The Ocala evening star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:07058

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
4v,':'''';;,.'-j!-',:'

OCALA

Weather Forecast: Fair tonight and
Wednesday except probably light
rain on east coast and also in north northwest
west northwest portion.

OCALA, FLORIDA, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1918.

VOL-25.N0. 242

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Allied Soldiers are Against an
Armistice

TEUI0:iS 111 THE DISTRUST OF ALL IIATIOIIS REAP THE RE REWARD
WARD REWARD OF TREACHERY

NUB OF

i mil rim

OUT THIS EVEIIIIIG

Washington, Oct. 8. The presi president's
dent's president's reply to the German and Aus Austrian
trian Austrian request for an armistice to be
followed by peace negotiations prob probably
ably probably will be dispatched before night,
if it is not already on the cables.
After being called into conference by
the president with Col. House, Secre Secretary
tary Secretary Lansing and Secretary Tumulty,
Secretary Lansing announced that he
would see the newspaper correspond correspondents
ents correspondents at 4 o'clock and would "prob "probably
ably "probably have something for them."
The president spent the entire
morning in his study and it is believ believed
ed believed he was putting in final shape the
document on which he worked nearly
all day yesterday. None in the presi president's
dent's president's confidence give any intimation
of his decision, but there is no
change in the confident belief that
an armistice will be flatly refused,
and the central powers informed that
an unequivocal acceptance of the con conditions
ditions conditions laid down by the United States
and the Allies must precede any
meeting of peace plenipotentiaries.
-FIGHT ON," SAY THE MEN IN
FRANCE
With the British Army in France,
Oct. 7. (By the Associated Press).-
The soldiers of the allied armies want
peace, but no ; peace except a com completely
pletely completely victorious one.
This was the opinion expressed by
officers and men alike to the Asso Associated
ciated Associated Press correspondent today. If
Germany is willing to admit her ut utter
ter utter defeat, then say these men who
have, been fighting the good fight for

the liberty of the world, so much the
better, but, they declare, the granting
of an armistice at this time, unless
the enemy is absolutely sincere,

might prove extremely dangerous.
RIGHT HERE WE SPLIT

Copenhagen, Oct.; 8. The Lokal
Anzeital Anzeiger, of Berlin, says
that two of President Wilson's points
must be considered ; as rejected: the
separation of Alsace-Lorraine from
Germany and the incorporation of an

independent Poland of Russian Pol
and. .:-'.:
ITALY'S OPINION

Rome, Monday, Oct. 7. "We must
have absolute victory. Any kind of

negotiation now is more than ever in
admissable." These words of Presi

dent Wilson, immediately after the

rejection of the -Austrian peace pro proposal,
posal, proposal, are reprinted by the Epoca in

large type as summarizing the atti

tude of the Italians towards the next

peace movement.
BUY LIBERTY BONUS
THE CASUALTY LIST

MR. BRINSON PITIES

OUR IGNORANCE

1

1 OF I

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fill

8

PU

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m

nut

i

ol

The following casualties are re re-the
the re-the American Expeditionary Forces,
ported by the commanding general of

The casualty lists of the American

army, will hereafter be posted in the

Star's front windows every morning,

If in looking over them you see the
name of anyone you know, please re

port it to the paper.
Killed in action 788
Missing in action .107
Wounded severely ..............345
Wounded slightly 4
Died, accident and other causes.. &
Died of wounds 34
Wounded, 'degree undetermined.. 32
Taken prisoner .......... i ..... 11
Died from airplane accident. . . 1
Died I of disease ................ 10
Total .......... 693
The following Florida names are
on the list:
Killed in action: Private Augustine
Willis, St. Augustine.
Wounded severely: Private Luther
F. Wilson, Cortez; John Bennett,
Jacksonville.

Editor Star: In your article of

yesterday afternoon you turn loose

upon the public a column and a half

of about the most refreshing ignor ignorance
ance ignorance in regard to tschool matters that
could be condensed into that space.

I again say that I do not want to

be construed as opposing in the

slightest the subscription for the

dummy guns and have not questioned

the good intentions of the Star in
fostering the matter, but it surely is
inconsistent to oppose, taxation for
needed school equipment and then
have to carry around a subscription
paper for what is needed.

In the matter of the salary of the

superintendent, do you suppose I

would have been drawing this salary j

for nearly ten years without knowing

the limits of it? No, sir. You have
exhibited complete ignorance of both

the law and facts in the case and had

you railed upon the office we would

have been glad to have saved you

from this exhibition.

The salary of the superintendent is

based upon the receipts of $100,000
per annum for school purposes from

all sources, making the minimum un

der the law of $175 per month and
this is the salary of the superintend superintend-riet
riet superintend-riet and he' cannot claim more until

the receipts are as much as $120,000.

I know that our board would not levy

more than one more mill and am not
at all sure that they would do this
and one mill on the present valuation
of Marion county, $7,213,239, would
would be $7,213 and all of the levey
is never .collected. Seven mills last
year yielded us for the county gen general
eral general fund but $45,167.94 and one mill
would under this yield us but $6, $6,-452.56.
452.56. $6,-452.56. The exact income for the
school year ending June 30, 1918,
was $102,878 from all sources and you
see that it would require a levy of the
full three mills ti entitle the superin superintendent
tendent superintendent to any increase whatever.
Neither will it increase the per diem
and mileage of the members of the
county school board.

You know that you make another
one of your utterly reckless state statements
ments statements when you say that the school

board would levy every mill if allow

ed to do so even were it twenty mills.
Ask the members of the present

board or the members of the board as

it will be after the coming January 1
No, sir, it has not been the busi

ness of the teachers to save the mon mon-,
, mon-, ey of : the people ; it has been their
business to earn the money of the

people and they have earned every

dollar that they have gotten and
many more taken as a class. Some
of course have not earned what they
received but as a body they have
been the poorest paid of the public
servants and they are the ones who

have performed the service of pre

serving and advancing .whatever of

civilization and democracy that you

enjoy this same "educational autoc
racy. -: ;

Also, it has been the business of

the boards and superintendents to

save the money of the people. They
were elected to spend the money of

the people and to get a dollar's worth

of service or material for every dol

lar spent just as nearly as possible.
In this they as a class or as a body
have been faithful as is attested by

the long terms that the superintend

ents and board members of Marion
county have enjoyed and which have
been full of service to the interests

entrusted to them.

Again, I am sorry to have to call

your attention to your ignorance of

OF THE LIDEnTV LOAtl WILL

01 THIS EVEIIIIIG

Washington, Oct. 8. The over overnight
night overnight increase in liberty loan sub subscriptions
scriptions subscriptions which reached the treasury
was $82,334,050, making the total
$1,406,051,000.
AFTER BREWERS' ASSOCIATION
Washington, Oct. 8. Charges that
the United States Brewers Associa Association
tion Association and its individual members sec secretly
retly secretly financed newspapers in the in interest
terest interest of the liquor traffic, contributed
to the National German-American
Alliance and improperly influenced
state and national legislation, were
renewed in a memorandum filed to today
day today by Senator Jones, republican,
with the Senate judiciary sub-committee
investigating loans by the
brewers to Arthur Brisbane, in con connection
nection connection with the latter's purchase of
the Washington Times. Senator Jones
contended that the inquiry be unlimit unlimited
ed unlimited in scope and not confined alone to
the Times.
-
WHEAT AND CROP FORECAST
-. $ '"."
Washington, Oct. 8. The 1918
wheat crop will be 918,920,000 bush bushels,
els, bushels, the department of agriculture an announced
nounced announced today in a preliminary esti estimate
mate estimate of production. Corn production
is placed at 2,717,775,000 bushels on
the forecast of the condition of the
crop October 1st. ; 5

PROBABLY

BE

MUSED

ALMOST S200.0Q0
IS THE AMOUNT

the law and the constitution when you
ask "Why didn't the legislature in instead
stead instead pass a bill giving each county
the right by the vote of its people to
levy more taxes?" It didn't do this
because it couldn't. Ask some lawyer

if you don't think I know what I am

talking about.

To assert that the measure has in

the least been "gumshoed" is to total

ly misrepresent the facts in the case.
There was a committee appointed

from the state educational associa

tion in open session with probably

five hundred present to present the

matter to the legislature to ask them

to pass the resolution to submit to

the people this proposed amend-

mend. Do you suppose they gum gumshoed
shoed gumshoed it through or over or under the
legislature? At the last session of
the association there was a campaign
committee appointed in open session
to conduct the campaign and to pro

perly present it to the public and

they are doing the best they can with

their very limited means. What do

you suppose those horrible pictures

that you spoke of some time ago in

which the dilemma of the school board
was so faithfully portrayed were for?

Did that look like gumshoeing ? The
policy has been the very opposite.

You are kind enough to say "We

think the teachers should be better

paid, but an honest and economical

state government could pay them
more without saddling an amend

ment on the people." How? From

what source ? I would again suggest

that you consult lawyer.
I am not called upon to defend the
state government but I have been in
the closest official touch with it for
nearly ten years and have not seen
the least sign of dishonesty. The
state educational department is strug struggling
gling struggling along with cramped quarters in
the capitol and very limited office
help as we have been doing here. We
have to make voluminous reports to
the state superintendent and also to

the comptroller and we find that if

there, is anything not clear to them
we have to make it so. I do not say
that I always agree with them in
policy but I have no reason to sus suspect
pect suspect dishonesty.
Your argument in regard to the

salaries of teachers is ridiculous. It
is correct when you say that "Taxes,
by the way, is something compara comparatively
tively comparatively few teacherse have to worry

about. The average man teacher sel seldom
dom seldom pays anything but his poll tax

The women don't pay that." Too true,

and sad it is that it is so. To the

shame of the country is this the fact.

You have spoken of employing

young students and people without
qualification for teaching. Ask a

father or mother if this is the kind of
teacher they want for their children.
Do your employ a novice or green

horn to train a dog, break a horse, or

even to look after well bred pigs?
By the way, what is this "educa
tional autocracy" you talk about ?

One would think it was on a par with

the German autocracy. It must be

Subscribed at the Liberty Loan Meet

ing Saturday Evening
at Citra
Mr. Ed. L. Wartmann of Citra, who

was in town today, asked the Star to
give the thanks of the people of Citra
to all who came from other parts of
the county to help out with the big
liberty loan meeting when the war
relic train stopped there Saturday

evening. Mr. wartmann particularly
thanked the Ocala band.

Mr. Wartmann said the amount

raised was $197,450.

Following is the remainder of the

list of subscribers added to that pub

lished yesterday.
Allemand, J. E., Ocala
Ax, Christian, Ocala
Ax, Mrs. Christian
Ax, Miss Adela, Ocala

Brock, L. .B., Lowell

Booher, Harry LJ, Ocala.....

