The Ocala evening star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:07032

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
OCALA
V NT

NG

fcVlcN

Washington, Sept. 7. Fair weath weather
er weather with a return to normal tempera temperatures
tures temperatures is the forecast for the coming
week in the southeastern states.

OCALA, FLORIDA, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1918.

VOL 25, NO. 216

91
0

Is in Rapid Course of Organiza

tion

AMERICA! TROOPS UN A TEH-MILE FRONT LAST IIIGHT REACH REACH-''
'' REACH-'' ED THE

X

HELLISH

Washington, Sept. 7. The organi

zation of the First American field

army in France is progressing so rap

idly, General March told the members

of the Senate military committee to

day, that nearly 05 per cent of the
American troop3 brigaded with the

French and British have been with

drawn and are being assembled at a

point he didn't designate. This ac- Three and a Half Years Experience

OF

counts for the small number of Anv

ericans engaged in the present for forward
ward forward movement of the Allies. The
chief of staff said there were now. be between
tween between ninety and one hundred thou

sand Americans with the British

of a Russian in a German Prison

Camp.

m

mm

NO

M
IIJI

PIU1

GOOD WEATHER BROUGHT OUT A GOOD CflOVD TO
SEE TODAY'S GAME

(Committee on Public Information)

For three and one-half years I

General March also told the news- was a prisoner in a German prison

paoer correspondents that Franco- camp. At the end of that time 1 was

American troops reached the Aisne on fortunate enough to escape. Although

a ten-mile front last night. 1 am a Kussian, tne peace oi crest-

General March disclosed 'the new LitovsJt did not give me my freedom.

policy of the' government, which will (Like the enemy subjects who were in

be to have General Pershing forward the same camp, l naa to wait my

twice a week lists of all the wounded, chance to make a perilous dash for

Cable reports will include the dead liberty.

and missing when the system is in ef- Although much has already been
fect. I written in the press of all countries

about the treatment of war prisoners

TEARING HOLES IN THE TEU- in Germany, nevertheless I believe

TONS Jthat I have had experiences which
' I are. to 1 a certain extent, uniaue and

With the Americans on the Aisne worth relating-. The canu in which I

Front, Saturday morning. (By the was confined is Camn Holzminden. on

Associated Press.) Additional forces the Weser. At this place a great

and supplies were brought up by ootn numDer of civilians who have in no

Americans and French during the WSLy participated in the war are held
night, and today the line again ad- Lative It is not a camo f or mili-

vanced. Allied artillery is being used tary prisoners; it i a camp for ene-

to vear holes in tne uerman lines. mv civilians.

With the American Army on the Th Tefrime at -Holzminden was

Aisne Front, Sept. 7, Noon. (By the fairiy mild until the beginning of
Associated Press.) The Germans 1917 But wnen General Haehnisch,
fell back a short distance today be- a barbarous old despot, was named

fore the pressure oi the i- rencn ana generai 0f the Tenth .Army Corps, to

Americans to the east oi neviiion, which district Holzminden belongs,

about the center oi tne line Detween the camp conditions were utterly
Conde and Rheims. changed at once. In the place of the

former commanding officer. General

CASUALTY LIST I Pf ImrraHt.. xvhn had treated the nris-

oners with decency and a certain

The following casualties are re nTT,mint nf consideration. Colonel

ported by the commanding general oi Qallus was appointed, a half -crazy

the American Expeditionary Forces: individual, vfith years of experience
Killpd in action ............. 27 1 as a prison director. With the help

Missing in action .. ; 15 of a ,group of his underlings, more

Wounded severely .....164 ruthless. than nimseu, tne coionei

Died of wounds ................ 151 very soon suceeded in establishing a

Died (accident and other causes) 2 German prison regime at Uolzmin

Wounded (degree undetermined) 69 den.

W'ounded slightly 1 Heaviest wotk itequirea.

This regime involved forcing i;he

Chicago, Sept. 7. The sun was
shining brightly this morning and the
forecast promised fair weather for
the third game of the World Series
this afternoon.
The indications were that the first
real crowd of World Series magnitude
would attend today's game. Early es estimates
timates estimates were 35,000. The revival of
interest is attributed partly to the
Cub victory yesterday and partly to
the perfect weather.
BATTERIES
Boston: Mays and Schan.
Chicago: Vaughn and Killifer.
UMPIRES
Klem at plate; Owens, O'Day and
Hilddbrand.
' FIRST INNING
Boston, 0; Chicago, 0. ;
'.-.,
The successive innings and the re result
sult result of the game will be bulletined at
the Star office as fast as they come
in, and our friends are invited to come
and see them.

RAST WAS REMOVED

Tax Collector of Duval County Said
to be Short in. His
Accounts

DAILY REPORT OF
INSTRUMENTS FILED

Furnished the Star by the Florida
Title and Abstract Corporation

Deeds Filed Sept. 6th
'Mabry Sumner to Wm. C. Charles,
warranty deed, dated Aug. 30, 1918.
Consideration, $100. Lot 84 of Chace
addition known as Linwood Park.
Cato Wallace, by special master, to
Robert W. Ferguson, master's deed,
dated Sept. 6, 1918. Consideration,
$300. East three quarters of south

east quarter of southeast quarter of
sec 9-14-20.

Let us supply your TOILET AR

TICLES. Our line is complete, and

the prices always reasonable. The
Court Pharmacy. Phone 284. tf

Total

r

...293

prisoners to do the heaviest sort of

The only Florida Yiame on the list iflho- Everv dav thev were reauired

is that of Private Henry Smith, St. to break up and haul stone, build

Augustine; wounaea in action. roads, and work in the fields. The

road building: was at a distance of

STEAMER SUNK BY . from five to six kilometers from the

t -

A SUPPLY SHIP camp. Work in the factories of Holz

minden was also looked up on as a

Atlantic City, N. J., Sept. 7. Five camp duty. Because of the fact that

lives are reported lost when the Unit-the prisoners were for the most part

ed Fruit Company steamer Almirante J students, engineers, merchants, and

was sunk by the United States supply So on, who' were unused to physica

ship Hisco in. a collision at sea yes-J labor of this sort, the tasks were par par-terday.
terday. par-terday. The Hisco picked up four of ticularly onerous. Furthermore, the

the dead along with the survivors and guards were instructed to keep nag

the crew of a coastguard station pick- ging at the prisoners constantly, to
ed up the body of the fifth victim and make them work faster.
placed it on board the Hisco. The manner of these guards is

quite indescribable. They received
APPRECIATIVE BOYS from the olonel himself orders of
TTia Star received this afternoon the most outrageous sort. To speed

tha fnllmvW message from the lit- the work of the prisoners, they were

tie band of selects vho left for Camp told to strike them with their fists

Jackson the other day: and with clubs. At the most trivial
Please express to the Ocala Red offense they were instructed to shoot.
Cross chapter our thanks for the If a guard was so rash as to be
dod us as we were leaving, friendly with one of the captives, he

Harry McCully. was severely punished. To make the
West Keeffe. guards more zealous in their work,
Roy Godwin. Colonel Gallus informed them that all
W. C White. :
Landis Blitch. (Concluded on Fourth Page)

(Associated Press)
Jacksonville, Sept. 7. John W.
Rast, tax collector of Duval county,
today was removed from office by the
governor following the discovery by
a state' auditor of an alleged shortage
of $146,000. No arrest was made.
JUSSERAND SIZED

UP "THE GERMANS

in

Unable to Stem Advance of
f
the Allies

FnEUCtU BRITISH AIJD ALIERICAIIS PUSHING THEM HARD 01!
ALL FRONTS

French Ambassador Predicts that the
Enemy's Peace as His War
Offensives Will Fail

(Associated Press)
New York, Sept. 7. A stirring ad

dress by Julius Jusserand, French
ambassador to the United States, in
which he asserted the "enemy is

doomed" and "we shall choose and
appoint, the day for peace," brought
to an end last night New York's cele celebration
bration celebration of the one hundred and sixty sixty-first
first sixty-first birthday anniversary of the
Marquis de LaFayette and the fourth
anniversary of the first battle ,of the
Marne. In an address delivered at
the banquet of the Franco-American
Society, Jusserand paid tribute to
American war efforts, showed the in insincerity
sincerity insincerity of former German peace of offers,
fers, offers, and predicted the enemy's next
peace offensive will fail as will his
other offensives.

