The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:07105

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Ocala weekly star


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OGALA

Weather Forecast: Fair' tonight, I
fy0,travyn rXlrttt OGALA, FLORIDA, MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1918. v VOL. 25, NO. 289
central portion; Tuesday fair.
. i : i

PRESIDENT VILSOH
ANNOUNCES PLANS

JTCREABY- ENUNCIATED BY HIM
WILL BE ACCEPTED AS
FOUNDATION FOR
'PEACE
Mr. Wilson Hopes to See a Perma Permanent
nent Permanent Agreement Between Nations
Made in the Next Few Months.
(Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 2. In the deliv delivery
ery delivery of his annual message today to
Congress, one the eve of his departure
for Europe, the president was expect expected
ed expected to make .known forthe first time
this morning of his plans for partici
pation in the peace conference. -Thej
president is to address the joint ses session
sion session at one o'clock.
.' PLANS FOR PEACE i
Washington, Dec. 2. In his ad address
dress address to Congress today, the president
formally announced his intention to
go to the peace conference, saying
that as the allied governments have
accetped the principles enunciated by
him for peace, it is his paramount
duty to be present. He said he would
be in close touch with America by
cable and wireless and that Congress
will know all he does on the other
side.
He said the government had taken
over the American Cable systems on
expert advice to make a unified sys system
tem system available.
READY TO RELEASE RAILROADS
Much of his address was devoted to
the railroad problem, for which the
president said he now. had no solution
to offer. He saidhe stood ready to
release the roads from government
control whenever a satisfactory plan
of readjustment had Aeen worked out.
PEACE BY SPRING
He declared he hoped to see a for formal
mal formal declaration of peace by treaty
"by the time spring comes."
The president spoke for forty-two
minutes and left the chamber amid
applause limited. to ..the democratic
side. Interruptions to his address for
questions, threatened Jby republicans,
didn't materialize. "'.'
S
CUMMINS WANTS TO v SEND A
CROWD v
Senator Cummins, .republican, in introduced
troduced introduced a resolution proposing that
a Senate committee of four democrats
and four republicans go to France for
the peace conference.
"CONSERVATION FOR
WORLD RELIEF" IN OCAtA
With the signing of the armistice
our nation, faces the stupendous prob problem
lem problem of feeding 325,000,000 people,
where, prior to peace, her problem
was to provide food supplies for only
130,000,000. The gigantic task of find finding
ing finding food stuffs for hungry Europe de devolves
volves devolves upon the food administration.
The only hope of success lies in the
awakening of our people to the trust
that s in fheir hands and making
conservation a religion to them until
the crisis is past. The success of the
new campaign hinges upon "Conser "Conservation
vation "Conservation Week," December 1 to 7.
Mr. Clarence Camp, the Marion
county food administrator, has ar arranged
ranged arranged for a number of conservation
meetings in this city during the week week-'
' week-' 1 Yesterday in all of the churches jsi
the city Mr. Hoover's messages was
read by the ministers, which" was the
beginning of the campaign.
Wednesday morning at the TempleT
theater i at 10 o'clock there will be a
joint meeting of the Marion County
Merchants' Association and the food
conservation chairmen of the county.
This meeting will be addressed by Mr.
E. E. McLin, of Orlando, director of
enforcement from the federal food ad administration
ministration administration office, and,. by. Mrs. John
T. Fuller of Orlando, state food con conservation
servation conservation chairman. There will also
be local speakers and music. This is
to be an open meeting and the public
is cordially invited to be present on
this occasion. It is earnestly hoped
that Mr. McLin and Mrs. Fuller will
be given a large audience Wednesday
as they are coming to Ocala especially
for this meeting and both will have
valuable messages for the people of
Ocala and Marion county.
Thursday night at the Temple the theater
ater theater during the regular picture show
performance, Mr. Clarence Camp will
read Mr. Hoover's "Message," and
there will be a beautiful solo by Mrs.
L. G. Ketchum and possibly other
music.
On Friday afternoon in the schools
of the city, both white and colored,
there will be special patriotic pro pro-.
. pro-. grame rendereda with attractive
features on "food conservation."
Paper Drinking Cups, 25 to pack package,
age, package, ten cent? at Gerig's Drugstore.

IMPERIALISTIC
PLOT UNEARTHED

TELTO" GENERALS CONSPIRE
TO REPLACE WILHELM ON
THE THRONE
(Associated Press)
London, Nov. 2. A plot to restore
imperialism and secure the return of
Emperor-William has been discovered
in Berlin, according to an Amster Amsterdam
dam Amsterdam dispatch to the Express. The plot
collapsed because a secret service
agent overheard a telephone conversa conversation.
tion. conversation. Many arrests have been made
ir Berlin and other cities.
BIG MEN IN IT
According to the dispatch the chief
men behind tKe plot were Field Mar Marshal
shal Marshal von Mackensen, Generals yon
Horn and von Arnim. No direct evi evidence
dence evidence of William Hohenzollern's con connection
nection connection with the plot has been found.
REICHSTAG SOON MEETS
Parish Dec. 2. The German reich reich-stag
stag reich-stag will be convoked shortly, accord according
ing according to South German newspapers,
says a Zurich dispatch.
t : :
SHAKE-UP SOMEWHERE
Recorded by Washington. Seismo Seismo-graphs
graphs Seismo-graphs this Morning
(Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 2. An earth earth-quaek
quaek earth-quaek of, moderate intensity, estimat estimated
ed estimated as centered 2900 miles from Wash Washington,
ington, Washington, was recorded by the seismo seismographs
graphs seismographs here this morning. The shocks
continued for about an hour.
TO ALL MEMBERS
OF THE WOMAN'S CLUB
As you know, the first'week in De December
cember December has been named conservation
week by the U.' S. food administra administration,
tion, administration, and a program prepared for its
uniform: observance throughout the
nation. t '.
Wednesday of this week has been
designated woman's day, and all the
women's organizations are asked to
hold special meetings on thatday.
Because our county food adminis administration
tration administration has arranged a special pro program,
gram, program, with speakers from the state
headquarters, in Orlando, one of whom
is Mrs. Fuller, representing the wom woman's
an's woman's department, the Woman's Club
will unite with the county food ad
ministration in its observance of the
day, and all club 'members are earri earri-estly
estly earri-estly urged to attend.
Please regard this requestas a
duty to your country, as there will be
outlined the new food problems and
responsibilities.
' Mrs. William Hocker,
Acting President.
SOME TAX MATTERS
Editor 'Star: The Tax Assessors'
and County Commissioners' Associa Association
tion Association met in Jacksonville last Friday
and among other things, requested
the governor to ask the legislature to
pass a bill which we prepared and
sent to him, making a fifty per cent
valuation a legal assessment and val validating
idating validating lill previous assessments. The
necessity of such a law is so apparent
that we think every sensible member
will vote for it. We agreed on a fifty
per cent assessment for 919 and the
same schedule of assessment on live
stock, except sheep, which was raised
from one to two dollars.
I declined to serve longer and Mr.
Wilson of Volusia was elected presi president,
dent, president, of the association.
If Governor Catts can separate
state and county taxes as he proposes
to, he will accomplish what the best
lailroad attorneys have been fighting
for, but have failed to do for many
years, and as it would relieve the
railroads from paying special school,
road and all other county taxes, they
can well afford to make him a present
of a hundred thousand dollars, but I
don't believe the "people of Florida
haveall gone crazy yet.
Yours truly, Alfred Ayer.
! 1
NOTICE, KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
'All members of Ocala Lodge No. 19,
K of P. are earnestly requested to
attend the meeting tonight. Election
of officers for ensuing year. y
C. K. Sage, K. of R. & S.
TO HOLDERS OF SEA
ISLAND COTTON IN BALES
If you will advise us how many
bales you have hn hand we will put
you on our list and keep you posted
wnen we are on tne marKet.
FARMERS' GIN & MILL CO.,
l-6t
Summerfield," Fla:
We are showing a most attractive
line of "Little Gifts." Be sure and see
them before purchasing. A. "E. Gerig,
THE SPECIALTY SHOP. tf

BOCHES DISPLAYED BAD BEHAVIOR
110 BRUTALITY OF BOLSKEVIKI

TOWARD AMERICAN PRISONERS
IN GERMANY, REPORTS
GEN. PERSHING
(Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 2. Americans
returning from German prison camps
complain of scanty food and bad hous housing
ing housing conditions, but no evidence of dis discrimination
crimination discrimination against Americans, nor
authenticate reDorts of brutalitv to
wards them, General Pershing re
ports. ..-
HEADQUARTERS AT TREVES
With the American Army of Occu Occupation,
pation, Occupation, Sunday, Decl. (By the As
sociated Press). No demonstration,
friendly or hostile, marked the entry
of the American army into Germany
today. By nightfall the Americans
had penetrated twelve miles, reaching
Radgen on! the left and Saarholz Bach
on the right. The line extends along
the Saar river, through Searburg and
Treves. Treves has been made ad
vanced general headquarters.
ENGINE WILL SOON
BE WORKING AGAIN
Mr. Charles E. Simmons, maanger
of the Ocala Iron Works; inf ormes the
Star that the Skinner engine at the
the electric light plant would in all
probability be in operation by the lat latter
ter latter part of this week. y-
The special pieces of steel ordered
some weeks ago for making parts of
the engine arrived a few days ago,
and Mr. Simmons has had his force
working on the job almost continu continuously
ously continuously ever since.
This will be good news to the peo people,
ple, people, as, while the engines at the old
plant have been doing nobly, they are
not of large enough capacity to carry
the load at the heaviest part, of the
evening,' and the service is anything
but satisfactory. V
NOTICE TO MEMBERS
OF THE U. D. C.
This week has been set aside as
conservation week for "world relief"
and during the week all over the
country a number of big conservation
meetings are to be held. Wednesday
has been set aside as a special day for
the meetings of all the women's, or organizations
ganizations organizations so we are asked to unite
with the meeting that has been ar arranged
ranged arranged to be held at the Temple the theater
ater theater Wednesday morning. I want to
Urge that as many of the members of
Dickison Chapter, United Daughters
of the Confederacy, attend this meet meeting
ing meeting as possible. At eleven o'clock the
program will be commenced. The
speakers will be Mrs. John T. Fuller
and Mr. E. E.-McLin of Orlando.
Mary W. Harriss,
President Dickison Chapter.
-f
Do you read the want ads?

