The Ocala evening star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:07077

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
OCALA
v rr
NO

(Tv nr a T7
STAIR

II a vt 11 1 X I

Weather Forecast: Probably local
rains tonight and Thursday, except
fair northwest portion; cooler tonight
northwest portion.

t

Attempts to Hoodwink Wilson
of No Avail

ANSWER OF IHE PRESIDENT 10 AUSJRIA WILL
BE MADE KliOWII THIS EVEIIIIIG

Washington, Oct. 30. Another note'
from the German government has
reached Washington. It supplements!
the last brief communication, saying!
an armistice and terms were awaited,
by reciting the details of government-'
al changes which have taken place in
Germany as evidence that the kaiser
has been deprived of all power of
making War or negotiating for peace.
This time the Germans don't address
President Wilson personally, but sent
the information for the American
government, apparently recognizing
that the stage of personal appeals
passed with the transmission of their
armistice and peace plea to the Allies.
WILL BE SENT TO PARIS
The note reiterates that the actual
power and responsibility "of govern
ment has been transferred to the
reichstag, and describes the progress
necessary for these constitutional
changes. The note probably will be
forwarcJed immediately to Paris,
where the supreme war council al already
ready already it is reported has formulated
terms of armistice.
ANSWER TO AUSTRIA
It was learned today that President
Wilson is working on a reply to the
last Austrian note. The president's
reply probably will be made public
before night. It is expected to inform
the authorities at Yienna that on the
basis of their acceptance of all the
conditions, including actual inde independence,
pendence, independence, not mere autonomy for sub
ject nationalities, their request has
been referred to the Allies.
ANNOUNCEMENT OF TERMS
WILL FOLLOW
it was stated later that the new
communication made no change in
the situation. The next step it is ex
pected will be the announcement from
one or all of the capitals of the co
belligerents of armistice terms.
" STRICT CENSORSHIP
Paris, Oct. 30. The meagerness .of
new.s during this important period in
Paris is due to the strictness of the
censorship.
In addition to the strictness of the
censorship, dispatches are held up on
account of the congestion of the
cables by the exchange of communi communications
cations communications between the United States
government and its representatives at
the inter-allied conference.
ACCIDENTALLY SHOT
Crosby Pinkston, a colored boy liv
ing six miles out on the Blitchton
road, lost his life the other day. He
and his brother, Sol, were playing
with a pistol when the gun went off,
inflicting a wound from which Crosby
died in a few hours.
NOTICE
We are expecting a big allotment 01
wool to be made up into socks and
sweaters. These articles have to be
completed in thirty days and made ac according
cording according to the latest directions. There
is an urgent need for experienced
knitters. Will all ladies desiring to
work on the allotment please leave
their names at the Red Cross head headquarters.
quarters. headquarters. Phone 381. House 10 to 12
a. m. and 1 to 4 p. m. Watch the
papers for notice of the arrival of
wool.' Marion County Chapter,
American ged Cross.
COMPANY A WILL DRILL
FRIDAY EVENING
All members of Company A, Mar
ion County Guards, are ordered to re
port at the armory at 7:30 Friday
night, Nov. 1st, for regular drill.
B yorder of C. V. Roberts,
Captain Commanding.
The "Easeall" Shoe, a perfect arch
protecting shoe, at Little's Shoe Par Parlor.
lor. Parlor. 24-tf

Ul
0
u
'BRINSON VERSUS BRINSON
No, sir, Brinson hasn't versed Brin Brin-son.
son. Brin-son. He wouldn't do that. You sure surely
ly surely are hard put to it trying to scrap
up some kind of argument or rebuttal
to my argument or rather present presentment
ment presentment of the case before us.
I never saw a party try harder to
do something and fall flatter in try trying.
ing. trying. I know you are in a tight place and
out of argument and it has been
amusing to watch you flounder around
and shuffle about trying to patch up
something that would have the ap
pearance of justifying the unfortunate
position that you have taken.
Your mistake was in butting into
something that you knew nothing
iibout.
I was not responsible for this and
for a long time overlooked the annoy
ing slurs that you from time to time
were casting at the Schools and the
teachers, hoping that each would be
the last and it was with hesitancy
that I finally took up the cudgel and
riddled your ridiculous positions.
I will say by the way that I read
your writings closely and have a habit
of filing a copy of a paper that I
think may be of use in the future.
You rashly rushed in and took up
positions that were totally untenable
and of course you have had a hard
time defending them when they were
being demolished by hot shot from
first hand information.
Really, how many of the teachers
of the county do you think would be
qualified to walk up into your sanctum
and take charge of the editorial work
of the Star? Well, do you not think
they would be equally as well pre
pared to do this as you are to criticise
Ask the trustees of those schools
mentioned in my article if they, have
not already asked for new buildings
and re-painting and repairs and more
times than one and for several years.
Ask them how long do they think
they should wait.
It has been suggested to me by a
friend of the amendment that if it
fails, to carry and the income con continues
tinues continues to fall short of the necessities
of the schools that the only way. he
sees out is to cut out the high schools
entirely and reduce the whole system
to a purely common school basis.
What do you think of that, you friends
of the high schools in Ocala and the
other parts of the county? According
to the previous positions of the Star
in which practically all of the high
school work has been characterized as
junk" this would meet your hearty
approbation.
It is also rather amusing to note
your attempts at suggesting changes
in the system and management in try
ing to justify your attitude of whole
sale critic. Really, do you thinft you
are in a better position to know the
scnooi neeas oi tne city, county or
state than are those people who have
enjoyed some measure of educational
advantage and who have then devoted
their lives to the theory and practice
of education? Do you really feel that
you are in a better position to know
the financial needs of the schools than
are the men who have sat around the
desk wrestling with the school prob
lems for years men who are success successful
ful successful business men in their several
lines? Do you really think you are in
a better position to know the needs
of the Ocala schools than the three
trustees who have for years been
working faithfully on their own time
without a dollar of pay for the inter
ests of the local schools? The same
thing would apply with the other
boards of the county and the things
that are true in Marion county are
generally true in the other counties
You have referred in a triumphant
manner several times to Mr. Light
article. It was simply a jumble of
figures. He refers to some statistics
that I suppose he culled from the bi
ennial report of the state superintend

PROBABLY

ent for the period ending 1916 and a

OCALA, FLORIDA, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1918.

nils
AFTER MANY CENTURIES
DOkilTIOII
Copenhagen, Oct. 30. The Czech
national committee took over the
functions of local government in
Prague, the Bohemian capital, Mon Monday,
day, Monday, marking the final step in its suc successful
cessful successful revolution there, according to
a telegram from Rome. The Austrian
imperial symbols were removed and
Austrian proclamations were torn
down. City officials take taken the
oath of allegiance to the Czech state.
During Monday night the general
commanding the Prague garrison
placed his entire armed force at the
disposal of the Czechs.
CAPITAL AT PRESSBURG
Paris, Oct. "30. The Czecho-Slovak
council of state has decided to make
Pressburg, thirty-four miles south southeast
east southeast of Vienna, the capital" of Slo Slo-vania,
vania, Slo-vania, according to the newspapers
here.
copy of which I have. He figures the
per capita expenditures for Marion
county to be something over $6 for
the year 1916. I have my annual re report
port report for that year before me and this
is the only source of information that
the state office has and I find that foi
that year we expended for operating
expenses of the white schools $57, $57,-995.48,
995.48, $57,-995.48, for the colored schools $16, $16,-226.17;
226.17; $16,-226.17; total of $74,221.65. I do not
now know what the population of
Marion county was in the year 1916
and no one else does as there was
census taken in that year but I should
think that 30,000 would be a fair esti estimate
mate estimate in round numbers and you will
see by this that the expenses for
operating per capita would be $2.47.
However, there is an additional ex expense
pense expense for administration of $7808.44,
making a grand total of $82,029.0i,
which using 30,000 as a basis of pop population'
ulation' population' will make a per capita expen expenditure
diture expenditure for all school purposes in Mar Marion
ion Marion county in the year 1916 of $2.73.
If you are looking for statistics I
have enough of them to run you
crazy:
I was aware that Mr. Burke was
opposed to the amendment. He starts
off as if he were one authority verify verifying
ing verifying another authority when he says
that "Mr. Light is quite correct." He
enters into a maze of figures very
much a la Light and the grand finale
6t it is that "the tax commission is
going to insist that the 1919 assess assessment
ment assessment be made at full cash value, as
the law requires,; ". Bless you,
have they not been insisting and in
sisting ever since they have been in
existence and have the assessors not
been persisting and persisting just as
regularly in refusing to do it?
You surely make an illuminating
remark when you boldly assert that
all the money appropriated for the
university ond college for women will
have to be refunded upon the ground
that they are public schools. Do yoa
really believe that the university, col college
lege college for women, college for negroes,
institute for deaf and blind and any
other institutions for the state that
may be created by statute are part of
the public school system in the con
templation of the constitution?
No, I do not believe the people of
Ocala, Dunnellon and Citra and a
number of other places that already.
have good school buildings are going
to act the part of "the dog in the
manger. I believe the great majority
of them are going to vote for the
amendment.
The expenses mentioned above cov
ered everything for teachers' salaries,
school lots, new buildings, repairs,
furniture, apparatus, insurance, jani
tor, fuel, free books, transportation,
incidentals, under the head of operat
ing expenses, and under the head ot
administration are salary of superin superintendent,
tendent, superintendent, traveling expenses of super superintendent,
intendent, superintendent, per diem and mileage of
school board, treasurer's commission,
tfiice help and office supplies and in incidentals,
cidentals, incidentals, printing, expense of exami exami-nrtions,
nrtions, exami-nrtions, tuition for county line pupils,
dormitory and a few other scattering
items.
Those who have followed our min minutes
utes minutes know that the budget appropria appropriations
tions appropriations for all recent years up to the
piesent from county funds has ben
$2.50 per month per average pupil in
firing the amount to be paid from
county funds for teachers' salaries. In
the case of the very small schools of
course it would have to be larger as
(Concluded on Fourth Page)