Did you mean to keep your war
savings pledge when you signed that
card? Then make good.
Our serial story starts in Monday
afternoon's paper.

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London, Sept. 7, 1 p. m. Tergnier,
three miles west of LaFere, has been
captured by the French. The French
have advanced on a twenty-mile front

to an average depth of two miles and
in some places four miles. They oc occupied
cupied occupied Tergnier without opposition.
The French also reached the forest
of Foucy and are now on a big stretch
of new ground.
British progress on practically the
whole battle front from Havrincourt
wood to the Aisne continued this
morning with rather greater rapidity
than had been expected.
CAPTURED FOREST OF COUCY

Paris, Sept. 7. On the front be between
tween between the Somme and the Oise, the
French continued to pVess fojrward
last night, overcoming the resince
of the German rear guard, it fy offic officially
ially officially announced. Pushing east of Ham
the French occupied the towns of
Dury and Ollezy, more than three
miles beyond Ham., North v of the
Ailette the French won the entire

'lower forest of Coucy. North of the

Vesle where the Americans have been
advancing, there has been no change
in the situation.
BIG GAINS FOR BRITISH
London, Sept. 7. The .Britis"h ad advanced
vanced advanced last night on the front to the
southeast and northeast of Peronne
and captured the towns of Hanscourt,
Sorell-Le-Grant, Metz, and Encoture,
it is officially announced. Fighting
their way 'toward the left flank of the
German positions along the Canal
TiuNnrd from Havrincourt northward.

the British penetrated the western

part of Havrincourt, taking prison prisoners.
ers. prisoners. In Flanders the British are
pushing toward Messines ridge, and
advanced their lines a short distance

in the direction of town. North of
the LaBassee canal British patrols
made headway in the vicinity of Can-

teleux and Violaines.

BRITISH ADVANCE NORTH AND
EAST

With the British Armies in France,

Sept. 7. Noon (By Associated Press)
British troops today advanced to the
east of Lonsravesnes and Lieramont,

in the region northeast of Peronne.

Other forces crossed the Nurlu-ins

road. In the Lys salient, the British
north of Ercrainehem are pushing to

ward the western bank of the river

Lys. The British have advanced north

of hill 63 to LerossicmoL

The British are well to the east of

Encourt, more than, nine miles to the

east of .the Somme, along the Cologne

river. Lincourt has been reached.

EXPLOITING FINLAND

Paris. Sept. 7. A treaty alliance

has been concluded between Germany

anH Finland under which the entire

manpower of Finland has been put at

Germany's disposal, according to a

dispatch to the Matin, from Copen
hagen.

Klenzo Tooth Paste Is the best we

have ever offered to the trade. It is

cleansing and refreshing, and the

pricee only 25 cents at Gerig's Drug

Store. . zi-ti

IE

THE BOARDS

Employes are Advised to Claim Ex Ex-emption
emption Ex-emption for their Most Valued
Employes

B. GOLDMAN
Candidate for Alderman from the Fourth Ward

The Reason
We Arc Giving Service
$50,000 MachUie Shop
OCALA IRON WORKS GARAGE

(Associated Press)
Washington, Sept. 1 As an addi

tional step in the process of speeding
up the draft organizations in the en endeavor
deavor endeavor to secure the induction into

the military service in October men

rom the new draft registration next

Thursday, Provost Marshal General

Crowder is planning enlargement of
the local and district boards 'wher 'wherever
ever 'wherever necessary.

Announcement .has been made that

General Crowder has telegraphed
draft executives in all states asking

if an increase in the size of the
boards would hasten their operation.

Boards already have been authorized -to
use additional registrars on Sept.

2th..
Employes or dependents of regis

tered men who for patriotic reasons
may object to entering a claim for
deferred classification on the grounds x
of dependency or the nature of their

occupation, will prevent injustice by
making the exemption claims for the

men it was said at the provost mar marshal
shal marshal general's office. There is a form
for such claims in the questionnaire,
it was pointed out, and local boards
will find their duties more complicat complicated
ed complicated if registrants entitled to exemp-,

tion do not claim it or some inter

ested person does not make the claim

in their behalf.
DREARY DAYS AFTER DECEM

BER
Washington, Sept. 7. The food ad

ministration announced last night
that the manufacture of beer in the

United States will be prohibited after

next December as a war measure. It

is said the decision was reached at a.

conference between the president and

representatives of the food and rail railroad
road railroad administrations and the war in industries
dustries industries board.

Factors which influenced the decis

ion to prohibit the manufasture of

beer after December, the announce announcement
ment announcement said, were further necessity of

industries for the whole fuel produs-

tive capacity of the country, consid

erable drouth, which has materially
affected the supply of feeding stuff
for next year, strain upon transpor transportation
tation transportation to handle' the necessary indus-

tries and shortage of labor caused by

enlargement of the army program.
Washington, Sept. 7 The twelve-million-dollar
agricultural bill, with a

rider for national prohibition from
next July 1st, passed the Senate last
night without roll call.
A DIFFERENT LINE OF TALK
Washington, Sept. 7- Germany and
Austria have agreed that the present
time is no time to start an offensive
according to a dispatch from Switzer Switzerland.
land. Switzerland. Reporting on the recent confer conference
ence conference at Vienna Admiral Von Hintze
and Count Burian, the message said
the Teutonic foreign ministers agreed
that the entente must be made to
realize that Marshal Foch cannot
break the German front and that
years may be required to defeat Ger Germany.
many. Germany. 4 ,v-

Thursday, September Twelfth, has Been Set By President Wilson as Registration Day. On
that Day Every Man from Eighteen to Forty-Five Years of Age; Not Previously Registered,
Must Register in His Voting Precinct. Be Prompt and Patriotic and Save Yourself and
Your Government Trouble. i



OCALA EVENING STAB, SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 7. 1918

OCALA EVENING STAR

Published Every Day Except Sunday by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY
OF OCALA, FLA.
R. K. Carroll, President
P. V, UTBgwHl, Sccretary-Treaaorcr
J. H. Benjamlu, Editor
Entered at Ocala, Fla., xstofflce as
Second-class matter.
TELEPHONES
RnatafM Offlet . . . .FIve-Oae
Editorial Department Two-Severn
Society Editor Five. Double-One
MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press Is exclusively
entitled for the use for republication of
all news dispatches credited to it or
, iiO otherwise credited in this paper
and also the local news published
herein. All rights of republication of
special dispatches herein are also re reserved.
served. reserved. ADVERTISING RATES
Display t Plate 10c. per inch for con consecutive
secutive consecutive insertions. Alternate inser insertions
tions insertions 25 per cent, additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charged on ads. that run less than
times 5c per inch. Special position
: 20 per cent, additional. Hates based on
4-inch minimum. Less than four Inches
will take higher rate, which will be
. furnished on application.
ReadfasT Xotlceat 5c per line for first
insertion; 3c per line for eaoh subse subse-'
' subse-' ouent insertion. One change a week
allowed on readers without extra coen coen-.
. coen-. oOBlttor charges.
Legal advertisements at legal rates.
Electros must be mounted, or charge
will be made for mounting.
- SUBSCRIPTION RATES r :
Domestic
One year. In advance....... ....J 5.00
Six months, in advance 2,50
Three months, in advance 1.25
One month, in advance .50
Foreign
One year, In advance. ........... .$8.00
8ix months, in advance 4.25
hree months, in advance.. 2.25
One month. In advance .80
Wonder how long it will be before
the German prople get tired of their
military liars slinging the bulletin.
t Look out for the Star's big serial
story, "The Kaiser as I Knew Him'
which will begin in Monday's paper.
.i
Too many people 'are looking for
the pay in patriotism. St. Augus Augustine
tine Augustine Record.
Too many are not looking for any anything
thing anything else. -;'
"Judge Bullock," says the Leesburg
Commercial; "has qualified ; as the
chief tick eradicator for the state.
And, considering that he has been a
cattle raiser io fifteen years, wcmay
safely consider his opinion not only
legal but just."
Rev. R. C. Dobson, D. D., camp
secretary Y. M. C. A. branch at the
naval,' marine and army aviation
camps at Miami, will preach at the
Methodist church Sunday at 8 p. m.
Dr. Dobson is a delightful speaker
and everyone should take this oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity of hearing him. Don't forget
it is tomorrow night at 8 o'clock, at
the Methodist church.
ikyv i tic utai is vcijr owiiy iaj ucax ui
the death of John, the little son -of
Mr. Joseph; Parker at Cotton Plant.
The boy was helping his father in the
field, was bitten by a rattlesnake, and
in spite of all efforts to save him died
Thursday night. His remains were
buried at Cotton Plant Friday. The
Star sincerely sympathizes with his
relatives and friends in their loss.
Messrs. Harvey Clark and ueorge