Peace Brings Us New Mouths to Feed

I.I ----rrm il

I rrr ;

BROKE INTERNATIONAL LAW BY
( INVADING NORWEGIAN LE LEGATION
GATION LEGATION AT PETROGRAD
(Associated Press)
J London, Dec 2.--Bolshevists have
entdfred the Norwegian legation at
Petrograd and removed documents
belonging to Switzerland, whose in interests
terests interests were under the protection of
Norway,' according to a Copenhagen
dispatch to the Mail. The Norwegian
minister protested in vain. The news newspapers
papers newspapers of that country are demanding
that Norway break relations with the
soviet government.
GAVE NICHOLAS THE GATE
t
London, Dec. 2. King Nicholas of
Montenegro has been deposed by
Skupshtina, of the Montenegro na national
tional national assembly, according to a mes message
sage message from The Hague.
LIGHT READING NEEDED
It will be seen by the following
that a quantity of light reading is
needed at once for our returning sol soldiers.
diers. soldiers. Will not our people get busy
and help supply the deficiency.
American Library Association,
Library War Service
Washington, Nov. 22, 1918.
To the Ocala Librarian:
We must have gift books ..ferr im immediate
mediate immediate use.
Every volume that has been donat donated
ed donated the American Library Associa Association
tion Association and is now stored in a public li library
brary library should be made available at
once. The flow of gift fiction' has
slowed down, and we are unable to
meet the needs of the service.
Our funds must be saved for tech technical
nical technical books, books on industries,
trades and vocations.
In .the plan of demobilization it is
evident that the injured and convales convalescent
cent convalescent men are -to be the first returned
from the other side. This means that
the debarkation hospitals must be
filled with books. The dispatch of offices,
fices, offices, from which these points normal normally
ly normally would be supplied, have no books.
Dispatch office agents at New York,
Brooklyn, Boston and Newport Ne;ws
declare themselves helpless in the face
of the demand.
Now that we have created confi confidence
dence confidence in our ability to give service,
we must justify the dependence of the
military forces upon it. We. can only
do this if you will back us up with all
possible speed in getting your books
to us.
If you have 500 or more good books
ready for shipment, wire us, giving
the nuhmber. In any other case,
write us, giving exact information as
to the number and how soon they
will be ready for shipment. We will
send immediate shipping instructions.
t Yours very truly,
Herbert Putnam, Director.

rX7n

GAMPAIGH OF COLOSSAL PROBLEMS
COIISEBVATII 0EF00E CONGRESS

ALL OVER AMERICA FOR WORLD
RELIEF IS NOW IN FULL
OPERATION
(Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 2. The food ad
ministration's conversation week for
"world relief campaign got into full
swing today over the country. The
need for the fullfillment of America's
food pledge for this year of twenty
million tons will be dealt upon.
KLOCK CONFIRMED
His Report on Conditions at the Mar-
ianna School Fully Borne Oat bv
the Investigating Committee'
(J. E. Worthington in Tampa Times)
Tallahassoe, Nov. 30. Inemciency
of the worst type in the management
is what ailed the Marianna school, ac
cording to report of the special com committee
mittee committee composed of Senators Hugh Hugh-lett
lett Hugh-lett and Anderson and Representa Representatives
tives Representatives Crews, Miller and Hamblin,
made to the house this morning.
Idleness was the prevailing condi condition
tion condition among theboys and every harsh
word that has been written about the
conduct of the school was justified in
this report. N
The board of commissioners of state
institutions is not whitewashed.
"In view of our observations that
the institution is in a deplortfble con condition
dition condition and not properly doing its
great and necessary work of reclaim reclaiming
ing reclaiming boys," says the committee, "we
feel compelled to say that the board
of state institutions has been negli negligent
gent negligent in visiting this institution and
properly directing its conduct, such
negligence haying extended over a
period of several years, and that the
superintendent, lately removed, was
unfit for the position he held and neg negligent
ligent negligent in discharge of his plain du duties."
ties." duties." -After
making a recommendation
for an appropriation of $25,000 for
immediate needs and urging a salary
of $2500 to attract a competent sup superintendent
erintendent superintendent and other recommenda
tions as to hospitals and other needed
buildings, the committee says:
"We further recommend that this
institution be placed under the super supervision
vision supervision of a committee of three well well-informed
informed well-informed citizens, whose duty it shall
be to visit and inspect the place twice
a year and who shall be paid reason reasonable
able reasonable per diem and mileage, and who
shall be required to report to the leg legislature
islature legislature and to the board of control."
In speaking of the report Repre Representative
sentative Representative Miller, who has caught such
a cold that he could hardly speak,
said the committee could have made
even harsher criticism, but thought
best to recommend constructive work
for the future rather than to go into
the troubles of the past. However, its
report bears out in every particular
the criticisms that have been made.
The hospital room they found in a
very unsanitary condition, "the floor
apparently not having been scrubbed
in weeks." The mattresses were wet,
dirty and uneven from wear and the
bed linen did "not appear to ever
have been laundered." The reading
and recreation room was in good
shape but "no sign that it had been
used in weeks and nothing for the
boys to read."
The old hospital, not now used, had
a leaky roof and one of the beds was
wet from rain. In the smoke house,
"very rudely constructed, they found
25 barrels of syrup, some of them
with the heads knocked in and no pro provision
vision provision to keep them covered. Meal
and grits were stored here but ruin ruined.
ed. ruined. The bakery was unsanitary, dirty,
greasy and not screened."
They found 256 pairs of fleece-lined
undershirts 'unpacked, and apparently
in the storeroom for some time, yet
attendants testified that the boys had
not had warm underwear for two
years. There were plenty of stores
but no inventory of them and no ac account
count account kept of what was used. Sev Several
eral Several of the boys had keys to store storeroom
room storeroom "and things occasionally disap disappeared."
peared." disappeared." The mess hall was clean but un unscreened.
screened. unscreened. The boys were given chunks
of meat, but no knives or forks and
tore their meat with their fingers and
teeth, wiping their hands on their
clothing. The officers at a much bet better
ter better meal in the same hall and with
proper equipment.
Three thousand pounds of, smoked
red meat was bought during the year.
The matron of the colored department
made frequent requisitions for it, but
was refused and, 2000 pounds spoiled
and was buried. -
Many of the boys were bare-footed,
few were warmly clad and all appear appeared
ed appeared in bad condition.
Dr. Baltzell, physician for the home,
told the committee he warned the
superintendent of the impending: epi
demic, but that no efforts were made

WILL BEGIN THE RECONSTRUC RECONSTRUCTION
TION RECONSTRUCTION OF A BADLY SHAT SHAT-r
r SHAT-r TERED WORLD

(Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 2. Problems of
peace and reconstruction nromisp tn
occupy fully a third of the time of the
last session of the Sixty-fifth Con Congress,
gress, Congress, which opened at noon today
and will continue to March 3rd. The
framing of a legislative program has
been seKin abeyance awaiting the ad address
dress address of the president.
NEW SENATORS
Certificates of election of Senators-
elect Pollock, South Carolina and
Ball of Delaware were today present
ed by Vice President Marshall to the
Senate.
AN UNTIMELY STRDIE
Alleging unfair dealing by the
Foundation Company, about 3000 em employees,
ployees, employees, including the yard and office
force, refused to go to work this
morning, and brought to a standstill
work on thirty-eight mine sweepers
being built for the Jrench govern government.
ment. government.
DECEMBER 10 A i
, GOOD FINAL DATE
American Railway Express' Officials
Join with Council of Defense in
Plea for Early Christmas
Shipments
Vice President D. S. Elliott, in
charge of traffic for the American
Railway Express Company,., has in informed
formed informed all operating officials and
agents of the express organization
throughout the United States, that it
i3 the purpose of the company to up uphold
hold uphold in every way the request of the
council of defense that hristma,3 ex express
press express shipments be started on 'their
way by December 5th.
A concerted effort will be made in
every city and town of the country
by the 125,000 1 express employes, to
emphasize the importance of prevent
ing any possible congestion of trans transportation
portation transportation facilities during these crit critical
ical critical times. Although the express fa
cilities are very elastic, so much of
the equipment is now used for strict strictly
ly strictly war purposes, that all gift ship shipments
ments shipments for long distance travel should
be delivered to the express company
not later than December 5th, and for
short hauls not later than Decembeir
10th. This will allow ample time for
sorting and delivering before Christ
mas day.
"We wish to emphasize strongly.
said Mr. Elliott, "the point raised by
the Council of National Defense, that
nothing should be forwarded, which
will interfere with essential war bus business.
iness. business. Just now the movement of
equipment and supplies for the over
seas forces is heavy and exacting, and
there should be no domestic burden
placed upon transportation, which
would tend to lessen the delivery of
war shipments.
"Also during the winter months
there is a tremendous movement of
foodstuffs to all of the larger cities.
These foodstuffs are perishable and
next to war shipments must be given
first consideration.
"We are asking our men every-
wher to bring these points before our
patrons, and to emphasize 'more
strongly than ever the vital impor importance
tance importance of proper packing and legible
marking. We are asking them to re refuse
fuse refuse all shipments which are not
packed strongly enough to reach their
destination with ordinary handling,
find to insist that the address of the,
sender and of the consignee be placed
on a card and enclosed inside the
package."
to meet it. He also said be had fre

quently told the state board condi--. ,,
tions were bad, but could get nothings
done. He was one of the committee
of three physicians called by the state
board, but whose findings practically -verified
the report of Dr. Klock, which
started the investigation.
Let us supply your TOILET AR ARTICLES.
TICLES. ARTICLES. Our line is complete, and
the prices lways reasonable. The
Court Pharmacy. Phone 284. tf
The most complete line of proprie proprietary
tary proprietary remedies in Central Florida is
always to be found here. Tydings &
Co., druggists. Phone 30. tf
Have your Greetings Cards engrav- -ed,
giving them a touch of individu-
ality. See samples at THE SPEC SPECIALTY
IALTY SPECIALTY SHOP, A. E. Gerig. tf
Prompt delivery or prescriptions Is
the watchword here. Tell your physic-
ian to leave them with us. We allow
no substitution. The .Court Pharmacy.
Phone 284. tf