Barco, Miss Carrie, Ocala...
Bachelder, Mrs. O. L., Ocala.

Brooks, Mrs. M. M., Ocala...

Burford, R. A., Ocala .'.
Blake, Miss Irma, Ocala

Burnett, J erry, Ocala
Beckham, F. B., Ocala......
Camp, Clarence, Ocala.....;

Camp, Jack, Ocala. 2000.00
Clyatt, W. W., Ocala ........ 500.00
Condon, B. F., Ocala ........ 1000.00
Carstens, J., Ocala 100.00
Cappleman, Miss Ruby, Ocala 00.00

Clement, E. W., Ocala.

Chace, J. E., Ocala .........
Crandali, H. P., Ocala......

Crandall, Mrs. M. E., Ocala.
Camp, Mrs. Jack, Ocala . .

Carlton,"Geo. L., Sparr. . .

Cam, Baxter, Ocala 50.00
Drake, T. P., Ocala ......... 1000.00
Dey, J. R., Ocala ..... 1000.00

Dobbs, E. E., Ocala.. .1000.00

Drake, Frank, Ocala;.. 300.00

Elliot, J. R., Ocala 50.00
Edwards, John L., Ocala.. .. 1000.00

Ervin, Miss Ruth, Ocala... 50.00

Frost, Miss Lillian, Ocala... 400.00

Ferguson, D. Niel, Ocala'....
Godwin, Jesse E., Ocala
Graham, M..D. L., Ocala....
Graham, Mrs. Cora B., Ocala
Gilmore, Jas. M., Ocala. ....
Gallagher, W. B., Ocala....

Griffin, Miss Edith, Ocala. .
Hitt, W. H., Tallahassee....
Henderson, E. M- Ocala....

rpifjM pn mi
MImI IDLIItJ

Other Points on West Front
Taken By Allies

REPORTED Til AT I1IUDE1BERG IKED AFTER TEtllCG ELI-

PEflOR EERI.1 HOES MUST RETREAT

200.00
100.00
50.00
50.00
50.00
250.00
50.00
100.00
50.00
500.0ft
50.00
100.00
50.00
2000.00

300.00
1000.00
200.00
200.00
200.00
500.00

500.00
100.00
150.00
250.00
50.00
200.00
50.00
100.00
50.00

Haughton, M., Ocala .... 100.00
Hitchings, J. H., Ocala. ; . . 50.00
Henderson, H. H., Ocala.... 100.00

Jordan, Mrs. E. C, Ocala. ... 500.00

Jackson, B. F., Eastlake . .

Jones, R. D., Ocala ......... 200.00

Jones, Mrs. Ada L.f Ocala... y 50.00
Jewett, Stephen, Ocala. . . s 100.00
Knoblock, J. H., Ocala ...... 100.00
Leavengood, P. V., Ocala. ,. 200.00
Leak, Geo. T., Ocala. ....... 50.00
Luffman, H. R., Sparr. ..... 50.00
Lopez, Narcisco, Ocala 50.00
Lane, Norris, Ocala .. .. 500.00
Meffert, J. M Ocala. ...... 1000.00

some kind of a "Before Day Club" or
"Sunday Morning Band," as I fail
to come in contact with it, not being
up before day and lying abed late on
Sunday mornings.
This amendment was proposed sev several
eral several months before and the resolution
was passed by the legislature just
about the time of the entering of this
country into the war. It had been
considered for some time prior to
this and the necessity for it had been
growing and had been recognized by
those who had to administer the
finances "of the schools.
It is a good measure and I believe
it is going to be adopted and I have
not the slightest idea that the school
boards will oppress the people but
they will be in position to meet the
demands of the people.
If I have used plain language in the
discussion of a plain subject it is with
the kindest of feeling for all con concerned.
cerned. concerned. Very respectfully yours,
J. H. Brinson.
- BUY LIBERTY BONDS
Do you read the want ads?

London, Oct. 7. According to a

Central News dispatch, from Amster Amsterdam
dam Amsterdam late today, Field Marshal von
Hindenbiirg has resigned, as chief of
the German general staff after a
heated interview with the emperor
in which the field marshal declared
that a retreat on a large scale was
impossible to avoid.
AMERICANS AND BRITONS IN

COMBINED ATTACK i
London, Oct. 8. -General Haig an announces
nounces announces that English and American
troops attacked this morning on the
front between Cambrai and St. Quen Quen-tin.
tin. Quen-tin. Satisfactory progress is being
made, it was stated.
Today's attack was launched just
before daybreak during a heavy rain
which began last night. In successful
local operations near Mont Brehain
and Beaurevoir more than 230 prison prisoners
ers prisoners were taken by the Americans and
English. m
BOCHES LEAVING BELGIUM
Amsterdam, Oct. 8. The evacua evacuation
tion evacuation of the Belgian coast region by
the Germans is continuing, according
to the frontier correspondent, of the
Telegraaf. Telephone. lines between
the frontier and the coast were being
taken down yesterday and today.
Stores of material at Knokke, near
the coast and five miles from the
Dutch border, are being set afirethe
report states. Many factories have
been undermined preparatory to quick
destruction. j
FRENCHMEN DRIVE THE FOE
Paris, OetTS. Northeast and north
of Rheims the French today continued
their successful advance. A war of office
fice office announcement says the French
have reached the outskirts of Conde-sur-Suippe
at the junction of the
Suippe and Aisne northeast of Berry-au-Bac.
Along the Suippe the French
have penetrated into Isles-sur-Suippe
and to the west captured Bazean Bazean-court.
court. Bazean-court. STEAMER SUNK
Washington, Oct. 8. The Ameri American
can American steamer Westgate of the naval
overseas transport service has been
sunk with the loss Xf six lives, in col collision
lision collision with the steamer American.

Munroe, Robt. T., Ocala....
Munroe, Miss Annie, Ocala .,
Munroe, Miss Abby, Ocala.

FiiSeil, E. W., Ocala....

50iKfMathews, T. S., Ocala.

McCredie, Mrs. Julia, Ocala.
McCredie, Miss Janette .....
McOavid, Mrs. M. Ocala.
McCredie, John, Ocala
McCredie, Miss Julia, Ocala.
McCredie, Hugh H., Ocala.
Manon, John L., Ocala......
Newberry, Mrs. M. E Ocala

Ocala National Bank

Phillips, John, Eastlake...

Pearson, J. Ocala ........
Pelot, Mrs. J. F., Ocala.....
Priest, L. L., Anthony.
Pillans, L. H Ocala
Phillips, Morris, Ocala......
Priest, Walter A., Ocala....
Rogers, C. H., Lynne..... ..
Rheinauer, Mrs. C Ocala. .
Rheinauer & Co., Ocala.....

50.00
50.00
50.00
50.00
250.00
200.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
50.00
100.00

35,000.00

50.00
6000.00
50.00
500.00
100.00
50.00
500.00
200.00
2000.00
5000.00

Rilea, W. W., Ocala 500.00
Rentz, Geo. P.. Ocala....... 50.00
Roberts, Ida L., Ocala 50.00
Rou, Mrs. Esther, Lowell.... 500.00
Rou, E. D., Lowell. 500.00
Seivers, A., Lowell 50.00
Scott, Mrs. G. S., Ocala.... 500.00
Simmons, Raiford, Ocala. .. .10,000.00
Sandifer, Miss Inez, Ocala.. 50.00
Swain, E. H, Ocala. 50.00
Sumner, R. L., Belleview. ... 100.00
Smith, Jas. M, Ocala....... 100.00
Sims, E. C, Anthony 150.00
Simmons, A. J., Ocala 100.00
Swain, Chas. V., Ocala..... 50.00

Scott, G. S., Ocala... 1000.00
Stokes, H. D, Ocala .... 250.00
Short ridge, R. S, Ocala 1000.00
TenEyck, Mrs. G. Ocala.... 50.00
Turner, Geo. D.. Ocala. ..... 100.00

: Thompson, Mrs. M. R, Ocala 800.00

PATRIOTIC ADDRESS AT
KENDRICK THIS EVENING

Mrs. Lillian B. Fulton of Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, a talented and brilliant speaker,
will speak at the Methodist church at
Kendrick Tuesday night, Oct. 8th, at
8:30 o'clock, under the auspices of the
W.. C. T. U. Her subject, "Destroy
the Nation's Enemy," is a nation nationwide
wide nationwide thought now and I am sure you
will all enjoy Mrs. Fulton. Every one
is cordially invited.
The W. C. T. U. will hold a busi business
ness business meeting Tuesday afternoon, at
3 o'clock. All members are urgently
requested to come. Visitors are al always
ways always welcome. Mrs. Edwin Lyles,
. Press Reporter.
BUY LIBERTY BONDS
SUGGESTIONS TO FARMERS

The writer attended the meeting of
county farm demonstration agents
last week at Gainesville and partici participated
pated participated in the discussion of farming
and the growing of live stock along
with many other subjects, which were
very instructive, and came home with
some good suggestions to offer our
farmers of Marion county.
One of these was the boll weevil
and how to combat with it that Wfc
may escape or lessen its damage to
our next year's crop. The best and
surest way to our notion is to cut the
stalks this month and rake them in

piles and as soon as they are dry

enough to burn, set fire to them and
burn them up. By doing this you will
destroy a large amount of both the
weevil and its eggs. r
Another suggestion was the pre preparation
paration preparation of your land for the spring
crops. This should be done by break breaking
ing breaking your land early this fall and turn turning
ing turning under all vegetable matter, such
as weeds and other crops that go to
make "humus in your soil. This will
give sufficient time for decay and
add largely to your fertilizer for the
coming crop.
We also suggest a cover crop on
your land to prevent leaching thru
the winter months, and by this means
retain much of the fertility of the
soiL In case you have no cover crop
on your land and. have plowed under
all weeds and other vegetation, leave
the ground rough; 'do not disk or
drag it, as it will pack and will not
work as good as to leave in a rough
condition until you are ready to re re-break
break re-break it for your spring planting.
Respectfully, H. Blackburn,
County Farm Demonstration Agent.
BUY LIBERTY BONDS
LIKES THE EXPRESSION

Editor Star: In my youth I read
many and harrowing tales of the sea.
Especially attractive to me were the
narratives of our own navy and the
exploits of the old American ship shippers
pers shippers and their hard-fisted mates and
gallant crews of the American clipper
ships engaged in the China trade. The
exclamation "Carrying on!" which
see occasionally in the dispatches,
used by our Americans boys or
some of our hard pressed allies,
recalls the origin of the expression,
which originated with the clipper
ship skippers, who would out-sail any
other seamen in the world and one of
whom would never take in canvas till
it meant the certain loss of some of
his sticks, or at least, smaller sails,
unless he immediately did so. Sailors
in every port on the seven seas knew
these American sailors and that they
would "carry on" till the devil him himself
self himself would be busy furling their sails.
E Pluribns Unanimous.
Turnipseed, J. E Ocala..... 100.00
Wartmann. H. A Citra..... 100.00

j Wartmann, Mrs. L. H, Citra 200.00

Wartmann, Baby, Citra 100.00
Wartmann, R. K, Citra..... 100.00
Wartmann, Mrs. E. L., Citra. 500.00
Wartmann, E. L., Citra ..... 1000.00
BUY LIBERTY BONDS
A nice lot of Salt Water Fish jnst
in at Main Street Market. Phone 1C3.



OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1918

OCALA EVENING STAR

Pa b 1 1 bed Ever? Dy Except Sunday fcy
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY
OF OCALA, FLA.

It. R. 'Carroll, Pretddeat
P. V. Learcasood, Seerctary.Treaaarer
J. H. Deajamla, Editor
TELEPHONES
Bualae Offle .Flva-Oae
Editorial Department Two-t
eietyt Editor ...... Five, Dooble-Oae
Entered at Ocala, Fla,, ostofflce aa
iecond-class matter.
MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
f ha Associated Press is exclusively
entitled for the use for republication of
all news dispatches credited to it or
ijt otherwise credited In this paper
and also the local news published
herein. All rights of republication of
special dispatches herein are also re reserved.

ADVERTISING RATES

DlMplayt Plate 10c. per inch for con consecutive
secutive consecutive insertions. Alternate inser insertions
tions insertions 25 per cent, additional. Cotrapoai Cotrapoai-tlon
tlon Cotrapoai-tlon charged on ads. that run less than
iX times So. per inch. Special position
20 per cent, additional. Rates based on
4-lnch minimum. Less than four inches
will' take higher rate, which will be
furnished on application.
Reading Notice i 5c. per line for first
insertion; 2c. per line for each subse subsequent
quent subsequent insertion. One change a week
allowed on readers without extra oora oora-oosltlor
oosltlor oora-oosltlor charges.
Legal advertisements at legal rates,
Electros must be 'mounted, or charge
will be made for mounting.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES

- Doaaeatle
One year, in advance, ...... -...,$5.00
Six months. In advance 2.50
Three months, in advance..,.,... 1.25
One month, In advance. .50
Forlara
One year, in advance. ........... .$8.00
Six months, in advance. 4.25
hree. months., in advance 2.25

One month, in advance .SO

II, the Allies refuse to talk peace
and go on fighting, the Germans will
take any old terms before Christmas.
BUY LIBERTY BONDS
We have not met anybody in Ocala

who wants peace except on whatever

terms the Allies see fit to give their
enemies. ;
BUY LIBERTY BONDS
The French will rebuild ruined
Rheims a hundred years sooner than
the Germans will rebuild their ruined
reputations. : -
- BUY LIBERTY, BONDS
Germany, like America, is trying to
float a war loan, but it has become
waterlogged before it left the dock.
We must make ours swim like a flag flagship.
ship. flagship. -. --
i-BUY LIBERTY BONDS
Today we present, to you another
argument from our friend Mr., Brin-
I t U A.

son, asUJ wny you sauua. mx yuur yuur-selves
selves yuur-selves some more. Tomorrow we will
make Mr. Brinson's eff ort look like
a last year's bird's nest.

i
The word conservation has been
used so regularly the last two years
that our linotype operator mechan mechanically
ically mechanically and involuntarily substitutes it
for conversation. As it would be a
good idea to apply conservation to
conversation, his error is not griev-

BUY LIBERTY BONDS -
The Tampa Times will put a gold
star on its service flag. Marion Leroy
Perritt, a brave boy who went from
its stereotyping room into the serv service,
ice, service, died of pneumonia the other day
in France.

The St. Petersburg Independent
mourns the death of Ed. Hall, one of
its ydung reporters who left his desk
in that office to go into the army. He
died in one of the training camps, and
the' Independent pays him a fitting
tribute.
'p BUY LIBERTY BONDS
Those two' wide-awake and patriot
ic papers the Tampa Tribune and the
Miami Herald, have been beseeching
the 'people of Florida to wake tip and
follow the example of Alabama in
taxing themselves some more for
school purposes. It seems to the Star
that it was high time for Alabama to
wake the percentage of illiteracy in
that state is two to one compared
with Florida.
BUY LIBERTY BONDS
If the Allies offer terms that will
secure the people of Germany and
Austria in their lives and property
(and of course they will offer no less)
and their governments do not accept,
there" will be revolutions in both
countries before the winter is over
The people mostly have lost their in interest
terest interest in plans of empire and

"spheres of influence." They want
bread and meat and peace.
'1 BUY LIBERTY BONDS
Among the patriotic purchasers of
liberty bonds is Ruth, the six-year-old
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. D.
Watson, living just west of the city.
Ruth's brother, Otis Watson, who is
now in France with the 337th Divis Division
ion Division Butcher Company, before his de departure
parture departure for the war, gave" Ruth sev several
eral several head of pigs. She has sold a
part of them and purchased a liberty
bond with the proceeds, and -will
within the next few months self more
and devote the money to the same

cause eitner tor oonas or inmi
stamps. An army backed by such
loyalty will never suffer defeat.
BUY LIBERTY BONDS
Superintendent Brinson inquires of
us what shall.be done in the case of
a community where the schoolhouse
is about to fall down from age, or is
overcrowded. We don't think there
are enough such schoolhouses in the
state to warrant increasing the school
tax forty per cent. There are in Mar

ion county and the state at large a
number of perfectly good churches,
all of which are shut up six days in
the week. It's the Star's opinion that
patriotic church members' would let

their churches be used to help out the

schools for a year or two. But we
have found that any suggestion we
make toward saving the people mon

ey is scouted by Mr. Brinson and the
teachercraft. Like Shylock, they want

their pound of flesh and will look at

nothing else.

- BUY LIBERTY BONDS
PRESIDENT WILSON'S
, TERMS OF PEACE

In an address to Congress January
8th last, President Wilson outlined
fourteen points as comprising the
American program for world peace.
The points were:
Open covenants of peace.
Freedom of navigation upon the

seas. ' :
Establishment of equal trade condi conditions
tions conditions among nations consenting to the
peace.
; Reduction of armaments.
Impartial adjustment of colonial
claims.
The evacuation of all Russian ter territory
ritory territory and the erection of Russia into
a free nation.
The evacuation t and restoration of
Belgium.
The surrender of all French terri territory
tory territory .and the wrong of Alsace-Lorraine
to be righted. x
Readjustment of the frontiers of
Italy. '. '
The people of Austro-Hungaria to
have the freest opportunity of auto autonomous
nomous autonomous development.
Rumania, Serbia and Montenegro
to be evacuated and restored.
Nationalities under Turkish rule to

be secured of security of life, and the
Dardanelles to be free.
An independent Polish state to be
erected with access to the sea.
A general association of nations to
be formed to afford mutual guaran

tees of political independence and
territorial integrity. Y V
. BUY LIBERTY BONDS
In conversation with Dr. Peek, city
health officer, Monday night, we
learned that there were about a hun hundred
dred hundred cases of Spanish influenza in
Ocala, and the number would certain certainly
ly certainly increase. Dr. Peek says the best
policy is for thes people to take dare
of them selves, to go on with their
usual life and business,- and if they
find themselves afflicted 7 with the
diseaseto : immediately take treat treatment.'
ment.' treatment.' Spanish influenza is nothing
more than a bad cold and if properly
treated can be more quickly cured. He
does not think it good policy to shut
up the schools, churches and theaters,
or ; prohibit public meetings. The
school children particularly had bet better
ter better be in school, as they will be no
more exposed, and more tinder obser observation.
vation. observation. He cited the cases of children
last year who were sent home when
infected with measles, but met other
children oh the streets or at each
other's homes and spread the infec infection
tion infection all the more. It is the same with
grown-up people the authorities can
shut up churches and theaters and
prevent public meetings, hut they
can't prevent a bunch of citizens
meeting on the streets, or a bevy of
ladies lining up in a store or having
a talkfest at one of their homes. As
the doctor, came from Jacksonville
the other day, he noted, four men af afflicted
flicted afflicted with the disease on the train,
and a railway train is one of the most
fertile breeding places in the world
for germs." He says there is nothing
to do but let the disease run its
course, and if people will take medi medicine
cine medicine and, won't be scared it will, soon
pass. 'r:
. BUY LIBERTY BONDS
In his speech in New York ? last
month, starting the Liberty Loaiv
drive, Mr. Wilson said:
."We are all agreed that there can
be no peace obtained by any kind- of
bargain or compromise with the cen

tral empires because we have dealt

with them already and have se

them deal with other government's

that were parties to this struggle it
Brest-Litovsk and Bucharest. They
have convinced us that they are
without honor and do not intend jus

tice. They observe no covenants, ac

cept no principle but force and their
own interest. We cannot 'come to
terms' with them. They have made
it impossible. The German people
must by this time be fully aware
that we cannot accept the word of
those who forced this war upon us.
We do not think the same thoughts

or speak the same language of agree

ment. It is of capital importance that
we should also be explicitly agreed
that no peace shall be obtained by

any kind of compromise or abatement

of the principles we have avowed as

the principles for which we are fight

ing.' There should exist no doubt

about that."

The American people will be great greatly
ly greatly disappointed in Mr. Wilson if he
does not stick to the foregoing sentiments.

tions. The population of Thrace is J
largely Bulgarian and the population'
of the part of Asia Minor proposed tt
be given to Greec has been principal-!
ly Greek for three thousand years.
To increase Serbia and Rumania by
adding to them their relatives in
Transylvania and Slavonia is exactly'

m line witn Mr. Wilson's proposi- j
tions. Look before you leap, or rather

before you write, Friend Times.
BUY LIBERTY BONDS
OBTAINING MONEY FOR
l SCHOOL EQUIPMENT

The editor of the Star hasn't much
time to solicit funds, but he picked up

a few more bones for high school mil military
itary military equipment yesterday evening
and this morning. As will be seen by
the following, the list is growing. If
lyou feel like contributing, don't leave
tit to the old man to run you down,
but him up. Next to the pawnbroker,
; he is the easiest man in town to find.
Following is the list:

BUY LIBERTY BONDS

The Ocala Star talks of settling the
Balkan question by "giving and tak taking"
ing" taking" territory by and from the var various
ious various little nations. The Star has
probably forgotten President Wil Wilson's
son's Wilson's principle of "self -determination
of peoples." St. Petersburg Times.
We are afraid the j Times hasn't
read either the Star, history or Pres President
ident President Wilson closely. As America is
not at war with Bulgaria or Turkey,
it can't interfere with Great Britain,
France, Serbia and Greece in the
terms they propose to give those na-

Geo. G. Chambers, Military
structor High School
J. H. Benjamin ...........
Baxter Cam
Marcus Frank ............
J. Malever ...............
H. M. Hampton
A. E. Gerig ..............

