The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06994

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
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Weather Forecast: Partly cloudy
tonight and Friday, probably local
showers in the peninsula.

OGALA, FLORIDA, THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1918.

VOL.25, NO. 178

II Mil j8"1

n i!

ffi

Bsl IIS

Grown Prince's Army in Pre-

carious Condition

LATE TODAY COMES THE REPORT THAT THE BRITISH HAVE
ALSO TAKEN THE OFFENSIVE

(Associated Press)

French Headquarters in France, via
Ottawa, July ,25. The French are
within three miles of Fere-en-Tarden-cis,
which is the center of German
communications in this region.; The
town is heavily shelled daily and

bombed by airmen.
OVERCOMING VICIOUS RESIST RESISTANCE
ANCE RESISTANCE With the American Army on the
Marne Front, July 25 (By the Asso Associated
ciated Associated Press). French and Ameri American
can American troops advanced, today north of
the Marne more steadily and also
gained on other parts of the 55-mile
front. The Germans resisted vicious viciously
ly viciously in a majority of cases.
PINCERS CLOSING ON THE
CROWN PRINCE
London, July 25. The Pall Mall
Gazette says rumors are current tha
the British have gained a great ad ad-van6e
van6e ad-van6e toward Fismes, and it is report reported
ed reported the 'Franch advance has put the

crown prince's armies in such a posi position
tion position in the Aisne and Marne salient
that extrication seems impossible.
COUNTER ATTACKS DID NOT
. COUNT .-
Paris, July 25. German counter counterattacks
attacks counterattacks on the north bank of the
Marne near Dormans enabled the en enemy
emy enemy to occupy a little of the Petit
wood, but the French soon drove them
out, .today's official statement says.
Violent artillery actions are reported
near the Ourcq river and' Rheims.
The French made a surprise raid
near Montdidier.

ADVANCE AT ALBERT
London, July 25. The British last
night pushed forward slightly near
Albert, capturing a few prisoners
and six machine guns, it, is officially
announced today. The. Germans occu occupied
pied occupied a British point near Villers Villers-Bretonneux,
Bretonneux, Villers-Bretonneux, but were driven out.
SITUATION SATISFACTORY

London, July 25. On the western
front of the Soissons and : Rheims
salient, the Allies have advanced an
average depth of three miles on a 12 12-mile
mile 12-mile front during the past two days.
There were no new developments in
the battle area this morning, accord according
ing according to advices here up to noon. The
situation is considered quite satisfac satisfactory.
tory. satisfactory. FLORIDA BOY WOUNDED
Washington, July 25. The marine
casualty list issued today, contining
.sixty-four names, includes Private
James M. Park, of Worthington
Springs, Fla., who was severely
wounded. The army casualty t list
contains 188 names.

WILL TREAT LAHDIIiG OF HE T

COAST AS CAUSE FOR VAR

A

(Associated Press)

ORGANIZATION OF THE

MIDDLE FLORIDA COTTON

GROWERS ASSOCIATION

Amsterdam, July 25. The Russian
Bolsheviki erovernment, according to
a Moscow dispatch to the Berlin Lok Lok-al
al Lok-al Anzeiger, considers the action of
the Entente powers in landing troops
on the Murman coast tantamount to
a declaration of war and' will take
counter measures accordingly.
ISN'T TO BE ENVIED
Vienna. July 25. Baron Von Hui

sarek has been appointed Austrian
premier.

Si

T AT THE

TJ

ROIIG

SUB

Pursuant to a call issued by Mr.
Nathan Mayo of Summerfield, there

assembled in Summerfield on Friday

afternoon, July 22, 1918, between

two and three hundred prominent

cotton glowers of Lake, Marion and

Sumter counties.
The meeting was called to order in
the schoplhouse, and Mr. R. W. Black Black-lock,
lock, Black-lock, the government's agricultural
demonstrator for Marion county, was
elected chairman, and Mr. Hamilton
F.' Dobbin of Altoona, was elected
secretary.
The chairman then introduced Mr.

Nathan Mayo, who, in well chosen

Allied Ships Along the American

Coast are on the Out Out-.
. Out-. look

COLORED REGISTRANTS,

PAY ATTENTION

All class 1 colored men in the 1917
registration to be called for Aug. 4th
to go to Camp Devens, Mass.
TEMPLE PROGRAM
FOR THE WEEK

Today: J. Stuart Blackton in "The
World for Sale." Muttmd Jeff.
Friday: The Pathe News. Sessue
Hayakawa in "Hidden Pearls."
Saturdav : Monroe Salisbury and

Ruth Clifford in "The Guilt of Si Si-lence."
lence." Si-lence." Monday: Jack Pickford in "Huck
and Tom," another Mark Twain story.
Tuesday: Pathe News. "Come
. Thru," a powerful melodrama, f eat eat-..
.. eat-.. uring Herbert Rawlinson.
Wednesday: Charles Ray in "Play "Play-'
' "Play-' ing the Game."
vater wings and bathing caps at
the Court Pharmacy. 15-tf

Coffee. Kept at all grocery stores. f

words, forcefully explained the ob

ject of thejmeeting, and gave a brief
outline of the; long-staple cotton .sit .situation.
uation. .situation. He brought '' out -in detail the

cardinal points, which confront the

cotton growers of this section, to-

wit: the difficulty of marketing the

crop so as not to disturb the present

prices; and the abnormal and precar precarious
ious precarious conditions of labor. ; He advo advocated
cated advocated a closer co-operation of the
growers and the fixing of wages for
the picking of cotton to be' adhered
to by all. IU invited the attention of
those present to" the general movement-
throughout the cotton-growing
states of a plari by which the farmers
are to withhold a part of their cotton

and not congest the market by sell selling
ing selling as fast as picked. A letter from b.
larere cotton brokerage concern of

Jacksonville Was read" by Mr. Mayo

suggesting that the growers, be in induced
duced induced to gin two bales out of every
three only, holding the other bale
in the seed in order not to have the
cotton reports show their holdings as
"cotton on hand or in sight." This
letter also brought out the startling
information that there were over 22r
000 bales of long staple cotton now
in the hands -of the spinners, and in

excess of 35000 bales being at pres

ent held by brokers and ginners. Mr.
Mayo reminded the growers that this
year the government was going to
practically assume control of all the

gins and that he had already been in informed
formed informed that not only does the gov

ernment demand that a ginner use

modern machinery and every means

at their command to gin the cotton
in an efficient end careful manner, but
the government, he said, also insists

that the cotton be free from dust
and trash. Mr. Mayo explained that
no matter how untiring might be the
efforts of the ginners and no matter
what care they might take in ginning,
they could not make the best grades
of cotton if it was carelessly gather gathered
ed gathered and full of foreign substances, and
thereby comply with the govern government's
ment's government's request, unless the growers

exercised greatest care, and attention
in having the crops picked to avoid
the oossibilitv of all trash and dirt.