a



OCALA, EVENING STAR, MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1918

OCALA EVENING STAR

Pub 11 bed KYry Day Exeept Sunday by
ySTAR PUBLISHING COMPANY
OF OCALA, FLA.
R. R. Carroll, Pretddeat
P. V. Lcaveasood, Secretary-Treassrar
J. H. Benjamin, Editor
Entered at Ocala, Fla, -ostofflc aa
4econd-class, matter.
TELEPHONES
Baalaenn Offle .. Fire-One
Editorial Department Two-ScTca
Hoelctr Editor Fire, Doable-One
MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively
ntitled for the use for republication of
all news dispatches credited to it or
k-vt otherwise credited In this paper
and also the local news published
herein. All rights of republication of
special dispatches herein are also re reserved.
served. reserved. ADVERTISING RATES
pispiayt Plate 10c. per Inch for con consecutive
secutive consecutive insertions. Alternate inser insertions
tions insertions 25 per cent, additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charged on ads. that run less than
times Sc. per inch. Special position
20 per cent additional. Rates based on
4-lnch minimum. Less than four Inches
will take higher rate, which will be
furnished on application.
Readlas N otice i Sc. per line "tor first
insertion; 3c. -per line for each subse subsequent
quent subsequent insertion. One change a week
allowed on readers without extra com com-oosltlor
oosltlor com-oosltlor charges.
Legal advertisements at legal rates.
VAiftmm Tmmt h mmmtd- or'ahartre
will be made for mounting.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Domeatfe
One year. In advance ....... f5.00
Six months. In advance 2.50
Three months, in advance. ....... 1.25
One month, in advance.... ....... .50
Fore lam : : j
One year, in advance f 1.0f
8ix months, in advance.......... 4.25
.Three months, in advance 2.25
One month, in advance .20
This town looks mighty frowsy.
Can't we make a concerted effort to
clean up? '.. 4 .'" 5
Extra fares on Pullman cars have
been i taken off which is another
thing' that doesn't help us a bit.
.
Our allies want Hoover to act as
food controller for them as well as
for the United States. Hoover knows
how. -'''' :- '.
There is one thing the Star's read
ers should be thankful to it for it
hasn't said "shop early" to them a
single time this year. We know they
wouldn't, anyhow.
Worshipers of Gambrinus need not
despair. There is enough beer in
stock to last until spring,. by which
time the breweries will probably "be
ii i x i i
nnuweu tu stan up again. ; t
There is a motion before the legis legislature
lature legislature to reduce the salary of the
governor from $6000 to $3500 a year.
The Star isn't stroner for the move.
,
We might some time have a $6000-
f V
governor.
ine rauroaa administration an announces
nounces announces that returning soldiers shall
have meals served to them on the
trains at 75 cents apiece. The regu
lar price is $1.; The reduction of 25
cents is not enough; it should be 50
The Germans, the Austrians, the
Bulgars and the Turks want America
to furnish the troops to garrison the
occupied cities; and to take charge of
affairs generally. This is not only be because
cause because they think America is good, but
because they think it is a good thing
. : 1 :
The Tampa office of the Florida
Citrus Exchange has ; protested
against the state railroad commission
being abolished -says it is useful to
the orange growers. We know some
orange growers around here who
don't think it amounts to much at any
time, and it certainly is of no use now.
A unique Thanksgiving dinner was
enjoyed by five American soldiers, in
cluding R. I. Guinn, of Newberry,
Fla., all of whom had escaped from
the Rastatt prison camp in Germany.
The men had their meal on an impro
vised table on a bridge across the
Rhine, -Germans guarding one end
and French the other.
Says the Tamoa Tribune: "Thl
thing of trying to colonize a bunch of
returned; mustered out soldiers is go going
ing going to prove the toughest -DroDOsition
these nien ever tackled. As a matter
of fact triey don't care a cent about
anything but unloading some land en
the government, and this is the best
excuse they can think of for trying to
ram a land deal down the throat of
a Florida legislature."
Jonn Jfeter Stokes wants to hang a
fellow voter January 1 if his breath
smells of alcohol. Not the first time
John, Peter went back on his friends
Tamna Tribune.
We can remember the time when
Mr. Stokes and us and two' or three
other good fellows took a drink to
gether in an Ocala saloon but how
times do change!
We are afraid the suggestions be being
ing being made to the legislature about, co cooperating
operating cooperating with the government to set-
tie soldiers on everglades land is
simply ah attempt to graft on the
government, which will result in an another
other another scandal that will make Florida's
name stink before the rest of the na nation.
tion. nation. Everglades lands are very good
and they will settle up in time in the
regular course of events. Some peo people
ple people down there, and some people else elsewhere,
where, elsewhere, don't want to wait and the

Star is strongly inclined to think they
want to use the returning soldiers as j

a pretext. A number of Marion
farmers have gone to the everglades
to raise truck, and we notice that
most of them have come back, and
they do not praise the everglades
very highly, either. They are not
anything like as good lands for men
in ordinary circumstances as those we
have here, or as can be found in
any good farming county in the
United States. The everglades
need as settlers two classes of men men-one,
one, men-one, men with some capital, who can
develop the land and, if necessary,
live there a bad season or two; the
other, men who have strength and
health and are willing and able to
work with all their might in the blaz
ing hot sun. They are no place for
ah invalid soldier, wjth very little
money; and no friend of the state or
of the soldiers will try to toll them
down there.
"KLOCK CONFIRMED
In common with almost everybody
else in the state, we are surprised at
the report of the legislative commit
tee on the Mananna school which re
port, under the head of "Klock Con
firmed," apepars elsewhere.
We did not expect the committee to
do any whitewashing, but from the
very fact that the condition of the in
stitution had been so severely criti criticised,
cised, criticised, and that the visit of the com
mittee was expected, we had naturally
supposed preparation had been madw
or it. ,-) ., "s-
The committee, however, seems to
have found the school nearly as bad-
y off as Dr. Klock found it. Neglect,
filth and waste prevailed everywhere.
It is "Dotheboys Hall" on a large
scale.
The committee confirms Dr. Klock
and condemns the board of state in institutions.
stitutions. institutions. It leaves the latter no
loophole of escape.
The members of the state board of
institutions have known this school
was in bad shape for years. For the
last two months they have known it
was in a horrible condition. They
abused Dr. Klock for his report, called
him a Hun and practically called him
a liar. The report of the legislative
committee proves Klock told the truth
and that the members of the board of
state institutions have acted very
much like the keepers of Hun prison
camps. v, ""
The editor, of a state contemporary
tries to excuse these officials by say
ing they are busy men. They have
found time to run around the state,
to attend state and county fairs, edu educational
cational educational meetings, political meetings
and other places where they thought
they could bolster up their political
fortunes." They" could have found time
to visit and closely inspect the Mar-
ianna school if they had been deter
mined to do their duty.
The Star respectfully submits that
Gov. Catts and the members of his
cabinet have demonstrated their un unfitness
fitness unfitness to be at the head of the state
government. If they are not enough
ashamed of themselves to resign, the
legislature should impeach them. Un
less we greatly mistake, the people
will impeach them at the next elec
tion.
A result of the war is a large num
ber of illegitimate children, whose ap
pearance in this world of tears is the
inevitable consequence of .the concen concentration,
tration, concentration, of large numbers -of young
men in the training camps. It seems
to the Star that the, government
should look out for. these children and
see that they have a fair chance in
life. Their being here is notf the re
sult of the usual processes of lust but
of circumstances for which the so
called moral portion of the nation is
largely responsible. If they grow up
neglected and with a stigma upon
thera, they will be as much victims of
the war as the orphans of Belgium
and France. It is the duty of the na
tion to so act that they be preserved
from this fate. i
The Tampa Times says: Letters re
ceived today from members of the
124th Infantry state that the regi
ment was right at the front when the
armistice was signed as indicated by
the notice of the wounding of Augus Augus-tin
tin Augus-tin Xopez, received yesterday. In a
letter to Mrs. John Spencer, from her
husband in that regiment, he tells of
the suppressed excitement and anx
ious waiting for 11 o'clock and the
signal to stop hostilities.
There was a story started at Talla
hassee that Gov. Catts recommended
that the tax commission be abolished
in order to get rid of : Burke. ,, Per
haps so. The state gets rid of the
tax commission, anyhow. Now. if
Burke could only do something that
would cause the governor to be-ship
ped back to Alabama, we would ac
claim both Catts and Burke as pat
riots. : V
The Florida Methodist conference
meets at Bartow Dec. 4. Bishop War
ren Candler will preside. It is a fore
gone conclusion that Rev. Smith Har
din will be returned to the Ocala
church. During the year that he has
been here, Mr. Hardin has done good
work, not only for his church, but the
entire town, and the entire town is
anxious that he be retained.
We are now showing a pretty line
of IVORY TOILET ARTICLES in
sets or single pieces. Just the thing
for' holiday presents. Tydings & Co.,
opposite Harrington Hotel. tf
Paper 'Drinking Cups, 25 to pack package,
age, package, ten cents' at Gerig'a Drugstore.

