The Ocala evening star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:07102

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
OCALA

EVEN

NO

STAR

. Weather Forecast: Frost tonight in
gulf states. Friday fair and cold.
- OCALA, FLORIDA, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1918.
VOL. 25, NO. 286

HUES I T PAY

ALL THE BILLS
UNDER NO MATTER WHAT GOV GOVERNMENT,
ERNMENT, GOVERNMENT, THE HUNS CANT
EVADE RESPONSIBILITY
(Associated Press)
London, .Nov. 28. "The German
states, whatever their form, must pay
the bills. Germany as a whole must
be held i expansible for the conse consequences
quences consequences of the war," says the West Westminster
minster Westminster Gazette, in discussing the sit situation
uation situation which has developed in Ger Germany.
many. Germany. The r.cwspaper admits the
Allies may find legal entity in Ger Germany
many Germany has undergone a complete
change; that like Austria it may burst
into fragments before the negotiations
have been completed..
SURRENDERING SUBS
Harwich, England, Nov. 28 Twenty-seven
German submarines were
surrendered yesterday to the Allies.!
Ihis brings to 114 the total of Ger
man U-boats turned over.
ACT MAY BE INVALID
(Associated Press)
Tallahassee, Nov. 28. The hbuse
lost no time yesterday afternoon con concurring
curring concurring in the senates action earlier
in the day ratifying the federal con constitutional
stitutional constitutional prohibition amendment.
President Johnson of the senate ask asked
ed asked that he be excused from voting,
holding that this senate was not com
stitutionally qualified to act on the
amendment.
MENTE IN A HOSPITAL
Monday's casualty list contains the
name of F. O. Mente, son of Mrs. A.
G. Mente of Jacksonville. Mrs. Mente
is a daughter of Mr. R. E. Yonge of
Ocala, and the young soldier was born
in this city. 'A dispatch from the war.
department announces that he was 1
gassod and is now in a hospital.
i
EXPLOSIVES LAW MODIFIED
License Still Required for High Ex Ex-j.rosives
j.rosives Ex-j.rosives Inspector of Explosives Clarence' E.
Woods of Fu?i;3, has received official
notice from the department of the in interior,
terior, interior, bureau of mines, Washington,
to the effect that all regulations to
fipewoVks are revoked and no further
U. S. explosives license for fireworks
will be required. This does not, how
ever, conflict with any municipal ord ordinance
inance ordinance in existence in Florida.
He also has been advised that all
regulations relative to explosives in ingredients
gredients ingredients not intended to be used in
the manufacture of explosives are re revoked
voked revoked and no further license for such
ingredients will be required. This
means' that druggists, who are the
largest dealers in explosives ingred ingredients,
ients, ingredients, will 'not be required to have 'li 'licenses
censes 'licenses hereafter unless such ingred ingredients
ients ingredients are intended to be used in the
manufacture of explosives.
Mr. Woods also has been advised
that -all regulations relative to plati platinum,
num, platinum, iridium and paladium and com compounds
pounds compounds thereof have been revoked and
no further U. S. license for these ar articles
ticles articles will be required.
However, the public is warned to
continue to obey the act regulating
the use of high explosives, such as
dynamite, gunpowder, nitro-glycerine
and all other .high explosives. The
strictest supervision .will be kept over
these explosives by the government
and all state, county and city offic officials.
ials. officials. Until further notice a United
States license will be required by any
one for the purchase, sale, manufac manufacture,
ture, manufacture, use or possession of high explo explosives
sives explosives under a penalty of $5000 fine
and one-year in prison. Ther is ab absolutely
solutely absolutely no exception to these rules.
FAIRFIELD
Fairfield, Nov. 27.- Airplanes pass
over our vicinity quite often now- j
adays.
Mrs. Alice Morgan of Boston, Mass.,
left last Saturday for Hawthorn, aft after
er after a week's visit to her brother, Mr.
H. J. Jernigan and faimly. Mrs. Mor Morgan
gan Morgan will visit relatives at Hawthorn,
Titusville and in South Florida be before
fore before returning to Boston.
Messrs. Arthur Rou and Roy Net Nettles
tles Nettles left today for Norfolk, Va., after
a few days' visit home. Their home homecoming
coming homecoming was a very glad surprise to
their relatives and friends, as they
came in very unexpectedly.
Mr. H. J. Jernigan and Mrs. Mary
' E. Rou are on the sick list.
Mr. A. M. Mathews has returned
from South Carolina, Georgia and
North Florida, where he visited rela relatives.
tives. relatives.
Mr. and Mrs. McKinney of 'Tampa
are visiting Mrs. McKinney's uncle,
Mr. D. B. Mathews and family.
Paper Drinking Cups, 25 to pack package,
age, package, ten cent? at Gerig's Drugstore.

IBERIA

T

TO BE III IT
PROPOSED LEAGUE OF NATIONS
APPROVED BY THE SPAN SPANISH
ISH SPANISH PARLIAMENT
(Associated Press)
Madrid, Friday, Nov. 22. (By the
Associated Press) Both chambers of
the Spanish parliament have approv approved
ed approved in principle the proposition for the
formation of a league of nations, with
the name of a Spanish representative
in the organization.
' COLD WEATHER COMING
(Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 28. Reports on
weather conditions today indicated
the probability of heavy frost tonight
in the gulf states. Fair weather Fri Friday
day Friday is indicated for the South Atlan Atlantic
tic Atlantic states.
WE OBJECT
(Associated Press)
Copenhagen, Nov. 28. The German
government will invite President Wil Wilson
son Wilson to visit Germany while he is in
Europe, says the Berlin Lokal An An-zeiger.
zeiger. An-zeiger. GENERAL AYER GOING
TO JACKSONVILLE
Gen. Alfred Ayer goes tomorrow to
Jacksonville, to attend the meeting of
tax assessors and county commis commissioners
sioners commissioners of the state, which will be in
session at th Seminole hotel. Gen.
Ayer is president of this convention,
which has made many sensible recom recommendations,
mendations, recommendations, very few of which 'have
been acted on by the legislature. The
general has held the office of presi president
dent president for a number of terms, but says
he is not a candidate for re-election.
Chairman W. D. Cam of the Mar Marion
ion Marion coard of commissioners will also
be in attendance on this meeting.
WEIRSDALE
Weirsdale, Nov. 27. Mr. and Mrs.
C. E. Albertson Jr. and two little
children arrived here this morning to
spend the winter with relatives. They
have been spending the past four
years in Kansas and their, many
friends are very glad to see them
again.
Mr. W. S. Alsop and Master Mal Malcolm
colm Malcolm Cameron are attending the state
fair in Jacksonville this week.
Mrs. E. Simpson was the guest of
her daughter, Mrs. H. Kimball at
Ocala last week. She also brings back
a good report of the Marion County County-Fair.
Fair. County-Fair.
Mr. D. S." Hogan and son, .C. C. Ho Ho-gan
gan Ho-gan have arrived here from Indiana
to spend the winter at the Lakeside
hotel.
Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Albertson and
Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Parten made a
jolly shopping party to Ocala last
Saturday afternoon.
Mr. Hugh Walling is home on a
few days'-furlqugh from the naval
school in Massachusetts, where he has
been for the past several months. His
many friends were glad to see him
again.
Mr. Frank C. Bryant of Orange Orangeburg,
burg, Orangeburg, S. C, has been here looking
after his orange groves, and ship ship-pine
pine ship-pine fruit, etc. v
Mrs. T. B. Snook and daughters
spent fair week in Ocala and brought
back an excellent report.
Mr. A. R. Sandlin was a business
visitor here today, attending to the
shipment of Mr. Nye's fruit.
There will be Thanksgiving services
held at the church at 11 a. m. Thurs Thursday.
day. Thursday.
CITRA
Citra, Nov. 27. Mrs. Allison Vart Vart-mann
mann Vart-mann and daughter, Elizabeth Ann
have gone to Fordyce, Ark., where
they will stay until after Christmas'
- Mr. W. J. Crosby left Saturday for
Tallahassee.
Mr. Middlethon is spending a while
at home.
There will be a Thanksgiving serv service
ice service at the M. E. church tomorrow
morning at 10 o'clock.
A nice barrel of things to eat was
sent to the Children's Home in Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville this week.
Mrs. Burleson is visiting her moth mother,
er, mother, Mrs. Jerkins at St. Petersburg.
Mrs. Cramer Feagle and little girl
of Ocala spent Saturday and Sunday
with Mrs. W. J. Crosby.
Mrs. Welburn Melton was the
guest of Mrs. J. W. Melton last .week.
T. L Williams, who is a student at
the University of Florida, spent Sat Saturday
urday Saturday and, Sunday with his parents.
Misses Sophia and May Redditt
will spend Thanksgiving at Grove
Park, the guests of their sister, Mrs.
Waites.
C. W. Driver is a business visitor
to West Florida this week.

SDLF SAYS XL

IS
ACCUSTOMED TO BREAKING
PROMISES, HUN DOUBTS
THE ALLIES
(Associated Press)
Zurich, Sunday, Nov. 24. German
Foreign Minister Solf has addressed
a note to the Allies protesting agains$
all attempts to deprive Germany of
territories in the Rhine country, to
the west of the Rhine, between Mer Mer-zig,
zig, Mer-zig, Sarre and Ruemines, comprising
Sarrelouis and Sarrebrouck, which be
says it appears the Allies may at attempt
tempt attempt to annex to Alsace-Lorraine.
THREE AIRMEN KILLED
(Associated Press)
Arcadia, Nov. 28. Lieutenants W.
E. Cummings of Augusta, Ga., and
Bismet of Baltimore, were killed in instantly
stantly instantly yesterday at Carlstrom Field
when their planes collided, falling a
thousand feet to the earth.
One Killed at Dorr Field
At Dorr Field, Lieutenant Mulvis Mulvis-ill
ill Mulvis-ill of New York, fell 1500 feet to the
earth. "His body was badly mutilated
by the fall.
ADDITIONAL STARS
We have added to the names repre represented
sented represented by stars on Marion county's
service flag those of Edward B. Green
and John Welch Dewey. We were
under the impression that these young
men registered before they volun volunteered,
teered, volunteered, but find we are mistaken.
Oscar Stucky also, we believe, vol volunteered
unteered volunteered before he registered, and if
so his name is .not on the list. He
was among the early ones to go to
France.
' Friends have sent in the names of
Leon Manning, Elton Stanaland and
Perry Richardson for the navy and
Orris D. Richardson for the army.
We are informed that the name of
John Henry Brown, colored, who went
to Camp Dix in May, was omitted
from the registered list.
Study the list over ,and if you find
that any man's name has been omit omitted,
ted, omitted, send it to us at once.'
TEMPLE PROGRAM
FOR NOVEMBER
' Shows begin at 3:30, .7 and 8:20 p.m.
Today, Nov. 28: Elsie Ferguson
m "The Lie." Pathe News.
Friday, Nov. 29: Montagu Love and
Dorothy Love in "The Grouch."
Saturday, Nov. 30: "Plaything."
Offirial War Review.
BELLEVIEW
Belleview, Nov. 28. Mrs. Edna
Peoples and baby ,of Valdosta, Ga.,
are guests : of Mrs. Peoples' parents,
Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Fielding.
Mr. Harley Lucius is home from
Norfolk, Va., on a ten days' furlough
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joe
Lucius.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Dustin came
Friday and will spend the winter
with Mr. and Mrs. N. D. Skinner.
Mr. Cnarles Oakley and Miss M. J.
Oakley returned to their sunny little
home Saturday.
Mr. E. W.' Crosby returned home
last Friday from a pleasant visit at
his old home in Alabama.
Mr. Rex Nichols is home on a ten
days' furlough from the naval hospi hospital
tal hospital in Savannah.
Mr. John Harrell and cousins came
down from Jacksonville and made
their friends -and relatives a short
visit. They returned Sunday night.
Mrs. J. W. Nelson and little Dor Dorothy,
othy, Dorothy, accompanied by Mr.- and Mrs.
Alton Mason and little Ruth and Mrs.
Banister took ,a very enjoyable trip
to Leesburg Sunday.
Don't forget the dance Friday
night, Nov. 29th, at the Civic League
hall.
Mr. James Shedd returned v home
from Jacksonville. He has been work working
ing working in the shipyard.
Mrs. Edna Peoples is ill at the home
of her mother, Mrs. W. N. Fielding.
Miss Cliffie Goode has returned to
Gainesville after a 'short visit with
Miss Minnie Tremere.
Mrs. Will Abshire1 has been very
ill for several days, as also has Mrs.
I. N. Nichols.
COLUMBIA
GRAPHOPHONES AND
GRAFANOLAS
On' Easy Terms
AT
WHY PAY MORE
9

