The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06996

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
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QCAlA

NQ

Weather Forecast: Partly cloudy
tonight and Sunday, probably local
showers.

FAB AN

ii

Steadily Driving Huns From
Soissons-Rheims Salient

POSSIBLE FOR THE EtIEM Y 10 ESCAPE BUT NOT UNTIL THEY
HAVE SUFFERED FEARFUL PUNISHMENT

(Associated Press)

With the American Army on the
Aisne-Marne Front (By Associated
Press) July 27. The Franco-American
forces northeast of Chateau
Thierry have driven the Germans al almost
most almost entirely out of thewooded area
they have been so stubbornly defend defending.
ing. defending. The allied pressure on the much
harrassed Germans N is constantly
maintained and this morning the
punishment of the enemy by artillery
was resumed with added vigor. The
French and Americans under cover
of their big guns again began crawl crawling
ing crawling forward. The advance, which is
bringing the Allies still nearer to the
important road junction of Fere en
Tardenois, it being made through a
dense wood and over the rain-soaked
fields and hills on the outskirts of the
woods. The Germans are slowly re retreating
treating retreating and fighting stubbornly.
The enemy's most intense efforts are
being exerted to hold his lines on his
flanks in the regions of Soissons and
Rheims.
ENEMY TRYING TO ESCAPE
With the American Army on the
Aisne-Marne Front, July 27, 2 p. m.
(By Associated Press). The Ger Germans
mans Germans were slowly yielding at noon
along the southern side of the Mame
salient. The Americans continued
pressing forward with artillery to
support them against a heavy Ger German
man German machine gun fire.
The French also advanced some somewhat
what somewhat with every indication that their
progress would continue.
The Germans were still occupied
today with the business of shifting
the main body of their forces north northward.
ward. northward. CAPTURE OF LE CHARMEL
Washington, July 27. General
Pershing reported today that Ameri American
can American troops had captured Le Channel,
betwen the Ourcy and Marne.
ALLIES TAKING THEM IN
Paris, July 27. The total number
of German prisoners captured by the
Allies since the start of the counter counter-offensive
offensive counter-offensive is placed at 30,000 by the
Havas Agency.
American troops have discovered
north of Chateau Thierry the em emplacements
placements emplacements of a German super-cannon
which was used in the bombardment
of towns behind the front, and per perhaps
haps perhaps Paris.
FRENCH GAINS
Paris, July 27. The French scored
additional advances last night immed immediately
iately immediately north of the Marne, where the
the Germans have been clinging to
the river, it is officially announced.
Today the French advanced to north
of Pont-a-Brisson. A French local
operation in the Champagne advanc advanced
ed advanced their lines nearly two miles on a
front of approximately two miles,
and two hundred prisoners were
taken.
BOCHES SHELLED BRITISH
London; July 27. German artil artillery
lery artillery was active last night northeasv
of Amiens. On both sides the artil artillery
lery artillery was active near the LaBassee
canal, says today's official statement.
FREIGHTER ATTACKED BY A
SUB
New York, July 27. A German
submarine attacked a British freight freighter
er freighter off the Atlantic coast early today,
according to a report in insurance
circles here.
"OFFERED" IS GOOD
Paris, July 27. The crown of Fin Finland
land Finland has been offered to Duke Adolph
Fried rich of Mecklenburg Schwerin,
by a deputation of Finnish language
peoples says a Zurich dispatch to Le
Journal. The dispatch adds the duke
has accepted and will be crowned in
a few weeks.
Don't fail to call for Maxwell House
Coffee. Kept at all grocery stores, tf

F
IS
p
a
Oil
JULY WILL BE THE
RECORD MONTH
For America in Sending Men
seas to Fight the
Germans
Over-
(Associated Press)
Washington, July 27. Secretary
Baker announced today that with the
fifty thousand men sent last week, the
number of Americans transported
overseas during July is expectedMo
reach the record of three hundred
thousand. The number of men em embarked
barked embarked is a million and a quarter.
ALSO RUSHING MATERIAL OVER
Secretary Baker said that seven
hundred and ? fifty-three Haviland
four airplanes had been completed in
the United States and more than
four hundred shipped to France. He
said that General Pershing had sug suggested
gested suggested some structural changes in
these machines. The secretary an announced
nounced announced that 5000 heavy Browning
machine guns had been completed,
but none of these as yet have been
shipped to France.
MORE TIME FOR MOONEY
California's Noted Criminal Repriev Reprieved
ed Reprieved Until December
(Associated Press)
Los Angeles, July 27. Governor
Stephens announced today that he
had decided to grant a reprieve to
Thomas J. Mooney, which will stay
execution until December.
TEMPLE PROGRAM
FOR THE WEEK
Today: Monroe Salisbury and Ruth
Clifford on "The Guilt of Silence."
Miss Billie Rhodes in comedy.
Monday: Jack Pickford in "Huck
and Tom," another Mark Twain story.
Tuesday: v Pathe News. "Come
Thru," a powerful melodrama, feat featuring
uring featuring Herbert Rawlinson.
Wednesday: Charles Ray in "Play "Playing
ing "Playing the Game."
LOST
Moore's non-leakable fountain pen,
trimmed with two gold bands. Return
to Star office or Mrs. C. W. Long and
receive reward. 25-tf
, W. K. Lane, M. D., Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat. Law Library Building, Ocala,
Florida. tf
Don't fail to call for Maxwell House
Coffee. Kept at all grocery stores, tf
A very nice line of Wash Cloths on
display at Gerig's Drug Store. We
also sell War Savings and Thrift
Stemps. tf
Phone us your wants anything in
pure drugs or druggist's sundries.
Court Pharmacy, phone 284. 15-tf

. ,i If you want to see a great line of
Boys Wash Suits, sizes age 2 to 8 years and Boys'

hirts and
5,

OCALA, FLORIDA, SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1918.

SUIIDAY

THE JUNEBHT OF THE

THE WORLD'S
(Associated
Events big with the fate of nations
have marked the fourth year of the
war which now comes to a close.
T. f i 00 i
; n V 7 19i4K-halA-S"
tria declared war on Serbia, begin-;
past twelve months there have been
occurrences that in some respects
have been of even greater import m
- a fe., ,j
their influence upon the world than :
i those in the preceding period.' Trans- ;
cending the significance any event in
(the actual theatres of war, America's;

full participation in the conflict, in-moving swnuy m Kussia. un iNovem iNovem-volving
volving iNovem-volving the transportation overseas ; ber while the offensive against
of more than a million men to engage ItaI' was under way, Alexander F.
m it must remain for all time the Kerensky, then the Russian premier,
great outstanding feature of the announced that Russia was worn out
fourth year of the struggle. It is the war and that the Allies must
upon America that the Entente is Moulder the burden thenceforward,
relying for the men and resources to Seven days later Kerensky was de de-turn
turn de-turn the tide. j posed by the Bolsheviki. The fall and

A year ago the number of ,Ameri- j
! can troops going to Europe had not
begun to assume large proportions.
A few regulars and some national
guardsmen had been sent to France,
but "most of the big military training
camps were still being built and the
men selected as the first contingent
to be called to the colors were still
in citizens' clothes. Until the first day
of August of 1917 the total number
of American soldiers taken overseas
was 26,967.' v
- Soon after that date, the movement
of troops was accelerated. Thousands
were despatched across the Atlantic,
during the winter months, but it was
not until the great German offensive
was started late in March of 1918
that the movement began to assume
really noteworthy proportions. The
figures for the months from August
1, 1917 to July 1, 1918, follow:
August, 18,323; September, 32,523;
October, 38,259; November, 23,016;
December, 48,840 ; January, 46,776 ;
February, 48,027; March, 83,811;
April, 117,212; May. 244,315; June,
276,382: July, 300,000.
On July 1, 1918, there were 14,644
American marines in France, bring bringing
ing bringing the total number of American
troops in that country and Italy up
to 1,019,115.
The Allies have been called upon
to face two great offensives during
the past year. The first of these came
last October in Italy and the second,
in France, began on March 21. Tht
German drives in France, while sep separated
arated separated by periods of from a few days
to several weeks, have been consider considered
ed considered as different phases of the same
offensive. The abortive Austrian at attack
tack attack against Italy in June also is
looked upon as merely another attack
against the western front and not as
a distinct military operation.
But these offensives perhaps would
not have been begun had it not been
for the collapse of Russia during the
past winter. German and Austrian
troops, released from the Russian
front, were taken to France and Italy
to swell the masses of men hurled
against the Allies in the western
theater of operations. As long as
Russia remained in the fight she held
great numbers of Teutonic troops in
the east, and her withdrawal from
the war exercised a fundamental in influence
fluence influence on the course of its develop development.
ment. development. FALL OFFENSIVE IN ITALY
The storm broke at Caporetto on
Oct. 26 and almost immediately the
whole Italian line was thrown into
disorder. Pouring through the passes,
where in some instances disaffected
Italian troops held positions, the Ger Germans
mans Germans and Austrians made progress
which from the first was alarming.
By wise generalship, the Italian line
was withdrawn from the Isonzo. It
paused at the Tagiamento and then
retired further until it rested on the