Mr. Raiford Simmons of Ocala next

addressed the meeting and interested
the growers by giving them an in insight
sight insight into the vicissitudes of cotton
growing by illustrating his own per personal
sonal personal experience of years as a cotton
erower which besran vhen he was

ten years old in the gold old state of

Georgia. He spoke of his struggles

and failures which was finally follow

ed by a successful "coming back" and

making good. He urged the growers
to stands together, hold their crops
and not to invite competitive bidding
for each other's hands to v pick the

cotton and thereby demoralize the al already
ready already unusual labor difficulties. He
warned them all to remember that
we were in a great world-wide war
and that it was incumbent upon each
individual to do his bit.
The secretary then read an inter interesting
esting interesting article from the Statesboro,
Ga, Bulloch Times, entitled, "Farm "Farmers
ers "Farmers Are Urged to Withohld Cotton;
Prices May be Held Up if the Farmer
Will Exercise His Judgment in Mar Marketing."
keting." Marketing." The article follows:

Atlanta, Ga., July 8. The most im important
portant important point in the plan outlined by
the cotton states official advisory
marketing ..board, at the recent New
Orleans meeting, for the gradual
marketing of the 1918 crop, as point pointed
ed pointed out by Commissioner of Agricul Agriculture
ture Agriculture J. J. Brown, is this: "The cot

ton producers in each of the cotton j
growing states are to be urged not to
market more than 20 per cent of
their crop in any one months and to
hofd over for twelve months, or until
such time as the war is terminated,
or shipping facilities are ample to
move the surplus freely, one bale out
of every three." ; ;

That is the gist of the whole thing,
toward the success of which every everything
thing everything else is, to contribute. Every
bale of the 1918 crop will be needed.
Conditions as to export and other otherwise,
wise, otherwise, are such that it is felt steps are
necessary to bring about the proper
gradual marketing of the crop. .Com .Compression
pression .Compression and proper warehousing,
with the maintenance of all neces necessary
sary necessary warehouse facilities, are used,
both to facilitate transportation and
t.r nrotect acainst damaere and waste.

Each cotton state is to 6e organized
by counties and school districts, can

vasses made and pledge-cards distri

buted and signed. Members of the
cotton states marketing board are to

work co-operatively in the various

states,, and every available agency is

to be used in completing the organi

zation and completing the plans

adopted.

Local community banks will be urg

ed everywhere to co-operate with tht
errowers of cotton in carrying all sur

plus cotton for the producers, in pref

erence to cotton merchants and spec

ulators.

Another very important feature ol
the plan is the "announced policy to
require by organization and co-operation
among the producers, merchants

and bankers, that the distress or sur surplus
plus surplus cotton of the 1918-19 crop,
shall be carried by each local commu community
nity community and that the great bulk of it
shall be carried by the producer," un until
til until conditions as to shipping facili facilities
ties facilities and otherwise provide an outlet
for it at prices in excess of the cost
of production.
This cotton marketing plan is in intended
tended intended to eovern the intelligent move

ment and marketing of the crop in a

c-radual wav. in such a manner as to

make it respond to the demands of

trade: to prevent congestion at

points of concentration, and to dis distribute
tribute distribute the carrying-burden of the

surplus crop among the producers

(Associated Press)
Washington, July 25. An Ameri

can submarine of the latest design,

cruising submerged, suddenly rose to

the surface near an allied armed

ship off the New England coast, ana

was fired upon. No one was injured,

but the submarine was slightly dam damaged,
aged, damaged, and is being towed to port.
DAMAGE WAS SLIGHT
Later, the navy department an announced
nounced announced that the submarine proceed proceeded
ed proceeded to her base under her own power.
Names were not given.
V OAK-GRINER FARM

ll

D

I

Defection of Russia Gave Them
Many New Divisions
AT THEIR PRESENT RECKLESS RATES OF FICllTIHG, THEIR RE RESERVES
SERVES RESERVES WILL S001I BE EXHAUSTED

(Associated Press)

Griner Farmi July 24. I did not
learn in time last week to mention
that Eagleton Hammack had joined
the navy.. His" mother lives in
Ocala, but as he has worked out here
for about a year, staying with his-

aunt, Mrs. C. R. Murphy, we, leel
that he belongs here, too. His eager

patriotism is grand for he is just an

undeveloped youth about 17 years oi
age and his desire to serve his coun country
try country must make a few hers take no notice
tice notice with shame-flushed cheeks for

Eagleton leaves a widowed mother mother-without
without mother-without several sons and a pension
to rely upon. His mother gave her

consent and may God see best to send
this noble youth home safe some day.

We learn with regret that Jasper

Wilson, son of Mr. P. T. Wilson, has

tvnhoid fever and has been taken to

the hospital. We sincerely wish for
him a sDeedv recovery, s ''

Mrs. J. B. Mathews of ucaia is out

sDendine a few days with her broth

er and his wife, Mr. and Mrs. W. O.

Camenter. .

I wonder how many have the pleas-1
ure of reading a home paper dated
1879. The writer came across a
small box of them. One was headed
"The East Florida Banner, Ocala,
Fla., Oct. 18, 1879." In it were a cou couple
ple couple of columns and headed "Tones of
the Northern Press." We can guess
what our southern editor thought of
them. Also two more Ocala papers,
"The Marion Free Press," 1899, and
"The Capital," 1893. One, the "Jack "Jacksonville
sonville "Jacksonville Times-Union and Citizen" of
1892-94-98-99. Another printed in
1S87, and others of the Star and

Banner 18 years old. In them of the

dates respectively were the details of

the Boer war, the Filipino insurrec insurrection
tion insurrection and Danish-American war and

(the attempt to assassinate President

McKinley. which proved fatal, and

ever so many things of interest that

happened in the writer s babyhood
years. But they are very much the

sarne as now war news on .every
page. '

With the French Army in France,
(By Associated Press) July 25. Ow Owing
ing Owing to the defection of Russia, the
Germans have been able to place
two hundred and ten divisions on the
western front this year. These di divisions
visions divisions have been engaged about four
hundred and thirty times since July,

so that each has been into battle at
least twice in that time, and with the
rapid increase in operations this pro proportion
portion proportion is increasing.
The Germans had twenty-eight di divisions
visions divisions between Rheims and Chateau
Thierry when the present battle be began
gan began and they have since increased
this number to more than forty. The
Germans "still have reserves but it is
questionable whether they are 'suffi 'sufficiently
ciently 'sufficiently recuperated to participate,
should the Germans try to retrieve
the crown prince's defeat.
So far this year the general staff

has been requiring soldiers to take

cart in twice as many battles before

recuDeratine in order' to try and

crush the French and British before

American troops arrived in sufficient
numbers to turn the balance.
EXPECTING A TEUTON COUN

TER ATTACK

HE DECIDED Til

STAY AT NOME

Congressman Slayden of Texas Re

alizes President's Influence with
his Constituents

(Associated Press)
San Antonio. July 25 Representa

tive Slayden withdrew from the race
for re-nomination for Congress fol following
lowing following the publication of a telegram
from President -Wilson to a publisher,

saying Slayden had not supported tne

administration.

ASSURED GOOD PRICES

FOR EARLY ORANGES

who, under normal economic condi conditions,
tions, conditions, are most able to carry it.
"The cotton states marketing
board," said Commissioner Brown,
"commends this plan to the country
as cne that will more nearly equalize
the responsibilities of caring for and
conserving any surplus production of
cotton until such time as it is needed

Paris. July 26. More reserves an

being thrown into the battle by the

Germans, according to latest; advices,
but these fresh troops were unable

to prevent, the Allies making appre

ciable gams Wednesday, and tne aj
lies are slowly surrounding the im

nortant point ? of Oulchy Le Chateau.