A

MORAL RATHER
THAN MATERIAL

A MOST EXALTED SPIRIT OF
THANKSGIVING TODAY
PERVADES AMERICA
(Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 28. A feeling of
gratitude and thankfulness greater
than could come to a nation through
material prosperity, pervades Amer America's
ica's America's observance of Thanksgiving Day.
Peace with victory after nineteen
months of war gave the day much
added significance. Many celebrations
of the day centered around soldiers
and sailors. Community Thanksgiving
services, song services and "Victory
celebrations" were held in many part
of the country.
FLORIDA BOY LOST
An additional list of enlisted men
lost on the transport Otranto Octo October
ber October 6th, includes Arthur Butler ol
Jacksonville, Fla., Charles Campbell
of Belton, S. C, Plumer Henderson,
Greycourt, S. C., Henry Freeman
Zeigler, Ga., and William Talley of
Atlanta, Ga.
CARING FOR EX-CAPTIVES
American Army of Occupation,
Nov. 28. (By the Associated Press.)
More than a million and a half pris prisoners
oners prisoners of various nationalities have
been released by the Germans, accord according
ing according to estimates based upon reports
received by the American Third army.
Of this number approximately 250,000
will pass through the American lines
and will be fed by the Americans.
Most of the quarter of a million pris-j
oners are French, English, Italian j
and American soldiers. The army, as-j
sisted by the Salvation Army, the
Young Men's Christian Association
and the Knights of Columbus, is
shouldering the bulk of the task.
LOST HIS LOOT
(Associated Press)
Zurich, Monday, Nov. 25. Field
Marshal von Mackensen, who com commanded
manded commanded the German troops operating
in Roumania, on his return to Berlin
had in his possession 69,000,000 marks
in gold and notes,, according to the
Zeitung in Augsburg, Bavaria. His
staff carried stocks of provisions for
their families.
Picket soldiers at the railroad sta station
tion station confiscated everything, the news newspaper
paper newspaper adds, and the authorities in re reply
ply reply to complaints made by the officers
stated that the guard had acted as it
did because "it was believed the goods
had been stolen."
THE 12TTH ON THE MARNE
, The 31st (Dixie) division is in com command
mand command of Gen. Lyon, and is at Brest.
It is to be among the first to return
home. The 32nd division, with which
the 124th Infantry is, is under com command
mand command of Gen. Hahn. It is at Aincre Aincre-ville
ville Aincre-ville and Saint Dizier. St. Dizier is
on the Marne and on the railway line
between Paris and Nancy, about forty
miles west of Toul. We can now begin
to learn where our soldiers are locat located.
ed. located. A LILY OF FRANCE
V postcard from our brave young
soldier friend, W. S. Bullock, some somewhere
where somewhere in France, bears the face of a
surpassingly beautiful French girl.
Willie always did have a bright eye
for beauty. We hope Freneh lilies
will not win him from American
roses. 4
OCALA BOY WITH FOCH
A letter recently received from
France announced that George Davis
was serving as a dispatch bearer at
Foch's headquarters. He was one of
twelve Americans on dyty at that
most important point at the time.
SUGAR RATIONING
TO BE VOLUNTARY
, (Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 28. Distribution
of .sugar under the certificate system
will be discontinued after December
1 under an order issued yesterday by
the food administration. In an announcing
nouncing announcing the order the administration
emphasized that requests for conser conservation
vation conservation of sugar were in no way modi modified.
fied. modified. Domestic consumers, it was
said, will he expected to observe the
voluntary ration of four pounds per
person a month, and public eating
places will be required to use only
four pounds of sugar for each ninety
meals served.
AT BELLEVIEW THIS EVENING
Mr. L. W. Duval will deliver the ad address
dress address at the Thanksgiving meeting at
the town hall in Belleview this eve
ning. Mr. Duval always makes a fine
speech, and the meeting is likely to be
largely attended.

EX-EMPEROR CAN

BE EXTRADITED
DISTINGUISHED INTERPRETER
OF INTERNATIONAL LAW
RENDERS THAT
. DECISION
(Associated Press)
Paris, Nov. 28. William Hohenzol-
lern can be" extradited in th nnininn
of Professor Bartholemy, of the Paris
law faculty, who explains his euidine
principle is that when there is appar
ent conflict between law and common
sense a-solution is always fpund by
following the latter. The atrocities
ordered by the former emperor, he
says, are condemned even in a state
of war by international law and con
stitute common law crimes. :
BAVARIA HAS BROKEN
OFF WITH BERLIN
(Associated Press)
London, Nov. 28.- Bavaria has
broken relations with the Berlin gov government,
ernment, government, according to a Munich dis dispatch
patch dispatch transmitted by the Central
News correspondent at Copenhagen.
The message says relations' were
broken "owing to the efforts of Berlin
to deceive the people Jby withholding
the' truth about conditions."
INTENDS TO ROUND THEM UP
(Associated Press)'
London, Nov. 28. The Vienna gov-J
ernment intends to bring to trial all
persons responsible for the war, in including
cluding including Count Berchtold, the Austro Austro-Hungarian
Hungarian Austro-Hungarian foreign minister when the
war broke out, Count Czernin, former
Emperor Charles and a number of
generals, according to an Exchange
Telegraph dispatch from Copenhagen.
ALABAMA METHODISTS GIVE
WOMEN LAITY RIGHTS
(Associated Press)
Mobile, Ala., Nov. 28. The Ala Alabama
bama Alabama conference of the Southern
Methodist church today adopted a con con-stituional
stituional con-stituional amendment granting full
laity rights to women, also changing
the wording of the creed from "The
Holy Catholic church" to "The Holy
Church of Christ."
HOMEWARD BOUND CANUCKS
ARRIVE AT HALIFAX
(Associated Press)
Halifax, Nov. 28. The great Brit British
ish British liner Aquitania arrived here today
with four thousand returned Canadian
soldiers. ,,
AN ALABAMA VENDETTA
, (Associated Press)
Albany, Ala., Nov. 28. Motives of
revenge are ascribed for the killing of
Herman Vandiver at the home of his
brother-in-law last night by a party
of four men. His relatives allege the
crime was committed in retaliation
for the shooting Tuesday of a man
named Branford of Lawrence county.
RED CROSS NOTICE
We are making a special effort to
collect a ton of tjin this month. Mrs.
W. W. Condon has recently turned
over to us nearly two hundred pounds
of tinfoil, which was collected at the
Book Shop. Besides conserving the
tin so much needed at this time, Mrs.
Condon has materially aided the local
chapter of the Red Cross. Save every
bit of tinfoil, collapsible tubes, pewter
articles and deposit them in the barrel
provided for this purpose at the Mar Marion
ion Marion Hardware Co. store. If you can cannot
not cannot bring .it, phone 118 and we will
send for it. W. P. Preer,
Chairman Conservation Committee.
TO THE SISTER
You were only a kid, little sister,
When I started over the sea.
But you've grown quite a lot since I
came here.
And you've written a letter to me
It's a secret, and we'll keep it well.
Your brother and you and the ocean,
- And nobody's going to telL
8
You were only a tot when I left you,
I remember I bade you good-by.
And kissed you, a little bit flustered.
And you promised you never would cry.
But I know that you cried, little sister.
As soon as I'd gone out the door.
And did I cry myself; I'm a soldier,
8o -don't ask me anything mora.
. H
I think of you often, kid sister
You're the only kid sister I've got
I know you'll be good to your mother.
And I know that you'll help her a lot.
And whenever she seems to be gloomy.
You've Just got to cheer her somehow,
You were only a kid to your brother.
But you're more than the world to bJm
now.
From Stars and Stripes, France.
Paper Drinking Cups, 25 to pack package,
age, package, ten cents at Gerig's Drugstore.
Do you read the want ads?

JUSTICE NOT HATE

FOR EWIIY

THE POLICY TO BE FOLLOWED
AT THE PEACE CONFER CONFERENCE,
ENCE, CONFERENCE, SAYS DANIELS
(Associated Press) x
Buffalo, Nov. 28. The deliberations
of the coming peace conference should
be guided by the principle of justice
touched with mercy to the weak and
not by passion or emotion, said Secre Secretary
tary Secretary Daniels, speaking, today at the
Buffalo community Thanksgiving seiv
vice. Germany must be dealt with
firmly at the peace conference. Mr.
Daniels said, "because the sins of her
rulers and all who followed their
spirit are black and bitter and their
crimes deserve such treatment and
punishment as will protect the future.
Hut no policy of hatred, no spirit of
vengeance should guide this world re
newal."
NO STRING TIED TO THE NEWS
Full Reports of Peace Negotiations
Will Come to America
from France ".
. (Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 28. President
Wilson's plans for attending the peace
conference are all matured with he
exception of the day and hour of sail sailing.
ing. sailing. His departure, however, is cer
tain early next week.
It is entirely probable that the first
announcement of the personnel of the
American legation will be made in the
president's address to the opening of
Congress, which will be delivered on
Monday or Tuesday. At the same
time, the president may take occas occasion
ion occasion to make something in the nature
of a statement to the country, as well
as to Congress, on his going to Eu
rope, something no other president
has ever done.
The most important announcement
that has yet been made in connection
with the official plans for the peace
conference came yesterday, It was
that there would be absolutely no cen censorship
sorship censorship on the news which the Amerr
ican newspaper correspondents send
back home. At the personal request
of President Wilson both the British
and French governments will entirely
relax all censorship pn all American
newspaper dispatches telling of the
deliberations. Furthermore, to facil facilitate
itate facilitate the transmission of news to thls
country, the government through its
recently acquired control of the cable
lines will give news a preference over,
all commercial business on the cable
lines.
AERIAL MAIL SERVICE
Hundreds of Airplanes to be Turned
Over to the PostofBce De Department
partment Department (Associated Press)
New York, Nov. 28. Capt. Benja Benjamin
min Benjamin R. Lipsner, director of the United
States aerial mail service, announced
her last night that the- war depart department
ment department had turned over to the use of
the mail service "hundreds of air airplanes."
planes." airplanes." Capt. Lipsner said he was not in a
position to announce the exact num number,
ber, number, but that the machines would be
used as rapidly as possible in extend--ing
the aerial mail service to all cities
of the country. It is anticipated that
the service will be able tQ organize its
personnel from hundreds of army avi aviators.
ators. aviators. SHADY
Shady, Nov. 27 Mrs. Will Little of
Marco, came pp last Thursday and
will spend the winter,. with her daugh daughter,
ter, daughter, Mrs. F. C. Barnes.
Mrs. Ernest Blair and baby are
visiting at Winter Garden.
F. G. Buhl and mother, Mrs. Mary
Buhl, visited Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Knob Knob-lock
lock Knob-lock at Martin Saturday and Sunday.
Mr. H. W. Douglas left Monday
morning on a business trip to Crystal
River and other places.
Mr. Kelley and family are again
camping at Shady for a short time.
Next Sunday Rev. R. Strickland
will ..preach at Olivet and a full at attendance
tendance attendance of the members of the
church is desired as special business
i3 scheduled to follow the devotional
service. Everybody welcome.
Mr. Sam Redding and Mr. George
Buhl will represent Olivet church at
Fellowship at the Baptist association,
December 4th to 8th.
Today reminds us of Longfellow's
"Rainy Day." The day is cold and
dark and dreary." "It rains
With best wishes to the Star and
all its readers for a pleasant Thanks Thanksgiving.
giving. Thanksgiving.
Take care of your feet. If they are
giving you trouble, have them ex examined
amined examined by M. M. Little, the only foot
specialist in Ocala. No cost to you. tf