Underwear "THE KAY NEE BKAIW' fco to

E. To HELVEMST1WS
Colors Quality,. Workmanshid and Prices Guaranteed.

OF
GREATEST STRIFE
Press)
;Pia,vTe' almos m slSht of the domes
of Venice. Here the Italian army re-
formed its columns, consolidated its
ong withdrawing from the
Rhaetian mountains to the Asiago
plateau and, assisted by the French
. . , to
tlefront, stood at bay.
J
RUSSIAN COLLAPSE
Events in .the meanwhile had been
flight of Kerensky was the signal for
Germany and Austria to enter into
peace negotiations with Russia. On
I November
30
the Bolsheviki an
nounced that Russia was out of the
war and proposed that all the Allies
join in negotiations for an armistice.
Russian and German representa representatives
tives representatives met at Brest-Litovsk on Decem December
ber December 22, and terms f peace were ex exchanged.
changed. exchanged. No progress was made with
the negotiations, and the conference
was broken up on January 11. In
the meantime, a new republic had
spt-ung' from the side of Russia. It
was Ukraine, a territory extending
along the Rumanian and Galician
frontier from the Black Sea north northward
ward northward to Cholm, in ancient Poland.
With this republic, the Central Em Empires
pires Empires made peace late in January. I
The failure of the Bolshevik au authorities
thorities authorities to reach any agreement with
the Germans resulted in the renewal
of hostilities on February 18, and
the German armies moved forward
once more.
THE BREST-LITOVSK TREATY
This brought about a renewal of
the peace negotiations, and at Brest Brest-Litovsk
Litovsk Brest-Litovsk the Bolsheviki were given to
understand that Germany would rec recognize
ognize recognize the kingdom of Poland, the re republic
public republic of Ukraine, the independence
of Finland, and the separate govern governmental
mental governmental status of Lithuania, Esthonia
and Livonia. Turkey, as an ally of
the Central Powers, was given a
great area to the east of the Black
sea, including the regions of Batum,
Kars and Erivan.
RUMANIA CAPITULATES
With the greater part of her terri territory
tory territory occupied by the Germans, Aus Austrians
trians Austrians and Bulgarians, May 6, Ru Rumania
mania Rumania signed a treaty of peace with
the Central Powers. By this treaty
Rumania lost the province of Dob Dob-rudja,
rudja, Dob-rudja, on the south side of the Dan Danube,
ube, Danube, which she had received after the
Balkan war, and agreed to a recti rectification
fication rectification of her western frontier. Eco
nomic concessions also were made
under pressure from the Teutonic
alliance.
GERMAN PEACE OFFER
German efforts to secure a peace
which would leave to Germany all
the fruits of her victory through
Russia's collapse, and with Belgium
and large portions of France to be
used as pawns at the council table,
began with the address of Count
Czernin, then Austrian foreign min minister,
ister, minister, at Brest-Litovsk, on December
26. The keynote of the address was
general peace without annexations
and indemnities.
On January 8, President Wilson,
addressing Congress, said that the
United States must know for whom
the German rulers were speaking.
The address was a complement to an

ffl

Mir.,
a
M

American Combat Troops Ar Ar-r
r Ar-r riving in Italy
M V-"
-
ALLIES Oil THE AISIIE-MARIIE FRONT MADE GREAT GAMS
DURING IRE WEEK AI GOIITIIIUE TO ADVANCE

(Associated
address made on January 5 by David
Lloyd George, the British premier.
To these addresses reply was made
by Imperial Chancellor von Hertling
of Germany, and Count Czernin. The
latter was pacific and conciliatory in
tone, while the former, alluding to
"the good German sword," showed
he was speaking for the militarists of
the Germanic powers.
"FOUR PRINCIPLES"
To these replies there ws rejoinder
by President Wilson, who, on Febru February
ary February 11, again addressing Congress,
laid down what have come to be
known as the "Four Principles" upon
which peace can be based. Briefly,
these principles were:
Final settlement must be based on
essential justice.
Peoples and provinces are not to be
bartered about like chattels.
Every territorial settlement must
be for the benefit and in the interest
of the population concerned.
All well-defined national aspira aspirations
tions aspirations shall be met with the utmost
satisfaction consistent1 with the fu future
ture future peace.
THE ENEMY OFFENSIVE
Last winter it became known that
the Germans were massing forces on
the western front. Reports came that
large units were training behind the
lines and that new and more terrible
engines of war than had been known
before were to be used in German ef effort
fort effort to break the allied lines, crush
their armies and force them to make
peace. The drive was well advertis advertised
ed advertised and even the place where it was to
be launched was known with compar comparative
ative comparative certainty.
On the morning of March 21, the
Germans began their attack from the
vicinity of Arrays, on the north, to La
Fere, on the south, and centering
their heaviest columns against the
British forces, under General Gough,
at St. Quentin.
Staggering before the impact of
the blow, the British army fell back
rapidly. For eight days the Germans
poured through the old allied line in
an effort to, crush the British and
drive a wedge between them and the
French, who were holding the lines to
the south. Then came a period of re reaction
action reaction and the Germans came to a
stop. They had driven ahead for 35
miles, along a front extending more
than fifty miles before they were
halted.
Hardly had their legions been held
before Amiens than a new offensive
was begun in Flanders, on April 2. It
swept the British back through Ar Ar-mentieres,
mentieres, Ar-mentieres, but did not break their
lines. The British, with the French
who were rushed up to the front,
stopped the Germans after they had
reached the hills southwest of Ypres.
There, on April 9, the Germans suf suffered
fered suffered a terrible defeat that halted
their offensive in that quarter.
FOCH IN SUPREME COMMAND
In the midst of the drive in the
sector toward Amiens the allied na nations
tions nations took a vitally important step.
They named General Ferdinand Foch,
hero of the first battle of the Marne,
generalissimo of the allied forces on
the western front, which includes all
the line in Italy as well as in France.
Blouse Waists,

VOL. 25, NO. 180

Press)
. Washington, July 27. General
March today informed the newspa newspaper
per newspaper men that trained combatant Am American
erican American troops from France had beguii
to arrive in Italy.
TWO MORE ARMY CORPS
Two additional American army
corps have been organized in France,
the fourth and fifth, commanded by
Major Generals Geo. W. Reed and
Omar Bundy. m
PUSHED BACK FROM PARIS
Summing up the Aisne and Marne
situation, Gen. March said that offi official
cial official advices showed that the Allies
had forced the Germans eleven miles
back further from Paris and shorten shortened
ed shortened the allied line ten miles. The posi positions
tions positions on the flanks of the salient at
Rheims and Soissons are relatively
unchanged.
ENEMY PULLING OUT
The German withdrawal, from
Chateau Thierry continues, and the
Allies are within three and a half
miles of Fere en Tardenois. which is
under continuous shell fire.
The most striking advance since
Wednesday was by the British, just
west of Rheims.
The German attack at Epieds only
delayed the Americans. They are
again moving forward.
Even the Murman coast, in northern I
Russia, has been held to be under hi& -command.
After a period of quiet, the Ger Germans
mans Germans attacked once more, this time
on the Aisne river, and in seven days
they reached the Marne at Chateau
Thierry, making a penetration of
about twenty-eight miles. At the
Marne they were checked and the im impetus
petus impetus of the blow was br6ken.
With hardly a day's pause for re reorganization
organization reorganization of their forces, the Ger Germans
mans Germans again attacked, choosing the
sector between Montdidier and Noy Noy-on,
on, Noy-on, on the southern side of the salient
driven into the allied line during the
March offensive, as the stage of their
onslaught. This offensive ran for
five days and was stopped north of
Compiegne after losses which were
described as unprecedented had been
inflicted upon the Germans.
From June 14 until July 15 the
Germans were engaged in shifting:
their forces and then they again
struck. This time the line of attack
was from Chateau Thierry eastward,
around to the north of Rheims and
then down the Vesle river to Prunay
and from that village eastward to
Massiges. This attack at the close of
the year developed into one of the
most ambitious of German strokes.
German forces crossed the Mame
over a wide front, but were unable to
make ground against American
troops near Chateau Thierry, and
could not advance rapidly further
east.
They did, however, forge ahead on
the north "side of the Marne and be between
tween between that stream and the mountain
of Rheim3. It appeared for a time
that they might reach Epernay.
Then General Foch struck a coun counter
ter counter blow, which is still in progress.
American and French troops attack attacked
ed attacked the Germans between Fontency,
on the Ajsne west of Soissons and
Belleau, on the Slignon northwest of
Chateau Thiejry. So sudden and
powerful was the blow that the Ger Germans
mans Germans fell back rapidly until their re reserves
serves reserves could be hurried up.
The rapid advance of the Allies,
however, so menaced the German
forces further south that on July 19
the enemy began a retreat across the
Marne. On Sunday, July 21, French
and Americans entered Chateau
Thierry and pressed on after the re retiring
tiring retiring Germans.
Since that time the Allies have
gained slowly, but steadily, not only
(Concluded on Fourth Page)