Military observers here are .confident

the German commander, General Lu
dendorff. will soon launch a counter

attack to trv and clear the. front be

tween Rheims and Soissons, a second
to lesson the demoralizing, effect of
the projected retreat to the Vesle
river and a third to have Germany
regain the offensive.
""RECORD RUN FROM MIAMI

While not attempting anything of

a record run, or even thinking of
such a thing at the time, Mr. S. M.

Lummus and family, probably made
one of the quickest runs from Miami
to Ocala. arriving here a little before

5 o'clock yesterday afternoon, that

has ever been made in an automobile.
Mr. Lummus and hi3 family, five in
all, with crates of fruit and baggage
amounting to several hundred pounds
in weight, in a nineteen sixteen model
Maxwell, left Miami at 9 o'clock
Tuesday evening and arrived in Ocala
a little before 5 o'clock 384 miles.
The party stopped for breakfast and

dinner, to change tires twice on ac account
count account of blowouts and help a fellow
traveler with tire trouble. Fifteen
gallons of gasoline was used on the
trip, being more than 25 miles aver

age to ythe gallon. Marion Lummus,
aged 14 years, Mr. Lummus' manly
young son, drove all of the distance
except for an hour just after mid midnight
night midnight when he asked his father to
relieve him at the wheel, but. soon
found he could not sleep and took the
driver's seat again.

(Concluded on Fourth Page)

SERVICES AT SHADY
Rev. Smith Hardin will preach at
Shady Grove next Sunday at 4 p. m.
Everybody invited.
Don't fail to call for Maxwell House
Coffee. Kept at all grocery stores, tf

- -
I-" E.T.MELVEN

Is Selling Out at a Great Reduction
ENTIRE ONE OF SUM MER TDKEE ANP SKIIOTS
: : : SEE THESE BEAUTIFUL GOODS BEFORE THEY ARE ALL GONE : : :

The Thomas Advertising Service
sent out the following report of the

meeting of citrus growers here Wed-.

nesday:
Ocala. Fla.. July 24.- That early

oranees. particularly Parson Browns,

lean be expected to -bring excellent

prices m me norwuu maiacw
the trend of opinion"' expressed at a
rally here today of Marion county
members of the Florida Citrus Ex Exchange.
change. Exchange. :
Speaking upon the subject of prices -Dr.
J. H. Ross, of Florence 'Villa,
president of the Florida Citrus, Ex Exchange,
change, Exchange, said it seemed probable that

speculators had been responsible for

the impression that orange ana

grapefruit prices would not oe gooa
this "year: anti that, in consequence

of this impression having gotten out,

a number of growers had been lea to
contract for the sale of their fruit

for considerably less than it was

worth.
"We have no information," said Dr.
Ross, ."that conditions will be such
as to compel growers to accept for
their fruit less than it is worth.. At
the same time, we believe that, with
the greatly, increased costs of citrus
fruit production this year, growers
should see to it that they obtain fair
prices for their crops.
"Inasmuch as 'our government, -and"
the director general of railroads in
particular, are on record as desiring
to afford every possible facility for
the movement of Florida's citrus
fruits, we have every reason to ex ex-nect
nect ex-nect our fruit to reach the markets in

reasonable time. Rumors that citrus
fruits might be denied transporta transportation,
tion, transportation, for the reasons that they are
erroneously thought by some people
to belong to the luxury class, prob probably
ably probably originate from the same sources
which have been responsible for the
impression, that prices will not be
good."
In addition to Dr. Ross, there were
present at the meeting F. L. Skelly,
sales manager, and C. E. Stewart Jr.,
business manager of the Florida Cit Citrus
rus Citrus Exchange, R. H. Holland, mana manager
ger manager of the New York office of that or organization,
ganization, organization, and a considerable num number
ber number of -the leading men of the citrus
fruit industry of Marion and Orang
counties.
While it was declared that no pre prediction
diction prediction safely could be made as to
exact prices, the opinion expressed
by the various speakers' was to the
effect that an excellent market foi
Florida's citrus fruits could be ex expected
pected expected throughout the selling season;
and the tone of the meeting was de decidedly
cidedly decidedly optimistic
WOOD! WOOD! WOOD!

Be on time. Get in your winter
supply of wood before it is too late
Let us furnish you with good and
first class service. Phone 339.
tf C. O. D. WOOD YARD.

1



OCA LA EVENING STAB, THURSDAY, JULY 25. 1918

OCALA EVENING STAR
PubllMhed Kverjr Day Except Sunday by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY
OF OCALA, FLA.
It. ft. Carrol!, Prenldeat
P. V. LMveaKOOd, Secretary-Treasurer
J. II. Ileajamfn, Editor
Kntered at Ocala, Fla., ostofflce as
.-onl-cla9 matter.

TELEPHONES
IIumIhmm Office ............. .FIve-Oue
Editorial Department Two-Seven
Molt- Editor . i .Five, Double-One

MES1I1EII ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively
entitled for the use for republication of
all news dispatches credited to it or
net otherwise credited in this paper
and also the local news published
herein. All rights of republication of
special dispatches herein are also reserved.

ADVERTISING RATES

DlMplayt Plate 10c. per inch for con consecutive
secutive consecutive insertions. Alternate inser insertions
tions insertions 2j per cent, additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charged on ads. that run less than
six times 5c. per inch. Special position
20 per cent, additional. Rates based on
4-inch minimum. Less than four Inches
will take higher rate, which will be
furnished on application.
Heading .otlceni Sc. per line for first
insertion; 3c. per line for each subse subsequent
quent subsequent insertion. One change a week
allowed on readers without extra com composition
position composition charges.
Legal advertisements at legal rates.
Electros must be mounted, or charge
will be made for mounting.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Domestic
One year. In advance. ........... .$5.00
Six months, in advance .. 2.50

... V J I X b. ) ... ........ v
One, month, in advance. . .50
Foreign
One year. In advance. ........... .$8.00
Six months, in advance 4.25
Three months, in advance........ 2.25
One month, in advance..... .80

The next generation will speak of
the goosestep as the quackstep.
The road to hell is rapidly becom becoming
ing becoming paved with German peace pro proposals.
posals. proposals. The use of sugar is only a habit
anyhow. There wasn't any of the sub substance
stance substance we call sugar until 299 years
.ago. .

The Germans made their treaties
into scraps of paper; now they are
picking up and using the scraps to

maks clothes.

The British, French and Italian
navies have about put an end to the
operations of Hun submarines in the

Mediterranean. ::

When this war is over, the1 Prus

sian eagle will have turned to a

chicken and his motto from "Gott Mit

Uns" to "Kamerad."

Sixty-one ships are in process of

building at the different Florida

ports. They aggregate over four

hundred thousand tons.

Bloom of the Lakeland Star threat

ens to suspend his paper and go in
the army. We will bet that Bloom

will make a good soldier.
.-..- 1

The German fortune-teller who

read thepalm of the American nation

three years ago did not notice that

the life-line ran to an iron muscle!

Honduras' was No. 23 of the na
tions to declare war against Ger

many," and it is' significant that the
Allies had the Teutons on the run
that day. '.

church put into them in the thousand
years or more it was the only church
English-speaking people had, we may
find ourselves considerably inconven inconvenienced.
ienced. inconvenienced. The Star doesn't favor the
ceremony at all, but if it is adopted
"angelus" will be a very good name
and we don't suppose one Protestant
in a hundred will object to it.