OCALA, EVENING STAR, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2S, 1918

OCALA EVENING STAR

Pabllabed Every Day Except Sunday by
STAR PUBLISHING C051PANY
OF OCALA, FLA.
R. R. Carroll, President
P. V. Leaveagood, Seeretary-Treaanrer
J. II. Beajamla, Editor
Entered at Ocala, Fla., Kstofflce as
aecond-class matter.
TELEPHONES
Baalaeaa OfAee Five-Oae
Editorial Department Two-Sevea
Society Editor Five, Doable-One
MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS.
The Assoclat-d Press is exclusively
entitled for the use for republication of
all news dispatches credited to it or
bat otherwise credited in tbU paper
and also the local news published
herein. All rlthts of republication of
opeclal dlspitcnes herein are also re reserved.
served. reserved. ADVERTISING RATES
piaplnyi Plate 10c. per inch for con consecutive
secutive consecutive Insert. ons Alternase inser insertions
tions insertions 25 per cent, additional. Con posi position
tion position charged. on fds. that run less than
biX tirues 5c, per inch. Special position
20 per cent, additional. Rates based on
4-inch mlnf.num Less thin four inches
will take higher ra e, wMch w 11 be
furnished on application.
ReaiivK Noteat 5c. ;er lliie fir flist
tnsertli .i: 3c. per line for each subse
quent insertion. One ch?nre a week
allowed on Teaders witnout extra com com-oositior
oositior com-oositior cnargres.
Lesrel advertisements at legal rates.
Electros must be mounted, or chtrge
will be made f i mounting:
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Domestic
One year, in advance J 5.00
Six rrontns, in advance ........ 2.50
Three months, in dvJnce 1.25
Ona month, in advance .50
. Fore Urn
One year, in advance ............. $8.00
81x months. In advance 4.25
'hree months, in advance........ 225
One month, in advance.: SO
THIS DAY OF THANKSGIVING
This is the greatest day of Thanks
erivine America has ever known. It
immediately follows America's great
est virtorv.
The crreatest one before it was
that of fifty-three years ago, when iii
a million American homes thanks
were given for the nation's victory
and the safe return of their sons.
But, over a third of the country lay
the shadow of defeat, the cru shiner
poverty of the day and a distrust of
the future that it took a third of a
century and another war to remove
Today we may all be thankful we
are all Americans, there are no more
sections, the soldiers and sailors from
every state have bought side by side,
the people at home have all worked
together, for victory for the nation
and for all humanity, and have won.
We should be thankful that our
country has proven itself the peer of
the other great nations that calmly
chose the furnace seven times heated
of war to the death rather than bow
the knee to the Prussian Baal;
We should be thankful to the heroes
who died that humanity might live,
and to those other heroes who suffer suffered
ed suffered wounds and sickness for the same
greatest cause, and with our thank thankfulness
fulness thankfulness should go the resolve that for
them at least the reproach that re republics
publics republics are ungrateful should have no
meaning.
We should be thankful that the fire
that was lit, at Jamestown and Ply Plymouth
mouth Plymouth Rock, that blazed up at Lex Lexington
ington Lexington to prove a beacon to the op oppressed
pressed oppressed of the earth, and to burn on
thru the long years has leaped into a
consuming fire in which the worst of
tyrannies has crumbled.
We should be thankful that the
America of .Wilson is the America of
Washington and Lincoln, only greater
and more united.
We should' be thankful that the
spirit that men showed at Bunker Bunker-Hill
Hill Bunker-Hill and Valley Forge has not only
come down to the sons of their sons'
sons, but that its divine fire has also
entered into the souls of the sons of
the men who later came across the
sea.
We should be thankful that our
boys, on the battlefield, the march
and the voyage have shown the ten tenacious
acious tenacious bravery of Grant and the chiv chiv-alric
alric chiv-alric courage of Lee.
We should be thankful that in its
ability to help itself and to help
others our country has shown itself
the greatest and most resourceful on
the face of the earth.
We should be-thankful for the tens
of millions of self-denying and hard hardworking
working hardworking people who by their efforts at
home have so efficiently backed the
millions who went to the battlefield.
We should be thankful for the
statesman who calmly and despite the
vituperation of the rabble led us into
the wat and planned our way to vic victory,
tory, victory, and whose words of justice and
reason caused long enthralled nations
to break their bonds and even the,
besotted victims of autocracy to stop
and -think that they, too, might be
men. ;
We should be thankful for brave
little Belgium, who with her slender
body blocked for awhile the wheels of
the Prussian Juggernaut, who thru
four years of the foulest oppression
so bravely kept the faith that no na nation
tion nation will ever again have any excuse
for being recreant, and who of all na nations
tions nations is the most grateful to America.
We should be thankful, twice thank thankful,
ful, thankful, to France, whose army like a
long, shining rapier flashed ever be before
fore before the eyes and drove deep into the
body of the beast and however much
it might drip with the gore of the en enemy,
emy, enemy, or blood from the arm that
wielded it, was never befouled with
treachery or cruelty.
We should., be thankful to Britain,

erim. untiring. uncomplaining, whose

i a :i
navy waa uur auie buiciu uuui uui
sword was ready to strike, and with with-out
out with-out whom the war could not have been
won. I
We should be thankful to Italy,'
whose storied fame has become dim
in the light'of her great achievements
of today.
We should be thankful to Serbia,
who went the furthest away and came
the furthest back the people that
even crucifixion couldn't kill.
We should be thankful to Japan
who by her stand among the hosts of
civilization has dispelled the "yellow
peril." We should be thankful to Por
tugal, who for no other reason than?
to keep her plighted word cast her
sword into the scale. We should be
thankful to big, generous Brazil and
brave little Cuba, who have proven
their gratitude to the country that
aided them when they were weak and
wavering.
We should be thankful to bleeding,
blinded Russia, but for whose blun
dering might? unsparingly lavished
during the first year of war, our i
friends might have been crushed, and
who we will help to guide into the
path of ordered liberty.
We should be thankful that of all
nations we have the greatest oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to be thankful and unselfish;
and we should resolve that the oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity shall be improved to the ut-.
most.
Last and least we should.be thank thankful
ful thankful to Prussia, whose unparalleled
treachery, unbounded cruelty and
lust, and unequaled effrontery and
stupidity awoke our dormant man manhood,
hood, manhood, and made us give reason "unto
ourselves to realize that Thanksgiv Thanksgiving
ing Thanksgiving is for a nobler purpose than to
dodge work and stuff our stomachs.
It is not neoessary to say we should
be thankful to God, for justice and
kindness, courage and self-sacrifice
are Hi$, and in being thankful to and
for these we are thankful to Him.
ANTHONY
Anthony, Nov. 27. Mr. B. K. Pad Padgett
gett Padgett is away on business andfMrJ.
A. Talton is S. A. L. agent during Mr.
Padgett's absence. f
News just received from Corporal
David N. Brown and Lawton C.t Sims
in France, states they have been
transferred. We know the boys were
sorry to al at.Ceevp
sorry to leave Captain, Drake, as they
have been with him since, they enlist enlist-e'd
e'd enlist-e'd over two years ago.
Mr. C. V. Swain is aeain able to b
on the street after a relapse with the
flu. v. y v v y
Quite a number of Anthony people
were watching the airplanes Tuesday
as they were passing overmen route to
Jacksonville.
. Mrs. M. R. Gill and daughter. Miss
Ruth, returned to Jacksonville Mon Monday.
day. Monday. Mrs. Lila Perry of Maxwell is 1 the
guest of Mrs. B. K. Padgett.
Mr. Mullen is visiting his sister,
Mrs. N. W. Meadows. ;
v Messrs. Stewart Baskin and Ralph
Manning returned home from Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville Saturday. Stewart left An Anthony
thony Anthony Sunday for Phoenix. Arizona.
where he has a position with Swith
oi Company.
The Anthony community exhibit re received
ceived received third prize at the Marion
County Fair. We think this is good
as they only had three days 'in which
to collect the exhibits.
Mr. and 1 Mrs. Nolan Higginbotham
and baby spent several days with Mr.
and Mrs. J. M. Gates last week.
Mr. J. C, Kendrick, Hinton Souter,
Mr. J. R. Wilder and others have gone
to the gulf on a pleasure trip.
Mr. Boyd Thorn shipped another
carload of hogs from here Monday.
Mr. George Brown Jr. will leave
Wednesday for Moore Haven.
Mr. H. G. Padgett and family have
moved to Tampa. v
Mr. Eddie Williams, who has spent
the past year in Anthony, left Sun Sunday
day Sunday for Island Grove.
Quite a crowd from here will take
dinner and spend Thanksgiving at the
Kenaig orange grove.
Miss Virginia Stumpe, who has
been spending a while with Mrs. Bell,
returned to her home in Palatka Mon Monday.
day. Monday. .' i .. ,
Dr. Eddis'on's Cushion Sole Shoe for
tired and tender feet,, at Little's Shoe
Parlor. 24-tf
SALT FISH 1
DIRECT FROM THE FISHING
BOATS 10 YOU
-DELICIOUS fresh caught SALTED
FISH, direct to the consumer by pre prepaid
paid prepaid parpel post or express, 15 pounds
for 2. Barrel shipments a specialty.
Try our DELICIOUS SALTED ROE.
Order now before the season closes.
ST. GEORGE CO. EVC.
ST. GEORGE ON THE GULF,
P. O. Apalachicola, Florida.
REMINGTON
AUTOMATIC GUNS
$42.00
- AT
"WHY PAY MORE"

! GOLDK i

--

TWO HOLD OFF
GUN COMPANY
Yanks Caught in Pocket Fight
Untij Last Bullet Is
' Gone.

