The Ocala evening star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:07044

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Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
rv

EVEN

NO

JL'

Weather Forecast: Fair, except
probably showers south portion, and
cooler tonight except extreme north
portion; warmer Sunday.

M

Passed by America in Sending
Men to Europe

GREAT FORTRESS
OE METZ IS
PERNOR
Washington, Sept. 2L The em embarkation
barkation embarkation of soldiers for all fronts
over seas has now reached the million
and three-quarters mark, -Gen. March
announced today. He said that on the
Lorraine front, where Gen. Pershing's
army had completed the elimination
of the St. Mihiel salient, the stiua stiua-tion
tion stiua-tion has become stabilized with the
enemy hurriedly perfecting a new
line from Maizeray to Mozelle. At
Vandieres the Americans are ten
miles from Metz and an equal dis distance
tance distance from Conflans.
TEXANS IN PICARDY
Answering questions, Gen. March
said the Ninetieth division, composed
of Texas, Oklahoma national army
troops, is in Picardy. He explained
that the French are now within half
a mile of the junction of the Chemin-des-Dames
road with the road from
Maubeuge, and are within ten miles
of Laon, which is being shelled. 1,
FIRING ON THE GREAT HUN
FORTRESS
Washington, Sept. 21. The forts
of Metz, the German stronghold in
Lorraine, are under the fire of Amer American
ican American guns of nine-inch and larger
caliber, members of the. House mili military
tary military committee were told in their
conference with Acting Secretary
Crowell and other war department of
ficials yesterday.
The identity of the American troops
participating in the drive that wiped
out the St. Mihiel salient and brought
Metz within range of the heavy guns
has not been reported to the depart department
ment department by General Pershing. Produc
tion of liberty motors and ordnance,
particularly eight-inch howitzers, is
increasing, the officials said. Liberty
motors are now being used in tanks.
OF COURSE
Geneva, Friday, Sept. 20. "The
bombardment of Metz by American"
artillery caused surprise but no pan panic,"
ic," panic," said the Metzer Zeitung. The
Zeitung adds that a few persons were
killed and the material damage was
insignificant.
AN AMERICAN AIR FIGHTER
With the American Armies on the
Lorraine Front, Sept. 21. The shoot shooting
ing shooting down of two enemy balloons and
three airplanes in his recent patrol,
instead of two of each type, as has
been reported, is claimed by Lieut. F.
Luke, of Phoenix, Ariz. The de de-.
. de-. struction of the balloons has been
confirmed by scores of witnesses, who
saw them burning.
CASUALTY LIST CORRECTED
Washington, Sept. 21 Corrections
in the published army casualty lists
include previously reported missing,
now reported sick and in the hospital,
Private Jesse Lynch, Clinton, S. C;
previously reported missing, now re returned
turned returned to duty, Private Robert Ray,
Cowpens, S. C.; wounded severely,
previously reported missing, Private
Benjamin Kinnan, Millwood, Ga.
YELLOW PAINT MAY BE USED
If you have not done your part to towards
wards towards helping the Red Cross or in
buying Liberty Bonds or war savings
stamps, you had best do so at once.
This is just a simple and charitable
warning, for there will soon be
"something doing" in this commuity,
for we have a few we are glad to
say, very few slackers on these
Jines. The people who do their full
part have about reached the end of
their patience. Some yellow paint has
been bought and some signs will soon
be put up and other "decorations"
made.
MRS. MINNIE A. BOSTICK'S
Smart millinery line features all the
clever dominating models shown.
Harrington Hall corner. Phone 310.
GOSSARD s
Corsets and Biassiers new models.

M

THE FIRE OF
GUNS
ITS PASSAGE IS
S
In the House and the War Revenue
Bill Now Goes to the
Seriate -'
(Associated Press)
Washington, Sept. 21. The House
late yesterday passed the war reve revenue
nue revenue bill designed to raise by taxation
approximately $8,182,000,000 of the
twenty-four or more billions needed
by the nation for the current year.
The huge measure the largest of its
kind in the history of any nation
now goes to the Senate. C
Passage of the bill was unanimous.
A formal roll call, demanded by Ma Majority
jority Majority Leader Kitchin, recorded 350
yeas ond no nays, which, announced
by Speaker Clark, was greeted by a
mighty roar of cheers and applause.
PRESIDENT WILSON'S
TERMS OF PEACE
In an address to Congress January
8th last, President Wilson outlined
fourteen points as comprising the
American program for world peace.
The points were:
Open covenants of peace.
Freedom of navigation upon the
seasv V e "'.
. Establishment of equal trade condi conditions
tions conditions among nations consenting to
the peace.
Reduction of armaments.
Impartial adjustment of colonial
claims.
The evacuation of all Russian ter territory
ritory territory and the erection of Russia into
a free nation.
The evacuation and restoration of
Belgium. 0
The surrender of all French terri territory
tory territory and the wrong of Alsace-Lorraine
to be righted.
Readjustment of the frontier ofs
Italy.
The people of Austro-Hungaria to
have the freest opportunity of auto autonomous
nomous autonomous development.
Rumania, Serbia and Montenegro
to be evacuated and restored.
Nationalities under Turkish rule to
be secured of security of life, and the
Dardanelles to be free.
An independent Polish state to be
erected with access to the sea.
A general association of nations' to
be formed to afford mutual guaran guarantees
tees guarantees of political independence and
territorial integrity.
CASUALTY LIST
The following casualties are re reported
ported reported by the commanding general of
the American Expeditionary Forces:
Killed in action 45
Missing in action .108
Wounded severely 99
Wounded slightly .... .... 1
Died, accident and other causes.. 7
Died of wounds 13
Died of disease 5
Total .. ................. 278
Total Number of Casualties sto Date,
Including Those Reported Above
Killed in action (including 291
at sea) .................... 6,038
Died of wounds .............. 1,866
Died of disease 1,780
Died, accident and other causes 852
Wounded in action 17,453
Missing in action (including- in
hands of enemy) ........... 4,482
Total to date s ........... 32,471
, f
Take advantage of the early ship
ments of wonderful hats for all oc
casions now arriving daily at the Af
fleck Millinery Parlor, south side of
Ocala House block. 20-3t

UNDER

1

OGALA, FLORIDA, SA1URDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1918.

Hi

n

AIIO

STREAM OF CAPTIVES
London, Sept. 21. Serbian troops
east of Moahtix have advanced more
than nine miles in one day and are
less' than nine miles from the main
highway connecting Prilep with the
Vardar river. A Serbian official state statement
ment statement received here says a great num number
ber number of prisoners have been captured,
that the Allies have taken Godiyak,
west of the Cerna river, and fifteen
miles southeast of Prilep.
JOINING THE ALLIES
In their advance northward the
Serbians have passed a line running
through Kryncvo, Strigovo, Drogojel
and Poloshko. Soldiers who were
forced to enlist in the Bulgarian army
during its occupation of southern Ser Serbia,
bia, Serbia, are throwing away their arms
and joining the army of liberation.
LIST OF REGISTRANTS
To Whom Questionnaires were Mailed
September 20th
604 Peter Brown, Dunnellon.
608 Charlie Clemmon, Dunnellon.
609 Charlie L. Strickland, Gaiter.
610 John I. Townsend, Qaiter.
611 Geo. W. Turner, Gaiter.
612 Henry J. Johnson, Gaiter.
616 Charlie Smith, Gaiter.
622 Jas. Ed. Brooke, Gaiter.
623 Wm. D. White, Dunnellon.
624 Joe Archer, Dunnellon.
625 John Allen, Dunnellon.
633 Elard Bennett, Dunnellon.
634 Belzie Berry, Dunnellon.
636 John Lee, Reddick.
637 Wilbur Mason, Micanopy.
642 Willie C. Mickins, Reddick.
645 Robert Morris, Williston.
649 George McNeil Jr., Williston.
655 Clifford M. Rodfile, Williston.
656 Frank Scott, Williston.
657 Jeff Sims, Williston.
659 Charlie J. Spates, Williston.
663 Clifford F. Smith, Romeo.
665 Gus Alexander, Romeo, v
667 George E. Edmonson, Ocala.
671 Benjamin Felder, Ocala.
673 Davis Flemming, Ocala.
674 Sam Foster, Lowell.
675 Ed Foster, Ocala.
677 George Frink, Ocala.
678 Dixie Goulman, Ocala.
680 Curry Johnson, Dunnellon.
681 Robert C. Miller, Oak.
686 Daniel H. Pennock, Oak.
687 Roy M. Priest, Anthony.
697 Edgar C. Shealy,; Anthony.
699 Thos. C. Sherouse, Oak.
700 Benjamin H. Smith, Oak.
703 Robert A. Swain, Oak.
705 Henry E. Talton, Anthony.
706 Robert W. Titus, Oak.
711 Lutha Smith, Summerfield.
716-Ed Williams, Summerfield.
722 Ambrose J. Blair, Summerfield.
723 G' C. Blackman, Summerfield.
726 Charlie Clements, Summerfield.
727 Thos. K. Clyburn, Starke.
729 Samuel J. Martin,' Moss Bluff.
730 James P. Martin, Moss Bluff.
737 Rosea M. Sellers, Electra.
739 Geo. A. Waters, Electra.
751 Robert Calvin, Reddick.
753 Leroy Cabanas, Reddick.
754 Thomas Colding, Reddick.
757 Dan Curry, Reddick.
759 Shelly Tillman, Dunnellon.
762 William Watson, Dunnellon.
763 William Washington, Dunnellon.
764 Junius D. Weeden, Dunnellon.
765 Otis Whittington, Dunnellon.
769 Will Williams, Dunnellon.
770 Robert Williams, Dunnellon.
771 Thomas Wilson, Dunnellon.
772 Charlie Williams, Dunnellon.
774 Sidney Reid, Ocala.
776 Arthur Reece, Ocala.
779 Answerl Richardson, Ocala.
782 Van Roberts, Reddick.
784 Alfred Davis, Electra.
785 Bartow Davis, Electra.
791 Barnwell B. Beck, Ocala.
792 Thomas E. Carter, Martel.
800 Alexander Mosby, Ocala.
801 Reuben Mosby, Ocala.
802 Arthur Mosby, Ocala.
807 Willie A. Barksdale, Dunnellon.
809 Archie N. Brass, Dunnellon.
810 Chas. R. Brockington, Juliette.
813 Jas. J3. Carlisle Jr., Dunnellon.
814 George H. Darr, Dunnellon.
816 John O. Edson, Dunnellon.
817 Randolph C. Griffith, Dunnellon.
823 James Butler, Ocala.
827 Charlie Campbell, Ocala.
828 Hartis Clark, Ocala.
834 Lee Colden, Ocala.
835 James Coleman, Ocala.
836 Clark Coleman, Ocala.
838 Eddie Creach, Ocala.