HI

hue

OF MISRULE,
IS OVER
T
ROBERT LEE'S RECORD
After Fighting in France He
is at
Camp Grant as Instructor
(Associated Press)
Rockford, 111., Oct. 30. Capt. Robt.
E. Lee, grandson of the Confederate
leader, has arrived at Camp Grant
from France to act as instructor. He
served with the Thirty-third ("Wild ("Wildcat")
cat") ("Wildcat") division until wounded.
CASUALTY LIST
The casualty lists of the American
army and marine corps are posted in
the Star's front windows every day.
If you find on them the name of any anyone
one anyone you know, please report it' to the
Star:
Killed in action ; . . 7
Died of wounds 17
Died, accident and t)ther causes.. 8
Died of disease 34
Wounded severely 57
Wounded slightly 142
Wounded, degree undetermined. .141
Missing in action 17
Total 423
Following are the Florida names on
the list:
Killed in action: Sergeant Walter
A. Monath, Miami..
Wounded, degree undetermined:
Private Chas. J. McMillan, Tampa.
BIG HAUL MADE BY
AN AMERICAN BOY
Corporal Clyde Rion, of the 11th
Infantry, who is the nephew of Rev.
John R. Herndon, has been having
some rare experiences at the front in
France. He has written his brother
that he has gone "over the top" five
times and was uninjured. At one time
when making a raid his lieutenant
was shot down by his side, and he as assumed
sumed assumed charge of the platoon and led
them on and reached their objective
and returned in safety. Later he and
a German "hell had a collision in
which he was hoist into the air and
in his fall his shoulder was dislocated,
but he had no other injury and had
no shell shock from the explosion. He
He was in the hospital and seemed
ashamed of his wound, but was proud
to receive a wound stripe.
But his richest experience is best
told in his own' words: "I captured
thirteen Dutchmen out of one dug dugout,"
out," dugout," he wrote his brother, "with no
other weapon than an automatic pis pistol.
tol. pistol. Yes, really, I am credited with
bringing one lieutenant, one sergeant
and eleven privates to the officer in
charge of prisoners. But they were
ridiculously easy to capture. Heard a
noise in the dugout, and when. I yell yelled,
ed, yelled, "Come out!' this procession came
forth with uplifted hands. I was
about the most surprised individual
in France just then. Didn't know
whether to run or shoot at first, but
they seemed rather anxious to throw
themselves upon the commissary of
their foe, so I decided to stick with
them."
Corporal Rion expected to be back
tM "ia "6""
G. A. CAMP
Mr. G. A. Camp, well known in
Ocala and at Lake Weir, died Friday
at Largo, where he had been operat--ing
a dairy for a short time, having
moved from St. Petersburg to that
place. Mr. Camp, with his brother,
Edwin Camp, Dr. and Mrs. Camp, re resided
sided resided at North Lake Weir for a num
ber of years and had a great many
friends in this section. Mr. and Mrs.
Edwin Camp, though both in bed with
influenza at the time, went to him as
soon as they heard he was dangerous dangerously
ly dangerously ill, but he had passed away when
they arrived. Dr. Camp was with his
son when he died. The body was
shipped to Georgia and buried near
Atlanta.
PAIR OF MULES FOR SALE
A pair of strictly first class mules
for sale. Apply at Star office. 28-6t
On November 5th the state votes
on state wide prohibition. Be sure and
vote DRY by making your cross (X)
mark before YES under Section XIX.
c-Adv. 24-tf

AOS

A

PRESS

Overwhelming Attack on the
Enemy Impending
PEOPLE 111 WESTERN GERMANY ARE LEAVING THEIR HOMES
Ifl WHOLESALE

Italian Headquarters on the Piave,
Tuesday, Oct. 29. (By the Associat Associated
ed Associated Press.) The Austrian forces are
retreating under ever-increasing pres pressure.
sure. pressure. It is felt the attack against the
enemy will become overwhelming as
soon as the entire allied force can en enter
ter enter the action.. Latest reports show
that 150 guns and 1000 additional
prisoners were .captured today in the
Piave district.
FLEET IS AT FIUME
Paris, Oct. 30. The Austrian fleet
has been hastily concentrated at
Fiume, according to a dispatch from
Rome dated Oct. 27th. A few vessels
remain at Pola, but all that were at
Cattaro have left. It is said the con
centration was demanded by Hungary.
DEBENEY'S DRIVE
Paris, Oct. 30. General Debeney's
First army has gained new successes
in encircling Guise, it is officially an
nounced. North of Guise they have
taken Beaufort farm. Along the
Peron river south of Guise the French
progressed east of Monceau-le-Neuf,
and captured prisoners.
ENGLISH TAKE A DAY OFF
London, Oct. 30. On the British
front in France, it is officially an announced
nounced announced by General Haig, there was
no activity except for patrol encoun encounters
ters encounters in which the British advanced
and captured a few prisoners.
REFUGEES DID NOT ARRIVE
Amsterdam, Tuesday, Oct. 29.
When the German retirement in Bel Belgium
gium Belgium and Flanders begun, it was ex expected
pected expected that a quarter of a million
refugees would seek refuge in Hol Holland.'
land.' Holland.' To Saturday night only a small
fraction of that number had arrived.
GETTING AWAY WHILE THE
GETTING IS GOOD
London, Oct. 30. Civilian depar departures
tures departures from the lower Rhine land and
part of Westphalia, which were begun
on a small scale when the first allied
bombs hit Cologne, have developed
into a panic flight! All banks are be
ing stormed by depositors withdraw withdrawing
ing withdrawing savings in German banks. Every Everybody
body Everybody who can possibly aflord it is
withdrawing eastward. Scores oi
houses are standing empty, and even
in Berlin a financial panis has seizad
the people, and ordinary paper curren currency
cy currency of the empire has vanished. The
big German banks have published
flaming appeals to depositors, but the
run on the banks has grown worse
than ever. The working population
of Cologne is seeing factories closed,
big houses evacuated and eastbound
trains crowded with fugitives to the
east. Violent demonstrations in favor
of peace have occurred.
TWENTY-FIVE
DOLLARS REWARD
The Board of Public Instruction will
Dav the above amount for evidence to
convict the parties who broke the
doors of the North Ocala school build
ing. J. H. Brinson,
10-30-6t Superintendent.
TIRES FOR SALE
Two chain tread, quick detachable
34x4. United States casings and
two gray tubes to fit same. Never
used. At a reasonable discount from
regular prices. Maxwell Agency,
Ocala. 28-6t
NOTICE
A great many northern people want
to come south. If you have a cot cottage,
tage, cottage, house, farm or any other real
estate for sale or rent, see or notify
W. D. Empie, 603 South Second St.,
Ocala, Florida. 25-6
Flower and garden seed3 for fall
planting now on hand! every one
fresh. Bitting & Co., the Carmichael
building. Phone 14. 30-6t

VOL. 25, NO. 2GI

y
IKE ORDER
Board is More Concerned with Send Sending
ing Sending Troops to Europe than With
Bringing Them Back
(Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 30 Contracts for
the. construction of a number of troop
ships costing ,$60,000,000, le to the
Bethlehem yards at Alameda, Calif.,
have been cancelled by the shipping
board. It has been found that type
of ships is unnecessary in bringing
troops back from Europe. The board
also desires to have the present pro program
gram program completed at the end of 1919.
MAKING LIBERTY MOTORS
Washington, Oct. 30 Production of
American aircraft has reached the
stage where it is limited practically
only by the facilities for transporting
planes to France. Production of lib liberty
erty liberty motors during the month of Oc October
tober October reached the stage of the thou thousand
sand thousand goal, which had not been hoped
for before December. The latest offic official
ial official compilations show that since June
1 approximately 2500 fighting planes
have been shipped to the American
forces in France. When it is realized
that since the' beginning -of the war
none of the belligerents had at any
one time more than 3500 planes in act actual
ual actual service, the significance of the
American production of 2500 planes in
five months becomes apparent.
TEMPLE THEATER
ATTRACTIONS
Friday: Charley Ray in "A Nim
O'Clock own." Toto in comedy.
Saturday: Carmel Myers in "The
Dream Lady."
BANKS SHUT ELECTION DAY
Tuesday, Nov. 5th, 1918, (general
election day), being a legal holiday in
the state of Florida, the undersigned
banks of this city will be closed for
business on that day.
The Commercial Bank.
The Ocala National Bank.
The Munroe & Chambliss Na National
tional National Bank.
DAVID LEE SKIPPER
David Lee Skipper, son of Mr. and
Mrs. J. J. Skipper, was born at
Crewsville, Fla., Aug. 4, 1884. He
grew to young manhood there, was
educated in the Bartow high school,
and completed a business course in
the Massey Business College, in Jack Jacksonville.
sonville. Jacksonville. He entered upon his busi business
ness business career in Zolfo, having beeu
president of the Zolfo State Bank, and
owner jf the Zolfo Drug Co., besides
extensive interests in orange groves,
live stock and real estate throughout
the southern part of the state.- He
was married Nov. 10, 1909, to Miss
Leila Marsh, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Marsh of Ocala. One
little son came to bless their home.
Mr. Skipper died at his home in Zolfo
Oct. 13, 1898, aged 34 years. He is
survived by his wife and little son,
Gordon, his mother, four brothers and
two sisters, his father and one broth brother
er brother and sister having preceded him to
eternal rest. He was a valued mem member
ber member of the Methodist church and a
member of the Shriners and Knight3
Templar. The funeral was conduct conducted
ed conducted by the Shriners, assisted by the
pastors of the Methodist and Baptist
churches. Interment was in the oH
family burial grounds at Crewsville.
I Dr. Eddison's Cushion Sole Shoe for
! tired and tender feet, at Little's Shoe
Parlor.
24-tf

FOR SHIPPING

x. ;