V Pasteur expect to start out early next

week to try to raise more funds for
the band. They have made a good
start and hope to keep things going.
It is the intention of the band to
give a concert every Friday night the
weather will permit, and it is hardly
necessary to say they cannot hit on
any plan that will give the people
more pleasure.
One of the reasons advanced for
,the infliction of the study of Latin on
the public schools is that it gives the
scholars the derivation of many
; words. The same argument could be

s made for German. It is essential for a
' student to know the meaning of a
v word, but non-essential for him to
know its derivation. If it be neces necessary
sary necessary for him to know the derivation
of a word, he can find out more from
a Webster's unabridged dictionary in
a couple of hours than he can by
studying Latin thru a full school

term. - -
Ocala. is threatened with a dreadful
calamity a coca-cola famine. Two

iountains have run out oi the Candler
juice, and the others have only just
so much. The trouble is caused by
those greedy people, who drink too
much. We take only four coca-colas
v a day, and if everybody else would be
as moderate or more so, there would
; be enough. It's the dope swines who
lap up five or more drinks per diem
that cause the trouble.- They should
be put on rations.
Thea Oklawaha Valley railroad will
run traits between Ocala and Silver
Springs tomorrow afternoon, in order
, to enable many of our people to en enjoy
joy enjoy bathing in the springs, which the
"- Sunday auto regulation deprived them
of last Sunday. The trains will leave
Ocala at 2 and 4:30 o'clock, and re.

turning leave the springs at 3:30 and
6. Round trip fare 30 cents. This
is a public-spirited act on the part of
v the little railroad and we hope our
k. people will appreciate it.
A v
' For the last two afternoons, the
'ttar has held up its forms to obtain
counts of the World's Series games.

This has delayed the issue of the pa paper
per paper two hours or more. We can't do
this any more. After this, the paper
will go to press at its usual hour, but
the reports of the game will be bul bulletined
letined bulletined at the Star office and our
friends are invited to come and read
them. It is possible that we will be
able to publish the reports of the
games played in Boston, but hardly
any more in Chicago. We notice the
other afternoon papers have not been
printing the reports and suppose the
reason is the heavy draft made by

the government on the wires, which
constantly hold up newspaper dis
patches.
IT IS TAXATION INSTEAD
OF EDUCATION
Editor Star: A few days ago you
published a list of the high school
text books prescribed for use in the
schools of Florida that was furnished
by myself, under a heading that
would carry the impression that this
price list would have something to do
with the proposed ten-mill amend
ment. - ' :
This list of books has nothing
whatever to do with the funds secur
ed by taxation for the maintenance of
the public school system.
This list simply covers the books
allowed to be used in the high schools
of the state and are at' as reasonable
rate as they can be bought anywhere
and the pretense that the price of
books is keeping children ; out of
school or that the number of books
they study is keeping children out' of
school is the thinnest kind of moon moonshine
shine moonshine and there is absolutely nothing
to it. ;
In a few of the counties of Florida
and in many states the text books are
furnished to the pupils from from
public funds and there" is no place in
the t world from which to get public
funds except from the public and
that through taxation.
Surely there can be no person of
anything like approximate intelli intelligence
gence intelligence who would at this critical
stage of the world's history advocate
letting down the standard of Ameri American
can American intelligence and substituting &
haphazard condition of ignorance. It
would be criminal and would invite
a condition of illiteracy similar to
that experienced during and immed immediately
iately immediately following the civil war in the
southern states for which you have
probably heard hundreds of apologies
upon the ground that there were no
schools in those days. In other words
there was no public school system
and thousands upon thousands of peo people
ple people grew up in illiteracy.
Is this an encouraging or a patriot patriotic
ic patriotic picture to hold up in front of your yourself
self yourself and the youth of the land? r
Very truly yours,
-;r v J. H. Brinson.
We are afraid we shall have to list
our good friend, Mr. Brinson, among
those people who maintain that if
anything is not white it is black. They
will not concede, there are seven col colors
ors colors in, between, and an object that is
not white may be blue or red or gold
or brown. No, they insist, if it isnt
white it, just perfectly can't help be being
ing being black. Also, thejy insist, if one
is not with them in everything,' he
must be against them in everything.
They will not allow you to agree with
them in 60 or 70 or 80 per. cent of
anything. You must go the whole
hog or you can't' have any pork.
Publishing the price list has this
much to do with the proposed ten ten-mill
mill ten-mill amendment, 'that the cost of the
books is great and that a man who
has to pay for them is already loaded
heavily without another 30 cents per
annum m taxes stuck on every hun
dred dollars worth of his property.
The cost of books and the ten-mill tax
may not have anything in common,
but they have this in uncommon, that
they are both excessive and both
have to come out of the taxpayer's
pocket.
The books may sell at as reason reasonable
able reasonable rate, as anywhere but the people
might prefer to think it is unreason unreasonable
able unreasonable rather than reasonable. At any
rate, it is very high, and it is no con consolation
solation consolation to the overtaxed people to
tell them they don't have to pay more
than anybody else. We are under the
impression, however, that they are to
be obtained at a lower, rate in some
other states. We have heard a great
many school patrons complain of the
price of books. ; A man with a large
family,, and who is too proud, as
many are, to let his school district
supply his children with books, has
a problem hard to solve when school
time comes around. Mr. Brinson to
the contrary notwithstanding, we
have known the price of books, com combined
bined combined with other adverse circum circumstances,
stances, circumstances, to keep a. good many children
out of school. There is not such a
thing as. free books anywhere.; Eve Every
ry Every self-respecting man prefers to pay
for his children's books. If he can't,
his neighbor has to help pay for
them, and in either case, one or the
other pays an average of $1.50 for
books that should cost him $1.
However, we can't get away from
the price of the books. The book
trusts have us where the wool is
short. But we can refrain from vot voting
ing voting any more taxes on ourselves.
Mr. Brinson converses thru his hat
when he tries to give the inference
that we favor letting down the stand standard
ard standard of intelligence and returning to
the conditions that existed at the
close of the civil war. He knows that
the Star has always stood for educa education.
tion. education. Mr. Brinson is now not argu arguing
ing arguing for education. He is arguing for
taxation, and the Star says of taxes
we already have enough. The schools

now have sufficient money to educate
the children if the school boards did
not insist on their being taught so
much that is of little or no use.
The public is sorrowfully aware
that Mr. Brinson is correct when he
says there is no place in the world to