ANOTHER COMPANY A

Wednesday night, the armory walls

again resounded to the terse words of
command and the tramp of marching

feet, as another "Company A" enter

ed on its course of training.

It was a rather encouraging out

look when Company A, Marion Coun

ty Guards, lined up for instruction

and drill. Capt. Roberts, Lieut. Seipp,
Sergt. Hoffman and forty-five rank
and file were present, and they made

a fine-looking company. The com

pany is made up of responsible busi

ness men who have gone into it from
a sense of duty. A very large propor

tion have served either in the Ocala
Rifles or other national guard organi organizations,
zations, organizations, and a few who enlisted in the

new army, but had to fall out be

cause of the very high physical quali

fication, are nevertheless good sol

diers and valuable, on account of the

training they had.

After calling the roll, Capt. Roberts

divided the company into two pla platoons.
toons. platoons. That composed of the men with

the most training marched out on the
street tinder command of Lieut. Seipp,

who began putting them thru their
paces in marching, forming line,
changing from line to column, etc.
They stepped right off and showed?
they had forgotten mighty little.

Meantime Capt. Roberts lined up the
"awkward squad," and began teach teaching
ing teaching the members their a b c's; name namely,
ly, namely, how to salute, right and left face,
right wheel, etc. They caught right
on, and after awhile were marched
out on the street to join their more
experienced comrades in marching.
The combined force made a good
showing. 1 They marched up on the
square and around some of the
streets, and won compliments from
those who saw them.
The company voted to change its
drill night to Friday, so as not to in interfere
terfere interfere with church services. A busi business
ness business meeting will be held tomorrow
night. Sergeant Hoffman has found a
gold mine in the shape of a bunch of
rifles once used in a military school.
They were for sale cheap and Cap Captain
tain Captain Roberts has ordered them, and
will trust in Providence to raise the
money to pay for them.
Ocala's new Company A has start started
ed started off well.

OFFICIAL PRICE LIST
OF FOODSTUFFS
(Corrected Weekly by Authority of the U. S. Food Administration)

Wheat Flour

Retailer Pays
.$12.10 to $13.55
per bbl. of 16 12
lb sacks

Rye Flour $12 to $13.90 per
bbl. of 16 12 lb
sacks
Corn Flour 6.75 to 7c. lb
Corn Meal, Old Fashioned ... :..4.40 to 4&c lb

Corn Meal, Cream or Pearl 4.80 to 5.80c lb
Corn Grits or Hominy 5.80 to 6.10c lb

Barley Flour .....6c lb
Rolled Oats, in 1 lb. pkgs ...11 to llhic a pkg
Rice Flour .94c to 10c lb
Edible Starch, bulk 6c lb
Edible Starch, in 1 lb. pkgs. 10 to 11c a pkg
Rice, Blue Rose Grade 9 to 10c lb
Rice, Broken ........ i.... 7 to 7c lb.
Rice, Fancy Long Grain .....10 to 12c lb
Granulated Sugar 8.38c to 8.57c lb
Lima Beans 15 to 16c lb
Navy Beans ..15 to 16c lb
Blackeyed Peas 104 to 10c lb

Pink Beans ...... .11 to ll&c lb
Lard, pure, bulk 27c to 27c lb
Lard (compound) substitute bulk... 24 to 24c lb
Lard, substitute in tin 27 to 30c lb
Evaporated Milk, small tins... 4 to 434c a tin

Evaporated Milk, tall tins.. lOYz to lle a tin
Condensed Milk, 11 oz. tins. : ..11 to 12c a tin
Canned Corn, standard. ........... .15 to 16c a tin
Canned Tomatoes, No. 2s ......10 to 11 Vic a tin
Canned Peas, No. 2s standard ...... 15 to 16c a tin
Canned Dried Beans Baked No. Is. .11 to 12c a tin
Canned Dried Beans Baked No. 2s... 17 to 18c a tin

Canned Dried Beans Baked No. 3s... 30 to 32c a tin
Seeded Raisins 15 oz. pkgs. i. 13 to 13c a pkg
Evaporated Prunes 6O-70s ........ .13 to 13 c lb
Corn Syrup, dark, No. Js ....12 to 13c a tin
Corn Syrup, dark, No. 5s. ......... .36 to 38c a tin
Eggs . ,. 35c per dozen
Butter, Best Creamery .'.47 to 50c lb
Potatoes, white .1.67c lb

Oleomargarine . .33 cents per pound
Cheese . ............ . . . .25 to 27c per lb
Standard Hams 32 to 33c lb
Standard Breakfast Bacon 45 to 52c per lb

Salt Pork .,- 26 to 28c per lb

-The h. c. of 1. hasn't surrounded us
entirely. There is a place in this town
where you can get all the fried fish
and bread you can eat for fifteen
cents and fish is brain food, too.

The dispatches say Gov. Catts went
,to Pensacola and made an arrange arrangement
ment arrangement by which all the saloons in that
town will shut in sixty days. We
shall be glad to have the report confirmed.

New Yprk democrats have noml
nated a person named Alfred E.
Smith for governor. Smith is presi president
dent president of the New York city board of
aldermen and has the advantage of
being obscure.
Emperor William wants to draw
the line distinctly between German
and Anglo-Saxon civilization. Tht
Anglo-Saxons will not object, but the
brand of civilization the kaiser up upholds
holds upholds is Prussian and pagan rather
than German.

The Jews of Rumania protest

against the new laws passed by the
Rumanian:" parliament. These laws;
they say, will deprive them of their
rights. The laws in question have been
passed by the Rumanian parliament
under compulsion of Germany.
The commanding officer of the Teu Teuton
ton Teuton submarine which is shelling
barges with women and children
aboard, off our coasts, must ; feel
proud of himself. Gentlemen in other
navies will not. associate with German
sailors for at least a century after
the war.

It is somewhat discouraging to

read of. the attempts of profiteers to
swindle our government, to corrupt
its agents and to supply our soldiers
and sailors with rotten shoes and
clothingj but it is encouraging to note

the1 way the department of justice is
going after them. The big men of our

government are strictly honest and
they will not fail in anything they
ca,n do to secure justice for the com

mon people and the fighting men.

Miss Ruth Catts is holding ... down

the job of secretary, to the governor

this week, and we haven t a word to

say. Lakeland Telegram.

: The Star has the straight dope
that Miss Ruth is a very smart as

well as a very charming young lady,

It will be a mighty good play for the

governor if he keeps her on the job.

About noon yesterday, the report

started, and soon passed all around

town that Germany had made a peace

offer. Scores made a hotfoot for the

Star's bulletin board, but when they

saw the terms proposed by the Teu

tons, the universal verdict was noth

ing doing. Only fools and cowards

would even discuss such proposals.