QUALIFYING

By KATHLEEN M. MOORE.
Genville was only a small town. The
male population was in the minority,
but the town boasted of a six-star serv service
ice service flag.
A few of the girls had organized a
benefit club.
"We'll call it" the S. S. S. club." sug suggested
gested suggested Vera Quinn, "and no one but a
eoldier or sailor's sweetheart will be
eligible."
"Fine!" exclaimed Gladys. "Then
Babs won't be eligible, because she
hasn't any sweetheart."
The aforementioned Babs heard of
the plans and applied for membershiD
on the ground that she had two broth
ers and four cousins In the service all
volunteers.
"But yju must have a sweetheart In
order to qualify," Informed Vera. "We
are sorry, but you can't Join."
"Oh, very well, miss," she replied
tartly. T11 qualify .before another
month Is up or my name Isn't Barbara
Helena Willows."
".And to think Babs will find a Sam Sammy
my Sammy sweetheart In Genville before a
month," laughed Ruth, another of the
members.
"Girls," called Vera, "we'll put It this
way; If Barbara Willows gets a sweet sweetheart
heart sweetheart In the service Inside of one
month well have to admit her to onr
club; if not, she can't have another
chance."
Arriving at this agreement, the club
adjourned. j
Two days passed, and soon they
grew Into weeks. Babs was seen in the
park frequently with Ted Barlowe, the
dude of the town. ; v
The club met for Its regular weekly
meeting, and since Babs had another
week In which to qualify, the whole
evening was spent in discussing her
progress.
Tuesday night ciime and the girls
had assembled early and were await awaiting
ing awaiting Barbara anxiously.
"Has anyone seen Barbara since our
last meeting?" asked the president
There came a chorus of noes.
The discussion drifted to a new fam family
ily family that had moved to 'Genville a few
days ago. Fifteen minutes had elapsed,
but no Barbara then there came a
long peal from the doorbell.
"There she Is now," they all cried, as
Ruth hastened to open the door.
Babs entered looking very charming,
and, smiling prettily, she said: "Well,
girls, I have won without trying, and
now may I be a member of your select
club?"
"First give us evidence of your quali qualifications,"
fications," qualifications," demanded Vera, growing
uneasy.
"Yes, produce evidence," cried the
others.
"Very well," replied Babs, in a matter-of-fact
tone t of voice. "My work
this month has not been In vain," she
began, "I not only made myself eligible
to the club, but I helped Increase the
ranks of Uncle Sam by three. Evi Evidence?"
dence?" Evidence?" and here she opened the door
and admitted two khakl-clad and one
sailor-clad boy. ; V'
The girls gasped in surprise, as they
beheld Art Gordon and Bill Stratam In
khaki and Ted Barlowe In a natty blue
sailor suit.
"Here's Is my evidence," Babs con-
tlnued, taking note of the surprised
looks on the girls faces.
When Vera had regained her com
posure she said somewhat nervously
"But which is your sweetheart? They
can't all be." :
"But we'd like to," piped the boys
cheerily. :
"None of them," and Babs laughed
michievously.
"None of them I echoed thegirls.
"Then I fall to see where you have
qualified," Vera said hastily.
"But, Miss President," don't jump at
conclusions," Barbara responded. "I
haven't finished yet. Here is my sweet
heart, add here is proof that he Is my
sweetheart," and she held up her left
hand, displaying a dazzling solitaire.
At the same time a stalwart young
man, dressed In khaki, made his ap
pearance, smiling.
"Allow me to Introduce Sergt Al
bert Phillips, a hew resident of the
town of Genville," said Babbs. "Ser "Sergeant
geant "Sergeant Phillips and I have been good
friends for a long time. I met him
through my brother when he was at
camp," in answer to their questioning
glances. "Being home on furlough be
cause of Injuries sustained In action,
he paid me a surprise visit. Ted, Bill
and Art having listened to my preach
ing for a month or more, enlisted for
Uncle Sam and elected me as their
godmother.' Now have I qualified?"
The girls cast envious glances to
ward Babs and her young army. After
a brief silence Vera said : "We cer
tainly take off our hats to you, Bar
bara. You have overqualtfied. We ad
mit you for a full-fledged member."
Barbara smiled upon her army
which stood erect behind her and said :
"Well, boys, I have come out victor!
ous, just like you boys are going to do
some day," and turning to her club
'sisters she said : "We'll leave Genville
tomorrow. The boys for their different
stations and I for a farm where I am
engaged to work all summer."
The girls expressed their regret at
this news, but congratulated Barbara
on her patriotic spirit.
"I move we enroll Babs as an hon-
orary member of the S. S. S. club,"
spoke up Ruth. v
The motion was carried unanimously.
and patriotic Barbara and her four
friends received a hearty send-off by
the dub, and the town of Genville
proudly added four more stars to its
service flag.
(Copyright, 1018, by the McClure i Newspa
per Syndicate.)

SPANISH IIIFLUEHZA
MBBMawaaaBB
Do N6t Fear When Fighting a Ger German
man German or a Germ!

(By Dr. M. Cook)
The cool fighter always wins and so
there is no need to become panic panic-stricken.
stricken. panic-stricken. Avoid fear and crowds. Ex Exercise
ercise Exercise in the fresh air and practice the
three C's: A Clean Mouth, a Clean
Skin and Clean Bowels. To carry off
the poisons that accumulate within
the body and to ward off an attack of
the influenza bacillus, take a good liv liver
er liver regulator to move the bowels. Such
a one is made up of May-apple, leaves
of aloe, root of jalap, and is to be had
at any drug store, and called "Pleas "Pleasant
ant "Pleasant Purgative Pellets."
I fa bad cold develops, o to bed,
wrap up well, drink freely of hot lem lemonade
onade lemonade and take a hot mustard foot footbath.
bath. footbath. Have the bedroom warm but
well ventilated. Obtain at the near nearest
est nearest drug store "Anuric Tablets", to
flush the kidneys and co ltrol the
pains and aches. Take iu "Anuric"
tablet every two hours, together with
copious drinks of lemonade. If a true
case of influenza, the food should be
simple, such as broths, milk, butter buttermilk
milk buttermilk and ice-cream; but it is impor important
tant important that food be given regularly in
order to keep up patient's strength
and vitality. After the acute attack
has passed, which is generally from
three to seven days, the system should
be built up by the use of a good iroi
onic, such as "Irontic" tablets, to be
obtained at some drug stores, or that
well known blood-maker and herbal
tonic made from roots and barks of
brest trees sold everywher as Dr.
'ierce's Golden Medical Discovery.
Adv. 3
RED CROSS NOTICE
We are making a special effort to
collect a ton of tin this month. Mrs.
W. W. Condon has recently turned
over to us nearly two hundred pounds
ot tinfoil, which was collected at the
Book Shop. Besides conserving the
tin so much needed at this time, Mrs.
Condon has materially aided the local
chapter of the Red Cross. Save every
bit of tinfoil, collapsible tubes, pewter
articles and deposit them in the barrel
provided for this purpose at the Mar Marion
ion Marion "Hardware Co.' store. If you can cannot
not cannot bring it, phone 118 and fre will
send for it. W. P. Preer,
Chairman Conservation Committee.
THE WAR IS OVER
Have your house painted. ; We do
all kinds of painting and paper hang
ing.
23-6t SWAIM SIGN SYSTEM.
ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE
OF TRAINS AT OCALA
Seaboard Air Line, Northbound
No. 4: Arrives 12:43 p. m. Departs
12:58 p. m. '
No. 16 (Limited): Arrives and de
parts 4:08 p. m. f
No. 2: Arrives 1:50 a. m. Departs
1:55 a. m.
Seaboard Air Line, Southbound
No. 3: Arrives 1:12 p. m. Departs
1:27 p. m.
No. 15 (Limited) : Arrives and de
parts 4:08 p. m. s
No. 1: Arrives 1:45 a. m. Departs
parts 2 p. m. ;
Atlantic Coast Line Main Line)
Northbound
....
No. 10: Arrives and departs 5:42 a.
No. 40: Arrives 1 p. m. Departs
1:20 p. m.
No. 38: Arrives and departs 2:27
a. m. ..
Atlantic Coast Line (Main Line)
Southbound.
No. 37: Arrives and departs 2:16
a. m.
No. 39: Arrives and departs 2:35
p. m.
No. 9; Arrives and departs 9:13p.m.
Atlantic Coast Line Branches, South
bound
No. 151 (Sunny Jim) : For Wilcox,
Monday, Wednesday and Friday,
leaves 6:10 a. m.
No. 35 (Sunny Jim): For Lakeland,
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday,
leaves 6:40 a. m. ,
No. 141: Daily except Sunday, ar arrives
rives arrives 10:50 a. m. from Wilcox. ,-
No. 49: For Homosassa, leaves 2:25
Atlantic Coast Line Branches, North Northbound
bound Northbound Y r
No. 48: From Homosassa: Arrives
12:53 p. m.
No. 150 (Sunny Jim): From Wil Wilcox,
cox, Wilcox, Monday, Wednesday and Friday,
arrives 5:45 p. m.
No. 32 (Sunny Jim): From Lake Lakeland,
land, Lakeland, Tuesday, Thursday and Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, arrives 9:48 p. m.
No. 140:- Daily except Sunday,
leaves 3:45 p. rxu for Wilcox.
Oklawaha Valley Railroad
Train No. 71, first class passenger
and mixed, leaves Palatka at 6:30 a.
m. every Monday, Wednesday and
Friday, arriving at Ocala at 10:30 a.
m., same days.
Train No. 72 leaves Ocala at 2 p.
m. Mondays, Wednesday and Fridays
Train No. 73 leaves Palatka Tues Tuesdays,
days, Tuesdays, Thursday and Saturdays : at
and arrives in Palatka at 5:50 p. m.
same days.
7:40 a. m and runs only to Rodman,
at which place it arrives at 8:25.
Train No. 74 leaves Rodman at
4:30 p. m. Tuesdays, Thursday and
Saturdays and' arrives at Palatka at
5:20 p. m. same days.

All iilLali u

The Government
wants tin

So hereafter all three brands
of IVRiSLEYS will be wrapped
in pink paper and hermetically
sealed in wax.
Look for WltS(LE!f in the
pink-end package and take
your choice of the same

three popular
Be sure to
get
for .quality
and because

The
Flavor

, Second Hand
'B HJ ML A IP MAG
Bought and Sold.
We Pay the Highest Cash Prices.
Write lor Prices to V
TAMPA BAG COMPANY ;
POSTOFFICE BOX 592 Long Distance Phone 4475
Tampa, Florida.

v ;
WHITE STAR LINE i
TRANSFER STORAGE j

'. ------- r
CO)

AUTO
TRUCK
SERVICE
Locg Distance
Moving

PHONE 296

-COLLIER

THE WMPSdDE HOTEL

JACKSONVILLE,

In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room service is
second to none.
RATES From $1.50 per day per person to $6.
ROBERT M. MEYER, J. E. KAVANAUGH
Manager. Proprietor.

flavors.