get public funds except from the pub
lic. Public officials are getting money
from the public. They are getting it
in gobs and stacks, and they are
spending more than they get, as will
be seen by ; the constantly increasing
public debts. Our officials have very
little idea of government except to
tax the people and spend the money.
In this state and county the people
are already heavily taxed, and the
schools are receiving their full share
of the proceeds. We have a 20-mill
tax, in the county of which the schools
receive seven. We have a 9-mill state
tax, of which a considerable portion,
we don't know how much, goes to the
university and other higher schools.
The poll taxes go to the schools and
in addition almost every school dis district
trict district in the county has its special tax
from one to three mills, almost all
of them the latter two figures. The
Ocala, Citra and some other districts
are bonded for new school houses. The
average taxpayer is paying from ten
to fifteen mills for education.
So far as our own county is con
cerned, we have no kick to make. We
have always had a competent and
honest school board and board of
commissioners. They have handled
school funds very well, and we do not
think our present school taxes are
higher than they have to be. Our
school board, of course, is not re responsible
sponsible responsible for the price of books nor
the course of study which is fixed by
the state. Unfortunately, we have to
help pay for delinquencies of other
counties and errors committed or al
lowed by the legislature and state of
ficials.
We are opposed to adopting any
amendment to the constitution that is
not absolutely necessary, particularly
at this time. jNobody knows how a
constitutional amendment will work
until it is tried, and it is harder to
get rid of than the seven-year itch.
The Florida legislature is very reck
less with the people's money, and is
very near-sighted about public af
fairs, nevertheless, we do not think it
would have presented .this amend
ment to the people if it had foreseen
present conditions. At present, prices
are high, work abundant and money
plentiful, except in rural Florida. In
two years or less, the war is going to
end. The soldiers will come back
home. A lot of people who are now
getting big pay 'will have to give up
their situations and jobs to the sol soldiers.
diers. soldiers. The country, speeded up to
production, will have supplies in
plenty instead of scarcity. Prices
will drop. The teachers who left
their profession to make big money
will be mighty glad to return to it,
for the same or lower salaries than
they receive now. But, if we vote
this amendment, our taxes and other
high taxes, will be fastened on us. We
have so far no conception of the taxes
we are going to have to pay in conse
quence of the war. If the averaere
mWn has to pay no more than twenty twenty-five
five twenty-five dollars on every hundred he has,
he will be lucky.
The trouble about Mr. Brinson and
the other members of the teacher
class is that they are working simply
and solely for present conditions.
They are not thinking of what will
happen after the war. They want to
keep the schools speeded up, when
they ought to know they can be and
must be slowed down for a year or
two. Like other public officials, they
have no remedy for anything but
"more money," and as Mr. Brinson
truly says, there is no way to get pub public
lic public money except to tax the people.
OAK'S IMPORTANT INDUSTRY
Ocala has a more than usually in intelligent
telligent intelligent man in Mr. F. H. Logan,
manager and one of the stockholders
of the McDowell Crate & Lumber
Company,,, the large crate and box
factory at Oak. This company is
manufacturing the four-one packing
boxes for the government and has
been "turning out large quantities of
them since last September. The box
is made of thin veneering, wired to together
gether together at each end, and is shipped
with the four sides of the box all in
one piece, laid out flat in the cars.
The heads, a light but very strong
frame, has the thin veneering fasten fastened
ed fastened on with staples, all ready to as assemble
semble assemble in an instant's time, when the
boxes arrive at the packing houses.
This box the quartermaster's depart department
ment department of the government has found to
be very light and almost indistructi indistructi-ble,
ble, indistructi-ble, and is six cents cheaper per box
than the heavier boxes, when metal
strapped, as they have to be when
shipped overseas. These boxes are
manufactured by machines, put out
on royalty by the Wire Bound Cor Corporation
poration Corporation and are handled through the
Four-One Association. The machines
which make them are wonderful and
rapid and the work of making them
at Oak, as well as the many vege vegetable
table vegetable crates, baskets and orange
crates is most interesting.
Mr, Logan has just returned from
Chicago, where he was called by spe special
cial special resolution, to meet and take part
We Are Doing
Yonr Neighbors Repairs Repairs-Why
Why Repairs-Why Not Yours?
OCALA IRON WORKS GARAGE

OCALA,
FLORIDA
in all of the deliberations of a several
days session of the board of govern governors
ors governors of the four-one people. The American-Association
of Boxmakers was
also in session at the same time and
Mr. Logan attended this meeting. j
, ".j
AT THE CHURCHES TOMORROW i
Methodist
9:30 a. m. Sunday school.
11 a. m. Preaching.
Sermon by Bishop H. C. Morrison.
8 p. m. Address by Rev. Robson
of the Y. M. C. A.
8 p. m. Wednesday, prayer meeting.
7 p. m. Senior League.
Smith Hardin, Pastor.
Baptist
First Baptist services will (D. V.)
be conducted by the pastor on Sunday
morning and -evening.
9:30 a. m. Sunday school.
11 a. m. Morning worship.
Subject, Fellowship with Jesus.
8 p. m. People's service.
Subject, The Message of Indian
Spring.
We invite all our old friends and
assure a hearty welcome to new ones.
Grace Episcopal
(Rev. Gilbert A. Ottmann, Rector)
9:45 a. m.--Sunday school..
7:30 a. m. Holy communion, every
Sunday.
11 a, m. Holy communion and
sermon, first Sunday.
11 a. m. Morning prayer and ser sermon,
mon, sermon, except first Sunday.
All seats free. Every cue welcome
at all services.
' v
St. Phillip's Catholic Church
.St. Philip's Sunday and holiday
services will be at 10 a. m. and at
5:30( p. m. Instruction for the chil children
dren children at 9 a. m. Daily mass at 7 a. m.
!.
Christian Science Society of Ocala
j Yonge's Hall)
lU a. m. Sunday school.
11 a. m. Sunday service.
7:45 p. m. first Wednesday in each
month.
Free reading room and library open
on Tuesdays and Fridays from 3 to 5.
MRS. MINNIE A. BOSTICK'S
Tailored Hats are very attractive and
appropriate for fall wear. All the new
designs can be found here. Harring
ton Hall corner, Ocala. ltwky
All 100 per cent Americans are
making good their war savings
pledge. Are you?
W. K. Lane, M-' D., Physician amd
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat. Law Library Building, Ocala,
Florida. tf
Motor and transmission parts for
Buoick vars, very low price. At the
Maxwell Service Station. 9-5
Is 'your word to Uncle Sam and his
soldiers good? Then prove it.
Duty says, make good your war
savings pledge. Patriotism calls for
more.
Gordon Seat Covers for Maxwell
car at less than cost. Apply at the
Maxwell Service Station. 9-5-
Advertise In the Star.
DR. K. J. WEIDE
EYESIGHT
SPECIALIST,
OPTOMETRIST
AND OPTICIAN
Don't scold your children if they
squint. Their eyes may need atten
tion.
(With Weihe Co., Jewelers)
' Phone 25 South Side of Square
OCALA. FLORIDA
DAVIS' CARRIAGE PAINTS
are colors ground in tough, elastic
CJoach Varnisn and one coat will maxe
your faded automobile or carriage
look like new. They are easy to ap apply
ply apply and dry with a strong, high gloss
inching Enamel finish. Made ior
wear and tea. 2-8
ror Sale By
THE MARION HARDWARE CO,
Ocala, Florida

SAFETY

You have been helping your Government by
buying United States Bonds. Maybe you would in invest
vest invest further if you hd a safe place to keep the bonds.
We have decided therefore to take care of your
bonds free of cost. Bring them at once. Those who
have not finished paying. for their Third Liberty Loan
subscription will please call and square accounts be before
fore before the Fourth Loan starts.
MUNROE & CHAMBLISS
.NATIONAL. BANK

- .1 V
-Ac
V

SALT SPRINGS HOTEL
Now Open Under New Management
Comfortable Rooms and Good Meals
Rates Reasonable
Good Hunting, Bathing and Fishing
Write for Rates and Reservations ''
MRS. A. N. GALLANT, Prop.
P. O. Address, Ocala, Fla.

A DOLLAR WASTED HELPS THE ENEMY
That is not a loyal thing to do, of course, and few of us realize
that we are helping the enemy when we waste money. Pretty hard
to define what waste is. One man's waste may be another man's
economy. In a general way, waste in war time may be defined as the
buying of anything not essential to health and efficiency. Every
dollar one spends for unnecessary things commands goods and ser services,
vices, services, that is, labor and materials, needed by the United States Gov Government
ernment Government for war purposes. And. if you invest the money you save
in War Savings Stamps, you are again helping by loaning your mon money
ey money to your Government.
calla lice & PacCstog Co.

AUTO SERVE CE
Passenger and Baoofle

w:,
enrro states
Loco and Sbort Hauling
WWfm STAR
MILINERY

.s.

An Elegant Line of the
Newest Models in

Fa

Now on Display at
AFFLECK MILINERY
PARLOR
South Side Ocala House
OCALA, N FLORIDA.