C. K. Sage

Mrs. Susan Ellis
Charles 'Peyser
W. F. Blesch
J. W. Crosby .
C. C. Balkcom ...
T. W. Troxler
Cash .. ........
Cash ........
J. J. Blalock ...
O. E. Cox ......
Ben Rheinau er
J. W. Tally
Sid Whaley ....
J. J. Gerig
Cash .......

H. S. Minshall

A. Slott
B. Max Wilson
N. L. Williams
Hayes & Guynn
Cash
Mrs. J. G. Swaim
R. E. Layton ...
Nasri Bros. .....
Banner . ......
B. Goldman
E. C. Jordan ....
W. W. C. Smith
W. O. Russell ...
H. W. Tucker ...
L. J. Knight v.:

F. K. Demetree
Lester Perkins

David S. Williams .........
New Names
B. F. Condon .............
A. E. Burnett ...............
M. : A. TenEyck
W. B. Gallagher
L. N. Green
Henry Livingston .......,.,
Dr. S. H. Blitch .............
Clarence Camp i . .
R. S. Hall .......v..,
- BUY LIBERTY BONDS
OVER THE TOP

a i

In In-....$L00
....$L00 In-....$L00 1.00
. . 1.00
.... 2.00
.... 1.00
.... 1.00
1.00
.... 1.00
.... .50
....1.00
.... .50
.... 1.00

1.00
.50
.25
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
.25
.5p
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
.50
.50
.25
25
1.00
1.00"
1.00
1.00
.50
.50
5
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

1.00
1.00
.50
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00

mm m"M

Boy scouts are proving highly suc successful
cessful successful assistants to agriculturists
who are experiencing labor shortage.

A nice lot of Salt Water Fish just
in at Main Street Market. Phone 108.

DAVIS' CARRIAGE PAINTS
are colors ground in cough, elastic
Coach Varnish and one coat will make
your faded automobile or carriage
look like new.' They are easy to ap apply
ply apply and dry with a strong, high gloss gloss-clinching
clinching gloss-clinching Enamel finish. Made for
wear and tea. r 2-8
For Sale By
THE MARION HARDWARE CO..
Ocala, Florida

How Much WouM the
: KAISER -Taw
Your- Business?-
Think this thought twice over: "If we should
fail to win this war what would happen to my business?"
What is left of business in the invaded districts
of France and Belgium? What will be left of business here,
if we fail to crush the sinister pawer of Prussian militar militarism?
ism? militarism? How much, would you have left after paying the
taxes ahd levies imposed by a victorious Germany?
Defend Yourself With
LIBERTY BONDS
This is not only a war for Democracy and Liberty,
but a war of self-defense. Germany menaces our rights, our
self-respect, our homes, and our means of livelihood. x
Every citizen every business man has weapons
of defense reiady to his hand. These weapons are Liberty
Bonds. We cannot all fight with guns and bayonets but we
can all fight with Liberty bonds.
Buy to Your Utmost
Of course you have bought Liberty Bonds. Every
one has. But how many more will you buy ? The success
of the Fourth Loan arid of the war itself depends on your
answer to that question.
Buy all the bonds you can. Go to your bank and
make your arrangements. Buy more than you ever thought
you could buy.
Buy to Your Utmost
Thia Spstt Contributed to Winning tks War By --

Wc Wo TWLHRI(S9

Help your country ,help the bariks
in their voluntary work of getting in
subscriptions to the Liberty Loan,
help patriotic women who have walk walked
ed walked around town getting pledges. Each
one of you who have made a pledge
to buy bonds call at once at your
bank, make applications and pay first

Pledges amount to no no-the
the no-the first installment is

We want to keep the work

cleaned up as much as possible
as we go along. We have but eleven

working days left so get busy.

installment

thing

paid

THE CCnStlERCIAL BANK
THE OCALA NATIONAL DANK
THE P.1UNROE & CHLr.IBUSS NATIONAL JJANK

Read the Star Want Ads. It pays



OCALA EVENING STAB, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1918

GOOD TOGS TO EAT
Urs. Kidd's Pin-Honey Pickles
Deiaz Sweet Mustard Pickles
Ueiaz Mushroom Ketchnp
neinz Walnut Ketchup
neinz Beefsteak Sauce
Welch Grape Juice, pints & qts.

Cllcqcet Ginger Ale
Loganberry Juice
Grapefruit Juice
Apple Juice
Royal Salad Dressing
Pcmpeian Olive Russian Sauce
Howards Salad Dressiog
. Durkee Salad Dressing
Premier Salad Dressing
Royal Tarter Sauce
Sandwich Olives
Ripe Olives
0U. TEAPOT
GROCERY.
PHONE 16 and 174
ORDER TODAY PRICES WILL
ADVANCE
Salt Fish
Delicious' fresh iio"ht: RnlfeH TTJeh
direct to the consumer by prepaid
express, 20 pounds for $2.00.
Fresh Salted Roe, 20 cts. per pound.
The St. George Co., Inc.
St. George "On the Gulf,"
APALACIIICOLA, FLA.
: YOU CALL A DOCTOR
' . Because v Z
HE IS A GOOD DOCTOR
: SEND DIS PRESCRIPTIONS :
To The
: COURT PHARMACY :
Z For the Same Reason 1
IMvev & MacKay
UNDERTAKERS and EMDALMERS
PHONES 47. 104305
OCALA, FLORIDA
w. DR. IL J. IYFIF1F
S!52$$fc EYESIGHT 1
OPTOMETRIST
i aim u OPTICIAN
The greatest menace to a woman's
beauty is that of eyestrain.
WIth Welhe col. ?eweie
Phone 25 South side of Square
We Are Buying
: COTTON
And Pay the Highest
CASH PRICE
: SMITH &PILANS
v AT SMITH GROCERY CO.
OCALA,
FLORIDA.
IF
IS Till
, USE SAGE TEA
Kere's Grandmother's Recipe to
Darken and Beautify
Faded Hair.
That beautiful, even shade of dark,
glossy hair can only be had by brewing
a mixture of Sage Tea and Sulphur.
Your hair is your charm. It makes or
( mars the face. When it fades, turns
gray or streaked, just an application or
two of Sage and Sulphur enhances its
appearance a hundredfold.
Don't bother to prepare the mixture;
you can get this famous old recipe im improved
proved improved by the addition of other ingredi ingredients
ents ingredients for 50 cents a large bottle, all ready
for use.'. It is called Wyeth's Sage and
Sulphur Compound. This can always be
depended upon to bring back the natural
color and lustre of your hair.
Everybody uses ''Wyeth's" Sage and
8ulphar Compound now because it dark darkens
ens darkens so naturally and evenly that nobody
can tell it has been applied. You simply
dampen a sponge or soft brush with it
and draw this through the hair, taking
one small strand at a time; by morning
the gray hair has disappeared, and after
another application it becomes beauti beautifully
fully beautifully dark and appears glossy and lus lustrous;'
trous;' lustrous;' This ready-to-use preparation is
a delightful toilet requiste for those who
desire dark hair and a youthful appear appearance.
ance. appearance. It is not intended for the cure,
mitigation or prevention of disease. &
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER
AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Con Contract
tract Contract work. Give? More and Better
Wbrk for' the" Money than any other
contractor in the city.

M

6

BRAY

OCM SOCIAL AFFAIRS

If You Hare Any News for this De Department,
partment, Department, Call Five Double-One
or Two-Seven
Over Here and Over There
The same bright rosy mornings (break
And smile thru dripping sun-kissed
tears,
The same glad, golden days partake
Of joy and grief, and hopes and
Y fears. -The
same sweet songs are sung anew
From swinging vine and budding
trees;
The same white clouds in arch of blue
Are scattered by the perfumed
breeze.
The same sun sinks, the same soft
light
Is idly hanging o'er the door;
The same gray shadows fall at night,
And slowly creep across the floor.
The spirit of the wood descends,
And wraps us in its mystic spell;
While eacn weird, trailing shadow
bends,
And softly whispers, "All is well."
Then, soulful silences abound,
And soft, sweet voices croon and
- call;
The same peace hovers all around,
The same God watches over all.
The same God watches over there,
As armies of the foe advance;
The same sun shines with steady
glare,
And warms the battle fields of
. France.
The spirit of the wood has fled,
Weird, trailing shadows quiv'ring
lie;- ." ' V..1 V"
And though night's same sweet tears
are shed,
She weeps for those who soon must
die! :
Sweet, soulful silences no more
Abound, no crooning; voices call;
But in each bloody battle's roar,
The same God watches oyer all.
He, by his sacred altar stands
And fans it with his holy .breath; -While
white-robed peace, with out outstretched
stretched outstretched hands, v
Begs for the sacrifice of death!
Peace, holy priestess, pitying bends,
As she demands the precious price;
From thund'ring skies the fire de-
scends, ,
And God accepts our sacrifice.
; ; v Luella P. Knott.
The talented author of the above
lines was a Marion county girl and
is one of Florida's best and brightest
women.
m
Notice, Tastern Star
The school of instruction to be held
in Ocala Thursday, Oct. 10th, at the
Masonic hall by the grand matron,
Mrs. Corrie W. Harris of Tampa, has
been postponed, but1 Ocala Chapter,
No. 29, O. E. S., will hold a regular
meeting on that date, at 7:30 p. m.
Mrs. Alice Yonce, W. M.
.
Robbinson-Wilson
A marriage license was. issued
Monday morning by Judge V B. D.
Hiers of Gainesville to Mr. Benjamin
F. Robbinson and Miss Frances L.
Wilson, both popular young ; people
living near Ocala, Mr. Robbinson is
a son of Mr. J acob D. Robbinson, and
is a splendid young man, and his
pretty bride is one of Oak's most pop popular
ular popular young ladies. Mr. and Mrs.
Robbinson have the best wishes of
their many friends.
;;- -.,-; ,mV". ty i
Mrs. Walker, formerly Miss Edna
Smith of this city, and littele son are
here from their home in Jacksonville
on a visit to Mrs. Walker's mother.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Rembert, who
have been guests of Mrs. Rembert's
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Cappleman
since Saturday, returned to their j
nome m dacKsonvme toaay, making
the trip in their car. Mrs. Rembert
will be pleasantly remembered here
by many girlhood friends as Miss
Addie Cappleman, and she is always
warmly welcomed on her frequent
visits to this city.
: : e
Mr. and Mrs. Frasier and children,
new residents in Ocala from Daytona,
are now pleasantly located at Mrs.
Belle Mershon's residence on Fort
King avenue. Mr. Frasier has charge
of the dry goods department at
Rheinauer's.
........ m 0. m :
Mrs. Wallace O. Stovall left Friday
night for Charleston, S. C, where she
will visit her husband, who is station
ed at the naval training 'school there.
Tampa Tribune.
Capt. Ira F. Bennett, who is sta
tioned in Washington, is enjoying a
few days furlough and has joined Ms
wife at the home of his parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Frank' I. Bennett in Chi
cago. .
Mrs. James Carlisle and son arriv
ed today from her home in Dunnellon,
and will be guests for several days of
Mrs. Carlisle's sister, Mrs. Albert
Davis.
Dr. R. C. Dobson, a noted war work worker
er worker of Miami, is in the city today con conferring
ferring conferring with Rev. J. R. Herndon, dis district
trict district director for the Y. M. C A.' war
work council, and his committee, in
regard to the campaign which will be
started as eariy as possible after the
drive for the fourth liberty loan, has
terminated.
The state woman's liberty loan
committee held a splendid meeting, in
this city today. Miss Katherine
Ridgeway, a prominent woman speak speaker,
er, speaker, was on the program, as was Maj.
A. E. Lowery, of the British army.
Plans for this meeting under the
auspices of the woman's liberty loan
committee, rMs. B. H. Seymour chair chairman,
man, chairman, were splendidly arranged, and
these eloquent speakers presented