COVERED
I MOVING
VANS
Teaming Packing
, Hosting
BROTHERS
I
FLORIDA



OCALA, EVENING STAB, MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1918

FRESH

FALL SEED
NOW IN
Beans
Irish Potatoes
Onion Sets
Garden Peas
All Kinds of
Small Seeds 4
OCALA SEED STORE
Ocala, Florida.
YOU CALL A DOCTOR
Because
HE IS A GOOD DOCTOR
SEND HIS PRESCRIPTIONS
' To The .. I
COURT PHARMACY
For the Same Reason
'Do not handicap your-
by neglecting his eyes,
himself an injustice
Many a man is doing
self. Good eyes are a good business
asset. '
, Dr. K. J. Weffie
Eyesight Specialist
Graduate Optometrist
With Weihe Co., Jewelers, Ocala, Fla.
; SAW FISH 1. v
DIRECT FROM THE FISHING
BOATS TO YOU i
DELICIOUS fresh caught SALTED
FISH, direct to the consumer by pre prepaid
paid prepaid parpel post or express, 15 pounds
for $2, Barrel shipments a specialty.
Try our DELICIOUS SALTED ROE.
Order now before the season closes.
ST. GEORGE CO. BVC;
ST. GEORGE ON THE GULF,
P. O. Apalachicola, Florida.
Mclver & MacKay
UNDERTAKERS and EMBALM ERS
PHONES 47. 104. SOS
OCALA, FLORIDA
A
Lire
FIRE
A. E. GERIG
INSURANCE
Ocala, Florida
ACCIDENT AUTOMOBILE
L ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER
AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Con Contract
tract Contract work. Gives More and Better
Work for the Money than any other
contractor in the city.
Do you read the want ads?
Evening Star
Unclassified
Ads.
Bring
Results
RATES Tweuty-five words
or less one time 25 cents;
three times 50 cents; six
times 75 cents. Over twenty-five
words, and under fif fifty,
ty, fifty, double above rate.
This rate is for consecutive
insertions. Special rate by
the month. Try them out.
PHONE

OCALA SOCIAL AFFAIRS

"Sometimes"
It takes so many hours to make a day
f Sometimes;
And yet the little moments slip away
Sometimes!
And if we only ask of them to wait,
They laugh, and fast and faster run
agate
Somestimes.
It takes so many hours to make a
week
Sometimes;.
And yet it hardly gives me time to
- speak
Sometimes.
Time treats our longings, our desire,
as sport,
And suits himself to measures, long
or short,
Sometimes.
Now someone comes to see me when
he can
Sometimes j
But other things step in and spoil his
plan
Sometimes;
That's how I know that time is light
" of wing,
Or that hecan go lame as anything
' Sometimes. Selected.
m m
Garnett-Smith
In a quiet wedding at the Baptist
church at 3:30 Sunday afternoon, Miss
Rebecca Smith became the bride of
Mr. William Rhea Garnatt. Rev. Wm.
H. Wrighton officiated and the ring
service was used, i Only immediate
relatives and a very fewfriends were
present.
The bride looked very charming in
a blue suit with accessories to match.
Immediately after the ceremony, the
young couple left for Jacksonville,
from where they will go to Miami for
a two weeks' wedding trip.
The bride i3 a young lady born and
raised in our city, and f a favorite
with numberless friends, to whom
she has endeared herself by an un unvarying
varying unvarying disposition of cheerful kind kindness
ness kindness and helpfulness. Mr. Garnett is
an excellent young man,, a conductor
on the Seaboard, well liked by all his
friends and trusted by his employer,
who now is Uncle Sam. His run is
from Inverness to Waldo, and in the
former pretty town he and his bride
will for the present make their home.
Advent Prayer Week t Changed to
Thanksgiving Week
The week of prayer, whose object
was to i stimulate the spiiituality of
the women of the church, ahd' which.
was inaugurated by the Woman's
Auxiliary of the Episcopal church and
sanctioned by the Church Mission
House, for the first week of December,
has been changed to a week of
thanksgiving. The prayers offered in
thanksgiving for peace will be held in
Grace Episcopal church on Monday,
Wednesday and Friday afternoons at
four o'clock. All members of the
church xas well as those of the Wom Woman's
an's Woman's Auxiliary are invited, and any
non-church members interested will
be welcomes. 5t
Notice, O. E. S.
There will be a special meeting of
Ocala .Chapter No. 29, O. E. S., Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday night, 8 p. m., for the purpose of
conferring degrees.
Mrs. Alice Yonce, W. M.
.
The .following is an interesting ex extract
tract extract from the London Mail: An av average
erage average of two weddings a week takes
place among blind soldiers at St. Dun-
stan. More than 200 have been mar married.
ried. married. Not only do girls keep their
vows to wed, made before the men
were blinded in combat, but in many
cases girls who have refused propos
als of marriage before the war, now
insist on being married to the blinded
heroes. Sometimes men marry girls
they have never seen. At St. Dun Dun-stan's
stan's Dun-stan's the blinded soldiers are trained
to be self-supporting and these men
are able, to support their wives. A
silver teapot is the gift to every blind
soldier married from the institution
and a wedding breakfast is given.
Mrs. T. H. Wallis left last night for
New York city, to spend three weeks
with her brother, Mr. Frank Acosta
and family. Miss Theo Wallis, who
has been teaching domestic science at
LaBelle, Fla., ten miles east of Fort
Myers, has arrived v home to keep
house for her brother and sister dur during
ing during their mother's : absence. Miss
Wallis will not return to LaBelle un until
til until afteh the holidays.
'.,' s s-.
. s-. Corporal Welch Dewey, who '.has
been with his motor supply train at
Camp Mills for the past month, ex expecting
pecting expecting to go overseas, was (transfer (transferred
red (transferred on Thanksgiving, with 3300 men,
to Camp Lee, Va., and they expect
to be mustered out in the very near
future. '.
The regular monthly meeting of
the Woman's Auxiliary of Grace
Episcopal church will be held Tuesdav
afternoon, Dec. 3rd, at the home of
Mrs. C. L. Bittmger at 3 o'clock. All
members of the church as well as
those of the auxiliary are cordially
invited. 2t
,.-
The engagement of Miss Margue
rite Carnegie of New York, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Carnegie,
was announced on Thanksgiving to
Mr. Roswell Miller. The groom-to-be
is a son of the late Roswell Miller of
New. York and Chicago, a widely
known railroad man.
Mrs. C. C. Bailey came over from
Green Cove Springs, Saturday, attend
the wedding of her sister, Miss Re

becca Smith, to Mr. Garnett. Mr. and
Mrs. Bailey are again residents of
Florida, Mr. Bailey having taken his
former position with the Dowling
Lumber Company at Green Cove.
They are making their home with
Mrs. R. O. Dennard, who we also
claim as an Ocala girl.
Notice to Rebekahs and Odd Fellows
Miriam Rebekah Lodge will hold
its regular meeting this evening All
Rebekahs and Odd Fellows and their
families are invited to be present, as
Mrs. Guy Lane, president of the Re Rebekah
bekah Rebekah Assembly of Florida, will "be
here.
Mrs. Emily Green received a letter
from her son, Edward Sunday after afternoon
noon afternoon and was overjoyed upon opening
it to see. he had written it himself. He
was only able, however, to write a
few lines, at a time, having to stop
frequently to rest. The letter was
dated Nov. 11, one month after he had
ben wounded, and he said his wounds
had not healed as rapidly as they had
hoped. Edward was mighty hungry
for some home' cooking, and sent his
mother a list of what he'd like for his
first dinner in Ocala. He seemed to
think about the best thing France af afforded
forded afforded at that time was grapes, which
were being brought to the hospital by
an old French woman.
.
The Orlando Double Ten girls de delightfully
lightfully delightfully entertained at a "weiner
roast" Thursday evening at the home
of Mrs. E. W. Davis. The roasting of
wenies was the main attraction of
the evening, after which the new
members of the club were initiated,
which afforded much fun for those
present. Dancing and games were
enjoyed until a late hour. Orlando
Reporter-Star.
The Temple will start off well with
its December 'program. The feature
this evening is "The Shooting of Dan
McGrew," an intensely interesting
story, in which Edmund Breese has
the leading role. Tomorrow Jane
Grey will appear in "Her Fighting
Chance," one of the best picture stor stories
ies stories ever put on the screen.
Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Clyatt expect
to motor to Bartow Tuesday to at attend
tend attend the Methodist conference. They
will be the guests of Mr. Clyatt's
brother for a week. Mr. L. W. Du Duval
val Duval and Mrs. D. W. Tompkins will ac accompany
company accompany Mr. and Mrs. Clyatt to Bar Bartow..
tow.. Bartow.. ." .. I
Mrs. D. C. Stiles, who has been in
Georgia for some time, is lending the
most valuable aid in the mill district
near LaGrange, where several weeks
ago there were 3000 cases ot influ influenza.
enza. influenza. C

...
The time of the second ward Bible
study class has been changed from
Wednesday to Friday afternoon. Fri Friday,
day, Friday, Dec. 6th, the call will meet with
Mrs. H. C. Bilbro, at 3 p. m. All
Bible students welcome.
m. e
Miss Anna McDowell's friends ares
sorry to hear she is on the sick list
today. Miss Mabel Meffert will
teach the sixth grade during her -absence
from school.
Mrs. M. M. Dunn and baby, Ara Ara-belle,
belle, Ara-belle, of Ocala, have arrived in Tampa
to spend the holidays with Mrs.
Dunn's mother, Mrs. J. J. Wallace,
Buffalo avenue. Tampa Tribune.
Mrs. Ida Mathews of Columbus,
Ga., will arrive in Ocala before the
Christmas holidays to spend several
months with her daughters, Mrs. H.
C. Cameron and Mrs. Mitchell.
Rev. Carlton Preer of Tallahassee,
Ala., is expected in Ocala Tuesday for
a week's visit to his brpthers, Mr.
W. P. Preer and Mr. J. R. Preer and
families.
Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Howard return returned
ed returned home last night1 from a three
weeks' visit to their beautiful grov
at Auburndale.
'
Mr. H. C. Cameron and sons, Henry
and Allen, have returned home from
a four days' visit to relatives in Co Columbus,
lumbus, Columbus, Ga.
Ocala Chapter No. 29. O. E. S.. will
hold a special meeting at the Masonic
nail Tuesday night at 8 o'clock. 2t
-
Mrs. Carl Dekle came over from
Palatka to attend the Garnett-Smith
wedding.
v.
Mrs. H. M. Hampton returned home
Sunday afternoon- from a delightful
visit to the state fair.
'
Mrs. Frank Ditto returned home
Saturday night from a four, days
visit to relatives in Jacksonville.
Miss Isabelle Mays, principal of the
Center Hill school, spent Thanksgiv Thanksgiving
ing Thanksgiving with Ocala friends.
Miss Calata Carpenter has returned
to her home in Brooksville after a de delightful
lightful delightful visit to her Ocala f riends.
'..
Miss Rachel Veal spent the week weekend
end weekend at her home near Cotton Plant.
(Concluded on Fourth Page)
Buy your CUT GLASS early for
holiday presents. We are now show showing
ing showing an elegant line. Tydings & Co.,
opposite Harrington Hotel. tf
Dr. Eddison's Cushion Sole Shoe for
tired and tender feet, at Little's Shoe
'Parlor.
24-tf