Put an Ad

Vote for
The Progressive Can Candidate
didate Candidate for Alderman

He is a Successful
Business man, and if
elected will do His
Best for Ocala's Inter Interests.
ests. Interests. Storage and Packing
LINE P6NE
SHOWING
Hats
in the Star



OCALA EVENING STAB, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7. 1918

e Finger Points

r Trade
A Mark
' Keg.

To the seat of
trouble in 90
per cent of
foot troubles
You ma y
THINK you
have rheau rheau-matism.
matism. rheau-matism. You.

pay not have. See the only

;r2fcraate Foot Specialist in

cala at

TITLE'S SHOE PARLOR

M. M. LITTLE. Pradipedlsl

OCALA SOCIAL AFFAIRS

If You Have Any News for this De Department,
partment, Department, Call Five Double-One
or Two-Seven

;O0D THINGS TO EAT

iladelphia Cream

icesc, Limburger

tiecsc, Pineapple

icese, Edam Cheese,

(inccd Ham,

Heed Ram (Boiled)

;Icry, LeUuce, Cabbage

vanish Onions,

matocs,

eded Raisins,

bmedary Dates,

aporated Peaches,

lfforl Unt Puff oil

heat, Rolled Oats,

rn Flakes, Shredded

heat Biscuit.

0. K; TEAPOT

GROCERY.
IONE 16 and 174

.......................
IEEP K00L 0N

SUNDAYS AT 1

SILVER SPRING
ni r i i r nsa

ne UKiawana vaney nan- ;
oad will make two round

rin In Silipr nrinnc pvppv

Junday until further notice.

ROUND TRIP 30 CENTS

v. ucaia z p.m. r.sv p.m

Lv. Spring 3:30 p.m. 6 p.m.

3KLAW AHA VALLEY :

RAILROAD CO.
-r:
i........... .......

elver' &' Marffov

t)ERTAKERS and EMDALRIERS

PHONES 47. 104. 305
OCALA, FLORIDA

JY WAR SAVINGS STAMPS

m Your Own Home

A House and Two Lots
$850
. A House and 3 Acres
$2,000
A House and 2 Lota
$1,200
be Bought With Monthly Pay
' menta of
$10
LM. MURRAY
Room 5, Holder Block,
Ocala. Florida

S BETTER, LASTS LONGER,

S LESS PER JOB THAN THE

OTHER KINDS
WHY NOT BUY IT

From the Marches of Glynn
As the marsh-hen secretly builds on
the watery sod,
Behold I will build me a nest on the
greatness of God:
I will fly in the greatness of God as
the marsh hen flies
In the freedom that fills all the space
'twixt the marsh and the shies;
By so many roots as the marsh-grass
sends in the sod
I will heartily lay me a-hold on the
greatness of God: -Oh,
like to the greatness of God i3
the greatness within
The range of the marshes, the liberal
marshes of Glynn.

Sidney Lanier.
' f. .,
Mrs. Arthur Cobb and children

have returned home from an exceed exceedingly
ingly exceedingly pleasant summer vacation spent
at Daytona Beach, where they had
apartments at the Ohio house. Mrs.
Cobb had as her guest her sister, Mrs.
A. J. Fagan of Trenton. They also
enjoyed a most delightful trip down
the East Coast, stoppinsr at Palm

Beach to visit their brother and go going
ing going as far as Miami, where they en

joyed several days of sight-seeing.

,
Mrs. Chester Fort and children,

Lindner and "Buster," returned home

yesterday afternoon from a delightful

six weeks stay at Daytona Beach,
where they were pelasantly located
at the Ohio house on the beach front.
Miss Parr and niece, Miss Katie Mae

Eagleton, also have rooms at this

pleasant apartment house.

Mrs. R. K. Heath and two children

of Fort Myers, are in the city for a
few days, guests of their friends.

Mrs. W. S. Bray and family at their

home on North Magnolia street. They
will then go to their new home at Vi Vi-dalia,
dalia, Vi-dalia, Ga.

.'..
Dr. and Mrs. J. E. Chace are enter

taining Dr. Chace's father, Dr. James

Chace of Jacksonville and brother-in-law
and sister, Mr. and rMs Jo Joseph
seph Joseph Hoover of Starke, who arrived
in their car yesterday afternoon from
Starke, and will remain for: several

days. : ;

X
Mr. J. C. Pillans of Electra was in

town yesterday, bringing with him his
daughter, Miss Dixie Pillans, who

was tne overnignt guest oi ner

brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and
Mrs. Louis Pillans, leaving for Tam Tampa
pa Tampa early this morning.

Mrs. W. R. Bryce and children are
home again from a vacation trip, in including
cluding including a short visit to Salt Springs,
going from there, to Citra, where they
had a most pleasant visit with Mrs.
Bryce' family at their country home

near Citra.

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Earman, pros prosperous
perous prosperous citizens of .Bunnell, who have

been guests of their niece, Mrs. Jack

Brooks, and incidentally looking over

the farm lands surrounding Ocala,

have returned to their, home.

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Jones have de

cided to name their fine little son

Thomas Herbert Jones. The little

fellow is growing rapidly and prom

ises-to be as fine a speciment of boy

hood as one could wish to see."

Mrs. A. E. Long has received her

first letter from her brother, Major

J. W. Davidson, since he crossed the

Atlantic. He has been in France
since the middle of August and had

good trip across.
-
Mrs. J; P. Phillips left yesterday

afternoon for North Lake Weir,
where she will be the guest for sever several
al several days of rM. and Mrs. Connor and

Miss Mary Connor at their pleasant

akeside home.

Mr. C. E. Winston is spending a
ew days in town, from a business

tour of the state. His family expect

to return to their home here from the

ake a week from next Monday.
Mrs. James Carlisle of Dunnellon

and sister. Miss OIlie Melin, who

makes her home with Mrs. Carlisle,
are in the city, guests of Mrs. Car

lisle's sisters.

.

Misses Gladys and Mary Brooks

and Mamie Johnson will accompany

Mr. C. W. Johnson to Jacksonville to

morrow and will be the guests of

friends for an extended visit.

m
Miss Estelle McAteer has return

ed to her hpme near this city from a

delightful visit of several months to

relatives and friends in Kentucky.

'

Miss Mary Connor who has been

the guest of Mrs. J. P. Phillips this
week, returned yesterday afternoon

to her home at North Lake Weir.

Mrs. J. A. Fagan is the guest of
her sister, Mrs. Arthur Cobb. She

expects to return to her home at

Trenton, Fla., Monday,

Plant City. Her friends were glad
to see Mrs. White and Mis3 Elizabeth
again, and to be introduced to Master
Joseph, who is one of the brightest

babies ever seen.

rMs. Sam Messick of Burbank was
the overnight guest of Miss Lillian

Melin Friday night.
Rev. Wm. H. Wrighton will preach
at the Long Olive Baptist church at
Shady Sunday afternoon at 3:30
o'clock.

Mrs. R. L. Caruthers of Anthony is I '&

the eruest of her aunt. Mrs. Howsell-j

d
and family. She expects to return

to ner nome tomorrow. i :.

, sjy
Mrs. B. Goldman left today for (j
Savannah to visit her daughter-in-

law, Mrs. Jake tioldman. bhe wui

also be ioined there by Mr. Jake

Goldman, who is stationed at Campfviy

Jackson.

Mrs. Way Shockley and daughter,
Miss Annie Shockley of Lowell, were :-7y

shoppers in the city yesterday. Missk-K)

Annie Shockley, who is an Ocala high (jft

scnooi graauaw;, win leave swii aui

her second term of school at Talla

hassee.

Little Miss Margaret Chace return

ed home today from Starke, where
she has been the attractive little guest
of her aunt, Mrs. Joseph Hoover.

. -'iv u- ; w -"m 'Z'-- -C- 'm'' -"m"- jv'u-j'Sl v'Iv

FRANK

The Fashion Center

OCALA,

FLORIDA

' Annnnnrp our nrpnrpnriPQs to 'till, n Miqqpc qtiH 5c

bin s Apparel Kequirements lor college, beminary and

IS School.' E

Having assembled for this purpose an unusually wide
selection of appropriate styles for class room, play time
and dress wear, developed in superior materials, at
moderate prices.