OCALA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, .JULY 27. 1918
t

OCALA EVENING STAR
I'iiMIhIicm Every Day Katt-ept Sunday by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY
' OF OCA LA, FLA.

It. It. Carroll, President
V. Lenvenfiood, Jeertary-Treanrer
J. II, Urnjamln, Editor

Kntered at Ocala, Fla., -ostoffice as
awond-claaa matter.

TELEPHONES
IIumIufkh Office .Flve-Oae
Editorial Department Two-Sev
Sm-I(j Editor ...Five, Double-One

ME1IHEU ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press la exclusively
entitled for the use for republication of
all newa dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper
and also the local news published
herein. All rights of republication of
special dispatches herein arg also reserved.

ADVERTISING RATES

Difiplayt Plate 10c. per inch for con consecutive
secutive consecutive insertions. Alternate inser insertion.?
tion.? insertion.? 2i per cent, additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition caarKt-J on ads. that run less than
six times 5c. per inch. Bpecial position
20 per cent, additional. Rates based, on
4-inch minimum. JLess than lour inches
will take higher rate, which will be
furnished on application.
Heading otlce 5c. per line for first
insertion; 3c. per line for each subse subsequent
quent subsequent insertion. One change a week
allowed on readers without extra oom oom-po.sition
po.sition oom-po.sition charges.
I2-al advertisements at legal rates.

Klectros must be mounted, or charge

will be made for mounting.

SUnSCRIPTIOX RATES

Domeillc
One year. In advance.......
8ix months, in advance.....
Three months, in advance..
One month, in advance....
Korelsrn
One year, in advance. .....
Six months, in advance,....
Three months, in advance..
One month, in advance.....

..,.$5.00

.... 2.50
1.25
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4.25
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.... .80

broken up in little groups, among
which the inference would be that
some were better and some worse
than the others. At any rate, the

school i3 doing very well and about

all the Star sees needful to it is more

room, and, as the number of inmates
increases, more teachers.

MUX ROE & CHAMBLISS
WEEKLY WAR MAP

THE GREATER FLORIDA
ASSOCIATION

At a meeting of the board of trade
last evening J. P. Durler, secretary of
the Greater Florida Association, ex explained
plained explained to the board the workings of
this association and pointed out tht
necessity of Ocala and Marion coun county
ty county becoming affiliated with it. Mr.
Durlers' talk to the board is as fol follows:
lows: follows: "Florida, possessing within herself
all the means of a domestic develop

ment of all her vast resources, as yet

OCALA,
FLORIDA

WOOD! WOOD! WTOOD!

The cover illustrations of Life this
week is one of the prettiest and most
appropriate war time illustrations we
have yet seen.
The spirit of France is like a sword
of finest steely which was sheathed in
a velvet scabbard. They called France

decadent because of the scabbard but

her enemies have found nothing de decadent
cadent decadent in the blade.

, When you pass a boy scout or a

squad in uniform, salute them; it
will make you both feel better. These
boys will soon be taking the places
of the soldiers and even now are doi

ing a great work throughout our

land.

A year aero, tens of thousands of

the American lads, the most of them

in fact, who have helped drive Ger German
man German veterans back in the last few
days, were quietly working in shops
and stores or tilling the fields of their
native land.

The Munroe & Chambliss National

Bank has contracted for a weekly
war man which is nosted now on its

window. This large and accurate almost untouched, and realizing that

maD of the war zone of EuroDe is fact implicitly, the leading business

chane-ed weeklv. showing the battle men of the cities, hamlets and coun

- I.. -ri 1 i ; I 4,

lines brought down to date each time, ties in r lonaa nave organized must

The public is cordially invited to con- effectively to develop tnese resources,

milt th man and keen nosted on the industries and country property, ine

fs nf fh hat.tld lines. result is the Greater Florida Asso

ciation

If the government takes over the The principal object oi our organ

newspapers, will George Creel be the ization is co-operation the combin combin-editor
editor combin-editor in chief ? Tamna Times. ing of all the intelligently, centrally

1 i sv 1 1

Tf h is well rrv to make a livinc directed enorts, wnicn is accompusn-

- i .... j i

by plowing. One of Mr. Wilson's few ing great tnmgs i or tne nation ana Be on time Get m your winter
faults is that when he appoints a for the allied forces striving for the suppiy cf wood before it is too late.

bonehead to office (which he does oc- victury m me wunu-wc x. ug furn,sn you good and

casionally ) he keeps him on the job "Acting in accora witn me spim first class service. phone 339.

until he learns it or dies. None of of the time, in coordinate and com- tf C. O. D. WOOD YARD.

them have died so far, but the people bine, m efficient and effective worK,

have suffered wnne some oi tnem wCM. phone No. 451 Is the American
have learned what they should have Greater Astaon Temple & Davis, proprie-

Known wnen appointea. Ana, we 5 & Cr tors, the best in the city, at the union

regret to say, some oi tnem snow no -- fc ,, passenger station. 16-tf

signs of learning. Iious commercial uigauiiauoua aim -

- I interests or tne state, wnicn nave in i

n w ;a heart and in nuroose the makine of Nunnally's Candies fresh every

work in the state of Florida of great-U greater and more prosperous com-1 week at Cengs Drug Store, where

er importance than that which has to monwealth of the great state oi ior- you c u,u UiiU aUiF3.

An wit hnnr stAt.e nrisons: and Der- Ida, m advertising tne wonaenui re

haps the appointment of J. S. Blitch sources of the state. For example,

as superintendent of the state prison mere is now no comomauon oi. pian
farm is the best wav to" utilize his un- or purpose, every community acting

deniable talents and abilities. He for and by itself, and while produc

will make e-ood in the nosition. as he ing some results, they are not com

has done in others. Lakeland Tel-1 mensurate with the aggregate sums

I of monev that are heme expended to

Sim was making such a good gov- devise metnoos to De empioyea ior

ernor that we hate to see him devo- the common people, out ail to one
A intn iaiW end. To bring the advantages of the

I state and oi every section zorceiuiiy

Bre'r Burke of the tax commission, and productively before the people of

still retains within easy reach the other states and oi tne worio, is one

verbal weapons with which politicians

NOTICE V
To Holdiers of Second Liberty Bonds
We are prepared to exchange
Third Liberty Loan 4 14 Bonds for
Second Liberty Loan 4 Bonds. Call
at once as the time will soon expire.
MUNROE & CHAMBLISS
NATIONAL BANK

A DOLLAR WASTED HELPS THE ENEMY
That is not a loyal thing to do, of course, and few of us realize
that we are helping the enemy when we waste money. .Pretty hard
to define what waste is. One man's waste may be another man's
economy. In a general way, waste in war time may be defined as the
buying of anything not essential to health and efficiency. Every
dollar one; spends' for unnecessary things commands goods and ser-
vices, that is, labor and' materials, needed by the United States Gov Government
ernment Government for war purposes. Ani, Jf you invest the money you save
in War Savings Stamps, you are again helping by loaning your mon money
ey money to your Government.
Ocala lice & PacMi&g Co;

c

are wont to make the welkin ring,

He refers to one of his critics as

of the purposes of the Greater Flor

ida Association.