OCALA. EVENING STAR, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1918

OCALA EVENING STAR

PnhllMhed Kverjr Dmy Except Sunday by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY
OF OCALA, FLA.
R. It. Carroll, Prewldent
P. V, Leavengood, Secretary-Treasurer
J. II. Benjamin, Editor
Entered at Ocala, Fla.. -vostofflce aa
Second-class matter.
MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively
entitled for the use for republication of
all news dispatches credited to It or
i.t otherwise credited in this paper
and also the local news published
herein. All rights of republication of
special dispatches herein are also re reserved.
served. reserved. TELEPHONES
BnMlnena Office Five-One
Editorial Department Two-Seven
Socle tv Editor Five, Double-One
ADVERTISING RATES
DlMplayt Plafe 10c. per inch for con consecutive
secutive consecutive insertions. Alternate inser insertions
tions insertions 25 per cent, additional. Composi Composition,
tion, Composition, charged on ads. that run less than
biX times 5c. per inch. Special position
20 per cent, additional. Rates based on
4-inch minimum. Less than four inches
will take higher rate, which will bo
furnished on application.
Reading Notice t 5c. per line for first
Insertion; 3c. .per line for each subse subsequent,
quent, subsequent, insertion. One change a week
allowed on readers without extra com com-oosltlor
oosltlor com-oosltlor charges. :
Lgal advertisements at legal rates.
Electros must be mounted, or oharge
will be made for mounting.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Domestic
One year, in advance
Six months, in advance
Three months, in advance...
One month, in advance
One year. In advance..'
Six months, in advance. ....
Three months, in advance...
One month, in advance :
.15.00
. 2.50
. 1.25
. .50
....$8.00
4.25
2.25
80
IMPOSSIBLE TO PROVE AN ALIBI
On another page, Supt.' Brinson
denies tnat ne is ootn piamun ana
defendant in Brinson vs. Brinson, and
asks to have the case dismissed. But
we doubt that the court, which is the
people, will admit his contention.
We pass over Mr. Brinson's attempt
to belittle our argument. Our argu argu-menl
menl argu-menl will take care of itself.
' Several times in the course of this
discussion, Mr. Brinson has introduc introduced
ed introduced entirely irrelevant matter and then
pointed to it with pride as clinching
, argument. Such is his query as to
how many teachers in the county wa
would consider competent to take
charge of our work. This is not a
parallel case. There is no teacher in
the county that has our technical
graining in newspaper work and we
nave no technical training as a teach teacher.
er. teacher. But any teacher in the county has
the right to his or her opinion on
what we write, and -we have a right
to an opinion of the work', of any
teacher, or of any public school. Mr.
Brinson nresents to vou the nronosl-
tion that we.have no right to criticise
public school affairs. This is about as
sensible as if we were to take the
position that nobody but another edi editor
tor editor has the right to criticise what we
write for publication.
Mr. Brinson has always welcomed
our opinions when they were favor favorable
able favorable to him or his work and if we
were arguing in favor of this amend;
ment he would lay down and roll over
and stand on his ear to testify his ap appreciation.
preciation. appreciation. Mr. Brinson can't establish an alibi
for one of himself in Brinson vs. Brin-
' son. 1 hat the trustees 01 various dis-
tricts have asked for help is some
thing it had not occurred to us co
deny, as itwas evident they had. But
Mr. Brinson has to produce the evi evidence
dence evidence that these trustees are insist-
. ing on this ten-mill amendment. Cer Certain
tain Certain it is that prominent school pat patrons
rons patrons from some of the districts he re refers
fers refers to have told us that they approv approved
ed approved of the Star's policy and that they
intended to vote aeainst the amend
ment.
Neither can Mr. Brinson set aside
his own declaration that we cannot
now build new schoolhouses.
Mr. Brinson tells you, in another
article, that the amendment is an
after-the war measure. We think we
can give you a little data that will
convince you that after-the-war con conditions
ditions conditions were not in the minds of the
people who induced the, legislature to
put this amendment before the voters.
The amendment was called for at
the last meeting of the legislature.
And the legislature met in the same
month that war was declared. It ad adjourned
journed adjourned before this country was fairly
in the war. When the submission of
this amendment was before the legis legislature
lature legislature our wisest men, let alone the
politicians that boss Florida, had no
idea of the conditions that would pre
vail in a year, let alone in two or
three. When you take this indubi indubitable
table indubitable fact into consideration, is it not
plain to you that Mr. Brinson's asser assertion
tion assertion that the amendment is an after
the war measure is an argument that
only occurred to him recently prob probably
ably probably only a few minutes before he
wrote it?
THot-o ia cnmpfhinp piss that, the
voter should consider. Asking the
legislature to submit this amendment
to the voters was planned by the
"educational autocracy" not during
the meeting of the legislature and
after war had been declared, but
months before, when the country was
at peace and when a majority of 'the
people believed that "Wilson would
keep us out of war."
Mr. Brinson may squirm and deny
and abuse the Star, but that this has

been the policy of the head pundits of
the teachercraft is so plain that even
he who runs may read.
The Star has never "characterized
practically all of the high school work
as junk." A great deal of our public
school work is junk, as any well post posted
ed posted man outside the teaching profes profession,
sion, profession, and a good many in it, will ad admit.
mit. admit. If this junk was cleaned out, we
would have better schools and they
would cost less, and the Star's dec declaration
laration declaration that it should be cleaned out
is the gum and substance of its of offending
fending offending against Mr. Brinson's princi principles..
ples.. principles.. The people of Florida know they
are not consulted about what shall be
taught their children.
Take the average boy, send him tt,
public school and let him stay there
until he has learned to read and write,
add, subtract, multiply and divide and
then put him in a good private school
and he will beat the boys in his ciasses
that remain in public school into coU
lege or business life by two or three
years. According to the almost unani unanimous
mous unanimous advice of the teachers, when a
boy or girl graduates from high
school all he or she is fitted for is to
go to school some more. In view of
the fact that the great majority of
young Americans are not able to go
any further than the high school
only a minority can go that far isn't
the Star right when it says that only
what is certain to be useful to all
should be taught in the public schools.
It isn't that we know so little about
the schools that irritates Mr. Brinson.
It is because we know so much about
iesults that causes him to protest so
much. He would have you think we
are the only incendiary that threat threatens
ens threatens his misfit temple of Diana. Many
journalists and some teachers in the
United States take the same position,
and our reasoning on this subject was
started a number of years ago by the
president of one of the biggest col colleges
leges colleges in Florida.
Mr. Brinson says Mr. Light's arti article
cle article is a jumble of figures. The truth
of some of his figures is self-evident
and Mr. Brinson has not disproved
any of them.
The population of Marion county is
less than 30,000. According to Mr.
Brinson's figures, the per capita ex expense
pense expense of $2.73 should aggregate less
than $80,000. The school revenues for
this year, are estimated at over $81, $81,-000.
000. $81,-000. Then what does Mr. Brinson want
with the $21,000 that the extra ten
mills would bring in. We should think
Mr. Brinson's figures would drive him
crazy.
Mr. Burke's figures will not occui
to the unprejudiced reader as being a
maze. His statement is very concise,
and if it is wrong it will be easy for
Mr. Brinson to disprove it.
We did not assert that all moneys
paid to the University of Florida, etc.,
would have to be refunded because
they were public schools. What Mr.
Brinson refers to is the following,
which was in Monday's Star:
"The supreme court has decided that
the legislature cannot appropriate one
cent for, the general maintenance of
the public schools. St. Augustine Re Record.
cord. Record. "If such be the case, all the money
appropriated for the University of
Florida and the State College for
Women will have to be refunded, foi
they are public schools."
As you will see by this, Mr'. Brinson
has tried to twist our remark a bad
habit of his in carrying on an argu argument.
ment. argument. -We have' consulted both the
constitution and an able lawyer on the
subject. Mr. Brinson had better do the
same if he thinks the state university,
state college for women, etc., are not
a part of the public school system.
We have been a citizen of Ocala and
Marion county .for twenty-five years,
in most of which time we have been
in close touch with public affairs and
ought to know something about them,
and as for our position on this ten ten-mill
mill ten-mill amendment it is notable that
nearly every county officer agrees
with us in it and several of them have
supplied us with the-figures to use in

the arguments against it.
That is a very pathetic picture Mi".
Brinson draws of the soldier coming
home from the war and finding that
the Star has denied his little brother
and sister an education. Mr. Brinson
is strong on pathos. It is his long suit.
He should be sob sister on the Ameri American
can American Schoolboard Journal. He can
think up enough pathfts in five min minutes
utes minutes to make himself weep for two
hours. We are some pathosister our our-self.
self. our-self. Let us draw the opposite picture
from Mr. Brinson's. If we don't try to
keep taxes down a little, the American
soldier will come home to find his
father and mother in the poorhouse
and his little brother and sister so
weak from short rations that they
will hardly be able to carry their
books to school. Exaggerated, of
course. So is Mr. Brinson's. Take
your choice.
Have Your
HEMSTITCHING
AND
PICOT EDGE WORK
Done at
"THE HEMSTITICHER
Ocala, Florida
Between Peyser's Store and the Har Harrington
rington Harrington Hall Lunch Room
T it T T7"V 71 XTT 1. 1
PRACTICAL CARPENTER
AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Con-;
tract work. Gives More and Better j
Work for the Money than any other
contractor in the city.

DOXT OPEN THE SCHOOLS

It is the intention of the school au authorities
thorities authorities to reopen the schools next
Monday morning.
The Star thinks it will be unwise to
do so.
Ocala has been comparatively light lightly
ly lightly touched with the influenza, but
there are a number of cases in the
city, all the same, and if only a few
broke out in the schools, they would
infect several scholars before they
were discovered ,and some sickness
and probably a death or two would
follow.
Influenza is on the wane, but it isn't
too late for an epidemic. We have
done well let us not take any chance
of spoiling our record.
Let's play safe.
Keep the schools closed for another
week.
NUT DRIVE WEEK
Let's make this nut drive week in
Marion county and particularly in
Ocala. While our schools are closed
it is possible for the children to do a
vast amount of good this way. The
Boy Scouts are taking up the work
with a vim. The women, especially
who drive their own cars are urged to
take a crowd of children out to the
woods one morning or afternoon this
week and bring in all the nuts they
can pick up. Hull them in the woods
and take the nuts at once to the food
administration office and spread them
on the floor todry. At the end of the
week let's have a carload to send to
headquarters. The gathering of hick hickory
ory hickory nuts seems a very simple thing,
but do not neglect nor delay doing it.
The need is urgent. Lives are de depending
pending depending on masks made from this
charcoal, perhaps Marion county lives.
Mrs. L. W. Duval,
Conservation Chairman for Ocala.
ADVICE FROM THE RED CROSS
As to How to Make Up Christmas
Parcels for the Soldiers
Overseas
Atlanta, October 19. In mailing
Christmas parcels overseas it is im important
portant important that only cartons provided by
the Red Cross be accepted for ship shipment.
ment. shipment. These are of standard size and
the Red Cross is the only agency au authorized
thorized authorized by the war and postoffiee de departments
partments departments to provide the proper car carrier
rier carrier for Christmas gifts. Only one
parcel will be accepted from an indi individual
vidual individual and the overseas label must be
affixedto this to insure its transmis transmission
sion transmission through the approved channels.
Department of Publicity, Southern
Division American Red Cross.
THE BEST TEST 1
IS THE TEST OF TIME
Years ago Mrs. S. E. Fraser of 218
Second St., Ocala, told of good results
from using Doan's Kidney Pills. Mrs.
Fraser confirms the former state statement
ment statement says there has been no return
of the trouble. Can Ocala people ask
for more convincing testimony?
"When my kidneys got out of or order,
der, order, I. would be so dizzy, I couldn't
walk straight and there were times i
couldn't get about, owing to the pain
across the small of my back," says
Mrs. Fraser. "There were other dis distressing
tressing distressing symptoms of kidney trou trouble,
ble, trouble, too. Doan's Kidney Pills, when
ever used, brought relief and I glad gladly
ly gladly recommend them." (Statement giv given
en given June 19, 1914).
On April 16, 1918, Mrs. Fraser
said: "I am stronger in praise of
Doan's Kidney Pills today than ever
before, for they cured me entirely of
kidney trouble."
Price 60c. at all dealers. Don't
simply ask for a kidney remedy get
Doan's Kidney Pills the same that
Mrs. Fraser had. Foster-Milburn Co.,
Mfgs., Buffalo, N. Y. Adv.
12
SALTS IF BACKACHY
drink lots of water and stop eating
meat for a while if your Bladder
troubles you.
When you wake up with backache and
dull misery in the kidney region it gen generally
erally generally means you have been eating too
much meat, says a well-known authority.
Meat forma uric acid which overworks
the kidneys in their effort to filter it
from the blood and they become sort of
paralyzed and loggy. When your kidneys
get sluggish and clog you must relieve
them, like you relieve your bowels ; re removing
moving removing all the body's urinous waste,
else you have backache, sick headache,
dizzy spells; your stomach bouts, tongue
is coated, and when the weather is bad
you have rheumatic twinges. The urine
is cloudy, full of sediment, channels often
get sore, water scalds and you are obliged
to seek rel?ff two or three times during
the night.
Either consult a good, reliable physi physician
cian physician at once or get from your pharmacist
about four ounces of Jad Salts; take
a tablespoonful in a glass of water
before breakfast for a few days and your
kidneys will then act fine. This famous
Balis is made from the acid of grapes
and lemon juke, combined with lithia,
and has been used for generations to
clean and stimulate sluggish kidneys,
also to neutralize acids in the urine so it
no longer irritates, thus ending bister
weakness.
Jad Salts is a life saver for regular
meat eaters. It is inexpensive, cannot
injure and makes a delightful, effer
Ycent IiUua-water drink.
SECOND NOTICE
Licenses must be paid. Any one
doing business without a license is
violating the law and liable for dou-
ble tax.
10-18-tf
W. W. Stripling,"
Tax Collector.