America is aroused. In the last few

weeks we have heard men who were

avowed pacifists two years agd, say
they were not willing for the war to

end until it is ended right. And these

men must pay heavily in money, and

perhaps in sorrow, too.,
ACT ON OFFICIAL

INFORMATION ONLY

The Christian Science Monitor ob objects
jects objects to the proposed national evening
prayer being called the angelus be because
cause because it is the name of a Roman
Catholic ceremony. It's a safe bet
that there are five Roman ; Catholics
to one Christian Scientist in the Am American
erican American army and navy, and if the
Monitor eliminates from our language
and customs everything the Catholic

Mr. Louis R. Chazal, Chairman Mar
ion County Chapter, A. R. C:

My dear Sir: Your letter of the

13th inst. received. Relative to the

Literary Digest article on knitting, I

beg to advise you that it represents

only the personal opinion of the writ

er. No attention should be paid by
your workers to communications

coming from unofficial sources. Our

national organization is working in

full co-operation with the war de

partment and with full knowledge of
the supply situation in regard to wool

and other material. Until official f m
structions are received, you may ad
vise your workers to continue knit
ting as in the past.
Very truly yours,
Guy E. Snavely,

Director, Bureau of Development,

. ... Southern Division, A. R. C.
LOST

Moore's non-leakable fountain pen,

trimmed with two gold bands. Return
to Star office or Mrs. C. W. Long and

receive reward. 25-tf

Consumer Pays
80c to 90c for
12 lb. sck or 7c
lb less than mill
packages
80c to 90c for 12
lb sack or 7c
lb in less than
mill packages
8 to 8c. per lb
5& to 5c per lb
5 to 7c per lb
7 to 7 per lb
8 to 8c per lb
14 to 15c a pkg
11c to 12 c per lb
8 to 8c per lb
12 to 15c a pkg
11 to 13c per lb
9 to 10c per lb
13 to 15c per lb
9.38 to 9.50 per lb
19 to 20c per lb
19 to 20c per lb
12 to 14c per lb
14 to 15c per lb
30c to 33c per lb
27 to 29 per lb
32 to 37c per lb
5 to 6c a tin

12 to 14c a tin
14 to 15c a tin
19 to 21c a tin
14 to 16c a tin
19 to 22c a tin
15 to 18c a tin
20 to 24c a tin
40 to 44c a tin
17 to 19c a pkg
17 to 18c per lb
15 to 17c a tin
45 to 48c a tin
' 40c per dozen
55 to 60c per lb
2 to 2c per lb
40 to 42c per lb
33 to 35c per lb
37 to 40c per lb
50 to 65c per lb

33 to 35c per lb

Clarence Camp, Marion County Food Administrator..

BARGAINS IN USED CARS 1

TH! I

in
! I!

i 1

i

!

AMW0UM-CEME'W.T;

Having purchased the Court Pharm Pharmacy,
acy, Pharmacy, one of the leading drug stores in
Central Florida, we wish to announce
that we shall endeavor to maintain
the high standard that has always
prevailed in every department. The
line of Toilet Articles and all kinds
of Druggists' Sundries will continue
to be kept right up to the minute. The
PRESCRIPTION Department has al always
ways always been the pride of the Court
Pharmacy, and we shall continue to
use as our slogan Prompt and Effic Efficient
ient Efficient Service at all hours, day or night.
The very best of drugs will always
be used in compounding prescrip prescriptions,
tions, prescriptions, and we will appreciate it if you
will instruct your physician to leave
your work with us. Our Cool Drink
Department will have the -personal
care of an expert, and we shall con continue
tinue continue to dispense the best to be had.
We solicit the patronage of the people
of Marion and adjoining counties.
HOWARD W. WALTERS,
HOLMES L. WALTERS,
Proprietors.

COURT'".-PHARMACY

! i

till!)

rT

4

10CA1A MARBLE WORKS

MANUFACTURERS OF
MARBLE AND GRANITE
MONUMENTS & HEADSTONES.

1917 Maxwell in A-l shape $500

1917 Ford ... ... . ......... .$400

1914 Ford ....... . ........... $350
1913 Cadillac . i $450

1916 Dodge $500
23-6t AUTO SALES, CO. I

A very nice line of Wash Cloths on
display at Gerig's Drug Store. We
also sell War Savings and Thrift
Stamps. tf i

mil

Life
Was a

Misery

Mrs. F. M. Jones, of
Palmer, Okla., writes :
"From the time I en entered
tered entered inftj womanhood
... I looked with dread
from one month to the
next. I suffered with my
back and bearing-down
pain, until life to me was
a misery. I would think
I could not endure the
pain any longer, and I
. gradually got worse.
Nothing seemed to help
me unta, one day,
I decided to
TAKE

A

ft

t 1

4

4

i,
I

14

SAYS HOT WATER
WASHES POISONS
FROM THEXIVER

Everyone should drink hot water
with phosphate In It,
before breakfast.,,

"

mW .- m

Ik-'
o
.....
: L:
VT
.....

i
i

Granite, Marble and Cement Feneing
and All Kinds of Cemetery Work.

Let Us Quote You Prices.

fSi E. W. LEAVENOOD, Manager.

0

V : v J Yard N. Magnolia St. Ocala, Florida.
3 ....

..... -. '
3.- -.iv -.3- -o- --o- zs -Ty ? O -z -Z- '-T.' O O v

TTin

To feel as fine as the proverbia

fiddle, we must keep the liver washed
clean, almost every morning, to pre prevent
vent prevent its sponge-like pores from clog clogging
ging clogging with indigestible material, sour
bile and poisonous toxins, says a noted
physician.
If you get headaches, it's your liver.
If you catch cold easily. It's your liver.
If you wake up with a bad taste, furred
tongue, nasty breath or stomach be becomes
comes becomes rancid, it's your liver. Sallow
skin, muddy complexion, watery eyes
all denote liver uncleanliness. Your
liver is the most Important,' also the
must abused and neglected' organ of
the body. Few know its function or
how to release the dammed-up body
waste, bile and toxins. Most folks
resort to violent calomel, which is a
dangerous salivating chemical which
can only be used occasionally because
it accumulates In the tissues, also
attacks the bones.
; Every man and woman, sick or
well, should drink each morning be before
fore before breakfast a glass of hot water
with a teaspoonful of limestone phos phosphate
phate phosphate in It, to wash from the liver and
bowels the previous day's Indigestible
material, the poisons, sour, bile and
toxins; thus cleansing, sweetening
and freshening the entire alimentary
canal before putting more foodLi&to
the stomach.
Limestone phosphate does not' re restrict
strict restrict the diet like calomel, because it
can not salivate, for It is harmless and
you can eat anything afterwards. It
Is inexpensive and almost tasteless, and
any pharmacist will sell you a quarter
pound, which is sufficient for a dem demonstration
onstration demonstration of how hot water and lime limestone
stone limestone phosphate cleans, stimulates and
freshens the liver, keeping you feeling
fit day In and day out.

TIRE

QUESTIONS

? ? ?

rrri TIT f V 1 Don t fail to call ior Maxwell House

llie WOman S lOniC .Coffee. Kept at all grocery stores. tf

Nunnally's Candies fresh every
week at Gerig's Drug Store, where
you can also get thrift stamps, tf
Careful prescription service, using
Squibb's chemicals, at Gerig's Drug
Store. War Savings and Thrift
Stamps sold. tf

"I took four bottles,"
Mrs. Jones goes on to
Say, "and was not only
greatly relieved, but can
truthfully say that 1 have
not a pain. .
" It has now been two
years since I tookCardui,
and I am still in good
health. . I would ad advise
vise advise any woman or girl
to use Cardui who is a
sufferer from any female
trouble."
If yousufferpain caused
from womanly trouble, or
if you feel the need of a
good strengthening tonic
to build up yourrun-down
system, take the advice
of Mrs. Jones. Try Car Cardui.
dui. Cardui. It helped her. We
believe it will help you.
All Druggists

J. 68

WHAT'S THE USE.
hanging on to old-time, old-fogy hand hand-mixed
mixed hand-mixed Lead and Oil Paint that will
soon chalk off and discolor when you
can get

fa"

i i : -

If yoii have tire questions bring them to
us for adjustment. We have a booklet an answering
swering answering any tire question you may ask. It
is published by the Hood Tire Company, and
is yours for the askingFree. Our VUL VULCANIZING
CANIZING VULCANIZING department is equipped with ma machinery
chinery machinery for VULCANIZING by the latest
mproved methods. Why buy new a tires
when you can get-thousands of miles out of
the old one by having us VULCANIZE it ?