WW

j& Mitt &AmiBQ8H&
PIGEON AND DOVE.
"We are as fine as people," said Miss
Pigeon.
"Are you, indeed?" asked Miss Dove.
"We are," said. Miss Pigeon.
"Coo o o" said Miss Dove. "And
aren't we as fine as people, tooT
"You are," said Miss Pigeon. "Yes,
you are. Coo o -o, you're very fine,
too."
"Do tell me all about If said Miss
Dove, "for I'm very anxious to hear.
Can't you pay me a call? Tm at home
this afternoon. And it would be far
nicer to sit and have a little talk than
it would be to take a fly. It's such a
warm day. v
"It is warm," agreed Miss Pigeon.
"Well, m come back and see you after
J. have my afternoon bath. I need a
little refreshing water."
"It's nice here in my eav.es," eaid
Miss Dove.
"Ah," said Miss Pigeon, "that's very
gracious of you. Well, I'd be delight delighted
ed delighted to accept your hospitality."
"I haven't got any of that," said
Miss Dove sadly. .
"Oh, yes you have," said Miss Pig Pigeon.
eon. Pigeon. "No, really; I am extremely sorry,
but I havent any at all."
"My dear Miss Dove," said Miss
Pigeon, "you really don't know what
the word means." 1
"That's true," said Miss Dove. "But
then if I bad any of it I'd know the
word, wouldn't I?" '
X don't know that you would," said
Miss Pigeon.
' "Sounds strange and a little confus confusing,"
ing," confusing," said Miss Dove.
"I'll explain it to you, my dear,"
said Miss Pigeon. "Hospitality means
something like entertainment. It
means, that you are generous and glad
to give me entertainment and offer
me what you have. It's very fine in indeed
deed indeed to be hospitable."
"I am glad I am," said Miss Dove.
"It's nothing like another word with
something the same sound! a place
where people are when they're ill and
when they're all cured up and well
they go home again?"
, "Oh, no, co o o," laughed Miss
Pigeon. "You're -thinking of a hospital
where sick folks go to be made all well
and strong. We of ten fly around the
hospital eaves In yonder part of the
town. But to be hospitable means to
be very generous and polite with every-
"Do Tell Me About It," Said MiM
: Dove.
thing yon have, and so it was hos hospitable
pitable hospitable of you to offer me a bath In
your eaves and save me the trouble of
flying home." I
"You'll accept then?" asked Miss
Dove, r
"HI be glad to," said .Mrss Pigeon.
"Well, I think I'll take a little show shower
er shower myself," said Miss Dove. So they
bathed and were nice and clean, and
they v felt very fresh and cool and
happy.
"Now, well have a rest," said Miss
Pigeon, "eh? A rest and a little chat,"
"Yes Indeed," said Miss Dove, "and
you must tell me why we are as fine as
people
"Ah, to be sure," said Miss Pigeon.
"Well," she continued, after a little
pause, for both Miss Pigeon and Miss
Dove had dozed off, and each taken a
tiny nap, "well," she went on, "I heard
the other day that there was a special
place where they could obtain houses
and homes of all1 sorts and sizes for
doves and pigeons. Some of these they
called portable,' which meant that
they could be moved about.
"But the great and glorious thing
to me about it was that it was so su superior.
perior. superior. Now we are to have houses
bought from little shops and big shops
just as people go to such offices and
rpnt Tinnaps.
"It just seems exactly like being a
person and seeing about a summer
home ah and they show fine homes
for us, too."
Tell, me about them," said Miss
Dove.
"They're very beautiful and of a
nice, generous size for the most part,
and they're painted in green and
white!"
"Beautiful !" said Miss Dove. "So
cooling are those colors. And green is
so very good for the optic nerve."
"What in the world is the optic
nerve?" asked Miss Pigeon.
"The optic nerve," said Miss Dove,
"is the nerve of the eyes. Green would
be good for eyes keep them from get getting
ting getting tired. I wanted to show you I
knew a good word, too."
And after they had talked some more
about the possible new summer homes
their owners would get for them, they
went to sleep and dreamed of green
and white houses!

nJiaptll
N II t 1 1 mtn ipiimilWIi

: M AX W ELL REPAIR S H O P
J 7 L. E. YONCE, PROP.

I Quick and Efficient Ser-
vice on All Electrical and
Slarter Troubles.
Ileyonce,
FT.

CMEVROI

Itar Economically

A Chevrolet "Four-Ninety Touring
car is a profitable investment for it
yields substantial dividends in effic-
ieni service.
It is a, safe investment for the ex excellence
cellence excellence of its construction protects
its utility.
It is an attractive investment for
the body has a beauty and richness of
finish quite unusual with cars of its
price. :
It is an economical investment for

its first cost is modest and i

low.

Ocala IroriWorks Garage

Ocala,
Chevrolet "Four-Ninety" Touring
IOC A LAMAR

f

. Have Your j!
Winter Bedding Cleaned Mow.
BlaMcets, ComlorSs, Etc.

For expert piano inner phone 427
The pride of the Court Pharmacy is
its prescription department. Every
prescription is carefully compounded
as ordered by your physician NO
SUBSTITUTION allowed. Phone 284.

1

Do not Delay as Small;
Troubles Develop Ia to ;
Large Ones. Economize
Now.
KING AVE, OPPOSITE STAR OFFICE
OCALA. FLORIDA.
GOOD VULCANIZING ON TIME
That's our motto. Vulcanizing work
that will stand up under hard wear
and tear of country roads vulcaniz vulcanizing
ing vulcanizing methods that double the life of
our tires and improve their riding
qualities. And we deliver work when
we promise; depend upon that. Our
charge is moderate and frequently
saves you the cost of a new tire.
GOODRICH TIRES
EXLUSIVELY
BLAL0CK BROTHERS
107 Oklawaha Avenue
JET
lpkeep
Florida. I
Car, $850, Delivered at Ocala.
B L E W OR K 1

T.IARDLE AND GRANITE i
MONUMENTS & HEADSTONES. I
i v . J
&
Granite, llarble and Cement Fencing
and All Kinds of Cemetery Work.
Let Us Quote You Prices. &
E.17. LEAVENG00D, Manager., p
Yard N. Magnolia SL Ocala, Florida j

0aaka (Kta
Take care of your feet. If they are
giving you trouble, have them ex examined
amined examined by M. M. little, the only foot
specialist in Ocala. No cost to yon. tf
Paper Drinking Cups, 25 to pack package,
age, package, ten cents at Gerig's Drugstore.



OCALA, EVENING STAR, MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, 191

oralis
Paper Drinking Cups, 25 to pack package,
age, package, ten cents at Gerig's Drugstore.
The boss of the American Railway
Express has laij an embargo on
booze shipments, and many people
are discontented.
The "Easeall" Shoe, a perfect arch
protecting' shoe, at Little's Shoe Par Parlor.
lor. Parlor. tf
Mr. Britt Sanders has secured from
the Fort McCoy section a carload of
sweet potatoes for the Ocala Canning
Factory.
Our exclusive line of Holiday Greet Greeting
ing Greeting Cards now on sale. A. E. Gerig,
THE SPECIALTY SHOP. . tf
Sam Dosh, who has been on the sick
list a couple of weeks, is out and de delivering
livering delivering Western Union messages
again. Sam's engaging smile had been
missed.
Paper DrinKmg Cups, 25 to pack package,
age, package, ten csnts at Gerig's Drugstore.
Mrs. Anna Tweedy, who is in
charge of the Marion Fair Associa Association's
tion's Association's exhibit at the state fair in Jack Jacksonville,'
sonville,' Jacksonville,' returned to that city today.
A year's subscription for a good
magazine makes a much appreciated
Christmas Gift. Leave your orders
with us. HE SPECIALTY SHOP, A.
E. Gerig. v tf
Mr. George Easterling, who has
been in South Carolina for some
months, is again among his Ocala
friends.
THEY ARE STACKING UP
We are requested to add to the
names of Marion county boys in the
service that of Ray Sanders,of Stand Standard.
ard. Standard. Ray is a grandson of Mrs. Mary
Frost of this, city. He is a member
of the 308th Aero squadron.
Also, the name of Thos J. McGah-
M. TUT "IT" Mnalam'Ti
of Oklawaha. Tom. who is well known
in Ocala, entered, the service at St.
Petersburg, but he really belongs to
Marion county.
Also, Samuel A. Snook, of Weirs Weirs-dale,
dale, Weirs-dale, wno enlisted at Stetson Univer University,
sity, University, several weeks ago, and-who is
disappointed because the war didn't
last longer. T
Also the name of Raymond Lam Lambert
bert Lambert Hunt, who tho he enlisted from
Mobile is a Marion county boy and
belongs on its list. v
Also, Bunyaif J. Hunter, one of 'the
later selects, who is doing effectual
work in the judge advocate's office.
A friend at Weirsdale writes as fol follows:.
lows:. follows:. '"
Editor Star: In looking over the
li&t of the names "For the Stars in
Marion's Service Flag," I did not see
some of our Weirsdale boys, so I will
send them to you. )
Fox the Navy: Floyd McNutt and
Hugh' Walling.
For the Army: A. Turney Reed and
Hugh DeWitt. All white.
MARION-DUNN MASONIC LODGE
Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 9, F. & A.
M., meets on the first and third
Thursday evenings of each month at
7:30 o'clock until further riotice. -..."j
Stephen Jewett, W. M.
R. A. M. CHAPTER NO. 13
Regular convocations of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13, R. A. M., on the first
Friday in every month at 7:30 p. m.
J. A. Bouvier, H. P.
Jake Brown, Secretary.
OCALA LODGE NO. 286. B. P. O. E.
Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of 'Elks, mets
the second and fourth Tuesday eve evenings
nings evenings in each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Club house oppo opposite
site opposite postoffice, east side.
C. W. Hunter, E. R.
E. J. Crook, Secretary.
NOTICE
Notice h hereby given that under
and by virtue of a certain execution
issued out of and under the seal of
the circuit court for Marion county,
Florida, tested the 2nd cay of Decem Decem-Iber,
Iber, Decem-Iber, 1918, in a certain cause therein
lately pending wherein the Bank of
Dunnellon. a corporation under the
laws of Florida, was nlaintiff and E.
J. Jordan was defendant, I have levied
upon and will on
Monday, the 6th day of January, 1919,
that being a legal sales day, offer for
sale.. and sell for cash to the highest
and best bidder allthe right; title and
interest of the said E. J. Jordan in
and to the following described lands in
Marion county. Florida, of which he
owned therein on May 13th, 1918, or
at any time between said date and the
date of said sale, to-wit:
East half of the, southeast quarter,
of section thirty, and commencing at
the southwest corner of the southeast
quarter, of section V thirty, running
thence east 7.50 chains, north 18 de
grees, east 16 chains, west 12.525
chains, south 15.68 chains to the point
of, beginning. Also the southwest
quarter of said section thirty, except
15 acres in the northeast corner,
all of said lands lying and being in
township 16, south, ranee 20 east:
also, the west half of the east half of
the southwest quarter of the north
west quarter, of section thirty-six,
township seventeen, south, range
twenty-four east.
Sold .to satisfy said execution and
costs. J. F. Galloway.
12-6-wky Sheriff Marion County, Fla.