mm

SEND A STEADY
H THEIR FDOIIT
E
Shown by Ocala People in the War
Experiences of Lieut. Anderson
It is very seldom that so large a
crowd of people is seen on the public
square as on Friday night. In fact,
we don't remember seeing any more,
if as many, present at any evening
event. The streets in hearing of the
bandstand were packed with cars in
which their occupants had reserved
seats, and when Lieut. Anderson
stepped to the front of the stand to
speak he looked down on a sea of up upturned
turned upturned faces.
Lieut. Anderson did not try to make
an oration. He simply told his friends
some of the things he had seen and
heard during his year of service on
the front. It brought the war closer
to us than ever before to realize that
this slender young man in his simple
garb of khaki, a couple of years ago
one of our most quiet and unosten unostentatious
tatious unostentatious boys, had been thru some of
the most terrific battles that evei
shook the world, and had helped bar
the Hun in his organized raid on civ civilization.
ilization. civilization.
Lieut. Anderson, who is an artillery
officer, was at Cantigny, at which
place last spring he took a part in
stopping the German offensive that
threatened Paris. At Cantigny, the
Americans for the first time took a
prominent part in a great battle in
this war. They struck the German
line a telling blow, taking the town
and holding it against all attempts
to retake it.
Very simply and unostentatiously
the young officer told of what he saw
at Cantigny and other places. He did
not play up his own part any more
than was necessary to hold his nar narrative
rative narrative together, and the people found
his story most interesting. However,
he was the hero of every small boy
in the crowd, relatives and friends of
the fighters at the front hung on his
words and many men present who ex expect
pect expect to be called soon found his talk
of the greatest interest.
Before he began speaking, a chorus
led by Miss Marguerite Porter sang
America most beautifully, and at the
close the band rendered "The Star
Spangled Banner." After that the
band gave most of its program, which
was greatly enjoyed by all who heard
it.
TEMPLE ATTRACTIONS
FOR THE WEEK
Today: The official war pictures.
Edith Roberts in "The Deciding
Kiss."
Monday: Emily Stevens in "A
Man's Word."
Tuesday: "The Zeppelin's Last
Raid." Pathe News.
Wednesday: Dorothy Dalton in
Green Eyes."
Thursday: Marguerite Clark in
"Uncle Tom's Cabin."
844 Henry La Corn, Santos.
857 Nicholas H. Brown, Belleview.
858 John H. Brown, Belleview.
861 Merritt M. Foxworth, Belleview
867 Odell Thomas, Orange Lake.
868 James S. Thomas, Irvine.
870 Sam Thornton, Mcintosh.
875 John Warren, Evinston.
876 Lawrence Whitaker, Evinston.
878 Walker Woodard, Evinston.
879 Will Bailey, Candler.
883 Julius Favor, Candler.
884 James F. Brown, Ocala.
897 Paul Burns, Ocala.
898 Ivory Butler, Ocala.
899 Edward Butler, Ocala.
907 Luther Bostick, Martel.
911 Henry Clark, ;MarteL
912- Jessie Colbert, Martel.
916 William J. Dorsey, Martel.
J 918 Earl R. Drayton, York.
tyiy jerry Ellaby, Martel.
920 Charlie J. Farnell, Martel.
925 Thaddeus Harvey, Ocala.
929 Jonas Jacobs, York.
930 Reuben Sutton, Ocala.
W. K. Lane, M. D., Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat, Law Library Building, Ocala,
1 Florida. tf

KB

FRO

TE S

I T

U
Evacuation of
Matter
VICTORY

OTHER

SMASHING

TQTTERIUG TURKISH EMPIRE

London, Sept. 21. An official an announcement
nouncement announcement says the British attack
against the Hindenburg line north northeast
east northeast of St. Quentin was resumed this
morning east of Epehy. Further steps
forward have been taken by the Brit British
ish British on the Flanders front, and British
positions improved west of Messines
to south of the Ypres, where a strong
point was captured. Northwest of St.
Quentin the British have advanced I
their front northwest of Belhnghse,
north of the Gauche wood. West of
Villers Guislain, one of the British
advanced posts, has been pressed
back slightly.
BRAVE LITTLE BUNCH
A British detachment of seven men
believed to have been captured when
the Germans took Moeuvres, held
their position for two days during the
German' occupation, and when the
village was retaken the entire party
rejoined its unit without losses.
PUSH UP ANOTHER POINT
With the British Forces in France,
Sept. 21. The British attacked the
Germans midway between Havrin Havrin-court
court Havrin-court and St. Quentin early this
morning on a front of two and a half
to three miles.
- The area under attack is immed
iately north of that part of the line
held by the Australians, who have al already
ready already gained the Hindenburg outpost
system and are closer to the canal
than the infantry on either side of
them.
BENAY CAPTURED
Paris, Sept. 21. In their drive for
outflanking St. Quentin on the south
the French last night captured the
town of Benay, and made progress
north of that place, it is officially an announced.
nounced. announced. ST. QUENTIN NEXT
Paris, Sept. 21. The Germans ap appear
pear appear to be hastening the removal of
the civil population from St. Quentin,
and fires have been observed in dif different
ferent different parts of the city, says the Echo
De Pans. It is added that the Ger Germans
mans Germans are placing numerous batteries
in St. Quentin.
BRITISH LOST A BOAT
London, Sept. 21- A British mon monitor
itor monitor was sunk lying in a harbor, the
admiralty announces. One officer and
nineteen men were killed. Fifty-seven
men are missing whom it is presumed
have been killed.
BRITISH VICTORY IN PALESTINE
London, Sept. 2L General Alien Alien-by,
by, Alien-by, British commander in Palestine,
with his French and Arab allies, has
delivered a heavy blow to the Turks
from the Jordan river east to the
Mediterranean. The Ottoman army
has been thrown back twelve miles
on a front of sixteen miles. Three
thousand Turks have been taken pris prisoner.
oner. prisoner. The. Turkish retreat has become a
rout. They are being closely pursued
by the British.
The cavalry has pushed through the
Turkish front and is advancing in the
rear of the Turkish armies in the
direction of Nablus. Another body of
cavalry is advancing in a northeast northeasterly
erly northeasterly direction toward Eafula and Bei Bei-san
san Bei-san to intercept the Turks to the
north.
On Wednesday General AMenby's
right wing attacked west of the Jor Jordan
dan Jordan and occupied El Mugeir.
PRUSSIAN POLICY
Copenhagen, Sept. 21. A meeting
of independent socialists in the First
Berlin district was dissolved by the
police, according to the Berlin Vor Vor-waerts.
waerts. Vor-waerts. Hugo Haase, the leader of
the socialist minority, was refused
permission to speak and the police
arrested Adolf Hoffman, chairman of
the meeting.
Fresh coca-cola just received at the
Court Pharmacy. 19-2t