the duties and privileges of the
fourth liberty loan in a most interest interest-in
in interest-in cr mumn&r TViia Irwnlit v tVn-nn cr

its woman's committee and with thej
committee, onerea an entnusiastic
welcome, as proof of their apprecia appreciation
tion appreciation and patriotism.
.....
Suitcase Shower for Miss Campbell
Mrs. J. R. Moorhead and Miss Mary
McDowell were hostesses yesterday
afternoon at one of the most pleasant
informal parties given by the young
women of the embroidery circle of the
Presbyterian church, especially in
honor of one of their most valued
members, Miss Alice Campbell, whose
marriage is an event of much .pleas .pleasurable
urable .pleasurable interest in the near future.
The guests on this occasion included
only the members of the sewing cir circle.
cle. circle. After an hour of pleasant social
conversation, the bride-elect, who had
been asked to "come to this meeting
to help plan the winter's work," re re-ceivedperhaps
ceivedperhaps re-ceivedperhaps one of the 'happiest
little surprises of her life, as Mrs.
Herndon and Miss McDowell entered
the living room bearing between
them a big h.eart-shaped basket, tied
with pink ribbons and decorated with
pink .vine and star jessamine, which
they placed at the feet of the hon hon-oree.
oree. hon-oree. Miss Campbell unclasped the
cover and with delighted surprise
viewed the wonderful contents, in the
presence of her friends, to whom she
is so devoted and whose hearts are
so firmly entwined about her. The
gifts were beautiful, simple and ap appropriate
propriate appropriate and will fill Miss Camp Campbell's
bell's Campbell's suitcase when on her wedding
journey -.
After the lovely tokens of affec affection
tion affection had been duly admired by he
recipient and the donors, Mrs. Hern Herndon
don Herndon and Miss McDowell served 'their
guests a delicious lunch of tomato
aspic, white and brown bread sand sandwiches,
wiches, sandwiches, crackers and iced tea, which
brought to a successful close an aft afternoon
ernoon afternoon of great pleasure which was
only marred 'by the thought that th
circle is soo nto part with a member
whose place will be hard to fill, and
who it is their delight to honor, she
having filled faithfully every trust
reposed in her. Miss Campbell has
for years held office in the missionary
society and is one of the most active
workers in the church along all of its
lines.
m m
Family Reunion
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Burgess were
hostesses at a most delightful spend
the day party Sunday but which was
in reality a family reunion. This
pleasant event was planned and car carried
ried carried out especialy in honor of the
birthdays of the hostess and her
brother, Mr. J. S. McAteer. All the
family connections were present and
the day was one of innumerable
pleasures. A most delicious luncheon
was. served at the noon hour in the
family dining room, the guests being
seated at a beautifully appointed
table; which had been transformed
into a bower of loveliness, with its
quantities of roses, and with its
cut glass, silver and dainty china, it
was truly very beautiful. Places
were laid for twelve and full justice
was done to the course dinner that
was so perfectly served by Mrs. Bur Burgess
gess Burgess and her assistants. The menu
consisted of fruit cocktail, roasted
turkey, broiled chicken, Spanish spa spaghetti,
ghetti, spaghetti, creamed potatoes garnished
with parsley, succotash, Waldorf
salad on lettuce with mayonaise,
olives, pickles, Spanish cream served
with whipped cream, cherries and
cake. -' ; ; :,
Saturday is liberty loan day in
Ocala and will be fittingly celebrated,
although plans for, the day have not
yet been formulated, t v
Union Bible study class of second
ward meets with Mrs. Batts on South
Watula street Wednesday at 4 p. m.
(Concluded on Fourth Page)
BUT LIBERTY BONDS
NOTICE TO REGISTRANTS
The legal advisory board will hold
its meetings in the jury room of the
postoffice building each day until the
work is completed, except national
holidays and Sundays, from 9 a. m.
until noon. and. .from 2 p. m. until
5:30 p. m. to render assistance to
registrants in making out their ques questionnaires.
tionnaires. questionnaires. It is especially urged that
registrants needing assistance should
carefully study their questionnaires
before coming for aid, and that they
be fully prepared with all data to en enable
able enable them to answer the questions in
telligently and speedily. By comply
ing with this request the work can be
expeditiously performed "' without the
consumption of unnecessary time. Do
not ask for assistance unless needed.
Legal Advisory Board,
By R. A. Burford, Chairman.
BUT LIBERTY BONDS
Your physician puts all his knowl knowledge,
edge, knowledge, skill and experience at work
when he writes your prescription; so
do we when we fill that prescription.
G. C. Green & Co., phone 424. tf
' m Have Your
HEMSTITCHING
AND
;;. PICOT EDGE WORK
Done at
THE HEMSTITICiER
Ocala, Florida
Between Peyser's Store and the Hfir
rington Hall Lunch Room
1

DEMOCRACY'S PROBLEM
IS IN ITS SCHOOLS

By DR. CLAUDE H. VAN TYNB,
of th University of tttehlga.
EDITOR'S NOTE. Thm defects
our educational system poiated out by
lOr. Van True ar fh principal targets
at which tbo KftfioBAl Security
.League's great natioa-wid eaaspalsa
;of Tatrlotlam Through Education" U
'aimed.
Certain fundamental mrioaa tflt
als most be impressed upon the Amer American
ican American youth. The crista through which
this nation recently passed before it
could be brought to a whole-hearted
support at a war begun for the pur purpose
pose purpose ef preserving the meat vital prin principles
ciples principles upon which it wa founded has
aroused educators everywhere like a
fl re-ben In tae night, te understand
that we mast employ our educational
taacbinery more than we hate la the
past to imbue every American citizen
with a comprehension of democratic
principles.
If we can find some definite means
;f securing an understaBdlBg of demo demo-'
' demo-' era tic ideals, we may expect as a
result a patriotic zeal In defending
! them. If Americanism is a beUef in
i and a habit of supporting such ideals,
1 then we may hope that such a process
J will produce it
Opposing Theories.
The American's theory of the state
jle that It exists to protect him In the
lenjoypsent ef life, liberty and the pur pursuit
suit pursuit of happiness; that the Individual
la the important thing, not the state.
An opposing theory, and It happens to
be the German theory, Is that the state
la the Important thing, that to it
the individual owes everything, life
; rd liberty and even blind obedience
or orders to do cruel and brutal acts.
Why not teach that difference to boys
and girls instead ef mere dry facts
about the organs of government nod
their functions. Let ne not be so shy
and saodest about the virtues ef our
: political system. The Germans are
.not. Let us say frankly' that democ democracy
racy democracy implies a nation in. peace, that
j autocracy implies a nation la arms.
! We can teach frankly, too, that our
great principle ef local self -government
is wholly at conflict with the
; German ambitions for world-empire,
;ana wua ner wnoie tendency ez gov
ernment in provinces like Poland and
Tenon Too Little."
It la the spirit of our Inotltatlona
which we have failed to Impart te the
: rising generations. We have been
: afraid to state -that oar democratic
philosophy upholds the Christian spirit
I of brotherhood, asserts the wisdom
:of united action for the good, of all,
:aad seeks to save the weak from the
aggression of the strong. We have
i refrained from saying that the auto-
jcratic phBosophy operated to deaden
jthe sentiment of humanity; that In
(affairs of state it sneered at mercy
tand gentleness, at love and kind kind-iness
iness kind-iness ; that the foundation ; of that
phUoeophy was the stern law of
I the survival of the fittest; that, to
'be concrete, Belgium, a weak state.
had ne rights when she stood in tht
way of Germany, a big state.
r We have taught the American youth
tall too little about the foundations of
their liberty. The story of the blood
said suffering of the builders, of the
'tempest that raged them while they
; built, of the martyrs who were the
architects ef) those foundations. This
;hlstory has been too little told. Aato Aato-;erats
;erats Aato-;erats see to It' that their people are
Impressed with their rulers' virtues
:and those of their ancestors, bat de de-laaocraeles
laaocraeles de-laaocraeles leave their citizens to take
! their liberties as they do the air they
.breath. Republics are ungrateful only
cause were la noooay wnoae inter
est tt is to Inculcate that gratitude.
SERVICE AS DftOAD v
as the cq:,3:ity
Mi Cimn Community Service Pro
vides Numberless Intimate Com Comforts
forts Comforts For Soldiers
Club rooms for soldiers, entertain entertainments
ments entertainments for the boys In khaki, outings
fnr aAnvaJeacent .men back frcto
jTanoo. small, but appreciated aer-
Tlces to soldiers and their relativee
and friends these are some of the
manifold activities of the War Camp
Community Service.
The War Camp Community Ser-
Tiee comes close to the Intimate life
of the soldier and provides for his
mental as well as physical comfort
by furnishing the faculties which
make It possible for him to relax
from the strati of military training
and the preparation for oversea
lighting.
Its symbol is the red circle and its
activities are as unending as the cir circumference
cumference circumference of its insignia. Thou Thousands
sands Thousands of soldier boys take advantage
of its facilities and other thousands
of relatives and friends of the bov
In Uncle Sam's uniform are daily
benefited through 'its various ave avenues
nues avenues of effort.
Girl wanted at once at Music store.
BUY LIBERTY BONDS
MIRIAM REBEKAH LODGE NO. 15
Miriam Eebekah Lodge No. 15
meets the first and third Monday even
nings in each month in the Odd FeL
lows hall at 8 o'clock;
Clara Moremen, N. G.
Eloise Bouvier, Secretary.