"There are, however, many other

Is a CHnafemeirs

"plutocratic." Somehow, whenever we matters to be .worked on, but all on
eo or henA that.'wnrd we are re- the same line that of combined and

minded of another "demagogic."

Lakeland Telegram

concentrated effort that will insure
benefit in return and in proportion to

A demagogue is generally a man the money and efforts expended

four

who would be a plutocrat if he could

make money without working for it.

AT THE CHURCHES TOMORROW

It doesn't require half as much
skill to drive a golf ball a hundred
yards as it does to drive a pig fifty
feet. St. Augustine Record.

Swinging a golf stick doesn't de-

either, but we can't make our golfists

First Presbyterian
9:30 a. m. Sunday school.
Eric Collier, superintendent.
11 a. m. Public worship.

A .very important matter that we

have up for consideration just now is

the safeguarding of transportation

facilities to Florida and the move

ment of products, out of Florida next

winter. This is a matter that con

cerns all Florida. The adjustment

of the freight rates in Florida is one

of the greatest pfbblems that we have

ever undertaken. The results can

8 d. m. Wednesday," midweek only be ; obtained by a combined or

T10 1TA1 WIAflllrllV

-""V. J I 1 f 1

worship with us. r iT- v T- a

sciii, uicu lasc w ii a.Tiiiii wiif auu i

will at least have the railroad admin

istrator thinking that we deserve
proper consideration.' We can get

this consideration through proper co

ordinate effort. We have it at first

hand, and from one of Florida's best

John R. Herndon, Pastor.

Sub-

The Associated i Press notifies the
newspapers -taking its service that
the order of the War Industries
Board regarding exchanges has been
rescinded. We supposed it would be,
tho' not so soon; in the meantime it
has put the newspapers of the coun country
try country to a lot of useless trouble. As
for the other sections of the board's
order, we think they were good and
necessary. The Star has practiced
them from its youth up.

Baptist
9:30 a. m. Sunday school,
ll a. m. Morning worship,
ject, "A Peace Offensive."

8 p. m. The- pastor will preach the f-onA t,w Pmnfv tW we

ast of the series of character ser- !,. QT,;TO a o-ef fno-efher nd

monS. JJO not miSS tniS. !wV,,r fan- citnafinn lib mm

7:4o p. m., Wednesday, is the hour ld put Qut gome plan wiU bring

when we gather for

and pray with u$

prayer. Com&

Grace Episcopal

(Rev. Gilbert A. Ottmann, Rector)

y:40 a. m. csunaay scnooi.
7:30 a. m. Holy communion, every

Sunday.

11 a. ( m. Holy communion and

sermon, first Sunday.

11 a. m. Morning prayer and ser

mon, except first Sunday.

All seats free. Every one welcomt

at all services.'

Methodist
9:30 a. m. Sunday school. Some

to Sunday school.

11 a. m. Preaching. Text, Philip-

pians 1:27-28.

7 p. m. Senior League.
8 p. m. Preaching. Topic, Chris

tian Waarf are. Text, 2 Cor. 10 ;4.

8 p, m. Wednesday, prayer meet

ing. Come and pray.

7 a. m. Thursday. Union prayer

meeting for our boys.

4:30 p. m. Friday, Junior League
Leader, Harvey -Hardin.

Our country and soldiers need your

presence and prayers at the church

service now. Be true to them by at

tending services.
Smith Hardin, Pastor,

Buy War Savings Stamps.

St. Phillip's Catholic Church

St. Philip's Sunday and holiday
services will be at 10 a. m. and at

5:30 p. m. Instruction for the chil children
dren children at 9 a. m. Daily mass at 7 a. m

Christian Science Society of Ocala.
(Yonge's Hall)
10 a. m. Sunday school.
11 a. m. Sunday service.
7:45 p. m. first Wednesday in each
month.
Free reading room and library open
on Tuesdays and Fridays from 3 to 5.
BARGAINS IN USED CARS

1917 Maxwell in A-l shape $500
3917 Ford $400

1914 Ford .$350

1913 Cadillac $450!
1916 Dodge ........ ...... .$500
23-6t AUTO SALES CO. J

water wings and "bathing caps at
the Court Pharmacy. 15-tf

PROTECT
YOURSELF
FROM
MOSQUITOES.
, Slay the Jesky
Critters with
FENOLE
It's the simplest
thing in the world
to KILL Mosquitoes1
with FENOLE; you
can spray several
rooms thoroughly in
less time than it
takes to say your
prayers.
Qts. 75c; Yz Gals
$1.35; GalsV $2.50
Sprayers:
Pint size 65c., Quart
size, 75c.; Com.
Air Sprayers, $1.25
Fenole Chemical Co.
Manufacturers,
Jacksonville, Fla.

Dr. W. A. Cooper touched a fine
chord when, in a letter to the Times

yesterday, he advocated the building

of cottages at ; the state school for
girls at Ocala. The cottage plan of
caring for those unfortunate girls,
who, either from their own faults or

from the general depravity of man,
society finds it necessary to restrain,

is regarded by sociologists as by far
the best. It gives opportunity for

seeresratioh and classification that

must be bad if the best results are
to be obtained. It is not right to con

fine a girl of 12, an innocent, plastic
little thing whose chief misfortune
may be lack of proper care, with a
girl of 20 who is, perhaps, a profes professional
sional professional prostitute or near it. Tampa

Times.

Dr. Cooper's letter was not entirely

just to the school and the Times'
comment, perhaps unintentionally,

has made it worse. The Times ought

to know that a "professional prosti

tute' would not be sent to an institu institution
tion institution like the industrial school. The

inmates of the Ocala school are, or

were, mostly naughty little girls who

would have been as good as any if
they had had a fair chance. There
has been no trouble among them for
months, and many have behaved so

well that thev have been sent home.

or to homes of people who have
adopted them. As for the dormitor

ies, while there are more girls in them

than was intended, still they are not

as much crowded as army barracks.

where men live in comfort and keep

their health. Twenty girls can do
very well in a room, if it is well ven ventilated
tilated ventilated and kept clean, as these rooms

are. There is one good feature abou

the dormitories that both the doctor
and the Times overlooks, and that is
that the better behaved girls, who
have been at the institution some
time, exert a good influence on the
new comers, which would not be so

seems to the Star that the girls' do I Don't fail to call for Maxwell House rtrrnac Smith cgogg
better all together than they would Coffee. Kept at all grocery stores, tf Co., Ocala Seed store.

the desired results. We believe the

best plan is the one now undertaken,

viz: the cementing together of every
county in Florida, through its com commercial
mercial commercial bodies, into one great organ

ization, so that when we go before

our legislature or railroad commis

sion, we can show strength enough to

make them take notice.

"I cannot be too persistent in my

efforts to have your association join

this movement, and sincerely hope

you will present a large membership,

so that Alachua county will be one of I

the biggest and brightest spots on

the map of Florida, through its ef

forts and work in the Greater Florida

Association."

Ever heard that order given at a gasoline filling station ?
You will if you just wait till a Chalmers drives up.
At some of the larger stations you'll see a row of three or

red pumps. ;
On each is a price, and in some cities the price will range from
say, 2354, 27fc to 30 cents per gallon.
. . )
Watch the different makes of cars as they arrive for refilling of tanks.
The "temperamental" ones will ; insist on the high-test gasoline
only. And pay the high pries.
They will tell you, that, with the low-test gasoline, their cylinders fill
with carbon, the carburetor will not function, and that the power
produced is niL
Well they ought to know. They, are driving those cars.
The Chalmers owner is the exception to the rule.
He stops at the first pump the cheapest, heaviest, low-test gasoline.
-
, He knows he is buying a liquid that is practically kerosene.
But he also knows his Chalmers motor will burn it and con consume
sume consume it perfectly.
And if he knows all the facts he will appreciate also that there are are-more
more are-more heat units per gallon in the heavy than in the lighter fuel
So his efficiency is greater at the same time that his fuel bill is less.
Yes you have it the famous "Hot Spot" and the "Ram's Horn"
manifold as you find them in combination only in Chalmers Motor
Gars, are responsible for that condition. V
You obtain a four-fold efficiency in a Chalmers- we'll tell you how
in the next advertisement
Meantime, drop in and let us show you just what the "Hot-Spot"
and the "Ram's Horn" really are what they accomplish and how.
Then you will understand the reason for, the tremendous popularity,
of the Chalmers a popularityaxid a demand so great that every everybody
body everybody in the trade concedes, This is Chalmers year."