VOL. 25, NO. 228

rprMPu

u
1 1
Ojffffll
DIM
St. Quentin a
of Hours
EN PALESTINE SHAKES TifE
IMPORTANT MEETING
AT ORLANDO
Orlando, Sept. 21. Supplementing
a' previous notice issued from the of office
fice office of Federal Food Administrator
Braxton Beacham in which he has
called a conference of employers to
take place at Orlando on Tuesday,
October 1st, Mr. Beacham wishes to
add that this meetinir should be at
tended particularly by the citrus fruit
packers and the packers of vegeta
bles.
The conference will be called to
order at 10:30 a. m. on the mornincr
of the first at the Colonial Inn, oppo
site the San Juan hotel.
The meeting place was secured
throusrh the courtesy of Mavor J. L.
Giles, .who tendered the building to
the use of Mr. Beacham and those who
attend this conference.
Federal Food Administrator Beach Beacham
am Beacham is anticipating one hundred or
more to be in attendance at this con conference,
ference, conference, which will be open to all em employers
ployers employers of labor and as noted pre previously,
viously, previously, especially those engaged in
agricultural activities.
WEATHER NEXT WEEK
(Associated Prees)
Washington Sept. 21. Generally
fair weather with a return to nearly
normal temperatures is predicted for
the southeastern states the coming
week.
BOARD OF GOVERNORS MEET
A special meeting of the board of
governors of the Marion County
Board of Trade was held last evening.
The meeting was called to order by
Chairman C. W. Hunter, with J. M.
Meffert, Max Israelson and D. S.x
Welch present.
The statement of the condition of
the board of trade was made by the
secretary. Same was adopted by the
board and the following committee
appointed to audit the report: C. W.
Hunter, Max Israelson, D. S. Welch
and J. M. Meffert.
The resignation of the secretary
was accepted and a resolution that a
vote of thanks be extended to him
for his services and that every good
wish go with him in his new work
with the Y. M. C. A., which he takes
up on the 25th of September.
The appointment of a secretary
was deferred until the next meeting.
There are several applications for the
position.
There being no further business,
the board adjourned. V
THE CASUALTY LISTS
The casualty lists of the American
army will hereafter be posted in the
Star's front windows every morning.
If in looking over them you see the
name of anyone you know, please re report
port report it to the paper.
.TEACHERS' EXAMINATION
Notice is hereby given that the ex examining
amining examining board will be in Ocala to
conduct' teachers' examinations be beginning
ginning beginning on Tuesday, October 15,
1918.
For full information apply to
9-21-sat J. H. Bnnson, Supt.
BUYING COTTON
Mr. H. W. Tucker is in the market
for seed cotton. He will buy all the
farmers will bring to him. 9-3-tf
........
A fifty-cent purchase of Palm Olive
toilet requisites at Gerigs' Drug
Store, entitles you to two cakes of
Palm Olive Soap FREE. t
Call and get the last minute styles
in millinery at the Affleck Millinery
Parlor, south side Ocala House block.
No substitutes and no delay in our
prescription work. Let us serve you.
G. C. Green & Co., phone 424. tf

0.



OCA LA EVENING STAR. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1918

OCALA EVENING STAR
Pa blinked Every Day Rxeept Sunday by

STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY
OF OCALA. FLA.
R. II. Carroll, IreIdent
P. V. Leaveagood, eeretary-Treaarer
J. II. Beajaf&la, Editor
Errtered at Ocala. Fla., oatofflce aa
second-class matter.
TELEPHONES
Baalaeaa Of fie ...... Ffve-Oae
Editorial Uepartmear Two-Sevca
.Society Editor Five. Dooble-Oae
MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press Is exclusively
entitled for the use tor republication of
all news dispatches credited to It or
J.ot otherwise credited in this paper
and also the local news published
herein. All rights of republication of
special dispatches herein are also re reserved.
served. reserved. ADVERTISING RATES
D Unlay i Plate 10c. per inch for con consecutive
secutive consecutive insertions. Alternate inser insertions
tions insertions 25 per cent, additional. Composi Composi-Hon
Hon Composi-Hon charged on ads. that run less than
bix times 5c. per inch. Special position
20 per cent, additional. Hates based on
4-lnch minimum. Less than four Inches
will take higrher rate, which will be
furnished on application.
Reading Notice! 6c. per line for first
insertion; 3c. per line for each siibse siibse-cruent
cruent siibse-cruent insertion. One change a week
allowed on readers without extra coon coon-oositlor
oositlor coon-oositlor charges.
Iegral advertisements at legal rates.
Klectros moist be mounted, or charge
will be made for mounting.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Domeatle
One year. In advance......
Six months, in advance....
Three months, in advance.
One month, in advance ...
' F"oreIar
One year. In advance......
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SUPERINTENDENT BRINSON
BECOMES SEVERE
Edito Star; In your issue of the
9th, you have one more of your reck reckless
less reckless tirades on the ten-mill amend amendment.
ment. amendment. In discussing the matter a few days
ago you spoke of my talking through
my hat in discussing the school situa situation
tion situation and I could not help thinking how
much like a demagogue running for
the legislature you sounded. You
mae a powerful howl about the bur burden
den burden of taxes when you and every citi-

not reduce taxes without reducing
public improvements and facilities
and conveniences.
As to the propriety of the pro propaganda
paganda propaganda in furtherance of the ten ten-mill
mill ten-mill amendment, I will say that it is
eminently the proper thing and the
cartoon published by the Ameri Ameri-ican
ican Ameri-ican School Board Journal, the lead leading
ing leading publication of the kind in Amer Amer-'
' Amer-' ica, several months ago, simply fitted
the case so completely that the cam campaign
paign campaign committee of the Florida Edu Educational
cational Educational Association thought it a
most timely thing to present to the
state.
So far as I know there has been no
arrangements made for paying for
the printing of the cartoon and if the
Tampa Tribune, the paper which
printed the cartoons by courtesy of
the School Board Journal, is donating
this service to the splendid cause, it
"is amply able to do so and it would be
a most commendable act of public
spirit.
i No, the school boards and superin superintendents
tendents superintendents and leading educators and
leading papers of the state are not
being made catspaws of by some mys mysterious
terious mysterious something, or other that you
conjure up in your mind as smacking
its chops for the fine choice hunk of
graft that your mind's eye sees.
t Please, Mr. Editor, be a little spe specific
cific specific and tell just how or even just
about how you figure that this nice

juicy slice or graft is going to come
out of the ten-mill amendment.'
There is not a thing to conceal or
camouflage about it. In the future as
in the past any information that may
be in the office here or that i may
have is at your service and is avail available
able available to the "public. I invite you to
call for any item of information that
may occur to you as serviceable.
I will volunteer this much informal
tion which will probably serve as a
good text for you. At the meeting of
the Florida Educational Association
at Daytona about the first, of last
January there was a resolution pass passed
ed passed asking the school boards of the
state to contribute $10 each as a per perfectly
fectly perfectly legitimate educational expendi expenditure
ture expenditure from public funds for the pur purpose
pose purpose of informing the people of the
state of the necessity for and the
purpose of the amendment. When the
regular annual meeting of school offi officers
cers officers and high school principals was in
session in Gainesville on May 10 the
question of the number of the coun counties
ties counties that had contributed their quota
was raised and a number of the most
progressive of the counties of the
state had already sent in thejrs and
on June 5 the board of Marion county
authorized it3 contribution and a war warrant
rant warrant for, this amount was drawn to
the credit of C. R. M. Sheppard, sup superintendent
erintendent superintendent of Volusia county, who
vjas treasurer of thi3 fund. They
have gotten this much of your seven seven-mill
mill seven-mill levy but I don't contemplate that
they will get any of your ten-mill
levy. This action was endorsed by
the superintendents and board mem members
bers members from all over the state and by
the state superintendent.
It is possible that a portion of this
fund has been used to pay for the
printing of the cartoons that so very 1
fittingly represent the dilemma that
you can find the Marion county school

board in ifyou will drop in at any
session of the local board of trus trustees
tees trustees when in session often times at
the Ocala National Bank wrestling
with the question of where the money