BOCHE SHELL GETS THEM
Caught Between Barrage and Hunt
They Fight in Manner to Make
One Proud to Be of
Same Race.
By E. A. BATCHELOR.
Paris. The Y. M. C. A. man told
the story with' tears in his eyes and
a break in his voice. He said that it
was the saddest thing that he ever
had encountered, which meant much.
He had been a long time in France,
so death and suffering, were no stran strangers
gers strangers to him. But when he spoke of
the sergeant and the private that they
had found dead beside their machine
gun he couldn't control his emotion.
It seems that the sergeant and the
private had been caught in a pocket.
The Germans, in force, were In front
of them. There was a barrage behind
which made it impossible for them to
rejoin their company. So they stayed
and roughed it out, fought In a man manner
ner manner that made one proud to be of the
same race.
He'ld Off Whole Company.
When they found them there was
pile of empty shells several inches
high around the gun and not a single
round of unexpended ammunition re remained.
mained. remained. The two had held off a whole
company of Boche machine gunners
for several hours.
The enemy had been around a bend
In the road, a scant 50 yards away,
and hadn't been able to advance be because
cause because of the brisk fire of the lone
American gun manned by the ser sergeant
geant sergeant and the private. The sergeant
had been evidently pointing the gun
and the private had been feeding It
Their only protection had been a lit little
tle little ridge where the dirt had been
thrown up beside the road.
The undergrowth just behind them
had been cut to ribbons by the Boche
bullets and the trees near where the
enemy had been were scarred by Yan Yankee
kee Yankee fire. It had been the hottest kind
of a fight and the Americans had been
winning against the terrible odds un
til a shell burst right on them and
killed both.
Whether It was a Boche shell or
one of our own, nobody ever will
know. Both sides had been firing Into
that part of the wood. Whatever the
source of the shell, it had done its
work quickly and thoroughly, for the
men were badly torn. Death prob probably
ably probably had come instantaneously. They
had gone while the joy of battle was
6tHl upon them.
Death Not in Vain.
It was a glorious death but a sad
pne because a few minutes after the
shell landed, the Boche had beeD
obliged to retire. Another half an
hour, and the heroic pair would have
been safe. But they had not died in
vain. The company that they had
held at bay carried back to the Ger German
man German lines a story of American hero heroism
ism heroism that will do much to convince the
Boche that the men from across the
sea are going to decide the war. The
sacrifice of these two lives will save
others.
They called on the Y. M. C. A. man
to help bury these two heroes. It was
not his first experience as a membei
of a burial party because he had been
at the front all through the big push,
As he aided in the burial he could not
help wishing that of all the thousands
engaged in that battle these two xnighl
have been spared.
GAIN WEIGHT IN TRAINING
Young Women Students in Montana
Also Increase Height and
Lung Capacity.
Missoula, Mont. Young women stu students
dents students In the freshman class at the Uni University
versity University of ,Montana here last yeai
gained In weight, height and lung ca capacity,
pacity, capacity, according to the report of Miss
Ina Glttings, physical director foi
women. .A thorough physical examin
ation at the beginning of school lasl
fall showed the condition of heart
lungs, posture, feet, etc. A similar ex examination
amination examination was made last spring.
The average gain in weight of each
girl taking physical training -was a lit little
tle little over four pounds, the average gain
in height was about one-third inch,
and the average" Increased lung capac capacity
ity capacity was one cubic Inch.
AGAINST WIDOWS MARRYING
German Doctor Urges a New Law to
Give Single Women a
Chance.
Amsterdam, Holland. Enactment oi
a law in Germany to prevent widowi
from remarrying so as to leave th
few available men for single women ii
urged in a letter to the Tag by a Mu
nich doctor, Hans von Hertig. n
points out that the widows, througfc
remarrying after the war, would have
a detrimental effect on the birth rate,
t as most of them are mothers already.
"On December 1, 1910," he writes
"there were in Germany about 300,000
widows between the ages of eighteen
t and forty-five. At a very modest est!

LABELS HAVE ARRIVED

May be Obtained from Red Cross
Headquarters for Attaching to
Parcels for Shipment to
Soldiers Overseas
Miss Mary McDowell, secretary of
the Marion County Chapter, Ameri American
can American Red Cross, has received from the
war department a supply of labels to
be used in shipping Christmas parcels
to soldiers with the American Expe Expeditionary
ditionary Expeditionary Forces in France. These
labels will be furnished by Miss Mc McDowell
Dowell McDowell to parents or next of kin of
soldiers who have not received labels
direct from their relatices in France.
The Red Cross secretary, also fur furnished
nished furnished a standard size cardboard box
in which to ship the Christmas gifts
that will be delivered to our boys on
Christmas day.
These boxes have to be in the
hands of the Red Cross chapter by
November 30. Do not mail the box
yourself. When packed, the box un
sealed and unwrapped, ready for in inspection,
spection, inspection, should be taken to the Red
Cross headquarters. Parcel post zone
rates will be charged. The parcels
are to remain in custody of the Red
Cross until delivered to the postal au authorities.
thorities. authorities. Nothing should go in a Christmas
parcel which will not keep fresh from
the time of packing until Christmas.
Hard candy, including chocolate,
would probably be safe in tinfoil or
heavy cardboard, but no sofe choco chocolate
late chocolate nor anything that could possibly
be crushed should be used. No liquids
nor articles packed in glass should be
placed in the package.
THE WAR IS OVER
Have your house painted. We do
all kinds of painting and paper hang hanging.
ing. hanging. 23-6t SWAIM SIGN SYSTEM.
The most complete line of proprie proprietary
tary proprietary 'remedies in Central Florida is
always to be found here. Tydings &
Co., druggists. Phone 30. tf
The "Easeall" Shoe, a perfect arch
protecting shoe, at Little's Shoe Par Parlor,
lor, Parlor, tf
Let us supply your TOILET AR ARTICLES.
TICLES. ARTICLES. Our line i is complete, and
the prices always reasonable. The
Court Pharmacy. Phone 284. tf

LAST, BIT NOT LEAST, FLORIDA'S OWN NEEDY KIDDIES

we cimdim's mm

Announces Its December Camp For 050,000 to Begin on the First
Day of December and End on Christmas Day.
One Thousand Floridians are asked to give One Fifty Dollar Liberty Bond: or Five Hun Hundred
dred Hundred Floridians to give One One Hundred Dollar Liberty Bond; or Ten Thou-
conH Flnr?r1ian to div fine Rohu "RnriH ( o Wai Qoitinri Ctnmnt

THE $50,000 IS WEEDED BY THE SOCIETY
For these three big items : $35,000 to provide for 1000 homeless orphan and needy
kiddies during the coming year of 1919 at an average cost of $35 each ; $10,000 to pro provide
vide provide for 200 fatherless kiddies whose widowed mothers would otherwise be compelled to
give them up permanently, at an average cost of $50 per child ; $5,000 to finish free of

debt the work ol iyi8, which
"YOUR BONDS AND STAMPS"
IWILL STILL HELP UNCLE SAM
And at the same time" HELP FLOR FLORIDA'S
IDA'S FLORIDA'S YOUNGSTERS IN NEED. Ar Arrangements
rangements Arrangements have been made by the
Home Society with the Atlantic Na National
tional National Bank of Jacksonville, to take
over the Bonds and Stamps at par
so that the Society can- secure the
funds, and yet keep the money in the
service of f our .Government, so your
Bond or. Stamps will in this way serve
two great causes, the cause of the
Allies, and the cause of Florida's chil children.
dren. children. OF COURSE REAL MONEY WILL
BE GLADLY ACCEPTED
While the aim of the Home Society
is to raise the $50,000 through Liber Liberty
ty Liberty Bonds and War Savings Stamps,
the main thing is to get the money,
therefore, of course the Society .would
be delighted to accept contributions
of money from the children's pen pennies
nies pennies up to the largest possible amount.
SUBSCRIPTIONS CAN BE MADE
PAYABLE MONTHLY
Any person who does not own a
Bond, or who prefers to buy another,

Send your Bond or Stamps, or contribution, to our Treasurer, R. V. Covington, 428 St. James Building, Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, Florida, and be sure to register your letter if you send a Bond, and ask for a return receipt card. Pleading
for some aid from every man, woman and child in Florida, we are your servants in the "greatest work under the

sun.'

CMirei s tome Smelly di Mmfc
State Headquarters: 428 ST. JAMES BUILDING, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

Judge W. H. Baker, President

N. B. All expenses for publicity borne by Board of Directors of Children's
, al contributions

GIVE THANKS
TO THE LORD
And Your Country For the Glory
of Our Arms by Buying War Sav

ings Stamps This Month
OCALA ICE & PACKING
'COMPANY

.JiiC'""?. -t7 -r. .-r

0CAIA MARBLE WORKS

ws

f -----
- i
f V

Granite,
and All
eee'-j-j- j-tA.

. Second Hand
BUtLAf B AGS
Bought and Sold.
We Pay the Highest Cash Prices.
Write Iof Prices to
TAMPA BAG COMPANY
POSTOFFICE BOX 592 Long Distance Phone 4475
' Tampa, Florida.

OF FLORIDA

Florida's Greatest Charity1

has provided homes, aid and
can send the Society a check or money
order for one-tenth of the amount of
the Bond, and make 'the other pay payments
ments payments monthly, the Bond to become
the property of the Home Society

R. V. Covington, Treasurer .Marcus C. Fagg, State Superintendent

mSL SAVINGS STAMPS
48 SUED BY THE.
UNITED STATES
GCTfEJlNMENT
.-T .-T-. .-T-. .-- .. .-..--. r- -t- -v r-r

V MANUFACTURERS OF
MARBLE AND GRANITE
MONUMENTS & HEADSTONES.

Marble and Cement Fencing
Kinds of Cemetery Work. )

- &
Let Us Quote You Prices.
E.W. LEAVENGOOD, Manager.
Yard N. Magnolia St. Ocala, Florida'

00
TPrrn
r99
care for nearly 1000 children.
when paid for. Persons who cannot
contribute at all NOW, can subscribe
the amount they feel they can give
and make the payments at ANY
TIME in the coming year of 1919. The
idea of the Society is to make sure of
the income of $50,000 for. the finishing
of this year's work-free from debt,
and the entire year of 1919, so that
no further appeal for funds need be
made until 1920.
MUST FLORIDA'S HOMELESS
KIDDIES PLEAD IN VAIN?
The good people of Florida have
taken care during the year of 1918,
and gone "over the top" In every one
of the Big Campaigns, and we have
confidence that they" will heed the cry
of these poor littl. helpless, homeless
kiddies, who ar the Hope of the Fu Future,
ture, Future, and -who must not be peYmitted
to suffer.
WILL YOU ADOPT ONE FLORIDA
KIDDIE FOR NEXT YEAR?
One Fifty Dollar Bond will provide
for the entire need of one of these
kiddies in need. Will you be one of
The Thousand to accept the responsi responsibility
bility responsibility for the care of one of these lit little
tle little ones?
Home Society of Florida, as person-



OCALA, EVENING STAR, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1918

YOU CALL A DOCTOR
Because
HE IS A GOOD DOCTOR
SEND HIS PRESCRIPTIONS
To The
COURT PHARMACY
For the Same Reason

6
. I advise and furnish
glasses only when they
aid or improve vision.
HoMing your eyes and
my profession above selfish interest.
Dr. K. J. Weihe
Eyesight Specialist
Graduate Optometrist
;ihe Co., Jewelers. Ucala, Jbla.
Misery
Mrs. F. M. Jones, o!
Palmer Okla., writes:
"From the time I en entered
tered entered into womanhood
... I looked with dread
from one month to the
next. I suffered with my
back and bearing-down
pain, until life to me was
a misery. I would think
I could not endure the
pain any longer, and I
gradually got worse.
Nothing seemed to help
me until, one day,
I decided to
hi
TARE
The Woman's Tonic
"I took four bottles'
Mrs. Jones goes on to
say, "and was not only
greatly relieved, but can
truthfully say that 1 nave
not a pain. .-
" It has now been two
years since I tookCardui,
and 1 am still in good
health. I would ad advise
vise advise any woman or girl
to use Cardui who is a
sufferer from any female
trouble." ;
If you suffer pain caused
from womanly trouble, of
if you feel the need of a
good strengthening tonic
to build up yourrun-down
system, take the .advice
of Mrs. Jones. Try Car Cardui.
dui. Cardui. It helped her. We
believe It will help you.
All Druggists
: J. 68
ID
If
1
At
Evening Star
Unclassified
Ads.
Bring
Results
KATES Twenty-five words
or less one time 25 cents:
tthree times 50 cents; six
- times 75 cents. Over twenty-five
words, and under fif fifty,
ty, fifty, double above rate.
This rate is for consecutive
insertions. Special rate by
the month. Try them out.
PHONE
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER
AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Con Contract
tract Contract work. Gives More and Better
Work for the Money than any' other
contractor in the city.