1

Mil gwr saaas

Tourinr Cr. 7-PMenser $1615 Towing Sdjui - fSSM TowiCi

Tooring; Car, 5-PuMnger $1065 Cabriolet. 3Phmii- S1985 UmootiM. 7-P;

StAuda.rd BotdfUr ... f IMS Towa Cmr. ?.fUNiCir fS9S5 Unto

All PrlM T. O. B. DtroU mbe to Chui WlUtoat Ho2e

fj IT T

mm

Mo Mo A

(DL

Fenole Is sold In Ocala by Ant!

Monopoly Drugstore, Clarkson Hard Hard-Co..
Co.. Hard-Co.. Ollie Mordis, Tydlnga Drugr- Co.,

FflorMa



OCALA EVENING STAB, SATURDAY, JULY 27. 1918

TSUtSnNG3SDLUP3
4iws rr thb.
UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT

Youra for All Kinds Of
SHEET METAL WORK
V. MEASEK
210Soutlt Osceola St.

NEW SWEET POTATOES
PECK 50c
Pettijohn's Breakfast Food
Quaker Corn Puffs
Quaker Puffed Wheat
Quaker Puffed Rice
Quaker Rolled Oats
Kellogg's Corn Flakes
Cream of Wheat'
Roxane Wheat Cereals
Roxane Wheat Bran
Shredded Wheat Biscuit
Post Toasties (Corn Flakes)
Pearl Barley

OCALA SOCIAL AFFAIRS
If You Have Any News for this De Department,
partment, Department, Call Five Double-One
or Two-Seven

0. IL TEAPOT
GROCERY
Phone 16&174

DR. K. J. WEIBE
EYESIGHT
SPECIALIST

(WithWeihe Co., Jewelers)
OPTOMETRIST AND OPTICIAN
Phone 25
South Side of Square
OCALA, FLORIDA

BUY WAR SAVINGS STAMPS
flllfM I 'fllllM llk

uwii iuui uwii nuiuc
A House and Two Lots
$850
A House aitd 3 Acres

A House and k Lots
$1,200
Can be Bought With' Monthly Pay Pay-menta
menta Pay-menta of
$10
I Ml MIIDDAV

l. m. muitum
Room 5, Holder Block,
Ocala. Florida

TEReiOLYSWOLLE
Suffering Described As Torture
Relieved by Black-Draught.

Rossville, Ga. Mrs. Kate Lee Able, ol
this place, writes: "My husband is an
engineer, and once while lifting, he in injured
jured injured himself with a piece of heavy ma machinery,
chinery, machinery, across the abdomen He was
so sore he could not bear to press on

himself at all, on chest or abdomen. He
weighed 165 lbs., and fell off until he
weighed 1 10 lbs., in two weeks.
He became constipated and it looked
like he would die. We had three different
doctors, yet with all their medicine, his

bowels failed to act. He would turn up
a ten-cent bottle of castor oil, and drink
it two or three days in succession. He
did this yet without result. We became
desperate, he suffered so. He was swol swollen
len swollen terribly. He told me hta suffering
could only be described as torture.
I sent and bought Thedford's Black Black-Draught.
Draught. Black-Draught. 1 made him take a big dose,
and when it began to act he fainted, he
was in such misery, but he got relief and
bega jo mend at once. He got well,
and we both feel he owes his life to
Thedford's Black-Draught.".
Thedford's Black-Draught will help you
to keep fit, ready for the day's work.
Try it! NC-131

I l .M I LA

in Doint nf Insr.pr. hpantv. hardness

and above all WEAR? It is proclaim proclaimed
ed proclaimed the best by those who have used
it for vpars

You insure you house against fire
why not insure it against decay with
which is the most durable Paint
made -and-by far the most economi economical
cal economical because its all Paint and you
get two for one our color card ex explains.
plains. explains. 9
For Sale By
THE MARION HARDWARE CO.,
- Ocala. Florida

A Song in Doubt

Is it lover or friend that she holds

me?
I know not, but know
That she shapes me and molds me
As sculptor, the pliable clay;
My longing, it floods and enfolds me
As does earth the snow,
Or as, at the lapse of the thrush
song, the darkness the day.
Her eyes are as skies as their fairest,
Unfathomably blue:
Her lips are as rarest:
Anemones touched by the sun;
Ah, heart of my heart, if thou carest,
Then give me the clue t
That shall point out the radiant path pathway
way pathway to paradise, won!
Bennett Stephens.
.
Friendship
A great writer has said: "It is bet better
ter better for a woman to fill "a simple hu human
man human part lovingly, better for her to
be sympathetic in trouble and to
whisper a comforting message into

one grieving ear, than
There will be a subscription dance
at the Woman's Club tonight.
Miss Sadie Dinkens is the charm charming
ing charming guest of Miss Lennie Pender for
a week.
Mr. A. T. Thomas arrived today
from Atlanta to spend the week-end
with his family.
' '
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Pender are
enjoying a very pleasant visit from
Mrs. Pender's brother, Mr. Howard F.
Dotts of Macon, Ga.
'.
Dr. and Mrs. Harry Walters will
move the first of August into Mrs.
Emily Green's residence on Oklawaha
formerly occupied by Judge and, Mrs.
W. M. Gober.
Mrs. J. P. Galloway and her guest,
Miss Nona Sewell of Jacksonville,
and little Miss Muriel Galloway, left
today for Brooksville, where they
will visit their, father for sometime.
i Mrs. Annie Stroud will arrive in
the city Monday from Fort'- Myers,
coming up with Mr. and Mrs. Claud;
Nix in their car. Mr. and Mrs. Nix
are on their way to Brunswick!, Ga.
where they will reside in the future.
,;
Rev. C. W. White took supper last
evening with Rev. Hardin and fam family.
ily. family. Rev. White is presiding elder of
the Orlando district and was on his
way to quarterly conference at Camp Camp-ville
ville Camp-ville and Hawthorn.
.
Rev. J. R. Herndon has returned
from Connor, where he has been the
guest of Mrs. Trantham and family.
He accompanied Dr. apd Mrs. Lane
home yesterday, they also being the
over night guests of Mr. and Mrs.
Trantham.
Misses Mary t and Gladys Brooks
are anticipating a very pleasant fort fortnight's
night's fortnight's trip to North Lake Weir.
They will be with their friend, Miss
Ruth Warner, who with her mother,
will occupy a cottage there for the
month of August.
Mrs. M. M. Carter returned yes yesterday
terday yesterday from Green Springs, wher
she left the rest of the party she ac

companied there last week. Those in
the pa'rty are Mrs.; Brinkley, Mrs.

Jake Brown, Mrs. Ottmann and Mrs.
T. C. Carter. They, will remain for

several days longer.

The food conservation sale con

ducted by the Friendship Wesley

Bible class under the direction of the

class teacher, Mrs. L. N. Green,
came to a most Successful close this

afternoon. The success of the under-

taink was in. advance of their most

ardent expectations.

The six weeks course of instrue

tion which Mr. Clifton W.' Long has
been taking at Annapolis will close

Monday, the 29th. It will then be

decided where he will be located. It

is probable that he will be stationed

in California to help handle Pacific

coast shipping. In any vent, his
wife will accompany him wherever he
is located.

Mrs. A. N. Gallant, who has been in

town for a short stay will return to

day to Salt Springs, where she left
her children. Mrs. Gallant is very
much improved in health since going
to the springs and is loud in her
praise of the wonderful curative pro properties
perties properties of its salty waters. She feels
tha,t she is now entirely well, which
is a splendid advertisement for the
springs.
Greenwood cemetery; is having a
thorough overhauling, the commit committee
tee committee of ladies having charge of the
work being Mrs. Walter Hood, Mrs.