SALT SPRINGS HOTEL
Now Open Under New Management
Comfortable Rooms and Good r.leals
Rates Reasonable
Good Hunting, Battling and Fisltfng
Write for Rates and Reservations jx
M0S. A. N. GALLANT, Prop.

e
e
A. HJ T O S
, Passenger
STATES
MOV
iocg sad Sbcrt Uanling
UNIVESITY 0F FLORIDA
' GaAeaville ':
Military Training Under Army Officers
Courses in Arts and Sciences, Ag
riculture. Chemical, Civil, Electric and
Mechanical Engineering, Law, Teach
ers' College.
Tuition Free. Send for Catalog.
A. A; MURPHREE, President
JACKSONVILLE,

S3.

In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in each 4 room. Dining room service is
second to none. ;
RATES From 10 per day per person to $6.
ROBERT M. MEYER, J. E. KAVANAUGH
Manager. Proprietor.

Gerig is giving away two cakes of
Palm Olive Toilet Soap with a fifty-
cent purchase of their goods. tf
PROTECT
YOURSELF
FROM
MOSQUITOES.
Slay the Pesky
Critters with
FENOLE
.
rtrn
nim
It's the simplest
thincr in the World
1 1 1 1 1 1
ml 'to KILL Mosquitoes!
with FENOLE; you
can spray several
rooms thoroughly In
less time than it
takes to say your,
prayers.
Qts. 75cl; Y2 Gala.'
$L35; Gala, $2J& -Sprayers:'
Pint size 65c, Quart
size," 75c.; Com.
Air Sprayers, $1.25 i
Feno!e- Chemical Co.
Mnnufacturers,
- Jacksonville, Fla.
r ; r.i it.
ri I I 1 1 tT"TIl r. .....
i'enole is sold in Ocala by Antl-
Mononoly Drusrtore, Clarkson Hard-
Co.. Ollie Jfordls. Tydlna-s Drug co.
The Court Pharmacy. Smith Grocery
Co.. Carn-Thomas Co H. B. Masters
Co.. Oos4a. Sss4 etore.
RED CROSS WAR FUND
Your attention is directed to your
patriotic pledge to the Red Cross War
Fond. The last payment is due and
payable October 1st. Kindly give
this your prompt attention if you
have not already done so, in order
that we can report all your pledges
one hundred percent paid.
Red Cross Finance Committee.

"

mui"' """" v'ltU.:

la I

:
ttrt

f o 1

- e
e
e

P. O. Address, Ocala, Fla.
E 1R. V E C E
and IBaggage
IMG
Storaac asd Padtisa
PHONE
2C3
FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE
for mum
Tallahassee
559 Students from 25 Florida Coun Counties
ties Counties and 17 States 1917-18. Total 851
including Summer School and Short
Course.
Write at once for Catakg.
EDWARD CONRADL, President
MOTEL
FLORIDA
NOTICE
This is to notify the creditors of the
Style Hat Shop that I have purchased
the interest of my partner, Laura N.
Luckie, and am assuming all indebt indebtedness
edness indebtedness of the Style Hat Shop.
' Rena Smith.
BUY LIBERTY BONDS
Prompt delivery of prescriptions is
the watchowrd here. Tell .vol physic physician
ian physician to leave them with us. We allow
no substitution. The Court Pharmacy.
Phone 284. tf
WHAT'S THE USE
hanging on to old-time, old-fogy hand hand-mixed
mixed hand-mixed Lead and Oil Paint that will
soon chalk off and discolor when you
can get .
a tnorougniy moaern, scienwuc mv-chine-made
Paint, that will outlast the
other, and cost you less money. 10
For Sale By
THE MARION HARDWARE CO,
Ocala. Florida
NOTICE
In the Circuit Court of the Fifth Ju Judicial
dicial Judicial Circuit of Florida, in and
for Marion County In Chancery.
Grace M. Edwards, Complainant, vs.'
' Peter Edwards, Defendant.
Order for Constructive Service.
It is ordered that the defendant
herein named, to-wit: Peter Edwards,
be and he is hereby required to ap appear
pear appear to the bill of complaint filed in
this cause on or before
Monday, the 21st day of October, 1918
It is further ordered that a copy of
this order be published once a week
for four consecutive weeks in the
Ocala Evening Star, a newspaper
published in said county andate.
This 16th day of Septemt iyi.
(aerie's Seal) P. H. N ,-nt,
Clerk Circuit Court, Marite County,
Florida. By Ruth Ervin, D. C.
Wm. A. Jeff coat, i
Complainant's Solicitor. 9-17-tuea



OGALA EVENING STAB, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1918

KHJ HIE

Mr. Reuben Blalock left last night
for High Springs, where he is em employed
ployed employed by the Coast Line.
BU Y U B ERTY BONDS
W. K. Lane, M. D., Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat, Law Library Building, Ocala, I
Florida. tf
BUY LIBERTY BONDS
Mrs. S. P. Hollinrake received this
morning the good news that her hus-
band had safely arrived in France. :
Mr. Hollinrake, being over draft age,
has elected to be one of the faithful
and necessary Y. M. C. A. workers. I
BUY LIBERTY BONDS
Go to Gerig's Drug Store and get;
two cakes of Palm Olive Soap FREE. ?
Ask about it. tf j
BUY LIBERTY BONDS
Mr. Clarence Camp climbed up into
our sanctum this morning to give us :
a dollar for high school military
equipment. We wish a few more of
you would come thou and do likewise.
We don't know whether we ever will
be able to buy another pair of shoes.
buy Liberty bonds ;
Our winter display of millinery i&
now ready for your inspection. Call ;
and se us. Style Hat Shop, Main )
street, Ocala. It j
buy liberty bonds j
, Dr. S. H. Blitch, who was in town
today, doesn't attend the Ocala high
school, but he handed over a dollar
for its military equipment.
BUY LIBERTY BONDS
No substitutes and no delay in our
prescription work. Let us serve you.
G. C. Green & Co., phone 424. tf
' BUY LIBERTY BONDS
As the Star goes to press, there is
a well attended meeting on the pub public
lic public square, listening to the addresses
of Major Lowry and Miss Ridgeway.
- BUY LIBERTY BONDS
Phone No. 451 is the American
Restaurant, Temple & Davis, proprie proprietors,
tors, proprietors, the best in the city, at the .union
passenger station. V 16-tf
BUY LIBERTY BONDS
The other day, J. R. Carnes, agent
for Georgia, Florida and Alabama of
the American LaFrance Company,
came thru Ocala, and examined the
big combination auto truck sold the
city by his company three years ago.
Today Fire Chief Chambers received
an official notification from Mr.
Cranes that the Ocala truck was the
best three-year-old machine in his
territory. He found it in excellent
order every way. His report was j
specially pleasing to the fire chief,
who gives that truck his own partic particular
ular particular attention.
BUY LIBERTY BQXlS
The pride of the Court Pharmacy is
its prescription department. Every
prescription is .carefully compounded
as ordered by your physician NO
ntmrtmrmiTmrAiT n tii rn t
ouoomuiiuw ai loweu. jr none
: BUY LIBERTY BONDS
Dr. D. M. Smith, who has been in
Chicago for some weeks, had one of
his eyes operated on a few days ago
by one of the leading specialists of
the country. It was a very delicate
operation, and the full result will not
be known for some days. No physic physic-ian
ian physic-ian in Florida has relieved more suf suffering
fering suffering nor been more faithful to his
patients than Dr. Smith. In his days
of waiting in the dark, he has. the
full sympathy of hundreds of friends
who hope he will soon return to them
cured.
i BUY LIBERTY BONDS-
A fifty-cent purchase of Palm Olive
toilet requisites at Gerigs' Drug
Store, entitles you to two cakes of
Palm Olive Soap FREE. tf
. BUY LIBERTY BONDS
Mrs. Gallant is spending a few
days in town attending to business
and brings fine reports from Salt
Springs of the success of her hotel
there. The hunting season is ap
proaching and she already has a full
house.' Miss Lily Gaskin of Orange
avenue, this city, who has been great
ly afflicted with rheumatism, has
been wonderfully benegted by the
salt baths, and the reputation of the
curative power of Salt Springs wa
ters is daily becoming more pro
nounced. Any one wishing to com
municate with Mrs. Gallant in regard
to obtaining board, will do well to do
. so at once.
MEETING OF VETERANS,
Marion uamp No. 56, U. C. V., met
October 8th, 1918, with Commander
McGahagm in the chair.
The following comrades answered
to rol call: Alfred Ayer, R. A. Carl
ton, J3. 1. Freyermuth, M. P. Frink.
W. E. McGahagin, J. W. Nance, C. C.
driest, G. R. Smith, J. 'C. Trantham
J. D. Williams, F. E. Harris and D
11. Irvine.
Minutes of last meeting read and
adopted.
Comrade McGahagin gave a A very
interesting account of his trip to
Tulsa,"and the royal manner in which
the old vets were entertained.
The following comrades were sent
tu the division reunion at Tallahassee
nameiy: r A. Harris. W. E. McGa
hagm, M. P. Frink, Alfred Ayer and
W. J. JPOlKS.
xno otner business the camp ad
journed. Alfred Ayer, Ad jt
; BUY LIBERTY BONDS
A nice lot of Salt Water Fish just
in at Main Street Market. Phone 108
BUY LIBERTY BONDS
Your physician puts all his knowl knowledge,
edge, knowledge, skill and experience at work
when he writes your prescription; so
do we when we fill that prescription.
G. C. Green & Co., phone 424. tf

DEFECTS SPELL
DEATH Itl FLYING
Psychological as Wei! as Physio Physiological
logical Physiological Factors Respon Responsible
sible Responsible for Accidents.