; Life I
f Wns a f

III 7 I III

J

m

mm

DCALA SOCIAL AFFAIRS

Thanksgiving Conundrums
As your Thanksgiving dinner nears
its close, a bowl of walnuts may be
passed. These nuts may be tied with
yellow ribbon, and when cracked, dis
close a slip of papef bearing a conun
drum. The walnut meats having been
ramoved, of course, and the halves
glued together, after inserting the
piece of paper. Each guest can then
read his or her conundrum aloud and
everyone have an opportunity to guess
the answer. The following conun
drums have been suggested by the
November Pictorial:
Why did the Plymouth Rock? It
was the cradle of American independ independence.
ence. independence. Why did Priscilla spin? She was the
top of New England society.
How did the Pilgrim Fathers get
the Mayfloker out of the harbor? They
had to back her (tobacco).
Why was Miles so Standish? R
was a son and the sun (son) never
sets.
Why did the Pilgrim Fathers find
Mass. at Bay? Nature had treed her.
What did Virginia Dare? To be b
woman. ;
Why did the Pilgrim Fathers
smoke? They were on fire with free freedom.
dom. freedom. ;
Why was the Indian s wigwam
(wig-warm)? It was made of skin.
Why should the world have a large
population of Indians now ? They are
peace pipers.
Why did Governor Bradford invite
the Indians to the first Thanksgiving
feast ? The white guests were few
and the Indians came to "fill up.'y
Why was the Indians' contribution
to the' feast so costly? It was dear
(deer).
What kind of a ship did Miles
Standish captain? A courtship-
Why did Priscilla know that' her
wedding petticoat was too long? She
saw Nantuck-it (Nantucket.)
What sin did the Indians bring into
the colony ? Mocca-sin.
What did Priscilla say become of
her spinning wheel? Paw-tucket (Pa-
took-it.)
What kind of keys did the Indians
use to unlock the Puritans' hearts?
Turkeys.
Why was Priscilla like the May Mayflower?
flower? Mayflower? She "landed" a Pilgrim.
a
Informal Dance at Elks' Club
A jolly crowd of young folks gath
ered at the Elks' Club last night and
danced to Victrola music for several
hours, chaperoned by Mrs. J. H. Spen
cer and Mrs. P. V. Leavengood. Those
dancing were Misses Louise and
Loureen Spencer, Virginia Beckham,
Sara Dehon, Helen Jones, Julia Hiert
and Simmie Handelsman, Messrs.
Robert Hall, Leonard Wesson, Lyim
Sanders, George Looney, Tom Wallis,
Frank Rentz, Leroy Bridges, Mar
shall Cam, Otis Green, James Thom
as, Baxter Bryan and Mr. Knight.
Mrs. H. M. Hampton left Tuesday
for'a five days stay in Jacksonville,
v
Mr. and Mrs.? Phil Robinson of In
verness are the Thanksgiving guests
of Mr. arid Mrs. G. K. Robinson.
;
Miss Julia Hurt of Atlanta is the
attractive guest of Mr. and Mrs. Roy
Newman and family on Oklawaha
avenue. k''.
Mr. and Mrs. lk. J. Roess and chil
dren of Jacksonville are the Thanks Thanksgiving
giving Thanksgiving guests of Mr. and Mrs. R. L.
Anderson.
Mr. and Mrs. B. A. Weathers have
gone to Lakeland to spend Thanksgiv-
ing with Mr. and Mrs. Vernie Stevens
and daughters.
Mr. C. R. Sapp of St. Petersburg,
passed through Ocala yesterday in
his car en route to Jacksonville, to
attend the state fair.
.
, Mr. Leroy Bridges and friends, Mr.
Knight, of the University of Florida,
are the Thanksgiving guests of Capt.
and Mrs. T. E. Bridges.
Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Blalock and lit
tle daughter, Betty motored to Madi Madison
son Madison Wednesday to spend Thanksgiv
ing with Mr. Blalock's relatives.
. ; ..
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. F.' Flippen and
their charming guest, Miss Nancy
Seibert, are the Thanksgiving guests
of Mr. and Mrs. B. D. Blackburn;
The Thanksgiving service at; the
Baptist church this morning was well
attended. Those present heard a fine
sermon and some splendid music.
Miss Annie Joe Law is the happy
hostess today of her mother and sis
ter, Mrs. T. J. Law and Miss Ada Law
of Brooksville, and her brother, Mr.
J. C. Law, who is with the students
training corps at Gainesville.
Mrs. H. F. Watt and little daugh
ter, Helen, who have been at the
Ocala House for several days, are now
pleasantly located at Mrs. Sidney
Haile's, in the apartments formerly
occupied by Mr. and Mrs. N. I. Gott
lieb and Miss Nellie .Gottlieb.
Mrs. Robert Ochiltree of Tampa,
who has been visiting her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Brigance in Jack Jacksonville,
sonville, Jacksonville, is expected in Ocala tomor tomorrow
row tomorrow to be the guest of Mrs. W. T.
Whitley until Sunday. Mrs. Ochiltree
was formerly Miss Irma Brigance of

this city.

H mm .1 f t r I t

i Mother's l.nnK nnnif i
f-j ICSSSW W WWW
I I
The surest road to health, say what they
will.
Is never to suppose we shall be ill;
Most of these evil3 we poor mortals know,
From doctors and Imagination grow.
ChurchiO.
Missouri Hoe Cake.
Put through a sieve two cupfuls of
cornmeal, and a half a teaspoonful
each of baking powder and salt. Add
one tablespoonful of melted fat and
stir in water to make a soft dough.
Make into small cakes a half inch t
thickand bake on a hot greased' grid-,
die until well browned on both sides.
f Barley Popovers.
Beat two eggs, one cupful of barley
flour, one teaspoonful of sugar, half J
a teaspoonful of salt and one cupful
of milk ; use a Dover egg beater and
beat until smooth. Bake about 40
minutes in a hot well-greased Iron
pan. One-fourth of a cupful of rice
flour may replace a half cupful of
barley flour. Improving the recipe
some.
Cheese and Rice Souffle.
Put one and one-half cupfuls of
American cheese through the food
chopper, stir Into it one and one-half
cupfuls of white sauce, season highly
with paprika, and when the cheese
Is melted add one, and one-half cup cupfuls
fuls cupfuls of cooked rice and the beaten
yolks of three eggs. Fold In the
whites of the eggs and, turn into a
well-greased baking dish, set In hot
water and bake half an hour in a
moderate oven.
. Liberty Ice Cream.
Add one and one-half cupfuls of
evaporated milk to one cupful of wa
ter and two cupfuls of milk,.then scald.
Add one cupful of honey and
cool. When cool add one cupful of
crushed raspberries and a teaspoonful
of lemon extract. Freeze i as usual.
Can apples, apple juice and other
fruit juice without sugar. In the win
ter the apple juice may beheated and
sweetened, and it will be as good as
if sweetened when put up. This takes
no sugar now when it is scarce. A jar
of fruit, perfectly sterile, will keep
fully as well unsweetened..
Dry corn. This is difficult to keep
when canned, but it dries easily and
keeps its flavor. Cook fivie minutes,
just long enough to set the milk. Cut
and dry as quickly as possible.
Dampen the brush of the carpet
sweper before using; it will. then take
up all lint with the dust.
v: Fastest Battle Cruiser.
The largest and fastest battle cruis
er In the world is being built by the
United States. It will have 180,000-
horse power and a speed of 35 knots.
Need a Few More Books
Miss Gamsby, custodian of the li
brary, informs us that about seventy seventy-five
five seventy-five more works of fiction are needed
to make up Ocala 's quota for the Li-,
brary Association. These books will
probably go to Miami, where there
is likely to be a big camp all winter.
We are now showing a pretty line
of IVORY TOILET ARTICLES in
sets or single pieces. Just the thing
for holiday presents. Tydings & Co.,
opposite Harrington Hotel. tf
Prompt delivery or srescrlptibns Is
the watchword here. Tell vour tmvsic-
Man to leave them with us. We allow
no substitution. The Court Pharmacy.
Phone 284. tf
WHEN YOU ARE TIRED
of payinar retail PAINT nrlce or the
Linseed Oil. in Readv-Mixed Paints,
buy one gallon or
which is ALL PAINT, then add one
gallon of Pure Linseed Oil, at Linseed
Oil Price, and you will have iwu
gallons of Pure Linseed Oil Paint, at
a clear savine to YOU of one dollar
or MORE according to the price of
Linseed Oil. In addition you will
have one of the most durable paints
obtainable, since it is Pure Linseed
Oil Paint. 2
For Sale By
THE MARION HARDWARE CO,
Ocala. Florida
GRAY POLISH
Fop Ladies' Shoes
AT
"WHY PAY MORE"

MOTSGMK
mm
MR. SUN'S FRECKLES.
"Whatever Is the matter with you,
Sir. Sun?" asked the fairies.
"Why do you
ask?" inquired Mr.
Sun. "Do I look
ill, or dangerously
sick in any way?"
"No," said Fairy
Princess Joy
slowly, "you don't
look a little bit ill
or very danger dangerously
ously dangerously so you just
look a little queer,
if you will pardon
me for saying so,
dear Mr. Sun."
"IH pardon you
for saying so,"
smiled the sun. "I
am glad, though,
that I haven't a
sick look. I'd not
"It Was Very Hard
to Keep CooI.
mind being sick nearly so much as I
would mind looking sick. I'd hate to
be a miserable, wretched, pale and for forlorn
lorn forlorn sun. I want to be bright and
strong.",.
"Well," said Fairy Twilight Bell who
enjoyed the dajtime even though the
twilight was her favorite Jime of the
day. '"AVell," she repeated, "you
needn't worry about being bright and
strong. You certainly aren't feeling
weak!"
"Then why should Fairy Princess
Joy ask me what is the matter with
me?" inquired Mr. Sun.
"I said that you didn't look ill," an answered
swered answered Fairy Princess Joy.
"To be sure you did," said Mr. Sun.
"You told me I looked a little queer."
"I do hope I didn't hurt your feel feelings,"
ings," feelings," said Princess Joy. "You asked
me if I thought you looked ill and I
didn't want to say you did when you
most decidedly did not and too I
thought it might worry you to have
some one think you looked ill. You
might imagine that all sorts of things
. were the matter with you if I thought
SO."
"I don't believe," said Mr.' Sun slow slowly,
ly, slowly, "that I would be so foolish."
"Of course not," said Fairy Princess
Joy. "I am getting very much mud muddled.
dled. muddled. Oh, dear, and I never want- to
make anyone feel unhappy or sad or
blue.';
"I don't feel blue," said Mr. Sun,
"nor do I' feel unhappy and sad. But
I do feel a little spotty 1"
"The very thing," said Fairy Prin
cess Joy.
"Oh, is that what made you say I
looked queer?". asked the sun.
"Yes," she answered.
said Mr. Sun, and Fairy Princess. Joy
looked very much pleased that Mr. Sun
was really not at all hurt but was sim
ply very understanding.
"I must look queer, of course," Mr.
Sun continued. "But there Is a reason
for it"
"I am sure there must be," said
Fairy Princess Joy.
"Will you tell us the reason?" asked
Fairy Twilight BelL :
"Do," urged all the fairies.
"You know what very hot weather
we have been having lately?" began
air. sun.
All the fairies nodded their heads.
We know, Mr. Sun, It was very hard
to keep cool, especially for the grown
ups and the children and the horses."
"Well, we've had a very, very hot
wave. Now the hot wave came to me
and said :
" "Look here old Sun, folks often say
you give them freckles ; they say that,
after all the good you do. They for
get that you cure them and make them
well by your sunshine and that you
make the flowers grow and the leaves
come out In the spring. They just get
mad at you if you give them freckles
and try to hide their faces from you
by broad-brimmed hats and sun sunshades.
shades. sunshades. What -have you got to eay
to that, old Sun?- v
"Now that made me very mad. I
always get mad when I hear such
things, and when
I get mad of.
course I blaze and
it makes every
one still warmer.
Well, old Hot
Wave talked to
me like this and
urged me on.
"'IH help you,
he said. 'Well
get even, with
them."
"So we went on
a regular tear
and hasn't It been
hot?"
'You Give Them
Freckles."
"It most certainly has," said the
fairies.
"But what do you think happened
to me?" asked the sun.
"The spots," said the fairies.
"Yes," said Mr. Sun, "the spots are
freckles freckles on the face of the
sun. Just fancy that! Mr. Sun was
the receiver of a number of freckles
rinrfnsr thp verv hot season! Isn't
that a ioke on me? But I don't mind.
It's been a record-breaking hot wave.'
And learned men they call scientists
tnnlr niftiirps Of Mr. SUU and HIS
freckles!
What It Meant.
Sunday School Teacher What does
Z the lot fell upon Jonah?"
I Little Ilarvie I guess It means the
' whole gang jumped on him.