is to come from to do the thing3 that
are absolutely necessary to be done.
Within a few days I expect to fur furnish
nish furnish the press of the county with a
plain, concise statement of the history
and the purpose of the proposed ten ten-mill
mill ten-mill amendment.
.. I appreciate your indulgence in
space to discuss the question and re regret
gret regret that we do not see the matter in
the same light or from the same
standpoint. Very truly yours,
J. H. Brinson.
Thanks, Mr. Brinson, "for these
kind woids," as' Happy Hooligan
would have said, in the days before
the Hun. In those days, when you
and us occasionally tackled a subject
on which we agreed, and to which we
used more severe language than we
have about the ten-mill amendment,
you did not call us a demagogue, nor
style our discourse a tirade. In this
business, as Mr. Blueback Speller
Webster says, are we now hooking
your ox, or, as a more down-to-date
architect might remark, do you ap apprehend
prehend apprehend our getting your goat?
If we said you and your brother
and sister members of the education educational
al educational autocracy were inclined to be pig piggish
gish piggish in trying to shove this ten-mill
amendment through at this time,
wouldn't we be as polite as you are,
and somewhat more truthful
Well, we will forgive you. We are
used to being called names in fact,
we sometimes call ourself more
names in a minute than you could
think up in a week. And we ain't go going
ing going to call you and the other educa educational
tional educational autocrats particularly the au au-tocratesses
tocratesses au-tocratesses any names, either.
We do not need to be v-specific in
figuring out the graft from a ten ten-mill
mill ten-mill tax. There would be no such
elaborate thing as figuring about it.
It would be as simple as a little nig nigger
ger nigger "busting" open a forty-pound
watermelon and going into it with
both hands.
Your explanation about raising
funds for your propaganda is indeed
a bad text for you. You should have
known, tho probably most of the
other teachers didn't, that when you
asked the school boards of the state
to contribute $10 each to push your
ten-mill propaganda that you were
asking the said boards to break the
law. There is no law allowing a
county board to appropriate money
for such a purpose. When the Mar Marion
ion Marion county board "authorized its con contribution
tribution contribution and a warrant for this
amount wa drawn to the credit of C
R. M. Sheppard," etc., then the Mar Marion
ion Marion county board took the people's
money without their knowledge or
consent. It had no right to take a
cent of public money for such a pur purpose,
pose, purpose, and we are very much surpris surprised
ed surprised to Team that it did. It is only ten
dollars, but a board that can illegally
appropriate ten dollars can appro appropriate
priate appropriate ten hundred or ten thousand
the same way. You teachers set a fine
example to the young people you are
supposed to instruct in ethics as well
as mathematics. If you wanted five
hundred dollars to use in inducing
the people of Florida to give another
million dollars a year, why didn't you
take up a collection That is what a
press association would have done.
Editors are not any richer than teach teachers,
ers, teachers, and there are forty or fifty teach teachers
ers teachers to one editor.
We don't doubt your sincerity in
explaining the source of your "war
fund," but we doubt that you know
all about it. Ten dollars apiece from
the counties of Florida wouldn't go
far on the printing bill of a cam campaign,
paign, campaign, even if they all paid. Some
teachers and some officials are not
as conscientious as the members of
the Marion' county school board. The
book trust has its agents among
them, as any man well acquainted
with Tallahassee knows.
You say, Mr. Brinson, that "every
citizen of intelligence knows you can cannot
not cannot reduce taxes without reducing
public improvements," etc.
There is one great improvement
that could be made without increas increasing
ing increasing the taxes, and that would be to
reduce the taxes.
At present, however, it is our pat patriotic
riotic patriotic duty to do without improve improvements
ments improvements until the war is over. The war
industries board has just refused the
state of New York permision to spend
nine million dollars of its own money
for new school houses. Municipali Municipalities
ties Municipalities are forbidden to issue bonds for
improvements; states must not vote
bonds for roads, unless they can be
used for military purposes, railroads
must not lay any more rails', except
where needed for carriage of troops
or supplies. You and your brother
and sister autocrats will be distinctly
disloyal' if you press this issue at this
time.
We admit that the schools need
money, but- they do not need it any
more than other departments of
the public service. The schools,
are receiving the lion's share of the
public funds now they can do very
well on what they have until the
war is over. A ten-mill tax would
increase Marion county taxes twenty
or twenty-five thousand dollars a
year, and would increase those of the!
f tate from seven to eight hundred
thrusand. Just that much less to
hlp out in war purposes, and every
dollars that goes in that cause short shortens
ens shortens he war.
If you read Mr. Brinson's effusion,
you will see that he has made no ar

(Concluded on Fourth Page)

y. v.v.v.vw,.,.va'.v.v.v.vav.".v.v.-.v..v.'v

The Kaiser as
I Knew Him
For Fourteen
' Years
W'VIW'.V.V.V.-.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.-.
(Copyright, 1&18. by the McClure Newspt Newspt-per
per Newspt-per Syndicate.)
CHAPTER XII.
'
The Crown Prince and Others.
I first saw the crown prince profes
sionally in the spring of 1905, a few
months before his marriage. He was
then twenty-three years old. He was
in the uniform of a German army offi
cer but looked more like a corps stu
dent except for the fact that 'his face
was not marked with a scar from duel
ling, as is usually the case with most
members of the German fraternities.
He had a habit of placing his hands
on bis hips and his coats were always
flared In at the waist which, with the
sporty angle at which he wore his cap,
gave him a swagger which was quite
foreign to the rest of the officers of the
army. He was of slender figure, which
was accentuated by his .height. He
was nearly six feet tall. x.
He came into my office, I remember,
with a copy of Life In his pocket. He
took it out and. opened it and showed
me a cartoon of himself which appar apparently
ently apparently caused him considerable amuse amuse-ment
ment amuse-ment and which, he said, he intended
showing his family.
There were two beautiful rings on
his left hand and he wore a wrist wrist-watch,
watch, wrist-watch, although at that time wrist
watches were used almost exclusively
by women. He seemed to be bright
and quick, but by no means brilliant.
Perhaps the quality exhibited by him
that impressed me most ton that first
occasion was his excessive nervousness,
He trembled all over. It was plain tq
see he was dreadfully afraid of pain,
and he evidently realized that I had
noticed his condition.
"I suppose the crown prince and the
future ruler of Germany 'ought to
be brave at all times," he remarked,
"but I just hate to have to go to a
dentist V
He asked me if I had seen any mem member
ber member of the court lately,, and I told him
that the kaiser's court chamberlain.
Count yon Eulenburg, had been to see
me the previous day.
Tm not surprised he has to go to
the dentist; be eats too much!" the
crown prince declared. "Hecan't ex expect
pect expect to have good teeth; he's always
eating. As for myself, I eat very little.
I want to remain thin. I hate fat peo people
ple people The crown prince and I did not get
along very well at that time. Apart
from the fact be was such a physical
coward that it was' almost Impossible
to work on him satisfactorily, he
seemed to have no idea of the meaning
ot an appointment.
He would agree to be at my office
at 9 :30 and I would plan my day ac accordingly.
cordingly. accordingly. At about ten he was apt
to call me up to jay he would be on
band at eleven, and he would actually
arrive about twelve. This happened
several times, and I ;old him that 1
couldn't have my work broken up in
that way.
Although I did not see the crown
prince again professionally until 1915,
the crown princess came to me in
1913, and from that time on paid me
mare or less regular visits. She was
a woman of great charm and intelli intelligence,
gence, intelligence, and although she "was more
Russian than German in her Ideas, and
for some time after her marriage was
rather generally criticized on that ac account,
count, account, she soon became extremely
popular and today is very much ad admired
mired admired by the German people.
She was one othe most democratic
and informal of my royal patients. 1
remember one day when 1 was work working
ing working on Princess Hatzfeld, we heard a
loud "Hoo-hoo" from the anteroom.

By
ARTHUR N. DAVIS. D. D. S.

The crown princess had heard that
the Princess Hatzfeld, who was a
great chum of hers, was in my office
and had followed her into my place
unannounced.'
The Princess Hatzfeld, I may men mention,
tion, mention, was an extremely Intelligent and
beautiful young woman, and because
of her intimacy with the crown prin princess,
cess, princess, I took a keen interest In the
views she expressed from time to time.
Her mother was an American.
When she called on me on one occa occasion
sion occasion after the war had started, I re repeated
peated repeated to her the gist of a conversa conversation
tion conversation I had had a few days before with
he? father, Excellenz von Stumm. He
Informed me that he had been trying
to convince all Germans of influence
that it would be a serious mistake to
annex Belgium.
"From morning to night I have been
trying to teach our people some sense,"
he had declared. "With the history of
Poland and Alsace-Lorraine In mind,
why should we take more responsibil responsibilities
ities responsibilities on our shoulders by retaining
Belgium? The Lord only knows we
have our hands full as it Is. I don't
see and I never have seen how Ger Germany
many Germany can possibly win this war I"
"Your father seemed to be very pes pessimistic
simistic pessimistic regarding the outlook I told
her.
. "The sad thing about it," she re-