SCIENTISTS EXPLAIN TIIEI.l
"
Some of the Qualities That Give Amer-
leans Superiority in Air Over
Their Hun Opponents Tern-
perament Is Important.
New York. Considerable concern
has been expressed at the large num number
ber number of fatal accidents reported from
our American military and naval avia aviation
tion aviation training camps. Considering the
risks the novice necessarily takes and
the very special physiological and psy psychological
chological psychological factors that enter Into the
science of flying, these fatal accidents
are few in proportion to the number
of men undergoing training, and they
are not more numerous than those on
the training fields of Great Britain,
France and Italy.
A perfect knowledge of all the rules
of the game of flying will not save a
man who lacks confidence in himself
and Is inclined to hesitate, A half half-second
second half-second of indecision may be fatal. In
itiative, the snorting instinct and a
certain irresponsibility, qualities in
herent In American youth, have been
found of far greater value in the air
than the logical, scientific, severely
disciplined character of the Germans,
and account for the superiority of the
allied aviators in generaL 4
The most eminent of British scien
tists have devoted special study to the
psychological and physiological as
pects of flying.
one autnority says that good eye
sight, normal hearing, good "muscle
sense" and equilibration are indispen
sable qualifications. But most impor
tant of all is the right temperament
not an easy thing for a medical board
to examine. Of the types the imagi
native and the unimaginative the
imaginative youth is said to make the
better pilot if he can keep his imagi imagination
nation imagination under control.
Surgical Operations No Bar.
In the British air service previous
history of wounds and disease is thor thoroughly
oughly thoroughly investigated. Persistent head
aches, vertigo and easily induced fa
tigue are serious defects But some sometimes
times sometimes even a serious surgical opera
tion is not regarded as important.
Thus a doctor recently passed as fit
for flying a man who had quite a large
piece missing from the frontal regjpn
of the skull. It is much more impor important
tant important that a man should have both
arms intact than both legs. A clever
pilot who was killed on the western
front was Lord Lucas, who had an
artificial leg.
Considerable Importance is attached
to the respiratory system. In addition
to good, healthy lungs and vital capac
ity, the would-be pilot must pass a
breath-holding test This gives an In Indication
dication Indication of his capacity to stand the
strain of flying at high altitudes.
where the air is rarefied and breath
ing is difficult. No man with a weak
heart can hope to pass the tests.
Self-balancing is another test. The
candidate has to stand on one leg with
his eyes shut and his hands on his
hips. There is also the old test for
sobriety walking a straight line heel
to toe with eyes open and then turn turning
ing turning round and walking back without
losing balance. The importance of
this test can be understood, seeing
that an aviator flying in a dark cloud
or In a fog becomes unconscious of his
position and sometimes the machine
Is actually upside down. It is essen essential
tial essential that he should not lose a second
in recovering his balance.
The throat, nose and ear are care carefully
fully carefully examined, for any defects might
seriously handicap a man during the
great strain that all flying imposes.
With regard to the eyes, it is consid considered
ered considered that pilots should have perfect
color vision, in order to pick out the
color or marking of hostile machines,
and in recognizing signal lights and in
judging the nature of landing grounds.
Alr Sickness Rare.
A candidate who suffers from sea
sickness or train sickness would not
be rejected on those grounds alone.
Air sickness, caused by the rolling and
pitching of the airplane, is a very rare
complaint, and sickness usually occurs
immediately after landing.
An unstable nervous system suggest
ed by fidgety movements of the hands,
feet or face, or biting the nails is a
poor recommendation. ,-
Aero-neurosis is the name which Is
sometimes given to nervous troubles
brought about by the strain of flying.
It has been said that an airman's life
consists of "long spells of idleness
punctuated by moments of intense
fear." lie has to endure intense cold.
rain, wind and fog, the nerve-racking
noise of the engine, the antiaircraft
fire, and to loop, spin, dive or side sideslip,
slip, sideslip, apparently out of control, In or
der to deceive an opponent. An in interesting
teresting interesting nerve test has been devised
in France for selecting the best types
of alimen for fighting. Around his
chest Is a pneumograph, in his left
ha nd a trembler, and around two fin fingers
gers fingers of his right hand a pneumatic
"doigtier." Behind the candidate a
revolver shot' is fired or a magnesium
flare is set off, and a record of the
effect on his nerves is obtained by
means of stylets writing on a black
ened revolving cylinder.

II

A H If il

(Continued from Third Page)
Dr. Van Hood's Work Complimented
At the institute held at High
SDrines by the W. C. T. U. last
Thursday and Friday, the morning
session was taken up by a talk from
Mrs. Varney. She spoke of the lines
of war work that the W. C. T. U. is
interested in and then on child wel welfare
fare welfare and social service. A report of
the hospital at Ocala for crippled
children was read. The secretary
was instructed to send a letter of
thanks to Dr. E. Van Hood for his
wonderful work for the unfortunate
children of our state. Perhaps we who
are so near to this work do not ap
preciate just how much our Dr. E.
Van Hood has really given in time
and service to this work, which is
given out of sheer love of humanity,
nor of the immense amount of hu humanitarian
manitarian humanitarian work that is carried on
at the Marion County Hospital. The
care given to the crippled children of
the state, the moral and social uplift
that they receive, the kindness of the
nurses to their afflicted charges, the
many little social pleasures given by
the townspeople, the free entrance to
the picture show are small matters
m;the every day life of the great
working force of the world, but they
are matters of momentous impor
tance and bring lasting results, for
anything done toward making the
children of this generation stronger
and better fitted for the battle of life,
is a point scored for the good of the
future generations of our country.
Mrs. Edgar Mills-Price and chil children,
dren, children, Hope and John of Boston, who
have been spending the past two
weeks in Youngstown, Ohio, with
Mrs. Mills-Price's sister, Mrs. Don
aid Schreiber, will leave Youngstown
Friday of this week for Ocala, to
spend the winter with her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. G. K. Robinson.
Mrs. W. 3. Frink, formerly Miss
Bettie Ray Mclver of this city, who
has been seriously ill with malarial
lever at ner home m uardner, is 1
still "very sick and unable to be with
her mother, Mrs. Mclver during her
serious illness.
.
. Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Blalock and little
daughter, who have been making
their home with Mrs. Blalock's moth-
er
Mrs. Wallis. have moved to the
residence of Mrs. J. "W Fouth
Watula street for the winter..
on
Mrs. H. M. Hampton is enjoying a
visit from her sister, Mrs. H. B.
Mason of Inglis, formerly of Gaines
ville, who will remain in the city for
a fortnight or longer.
Mrs. Laura N. Luckie has taken the
position of bookkeeper and stenogra
pher in the Ford garage.
The Temple attraction last night
was wo Man's .Land." a story very
cleverly made over from a novel of
about four years ago. In changing
from the Atlantic to the Pacific and
substituting German spies and pirates
for smugglers, the picture people
made a clever success. Owing to
there being a seven-reel picture this
evening, the Pathe News was also
shown. The picture tonight, "To Hell
with' the Kaiser," is a big one, with
the atrocity of the Hun brought out
in glaring relief. It will hold every
body's interest, and everybody should
see it.
V BUY IJBERTY BONDS
WILL NOT CLOSE THE SCHOOLS
At a meeting of the local trustees
of the Ocala sub-school board, com
prising Messrs. John L. Edwards, C.
S. Cullen and Mrs. William Hocker,
together with Mayor Chace, Mr. D. E.
Mclver, president of the city council
and Dr. E. G. Peek, city health offi
cer, neid at l o'clock tnis morning,
the matter of closing the city schools
during the prevalence of influenza in
the city was discussed and it was de decided
cided decided not to close the schools unless
the disease should spread among the
teachers and cripple the faculty. The
board's main reason for this action
is that the children are being watch
ed carefully and sent home immed
iately if it is thought they are taking
influenza. The board thought that the
children were better off under the
supervision of competent teachers
than running loose on the streets.
BUY LIBERTY BONDS
FOUR-MINUTE MEN
The following citizens of Ocala
have been designated by the Liberty
Loan committee to serve as four four-minute
minute four-minute men,' during the campaign, at
the Temple theater, one each night,
at eight o'clock on the date preced
ing his name as appears below:
Oct. 8th : E. H. Martin.
Oct, 9th: Rev. J. R. Herndon.
Oct. 10th: D. S. Welch.
Oct. 11th: T. S. Trantham.
Oct. 14th: H. M. Hampton.
Oct. 15th: D. E. Mclver.
Oct. 16th: Judge W. S, Bullock.
Oct. 17th: John L. Edwards.
Oct. 18th: L. W. Duval.
By authority of Liberty Loan com committee
mittee committee of Marion county.
T. T. Munroe, Chairman.
BUY LIBERTY BONDS
WOODMEN OF THE WORLD
Fort King Camp No. 14 meets it
the K. of P. hall at 8 p. m. every
second and fourth Friday. Visiting
sovereigns are ailways welcome.
P.-W. Whitesides, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk

EASY TO WRITE WITH TOES

Assertion Made That "Accomplish "Accomplishment"
ment" "Accomplishment" Can Be Acquired in a Com Comparatively
paratively Comparatively Short Time,
When next you go to the 100, watch
the monkeys use their hands, suggests
the Popular Science Monthly. Notice j
how they seize things with their fists.
They do not use their finger-ends as
we do. While the higher monkeys.
such as gorillas and chimpanzees, may
be taught to use their fingers, they;
never learn to use them as easily as j
do human beings.
The monkey is primarily a tree-
dweller. It lives in forests and swings
from tree to tree, using its hands as
hooks with which It grasps the
branches. The thumb Is not brought
into play. Some South American mon monkeys
keys monkeys have lost the thumb through dis
use; all that is left of It is Indicated
by a little lump under the skin.
In the higher monkeys the wrist is
built like yours. It has the same num
ber of bones. But the monkey has
never used his wrist, and so it has lost
the flexibility. The monkey can use
his fist to better advantage than his
hands.
Man, on the other hand, has used his
feet so long simply for the purpose of
walking, that he would experience con
siderable difficulty in using them as
he uses his hands. Yet, It is amazing:
how quickly a man can learn to use
his toes as he does his fingers. If you
don't believe this, just try to write
with your toes. At first the letters
will be very large and awkward. -But
with a very little practice you will
find that you can write with your foot
mire easily than with your left hand.
If you are naturally right-handed. It
Is an attractive exercise with which
to while away an hour. We know you
will try the experiment.
LESSON WAS TOO REALISTIC
Class in First-Aid Work Promptly
Proved That "Nerve" Was a Thing
They Lacked.
A doctor of. a small town of central
Missouri was instructing a class of 30
enthusiastic young women in first-
aid work. :
The lesson for the evening was on
nerve, and he was endeavoring to en
lighten them as to Just what was
meant by "nerve," and how it was es
pecially necessary in the case of acci
dents. -T ;
The Instructor continued by saying
a distinguished physician had said that
'Nerve means you must be cool, you
must be very cool, you must be
cool."
Just as he finished this explanation.
a scream was heard outside, followed
by several pistol shots. The outer door
Into the basement of the town library.
where the class was being held, was
flung open. Two men, struggling to
gether, their clothes drenched in blood,
rolled down the steps into the room.
There were moans from the writhing
forms on the floor, but the class did
not hear them. They had flown, not
only to the outer door, but to a friend friendly
ly friendly shelter across the street.'
Nor, when the doctor went across to
them, and explained that the shooting
affray was only a sham one between
two college boys, which he was using 1
to illustrate his lecture, .would they re
turn.
They had completely lost their
'nerve," they explained, and .their
nerves were so shaken they must go
home at once, and go they did.
Training Little Children.
Children are so open-hearted and
ready and respond so sweetly and
quickly to faith and trust that we often
miss great happiness by not sharing
our hopes and joys more freely with
them.
If we keep the bond very close,' our
home will become the great meeting
place of all children, and this love and
companionship between parents and
children will be like a powerful mag magnet
net magnet whose attraction the children can cannot
not cannot resist.
So, from these beginnings the Lome
tie will be so strengthened that we
need never fear that the allurements
of the world can draw our children
from us,-but can rest assured that they
will always return to the "center of
deep repose
V Worms That Thrive on Ice.
F. E. Matthes of the United States
geological survey described some
strange vonas that abound on the low
er parts of the Mount Rainier glaciers.
They are dark brown, slender ana
about an inch in length. On favorable
days in July and August millions and
millions of them may be found writh writhing
ing writhing on the surface of the Ice, eyidently
breeding there and feeding on organic
matter blown upon the glacier in the
form of dust. "So essential to their
existence," says Mr. Matthes, "is the
chill of the Ice that they enter several
Inches, and sometimes many feet, be below
low below the surface on days when the sun
Is particularly hot, reappearing late
in the afternoon."
Real Purpose of the State.
The ultimate purpose of the state
is not to rule men, to keep them In
fear, to subject them to the will of
others, but, on the contrary, to allow
each as far as possible to live in se security,
curity, security, that is, to preserve for each
Wmcolf nr tn his nolirhhnr No. T re-
onfrtm.t. it hi i to
able the citizens to develop In security i
their bodies and their minds, freely to
employ their reason. The true end of
the state, therefore. Is liberty.
Soinosa.