D A VIES

, The Tire Man

a thoroughly modern, scientific machine-made
Paint, that will outlast the
other, and cost you less money. 10
' For Sale By
THE MARION HARDWARE CO.,
Ocala. Florida

L ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER
AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Con Contract
tract Contract work. Gives More and Better
Work for the Money than any other
contractor in the city.

OCALA AGENCY
FOR HOOD TIRES

7f.

First Class
CHSMESE LAUNBMY
J.J. Loy, Proprietor
ALL DELICATE LINENS, ETC.
Receive Special Attention
12 E. Ft. King Ave. Ocala, Fla.

m

Hi!
iij;,
i;:;
it.-;
P.
Hi
.



OCALA EVENING STAB, THURSDAY, JULY 25. 1918

0. K. TEAPOT
BULLETIN
Smoked Sausage in oil
Sliced Breakfast Bacon
Chipped Dried Beef
Minced Ham

aaiomi 4
American Swiss Cheese
New York State Cheese
Limburger Cheese (call

11 wnaiycn picasc;
Philadelphia Cream
Cheese
Camembert Cheese
Brick Cheese
Phones 16 & 174

BUY WAR SAVINGS STAMPS
Own Your Own Home
A House and Two Lota
. $850
A House and 3 Acres
$2,000
A Flouse and 2 Lots
$1.200
Can be Bought With Monthly Pay
ments of
$10
L M. MURRAY
Room 5, Holder Block,
. Orata, Florida

XJJLiOWGSSTAiin
liima wr not
UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT

.Yours for All Kinds Of
SHEET METAL WORK
. MEASEK
210South Osceola St.

IF YOU USE

your building will look well, the Painf
will wear well, the cost will be lowest,

since you will have fewer gallons to
buy, because its all paint, and you
get two for one. V-tC
A coat now and then of DAVIS
OLD COLONY WAGON PAINT pre preserves
serves preserves your wagons and farm imple implements
ments implements and makes them look like new.
t or Sale By
THE MARION HARDWARE CO.,
Ocala, Florida

Mclver & MacKay
UNDERTAKERS and EMBAIMERS
PHONES 47. 101. 305
OCALA. FLORIDA

Evening Star
Unclassified
Ads:
Bring
Results

RATES Twenty-five words
or less one time 25 cents;
three times 50 cents; six
times 75 cents. Over twenty-five
words, and under fif fifty,
ty, fifty, double above rate.
This rate is for .. consecutive
insertions. Special rate by
the month. .Try them out.
PHONE

OCALA SOCIAL AFFAIRS
If You Have Any News for this De Department,
partment, Department, Call Five Double-One
or Tiro-Seven

Don't fail to call for Maxwell House
. Coffee. Kept at all grocery stores, tf
Norris Candies fresh every week at
the Court Pharmacy. Phone us and
let us send it up. 15-tf

The Way of Life
A table set for two, in a little house
so new.
With everything so cozy and so
clean -That
not a speck of dust, and not a
bit of rust
Within the little house is ever seen-
A table set for eight, in a house so
big and great;
With merry, happy voices, sweet
and clear
The rooms reverberate. From early
until late
We hear their noise and laughter
everywhere.
The years go swiftly by, they seem to
fairly fly!
And with them, all the little ones
have flown;
No happy voices fill the rooms so
rushed and ; still,
For lo! they live in houses of their
own.
And once again.; I see, as clean as it
can be,
A big and silent house, so old and
worn;
And once again I view a table set for
two,
And see an aged couple all alone.
Louella Pugh Knott.
'.'-...-.
Need of Literature
There is a great need of books for
our soldiers and sailors. Hundreds of
thousands of them are desired for the
war service libraries, maintained by
the American Library Association at
cantonments, training camps, posts,
forts, naval stations, on vessels and
over seas. Our men need these books
for recreation and home study in their
leisure hours. Do not delay giving
generously from your own library.
Hundreds of thousands of, books will
be purchased, but hundreds of thou thousands
sands thousands more must be- obtained as
gifts. Deliver to your public library.
Send your best for our boys.
Baptist Sunday School Workers
The members of Mrs. E. Van Hood's
Sunday school class are busy young
workers and even though their faith faithful
ful faithful teacher is out of town, on a well
deserved vacation her in fluence is
far reaching, for her girls continue
their work, which at present is th
making of a Belgian baby outfit. A
meeting was held at Marie Robert Robertson's
son's Robertson's home yesterday afternoon, and
nimble fingers were kept busy and
the hours flew swiftly, whiled away
in happy conversation while they in industriously
dustriously industriously worked.? The members of
the class are Irene Cam, Marie Rob Robertson,
ertson, Robertson, Maudie Marshall, Nettib
Camp and Elizabeth Hocker.
"Mutt"
Nearly eyerybody in Ocala knew
the little dog "Mutt," and many will
regret to learn of his death which oc occurred
curred occurred Tuesday, after a desperate
illness of a week.
"Mutt" was not only a smart little

dog, but a very lovable one. He was
friendly and kind to. everyone, and
few and far between were those, who
did not welcome his friendship. He
was brought up in the family of Mr.
and Mrs. Clifford Anderson and was
the pet and playmate of the Anderson

children, and all their friends. When

Mr. and Mrs. Anderson left for. Lake Lakeland,
land, Lakeland, the little dog made his home
with Mrs. Mamie Fox and became

the special friend of her nephew,

Frank Ditto Jr. He was carefully and

tenderly nursed during his sickness,
and his death has .left an ache in

many a childish heart and some older

ones.

Little Miss Mary Scott is the guest

of relatives .an Gainesville.

The library board will meet at 8

o'clock this evening, July 25th.
-..

Miss Alma Turner, who has been
relieving Mr. Sage at the Western

Union office, left for Gainesville yes

terday.

Mrs. P. W. Priest of Crystal River,

who has taken a position in Rhein

auer's store," is making her home with

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Davis.
. -

Miss Isabel Davis, who attends

Southern College, is spending her

vacation with her parents and is tak tak-iner
iner tak-iner a business course from Mrs. L. M.

Murray.

Rev. J. G. Glass of Orlando is an
Ocala visitor, having come to attend

the meeting of the citrus growers
Rev. Glass family is now at Se-

wanee, Tenn.

Mr. Wakefield Wells Jr. who has

been the eruest of his cousin. Miss

Kathleen Leitner for several days

returned to his home in Jacksonville

yesterday.

Miss Isabel Mays' many friends
will be glad to know she will arrive

in Ocala tomorrow to be the week weekend
end weekend guest of Mrs. George Martin, she

having been disappointed in her visit

planned for last Friday.