GHEVR0LE
For EconoirucTisportatiDn

With a Chevrolet "Four-Ninety" car you can

cover distance swiftly, economically and with
comfort. From home to office to the factory and
from the farm or to the innumerable places that
the demands of each business day call you is a
matter of minutes instead of hours with a Chev Chevrolet.
rolet. Chevrolet. This service is always at your command
the instant you want it. It gives you travel inde independence
pendence independence with economy and comfort all the time.
Come and inspect this model. Get acquainted
with all it tan offer you.
We -maintain the most complete garage and
repair shop in Central Florida.
OCALA IRON WORKS GARAGE

North Main Street
OCALA,

Chevrolet "Four-Ninety" Touring Cai

t Have

Winter Bedding Cleaned Now.
Blankets, Comforts, Etc.

lagBagapsr'-rv-"- &m m i

THE WBNIEDSOR HOTEL

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

3
In1..
f
(5
-vv

1 In the heart of the city with "Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in "each room. Dining room service is
second to none.
RATES From $1.50 per day per person to $6.
ROBERT M. MEYER, J: E. KAVANAUGH
Slanager. Proprietor.

WHITE STAR LINE
TRANSFER STORAGE

AUTO
TRUCK
SERVICE
Long Distance
'"-Moving

PHONE 296

COLLIER
Get the Genuine.
and AygI
?vinr Every Cake

I

W. KLane, 3!. D, Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear,' Nose and
Throat, Law Library Building, Ocala,
Florida. tf

Telephone No.. 4

FLORIDA
Your
COVERED
.MOVING
VANS
Teaming Packing
' Hosting
BROTHERS

Mclver & MacKay
UNDERTAKERS and EMDAU1ERS
PHONES 47. 104. 3C5
OCALA, FLORIDA

, The pride of the Court Pharmacy is
its prescription department. Every
prescription is carefully compounded
as ordered by your physician NO
SUBSTITUTION allowed. Phone 284.



OCA LA, EVENING STAR, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1918

a nil

H. A. King, a Salvation Army
worker from St. Petersburg, is in the
city.
The Pathe News will be among the
attractions at the Temple this eve evening.
ning. evening. That jolly person, Mr. R. H. Pur Pur-dom,
dom, Pur-dom, is here from Jacksonville, to
spend Thanksgiving with Mrs. Pur Pur-dom
dom Pur-dom and circulate among his numer numerous
ous numerous friends.
Miss Isabel Mayes, formerly with
our high school, now teaching at Cen Center
ter Center Hill, was visiting her Ocala
friends today.
' Patsy Gillen, who is attending the
students' training camp at Gaines Gainesville,
ville, Gainesville, is home to spend Thanksgiving.
He was accompanied by a comrade, F.
S. Harmoritz of Tampa.
Buy your CUT GLASS early "for
holiday presents. We are now show showing
ing showing an elegant line. Tydings & Co.,
opposite Harrington Hotel. tf
The secretary of the county f oocf
administration having informed us
that there are a number of changes to
be made in the food list, but that he
must await information from Orlando
to make them, the list will not be
printed this week. i
Pretty Vivian Martin was the shin shining
ing shining star of "Unclaimed Goods," a Bret
Harte and Deadwood Dick movie at
the Temple last night. The picture
met the approval of all the old-timers
present. s This evening the ever-bewitching
"Elsie Ferguson will gleam in
"The Lie," and there being many dif different
ferent different kinds of lies you had better go
see which sort of one it is. j
Paper Drinking Cups, 25 to pack package,
age, package, ten cants at Gerig's Drugstore.
Ping Bodie Is One of New
York Yanks' Heavy Hitters
, and Is Doing Good Service
Ping Bodie Is one pf the New York
rankees' heaviest batters. Miller
Qggins seems to be getting more
aeeball out of him than did any other
taanager. Bodie was with the White
Sox for some time and was criticized
so extensively by the press and his
manager that he was unable to play
to the true worth of his talent. He
Ping Bodie.
i went back to' the-coast and was-purchased
by Connie Mack for whom he
'hone with the bat Huggins desired
a slugging ball club and purchased
Bodie from Mack and has had no cause
to regret it, for the chunky outfielder is
rapping the ball timely, Is playing a
y nice game in the field and has not
been accused of perpetrating any
'"boners" on the bases.
Each Hen Should Produce
Ten Dozen Eggs Per Year.
The average novlnce can reasonably
rpect to get an average of a least
ten dozen eggs per hen per year from
his small flock In the back yard. On
the basis of two hens to each member
of the family, according to the depart department
ment department of agriculture, this will give 20
dozen eggs In a year to each person,
which amount is about halfway be between
tween between the general average of farm and
city consumption. No back yard poul poultry
try poultry keeper should be satisfied with less
than this. Every back yard poultry
keeper should try to get as much more
as possible.
To provide an egg & day for each
person, two hths would have to lay
183 eggs each per year. This Is by no
means an Impossible average for small
flocks. It is perhaps not too much to
say that In cases where the person at attending
tending attending the flock is practically "on
the Job" all the time, that is. In a posi position
tion position to look after the wants of the
birds three or more times a day, an
average of better than 13 dozen eggs
per hen' can easily be secured. If the
hens are mature and in good condition
at the start, and have the vitality to
carry them through a year of heavy
laying.
Accurate and prompt prescription
service is always at your command
here. Ask your doctor. Tydings &
Co., druggists. Phone 30. tf
i

ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE
OF TRAINS AT OCALA

Seaboard Air Line, Northbound
No. 4: Arrives 12:43 p..m. Departs
12:58 p. m.
No. 16 (Limited): Arrives and de departs
parts departs 4:08 p. m.
No. 2: Arrives 1:50 a. m. Departs
1:55 a. m.
Seaboard Air Line, Southbound
No. 3: Arrives 1:12 p. m. Departs
1:27 p. m.
No. 15 (Limited): Arrives and de departs
parts departs 4:08 p. m.
No. 1: Arrives 1:45 a. m. Departs
parts 2 p.m. '..''.
Atlantic Coast Line (Main Line)
Northbound
No. 10: Arrives and departs 5:42 a.
m.
No. 40: Arrives 1 p. m. Departs
1:20 p. m.
No. 38: Arrives and departs 2:27
a. m.
Atlantic Coast Line (Main Line)
Southbound
.
No. 37: Arrives and departs 2:16
a. m.
No. 39: Arrives and departs 2:35
p. m. j
No. 9: Arrives and departs 9:13p.m.
Atlantic Coast Line Branches, South
t bound
No. 151 (Sunny Jim) : For Wilcox,
Monday, Wednesday and Friday,
leaves 6:10 a. m.
- No. 35 (Sunny Jim): For Lakeland,
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday,
leaves 6:40 a. m.
No. 141: Daily except Sunday, ar arrives
rives arrives 10:50 a. m. from Wilcox.
No. 49: For Homosassa, leaves 2:25
P m.
Atlantic Coast Line Branches, North North-.
. North-. bound
No. 48: From Homosassa: Arrives
12:53 p. m.
No. 150 (Sunny Jim) : From Wil Wilcox,
cox, Wilcox, Monday, Wednesday and Friday,
arrives 5:45 p. m.
No. 32 (Sunny Jim): From Lake Lakeland,
land, Lakeland, Tuesday, Thursday and Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, arrives 9:48 p. m.
No. 140: Daily except Sunday,
leaves 3:45 p. in- for Wilcox.
Oklawaha Valley Railroad
Train No. 71, first class passenger
and mixed, leaves Palatka at 6:30 a.
m. every Monday, Wednesday and
Friday, arriving at Ocala at 10:30 a.
m., same days.
Train No. 72 leaves Ocala at 2 p.
m. Mondays, Wednesday and Fridays
Train No. 73 leaves Palatka Tues Tuesdays,
days, Tuesdays, Thursday and Saturdays at
and arrives in Palatka at 5:50 p. m.
same days.
7:40 a. m., and runs only to Rodman,
at which place it arrives at 8:25.
Train No. 74 leaves Rodman at
4:30 p. m. Tuesdays, Thursday and
Saturdays and arrives at Palatka at
5:20 p. m. same days.
Paper Drinking Cups, 25 to pack package,
age, package, ten cents at Gerig's Drugstore.
OFFERS RECIPE FOR RAIN
Oklahoma Official Turns Down Good
Chance to Become Public
Benefactor.
X
Oklahoma City, Okla. Chester West-
; fall; assistant secretary of the Okla
homa state council of defense, passed
up a perfectly good chance to .became
a public benefactor by securing a good
soaking rain for the state. All on ac account
count account of a small fee of $2,000 for the
rainmaker.
An. Oklahoma City woman walked
Into the office of the council of defense
and announced to Mr. Westfall that
she possessed the secret m of making
rain. She demanded a fee of $2,000
for the job. Mr. Westfall endeavored
to get her to part with the secret, but
she refused.
"The, Bible says that he who won't
provide for his own household is worse
than an infidel, and I have a family to
look after," was her "parting shot as
she left the office crestfallen at her
failure.
New Cure for Cooties.
New York. "W e've got a new newfangled
fangled newfangled disinfectant for 'cooties' which
Is fine," writes Private Fred G. Motten
to his mother here.
Tt is' a sort of wash that you put on
at night. Then you sleep like a log
and dream that you are home.
"They issue It to us every night for
a soother. And as it sure keeps the
kaisers' off one, you need have no
worry about me. Cooties were our
greatest source of worry."
; Bonfire of German Books..
Mellen, Wis. Af ter seizing all the
German text-books In ; the high school
here, citizens carried them out into the
street and then burned them. Scores
3f people witnessed the destruction of
the books, which marked the end of
the teaching of German in the schools.
Paper Drinking Cups, 25 to pack package,
age, package, ten cents at Gerig's Drugstore.
: small
DIAMOND RINGS :
Z For X-mas Gifts
AT
I!
"WHY PAY MORE" :