OCAJL.A.
FLORIDA
plied, is tnat rainer is always nguu
I never knew him to make a mistake
in judgment."
When the crown prince called to see
me again I was surprised to find a
considerable change in his general ap appearance.
pearance. appearance. Although, of course, he was
ten years older, he bad aged more
thaa I would have expected. There
were lines on his face which made him
look older than his thirty-three years.
In the outer world he was generally
believed to be one of the leading spir spirits
its spirits of the military party In Germany,
but among his own people he was not
credited with sufficient ability or In Influence
fluence Influence to be much of a factor. In Indeed,
deed, Indeed, within the past year he bad been
criticized rather severely In army cir circles
cles circles for his indifference to the crisis
In which his country was Involved and
for not taking the war seriously
enough, and from all I was able to
observe of him during the visits be
paid me after the resumption of our
relations, these criticisms were well
founded. The newspapers, however,
which were naturally inspired, always
brought his name to the front when whenever
ever whenever the army he was accredited to
made any successful showing Just as
they did in the case of the kaiser.
During his various visits to me I
tried to draw him out a little on dif different
ferent different aspects of the international sit situation,
uation, situation, but the ideas he expressed
were not of much moment.
"The allies think we will run short
of man-power," he said on one occa occasion,
sion, occasion, "but we've got 2,000,000 youths
growing up and well soon be able to
put them in the war. There's no dan danger
ger danger of our running short of men, but,
really, I wish it were all over. This
wartis a lot of damned nonsense, you
know 1" He talked as if the two mil million
lion million growing-up youths of Germany
were created for the Hohenzollerns to
use as they pleased.
Another remark he made which in indicated
dicated indicated how sadly he misconstrued the
epoch-making significance of the great
war in which the whole t world was
involved was quite characteristic.
"Witn so many men at the front,'
he said, "the men at home ought to be
having a fine time with the women,
eh, .what? .Do you see many good
looking girls in Berlin now?"
In this connection I may mention
that many of the more sober officers
told me that they were disgusted with
the manner in which the crown prince
was acting at his headquarters "It is
really a disgrace," they complained,
"for the crown prince to have so many
questionable women visiting him. It
certainly doesn't set much of an ex example
ample example for the rest of the stall."
The whole situation appeared to the
crown prince very much in the light
of a joke.
"I've just come from the western
front," he told me. "My ; men are up
to their knees in water and mud.
We've been naving lots of fun pump pumping
ing pumping the water out of our trenches into
the French trenches."
"Well, 1 suppose the French pump
It right back again, don't they?"
"You're quite right, quite right.
That's exactly what they do. Really,
it's a great lark."
Remarks of this kind rather sickened
me of this self-satisfied young man.
I realized, of course. that his part In
the war was played at such a safe
distance from the front lines that be
was probably not familiar with all the
horrors of trench warfare, and yet it
could not be possible that he was un unaware
aware unaware of the terrific loss of life and
the untold agony and suffering which
millions of his people had to endure
while the "nonsensical" war contin continued.
ued. continued. After diplomatic relations were
broken off between America and Ger Germany,
many, Germany, the crown prince and bis fam family
ily family ceased coming to me. They were
afraid, no doubt, of. public criticism,
although the kaiser was not.
Of the kaiser's other children.
Prince William Eitel Frederick and
Prince Oscar were the only ones 1
never met.
Prince Adelbert, the kaiser's third
son, was a very handsome and charm charming
ing charming -man. He always came to me at attired
tired attired in a naval officer's uniform. 1
saw him but a few times, as he was
seldom in Berlin, and he never talked
on matters of general importance. 1
never saw him after America entered
the war.
Prince August Wilhelm, the fourth
son, was perhaps the most democratic
of them all. He sometimes came to
see me in an ordinary taxi cab and be
was the only one of the kaiser's sons
whom I ever saw in civilian dress. He
was the first member of the royal fam family
ily family to come to me after the murder
of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand, and
he was in mournine when he called,
tragedy of Sarajevo would almost in
evitably lead to a general war.

(Continued Monday)

S A F

You have been helping your Government by
buying United States Bonds. Maybe you would in invest
vest invest further if you hrd a safe place to keep the bonds.
We have decided therefore to take care of your
bonds free of cost. Bring them at mice. Those who
have not finished paying for their Third Liberty Loan
subscription will please call and square accounts 1 e e-fore
fore e-fore the Fourth Loan starts.
MUNROE & CHAMBLISS
. NATIONAL BANK

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Our long and
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lamest and most modern alns l?l

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I FARMERS GM
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I Comfortable Rooms and Good Meals Z
Rates Reasonable
......
I Good Hunting, Bathing and Fishing Z
f Write for Rates and Reservations
: MRS. A. N. GALLANT, Prop. :
P. O. Address, Ocala, Fla. Z
m m

A DOLLAR WASTED HELPS THE ENEMY
That is not a loyal thing to do, of course, and few of us realize
that we are helping the enemy when we waste money. Pretty bard
to define what waste is. One man's waste "may be another man's
economy. In a general way, waste in war time may be defined as the
buying of anything not essential to -health and efficiency. Every
dollar one spends for unnecessary things commands goods and ser services,
vices, services, that is, labor and materials, needed by the United States Gov Government
ernment Government for war purposes. And, if you invest the money you save
in ,War Savings Stamps, you are again helping by loaning your mon money
ey money to your Government.
cala- Ice & PacMegj Co.

THE WINDSOR MOTEL
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room service is
second to cone.
RATES From $1.50 per day per person to $6.
ROBERT M. MEYER, J. E. KAVANAUGH
Manager. Proprietor.

UNIVESITY OF FLORIDA
Gainesville
Military Training Under Army OfScers
Courses in Arts and Sciences, Ag Agriculture.
riculture. Agriculture. Chemical, Civil, Electric and
Mechanical Engineering, Law, Teach Teachers'
ers' Teachers' College.
Tuition Free. Send for Catalog.
A. A. MURPHREE, President
Put an Ad

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short staple Col-
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4 ..:
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FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE
FOR WOMEN
Tallahassee
559 Students from 25 Florida Coun
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including Summer School and Short
Course.
Write at once for Catalog.
EDWARD CONRADI, President
in the Star



OCALA EVENING STAB, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1918

The Finger Points

To the seat of

trouble in 90
per cent of
foot troubles
r o u m a y
THINK you
have rheau rheau-matism:
matism: rheau-matism: You.

may not have. See the only

Trade
mS Mark
, Reg.

Graduate Foot Specialist in

Ocala at
IITTIE'S SHOE PARLOR
M. M. LITTLE. Praclipedisl

OCALA SOCIAL AFFAIRS

If You Hare Any News for this De Department,
partment, Department, Call Five Double-One
or Two-Seven

GOOD TOBVGS TO EAT

fs: Kidd's Pin-Money Pickles

Heinz Sweet Mustard Pickles
Heinz Mushroom Ketchup
, Heinz Walnut Ketchup
Heinz Beefsteak Sauce
Welch Grape Juice, pints & qts.
Clicquot Ginger Ale
Loganberry Juice

Grapefruit Juice
Apple juice

Royal Salad Dressing
Pompeian Olive Russian Sauce
Howards Salad Dressing -Durkee
Salad Dressing
Premier Salad Dressing
Royal Tarter Sauce
Sandwich Olives
Ripe Olives
O. K. TEAPOT

GROCERY.

PHONE

KEEP K00L0W
SUNDAYS AT

SILVER SPRING j

The Train of Life

Sure's it's on the road we all are, and

bound for 'kingdom come;

While many have a journey long, it's

but a "lift" for some:

For there's the gay and merry youth,

intent on untried lands,

And wrinkled age with shoulders
bent, ahold of of-trembling hands.
There's kings of frenzied finance, and

, knights of small-town fame:

There sinner sits beside the saint, and

blind beside the lame;

There the preacher and the poet, and

fashion's aire queen

Rub elbows with the common herd,

that peers to watch, unseen.
Sure, there's heartache and heart
break along the untried way.

Though sunshine and star-gleam is

glimmering night and day:

There rapture and anguish waits each

turning of the wheel,

While love and hate brood side by

side, o er fate s restless deal.

Sure the train is rushingonward, we

near its snnek and roar
As fast it sweeps in greater speed
past scenes ne'er known before;
But safe and surd, without a fear,
o'er flying miles of sod
We ride secure because we know
our engineer is God!
; Selected.
.'-
Peabody-Gale
The Star has received the following
wedding announcement:
"Mr. and Mrs. Herbert J. Bickford
announce the marriage of their niece,
Mildred Abigail Gale to Mr. Clifford

j Russell Peabody, Q. M. C., U. S. A.,
ion Saturday, September 7, 1918, at
jthe Church of the Redeemer, Pelham,

iew iorK.
Mr. Peabody is very well known in
Ocala, where he made his home for a
number of years. His friends here
join the Star in the bestof good
wishes for himself and 'his bride.
.".
Attention, U. D. C.
The Daughters of the Confederacy
are urged to send in their donations
for the box to the bid soldiers, not
later than Tuesday. The committee
is ready to pack the. box.
If there had been nothing else to it,

the Hawaiian scenery shown in the

picture. "The Marriasre Rine." at the

16 inl 174 iTemPle yesterday, would, have been

(worth more than the admission price.
: 7 - jThe soft beauty of the tropics, the
tragic splendor' of Pele and the caress

lof the Pacific on the rugged coasts
were all shown most effectively. The

; story, however, was a very good one,
J : as Enid Bennett's pictures generally

are. 1 he olhcial war pictures will be
shown this evening, and with them
"The Deciding Kiss," which ought to

I be decidedly good. The Temple pro pro-Igram
Igram pro-Igram next week includes "The Zep Zep-ipelin's
ipelin's Zep-ipelin's Last. Raid2 Tuesday which

M . ., V twill certainly be spectacular and
The OklaWaha Valley Rail- J thrilling, and Thursday Marguerite
road Will Uiake a rOUnd tiClark will play Little Eva in "Uncle

j I om's uabin," and there is little
J i doubt that the dainty and petite Mar-
j guerite will present the part more
2 j prettily than it has ever before been
o 'put on the screen.
,

trip to Silver Springs every
Sunday until further notice.

ROUND TRIP 30 CENTS
I,v. Ocala 2 p. in.
Lv. Spring ...... 4:30 p. m.
OKLAWAHA VALLEY
RAILROAD CO

GLAIX TOTESTIFY
Says Watoga Lady, "As To Wk&t
Cardui Has Done For Me, So
As To Help Others."

J ( Miss Winnif red Hunt, who has
been in "New York for some weeks,
1 : i 3 : iT -m t-

Store, returned home yesterday aft afternoon.
ernoon. afternoon. While in the market she
bought a line of goods that is right
up to the minute and the patrons of
this popular establishment will have

the advantage oi buying the very

latest in ladies' wearing apparel, as

well as all kinds of piece goodsN

trimmings, etc. Mr. Frank, who is
now located in New York, is also al

ways on the lookout for new and nov

el creations in the line of ladies'
goods. Many the pretty dresses
and suits for farPear which Miss

Hunt selected while in the big city

are now arriving. Watch the firm's
announcements in the newspapers.