Mrs. D. M. Williams of Boardman
and Mrs. Walter Thigpen of Orange

Lake, who were interviewing the den

tist in Ocala yesterday, were unfor unfortunate
tunate unfortunate in missing their train and had

to remain over until this morning.
Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Lummus, Miss
Frances Lummus and Master;- Marion
Lummus, accompanied by Mr." Lum Lummus'
mus' Lummus' sisters, Mrs. A. B. Weaver of

Miami and Mrs. G. A. Douglass and

children of Arch Creek, and Mr. Fred

Winer returned last night from a de-!

lghtf ul motor trip to Miami. I
I

K irby -Hagmaier
The marriage of Mr. John T. Kir-

by Jr. to Miss Jean Hagmaier of
Pittsburg was an event of interest

aking place Saturday, July 20th, in

Valdosta, Ga. Mr. Kirby is manager

of the Marion stock farms, and is a
man of sterling worth. His mar

riage to Miss Hagmaier is a matter

of pleasing interest to his many

friends, who are giving the young

bride a most cordial welcome.

m
White-Robertson
The following from the Plant City

Courier will be of interest to a wide

circle of friends of the groom who is
well known here:

Robert N. White and Miss Irene V.

Robertson motored to Tampa Satur

day, were united in marriage and are
now on a brief bridal trip to points up
the state, including Ocala, Daytona
and other points. Friends surmised
that the young couple had set the
date for the happy event, but few had
definite information, so well did they
guard their plans. The bride is a
daughter of Miss Isabel Robertson of
Youmans. She was reared in this

community, and is justly popular

among a large circle of friends. Mr.
White is a son of Mr. and Mrs. J. It.

White, formerly of Ocala, and since
moving to Plant City has made many

friends. He is an expert mechanic,

although he has not yet reached his

majority. The young couple are ex

pected to return to Plant City the

atter part of the week, when friends

will be gfad to extend best wishes foi

their future happiness and prosperi prosperity.
ty. prosperity. .

Dancing Party at Silver Springs
A very pleasant party motored to

Silver Springs last evening in com compliment
pliment compliment to Mrs. I. Arthur Hornstein
of Savannah, who is the guest of her

brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and

Mrs. Jake Goldman, who are stopping
at the Florida House. Among the

guests were the following: Mr. and
Mrs. Delbert Haskell, Mr. and Mrs.
George MacGwigan, Mr. and Mrs.
Eugene Dobbs, Mr. and Mrs. Lester
Lucas, Mr. D. W. Swain, Mrs. I. A.
Hornstein and Mr. and Mrs. J. Goldman.

Dancing was enjoyed until a late

hour.

"
Food Conservation Sale
The young ladies of the Friendship

Wesley Bible class, whose able in instructor
structor instructor is Mrs. L. N. Green, will on

next Saturday morning on the Ocala
House porch, be prepared to serve to
the public eatables of the most delic

ious quality, which will prove they
have acquired the culinary art in its
highest degree. The test of the pud pudding
ding pudding is the eating thereof, so come
and find out for yourselves. We as

sure you there will be delicacies to
tempt the palate of the most fastid fastidious.
ious. fastidious. They will gladly take orders

for Boston brown bread and Hoover-

ized cookies throughout the week..

'..
Attention, Junior Leaguers
Mrs. DeWitt Griffin will entertain

the Junior League Friday afternoon
at 4:30 o'clock at her home on South

Second street. Children, meet me at

the Methodist church at 4 o'clock so
that we can all go together.

Mrs. J. P. Galloway, Supt.
Five of Ocala's promising young

ladies who are known to be habitual habitually
ly habitually industrious, arose early yesterday
morning and with bag and baggage
took themselves to Silver Springs.

After a day of strenuous enjoyment,
and a splendid picnic lunch, they re returned
turned returned to town in cars, chaperoned by

their much loved friend, Mrs. E. A.
Osborne, who is never so happy her herself
self herself as when giving happiness to
others. Those in the party were
Misses Lucile Gissendaner, Elizabeth
Bennett, Rhoda Thomas, Ullaine Bar-

nett and Ruth Simmons.

The early morning prayer service

was held this morning at the Presby Presbyterian
terian Presbyterian church, Rev. J. R. Herndon

leader. There was an unusually good
attendance and many fervent prayers
were offered for our brave men in
far-away France. The service will be

held at the Methodist church next

Thursday morning.
'
.Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Harper, who
have had rooms at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. George Taylor, are moving
today to the Arms House, where their
daughter, Mrs. Newman of Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, will be their guest for several
days.
Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Hampton are
enjoying a visit from Mrs. Hamp Hampton's
ton's Hampton's mother, Mrs. Carlton and
sister-in-law, Mrs. Walter Carlton
and two children and sister, Miss
Kate Carlton of Arcadia. They ar arrived
rived arrived today.
Miss Rhoda Thomas is the recipient
of two lovelv crates of Georgia's best

peaches, shipped her by her father,
Mr. A: T. Thomas, from his peach or orchard
chard orchard near Atlanta.
Misses Clara Kibler, Marie Grum Grumbles
bles Grumbles and Alonzo Baskin, popular

Dunnellon young people well known
in Ocala, are spending a few days in
St. Petersburg.

FINAL
CLEAN-UP SALE
OF ALL SUMMER READY-TO-WEAR
DRY GOODS AND MILLINERY

r : v

a m m -

we are iorcea to clean out all remaining summer
goods regardless of price to make room for the new

Fall Goods now beginning to arrive.

J

f :

v

Ladies' Silk and Cloth Suits at greatly
reduced prices.
Lot of Gingham Dresses, Special $4.95
Every Georgette and Taffeta Dress in
the house reduced. :
White Garbardine Skirts at exactly
half price.

Millinery

i

Trimmed and Untrimmed
Hats at 1-2 price.

Special Purchase of Ribbons.

This lot of Ribbons consists of Moire, Taffeta, Satin; Plaids and
Roman Stripes up to six inches wide and are values to 50c per yd.

Special at
yard 25 cents

OCALA

FLORIDA

FRANKS

OCALA
FLORIDA

"The Fashion Center"

PEDRO

(Concluded on Fourth Page)

Pedro, July9 24. Rev. Martin fail failed
ed failed to meet his appointment here Sun Sunday
day Sunday fro msome cause, and Rev. R. L.
Clyburn of Summerfield preached in
his place Sunday, morning and night.
Rev. Clyburn has preached for us so
long, that we feel glad to have him
with us at any time. His sermons

were greatly enjoyed by all.

Mr. Martin Brinson of Eureka was

visiting here Saturday nd Sunday.

Mr. John Lanier arrived home from
Dunedin last Thursday to be examin examined
ed examined for the army.
Miss Estelle Proctor spent last
week in Belleview, visiting her sister,
Mrs. J. W. Lucius. T
Mr. J. C. Perry was a visitor to
Ocala last Friday.
Misses Evelyn and Lillian Grimes
and Estelle Proctor were guests of
Miss Edna Mae Lanier Sunday.
T. C. Connell, P. B. and Carl Perry,
Charlie Perry and family were busi business
ness business visitors to Ocala Thursday.
Messrs. Jarvis Perry, Marion Brin Brinson,
son, Brinson, John and Louis Lanier motored
to Silver Springs Sunday af tternoon.
Mrs. Charlie Perry and children
are vistiing Mrs. Perry's grandmoth grandmother
er grandmother of Sydney this week.
Two more of our boys stood the ex examination
amination examination and will leave here in Au August.
gust. August. If this war keeps on there
won't be any boys left here.
Miss Kathleen Cameron, who has
been visiting her aunt in Bushnell,
came home last Saturday
Mr. Macon Rutland passed through
here en route to Shady Grove Sunday
afternoon.
Messrs. John and Louis Lanier left
Monday for Clearwater, St. Peters Petersburg
burg Petersburg and other points, where they
expect to stay a few weeks until
Uncle Sam calls them.
A surprise party was given in

honor' of Miss Juanita Pruitt at her

home last Saturday night. From the
reports, everybody suffered with
pure enjoyment.