J. J. Gerig, Mrs. J. E. Chace and

airs, j&miiy ureen. I ney nave a

force of men who will work there all
of next week and beautiful Green Greenwood
wood Greenwood will then be in fine condition
and a most fitting resting place for
our beloved dead.

most substantial orange growers in
South Florida. Last season he sold
the fruit on an eight-acre orange
grove for eight thousand dollars.
Red Cross Work
The following is an extract from a
leter from the Southern division, At Atlanta:
lanta: Atlanta: "The spirit of sacrifice that tho
noble women of your community are
showing is worthy of the highest
commendation. This office is anxious
to serve your chapter in any way it
ca!h to make it an even larger active
force for the saving of American
manhood on the battlefields of France
and the winning of the 'war for the
principles for which America stands."
The July allotment of surgical
dressings has been received, the
amount being 512 split irrigation
pads and 3840 2 x 2 wipes.
The work room at the postoflice
building will be open beginning Mon

day at 8:30 a. m. every day except
Saturday until the allotment is finished.

Let every one come and do their

part and not leave it for a few to do

alone.

It is everybody's work.
Mrs. D. C. Stiles Jr.
. One of the most delightful of the

social festivities of the week among
the young society set, will take place
this evening at the residence of Mrs.

A. M. Perry, when her daughter,
Miss Emma. Perry, will entertain the
members of the "A" club. Miss
Perry will first take her guests to
the Temple theater, where they will

enjoy the fine picture to be shown
there this evening. Then they will

repair to the Court Pharmacy where

a delicious ice cream course with cake
will be served. The entire party will
afterwards attend the subscription
dance to be given at the Woman's
Club. Miss Perry's guests on this oc

casion will be the following, Misses

Rexie Todd, Ava Lee Edwards, Nina

Gamp, Mabel MerTert, Onie Chazal,

Elizabeth Davis, Caroline Hamss,

Ruth Rentz, Hannay Ellis, Blair

Woodrow, Stella Camp, Mary Harriet

Livingston, Eloise Henry, Sadie Till

man and Sidney Perry.

-
Mr' and Mrs. J. C. Johnson and

three children, accompanied by Mr.
and Mrs. W. W. Harriss and daugh daughter,
ter, daughter, Miss Caroline Harriss and son,
Mr. Albert Harriss, left early this
morning for Daytona Beach. They
will return to Ocala Tuesday after

noon.

(Concluded on Fourth Page)

UNCLASSIFIED Y
ADVERTISEMENTS

WANTED, LOST, FOUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS

RATES: Six line maximum, ae
time 25c; three times 50c; six times
75c; one month $3. Payable in advance.

ROOMS FOR RENT At the Dormi Dormitory;
tory; Dormitory; furnished or unfurnished for
light housekeeping. "Half price to
over night lodgers." Hot and cold wa water
ter water connections. Rooms large and
airy; best ventilated in town at low lowest
est lowest prices. Parents, now is the time
to arrange for your children at the
Dormitory. Call on me at my resi residence,
dence, residence, 703 S. Pond St, or phone 305.
Mrs. C. V. Roberts, new matron. 25 tf

FOR SALE Farmer certificates, for
use. of merchants in selling flour.
Price postage paid, fifty, 40c; one
hundred, 75c.; two hundred fifty,
$1.50. Cash must accompany orders.
Star Publishing Co., Ocala, Fla. tf

WANTED Experienced Insurance
agen to handle industrial department
of general fire and life assurance cor corporation
poration corporation for Marion county. Apply to
J. W. Prince, Jacksonville, state
agent. 2-6t

WANTED Owner of small saw
mill to contract to cut a million
feet of yellow pine timber. Will
deliver logs to mill at sidetrack.
Good loaction and plenty of labor.
Address, "T," care the Ocala
Star. 19-6t

THIS IS THE TRIE FOR EVERY CITIZEN TO SUPPORT THE
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT
Many are doing so at a considerable cost or sacrifice to themselves.
This Bank is a member of the Federal Reserve Banking System established by
the Government to give greater financial stability and strength to the member
banks and protection to their depositors. We invite you to become one of our
rMistnmprs so that von mav eniov this Drotection.

Ocala, - - MoFMa

line Ocala NattloeaH Bairulk

SAFETY.

Has become the. slogan not
only ion the. highways of
travel, but also in all lines
of industry. There's no
such thing as safety if
your valuable property is
not covered by 1
FIRE INSURANCE
We represent a number of
the most reliable companies
in existence, and our facil- -ities
are not surpassed in
Florida..

D.W DAVIS, Agency,

HOLDER BLOCK
OCALA :-: FLA.

3

TEE HOHFEL

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

jT-f - v '- ?v
i y .. it '" si " t : x.
. s ; . .v m-.v.n.'v--'"'
,V -i '-.r : H,r ..

In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern, convenience in each room. Dining room service is
second to none.
RATES From $1.50 per day per person to $6.
ROBERT M. MEYER, J. E. KAVANAUGH
Manager. Proprietor.

Read the Star Want Ads. It pays

CASH FOR OLD FALSE TEETH
Dont matter if broken.' I pay $2 to
$25 per set; also cash for old gold,
silver, platinum, dental gold and old
gold jewelery. Will send cash by re return
turn return mail and will hold goods 10 days
for sender's approval of my price.
Mail to L. Mazer, 2007 S. 5th street;
Philadelphia. Pa. 7-5-lra

WANTED At once, broken grind

stones. Will pay cash for them. Ad Address
dress Address Ocala Marble Works, Ocala,

Fla. 23-6t

Norris Candies fresh every week at
the Court Pharmacy. Phone us and
let us send it up. 15-tf

Rev. H. C. Hardin and Mr. W. N.
Denham of Winter Haven, spent last
night at the Methodist parsonage
with Rev. Hardin. He and Mr. Den Denham
ham Denham are on their way to Lake Juna Juna-luska,
luska, Juna-luska, N. C. Rev. Hardin is pastor
of the. Methodist church, at Winter
Haven and Mr. Denham is one of th

FOR SALE One Stearns auto truck;

four new Cord tires; body already
built. Can be seen at McAteer's shop.

Bargain at $550. Auto Sales Co.,

Ocala, Fla. 23-6t

GLEAN

FINAL

-UP SALE

OF ALL SUMMER READY-TO-WEAR

GOODS AND MILLINERY

DRY

We are forced to clean out all remaining summer
goods regardless of price to make room for the new

Fall Goods now beginning to arrive.

FOR SALE Farmer, certificates for
use of merchants in selling flour.
Price postage paid: 50, 40c; 100, 75c.;
250, $1.50. Cash must accompany all
orders. Star Publishing Company,
Ocala. Fla. 22-12t

SEAT COVERS FOR SALE Gordon
seat covers for Maxwell 1917 model
touring car; closing out at less than
cost. Marwell Service Station. 26-4t

Ladies' Silk arid Cloth Suits at greatly
reduced prices.
Lot of Gingham Dresses, Special $4.95
Every Georgette and Taffeta Dress in
the house reduced.
White Garbardine Skirts at exactly
half price.

r

Millinery

Trimmed and Untrimmed
Hats at 1-2 price.

r

Special Purchase of Ribbons.
This lot of Ribbons consists of Moire, Taffeta, Satin, Plaids and
Roman Stripes up to six inches wide and are values to 50c per yd.
Special at
yard 25 cents

OCALA
FLORIDA

TTZO OCALA

FLORIDA

"The Fashion Center"

v
A
- V

A
rf
ill



OCALA EVENING STAB, SATURDAY, JULY 27. 1918

FOUR LONG YEARS
OF BLOOD AND FIRE

1! Hi
(Continued from Third Page)

i

The county judge has issued a
marriage license to L. T. Wylie and
Miss Gussie Mae Sills.

Dodge Touring Car for sale cheap;
good condition. Apply at the Max Maxwell
well Maxwell Agency. 20-tf
'Sergeants Effinger and John Tar Tar-ver,
ver, Tar-ver, both of Company A, are expect expected
ed expected home next week for a short furlough.

Sergeant Miller and Corporal Mil Miller,
ler, Miller, Company A boys, both from Lake
county, and home on a brief furlough,
are in town today.
Mr. Carl Short left yesterday aft aft-ternoon
ternoon aft-ternoon for "an Atlantic Port" to
enter on his duties in the navy. Mr.
Short is a brother of Mrs. Troy Hall.

