest fpr our $100 M ri will take place in Jacksonville at the Pure Food Exposit0on
to be held Janun 4th to 18th, 1906. The prizes offered are as follows: $100 in gold for the best box
of oranges; $8.or second best; $25 for third best; $50 for best box grape fruit; $25 for second best,
o f 'oges (,$10 for third best. For full particulars, address,
SO Pahter JACKSONVILLE,
O.Panter Fert nzer Coo FrOORIDA




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