AND

KM

HURT

DIP
V.
010

u

Mm Place Noy. 19,

WHY GATHER NUTS
FOR THE RED CROSS?
Because it takes 130 hickory nuts
to make one gas mask for some .sol .soldier
dier .soldier to wear in fighting the Hun.
Why Save Peach and Prune Pits?
Because 200 peach pits or 300 prune
pits will make one mask.
Boys and girls, how many have you
collected?
Bring your nuts and fruit stones to
the food administration office, 118
South Main street, where Mr. Clar
ence Camp, the county food adminis administrator
trator administrator has placed a can in which they
are to be deposited and he will later
on turn them over to the Red Cross
for the purpose for which they are
being saved.
ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE
OF TRAINS AT OCALA
Seaboard Air Line, Northbound
No. 4: Arrives 1:15 p. m. Departs
1 :30 p. m.
No. 16 (Limited): Arrives and De
parts 4:15 p. m.
No. 2: Arrives 1:50 al m. t Departs
1:55 a. m.
Seaboard. Air Line, Southbound
No. 3: Arrives 1:10 p. m. Departs
1:30 p. m.
No. 15 (Limited): Arrives and de
parts 4:15 p. m.
No. 1: Arrives 1:45 a. m. Departs
1:50 a. m.
Atlantic Coast Line (Main Line)
Northbound
No. 10: Arrives and departs 5:42 a.
m.
No. 40: Arrives 1 p. m. Departs
1:20 p. m.
No. 38: Arrives and departs 2:27
a. m.
Atlantic
i
Coast Line (Main Line)
Southbound
Arrives and departs 2:16
No. 37
a. m.
No. 39
Arrives and departs 2:35
p. m.
No. 9: Arrives and departs 9:13p.m.
Atlantic Coast Line Branches, South Southbound
bound Southbound No. 151 (Sunny Jim): For Wilcox,
Monday, Wednesday and Friday,
leaves 6:10 a. m.
No. 35 (Sunny Jim): For Lakeland,
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday,
leaves 0:40 a. m.
No. 141: Daily except Sunday,. ar arrives
rives arrives 10:50 a. m. from Wilcox.
No. 49: For Homosassa, leaves 2:25
p. m.
Atlantic Coast Line Branches, North Northbound
bound Northbound No. 48: From Homosassa: Arrives
12:53 p. m.
- No. 150 (Sunny Jim): From Wil Wilcox,
cox, Wilcox, Monday, Wednesday and Friday,
arrives 5:45 p. m.
No. 32 (Sunny Jim): From Lake Lakeland,
land, Lakeland, Tuesday, Thursday and Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, arrives 9:48 p. m.
No. 140: Daily except Sunday,
leaves' 3:45 p. m. for Wilcox.
Oklawaha Valley Railroad
Train No. 71, first class passenger
and mixed, leaves Palatka at 6:30 a.
m. every Monday, Wednesday and
Friday, arriving at Ocala at 10:30 a.
m., same days.
Train No. 72 leaves Ocala at 2 p.
m. Mondays, Wednesday and Fridays
Train No. 73 leaves Palatka Tues Tuesdays,
days, Tuesdays, Thursday and Saturdays at
and arrives in Palatka at 5:50 p. m.
same days.
7:40 a. m., and runs only to Rodman,
at which place it arrives at 8:25.
Train No. 74 leaves Rodman at
4:30 p. m. Tuesdays, Thursday and
Saturdays and arrives at Palatka at
5:20 p. m. same days. Palatka News.

How Can I Save Sugar on a
2,Ib. Ration?
INSTEAD OF BREAKFAST TRY BREAKFAST

Fruit- 1 Rounded Teasnoonful
Cereal
Coffee
Tea
2 Rounded Teaspoonf uls
2 Rounded Teaspoonf uls
LUNCHEON
1 Rounded Teaspoonful

Other Dish 1 Rounded Teaspoonful a day for table use; or only one
Making 7 rounded teaspoonf uls a pound a month, leaving one pound
day; or over 4 pounds a month. for other uses.
OCALA ICE AND PACKING COMPANY

TEE

WINDSOR HOTEL
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

I f &' .... ""?-H
' v.' li"5 v- ; v- )V i' ii Ki h

f In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front, yard.
"Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room service is 1
second to none.
RATES From $1.50 per day per person to $6.
ROBERT M. MEYER, J. E. KA VAN AUGH
Manager. Proprietor.

AU
t o is
IVI O V
Long and Short Hauling
WHITE STAR

Read the Star Want Ads. It pays

20, 21, 22.
ru" o bugar
Jf1
No Susrar
1 Rounded Teaspoonful
LUNCHEON
I Level Teaspoonful
Making rounded teasnoonfuls
e: jr. '--v i c e
TZJLi3TJCSSTlAPS
MVU MX THE
CKTTED STATES
GOVEBXMZNT
ING
Storage and Packing
LINE P19TE
GOOD VULCANIZING ON TIME
That's our motto. Vulcanizing work
that will stand up under hard ?wear
and tear of 'country roads vulcaniz vulcanizing
ing vulcanizing methods that double the life of
our tires and improve their riding
qualities. And we deliver work when
we promise; depend upon that- Our
charge is moderate and frequently
saves you the cost of a new tire.
GOODRICH TIRES
EXLUSIVELY
BLALOCK BROTHERS
107 Oklawaha Avenue

fWKKl



OCALA, EVENING STAR, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1918

LIFE

AT THE CLOSE OF TDE
CIVIL WAR
LDNCOLN

s

SAID: "We have Cleaned

upuColossal Job.The Next

Grtea Question will be thej

i
Abolition of The Liquor

Taffic.,,

Make the Great Emancipator's
Word Come True
VOTE DRY
NOV. 5TH, 1918.

Mclver & MacKay
UNDERTAKERS andEMBALMERS
PHONES 47. 104. 305
OCALA, FLORIDA

OCALA SOCIAL AFFAIRS
If You Have Any News for this De

partment, Call Five Double-One
or Two-Serea

YOU CALL A DOCTOR
Because
HE IS A GOOD DOCTOR
SEND HIS PRESCRIPTIONS
To The
COURT PHARMACY
For the Same Reason

FIRE

A. E. GERIG
INSURANCE
Ocala. Florida

ACCIDENT AUTOMOBILE

FRESH
FALL SEED
NOW IN

Beans
Irish Potatoes
Onion Sets
Garden Peas
All Kinds of
Small Seeds

OCALA SEED STORE
Ocala, Florida.

Evening Star
Unclassified
Ads.
Bring
Results

RATES Twenty-five words
or less one time 25 cents;
three times 50 cents; six
times 75 cents. Over twenty-live
words, and under fif fifty,
ty, fifty, double above rate.
Tl is :ate is for consecutive
insertions. Special rate by
th- month. Try them out.
PHONE

To Old Glory
A health to Old Glory! For page upon
page
We may read all the glory of glorious
ace.

We may hear in the rustling of its

sweeDine folds

The wonderful promise it held and

still holds.
The faith that makes strong, and the
hope that makes true
The strength of the red and the white
and the blue. -We
may hear it, and know it, and feel
it and see
All the pride of the past and the glory
to be,
The red erowine redder, the blue

growing bluer.
The stars flashing clearer and dearer
each day,
A health to Old Glory the flag of to today!
day! today! Exchange.
Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Townsend were

representative citizens from Martin in
Ocala yesterday.

Judge J. C. B. Koonce of Bushnell
is in the city today on a business trip
and short visit to his wife.
The friends of Mr. Robert Blake
are glad to see him out again after a

slight indisposition, which reminded
him very much of what the "flu"
might be.
Miss Hannay Ellis is expected home
today from Bristol. She will leave
the pinth of this montbfor Savannah,
where she will take a two years train training
ing training course at Telfair hospital.
Linsy, son of Mr, and Mrs. T. W.
Troxler, who has been very ill, has
had, we regret to say, a relapse. The
many friends of the Troxler family

sincerely hope that the boy will soon

begin to improve.

i m m
The many Ocala friends of Sergt.
John V. Tarver will be interested in
the following cablegram received oy
his mother this morning: "The ship
on which V sailed arrived safely over overseas."
seas." overseas."
Mrs. J. R. Herndon is anticipating a
visit from her mother, Mrs. R. A.
Wood and sister, Miss Effie Wood,

who will arrive from Johnson City,

Tenn., tomorrow. They will spend the
winter here.
Mr. and Mrs. B. W. Stone spent to

day in, the city from Winter Park.