(Continued from First Page)

A letter from Roy Galloway am
nounces that his unit expects to go
north soon and hopes to see some of
the fighting in France before winter
sets in.

Buy Thrift Stamps of us and keep
your skin nice and soft with Rexall
Skin Soap. G?rig's. Drug Store, tf
Judge and Mrs. W. S. Bullock to today
day today received a letter from their son
Julian, "somewhere in England." Jul Julian
ian Julian sends best wishes to all his
friends, which means a townfull.
Sergeant Hoffman of the county
guards and Commercial Bank put his
Thursday half holiday to a good ad advantage
vantage advantage by hieing to Lake Weir and
catching at least one fish big enough
to materially reduce his week's boara
bill.

The members of Company A, Mar Marion
ion Marion County Guards, are in sure sure-enough
enough sure-enough earnest about training. .They
held a business meeting last night,
and then went out on the street for
an hour's drill, which was well car carried
ried carried out. i

south of Soissons, but also north of j
the Marne and between that river!
and Rheims. There are indications
that a German retreat from the sal salient
ient salient is now under way.
ITALIANS STAND FIRM
On June 15, the Austrians began a
drive against Italy. It was a failure.
The Austrians crossed the Piave, but
on the west bank met with such stub stubborn
born stubborn resistance that progress was
impossible. Slowly the Austrians
were driven back toward the river,
and then the Piave, swollen by rains
in the mountains, completed the over overthrow
throw overthrow of Austria's hopes. After suf suffering
fering suffering terrible losses the Austrians
retreated to the eastern bank of the
Piave from the Montello plateau to
the Adriatic.

MINOR OPERATIONS
Among the year's operations of
comparatively lesser importance were
the British drives in Palestine and
Mesopotamia; The Turkish advance
in the Caucasus; the French and
Italian offensive in Albania; and the
fighting in the German African colo colonies.
nies. colonies. Jerusalem was captured by the
British on December 10, and shortly
afterward the fall of Jericho was an announced.
nounced. announced. Since the taking of Jericho
the British forces in Palestine have
not been active on the offensive.
General Maude led the British
troops into Bagdad on March 11, and
shortly afterward died from cholera.
His forces pushed further up the Ti Tigris
gris Tigris river until the intense heat of

'summer terminated operations.

The Turks after the collapse of
Russia took advantage of the de demoralized
moralized demoralized condition of the Russian
forces to advance through the Cau Caucasus
casus Caucasus and obtain possession of the
regions subsequently ceded them bj bj-the
the bj-the treaty of Brest-Litovsk.

Mr. II. B. Borland has been spend spending
ing spending the week in South Florida in the
interest of his orange buying house.
Mr. Borland's brother, Robert, at
Camp Johnson, where he is now in
training for a commission, has wired
that he will leave for France in a few
days, i
We are very glad indeed to learn
that there is a strong probability of
Mr. Arthur Sandlin coming back to

Ocala right away to take charge of

the Ocala packing house and the
office of the Marion County Citrus

Sub-Exchange. There is no better

citrus fruit or packing house man in
the state, and few more likable fel fellows
lows fellows than Mr. Sandlin, and he has a
town full of friends here.

Mrs. Hornstein Honored
An exceedingly delightful evening
was enjoyed yesterday at the Florida
House, when Mr. Lester Lucas, the
well known soloist, rendered several
vocal selections, accompanied on the
piano by Mrs. Lucas. Every number
was delightful and greatly enjoyed
by the guests. Later dancing was in indulged
dulged indulged in in the lobby of the hotel.
Among those present were Mr. and
Mrs. Eugene Dobbs, Mr. and Mrs.
George Guigan, Mr. and Mrs. Delbert
Haskell, Mr. and Mrs. Lester Lucas,
Mr. Max Fishel, Mr. Wilson of Jack Jacksonville,
sonville, Jacksonville, Mr. Charles Taylor of Val Val-dosta,
dosta, Val-dosta, Mr. Reynolds of Atlanta and
Mrs. I. A. Hornstein, who was tha

honor guest of the evening.
Mr. George F. Armstrong, a prom prominent
inent prominent citizen of Savannah, Ga.f ar arrived
rived arrived in Ocala yesterday afternoon
for a brief visit with his brothers-in-law,
Messrs. Clarence, Clifton and
Jack Camp.
Dr. A. Mcintosh left this afternoon
for a visit to his nephews, the Messrs.
Campbell, near Bartow. He will be
accompanied to Bartow by Miss
Frances Mclver, who will go on from
there to visit her sister Mrs. W. J.
Frink, at Gardner.
, At their hospitable home on South
Lime street yesterday evening, Mr.
and Mrs.' D. E. Mclver gave an ele elegant
gant elegant dinner to a few friends. The
fortunate ones were Rev. J. R. Hern Hern-don,
don, Hern-don, George MacKay, A. E. Gerig and
J. H. Benjamin. Mrs. Mclver is &
most- charming hostess and an adept
at providing a savory and bountiful
meal without infringing on the rules,
of the food administration
,
Mr. and Mrs. John Dozier will
leave this afternoon for an over-

I night visit to Mr. and Mrs. Sylvan

56?

SAVE

THAT

The French and Italian drive in' jjcElroy jn Orlando. Tomorrow they
Albania began on July and is still. wm accompany Mr. and Mrs. McEl-

Effective August 1, 1918, the Price
On All CHEVROLET Cars Will
advance Fifty Dollars. You have
Been Intending to buy a Chev Chev-rolet
rolet Chev-rolet for some time, so get it now
and save that $50. The present
price delivered at Ocala, is

0.0"0

WACAHOOTA

Wacahoota, July 24. We had nice
showers Briday and Saturday, which
were gratefully received.
Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Smith, Mr. L.
M. Smith and Misses Theora and
Leola Smith returned last Monday
from a visit to friends and relatives
in Jacksonville. They spent Sunday
out at the beach and enjoyed bathing
in the surf.
Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Smith and Mr.
and Mrs. J. W. Bradley and daugh daughters,
ters, daughters, Lucile and Johnnie, and Janielie
Tyson, motored over to the Univer University
sity University City Friday and took in the pic picture,
ture, picture, "Over the Top."

Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Curry and
daughter, Miss Thelma and Miss
Marie McMullen of Micanopy were
visitors to Mcintosh Saturday after afternoon.
noon. afternoon. Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Smith and son,
Pearce, were shopping in Gainesville
Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Bradley and
Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Smith went to
Montbrook Saturday afternoon to
see Miss Loleta Rawls, who is quite
ill with appendicitis.
Mr. and Mrs. John Maynard, Mrs.
n. Sistrunk of Jacksonville and Mr.
Waterman Johnson and granddaugh granddaughter
ter granddaughter of Micanopy passed thru here
Sunday and called on Mr. and Mrs.
C. R. Curry.
Mr. Lute Howell has just purchas purchased
ed purchased two fine iron gray horses. They
are a good match and will be of great
value on his farm.
Mrs. Lute Howell and Mrs. Elvin
Bruton were shopping in Micanopy
Friday morning.
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Edwards anof
sons of Ocala were guests of Mrs. V.
P. Smith Sunday.
Mrs. Charles Mixon, Dr. C. G. Mix-

on and daughter. Miss Katherine ot

Gainesville and Mr. and Mrs. G. W,

Bradshaw and son of Archer and Mr.

and Mrs. W." J. Whitehurst of Ral
eigh, were calling in our midst Sun
day afternoon.

Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Tyson and chil children
dren children were dinner guests of Mrs. V. P.

Smith Sunday.
Mr. Charlie Smoak of Flemington,

was her last week and bought most

all the pears in this section.
Mrs. Lute Howell entertained Mr.

and Mrs. Elvin Bruton and son, J. D.
and Mr. F. J. Bruton and Mr. ana

Mrs. C. R. Curry and Miss Thelma
Curry at dinner Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Epperson and
children of Williston were week-end
guests of Mrs. L. M. Smith and and
T. N. Smith.

Mr. and Mrs. William -Neal of

Jacksonville are guests of Mrs. Neal's
parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Smith.

m progress.
During the year British forces in
Africa drove German forces before
them in German East Africa and in
German Southwest Africa and finally
compelled them to disperse or sur surrender.
render. surrender. This took from Germany the
last of the vast colonial possessions
held by her when the war began.