PEACE ADDS TO
U. S. FOOD TASK

Europe Needs. Nearly Doublei
Last Tears buppiies,rrom
America-
ECONOMY MUST CONTINUE
World Survey Shows Sufficient Whe.t,
But Shortage of Fat Govern
ment's Stimulative Pro Program
gram Program Justified.
With the return of peace America if
confronted by a food problem even
harder of solution than that with
which we coped in time' of war. We
have an entirely new world situation
In food, ft will mean essential changes
In our domestic program. But more
Important than this, it must of neces necessity
sity necessity require Increased export.
Last year we shipped 11,820,000 tons
of foodstuffs to the European Allies.
Had the war continued we would have
increased this enormous figure to "17, "17,-550,000
550,000 "17,-550,000 tons In the present year. Now,
with the responsibility of feeding mil mil-Ions
Ions mil-Ions of people liberated from the Ger German
man German yoke, our exports must be brought
up to at least 20,000,000 tons prac practically
tically practically the limit of loading capacity at
our ports.
World Food Demand Increased.
The end of the war will create an
enormously increased demand for food.
Humanity demands that the starving
millions freed from Prussian oppres oppression
sion oppression shall have sufficient supplies to
assure their return to health and pros prosperity.
perity. prosperity. If these liberated nations are
faced with starvation they cannot'. es establish
tablish establish orderly governments. Hunger
breeds anarchy in a people. The war
to free the world for democracy will
be lost after it has been won. Amer America
ica America must continue Its work to libera liberation
tion liberation and by sharing its food make de democracy
mocracy democracy safe In the world. t
In order to meet this new situation
the Food Administration has made a
careful survey of the food resources of
the whole world in relation to the to total
tal total demands. Computing supplies on
the basis of the avoidance of waste
and war consumption, It is found that
wheat and ryemay be obtained In suf sufficient
ficient sufficient quantities to meet economical
world consumption ; high protein feed
for dairy animals will show a shortage
of about ,3,000,000 tons, while there
will be sufficient supplies of other
feeds to allow economical consump consumption;
tion; consumption; beans', peas and rice will alsq be
found in sufficient quantities to main maintain
tain maintain economy in consumption; there
are sufficient supbjfes of beef to keep
pace with the capacity of refrigerating
sace.
Great Fat Shortage.
The .most distinct reversal of policy
will come with pork and dairy prod products,
ucts, products, vegetable oils, sugar and coffee.
Utmost economy will be required in
the use of fats and oils, In which there
is a world shortage of about 3,000,000, 3,000,000,-000
000 3,000,000,-000 pounds. Tnere are sufficient sup supplies
plies supplies for us to return to our normal
sugar consumption if other nations
continue their, present short rations,
or even if their rations are slightly 'in 'increased.
creased. 'increased. If the European countries,
however, are to resume their normal
sugar consumption It will be through
our continued conservation In order
to share' with them. There is a sur surplus
plus surplus of coffee.
Of the world total required to pro produce
duce produce these results North America will
furnish more than 60 per cent The
United States, including the West In Indies,
dies, Indies, will be in a position to furnish
a total of about 20,000,000 tons
against our pre-war exports of about
6,000,000 tons.
The bread grains situation allows
the world to abandon the use of sub substitutes
stitutes substitutes in wheat bread. Large sup supplies
plies supplies have accumulated in the Argen Argentine,
tine, Argentine, Australia and other hitherto in inaccessible
accessible inaccessible markets. A continued high
milling percentage, economy of con consumption
sumption consumption and elimination of waste
make it possible for the world to re return
turn return to a white wheat loaf.
Of all our export possibilities In
fats, the largest and most important
item is pork. While we cannot supply
the world deficiency, we will be able
to help it enormously because of the
past policies of stimulating production
and restraining consumption The
government's policy with' regard to
stimulating the production of wheat
and of pork, the readiest source of
fats, is thus amply justified by the sit situation
uation situation upon the return of peace.
Famine Specter' Still Stalks.
The" people of the United States
must continue care and wise economy
In the use of food in drder to complete
the work of liberating the world. But
even withthe utmost conservation and
production In this country there will
be in Europe for the next year or more
starvation beyond all human power to
allay. In North Russia there are 40, 40,-000,000
000,000 40,-000,000 people to whom" food cannot
be made accessible this winter. Their
transportation is demoralized in com complete
plete complete anarchy. And even if Internal
transport can be assured their ports of
entry would soon be frozen. Millions
more wljo have felt keenly the oppres oppression
sion oppression of war will be beyond reach of as assistance.
sistance. assistance. We must realize that upon our
shoulders rests a greater responsibili responsibility
ty responsibility than we have ever before been
asked to assume. We must realize that
millions of lives depend t absolutely,
upon the continued service and sacri-i
fice of the American people.
We must realize that the specter of j
famine abroad now haunts the abun
dance ox our table at borne.

0IISIfif
(Continued from Third Page)

Reception at the Woman's Club
The reception at the Woman's Club
Saturday afternoon for the new mem members
bers members and the school teachers was a
very delightful affair and was enjoyed
by a large number of club women.
The club house was decorated with
quantities of poinsettia blossoms and
at the right of the president's chair,
a beautiful new American flag, the
gift of Mr. Ben Rheinauer, was sus
pended, and to the left hung the club
service flag.
After the meeting was brought to
order by the acting president, Mrs.
William Hocker, reports of the state
federation meeting were read by Mrs.
G. T. Maughs, Mrs. E. G. Peek, Mrs.
C. R. Tydings and Mrs. E. Van Hood.
', A letter from the editor of the Star
was then read by Mrs. Hocker and
also one from Mrs. Cummer of Jack
sonville in regard to the children's
home.
America was then sung by by all
present, accompanied at the piano by
Misfe Irma Blake, who then
piano solo.
gave j a
Mi&s Margaret Hocker gave an in
terpretation of "Narcissus," the ac
companiment being played by Miss
Marguerite Porter.
The next number consisted of sev several
eral several very catchy vocal selections by
Mrs.. Van Hood and Miss Marguerite
Porter, the latter playing the banjo
accompaniment.
A folk dance was then given by six
little fairies, Misses Margaret Hock Hocker,
er, Hocker, I'anita Cobh, Mamie Sue Spencer,
Dorothy Adams, Adeline Malever and
Chivalette Smith. The musical pro program
gram program ended by singing of the Suwan Suwannee.
nee. Suwannee. River, which has ben adopted by
the federation.
Every one present then greeted the
new club members and the teachers,
who formd the receiving lin.
The hostesses of the afternoon, Mrs.
Emily Green and Miss Annie Davis,
then served hot tea, sandwiches and
stauffed dates. They were assisted
by the little fairies who gave the
folk jlunce and by Mrs. Jack Camp.
Friends of Mrs. G. W. Martin and
her daughter, Mrs. W. H. Wilson, re
gret exceedingly to hear they havei
been ouite ill for several days..
Mr. Perry Anthony returned to
Camp Johnston this morning afetr a
brief visit to his wife and mother on
Sanchez street.
Mrs. Nancy Seibert returned to her
home in Fernandina Sunday after afternoon
noon afternoon after a pleasant two weeks' visit
to Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Flippen.
Miss Lou Moody of Leesburg spent
Thanksgiving in Ocala with Miss
Irma Blake.
MIRIAM REBEKAH LODGE NO. 15
Miriam Rebekah Lodge No. 15
meets the first and third Monday eve evenings
nings evenings in ''each month in the Odd Fel Fellows'
lows' Fellows' hall at 7:30 o'clock.
. Claire Moremen, N. G.
v Eloise Bouvier, Secretary.
AS STRENOUS AS EVER
They don't seem to have heard of
the Armistice at Camp Greenleaf
where Dr. (now Lieutenant) C. W.
Moremen is training. He writes:
'-Editor Star: I have been trying to
find time- to write you for some time,"!
but when one is taking a special'
fnnrco I ilro wo Viavo hoio it nrnrnr snr.
gery, you hardly have time to eat or
sleep. ;
We are out at 5:45 a. m. and' on a
continual go until 9:30 at night and
then have to be in bed and lights out
at 10 p. m., so we only have thirty
minutes we can call ouryc.wn.
We get one and one half hours" drill
each morning, then the lectures on I
our professional work. Dinner and j
then all afternoon, except one hour,
in infirmary doing practical surgery
and war first aid work. The one hour(
exception mentioned above is taken
up in drill formation work anjd stand-!
ing retreat. Supper and then we have j
our study period -and quiz.
Also"went ona three days' hikej
week before last to test our endur endurance
ance endurance and train us to put up with
hardships we are supposed to encoun-,
ter,,"over there." j
The signing of the armistice has
made no change whatever here in
this professional camp of about 28,000
men. It is generally thought that all
here will be used here in this country,
for reconstruction work in base andi
general army hospitals. j
So it looks like those here and the
class of graduates on Dec. 15th t will
I e in the' army for some months to
come. I have enjoyed my work here'
even though a strenuous life, and am
happy in the thought that I have con-
tributed my mite towards winning
the war, and will state right here that
when Uncle Sam gets through with j
me I will be only too glad to return
to Ocala and resume my practice, be-'
cause I feel very grateful for the
many favors extended Mrs. Mormen;
during my absence thus far. With
best regards to you and all my Ocala
friends, I am,
Very truly yours,
Lt. C. W. Moremen.
. 1 ji I 1
f Accurate- ana prompt prescnpnuu:
service is always at your command
5 here. Ask your doctor. Tydings &
Co., druggists. Phone 30. tf

KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS

Ocala Lodge No. 19. Conventions
held every Monday evening at 7:30 j
at the Castle Hall, over the G. C.i
Greene Co. drugstore. A cordial wel
come to visiting brothers.
H. B. Baxter, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, K. of R. & S.
ODD FELLOWS
Tulula Lodge No. 22, I. O. O. F.,
meets every Tuesday evenhig in the
Odd Fellows' hall on the third floor of
the Star office building at 7:30 o'clock
promptly, A warm welcome always
extended to visiting brothers.
L'. H. Pillans, N. G.
M. M. Little, Secretary.
r
W.,K. Lane, M. D Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat, Law Library Building, Ocala,
Florida. tf
CARD OF THANKS
Editor Star: Kindly grant me space
in your valued columns to express my
gratitude for the kindness shown me
on Thanksgiving afternoon, when one
and a half miles south of Reddick my
car turned over with me, wife and
baby, causing a slight bruise on my
left arm and thre ugly cuts on the
face and head of my wife, the baby
being unharmed. The car was wreck wrecked.
ed. wrecked. ' !.
Mr. Lutz and his friends were the
first on the scene. Noticing my wife
bathed in her own blood, Mr. Lutz
kindly consented to convey us to Red Reddick,
dick, Reddick, Tvhere the good people of that
community administered to our suf sufferings.
ferings. sufferings. Through the kindness of Mr.
Thagard, two colored men and Mr.
Smith and Mr. Jordan of the Jordan
furniture company, we soon got the
car on its wheels again, but unfit for
service.
Dr. R. S. Hughes having received
a phone message, made double quick
time in reaching us to save my wife
from bleeding to death. v Through his
kindness we also got back to Ocala
before dark. v
friends of Ocala who have shown us
unexpected kindness, especially to our
next dopr neighbors, both on our
right and our left, who are still minis ministering
tering ministering to our needs untiringly.
We hope some day in some way to
show to these our good friends our
further appreciation of their kind
deeds and expressions
"Those few friends thou hast and
their adoption tried, V
Grapple them to thv soul with hoops
of steel."
Respectfully, D. W. Goodwin.

LAST, BIT NOT LEAST, FLORIDA'S OWN WEEDY KIDDIES

IHE lliBK 1WE

Annnnnnno Io 1lnAAm1iAnrinmnnSmi AAA

muiuuiiusa ua lciciiiuci vciiupciiyii tui t)v,vut ucyall .till lllc rirsi
Day of December and Ends,on Christmas Day.

une liipusanu nonuiaiis are asiteu 10 give une ruiy juoiiar L,iDerty rsond: or rive Hun Hundred
dred Hundred Floridians to give One One Hundred Dollar Liberty Bond; or Ten Thou Thousand
sand Thousand Flbridians to give One Baby Bond (a War Saving Stamp).
' THE $50,000 ISf NEEDED BY THE SOCIETY
For these three big items : $35,000 to provide for 1000 homeless orphans and needy

kiddies during the coming year of 1919 at an average cost of $35 each; $10,000 to pro provide
vide provide for 200 fatherless kiddies whose widowed mothers would otherwise be compelled to
give them up permanently, at an average cost of $50 per child ; $5,000 to finish free of

nftnr rrif wnrirnT h wninn
'
"YOUR BQNDS AND STAMPS"
WILL STILL HELP UNCLE SAM
And at the same time HELP FLOR FLORIDA'S
IDA'S FLORIDA'S YOUNGSTERS IN NEED. Ar Arrangements
rangements Arrangements have been made by the
Home Society with the Atlantic Na National
tional National Bank of Jacksonville, to take
over the Bonds and Stamps at par
so that the Society can secure the
funds, and yet keep the money in the
service of our Government, so your
Bond or Stamps will in tliis way serve
two great causes, the, cause of the
Allies, and the cause of Florida's chil children.
dren. children. OF COURSE REAL MONEY WILL
BE GLADLY ACCEPTED
While the aim of the' Home Society
is to raise the $50,000 through Liber Liberty
ty Liberty Bonds and War Savings, Stamps,
the main thing is to get the money,
therefore, of course the Society would
be delighted to accept contributions
of money from the children's pen pennies
nies pennies up to the largest possible amount.
SUBSCRIPTIONS CAN -BE MADE
PAYABLE .MONTHLY
Any person who does not own a
Bond, or who prefers to buy another,

Send your Bond or Stamps, or contribution, to our Treasurer, R. V. Covington, 428 St. James Building, Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, Florida, and be sure to register your letter if you send a Bond, and ask for a return receipt card. Pleading
for some'aid from every man, woman and child in Florida, we are your servants in the "greatest work under the

sun.

State Headquarters: 428 ST. JAMES BUILDING JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
Judge W. H. Baker, President R. V. Covington, Treasurer Marcus C. Fagg, State Superintendent
N. B. All expenses for publicity bor ne by Board of Directors of Children's Home Society of Florida, as person
. al contributions '

GIVE THANKS
TO THE LORD'
And Your Country For the Glory
of Our Arms by Buying War Sav

ings Stamps This Month.
OCALA ICE & PACMMG
COMPANY

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
RATES: Six line maximum, one
time 25c.; three times 50c.; six times
75c; one month ?3. Payable in advance.
WANTED, LOST, FOUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS
FOR SALE One good milk cow,
just fresh; also one-horse wagon, al almost
most almost new. C. A. Holloway, 715 Lime
street. 29-6t
PLANTS FOR SALE Collard and
cabbage plants 25 cents per 100; or
$2 per 1000. J. J. Tiptop Ocala,
Fla. 26-6t
FOR SALE One good, work mule,
about 12 years old. Phone 279 or call
at American Fruit Store. 25-tf
RAGS' WANTED At once. Cotton
rags; table or 'bed linen, -underwear,
etc. No sewing room scraps. Must be
well laundered. The Star office, tf
FARM FOR SALE A small 50-acre
ideal, farm, corners 200 yards from
depot in Anthony, Florida; land and
improvements very best! All in culti cultivation;
vation; cultivation; fenced an dcross-fenced with
woven wire. Will sell at a bargain.
Address, J. A. Price, Ocala, Fla. 6t
RAZOR BLADES SHARPENED
I sharpen all makes of safety razor
blades. All hair tested. Durham Durham-Duplex
Duplex Durham-Duplex doz. 50c; other double-edge
$35c; single-edge, 25c. T. C. Peacock,
707 Franklin St., Tampa, Fla. 9-lm6
FOR SALE One young eleven hun- j
dred pound horse, gentle, works any-'
where; one smaller iron gray mare,!
3 years old, good saddler and works!
OF FLORIDA

Florida's Greatest Charity1

nas rrnvinfn nnmfs fim arm

w XAWU&IJ U1UU1CU

can send the Society a check or money
order for one-tenth of the amount of
the Bond, and make the other pay payments
ments payments monthly, -the Bond to become
the property of the Home Society
V
4

y -X- i
w.YM-w.y.''y. I

TSUI SAVINGS STAMPS
'ISSUED BY TKB.
UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT

gentle; 25 head hogs; all sizes, no-
fat; three nice Jersey .heifers.' Will
en any or an oi aoove separately.
Apply F. W. Ditto.NOcala, Fla. 26-6t
1 1 n i .
FOR SALE Bungalow worth $2500
for $1500,. half cash, balance $25 a
month, no interest. W. A. Robertson,
Ocala, Fla. 12-2-6t
FOR SALE Fine Jersey cow. Will
soon be fresh; .Apply "to A. Slott, next
to Gerig's Drug Store, Ocala, Fla. 6t
FOR SALE Four good mules and
two-horse wagon. Apply to A. T.
Thomas. ll-4-3t
How to Read.
At bes the printed words of an au author
thor author renrpspnt hut n rtoor frnrHnn of
what is in his thought and feeling, of
what he would express if he could.
Tnerefor, It Is veil to follow Raskin's
advice on '"reading for the thought,'
and "get into the habit of looking In Intensely
tensely Intensely at words and assure yourself
of their meaning syllable by syllable-7
nay, letter by letter." Not only does
thor's meaning by comprehending his
words, but the act of concentration
fertilizes and awakens your own mind
and tends to bring you Into such sym sympathy
pathy sympathy with the idea expressed, and
with the author, that you are Illumined
by far more of the subject than the
printed words alone contain. William
K. Towne in Nautilus.
Smoky City Sees ''Snakes.
ing headlight of a standing automobile
a five-foot snake, eight inches in cir circumference
cumference circumference stanJed pedestrians in
the downtown section recently. Po Policemen
licemen Policemen were, summoned and the rep reptile
tile reptile was dispatched.' Its arrival In the
business district remains a mystery to
the police department.
SOCIETY
r9
AM 41. r? m.
rar tor nMr v innn nv.;u.
when paid for. Persons who cannot
contribute at all NOW, can subscribe
the amount they feel they can give
and make the payments at ANY
TIME in the coming year of 1919. The
idea of the Society is to make sure of
the income of $50,000 for the finishing
ol this year's work free from debt,
and the entire year of 1919, so that
no further appeal for funds need be
made until 1920.
1
itiuox tLUUlUAf) HU31ELESS
KIDDIES PLEAD IN VAIN?
-
, The good people of Florida have
taken care during the year of 1918,
and gone "over the tdp" In every one
J of the Big Campaigns, and we 1 have
confidence that they will heed the cry
1 of these poor little helpless, homeless
, kiddies, who are the Hope of the Fu-
ture, and who must not be permitted
to suffer.
WILL YOU ADOPT ONE FLORIDA
KIDDIE FOR NEXT YEAR?
- One Fifty Dollar Bond will provide
f for the entire need of one of these
I kiddies in need. Will you be one of
The Thousand to accept the responsi-
bility for the care of one of these lit lit-!tle
!tle lit-!tle ones? - i



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