They were accompanied home this

afternoon by their daughter, Miss

Stone and her guest, Miss Shine, whoj
will remain at Winter Park until the
public school reopen here.

Mr. Burkhardt left for Tallahassee
Friday in response to a message stat stating
ing stating that his brother, Mr. John Burk Burkhardt,
hardt, Burkhardt, was very ill. Mr. Burkhardt
reached his brother's bedside only a
short while before he passed away
Sunday. In the loss of his brother,
Mr. Burkhardt has the sympathy of
the entire community. He will re return
turn return to Ocala today.
.

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Ott and baby
daughter, Edith spent Sunday in
Ocala the guests of Miss Susie Lou
Ellis. Mrs. Ott, who was Miss Eloise

Robinson, has spent the past four
months at her girlhood home in Or

lando, as a precautionary measure
against her little daughter contract contracting
ing contracting influenza, and the family were
returning to their home in Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville.
Mr. and Mrs. B. F Borden and chil children
dren children will move the latter part of this
week to the water works cottage on

Orange avenue, and the house on
South Fourth street which they have

been occupying has been leased by
Mr. and Mrs. Martin of Inglis. Mr.

Martin is the new superintendent of

the light and water plant.

Rev. C. H. Summers, Y. M. C. A.

executive secretary for the state of

Florida for work among the colored
people, spoke yesterday afternoon and

at night to the colored people. He
stated that the colored people of the

state would cive $200,000 for war

charities. While here Mr. Summers
paid a visit to his friend, Rev. Smith

Hardin.

Miss Annie Pope Eagleton who is
one of the teachers in the DeLand

school this year, is spending her va
cation here with her relatives, com

ing especially to act as maid of honor
at the wedding of her friend, Miss
Alice Campbell, which interesting

event will take place tomorrow. Miss
Eagleton is well pleased with her

position and loud in her praise of the
attractive little city of DeLand and its

charming people. She will return t

DeLand in time for the reopening of

school, November 4th.

Miss Thelma Wright was the little
hostess at a delightful neighbodhood
party last evening, entertaining the

fortunate guests at the home of her
aunt, Mrs. W. M. Parker, corner of

Orange and South Eighth streets. In

making this party a memorable one

for her niece, Mrs. Parker was assist

ed by Mrs. Clifton Long and Miss

Edna Counts. Cards were the prin
cipal feature of the evening's enter

tainment, supplemented by other in interesting
teresting interesting games. At the conclusion
of this pleasant evening, delicious

fruit jello topped with ice cream and
white cake was served. Those enjoy enjoying
ing enjoying the party with the young hostess
were Mrs. Clifton Long, Misses Edna
and Susie May Counts, Willie Ken Kennedy,
nedy, Kennedy, Leonora Colby, Whilden Gil Gil-more,
more, Gil-more, Maude L. Little, Claude Bar Bar-nett,
nett, Bar-nett, John Cook, Junie Counts, James
Gilmore, Sam Phillips George Akin
and Pat Melin.
Raiford Simmons Futch
Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Futch are the
proud parents of a little son born at
the home of its grandparents yester
day morning. The boy has been named
in honor of his grandfather. Mi.
Futch, who has been spending the

past two weks with his wife here, left
Saturday, and will be greatly disap disappointed
pointed disappointed in not being present to wel welcome
come welcome his son and heir.
mm

The many friends of Miss Margue Marguerite
rite Marguerite Porter of Ocala will be interested

to know that she has applied for Y

M. C. A. work and expects a call any

day. Miss Porter is a very accom-

pnsned musician and possesses a

beautiful soprano voice. Last summer
she gave concerts at the reconstruc reconstruction
tion reconstruction hospital in DesMoines, la., to the
wounded men that had been returned

irom r ranee, and also gave a pro

gram at Camp Johnston. She has

frequently visited in Tampa as the at

tractive guest of Mrs. J. H. Mason on

Bayshore boulevard Tampa Tribune.

Miss Porter's Ocala friends hope
the war will end before she can leave

them, as she is very useful right here

at home.

'TWAS FALSE

By VINCENT G. PERRY.

OFFICIAL PRICE LIST
OF FOODSTUFFS

(Concluded on Fourth Page)

V

E THE "FLU"

Follow the Suggestions Here and

Escape Serious Illness
When you feel feverish or as if you
are taking cold, and you start sneez sneezing
ing sneezing and your nose begins to run, you

have surely got influenza germs work

ing in you and you should immediate

ly take a few doses of Dr. Williams'

No. 101 Tonic and escape a spell cf

illness and loss of time in bed. It is
just what you need at that time and

it works wonderfully well and quick

ly, too. The quinine in it kills influ

enza germs without mercy. The iron

ingredient gives appetite and restores
your "pep." The magnesia acts on the

liver and bowels, eliminating poison

ous gases and excretions and making
the body clean and wholesome. Dr.
Williams' No. 101 Tonic is a ready
prepared prescription of a noted phy physician,
sician, physician, the late Dr. G. B. Williams, oi

Quitman, Ga., and has been extensive

ly used for malaria, grippe, colds,

chills and fevers. Get a bottle at once

and begin taking it and make your

self immune from the "flu." All drug

gists and drug dealers sell it or can

get it for you. 25c. and 50c. a bottle
Refuse all substitutes. Adv. 1

TIRES FOR SALE Two chain tread,

quick detachable, 34 x 4 United

States casings and two gray tubes to
fit same. Never used. At a Reason Reasonable"
able" Reasonable" discount from regular prices? The

Maxwell Agency, Ocala. It

PromDt delivery of prescriptions Is

the watchword here. Tell your physic

ian to leave them with us. We allow

no substitution. The Court Pharmacy.

Phone 284. tf

SERVICE is not an

empty word. It has a
meaning for every everybody.
body. everybody. I am prepared

to give your eyes the very best service

Dr. K. J. Weihe
Eyesight Specialist
Graduate Optometrist

With Weihe Co., Jewelers, Ocala, Fla

Paper Drinking Cups, 25 to pack

age, ten cents at Gerig's Drugstore.

' O CERgLJ t rA

ividends

of better health
and comfort are
being enjoyed by
thousands who
hove "invested"
in

iMSTANT

TTUM

as their regular
table beverage
in place of
coffee
Convenient
Economical
Delicious

(Copyrfght, 1S18, by the MoClure Newspa Newspaper
per Newspaper Syndicate.)
Arthur Thome had argued until he
was tired of arguing. There was no
use trying to talk sense Into a man
who hadn't any, he thought at last, as
he gave up with one more effort.
"I tell you she is young just about

twenty-one," he said hotly. "Because
she is an actress you think she has to
be old. There are some young ac actresses,
tresses, actresses, arent there T
Mervin Benton, his companion, was
quite willing to admit that there were
but this one, he claimed, was not. "Ton
can't tell me," he argued. "This Dora
Fraleigh will never see thirty-five
again. Her hair is false, Tm willing
to wager anything. Did you ever see
curls like hers that were real? Every Everything
thing Everything about her is false."
Arthur knew if he stayed he would
become angry. Mervin was Jealous
that was what was the matter, he felt.
Without another word Arthur left
the bath-house where the conversation
had been held and made for the beach.

It was a glorious day and the guests of
the hotel were making the best of the
bathing weather. He caught sight of
Dora almost immediately. Apparently

she was searching for something In the
water near the beach.

'What have you lost?" he asked, as

he waded toward her.

'Oh, nothing," she answered a trifle!

confused. "Isn't the water fine?"

After completely Immersing himself

and swimming aimlessly about for a
few seconds, Arthur agreed that It
was. "Let's go out on the raft," he

suggested, but Dora seemed unwilling

to leave the shallow place. This was
surprising, for she had alw'ayB seemed

anxious to get all the fun possible.

There was something troubling her.

She even seemed unwilling to go on
the beach for a sun bath, but finally
agreed.

"There !" Arthur exclaimed, as he

stretched out on the sand. "I thought

I never would get away from that

shallow part. There were so many

children there I didn't have a chance

to talk with you."

"You usually have lots of opportuni

ties," Dora smiled.

"What's this?" he asked, as he picked

up something his toes had been rub rubbing
bing rubbing against In the sand. "Well, look

what's here A false curl 1" Sure

enough It was.

Dora took It-from him eagerly.

lost it 1" she exclaimed, as she Jumped ',
to her feet. "I was searching for Itf

out there. Wait until I go and tell

auntie. She'll be delighted."

She was off before Arthur could stop

her. He looked after her with an ex exclamation
clamation exclamation of dismay on his lips. Tot
think that those beautiful curls of hers

were false. No wonder she hadn't1
talked much and had been confused.1

So Mervin had been right

When Dora joined him again he was

trying to smile, but found he couldn t, 1
"What makes you so quiet?" she asked, S
after they had sat in silence for near-i
ly five minutes.

"Nothing very much," he replied to

her question. "I was thinking that I
was going home tomorrow."

"Going home!" she echoed. "Why

you said last week that you would be

here all summer.'

"I have changed my mind," he an

swered, but when he saw the pained
look on Dora's face be wished he had

thought up an excuse.
The next morning Arthur's resolve
to go home had riot faltered. He
wasn't going to siay there to be the
laughing stock of tie whole hotel when
they found out about Dora's age. He
was only twenty-one and most likely
she was thirty, anyway. Nine years

was too much difference. He felt so
uncomfortable over It, he went to the
station half an hourbefore the train
was due to leave. .His going away

would leave the field lopen for Mervin.

That was too much. He left the train

in a hurry and left word with the bag

gage man to have his-trunks sent back
to the hotel. He couldn't be happy

without Dora, even if shei was eighty.
He found Dora In a secluded corner
of the veranda. Her eyes were red and
there were other traces of tears.
"You haven't gone yet," she cried
Joyfully, as she caught sight of him.
"I heard that you had gone without
even saying good-by to me."
"I came pretty nearly doing it, dear,"
he said, "but I couldn't, go away and
leave you hereC When I gol want to
take you with me. I want y to marry

you."
"If you wanted to marry 'me, why
did you make me worry about your
leaving so unexpectedly?" she asked,
trying not to smile. "Last night was
the second night I have lost sleep by
worrying. The night before it was the
thought of having lost auntie's best
curl that"
"Auntie's curl?" he interrupted.
"Yes, the curl you found, yesterday."
"Oh!" Arthur groaned. "I thought
that was your curl!"
"Mine!" she laughed. "And I was
only twenty a week ago!"
"Thank goodness for that," hecried.
"But why?" she asked, perplexed.