SUBMARINE WARFARE
The past year has been marked by
a gradual decline of submarine sink sinkings
ings sinkings as compared with the number of
ships being built by the Entente Al Allies.
lies. Allies. The operations of the British
and American destroyers have spread
terror among the "wasps of the sea,"
while a great mine field completed in
May by the British navy converted

virtually the whole. North sea into an
area closed against U-boat activities.
The harbors of Zeebrugge and Os Os-tend,
tend, Os-tend, from which German submarines
had been operated against Entente
shipping, were either sealed entirely
or made virtually valueless as sub submarine
marine submarine bases by daring naval and air
raids by the British in May.
U-BOATS IN AMERICAN WATERS
.German submarines visited Ameri American
can American waters in June and sank at least
ten ships, the field of the U-boat ope operations
rations operations being from the North New
Jersey coast south to the Virginia
capes and easterly half way to the
Bermudas.
The only United States transport
lost while carrying troops to Eu

rope was the Tuscania, which was
torpedoed off the north coast of Ire Ireland
land Ireland on February 6 with a loss of 212

men.

HOSPITAL SHIPS SUNK
During the year eleven hospital
ships have been sunk by submarines,
the latest and most flagrant case of
this violation of the Geneva conven convention
tion convention being the destruction of the Brit British
ish British steamer Llandovery Castle, car carrying
rying carrying Canadian nurses and doctors.
This took place on June 27, only
twenty-four of the 258 persons on
board being rescued.
The total shipping reported sunk
since August 1, 1917, is more than
4,250,000 tons. Against this destruc destruction
tion destruction of shipping the Allies have com combined
bined combined their shipbuilding capacity. The
actual number of tons of shipping
launched and put into service has not
been published. Official announce announcements
ments announcements have been made in the recent
past, however, to the effect that more
ships are being built than are being
sunk. On July 4, ninety vessels were
launched at American shipyards.

LOSSES IN BATTLE
The year's fighting has entailed
great losses for most of the belliger belligerents.
ents. belligerents. During the drive in Italy last
October and November the Teutonic
armies claimed the capture of more
than 180,000 Italians. In the Ger German
man German offensive in France this year
about 190,000 French, British, Ameri American
can American and Portugese were reported to
have been taken in battle.
Added to these losses are the cas casualties
ualties casualties in killed and wounded. No
definite figures have been issued by
Germany and Austria, but it has been
reported on what appears to be good
authority that in the fighting from
March 21 till June 14 the Germans
lost more than 500,000 men. The
French and British losses were con considerably
siderably considerably smaller, as the Allies were
fighting from entrenched positions.
FINANCIAL ASPECTS
The United States has floated three

rby to Daytona Beach. Mr. and Mrs. j

Dozier will return to Ocala Monday
and Mrs. MpElroy and son will prob probably
ably probably come to Ocala with them and be
their guests for a few weeks. They
have taken a cottage at the beach for
the month of September.
Mr. Herbert Martin arrived in the
city Thursday afternoon from Au Auburn,
burn, Auburn, Ala., for an extended visit to
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George W.
Martin. Mr. Martin is professor of
chemistry and metalurgy in the Ala Alabama
bama Alabama Polytechnical Institute at Au Auburn,
burn, Auburn, which is doing; governmental
research work. He spent Thursday
in Jacksonville as the guest of his
brother, Mr. Georgef Martin, who will
come to Ocala about the first of Au August
gust August for a ten davs' visit.
The picture story at the Temple
yesterday, "The Hidden Pearls," was
one of the best in which that excel excellent
lent excellent actor, Sessue Hayakawa, has
featured here. For a good plot, well
carried out, and beautiful scenery, it
rnadf-. a fine combination. The feature
this afternoon and evening, "The
Guilt of Silence," in which Monroe
Salisbury and Ruth Clifford have
leading parts, is one of the best Blue Bluebirds.
birds. Bluebirds. Miss Billie Rhodes will also
be on the screen with one of her
charming comics.
PICNIC AT OXFORD
.

Let us demonstrate it for you.

OCALA ION

GARAGE

C E. Simmons, Mgr.

The annual Oxford picnic and bar barbecue
becue barbecue will be held Saturday, August
3rd. Everybody come and bring
your friends and renew old friend friendships.
ships. friendships. You are welcome, one and all.
Ice cream and cold drinks sold for
the benefit of cemetery. Come early,
stay late. P.. Caruthers,
Manager of Picnic.

JOIN WIN THE WAR LEAGUE

The public of Ocala is urged to join
the Win the War League. It entails
no expense whatever, and all loyal
American citizens, over the age of
twelve, are entitled to membership.
The Boy Scouts will call on you with
membership cards for your signature.
Please give the scouts your attention
when they call on you, and sign the
membership cards.
Publicity Committee,
Ocala Win the War League.
FOR RENT Bath rooms; Eastlak
Bathing Beach, Eastlake, Fla. See
Wesson. 27-sat

Don't fail to call for Maxwell House
Coffee. Kept at all grocery stores, tf
For sale cheap, a Dodge Touring
Car, in excellent condition. The Max Maxwell
well Maxwell Agency, Ocala. 20-tf
Careful prescription service, using
Squibb's chemicals, at Ceng's Drug
Store. War Savings and Thrift
Stamps sold. f

great Liberty Loans. The proceeds
of these loans have aggregrated $10, $10,-788,541,900.
788,541,900. $10,-788,541,900. The total war cost to
the United States, according to the
latest available figures, is $13,800, $13,800,-000,000.
000,000. $13,800,-000,000. Since the nation entered the
war it has extended credits to the
Alllies aggregrating ?6,091,590,000.
The total cost of the war to Eng Eng-gland
gland Eng-gland up to December 15, 1917, was
placed at 6,242,000,000, while French
votes of credit are somewhat smaller.
At latest reports the total of the Ger German
man German war loans approximated $31, $31,-000,000,000.
000,000,000. $31,-000,000,000. r

THE WEEKLY STAR AND
THRICE-A-WEEK NEW YORK
WORLD ONE YEAR $2.25

The value and need of a newspaper
in the household was never greater
than at the present time. We have
been forced to enter the great world
war, and a large army of ours is al already
ready already in France. You will want to
have all the news from our troops on
European battlefields.
No other combination of newspap newspapers
ers newspapers at so small a price will furnish
such prompt and accurate news of
these world-shaking events. It is not
necessary to say more.
We offer the Weekly Star and the
Thrice-a-Week New York World to together
gether together for one year for $2.25. Don't
ask for credit on this proposition. Ad Address
dress Address Ocala Weekly Star, Ocala, Fla.
Don't fail to call for Maxwell House
Coffee. Kept at all grocery stores, tf

mm' . Aim

mm

Wont ycu let us prove to you by
one trial that there is no finish that
will give you a lasting satisfaction
like
DAVIS VARNISH STAIN
For Sale By
THE MARION HARDWARE CO,
Ocala. Florida

L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER
AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Con
tract work. Gives More and Better
Work for the Money than any other
contractor in the city.

MM 0 M! C E1ERI I!

Having purchased the Court Pharm Pharmacy,
acy, Pharmacy, one of the leading drug stores in
Central Florida, we wish to announce
that we shall endeavor to maintain
the high standard that Has always
prevailed in every department. The
line of Toilet Articles and all kinds
of Druggists' Sundries will continue
to be kept right up to the minute. The
PRESCRIPTION Department has al always
ways always been the pride of the Court
Pharmacy, and we shall continue to
use as our slogan Prompt and Effic Efficient
ient Efficient Service at all hours, day or night.
The very best of drugs will always
be used in compounding prescrip prescriptions,
tions, prescriptions, and we will appreciate it if you
will instruct your physician to leave
your work with us. Our Cool Drink
Department will have the personal
- care of an expert, and we shall con continue
tinue continue to dispense the best to be had.
We solicit the patronage of the people
of Marion and adjoining counties.
HOWARD W. WALTERS,
" HOLMES L. WALTERS,
Proprietors.

COOffiT PBAffiEflACY.

Our prescription. department offers
you the best in" PURE DRUGS and
CHEMICALS. Your doctor will tell
you. Court Pharmacy. Phone 284. 15tf
Don't fail to call for Maxwell House
Coffee. Kept at all grocery stores, tf

Mclver & MacKay
UNDERTAKERS and ELI BAITERS
PHONES 47. 104. 305
OCALA, FLORIDA

7r
1

ii



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