(Concluded on Fourth Page)

TEMPLE ATTRACTIONS

FOR THE WEEK

Today: Carmey Myers in "The
City of Tears." Official War Review.
Monday: Francis X. Bushman and
Beverly Bayne, in "Social Quick Quicksands,"
sands," Quicksands," a Metro picture.
Tuesday: Walker Whiteside and

Valestine Grant in "The Belgian' an

amazing drama of love, intrigue ,and

mystery.'

1 Wednesday: Vivian
Petticoat Pilot."

Martin in "A

'.TV

St?

HO

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

I

WIN THE WAR LEAGUE

The undersigned constitute the ex- fVs

ecutive committee of the Ocala Win j

the War League. As the title indi-

eaten, the obieet of the leaerue is tolv)

MRS. MINNIE A. BOSTICK

Has now on display a' complete line of
Fall and Winter Tailored Pattern and
Ready-to-Wear Hats. Call and see

the new styles. Harrington Hall cor

ner, Ocala. ltwky

Juniors' and Girls' Washable School
Dresses in plaid Ginghams, smart col colorings
orings colorings and girlish styles, sizes 6 to 16,
$1.95 to $5.95

The "Miss Saratoga" Middy Blouses, i
with blue serge collar and cuffs; all sizes

At $2.95

. . -: e

"Miss Saratoga" Middy Suits of all wool French and,
storm serge, the school and college' girls' delight ; i
$22.50 and $24.50

You will feel beter if you keep your

war saving pledge.

A pretty line of Silk
Dresses in Misses' sizes
$16.50 to $35

Children's Coats in very
pretty styles
$6.50 to $13.50

Paint. It costs no more per gal

han the Ready-Mixed kind, and

retVo gallons for one.

: tW" dealer or get our color

for explanation, r
For Sale By

E MARION HARDWARE CO-

Ocala. Florida

do things and to gather any infor

mation that may be of assistance to

the crovemment in carrying on the

war. To this end we invite the co

operation of all loyal citizens. If you

have any information relative to hos

tile acts by any person, or persons,

such as interference with the opera operation
tion operation of the draft or the use of sedi

tious language, please' communicate

with any one of the undersigned and
your information will be regarded as
confidential and your name will not be
divulged. This information will be
transmitted to the United States au

thorities without delay.
C. S. Cullen.
, R. A. Burford.
W. K. Zewadski

Harvey Clark.
George MacKay.
T. T. Munroe.
L. W. Duval.
L. R. Chazal.
Rev. J. R. Herndon.
Clarence Camp.
R. L. Anderson.
J. M. Thomas.
W. D. Cam.
J. E. Chace.
B. A. Weathers.
- Mrs. Caroline Moorhead.
Mrs. Elizabeth Hocker.
W. S. Bullock.
H. M. Hampton.

You are a better American if you

keep your War savings pledge.

Mrs. F. H. Logan and children, who

have been spending several months

in Ohio, are expected home this after
noon.

Mrs. J. R. White and children, Eliz Elizabeth
abeth Elizabeth and Joseph, who have been vis-

Jiting Mrs. H. B. Whittmgton m this

VOLUNTEERS WANTED
Qualified for Limited Service Only

A call will soon be Issued for a

number of good stenographers, who
have had legal training. This call

will be for limited service men only,
and those who qualify under this call
will probably, be assigned to the

judge advocate general's and provost
marshal general's departments, and

they will be required to report court

martial cases and attend t othe mat matters
ters matters pertaining to military law in the

field.

For further information, apply to

the local board, Ocala, Fla.

v.
...
f
:-k'
Jy

7v

Mi

...
7'

:4c'

...
.....

SMART AUTUMN FASHIONS FOR WOMEN

Are assembled for immediate selection
in unusually well-chosen assortments of
models, including
Fur Trimmed and Tailored Suits, After Afternoon
noon Afternoon and Evening Dresses, Coats for all
occasions.
Every garment presents an accurate
forecast of the vogue for Autumn and
Winter in fabric, trimming and coloring.
Moderate prices prevail.
Also a pretty line of small furs at prices
within reach of everyone.

DISTINCTIVE FALL MILLINERY FOR MISSES

AND WOMEN

The season's newest models in
large and small Hats, Velour and
Velvet, trimmed and untrimmed
$1.95 to $12.50

Beautiful new Fall Ginghams, pretty plaids, yd......59c

L. A .AA A X A? .A?

kAAAAAA

L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER
AND BUILDER

Careful Estimates made on all Con

tract work. Gives More and Better
Work for the Money than any other

contractor in the city.

Gear Cutting, Nickle
Steel Shafts & Axles,
Oxy-Acetylene Weld Welding
ing Welding & Burning.

OCALA IRON WORKS GARAGE

THIS IS THE TIME FOR EVERY CITIZEN TO SUPPORT TIE
UNTIED STATES G0VE.IENT
Many are doing so at a considerable cost or sacrifice to themselves.
This Bank is a member of the Federal Reserve Banking System established by
the Government to give greater financial stability and strength to the member
banks and protection to their depositors. We invite you to become one of our
customers, so that you may enjoy this protection.

Hie Ocala Mafinomal IBaimM

Ocala

FlorMa

US I

j city, leave Sunday for their home in Advertise in the Star.

k..AAi

kAAi

L.AA.

AAAJ

M1U1M1MJ

A.A.M.AAAAAA.AAAf5j

T V..Y..Y..TT V



OCALA EVENING STAB, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7. 1918

X

A-
V

lis
News,- comes today that Lieut.
Louis H. Chazal has landed in France.
We heartily congratulate our young
friend. His ancestors came from
France, next to America he loves
France and for years it has been his
highest hope and desire to fight for
America and France on French soil.
We know he is happy today.
-
After having been on the sick list
about thirty days, C. G. Bryant, one
of the telegraphers at the union sta station,
tion, station, has returned to work. Mr. Bry Bryant
ant Bryant has purchased a house from Mrs.
M. M. Little on Wenona street and
expects to move into it within the
next two weks.
The latest styles in Fall millinery
may now be seen at the Style Hat
Shop. Many new ones pust in. Call
and see them. tf
Mack Taylor has just returned
from Atlanta, where he went on bus
iness connected with his Dodge auto
mobile agency. He says that he found
only optimism everywhere, and that
the outlook for securing plenty of
Dodge cars for his trade is fine.
v i
"The Kaiser as I Knew Him for 14
Years" starts in Monday's Star. Be
sure lo read the opening installment,
as back numbers of the paper are sel
dom available, now that the govern government
ment government has asked us to conserve on pulp
paper.
Mr. Will Gray, who has a job in a
shipyard in Jacksonville, has been
compelled by sickness to return home
for a few days.
Phone No. 451 Is the Americas
Restaurant, Temple & Davis, proprie
tors, the best in the city, at the union
passenger station. 16-tf
Mr. P. B. Sandtfer of Tallahassee,
who has been the guest of his nephew,
Mr. R. ASadifer and family for sev
eraL I left 'yesterday for South
Xlts.
gs pledge means protec
jys at the front. Are you
share ? t ;
liss Jennie Riker, one of the little
girls at the industrial school, was
badly burned on one arm yesterday.
but the injury having been carefully
treated is not suffering much pain to today.
day. today. Mr. J. J. Caruthers, one of the pro progressive
gressive progressive citizens of the Coleman,, is
among the visitors in the., city today.
A good deal of cotton is coming in
and our buyers are purchasing and
storing it.
Prompt delivery of prescriptions is
the watchword here. Tell your phyic phyic-ian
ian phyic-ian to leave them with us. We allow
no substitution. The Court Pharmacy.
Phone. 284. tf
The home guards had a good turn turnout
out turnout at the armory last night and Cap Captain
tain Captain Roberts drilled them well in the
manual of arms. The company im improves
proves improves u its work every week.
Experienced stenographer would
like to substitute for several weeks.
Address, Steno, P. O. Box 502, Ocala,
Fla. 9-6-3t
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. H. Shaw will
leave Zuber next week vf or the Pinel Pinellas
las Pinellas country. Mr. Shaw's mercantile
business at Zuber will continue, how however,
ever, however, for the present.
' With each $1 worth of hemstitch hemstitching
ing hemstitching we do for you the week of Sept.
9th-16th, we will give you one thrift
stamp. The Hemstitcher. 2t
It is not necessary for you to wait
forthe collector to call on you for
yourv subscription to the Star. If you
know that the time for which you
have paid has expired, just call at the
office and leave us your renewal
check or mail it in.
The pride of the Court Pharmacy is
its prescription department. Every
prescription is carefully compounded
as ordered by your physician NO
SUBSTITUTION allowed. Phone 284.
Mr. G. A. Waters, the enterprising
farmer of Electra, left a large Jap Japanese
anese Japanese pie pumpkin, at the Star office
today, and there's i going to be some
pie eating, here for the next several
weeks. It is of the large crook-neck
variety and weighs 25 pounds. If
Marion county had' several thousand
and progressive farmers as Mr. Wa Waters
ters Waters we would have no trouble in
maintaining ourpoistion as the lead leading
ing leading agricultural county of Florida.
Says the Palatka News: "The
Ocala Star's criticism of the state tax
commission is sensible, and that an
effort will be made by the next legis legislature
lature legislature to abolish it, now seems cer certain.
tain. certain. And there are certain other
'commissions' not now important in a
business-like administration of state
affairs, which could well be abolished.
For instance. Of what use is a rail railroad
road railroad commission in the state now
that the railroads are being adminis administered
tered administered by the national government?
Certainly the people are ready to dis discard
card discard all 'incubuses that waste the
people's money.'"