How Can 1 Save Sugar on a
" 2 lb. Ration?

INSTEAD OF BREAKFAST
Fruit
Cereal
Coffee
Tea
1 Rounded Teaspoonful
2 Rounded Teaspoonful s
2 Rounded Teaspoonfuls
I
LUNCHEON
1 Rounded TeaSDOOnful

Other Dish 1 Rounded Teaspoonful a day for table use; or only one
Making 7 rounded teaspoonfuls a pound a month, leaving one pound
day; or over 4 pounds a month. for other uses, v
OCALA ICE AND PACKING COMPANY

RED CROSS WAR FUND
Your attention is directed to your
patriotic pledge to the Red Cross War
Fund. The last payment is due and
payable October 1st. Kindly gire
this your prompt attention if you
have not already done so, in order
that we can report all your pledges
one hundred percent paid.
Red Cross Finance Committee.
' BUY LIBERTY BONDS
BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS
Zane Grey.
Gene Stratton Porten
Riley's Poems 7 volumes.
Jack London.
Gerard's Book at 75c
Forty new titles at 65c.
Roy Scouts.
Rover Boys.
Ten new war books.
Bobsey Twins and
Several other Juveniles.
Just in at THE BOOK SHOP 3t
- BUY IJBERTY BONDS
NOTICE TO REGISTRANTS
The legal advisory board will hold
its meetings in the jury room of the
postoffice building each day until the
work is completed, -except national
holidays and Sundays, from 9 a. m.
until noon, and from 2 p. m. until
5:30 p. m., to render assistance to
registrants in making out their ques questionnaires.
tionnaires. questionnaires. It is especially urged that
registrants needing assistance should
carefully study their questionnaires
before coming for aid, and that they
be fully prepared with all data to en-
in.
expeditiously performed without the
consumption of unnecessary time. Do
not ask for assistance unless needed.
Legal Advisory Board,
By R A. Burf ord. Chairman.
; BUY LIBERTY BONDS
ARRIVAL. AND DEPARTURE
OF TRAINS AT OCALA
Seaboard Air Line, Northbound
No. 4: Arrives 1:15 p. m. Departs
1:30 p. m.
No. 16 (Limited): Arrives and De Departs
parts Departs 4:15 p. m.
No. -2: Arrives 1:50 a. m. Departs
1:55 a. m.
Seaboard Air Line, Southbound
No. 3: Arrives 1:10 p. m. Departs
1:30 p. m.
No. 15 (Limited): Arrives and de departs
parts departs 4:15 p. m.
No. 1: Arrives 1:45 a. m. Depart
1:50 a. m.
Atlantic Coast Line (Main Line)
Northbound
No. 10: Arrives and departs 5:42 a.
m.
No. 40: Arrives 1 p. m.. Departs
1:20 p. m.
No. 38: Arrives and departs 2:27
a. m.
Atlantic Coast Line (Main Line)
Southbound
No. 37: Arrives and departs 2:16
a. m.
No. 39: Arrives and departs 2:35
p. m. r
No. 9: Arrives and departs 9:03 p.m.
Atlantic Coast Line Branches, South Southbound
bound Southbound No. 151 (Sunny Jim): For Wilcox
Monday, Wednesday and Friday,
leaves b:lu a. m.
No. 35 (Sunny Jim): For Lakeland,
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday,
leaves 6:40 a, m.
No. 141: Daily except Sunday, ar arrives
rives arrives 10:50 a. m. from Wilcox.
No. 49: For Homosassa, leaves 2:25
p. m.
Atlantic Coast Line Branches, North North-.
. North-. . bound
No. 48: From Homosassa: Arrives
12:53 p. m.
No. 150 (Sunny Jim)? From Wil Wilcox,
cox, Wilcox, Monday, Wednesday and Friday,
arrives 5:45 p. m.
No. 32 (Sunny Jim): From Lake
land, Tuesday, Thursday and Satur
day, arrives 9:48 p. m.
No. 140: Daily except Sunday,
leaves 3:45 p. m. for Wilcox.
Oklawaha Valley Railroad
Train No. 71, first class passenger
and mixed, leaves Palatka at 6:30 a.
m. every Monday, Wednesday and
Friday, arriving at ucaia at 10:30 a.
nu, same days.
Train No. 72 leaves Ocala at 2 p,
m. Mondays, Wednesday and Fridays
Train No. 73 leaves Palatka Tues-
I08' Anursaay
and Saturdays at
and arrives in jfalatka at 5:50 p. m.
7:40 m- and onlv to Rodman,
at which place it arrives at 8:25.
Train No. 74 leaves Rodman at
4:30 p. m. Tuesdays, Thursday and
Saturdays and arrives at Palatka at
5:20 p. m. same days. Palatka News.

TRY BREAKFAST
No Sugar
No Sugar
I Rounded Teaspoonful
LUNCHEON

ruu.
rreal
aee
Tea I Level Teasnonnfnl
Makincr 1 U -T-rm-nHfv? tjn srtrtnn fills
UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
HATES: 61 line .naxlmum, n
time 25a; three times 50c; six time
75c.; one monti S. Payable In advance.
WANTED, LOST. FOUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS
'
FOR SALE CHEAP Horse, wagon
and harness, also wooden and steel
beam plows, axes, bush hooks, hoes,
rakes, pitchforks and other farming
tools. Health conditions make it im impossible
possible impossible for me to farm and must
sell at once. J. H. Hunter, at Gun Gun-shop,
shop, Gun-shop, Ocala, Fla. 8-6t
FOR SALE Two horsepower motor.
Used less than three months. If you
mean business address "Motor," care
Evening Star. 8-6t .-..
LOST Airedale puppy, male; an answers
swers answers to name of -"Pedro." Return to v
Harrington Hall hotel and receive re reward."
ward." reward." 1-tf
FOR RENT First floor, five rooms,
furnished, including parlor, reception
hall, bedroom, dining room, kitchen;
hot water, phone and other conven conveniences.
iences. conveniences. Mrs. Moremen, phone 298. 6t
FOR RENT Rooms furnished for
light housekeeping; also single fur furnished
nished furnished room. Phone 242, Mrs. A. M.
Perry. v 24-tf
'' cottage,
modern
cle ui. sooJ location, all
conveniences, very close
and high school houses,
H. Christian, city.
to primary
Apply to S.
14-tf
ROOMS FOR RENT At the Dormi-.
tory, furnished or unfurnished for
light housekeeping. "Half price to
over night lodgers. Hot and cold wa
ter. Roome large and airy; best venti ventilated
lated ventilated in town at lowest prices. Par-
ents, now is the time to arrange for.
residence, 703 S. Pond St, or phone
305. Mrs. C V. Roberts, new mat matron.
ron. matron. : eod
FOR RENT Immediate possession,
residence on Fort King avenue for formerly
merly formerly occupied by Mr. Hetrick. Ap Apply
ply Apply to Mrs. McDowell, next door
east. 99-tf
DRESSMAKING Mrs. S. C. M.
Thomas, 103 Watula street. tf
Let us supply your TOILET AR ARTICLES.
TICLES. ARTICLES. Our line is complete, and
the prices always reasonable. The
Court Pharmacy. Phone 284. tf
OCALA FRATERHAL ORDERS
MARION-DUNN MASON'C LODGE
Marion-Dunn Louge No. 19, F. &
A. M., meets on the firs? and. third
Thursday evenings 6f each month at
8 o'clock, until further notice. 5
Stephen Jewett, T7. 1L
Juke Brown, Secretary.
OCALA LODGE NO. 286. B. P. O. K."
and Protective Order of Ellcs, meets
the second and fourth Tuesday even evenings
ings evenings in each month. Visitir breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Club house oppo opposite
site opposite oostofilce, east side.
& W. Hunter, fc. R.
, iti. J. Crook. Secretarv.
KNIGHTS OF PtXtiiAS
Ocala Lodge hu. i. Conventions
held every Monday evening at 8
at the Castle Hall, over the James
Carlisle drugstore. A cordial welcome
to visiting brothers
Tl T T i 1 m
11. JD. JDcULWCI, J
CLs. K. Sam. K. of C S
Tulula Lodge No. 22, L O. O. F.,
meets every Tuesday evening in the
Odd Fellows' hall on the third floor of
the Star office building at 8 o'clock
promptl y. A warm welcome al way j
extended to visiting brothers.
L. IL Pillans, N. G.
M. M. Little, Secretary.
ORDER OF EASTERN STAR
Ocala Chapter, No. 29, O. E. S-f
meets at Yonge's hall the second and
fourth Thursday evenings of each
month at 8 o'clock.
Mrs. Alice Yonce, W. M.
Mrs. Susan Cook, Secretary.
R. A. M. CHAPTER NO. 13
iveguiar convocations 01 me vcal
Chapter No. 13, R. A. M on the
first Friday in every month at 8 p. a.
T A RaiivU. XI D
Jake Brown. Secretary.



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