She laughed for a long time after he
told her. "But what difference would

it have made if I was thlrty-fivef?" she

said.

"None; but I'm glad you'reonly

twenty," he replied.
Real Tst.

"He loves the very ground! she walks
on."
"Does he love It well) enough to plant
a vegetable garden In lit for her bene benefit?"

Octlt, Fla., October SO, 1918
(Corrected Weekly by Authority of the U. S. Food

Administration)

Retailer Pays
Wheat "our $12.10 to $13.55
per bbl. of 16 12
lb sacks
Rye Flop- $12 to $13.90 per
bbL of 16 12 lb
sacks

Consumer Pays
80c to 90c for
12 lb. sck or 7c
lb less than mill
packages
80c to 90c for 12
lb sack or 7e
lb in less than
mill packages
7 to 7c per lb.
5 to 6c per lb
6 to 7 lie per lb
6 to 74c per lb
8 to 9c per lb
6 to 7c lb
14 to 15c a pkg

11c to 12ft c per lb
8 to 8c per lb
12 to 15c a pkg
13 to 15c per lb

Corn Flour 5.85 to 6c per lb
Corn Meal, Old Fashioned ..... 4.35 to 5c per lb
Corn Meal, Cream or Pearl 5-30 to 5.65 per lb
Corn Grits or. Hominy 5.11 to 5.75 per lb
Rolled Oats, bulk 6.20 to 6.75c lb
Barley Flour 5 to 6.25c per lb

Rolled Oats, in 1 lb. pkgs .11 to 11 & c a pkg
Rice Flour 9 hie to 10c lb
Edible Starch, bulk 6c lb
Edible Starch, in 1 lb. pkgs 10 to 11c a pkg

Rice, Blue Rose Grade 10.31 to 11.38
Rice, Broken
Rice, Fancy Long Grain .....oco
Granulated Sugar P lb
Lima Beans 15 to lbc lb
Navy Beans 12 to 16 lb
Blackeyed Peas t0
Pink Beans lb
Lard, pure, bulk : 28 to 39 c lb
TorJ fonmnstiinril mV,at if nfo hnllr 24 tO 24C lb

Lard, substitute in tin 1 27 to 30c lb

Evaporated Milk, small tins -.f,10 ;8,a tm.
Evaporated Milk, tall tins. to Jc a m
Condensed Milk, 11 oz. tins 12c to 13&c a tm
Canned Corn, standard 15 to 16c a V1
Canned Tomatoes, No. 2s 10 to 13c a tm
Canned Peas, No. 2s standard 15 to 16c a tin
Canned Dried Beans Baked No. ls...n to 12c a tin
Canned Dried Beans Baked No. 2s. .. 17 to 18c a tin
Canned Dried Beans Baked No. 3s... 30 to 32c a tin
Seeded Raisins 15 oz. pkgs 13 to 13c a pkg
Evaporated Prunes 60-70s ..13 to 13c lb
Corn Syrup, dark, No. ls ,12 to 13c a tm
Corn Syrup, dark, No. 5s .....36 to 38c a tin
Eggs 56c to 55c per doz
Butter Best Creamery !!!...!.... !&6 to 66c per lb
Potatoes, white 3.20 to 4 l-5c lb
Potatoes, sweets 2Vi to 2 c lb
Oleomargarine 34 to 40c per lb
Cheese .. 33 to 38c per. lb
Standard Hams 35c to 37c per lb
Standard Breakfast Bacon .42 to 61c lb
Salt Pork 26 to 30c per lb

Clarence Camp,,
Ma "ion County Food Administrator.

9.38 to 11c lb
19 to 20c per lb

16 to 20c per lb
12 to 14c per lb
14 to 15c per lb
31c to 35c per lb
27 to 29 per lb
32 to 37 c per lb
5 to 8c a tin

12 to 18c a tin
15c to 17c a tin
19 to 21c a tin
14 to 17c a tin
19 to 22c a tin
15 to 18c a tin
20 to 24c a tin
40 to 44c a tin
17 to 19c a pkg
17 to 18c per lb
15 to 17c a tin
45 to 48c a tin
60c per dozen
.62 to 72c per lb
4c to 5c lb
3 to 3c per lb
42 to 46c per lb
40 to 45c per lb
40 to 43c per lb
50 to 70c per lb
33 to 37c per lb

WivlS"! li
li .d

Mc Laren's Imperial Cheese
- Mc Laren's Deriled Cheese,
Mc Laren's Chile Cheese,
Pineapple Cheese, Edam Cheese.
Dried Fifls,
Seedless Raisins,
New Seeded Raisins,
Dromedary Dates. v
Citron, Orange and Lemon Peel.
PICKLES
Bulk, Dills, Sweet Mixed, Chow Chow and
Sweet Relish.
COOKING APPLES
65c Peck.

TEAPOT MCIMY
Phones 16 & 174.

IMPORTANT RED CROSS NOTICE

The Ocala Red Cross Chapter has

just received an urgent appeal from
the government for the conservation

of two metal3 needed in the prose

cution of the war. One is a metal
which can be used merely by conserv-

ine heretofore waste products this

metal is the homely tin which is usea
for so many domestic purposes the

other is the rarer but equally essen essential
tial essential metal of platinum which many
of our members possesses in the
form of jewelry and other articles
that they may be willing to sacrifice

Jfor their country's netds.

Surely one or the other ot tnese
metals can be collected by the Red
Cross members in our town.
We ask our members and the pub-

lis generally to keep for us every bit
of tin foil, every empty tube of salve,
or tooth paste, every old pewter toy
or vessel of any sort. TIN is made
from these and we MUST HAVE TIN
TO CARRY ON THE WAR.
Platinum we have said is more
precious but that, too, many of our
members have. We ask the help of
each patriotic citizen; of every store
using tin in any form; of every per person
son person willing and anxious to help win
the war.
We cannot use tin cans they are
till "in name only" but WE CAN
AND WILL USE EVERY OTHER
FORM OF TIN. For further infor information
mation information apply to Wi P. Preer, Chair

man Conservation Committee.
(Take or send your tin to the Ma Marion
rion Marion Hardware store, or notify Mr.
Preer and he wil send for it.



OCALA, EVENING STAR, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1918

O

Mr. Edward Tucker, who has been
quite ill, is somewhat better today.
Girl wanted at once at Music Store.
Mr. C. A. Tremere of Belleview was
i ntown today. He says his town has
ducked the flu. Only four cases one
white and three colored.

(I

Some pro-German or pacifist has
been breaking into and defacing the
North Ocala schoolhouse. The people
of the community should put on guard
some person adequately provided with
birdshot shells.

Flower and garden seeds for fall
planting now on. hand- every one
fresh. Bitting & Co., the Carmichael
building. Phone 14. 30-6t
Dr. W. II. Henry tried to put 1 the
capsheaf on our little stack of high
school military money today, handing
over a dollar, which we gladly added
to the fund. Two or three more cap cap-sheaves
sheaves cap-sheaves wouldn't hurt.

Paper Drinking Cups, 25 to pack package,
age, package, ten cents at Gerig's Drugstore.

The meeting on the public square
last night, in which talks were made
to the colored people in the interest
of United War Work, was rather
slimly attended, but good talks were
made and all present were much in

terested.

Lieut. Morris Smith was in the
great battle on the western front in
which his brother. Major Dan Morgan
Smith, was wounded and won promo promotion.
tion. promotion. Nothing has been heard from
Lieut. Smith, but his friends know

that he did his full share toward win
ning.the victory.

Let's go ""over the top" in voting
the state dry on November 5th. Vote
for the Constitutional Amendment to

Section XIX. Adv. 24-tf

A letter from Mr. T. M. Livingston
in Neuces, S. C, says that he has just

consummated another land sale and
now owns a fine tract of land just out
of Columbia. Mr. Livingston and his

brother, Mr. Clifford M.. Livingston of

this city, recently closed up a large

land deal in South Carolina.

In consequence of our "lightless
nights," Mr. H. W. Tucker has been

limping several days. Going home one

night last week, and trying to step up

on the piazza, in the dense darkness
he missed the end of the step just far
enough for its sharp corner to cut an
ugly gash along one shin. It was very

painful for several days and hurts

him yet.
Dr. van Engelken hears a good re

port of the work being done by his

son-in-law, Dr. J. W. Rowntree, in
combating the flu at Waterloo, la. It
seems that Dr. Rowntree has been
treating his patients with a most ef effectual
fectual effectual serum that he obtained from
Mayo brothers, the famous specialists
of Rochester, Minn. It has saved many
lives.

KEI'ORT OF SCHOOL, FUNDS, MARION COUNTY, PERIOD ENDING
JUNE SOTH, 1IS

Paper Drinking Cups, 25 to pack package,
age, package, ten cents at Gerig's. Drugstore.
Mr. Yonge Sage has returned to his
work in the Western Union office in
Jacksonville. The flu fell heavy on
the telegraph operators. For awhile
over half of the keypounders in Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville were sick, and for everyone
who returned to work two were taken
sick. It is a wonder how the survi survivors
vors survivors ever got the dispatches thru. Mr.
Chas. K. Sage of the Ocala office has
been alone for several days, having
loaned his only assistant to Gainesville.

Paper Drinking Cups, 25 to pack package,
age, package, ten cents at Gerig's Drugstore.
. Mr. G. H. Whittington, one of our
Marion county men, who with a pla platoon
toon platoon of his comrades went to Fort
Dade last week, writes that they are
all well treated and well pleased at
that excellent post and training
point. All have escaped the flu and
are enjoying their rations. He says
for us to send him the daily, so he
and the other boys can see what is
doing in old Marion. The paper is on
its way.

"Demonstration" Friday Nov. 1st, 3
to 5 p. m. Bring a piece of your
tarnished silver with you. We will
show you how. to make silver cleaning
a pleasure. Weihe Company, the Ocala
Jewelers. 29-3t

We have consulted four physicians
this morning, and all think that while
the flu is fleeing it is best to play safe
and keep the schools closed another
week. There are a good many cases
of whooping cough in town, and a
case complicated with influenza would
be dangerous. One physician says the
people must make up their minds to
be permanently careful, as there will
probably be occasional cases of grip
all winter, and they must be watched
out for.