HELLISH CRUELTY OF HUNS

(Continued from First Page)
of the civilians incarcerated at Holz-
minden were pirates and criminals,
deserving of the most violent treat
ment. The result is inevitable. There
were almost daily cases of physical
mistreatment while I was at Holz Holz-minden.
minden. Holz-minden. Some of th poor fellows
were so badly handled that they had
to be taken to the hospital.
A Dreary Day."
The day's program was a dreary
one. At 4:au we were awanenea;
that is, at 4:30 by German summer
time, which is in reality at 3:30. At
5 we went to work. Often we could
not return to the barracks at noon
because we were obliged to remain
out-or-doors in the wet and the rain
until 7:30 in the evening. A 9 p. m.,
when it was still light we were locked
up in the barracks. We had not suf
ficient time for sleep, rest, or even
for meals.
InsDite of the constant activity de
manded of the prisoners, the food
was poor and contained little nour nourishment.
ishment. nourishment. We did have a sort of com
missary committee, composed of
three prisoners. But if it for a single
time ventured to complain of the
soup as "unsatisfactory," the most
disagreeable things always hap
pened. Mail was frequetnly held up
by way of retaliation for alleged mis-"
deeds. Mail was not allowed to be
kept beyond eight days and if a post postcard
card postcard older than that was found, upon
the person of a prisoner he was al always
ways always rigorously punished. There was
not enough clothing to make one
comfortable. As we had to work out
of doors regardles of weather or sea season,
son, season, our clothing was often wet
through, and the next morning we
had to put it on while it was still
damp. Colds .were naturally una unavoidable.
voidable. unavoidable. The medical attention
given was absurd. The crazy colonel
himself made a point of being pres present
ent present at almost all medical examina examinations,
tions, examinations, and completely dominated the
physicians, who cringed before him.
He was fond of saying that only the
lazy ones pretended to be ill, that the
camp itself was the best sanitorium,
and hard work the best cure-all.
The Colonel Was SentimentaL
In spite of his I brutality, the col colonel
onel colonel had his sentimental streaks. The
following anecdote is illustrative. A
Frenchman, 70 years of age, was oc occupied
cupied occupied in paving the street of the
camp. The colonel passed by, and,
as the old fellow did not seenf-to shim
to be working diligently enough, he
stepped up and gave him a tremen
dous box on the ear. The poor old
man said nothing, but took out of his
picket a little certificate, from
which it appeared that he .was ill and
only capable of a small amount of
work. The colonel was much moved,
almost to the point of tears. He gave
the old man eight days of exemption
from all labor. But that was rather
cold comfort.
Camp Holzminden was frequently
visited by General Haehnisch and
other officials. However, they never
looked at the prisoners' quarters, ex except
cept except in the most perfunctory way.
They merely strutted ahrough the
barracks, watched the laborers at
work, and then directed all their at attention
tention attention to the camp pigs. These pigs,
the especial interest of Colonel Gal Gal-lus,
lus, Gal-lus, were royally treated in their
pens, and certainly led a much hap happier
pier happier life than the prisoners, until
they were slaughtered for the offi officers'
cers' officers' mess.
Even the women are not spared.
Lately conditions have become still
worse, I am told. The women are
now forced to do all sorts of burden burdensome
some burdensome things. For instance, they are
put at braiding and unb raiding fish fishnets,
nets, fishnets, and the only purpose of the
taskmasters seem to be to make their
fingers sore. Every Sunday, a weird
walk is undertaken, to a wood about
six kilometers away, from which they
bring back wood on their backs. Hun-
533
PROTECT
YOURSELF j
FROM
MOSQUITOES.
' Slay the Pesky
: Critters with
FENOLE
It's the simplest
thing in the world
' to KILL Mosquitoes
with FENOLE; you.'
can spray several
rooms thoroughly in
less time than it
takes to say your
prayers.
Qts. 75c; Yz Gals
$1.35; Galsv $20
Sprayers:
Pint size 65c, Quart
size, 75c; Com.
Air Sprayers, $1.25
Fenole Chemical Co.
Manufacturers,
Jacksonville, Fla.
mm
1 1 1 1
:::5
Trtu
Fmffl
i
rrvrrn
It Mtl
Fenole is sold in. Ocala by Anti Anti-Monopoly
Monopoly Anti-Monopoly Drugstore, Clarkson Hard Hard-Co.,
Co., Hard-Co., Ollle Mordis, Tydinga Drag Co.,
The Court Pharmacy, Smith Grocery
Co., Carn-Thomas Co.. H. B. Masters
Co., Ocala Seed Store.