; fin i mum m

Si

bULUKWN

T

The
AND THEY SHOWED NO MERCY
Former Students Under Strict Profes Professor
sor Professor Given, by Fortune of War,
Unlooked-for Opportunity.
This true story, related substan substantially
tially substantially as below by Gee Ell, is a little
late in arriving;
but it needs the
light of publicity,
so we don't apolo apologize
gize apologize for it. Re Remember,
member, Remember, it hap happened.
pened. happened. Once on a time
there was a pro professor'
fessor' professor' at Case
school, who was
entirely impos impossible.
sible. impossible. He was the
Kind or person
who assigns home work for the stu students
dents students to do during vacation. And nat naturally,
urally, naturally, all the students who ever took
his course heartily' wished that their
positions could be reversed- for awhile.
Then along came the war, and sev several
eral several of the Case boys went to Fort Een
and 'took the training necessary to be become
come become officers. Of the number, three
were assigned to Chillicothe.
In the meantime, there came the
draft and caught our professor.
When he got to Chillicothe, he found
that the officers of his company were
his former pupils.
Now the professor does his regular
drill work, and as much extra duty as
anyone can think of in the way of
peeling spuds and all that sort of thing.
The news has gone back to Case.
Everybody Is happy, there, and con convinced
vinced convinced that Eternal Justice is a verity.
Cleveland Plain Dealer.
MILLIONS ENGAGED IN WAR
Table Shows Population of Countries
Which Are embroiled in Great-'
est of All Conflicts.
Inhabitants.
British Empire ............ 430,959,000
China . . .320,850,000
Russia 175,137,000
United States 113,168,000
Franco 87,429,000
German i .' 80,601,000
Jffpa'n 73,S07,OCO
Austria .. 49.882XXX)
Italy 37,30S,000
Brazil 24,618,000
Belgium 22,571,000
Turkey 21,274,000
Portugal- 15,208,000
Siam 8,149,000
RouiAania 7,508,000
Greece 4,821,000
Bulgaria ... 4,715,000
Serbia ..i 4,547,000
Bolivia .......... 2,890,000
Cuba ... 2,500,000
Guatemala 2,003,000
Liberia 1,800,000
Santo Domingo... 710,000
Honduras .. 562,000
Montenegro 516,000
Costa Rica...... 431,000.
Panama 427,000
San Marino. 12,000
Billiards at the Front.
An officer on the Lake Doiran, Sal Sal-oniki,
oniki, Sal-oniki, front whgn home on leave re recently
cently recently took with him on his return
some webbing "pockets" and small
composition billiard balls. He has
since opened a "billiard saloon" for his
men in a specially constructed dugout,
and, writing home on the subject, says :
"I made a thirty-two break on the
table here the other night. It is
rare fun. The table is six feet by two
and a half; a-blanket stretched across
it and tacked down is the cloth. The
cues are made of bivouac poles cut
down and turned, and the scoreboard
is the lid of a box. Playing right up
the line, too, adds to the excitement.
The saloon is crowded nightly."
One Is glad to know it, is "rare fun;"
it seems so like a realization of the
mikado's ideal punishment for the bil billiard
liard billiard sharper. London Observer.
' Paper Substitute for Jute Bags.
Paper bags made to serve the pur purpose
pose purpose of jute bags are being made by a
firm in the middle West. According
to local manufacturers and exporters
who have seen and used the new
product it has add the durability and
other desirable qualities of the jute
one, and has proved every bit as satis satisfactory.
factory. satisfactory. The prevailing scarcity of
jute bags, duo to conditions brought
on by the war,- makes this paper sub substitute
stitute substitute particularly welcome just at
this time. In the opinion- of many, it
promises to hold its own in the market
against jute even after peace is de declared.
clared. declared. Shoe-Testing Machine.
Speed has been essential in equip equipping
ping equipping our new armies, so in buying
shoes it was not possible to test them
by actual wear to see if they came up
to specifications. The bureau of stand standards
ards standards came to the aid of the quarter quartermaster
master quartermaster department by devising a ma machine
chine machine for testing samples of sole leath leather.
er. leather. These are mounted, both wet and
dry, on a revolving wheel, which brings
them in contact with a rough surface,
perfectly reproducing the wear and
tear of actual walking.
Going Up!
Client This bill of yours Is exor exorbitant.
bitant. exorbitant. There, are several items on it I
don't understand.
Lawyer I am perfectly willing t-
explain It, but the explanation will
'rost you five dollars. Christian Register.

Scrap

Book

OCALA FRATERNAL ORDERS

MARION-DUNN MASONIC LODGE
Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. & A.
M., meets on the first and thira
Thursday evenings of each month at
7:30 o'clock until further notice.
Stephen Jewett, W. M.
MIRIAM REBEKAH LODGE NO. 15
Miriam Rebekah Lodge No. 15
meets the first and third Monday eve evenings
nings evenings in each month in the Odd Fel Fellows'
lows' Fellows' hall at 7:30 o'clock.
Claire Moremen, N. G.
Eloise Bouvier, Secretary.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Ocala Lodge No. 19. Conventions
held every Monday evening at 7:30
at the Castle Hall, over the G. C.
j Greene Co.-drugstore. A cordial wel wel-;
; wel-; come to visiting brothers.
H. B. Baxter, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, K. of R. & S.
GCALA LODGE NO. 286, B. P. O. E.
Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, mets
the second and fourth Tuesday eve evenings
nings evenings in each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Club house oppo opposite
site opposite postoffice, east side.
C. W. Hunter, E. R.
E. J. Crook, Secretary.
WOODMEN OF THE WORLD
Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
K. of P. hall at 7:30 p. m. every sec second
ond second and fourth Friday. Viisting sov sovereigns
ereigns sovereigns are always welcome.
P. W. Whitesides, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk.
ORDER OF EASTERN STAR
Ocala Chapter No.. 29, O. E. S.,
meets at Yonge's hair the second and
' f ni i t n Trmrcmr cirDninive rt Ao.n
month at 7:30 o'clock.
Mrs. Alice Yonce, W. M.
Mrs. Susan Cook, Secretary.
ODD FELLOWS
, Tulula Lodge v No. 22, I. O. O. F.,
j meets every Tuesday evening in the
; Odd Fellows' hall on the third floor of
the Star office building at 7:30 o'clock
j promptly. A warm welcome always
extended to visiting brothers.
L. H. Pillans, N. G.
; M. M. Little, Secretary.
R. A. M. CHAPTER NO. 13
Regular convocations of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13, R. A. M., on the first
Friday in every month at 7:30 p. m.
J. A. Bouvier, H. P.
Jake Brown, Secretary.
Church Membership in the
United States Shows Large
Increase in Ten Years
During the ten-year period ending
December 31, 1916, the total church
membership In the United States in increased
creased increased from 35,068,058 to 42,044,374.
or 19.9 per cent; the number of
churches from 212,230 to 228,007, or
7.4 per cent ;. the number of ministers
from 164,830 to 191,722, or 16.3 per
cent; the number of Sunday school
scholars from 15,337,811 to 20,569,831
or 7.8 per cent, and the number of
Sunday school officers and teachers
from 1,746,074 to 2,049,293, or 17.4 per
cent. ;
These data, developed by the census
bure'au's recent inquiry relating to re religious
ligious religious bodies, are contained In a state statement
ment statement compiled under the supervision
of William C. Hunt, chief statistician
for population. ;
The number of denominations cov covered
ered covered was 201, an Increase of 13 over
the number reported for 1906. "This In Increase
crease Increase is the net result of the consoli consolidation
dation consolidation or dropping out of 16 small de denominations
nominations denominations and the addition of 29
small denominations, comprising some
in existence In 1906, but not then
brought to light, and others resulting
from consolidation of formerly (inde (independent
pendent (independent churches. ;
Of the 42,044,374 church members re reported,
ported, reported, 15,742,262, or 37.4 per cent,
were Roman Catholics; 250,340, or six six-tenths
tenths six-tenths of 1 per cent, were adherents of
the easfern orthodox churches (mainly
Greek and Russian), 359,998, or nine nine-tenths
tenths nine-tenths of 1 per cent, were members of
Jewish congregations.
The remainder, 25,691,774, or 61.1
ier sent, comprised the membership
of the various Protestant churches, to together
gether together with that of a few bodies, such
as the Latter Day Saints, the Spirit Spiritualists
ualists Spiritualists and others not usually consid considered
ered considered as belonging to any of the groups
named.
In comparing the figures given It
should be borne in mind that the Ro Roman
man Roman Catholic and eastern orthodox
churches include In their membership
all children who have been baptized,
whereas the Protestant churches do
not, as a rule, receive young children
33 members, ,and that in the case of
some of the more orthodox Jewish or organizations
ganizations organizations only the male Incorpora Incorporators
tors Incorporators or those who have bought shares
or memberships are treated as mem members.
bers. members.
The foregoing percentages, there therefore,
fore, therefore, overstate the relative strength of
the Roman Catholic and eastern or orthodox
thodox orthodox churches and understate that
of the Jews.
Dr. Eddison's Cushion Sole Shoe for;
tired and tender feet, at Little's Shoe'
Parlor. 24-tz

MABEL'S MISSION

By CARRIE GREENWAY.
Covington was cleaning up the desk.
The upstairs girl, answering his ring
for a larger waste basket, almost fell
down the back stairs in her hurry to
spread the news.
Covington had come to board at
the Bradley's three years before, and
since then no one could recall having
seen the top of the desk. A little
space in front, just large enough to
write upon, was kept fairly clear, but
for the rest Covington seemed to take
a pride in the confusion he maintain maintained
ed maintained and boasted that he could find any anything
thing anything he wanted at a moment's no notice.
tice. notice. At the office his desk was scrupu scrupulously
lously scrupulously neat, but the roll top In his sit sitting
ting sitting room, used for his personal cor correspondence,
respondence, correspondence, was piled high with pa papers
pers papers and books.
It might have continued so for an another
other another three years, but Covington was
restless. He found the evening pa papers
pers papers dull, the theatrical advertise advertisements
ments advertisements made no appeal to him, and
books were Intolerable.
- In his restless roaming around the
room his attention was attracted by
the desk, and sinking Into the chair
he began to clean up. Here, at least,
was a novel occupation, and soon he
was busily engaged In reading over
old letters and discarding those of
no further Interest.
Mabel's letters, of course, he kept
in a drawer, the top one with the
Tale lock. Well perhaps It would be
well to clear those out, too. Romance
was dead. He had written her the pro proposal
posal proposal he seemed unable to make In per person,
son, person, and had added : "I shall not write
again until your answer comes." That
had been a fortnight ago.
His eyes caught a line in an ad advertisement
vertisement advertisement in a theatrical paper that
formed part of the Utter of his desk.
'Consider silence ,a polite negative,"
it ran. That was what he was doing.
Mabel had not even taken the trouble
to answer.
He viciously thrust the paper Into
the basket and caught up a letter. It
was that check for his tailor. He had
been positive he had mailed that; the
subsequent argument had resulted In
a transfer of his patronage, yet here
was the check still inside. He was
rather glad that he had commenced
the cleaning up process.
There was another envelope under
the pile of consular reports. He drew
It out and his face blanched, tt was
the letter to Mabel. In some fash fash-Ion
Ion fash-Ion It had slipped Into the tangle on
the desk. He remembered he had
written a number of other letters at
the same time. When he had done he
snapped a rubber band about them and
had given them to one of the fellows
to take out s
What could she think of him? He
had ceased his customary visits and
had not even written. He slipped out
of his house coat and Into his dinner
jacket. There was a telephone in-the
lower halL Perhaps Mabel had not
gone out.
It was her mother who answered,
rather frigidly, with a certain note
of disapproval In her voice. Mabel was
in, but she was ill and had gone to
her room.. She did not think that she
could see Mr. Covington."
But Covington was persistent and In
the end he gained permission to call.
He found her pale, with nervous lines
In her face. She tried to laugh it off
but he would not have it so.
T have a special delivery message
for you," he announced. 'It should
not have been a letter at all; but I
guess I'm a sort of moral coward.
"Anyhow, I was cleaning up my desk
at the house to-night and I found this.
I thought It had been sent two weeks
ago
"Letters often go astray," she com commented
mented commented as she stretched out her hand
to receive It.
Tt was my fault," he said humbly.
"Ton see, I've a 'desk up at the house
and I've rather prided myself upon Its
confusion. Tonight I cleaned It up.
Just to have something to do, and I
found this letter."
Something In his tone conveyed Its
import and she slowly broke the seal
and glanced through the contents. At
last she looked up.
"So that Is the reason I have not
heard from you lately," she said. "I
wondered that you forgot the Apollo
concert.
"That is only one count," be said
humbly, v I did not bring the letter
expecting that you would give the
same answer I hoped for two weeks
ago. I just wanted you to see that I
was not quite as bad as you think I
am."
T did not give It great thought,
she said, while the' red, flooding her
face, denied her words. "I thought
that perhaps you were engrossed In
some Important deal
"This Is the most Important 'deal
In a -man's life, he laughed a lit little
tle little bitterly. "And I have bungled it
badly.
"Pity is akin, to love, she reminded,
"and do you know, Frank, I think I
have a mission.
"And that?" he asked hoarsely.
"To keep that desk straight,' she
smiled. t
(Copyright, 1918, by the McClare Newspa Newspaper
per Newspaper Syndicate.)
Of Course.
Mrs. Propper Why, Elsa, I am sur surprised
prised surprised that you should allow that
young lieutenant to kiss you!
Elsa Foreet it mother. It Is a doty
as well as a privilege of us girls to
1 sustain the morale of our fighting

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
RATES: Si line maximum, one
time 25c.; three times 50c; six times
75c; one month $3. Payable In advance.