Watoga, W. Va: Mrs. S. W. Glad wen,
of thistown, says: "When about 15 years
of age, I suffered greatly ... Sometimes
would go a month or two, and I had
terrible headache, backache, and bearing bearing-down
down bearing-down pains, and 'jvould just drag and
had no appetite, f hen ... it would last
. . two weeks, and was so weakening,
and my health was awful.
My mother bought me a bottle of
Cardui, and I began to improve after
taking the first bottle, so kept it up till I
took three ... I gained, and was well
and strong, and I owe it all to Cardui.
I am married now and have 3 children
... Have never had to have a doctor for
female trouble, and just resort to Cardui
if 1 need a tonic. I am glad to testify to
what it has done for me, so as to help
others."
If you are nervous or weak, have head headaches,
aches, headaches, backaches, or any of the other
ailments so common to women, why not
give Cardui a trial? Recommended by
many physicians. In use over 40 years.
Begin taking Cardui today. It may
be the very medicine you need.
NC-130

L ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER
AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Con Contract
tract Contract work. Gives More and Better
Work, for the Money than any other
contractor in the city.

Mr. and Mrs. F. G. B. Weihe and
Mr. and Mrs. Karl Weihe motored to
Yalaha Friday and spent the after afternoon
noon afternoon and evening with Mr. and Mrs.

Frank Durand. Owing to tire trou

tle the party did not reach Ocala tin-
til 1 o'clock a. m., but felt well repaid

for the trip, which was one of great

pleasure. They also visited the Drake

f erhery, which is something well

worth seeing.

A congenial party leaving t early
this morning for Daytoha were Dr.

and Mrs. J. E. Chace and Miss Mar

garet Chace, Mrs. G. S. Scott and
Miss Mamie Taylor. The party went

in Dr. Chace's car and will join Mr.
arid Mrs. John Taylor at the beach

for a week's recreation.
Rev. Smith Hardin and family re

turned last night from a pleasant
trip through Georgia and South Car Carolina,
olina, Carolina, visiting Mr. Hardin's relatives
in the latter state. Mr. Hardin is
much refreshed by his vacation and
able to take up his work with renew

ed vigor.

Mrs. Ernest Blair .and Miss Willie
Proctor motored over to their old
home at Eureka Thursday afternoon,
and brought back with them Miss

Donnie Proctor, who will teach m the

'North Ocala school this term.

"' '..

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Davies left

early this morning in their car fori

spend a fortnight, going especially
for the benefit of Mr. Davies health,
which has not been of the best of
late.
m m m
Mrs. A. T. Thomas and daughter,
Miss Rhoda and son, Moultrie, return

ed yesterday from an auto trip to
Sanford, N. C, and other points in
the mountains of the Carolinas.

Moultrie's call to the navy has been

deferred for the present.

Miss Louise Booe arrived home

yesterday afternoon from Jackson

ville, where she has been the guest of

her aunt, Mrs. Wyley since returning

from New York city, where she en

joyed a magnificent trip and had a

most delightful outing.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Rawls have

been enjoying a visit from Mr. Rawls

sister, Mrs. Pooser of Atlanta. Mrs.
Pooser is now visiting friends in the
Fellowship section before returning
to their home.
Mrs. J. G. Spurlin spent Friday in
the city, coming up especially from

her home at Oklawaha to see Mrs. D.
E. Mclver, who has not been in the
best of health since her return home

from White Springs.

Mrs. Ida Gates and her daughter,

Mrs. Petteway, a bride of a few
weeks, arrived in the city Thursday

from their home in Lakeland for a
few days, combining business with
pleasure.

Mrs. Sidney Haile and daughters,

Amy Miller, Amelia Dozier and Gen

evieve, are at home again -after a stay
of several weeks with Mr. Haile at
his plantation near .Gainesville.

Mrs. J. F. Martin, a former Ocala

resident, now living in Lee burg, who
has been the guest of her cchisin, Mrs.

Luffman and friend, Mrs. M. L. Rey

nolds, returned to her home today.

Mr.r M.'M. Little returned yester

day from a brief but much needed va vacation
cation vacation in Gainesville, Ga. Mr. Little
also visited Atlanta on his return
home.

'7
Miss Hattie Carlton, accompanied

by her niect, Miss Ruth Ervin, left
today for St. Petersburg, where they

will be guests of Miss Ervin's mother
for an extended visit.

Mr. J. W. Klock has returned from

New Hampshire and is again r.t his

winter home at Eastlake. Mrs. Klock
and her eldest daughter, Mrs. Mer Mer-riam,
riam, Mer-riam, will be here in a week or two.

,-'.'
Mn Marion Parker and family,

former citizens of Ocala, who have
for the past few years resided in

Starke, have returned to Ocala to

again make it their home.

Mrs. Alice Vogt and daughter, Miss

Dora Mae Vogt, left yesterday after afternoon
noon afternoon for Atlanta on an extended visit
to their son and brother. Dr. Vogt.

.
A faculty meeting of the Ocala high

school and primary teachers was held
at the school building this afternoon
at 2 o'clock.

"
Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Maughs arrived

home today from a several weeks

visit to Mr. and Mrs.: Arthur Williams

and family at Murdock..

.
Mrs. W. A. Knigfit returned yes

terday afternoon from Valdosta, Ga.,

where she has spent the past few

weeks visiting relatives.

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Beck are the

guests for the week end of their uncle
and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Charles

Mathews at Candler.

Misses Henrietta, Delia and Lillian

Livingston departed last night for

Kitchins Mills, S. C, where they will

attend school this winter. v

' ;

Mrs. Jt F. Hall has returned from

an 1 enjoyable trip to Tampa, where

she was the guest of her brother, Mr.

W. L. Hane.

Mr. Charlie Cleveland, after a visit

to his mother and sister here, left

yesterday for Camp Travis, Texas-

i

Mrs. Rex Todd arrived home yes

terday afternoon from a pleasant va
cation spent at White Springs.

7

Mr. and Mrs. Logan and Mrs.

George Ford left today for a week weekend
end weekend visit to Daytona Beach.

-
Mrs. E. G. Lindner leaves tomor

rowafternoon for a vacation at her

childhood home in Patton, Pa.

TRIMMED TAILORED
HATS HATS
.
Hats
That Appeal to Every Woman, V
For Every Occasion. 7
t . 7'
Madame Grace Corsets, 7
Front and Back Lace
-
STYLE HAT SHOP
Laura Luckie. Rena Smith.
Munroe & Chambliss Bank Building, Ocala, Florida
MODkRATE -' QUICK
PRICES v SERVICE

Fi T.TTirTMTTTMTKTHITtIT MiiiTiiTnf iiitiiMiniMfnf HTHrttTiiniTiii ..T..T..T..I

rTtTl

Miss Ullainee Barnett is home from

a very Dleasant visit to friends in

Southern Georgia.

Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Johnson of this

city are the proud parents of a beau
tiful little baby girl.

(Concluded on Fourth Page)

Have Your
HEMSTITCHING
. AND
PICOT EDGE WORK
1 Done at
"THE HEMSTITICHER"
Ocala, Florida
Between Peyser's Store and the Har
rington Hall Lunch Room

ml
?1
ml

a:

mAm

TffiS IS THE TIME FOR EVERY CITIZEN TO SUPPORT THE
UNITED STATES G0VERM1ENT
Many are doing so at a considerable cost or. sacrifice to themselves.
This Bank is a member of the Federal Reserve Banking System established by
the Government to give greater financial stability and strength to the member
banks and protection to their depositors. We invite you to become one of our
customers, so that you may enjoy this protection. y :
7s Tlae Ocala Maflnooal BaiMs
Ocala - -. Ffli?Ma

.T..Y..T..Tv.v....r..v..r'..v..

AT THE CHURCHES TOMORROW

Grace Episce?tl
(Rev. Gilbert A. Ottmann, Rector) 1
9:45 a. m. Sunday school.
7:30 a. m. Holy communion, every

Sunday.

11 a. m, Holy communion and

sermon, first Sunday. r

11 a. m. Morning prayer and ser

mon," except first Sunday.

;. All seats free. Every o&e welcome
at all services. 7
' Baptist 't
9:30 a. m. Sunday school.
11 a, m. Morning .worship.
8 p. m. People's service. Subject,

Come with your friends and get

new strength for daily toil, new cour courage
age courage for daily difficulties and new hope
for eternity.

Methodist
9:30 a. m. Sunday school.
11 a. m. Preaching.
Life's Journey. Text Heb. 11:9-10.
7 p. m. Senior Epworth League.
8 p. m. Preaching.
Subject, 'The Christian Miinstry."

Tex, Isaiah 6:8.

7:45 p. m. Wednesday, prayer-

meeting.

We have had a pleasant time on
our trip" and are glad to be home and
will be glad to see all, our members
and friends at Sunday school and

preaching, both mtorning and: evening.