Mr. A. R. Sandlin, the well-known
orange expert from Orlando, was in
town last night. Mr. Sandlin says
there' will be a good orange crop this
year about seven and a half million
boxes. More oranges he thinks than
people to handle them. He thinks
prices will be good and does not ap apprehend
prehend apprehend the market being glutted.

(Continued from Third Page)
New Year Book
The new year book of the Woman's

Club of Ocala, which club was organ organized
ized organized in 1909 and federated with the

Florida State Federation in 19(h),

and with the general federation in

1917, contains on its front page the

following sentiment:

'What We Believe, by Lincoln Hui-

ley, president of Stetson University,
DeLand, Florida.

'We believe in Florida, the land of

blue skies, soft winds and eternal
sunshine.

"We love its rivers, lakes, pine

woods, orange groves and broad
stretches of prairie.

'We are one with her people to

unite heart, soul and body in develou-

ing her resources, in making this the
beautiful home of a free and prosper

ous people.

"We vow with them to be true tj

the ideals of the sturdy settler who
opened this fair land to be a home for
all people. We invite those seeking

new homes, if they are worthy to "set

tle among us, and we pledge to .them

the warm hand of hospitality, a glad
welcome to the state, and a fraternal
co-operation in seeking peace and

happiness in this land of plenty, a
land of summer and sunshine and
song."
Because of this the Woman's Club
has created its hospitality committee.
,
A Card of Thanks
Mrs. M. C. Elliot desires to return
her thanks to her many friends for
their kindness and sympathy shown

to her in the hour of her dire distress,

in the death and burial of her beloved

son, Duncan Elliot. She wishes to

express appreciation for the many
beautiful flowers sent by friends, and
especially the sympathy and kind
thoughtf ulness shown to her by the
teachers and girls of the industrial

school, who did all in their power to
help her bear this heavy burden of

sorrow.

Dinner Party Honoring Miss Camp

bell

Mrs. E. Van Hood will entertain
this evening at a lovely dinner party
honoring Miss Alice Campbell, whose
marriage to Dr. Hubert Noland of
Timmonsville, S. C, takes place at the
Presbyterian church tomorrow after afternoon.
noon. afternoon. Mrs. Hood is an old family friend
of the Campbell family, having known
Miss Campbell since she was a tiny
girl and this dinner is an expression
in a small measure of the great love
which she bears for her. Dr. Noland,
who is a prominent Methodist minis minister,
ter, minister, is a South Carolinian by birth
and a brother of Mrs. Shedd of Belle Belle-view,
view, Belle-view, and is also to 'be an honored
guest of Dr. and Mrs. Hood this eve evening.
ning. evening. Further details of the dinner and
the wedding plans in general will be
given in tomorrow afternoon's Star.
t
Reopening of the Temple
The Temple will reopen its doors
Friday afternoon, with a Toto comedy
and an Ince feature, "A Nine O'Clock
Town," in which that sophisticated
greenhorn, Charles Ray, who always
does the unexpected will lead. Satur Saturday
day Saturday pretty and vivacious Carmel My Myers
ers Myers will star in "The Dream Lady."
On account of fuel regulations, the
Temple will put into effect the fol following
lowing following schedule, which its patrons
must take note of. Each afternoon
there will Jbe one performance, begin beginning
ning beginning at 3:30. This over, the theater
will close until 7 p. m., when it will
reopen, and the pictures will be run
twice. This will give everybody h
chance to see the pictures if they wil
be on time.
The funeral service of Mrs. Henry
Gatrell, who died in this city Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday morning, was held this afternoon
at 3 o'clock, at the home of her aunt,
Mrs. W. W. Clyatt. The open air
service was conducted by Rev. W. H.
Wrighton of the Baptist church of
this city, in the presence of a large
circle of friends and relatives. Mr.
Wrighton gave a most comforting and
inspiring talk, taking his text from
the 4th verse of the 39th Psalm, in
which he commented on the brevity of
life and the need of keeping the end
in view and o prepare our hearts to
trust in Christ that the end will find
us ready even as it was with this
sweet young bride, who was a Chris Christian
tian Christian and when the call came she was
not found wanting. The pallbearers
were Messrs. Cecil Clark, Ed Weath Weathers,
ers, Weathers, John Edwards, D. W. Tompkins,
George Pasteur and N. R. Dehon. The
body was laid to rest in Greenwood
cemetery under a mound of beautiful
flowers, to await a glad reunion with
loved ones on the resurrection morn.
Mrs. R. L. Martin of Lake Weir, has
arrived in Ocala on her way back from
her summer outing in Tennessee and
Kentucky. She stopped since the first
of the month with her daughter, Mrs.
H. B. Potter in Jacksonville. Her
grandson, Master Martin Potter, had
influenza about the first of October,
but has entirely recovered. No other
one of her daughter's family had it.
Mrs. Martin will remain in Ocala un until
til until after the marriage of her cousin,
Miss Alice Campbell.
W. K. Lane, M. D Physician and

Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat, Law Library Building, Ocala,
Florida. tf

The following report of tbe receipts and disbursements of the school
funds of MARION COUNTY for the period ending June 30th, 1918, with the bal balances
ances balances and amount of warrants outstanding and a statement of the assets and
liabilities, and the valve of the school property of the said Marion county as
reported on the JsOth diy of Jcne, 1918, by the County Board of Public Instruc Instruction
tion Instruction and the Superintendent cf Public Instruction, is hereby published under
the provisions of Chapter 6813, Laws of Florida. Acts of 1915.
ERNEST .AMOS, Comptroller.

(iEEK AL SCHOOL. FLND
Depository balance January 1, 1918
Warrants outstanding January 1, 1018

Net deficit January 1, 1918
Receipt for tbe M Month i
From tax collector, taxes and polls -a,?-2
County judge, hunting license oT"a
Comptroller, tax redemption
Comptroller, railway tax lu'??-r!?

ComptroJler, National Forest fund... fund...-Comptroller,
Comptroller, fund...-Comptroller, state one-mill school tax
Citrus county, county line -pupils
Superintendent, treasurer's bondsmen
Rank of Iunnellon, transfer of taxes.
Superintendent, Insurance
Eanks, interest on deposits
Ranks, depository transter

Sundry receipts

$ 3,646.25
9.694.29
$ 6,048.04

569.10

6,223.25
80.00
1,018.95
2,489.50
175.00
30.37
2.125.00
43.11

Borrowed money 12,120.00

62,628.37

Making balance
DIburementM for tbe SI .Month:
Expended for Schools:
Salaries of teachers $
Purchase of school lots
New buildings
Repairs to buildings
Furniture
Apparatus
Rent
'Manual training
Domestic science
Incidentals for schools
UipenNCN of Administrations
Salary of superintendent
Traveling expenses cf superintendent'
Per diem and mileage of members of board
Office help
Incidentals for board and superintendent
Piinting financial statement
Printing
Miscellaneous .. .
Attorney's fees
County line p-upils
Home demonstration work
Dormitory . .
Roans and notes .. -
Interest
; Warrants issued for depository transfers
Warrant issued for redemptions

$ 56.580.33

28,210.19
181.33
11.40
138.96
80.48
60.58
2.00
20.25
36.47
32.26
875.00
98.67
177.76
496.00
145.21
48.00
58.00
59.25
102.00
50.00
150.00
12.00
18,520.00
-$,216.32
22,600.00
9.185.68

84.567.82

Leaving deficit
Cr. Error in outstanding warrants at beginning.

$ 27,987.49
35.00

Leaving deficit .;
Dr. Error in warrants B-4412 and B-4465 la.OO
Dr. Dep. receipts by transfers 19,421.00
Dr. VTarrant issued for redemptions 8,410.68

28.022.49

27,846.68
175.81
1,256.91

w , 1,081.10
Depository balance
SPECIAL TAX SCHOOL DISTRICT IIOXD, I. & S. FUND, MARION COUNTY

BRIXSOX VERSUS BRIXSOX

(Continued from First Page)
we paid no white teacher less than
$40 per month fdr the six months
term.
The small taxpayer and patron of
the public schools cannot afford to
vote against the amendment for the
interest he has in the education of his
children and the heavy taxpayer can cannot
not cannot afford to vote against it for the
interest he has in the general welfare

CANDLER
Candler, Oct. 30. Mr. and Mrs.
Norton's many friends are welcom welcoming
ing welcoming them on their return, from theli
annual summer visit to their homes in
Brooklyn, N. Y., and Boston, Mass.
Messrs. Charles and Robert Math Mathews
ews Mathews are expected home today frofn

Fort Lauderdale, where they have
been the guests for the past week of

the former's brother, Mr. Georsre

Mathews and family.
Mrs. Mary Mitchell was called to

Coleman last b riday. to assist in

nursing her two grandchildren, who of his country and for the mdirec
are ill with pneumonia. financial interest every property hold-
Mr. Peter H. Fort has a position at j er has in the maintenance of good
Murdock. schools in the neighborhood of that
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Sylvester en-j Property,
joyed a visit .from their aunt last! The Star, has repeatedly spoken of
week, Mrs. Dinkens, who was en route j the amendment as being "unpatriotic."
to her home in Coleman from a visit t To my mind it is the very essence of
to Orange Park relatives. patriotism. What more patriotic
Mrs, J. N. Marshall and son, Albert thing, with possibly the exception of
and Mrs. Mary Mitchell have return- j the actual risking of one's life in act acted
ed acted from a pleasant visit to relatives j ua"- combat at the real front, can one
at Moore Haven. do than to make provision for pre-

Mr. and Mrs. Newman came down serving and extending the general m-

from a visit to Alabama for a briaf
visit to Mr. and Mrs. George McGee
last week.
The Methodist parsonage is under undergoing
going undergoing some needed repairs, both in interior
terior interior and exterior.

Net deficit June 30, 1918
Warrants outstanding June 30, 1918.

E
3
25

T3 oo
u
fci c

303 1

1. $11,772.57
5. 5,311,73
10. 1,651.36

be
.
o -j"

$75,000.0v
12,000.00
10,500.00

JU-NE 30TH, 191S

a
'4.

a,
1

$ 6,001.20
2,972.33
867.39

3,750.00
262.56

00
0 10

$75,000.00
12,000.00
10,500.00

i ri
S. 41
Ceo
tf re 0
sag

$14,023.77
8,284.06
2,256.25

tia7rfiB $07 500 00 $ 9,840.92 $4,012.50 $97,500.00
.?6 It, ,.YfiiiT SPECIAL TAX SCHOOL

"""''r FLORIDA JUSiE SOT... 191

$24,564.08
DISTRICT

District Number

- CD
o
re
Be

41 e
m

M0
on
5 3

a
v
u

c
E

3
CO

District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
Distiict
District
District
District
"District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District

No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No,
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.

t .
8 ..
9 ..
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
3
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41

2,963.
282.
292,
8
1,115
118.
263
249.
511.
172.
' ' 4V
52
713
22.
71
173

342

158

73.
140.
168.
214
30
13.
198
37
173.
46
120.
373
577

88
82
83.
48
96
03
,29
54
28
36
77
48
,51
76
,25

.23

67

.09

64
.57
,91
.72
.01
.34
.03
.51
.86
.46
85

.96

78

$.