WANTED, LOT, FOUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AN. SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS
FOR 'SALE One young eleven hun hundred
dred hundred pound horse, gentle, works any anywhere;
where; anywhere; one smaller iron gray mare,
3 years old, good saddler and works
gentle; 25 head hogs, all sizes, now
fat; three nice Jersey heifers. Will
sell any or all of above separately.
Apply F. W. Ditto. Ocala, Fla. 26-6t
PLANTS FOR SALE Collard and
cabbage plants 25 cents per 100; or
$2 per 1000. J. J. Tipton, Ocala,
Fla, 2G-6t
FORD AT A BARGAIN A good
Ford touring car for sale. Apply to L.
E. Yonce, corner Fort King and Os
ceola streets. 26-4t
FOR SALE One good work mule,
about 12 years old. Phone 279 or call
at American Emit Store. 25-tf
RAGS WANTED At once. Cotton
rags; table or bed linen, underwear,
etc. No sewing room scraps. Must be
well laundered. The Star office, tf. ,.'
. :
FARM FOR SALE A. small 50-acre
ideal farm, corners 200 yards from
hiepot in Anthony, Florida; land and
improvements very best. All in culti cultivation;
vation; cultivation; fenced an dcross-fenced with
woven wire. Will sell at a bargain.
Address, J. A. Price, Ocala, Fla. 6t
RAZOR BLADES SHARPENED
I sharpen all makes of safety. razor
blades. All hair tested. Durham Durham-Duplex
Duplex Durham-Duplex doz. 50c; other double-edge
$35c; single-edge. 25c. T. C. Peacock,
707 Franklin St., Tampa, Fla. 9-lm6
Jump from Bed
in Morning and
Drink Hot Water
Tells why everyone should drink
- hot water each morning
before breakfast. ;
Why Is man and woman, half the
time, feeling nervous despondent,
worried; some. days headachy, dull and)
unstrung; some days really Incapaci Incapacitated
tated Incapacitated by illness.
If we all would practice Inside-bath
lng, what a gratifying change would
take place. Instead of thousands of
half-sick, anaemic-looking souls with
pasty, muddy complezlonsNwe should
see crowds of happy, -healthy, rosy rosy-cheeked
cheeked rosy-cheeked people everywhere. The rea reason
son reason Is that the human system does not
lid t itself each day of all the waste
which it accumulates under our pres present
ent present mode of living. For every ounce
of food and drink taken into the system
nearly an ounce of waste material
must be carried out, else It ferments
and forms ptomaine-like poisons which
are absorbed Into the blood.
Just as necessary as It Is to clean
the ashes from the lurnace each day,
before the fire will burn bright and
hot. so we must each morning clear
the Inside organs of the previous day's
accumulation of iadigestible waste and
body toxins. Men and women, whether
sick or well, are advised to drink each
morning, before breakfast, a glass of
real hot water with a teaspoonful of
limestone phosphate hi It, as a harm harmless
less harmless means of washing out of the
stomach, liver, kidaeys and bowels the
Indigestible material, waste, sour bile
and toxins; thus cleansing, sweeten sweetening
ing sweetening and purifying the entire alimen alimentary
tary alimentary canal before putting more food
Into the stomach. v
Millions of people who had their turn
at constipation, bilious attacks, add
stomach, nervous days and sleepless
nights have become real cranks about
the morning Inside-bath. A quarter
pound of limestone phosphate will not
cost much at the drug store, but Is
sufficient to demonstrate to anyone,
Its cleansing, sweetening and freshen freshening
ing freshening effect upon the system.
iOU CANT GATHER, FIGS FROM
. THISTLES
Neither can you secure a decent,
economical and lasting job of paint painting
ing painting if your paint contains adultera adulterated
ted adulterated Linseed Oil THE QUALITY IS
NOT THERE. You avoid all t risk
when you use a
taii Vtfcr Tn fill
Jll,G jfXJl UUJ kUV A. M A AJAltOV V-V XV A
YOURSELF at Oil price and add it
to the 2-4-1, the result will be pos positive,
itive, positive, since YO UYOURSELF will
have made it so, by using Pure Lin Linseed
seed Linseed Oil. Adv 1
t or Sale By
THE .MARION HARDWARE CO CO-Ocala,
Ocala, CO-Ocala, Florida
For expert piano tuner -phone 427
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER
AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Con Contract
tract Contract work. Gives More and Better
Work for the Money than any other
contractor in the city.

A

X
,



Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
fcla fda yes
!-- Ocala evening star ( Newspaper ) --
METS:mets OBJID UF00075908_07102
xmlns:METS http:www.loc.govMETS
xmlns:xlink http:www.w3.org1999xlink
xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance
xmlns:daitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss
xmlns:mods http:www.loc.govmodsv3
xmlns:sobekcm http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm
xmlns:gml http:www.opengis.netgml
xmlns:lom http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm_lom
xsi:schemaLocation
http:www.loc.govstandardsmetsmets.xsd
http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss.xsd
http:www.loc.govmodsv3mods-3-4.xsd
http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcmsobekcm.xsd
METS:metsHdr CREATEDATE 2014-07-31T22:34:12Z ID LASTMODDATE 2009-04-29T15:57:01Z RECORDSTATUS COMPLETE
METS:agent ROLE CREATOR TYPE ORGANIZATION
METS:name UF,University of Florida
OTHERTYPE SOFTWARE OTHER
Go UFDC FDA Preparation Tool
INDIVIDUAL
UFAD\renner
METS:dmdSec DMD1
METS:mdWrap MDTYPE MODS MIMETYPE textxml LABEL Metadata
METS:xmlData
mods:mods
mods:accessCondition This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
mods:genre authority marcgt newspaper
sobekcm newspaper
mods:identifier type OCLC 11319113
ALEPHBIBNUM 2052267
LCCN sn 84027621
sn 84027621
mods:language
mods:languageTerm text English
code iso639-2b eng
mods:location
mods:physicalLocation University of Florida
UF
mods:note dates or sequential designation Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
funding Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855
mods:originInfo
mods:publisher Porter & Harding
mods:place
mods:placeTerm marccountry flu
mods:dateIssued November 28, 1918
marc point start 1895
end 1943
mods:frequency Daily (except Sunday)
marcfrequency daily
normalized irregular
mods:recordInfo
mods:recordIdentifier source UF00075908_07102
mods:recordCreationDate 841027
mods:recordOrigin Imported from (OCLC)11319113
mods:recordContentSource University of Florida
marcorg NPU
FUG
OCLCQ
mods:languageOfCataloging
English
eng
mods:relatedItem original
mods:physicalDescription
mods:extent v. : ; 61 cm.
series
mods:part
mods:detail Enum1
mods:caption 1918
mods:number 1918
Enum2
November
11
Enum3
28
28
lccn 84027622
oclc 11319138
mods:titleInfo
mods:title Ocala weekly star
mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
mods:geographic Ocala (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ651_2
Marion County (Fla.)
Newspapers
mods:hierarchicalGeographic
mods:country United States
mods:state Florida
mods:county Marion
mods:city Ocala
mods:nonSort The
Ocala evening star
uniform
Ocala Evening Star
alternative displayLabel Other title
Evening star
Star
mods:typeOfResource text
DMD2
OTHERMDTYPE SOBEKCM SobekCM Custom
sobekcm:procParam
sobekcm:Aggregation FDNL1
FDNLN
NDNP
sobekcm:MainThumbnail 0006thm.jpg
sobekcm:Wordmark UFPKY
NEH
CHRAM
sobekcm:bibDesc
sobekcm:BibID UF00075908
sobekcm:VID 07102
sobekcm:EncodingLevel #
sobekcm:Publisher
sobekcm:Name Porter & Harding
sobekcm:PlaceTerm Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
sobekcm:Source
sobekcm:statement UF University of Florida
sobekcm:SortDate 693595
sobekcm:serial
sobekcm:SerialHierarchy level 1 order 1918 1918
2 11 November
3 28 28
DMD3
GML Geographic Markup Language
gml:FeatureCollection
gml:featureMember
gml:Point label Place of Publication
gml:Coordinates 29.187778,-82.130556
METS:amdSec
METS:digiprovMD DIGIPROV1
DAITSS Archiving Information
daitss:daitss
daitss:AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT PROJECT UFDC
METS:techMD TECH1
File Technical Details
sobekcm:FileInfo
METS:fileSec
METS:fileGrp USE reference
METS:file GROUPID G1 JP21 imagejp2 CHECKSUM 899b98129de5c1c25025b267b08f343c CHECKSUMTYPE MD5 SIZE 7392564
METS:FLocat LOCTYPE OTHERLOCTYPE SYSTEM xlink:href 0550.jp2
G2 JP22 9b771a1b80579b75a148c900bdd3577d 7328043
0551.jp2
G3 JP23 7118da7ef16931e574c9a7e91d60be07 7407301
0552.jp2
G4 JP24 ae421ff0307c76b360aa90126f956e2f 7420244
0553.jp2
archive
TIF1 imagetiff f027821b6556077b07e6374a4183502b 59122456
0550.tif
TIF2 0ce1a07ad9fec7e910c6a3b3cb234cd6 58597073
0551.tif
TIF3 0b188bdb2d669aaddebe698a9e19afce 59240211
0552.tif
TIF4 e9a8168960f1d8d6a34cad496ca306f0 59325783
0553.tif
TXT1 textplain f99a4def59c84aa050a4ba76ec59136e 25942
0550.txt
TXT2 81aeb1fcc76e8fd86ecb78ef754e8260 22445
0551.txt
TXT3 ec72f98d53cb175e83ba21ddd9ae26bd 16874
0552.txt
TXT4 9a4abfa0d9643db5126eb5ef7dd85a3c 28194
0553.txt
ALTO1 unknownx-alto 577065146a48cfe2852db25b1d186b21 767561
0550.alto
ALTO2 6a4771676d204f219878a795277d259e 703003
0551.alto
ALTO3 87f6d67bb360b711212b4853acd0cb77 560222
0552.alto
ALTO4 eb684732ca0ee23259229e663c553e4d 869108
0553.alto
METS1 unknownx-mets 304b3da431497ed4ab13601d59bbf0ec 9863
UF00075908_07102.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ADMID The ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 Main
PAGE1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
PAGE2
PAGE3
PAGE4 4
STRUCT2 other
ODIV1
FILES1