r t i

m

(Continued from Third Page)
i

Wallace Reid played up with his
usual force in "The House of Silence,"
at the Temple yesterday. It was a
good story and well presented. That j jjj
poppy-flower girl, Carmel Myers, will i E
feature m "The City of Tears" this;
afternoon and evening; also, there s
will be the always eagerly looked for-! E
ward to Official War Pictures- Eve- j E
rybody should remember that Francis
X. Bushman, the movie Beau Brum-
mell will be seen on the Temple
screen Monday.
,
The Lees burg Commercial says
Mrs. B. F. Watts spent last week in
Jacksonville with her son, Franklin,'
who is employed in the shipyards.
She was accompanied home by
Franklin, who spend the week-end in
Ocala and with his parents in Lees Lees-burg.
burg. Lees-burg. .
"
Mr. and Mrs. R. L. McCarley and
infant daughter of West Palm Beach,
who have been guests of Mr. and Mrs.
F. W. Cook, went to Boardman yes
terday to visit relatives for a few
days. They will make another visit
to Mr. and Mrs. Cook before return
ing home.
Mrs.- E. H. Mote has returned to her
home in Leesburg from Tampa, where
she was called owing to the serious
illness of her niece", Mrs. W. H. Jack
son. Mrs. Jackson, we are glad to
state, is now very much, improved.
-
Mrs. Bow, social worker for Lake
county, who has often visited in
Ocala, has moved from her former
home at Tavares to Leesburg, (where i
she will in future reside.
'
Mr. Ralph Cook of West Palm
Beach, will spend the winter in Ocala
with his brother, Mr. F. W. Cook and
family, and attend the public school.
.'
Mrs.. W. H. Clark is in the city
from her Lake Weir home, spending
a few days with her son, Mr. Harvey
Clark and family.
TEMPLE'S POPULAR CAFE
A number of the Star's office force
who are eating away from home just
now drilled down to Mark Temple's
union station eating house yesterday
and took dinner with him. The cafe
serves a regular dinner for 75 cents
and feeds in addition to the passen passengers
gers passengers and crews of the trains a great
many other traveling people and
Ocala citizens. The service through
the balance of the 24 hours is a la
carte, and the place is never closed,
night or day. Mr. Temple's cafe is
one of the best ventilated, the best
cooled, the cleanest and prettiest in
the country. It is attractive to look
at and comfortable to eat in, and flies
are unknown. One of the methods
for keeping them out is a huge elec electric
tric electric fan, revolving at great rapidity,
just outside and in front of the en
trance. The food is good and well
scrvea ana tne noon aay meai is most
appetizing and in greater abundance
than one needs. While a little out of
the "beaten path," Mr. Temple's ex excellent
cellent excellent service is counting and his
trade is growing aH the time.
dreds of men and women are put at
this work every Sunday, although t
could easily be done by a wagon and
two horses.! In fact, the' biggest part
of the labor demanded of the pris
oners is almost wholly unproductive,
and serves no purpose save to tor torture.
ture. torture. If any of them dare to com complain,
plain, complain, they am subjected to certain
peculiar punishments, of which the
most frequent is confinement in an
extraordinary cell called the "bug
room," a place filled with old straw
mattresses and sacks, which simply
swarm with venim and lice.
V: The winning of the war may swing
on your war savings- pledge. Make
good that pledge.
Those chic shapes in all the popular
colors in fall millinery can now be
found at the Style Hat Shop. A lot
of new ones just received. tf
Another shipment of Jonteel Tal Talcum
cum Talcum Powder just in at Gerig's Drug
Store- 21-tf
Your conscience will not reproach
you if you make good youri war sav savings
ings savings pledge.
NOTICE OF SPECIAL -ELECTION
Notice is hereby given that pursu pursuant
ant pursuant to a resolution of the city council
of the city of Ocala, adopted August
1st, 1918, a special election will be
held in the city of Ocala on
Tuesday, the 10th day of September,
A. D. 1918,
for the purpose of electing a council councilman
man councilman for the fourth ward of the city
of Ocala to fill the unexpired term of
G. A. Nash, resigned.
The inspectors and clerks chosen
for such election are as follows:
Ballot Box A-L
Clerk: J. P. Phillips.
"Inspectors: L. M. Murry, Isaac
Stevens, E. W. KraybilL
Ballot Box M-Z
Clerk: John E. Bailey.
Inspectors: George Stuart, B. H.
Seymour, George Smith.
By order of the city council.
This August 23, 1918.
H. C. Sistrunk,
8,23-fri-3t City Clerk.

ltllllllflllllllllllllllllllllllllllltllllllllllllf

I "America
I must be
punished
Such was the decree of
Kaiser Wilhelm, furious
because the allies were
obtaining food and I
munitions of war from
the United States.
m m
Dr. Arthur N. Davis,
the young American
I who was dentist to the i
i German emperor from
1 1904 till 1918, tells of 1
I the ruler's determina- j
1 tion to wreak vengeance I
1 upon the United States j
1 in his remarkable nar- j
rative
I The Kaiser, as I
I Knew Him j
1 for 14 Years
This story reveals the
E inner workings of the
E kaiser's mind. It shows E
E once more why the world
is at war. It will appear
E as a serial in this paper. E
Don't miss it
Coming Soon
njiiuiiiuiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiin
A NERVOUS WRECK
From Three Years9 Suffering. Says
Cardui Made Her Well
Texas City, Tex. In an interesting
statement, Mrs. G. H. Schill, of this town,
snys: "For three years I suffered untold
agony with my head. I was unable to
do any of my work.
I just wanted to sleep all the time, for
that was the only ease I could get, when
I was asleep. I became a nervous wreck
just from the awful suffering with my
head.
I w3 so nervous that the least noise
would make me jump out of my bed. I
had no energy, and was unable to do
anything. My son, a young boy, bad to
do all my household duties.
I was not able to do anything until I
took Cardui. I took three bottles in all,
and It surely cured me of those awful
headaches. That has been three years
ago, and I know the cure is permanent,
for I have never had any headache since
taking Cardui.
Nothing relieved me until 1 took Cardui.
It did wonders for me."
Try Cardui for your troubles made
from medicinal ingredients recommended
in medical books as being of benefit in
female troubles, and 40 years of use has
proven that the books are right Begin
laking Cardui today. NC-134
j'
UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
RATES: Six line maximum, one
time 25c; three times 50c; elx limes
75c; one month S3. Payable In advance.
WANTED, LOST, FOUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM- t
ILAR LOCAL NEEDS
FLAT FOR RENT A 4-room down downstairs
stairs downstairs flat; all modern conveniences.
Apply to Mrs. T. H. Wallis, 603 South
Second street. 5-tf
ROOMS FOR RENT At the Dormi Dormitory,
tory, Dormitory, furnished or unfurnished for
light housekeeping. "Half price to
over night lodgers." Hot and cold wa
ter. Roome large and airy; best venti ventilated'
lated' ventilated' in town at lowest prices. Par Parents,
ents, Parents, now is the time to arrange for
residence, 703 S.'Pond St., or phone
305. Mrs. C. V. Roberts, new mat matron,
ron, matron, eod
FOR SALE Edison Phonograph in
good condition; cost $50, with about
10 Orecords; will take $20 for the
outfit. Address, Edison, care the
Star. 5-6t
FOR SALE CHEAP Pretty corner
lot, Lakeside Park, Jacksonville, one
block from car line, close to and on
city side of McGirth's creek, near the
great army cantonment. Apply to
Jacksonville, care Star office. 9-5 6t
FOR SALE North Ocala lots cheap.
Choice locations. Easy terms if de desired.
sired. desired. Address Box 164, city. 9-5-6t
FOR SALE Ford Touring Car. Just
worked over and in good condition.
See J. E. Frampton, 110 E. 5th St..
Ocala, Fla. Phone 185-G. 28-6t
FOR SALE Geenral Electric Com Company
pany Company motor; 2-horse power, 1200 r.
p. m.; three phase. In actual use less
than a month. Price $75 cash f. o. b.

SSKSiS
la

iiFRANK'S

"The Fashion Center"
1 OCALA, - FLORIDA

CLOSED

fjf Saturday, Sept.
HH

Store Opens Saturday Evening at

6 O'clock

To make things
evening we will
only, regular 30'

Cambric, 36 inches wide at

21

YARD

Also 28 cent quality yard wide

Unbleached Muslin at

19

YARD
7.

No more than 10 yards of

each to a
r
r
39
(
w
cs-
f

Our Store will be
Open for Business
After 5:30 This
Afternoom "Why
Pay More."

&
yr- irr rr-. .rz-. j. .-x- d. t. -z--
Ji-"o" "wr 'J' "o 'J- "Jx 'Zr 'Jx"C
Ocala. Address "Slotor" care Ocala
Star, Ocala, Fla. 5-6t
FOR SALE Have a second hand
Ford touring car in good condition.
Apply to E. L Bell, 416 East Third
St Ocala, Fla. 9-3-12t
The Style Hat Shop now has on
display a magnificent line of Fall
millinery. tf
Try "Bouquet Dazira Extract." It
has no equal, and can be had only at
Gerig's Drug Store. 21-tf
BUYING COTTON
Mr. H. W. Tucker is in the market
for seed cotton. He will buy all the
farmers will bring to him. 9-3-tf

8vvt$3H
T

7th, On Account olM
1 1 1 A Y
lively Saturday
sell fronr6 till 10 g
cent quality fine &
CENTS
CENTS
customer
1
- i
-
a. sz-- .rz-- iZ2:d&jX'd'-sX'-Z-tST'- Tt,
''Qy J ,w" v '-s '--
Wc Have
forty men at your service, so we
can guarantee promptness.
OCALA IRON WORKS GARAGE
If you have never tried Klen
Tooth PjKf Hytrin nnnr a-rifl wo Irrnv
V t VVH. WW .... I. WW W V W
we will have you as a customer fol
this right along. It costs only 2:
cents the tube, and one has to u
about half the quantity as comparec
with other tooth pastes. To be had iri
Ocala only at Gerig's Drug Stofc
When the baby of today asks yoi
what you did in this war, will you tel
Vu m tVi n t VA11 fA Tint 1ran ttmit nmi

savings pledge?

UK

x..



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