... $ 6,250.44 $

5.00
1,870.05
139.66
6.30

35.45

16.44
5.00
10.00'
157.03
50.00
200.50

10.00

85.29

103
113
28
277
43

30

88
72
81
26
97

.31

V.66
''"4.0b
.WW.".."." Vo'0'6
:. 10.00
38". 81 2066
65.67 250.61
60.02
66.40
"..!.!".!".". V9Y.66
10.00

4,729.
391.
556.
87.
2,981.
265.
181.
63.
585.
851.
215.
385.
254.
312.
269.
122.
149.
158.
190.
167.
1.
92.
224
34.
78.
249.
45.
103.
69.
187.
290
166.
181
241.
209.
427.
177.
125.
219
83.
137.

31
30
43
87
95
50
40
85
92
94
36
90
75
64
20
93
26
18
33
98
44
89
.23
10
14
18
15
23
88
00
.05
74
.34
36
48
78
19
73
.39
68
,67

4,822.73
192.61
390.95
8.58
1,384.59
251.26
146.13
11.74
250.83
644.78
73.62
179.66
21.97
250.88
171.28
73.47
143.20
10.75
63.44
73.27
10.00
33.63
146.27
21.61
11.50
19.69
11.05
130.09
33.20
98.78
196.37
97.20
31.92
57.58
300.73
236.37
18.75
162.93
124.96
89.32
145.16

Total $10,415.11 $ 139.93 $ 9.483.45 $16,267.65 $11,142.95
RECAPITLLATIOV OF HEPOIIT OF SPECIAL TAX SCHOOL DISTRICT
FINDS, MARION COI NTY, FLORIDA, JUNE 30TH, 1018

District Number

5 o B
&

4

1- r- o
"I-

oo
1-
O 3

6e2
m coi
p. c o
t re"
(6 a! J

Nol

No.

No.
No.
No.

No.

Distridt
District
District
District
District
District

District No

District No.

District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District
District

.$ 1,043.51 $ $ I 6,325.44 $

No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.

3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26

1,331.27

1.940.05
28.43
630.

344.57

246.44

5.00

10.00

157.03
10.00
200.50

10.00

4.00

telligence of the people who consti constitute
tute constitute a free state? It is not simply
making a living it is making a peo people.
ple. people. What are you going to say to
the flower of our land who are fight fighting
ing fighting our battles on the other side when
they return and find that you made

, return anu mm mat you maue
Take care of your feet. If they are the most complete pr0vision for their

28
29
30
31
32
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41

5.00

".".".".".. Vo'66
"... """ 10692
. ." 6.39

10.00

300.61
60.02
66.40
2.00
297.00
50.66

Ed
C3 3
3

1,901.95
481.51
458.31
82.77
1,452.25
21.04
298.56
301.65
846.37
264.95
106.2k
246.01
285.26
745.27
120.68
120.71
179.29
490.10
264.98
168.35
132.01
228.17
292.68
37.50
79.98
427.52
71.61
147.00

83.14
164 07
467.64 j
687.32 I
90.61
269.07 1

' 29529
272.16

giving you trouDie, nave tnem ex

amined by M. M. Little, the only foot
specialist in Ocala. No cost to you. tf
Let us supply your TOILET AR ARTICLES.
TICLES. ARTICLES. Our line is complete, and
the prices always reasonable. The
Court Pharmacy. Phone 284. tf
Chinese Queues Not Barred.
Although the traffic in human hair
has not been so brisk during the past
few years "as formerly on account of

the veering of the fashions in hair hair-dressing
dressing hair-dressing toward the extremest simplic simplicity,
ity, simplicity, there are millions of pounds of
human hair exported from China. One

of the peculiar facts in connection

with the trade is that often after the

Chinese send the hair to us wre treat
it and dye it and send it back to be
made up for special use. This is usual usually
ly usually true in regard to the Invisible hair
nets which American and European
women use to keep their own locks
In order on a windy day.
The hair-net business has become of
great importance to the province of
Shantung, which now provides practic practically
ally practically the entire supply for the market market-Thus
Thus market-Thus the hair net worn by the veriest
stay-at-home In America has doubtless
crossed the ocean three times. Popu Popular
lar Popular Science Monthly.

comfort that has ever been made for
a soldier but failed to make provision
for the education of his little brother
and sister at home? More than that
and beyond that what are you going
to say to yourself when you see the
brothers and sisters of the brave onss
who have lain down for their last
bivouac under foreign skies for the
defense of their homeland, and you
remember that you did everything
that you could possibly think of .to
kill a measure intended to give these
same brothers and sisters a fair
chance with the rest of humanity to
work out a full and satisfying des-

itiny? Very respectfully,

J. H. Brinson.

Lightning at Sea.
When proper precautions are taken
ships at sea are In no danger of being
destroyed by lightning. Of all the dan dangers
gers dangers that beset the seaman, lightning
is the only one that he can guard
against with perfect thoroughness.
Permanent conductors, properly ar arranged,
ranged, arranged, offer the most complete pro protection
tection protection from the electric fluid.
Before this fact was well under understood,
stood, understood, lightning was a very frequent
cause of damage to shipping. In 1808
to 1815 no fewer than seventy vessels
of the English navy were entirely crip crippled
pled crippled by being struck. It was a no"un no"un-comrnoa
comrnoa no"un-comrnoa thing for vessels to be set on
fire so Completely by lightning as to
defy extinction, with the result' that
those on board who were not killed by
the electric discharge in many in instances
stances instances proic-bly lost their livs
through being unable to let down the
boats before the fire reached them.

What They Asked Him.
There is one man in town who Is
tired of hearing the name of a small
car of popular raake. His name is L.
G. (Baron) Rothschild. It all hap happened
pened happened like this: On Monday morning
the baron, in his haste to get to the
Jewett inauguration, as some say, slip slipped
ped slipped on the sidewalk and broke a bone
in his wrist and tore loose two liga ligaments
ments ligaments in his right hand. He has since
been carrying the hand around In a
plaster cast. Since then, whether in
the club or on the street, nine ac acquaintances
quaintances acquaintances out of ten asked him the
question, "Were you cranking a M
(name deleted to avoid giving free ad advert!
vert! advert! si ng ) IndianpoIisiws
Paper Drinking Cups, 25 to pack package,
age, package, ten cent? at Gerig's Drugstore.
For expert piano tuner phone 427.
The pride of the Court Pharmacy is
its prescription department. Every
prescription is carefully compounded
as ordered by your physician NO
SUBSTITUTION allowed. Phone 284.

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS

HATES: Six line maximum, one
time 25c; three times 50c; six times
75c; one month 3. Payable in advance.

WANTED, LOST, FOUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS
FOR SALE -passenger Reo four,
good shape, good tires. In Al condi condition.
tion. condition. Willing for any good mechanic
to pass on engine and running gear.
Run 10,700 miles. A bargain. Will
take Liberty Bonds, W. S. S. or cash.
Terms if paper is bankable. J. P.
Phillips. 30-4t

DODGE CAR FOR SALE A 1917
model touring car, in first class condi condition
tion condition in every way. New leather top,
new non-skid rear tires, new high high-grade
grade high-grade storage battery. Apply at the

Maxwell Agency.

30-6t

FOR SALE Good Jersey milk cow.
Address Box 6A, Route B, Ocala,
Fla. 29-ot
NOTICE Am having calls for fur furnished
nished furnished houses. It. will pay those who
have one to place it in my hands. Alio
have good reliable renting properties.
E. DeCamp, P. O. Box 26, Ocala. 29 Ct
FOR SALE, CHEAP-41 Hp. gaso gasoline
line gasoline engine, International make; one
feed crusher; one wood sawing outfit
complete; one pump jack; two Stude Stude-baker
baker Stude-baker 2-horse wagons, nearly new. W.
L. Baker, Kendrick, Fla. 29-Ct
FOR SALE Strawberry plants,
per 1000. B. B. Blackburn, 42G Okla-waha-"
10-28-6t

FOR RENT Rooms furnished for
light housekeeping; also single fur furnished
nished furnished room. Phone 242, Mrs. A. M.
Perry. 24-tf

SALT FISH
Delicious fresh caught salted FISH,
direct to the consumer by prepaid ex express,
press, express, 18 pounds for $2.00. Barrel
shipments a specialty. Try our delic delicious
ious delicious SALTED ROE.
The St. George Co., Inc.
St. George "On the Gulf'
APALACHICOLA. FLA.

371.69
28.33
72.52

Total 2,734.35 $ 55.00 113.31 9,704.22 $13,054.61

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES
Available Aiet
Geueral School Fund

Flalance cash in depository
Uncollected taxes, including current year
District warrants due county

nonimen notes

$ 1,081.10
5,373.28
8,639.16
2.656.85

Bond I. and S. fund balance 24,564. OS

Special Tax DiMtrirt
P.alance cash in depositories ." 12,941.30
Uncollected taxes, including current year 3229.59
Total available assets f 58,485.36
LIABILITIES
General School Fu n tl
Warrants outstanding for current expenses
Warrants outstanding or other evidences of indebted indebtedness,
ness, indebtedness, except bond given for property or money
borrowed, the payment of which is deferred
P'ndintr warrant?
. her liabilities of every kind hot otherwise enumerat enumerated,
ed, enumerated, and for which no warrants or other evidences of
indebtedness has been issued
Special Tax Mnirletm
Warrants outstanding
IKnds outstanding
Ti ne warrants outstanding
. Total
General
Value of School Property
School houses and lots $ 14.880.00
.School iurniture 2,370.00
School apparatus 460.00
Other school property 36.00
Special Ti mtrle
School houses and lots $174,810.00
School furniture 11,340.00
fcchool apparatus .. 3,604.00
Other school property ,r 2,462.00
Total ...J209.962.00

$ 1,256.91

42,100.00
30,500.00

7,000.00
9,500.22
12,800.00
600.00
$103,757.13



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