First Presbyterian.
9:30 a. m. Sunday school.'
Eric Collier, superintendent.
11 a. m. Public worship.
8 p. m. Public worship.
8 p. m. Wednesday midweek
prayer meeting.
7 a. m. Thursday, union prayer
meeting of the city.
The pactor will preach at both
services tomorrow. The members of
the church and congregation are urg urged
ed urged to be in their places for all serv services.
ices. services. We must get things in shape
for the fall and winter. Several new
teachers "needed in Sunday school.
Volunteers are called for. New Pres Presbyterian
byterian Presbyterian families who have come to
the city are urged to get m line with
the work of the church. The public
is cordially invited to worship with
us. John R. Herndon, Pastor.
St. Phillip's Catholic Church

St. Philip's Sunday and holiday

services will be at 10 a. m. and at

5:30 p. m. Instruction for the chil

dren at 9 a. m.' Daily mass at 7 a. m.

Christian Science Society of Ocala
(Yonge's Hall)
10 a. m. Sunday school.
11 a. m. Srnidav service.

7:45 p. m. first Wednesday in each

month.

Free reading room and library open

on Tuesdays and Fridays xrom a wo

YOU HAVE. TRIED THE. REST
NOW USE THE BEST

It is the best from every angle you
consider it ITS- FINISH is glossy
and lasts longest because it contains
no adulterated oil; ITS DURABILI DURABILITY
TY DURABILITY is assured because the Oil is Pure
the pigments and colors are the best

and they are scientifically balanced
for service. IT IS MOST ECONOMi-

CAL because a can of 2-4-1 is all
Paint Price and your Linseed Oil at
Oil Price, thereby saving from 50
cents to 80 cents per gallon, accord

ing to the price of Linseed Oil.
ONE TRIAL WILL CONVINCE YOU

For Sate By -THE
MARION HARDWARE CO.,
Ocala. Florida

Daytona Beach, where they expect to Do you read the want ada?

Plan to attend the fair Nor. 19-22.

E J PROTECT :;

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 IUUKSLr I

I

PROTECT
YOURSELF

FROM
MOSQUITOES. (
Slay the Pesky
Critters with
FENOLE
It's the simplest
thing in the world,
'to KTTJ. Mosquitoes
with FENOLE; youj
can spray several
rooms thoroughly in
less time than it
takes to say your
prayers.
Qts. 75c; Yi Gals.
$1-35; Gal&, $2J0
Sprayers:
Pint siz 65c, Quart
size, 75c; Com.
Air Sprayers, $1-25
FenoIe Chemical Co.
Manufacturers,
Jacksonville, Fla.

ORDER TODAY-PRICES WILL
ADVANCE
Salt Fish

Delicious fresh caught, salted fish,
direct to consumer by prepaid parcel
post,; 10 pounds for $1; 21 pounds for
$2.. 7-
The St. George Co., Inc.
St. George "On the Gulf,"
APALACHICOLA, FLA.

BUY, WAR SAVINGS STAMPS
V.. ...
Own Your Own Home
7 ; A House and Two Lots
$850
A House and 3 Acres
A House ana i Lots :
' $U00
Can be Bought With Monthly Pay Pay-merits
merits Pay-merits of
$1
L M. MURRAY
Room 5, Holder Block,
Ocala. Florida

m
f

mi

1
j

H TJ 1 1 I

DR.IL J.WEIDE
EYESIGHT

SPECIAU8T.
OPTOMETRIST
,AND OPTICIAN

Be sure that child's eyes are in
proper condition before the school
study strain is put on them..
? (With -Weihe Co..' Jewelers)
Phone 25 South Side of Square
OCALA, FLORIDA

YOtfCALL A DOCTOR
-
Because

HE IS A GOOD DOCTOR

I SEND HIS PRESCRIPTIONS :
To The
i COURT PHARMACY
1 For the Same Reason

Fenole Is sold In Ocala by Anti Anti-Monopoly
Monopoly Anti-Monopoly Drag-store, Claxkson Hard Hard-Co..
Co.. Hard-Co.. Ollie JfoTdifcTydingj Drug Co.,
The Court Pharmacy. Smith Grocery
Co.. Cara-Tbomu CoH. B. Maatera
Co., Ooala (toed Store. r

Mclver & MacGay
UNDERTAKERS and EMDAUIERS
PHONES 47. 104. 305
OCALA, FLORIDA



OCALA EVENING STAB. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1918

mm
UUIS
3

1919

Mr. Phillip Dye, a former Ocalan,
now residing in St. Petersburg, is at
the express office for the present.
Your physician puts all his knowl knowledge,
edge, knowledge, skill and experience at work
when. he writes your prescription; so
do we when we fill that prescription.
,G. C. Green & Co., phone 424. tf
Commencing Saturday, Sept. 21st,
the rate for the Times-Union will be
advanced to 20c' per week, and 85c.
per month. The" retail price for the
Sunday issue will be 6c. per copy.
20-3t A. E. Gerig, Agent.
Mr. Dempsey B. Mayo, one of
Ocala's most popular citizens, always
a boy tho his hair is sprinkled with
gray, has volunteered for Y. M. C. A.
work, has been accepted V and will
leave Monday for Blueridge, N. C, to
take up preliminary training. We
don't know anybody who can help to
brighten camp life more than Demp Dempsey.
sey. Dempsey. Prompt delivery of prescriptions is
the watchword here. Tell your pbyicr
ian to leave them with us. We allow
no substitution. The Court Pharmacy.
Phone 284. tf

Absolute accuracy is our hobby in
filling prescriptions. Tell your phy physician
sician physician to leave yours with us. G. C.
Green & Co., phone 424. tf
1, I, i -..I i ..
Phone No. 451 is the American
Restaurant, Temple & Davis, proprie proprietors,
tors, proprietors, the best in the city, at the union
passenger station. 16-tf
c : 7- -:
Let us supply your TOILET AR ARTICLES.
TICLES. ARTICLES. Our line is complete, and
the prices always reasonable. The
Court Pharmacy. Phone 284. tf
Go to Gerig's Drug Store and get
two cakes of Palm Olive Soap FREE.
Ask about jt. tf
On a visit to Silver Springs last
Sunday, the Star reporter met Miss
Jones of the Palatka Post, who came
over from Palatka to see the Springs
on the first excursion, the Sunday be before,
fore, before, and was so pleased that she
made the second trip. ; Miss Jones,
like missions In America? and thou thousands
sands thousands in Florida, had no idea of the
beauties of Silver Springs. She
thought it was only a pretty but ord ordinary
inary ordinary spring and was surprised to
find it a river gushing out of the
earth. 'On the same excursion with
Miss Jones came about two dozen
other Palatkans, among them Dan
Whitfield, formerly of Ocala but now
thriving in-the Gem City.
Gerig is giving away two cakes of
1 Palm Olive Toilet Soap with a fifty fifty--
- fifty-- cent purchase of .their goods, 'tf
The pride of the Court Pharmacy is
its prescription department. Every
prescription is carefully compounded
as ordered by youn physician NO
SUBSTITUTION allowed. Phone 284.

WANTED

The use of two victrolas to be used
in teaching musical appreciation and
listening lessons one for the high
school and one for the primary school.
Th utmost care will be taken of them
and they will be kept in the princi principal's
pal's principal's office when not in use. Any one
who will be so generous as to loan
their victrola even for one month will
be doing a great "community serv service."
ice." service." The loan of good records will
also be appreciated.
If you will enter into tO plan for
the musical culture of the children of
Ocala, kindly phone 164, Miss Mar Mar-guerite
guerite Mar-guerite Porter. Each record will be
called for, used and returned immed immediately.
iately. immediately. A very essential part of a musical
education is musical appreciation.
, This can only be had through music musical
al musical intelligence created by hearing the
best music rendered by artists. .Vis .Visitors
itors .Visitors will always be welcome at these
lessons.
The following is a suggestive list
of records needed: Any records by
Galli-Curci, Tetrazzini, Melba, Gluck,
Sembrich, Farrar, Homer,. Shumann
Heink, Caruso, McCormack, Amato or
-Scotti; opera, oratorio, folk songs,
duets, quartets, sextets, marches,

waltzes, mazurkas and also Mother

Goose records and children's songs.
NOTICE TO REGISTRANTS

Miss Helen Conibear has crone to

Tallahasse to resume her studies at

the State College for Women. Lake

land Telegram.

The legal advisory board will hold
its meetings in the jury room of the
postoffice building each day until he

work is completed, except national
holidays and Sundays, from 9 a. m.
until noon, and from 2 p. m. until
5:30, p. m., to render assistance to
registrants in making out their ques

tionnaires. It is especially urged that
registrants needing assistance should

carefully study their, questionnaires
before coming for aid, and that they

be fully prepared with all data to en enable
able enable them to answer the questions in

telligently and speedily. By comply

ing with this request the work can.be
expeditiously performed without the

consumption of unnecessary time. Do
not ask for assistance unless needed.
V Legal Advisory Board,
By R. A. Burford, Chairman.

(Continued from Third Page)
Sergeant Vernon W. Gallagher is
among those who fell before Cupid's

shells at Camp Wheeler on the eve of
the soldiers' departure, says the Plant

City Courier. The bride is Miss
Mamie Theese, and according to in

formation coming from Macon, she
was in Plant City at one time and is
well known there. The wedding oc occurred
curred occurred last Wednesday evening.

Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Pillans and

children leave in their car this after afternoon
noon afternoon for Orlando, where they go to

bid good-bye to Mr. Pillans' brother,
Dr. Pillans, who leaves early next

week for camp.

Mrs. De Witt, Griffin of Ocala has

arrived in Tampa for a visit of two

weeks with relatives. Tampa Times.

Miss Mamie Hogan is now the pre

siding fairy of Druggist Green's re

freshing soda fountain.

SUPERINTENDENT BRINSON

BECOMES SEVERE

(Concluded from Second Page)

gument. He ''started off by abusing
us, then he makes a string of asser assertions
tions assertions in a tone that sounds like he

thinks we have no right to oppose a

policy that he and his educational au autocracy
tocracy autocracy favor, admits said autocracy

was too stingy to go down in its jeans

for the coin to carry on its propa propaganda
ganda propaganda and asked the school boards
of the state to make an illegal ap

propriation and finally promises a
"plain, concise statement" regarding

the said amendment.

We shall not abuse Mr. Brinson. We

have always had confidence in his

honesty and good sense, but we think
his judgment has wobbled on this

ten-mill amendment. We oppose it

because:

A constitutional amendment is a

very clumsy and awkward manner of
fixing taxation, particularly at a

time like this when economic matters
are in a fluid state, and we should not

make, any hard and fast agreement
about taxation until the war is over
and we can form some idea of what

affairs will be afterward.

It' is unwise and unpatriotic to add

a single mill unless it is absolutely
necessary to local or state taxation
during the war.

The schools already have the lion's

share of the public funds and do not

need any more, if as much, as other

departments of the county and state
work.

We already have a very unjust and

unequal system of taxation. Thou

sands of men and women in the state
pay little or nothing on their person

al property ,and millions of dollars
worth of such property is untaxed,
which if it paid its pro rata would

give more money for the schools and
everything else on a lower instead of
a higher millage. On the other hand,

some people and some property pay

all 'the taxes, and this ten-mill

amendment would add to their load

without corresponding, benefit. It is

much better for us to go to work and
try to establish a sensible and some somewhere
where somewhere near equable system of taxa taxation
tion taxation than to lay three more sawlogs
on thealready overburdened camel's
back.

MRS. MINNIE A. BOSTICK
Presents the new styles and simplic simplicity
ity simplicity in fall and winter millinery. Har Harrington
rington Harrington Hall corner. Phone 310.
GOSSARD
Corsets and Brassiers new models.

MODEL

MAX

MAS

W V

Call and get the last minute styles
in millinery at the Affleck Millinery
Parlor, south side Ocala House block.

' WACAHOOTA
Wacahoota, Sept. 20. The farmers
are quite busy gathering corn and
saving hay and peanuts while the sun
shines.
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Bradley and
daughter, Lucile and Misses Theora
and Leola Smith were shopping in
Micancpy Friday.
Mr. C. R. Curry and daughter, Miss
Thelma, were business visitors to
Micanopy Thursday.
, Mr. 'and Mrs. R. P. Smith motored
over to Williston Saturday afternoon
to take Miss Loleta Rawls and Mrs.
Shade Rawls, who have been Mrs.
Smith's guests for the past two
weeks.

Mr. and Mrs. Elvin Bruton were
week-end guests of Mrs. M. Phiney of

Raleigh last week. -We
are glad to note Mr. Bruton is
much better and able to go back to
work on route No. 2.
Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Tyson and chil

dren and Mr. T. J. McKinney were

visitors to the University City Sat
urday afternoon.

Mrs. Lute Howell and Mfs. Elvin
Bruton went on a shopping trip to

Micanopy Saturday afternoon.
Sunday now seems very quiet thru
here as we do not ever hear a "fliv-

! ver" pass through.

jir. ana ; airs, v r. amitn returnea
Saturday afternoon from an outing at
Salt Springs. Mr. J. M. Smith and

family motored to Ocala to meet

them.

, Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Herrin and

children were visitors -to Micanopy

last Tuesday. They were-guests of

Mrs. J. R. Reeves to dinner.

ARRIVE,
A carload of six handsome new 1919 Model Maxwell
Touring cars has just arrived at Ocala.
They are by long odds the handsomest and best cars the
Maxwell Factory has ever put out.
Many new refinements and improvements have been
made. Some of them are:-
' '.., j 1
v ' '
. ' . r' ... :
A much better top, better upholstering, an improved
Dual ignition system, handsome new mahogany instru instrument
ment instrument Board, improved wheels and rims, Gasolene Tank
on rear, Stewart Vacuum feed, new arid better Carburet Carbureter,
er, Carbureter, Heavier and stronger rear end system etc., and the
priceisonly

MiodDdD

as

Delivered, fireigM amncR war flax inclndedi.
nil is 200.00 MiMeF any Aluer car of ills
vaMe in flBue mmairlkett.
Tnis price is nott gjniiarantteecl foeyond flltois
snipineiill, so comie alt ounce if yon wanfl
one.
Attttracttive ttimne selling plain, iff yona wlsln.
Hie Maxwell is line mnostt economical car
in ttBue inarlkett. Bettfler gett youiF cap wlnile
your can, Soon very soon, fllnere may toe
none.

. V

A
V.

OCALA,

IR. JR. cairirol.il,

FLORIDA

MRS. MINNIE A. BOSTICK'S
Smart millinery, line features all the
clever dominating models shown.
Harrington Hall corner. Phone 310.

GOSSARD J
Corsets and Brassiers new models. 1

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS

Have vou used Klenzo Dental

tube. tf

DAVIS' PORCH AND ECK PAINT
is made especially to resist all weath weather
er weather conditions so when painting why
not use the thing for the purpose? It
will cost no more will look right and
wear right.
For Sale By
THE MARION HARDWARE CO..
Ocala, Florida

RATES: Six line maximum, on
time 25a; three times 50c.; six times
75c; one month S3. Parable In advance.
WANTED, LOST, FOUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM-
ILAR LOCAL NEEDS

DRESSMAKING Mrs. S. C. M.
Thomas, 103 Watula street. tf
WANTED At once, lady or man,
timekeeper and invoice clerk. Plant
near Ocala. Address "M," care the
Ocala Star. 20-t

LOST Ford back light with license
number 1175B attached. Finder will
please return to W. W.' Harriss. 3t-19
FOR SALE Two good milk cows.
Can be bought- for $75 each if taken
at once. A bargain. Apply to C. A.
Holloway, 715 South Lime St. 18-6t

ROOMS FOR RENT At the Dormi-

ftory, furnished or unfurnished for

light housekeeping. "Half price to
over night lodgers." Hot and cold wa
ter. Roome large and airy; best venti ventilated
lated ventilated in town at lowest prices. 'Par 'Parents,
ents, 'Parents, now i3 the time to arrange for
residence, 703 S. Pond St., or phone
305. Mrs C. V. Roberts, new mat matron,
ron, matron, eod

....
FOR RENT A five-room cottage,
close in, good location, all modern
conveniences, very close to primary
and high school houses. Apply to S.
H. Christian, city. 14-tf

FOR SALE Eight good mules.
Nathan Mayo, Summerfield, Fla. 12t

FOR RENT Lunch room furnished;
rent cheap. Inquire 804 S. Alvarez
St., Mrs. Elliott. 16-?
FLAT FOR RENT A 4-room down downstairs
stairs downstairs flat; all modern conveniences.
Apply to Mrs. T. H. Wallis, 603 South
Second street. 5-tf

FOR SALE A new set of stocks and
dies at a bargain; scarcely used at
all. Apply to R. E. Yonge. 16-6t

WANTED To rent with privilege of
buying, 40 to 100 -acre farm suitable

for hogs; good land and priced right;
near town as possible. Particulars in
first letter; possession at once. Ad Address
dress Address Advertiser, care Star. 16-6t
FOR SALE A hand or power ma machinist's
chinist's machinist's drill, anvil, etc Apply to R.
E. Yonge. 16-6t
FOR RENT Immediate possession,
residence on Fort King avenue for formerly
merly formerly occupied by Mr. Hetrick. Ap Apply
ply Apply to Mrs. McDowell, next door
east. 9-9-f

TEACHERS' EXAMINATION

Notice is hereby given that the ex examining
amining examining board will be in Ocala to
conduct teachers' examinations be beginning
ginning beginning on Tuesday, October 15,
1918.
For full information apply to'
9-20-wky J. H. Brinson, Supt.
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER
ANfJ BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Con Contract
tract Contract work. Gives More and Better
Work for the Money than any other
contractor in the city.

n



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mods:recordCreationDate 841027
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mods:recordContentSource University of Florida
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mods:caption 1918
mods:number 1918
Enum2
September
9
Enum3
21
21
lccn 84027622
oclc 11319138
mods:titleInfo
mods:title Ocala weekly star
mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
mods:geographic Ocala (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ651_2
Marion County (Fla.)
Newspapers
mods:hierarchicalGeographic
mods:country United States
mods:state Florida
mods:county Marion
mods:city Ocala
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Ocala evening star
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Ocala Evening Star
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Star
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sobekcm:Name Porter & Harding
sobekcm:PlaceTerm Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
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sobekcm:SortDate 693595
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2 9 September
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