Lloyd Proctor was an Ocala visitor

Tuesday.

Buy Thrift Stamp of us and keep
your skin nice and soft with Rexall

Skin Soap. Gerig's" Drug Store, tf

For sale cheap, a Dodge Touring
Car; in excellent condition. The Max Maxwell
well Maxwell Agency, Ocala. 20-tf

i W. E. Lane, M. D Physidan and
, Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Noae and

Throat Law Library Buildiny, Ocala,

Florida. tf

A DOLLAR WASTED HELPS THE ENEMY
That is not a loyal thing to do, of course, and few of us realize
that we are helping the enemy when we waste money. Pretty hard
to define what waste is. One man's waste may be another man's
economy. In a general way, waste in war time may be defined as the
buying of anything net essential to health, and efficiency. Every
dollar one spends for unnecessary things commands goods and ser services,
vices, services, that is, labor and materials, needed by the United States Gov Government
ernment Government for war purposes. And, if you invest the money you save
in War Savings Stamps, you are again helping by loaning your mon money
ey money to your Government.
(Dcalla Ice & PacMimg Co.

Is now a universally acknowledged necessity. No business man is
piepared to meet the daily affairs ot uis business if he is not pro pro-..tected
..tected pro-..tected with

FIRE INSURANCE

We represent not only the best fire insurance companies, but
also the highest class INDEMNITY AND BONDING concerns in
the world. Talk is over with us.
D. IV. DAVIS, Soer" OCALA, FLA.

www

Lim

;

AUTO ER VICE
Passanger and Baggage

ws..
49un snr trk
UNITED STATES
GOVZJUCMNT

M O V I M G

Long and Short Danling

WMUTE TA& 1ME

Storage and Packing

PHONE
226



OCALA EVENING STAR, THURSDAY, JULY 25, 1918

IIS

Mr. and Mrs. William Bickley of
Weirsdale were in town today.
Mr. Herbert Lattner of Jacksonville
is spending a few days in the city.
Judge William Gober came up from
Lakeland yesterday, to transact bus business
iness business at his former home here.
Mr. W. F. Malcolm, the Remington
man, is in the city, calling on the
numerous frjends of himself and his
machines.
Mr. Ilarry' Palmer, who has been
visiting his brother, Mr. Whitfield
Palmer for several days, returned to
Tampa last night.
Don't fail to call for Maxwell House
Coffee. Kept at all grocery stores, tf
Early tomorrow morning Messrs.
Bailey and Dixon of the Maxwell Maxwell-Chalmers
Chalmers Maxwell-Chalmers sales force, will go to Jack Jacksonville,
sonville, Jacksonville, taking two used Maxwells to
customers there and will drive down
two new cars. There will be eight
vacant seats in the cars, going and
coming, that might as well be filled
as not.
Don't fail to call for Maxwell House
Coffee. Kept at all grocery stores, tf
Friends of Sergeant George Wen Wen-zel
zel Wen-zel in this city are much gratified to
hear from him again, the letters
coming over in less than a month.
George was in the great battle be beginning
ginning beginning last March, and was gassed a
few days after it opened. He was in
a hospital in France for a few weeks
and was then sent to England to
complete his recovery. He hopes to
be on the firing line again soon.
NOW IS THE TIME
TO JOIN THE NAVY
We now have plenty of records on
hand and can enlist in the navy or
naval reserve all young men between
the ages of 18 and 35 who wish to ap apply.
ply. apply. All branches are open for enlist enlistment.
ment. enlistment. Come to see me before it is too
late. Now is the time to get in and
win the war. We need you now and
not after it is all over. I hope to see
every one who can go come up like a
man and go on through. You will not
be promised anything that you can
not obtain. T. M. Kilgore,
Navy Recruiting Station.
Postoffice Building, Ocala, Fla.
UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
WANTED, LOST, .FOUND, FOP
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIM-ILAR
ILAR SIM-ILAR LOCAL NEEDS t
RATES: Six line maximum, one
time 25c: three times 60c; six times
75c; one month i 3. Payable in advance
ROOMS FOR RENT At the Dormi Dormitory;
tory; Dormitory; furnished or unfurnished for
light housekeeping. "Half price to
over night lodgers." Hot and cold wa water
ter water connections. Rooms large and
airy;. best ventilated in town at low-J
est prices. Parents, now is the time
to arrange for your children at the
Dormitory. Call on me at my resi residence,
dence, residence, 703 S. Pond St., or phone 305.
Mrs. C. V. Roberts, new matron. 25 tf
Boys Wanted We need the services of
a number of grammar school boys for
permanent part-time work. The boys
we select will be well paid and given
an opportunity to earn, learn and ad advance.
vance. advance. Apply to The Book Shop, Inc.,
W. W. Condon, Ocala, Fla. 3t-thur
FOR SALE Farmer certificates, for
use of merchants in selling flour.
Price postage paid, fifty, 40c; one
hundred, 75c; two hundred fifty,
$1.50. Cash must accompany orders.
Star Publishing Co., Ocala, Fla. tf
WANTED Experienced Insurance
agen to handle industrial department
of general fire and life assurance cor corporation
poration corporation for Marion county. Apply to
J. W. Prince, Jacksonville, state
agent. 2-6t
WANTED Owner of small saw
mill to contract to cut a million
feet of yellow pine timber. Will
deliver logs to mill at sidetrack.
Good loaction and plenty of labor.
Address, "T," care the Ocala
Star. 19-6t
CASH FOR OLD FALSE TEETH
Don't matter if broken. I pay $2 to
$25 per set; also cash for old gold,
silver, platinum, dental gold and old
gold jewelery. Will send cash by re
turn mail and Will hold goods 10 days
for sender's approval of my price.
Mail to L. Mazer, 2007 S. 5th street,
Philadelphia. Pa. 7-5-lm
WANTED At once, broken grind
stones. Will pay cash for them. Ad Address
dress Address Ocala Marble Works, Ocala,
Fla. 23-6t
FOR SALE One Stearns auto truck;
four new Cord tires; body already
built. Can be seen at McAteer's shop.
Bargain at $550. Auto Sales Co.,
Ocala, Fla. 23-6t

(Continued from Third Page)

Burkhart-HoIIy
Married at the Presbyterian manse
last night, by Rev. J. R. Herndon,
Miss Annie E. Holly to Mr. Peter
Burkhart.
Mr. Burkhart is the competent and
clever yardmaster of the Atlantic
Coast Line, and his bride the charm charming
ing charming daughter of Mrs. A. E. Holly,
who came to Ocala from Lynne a few
years ago. Both the young people are
much esteemed by their friends who
join the Star in wishing them happi happiness
ness happiness and prosperity. They are making
their home at Mrs. T. M. Moore's' on
Fort King.
The many friends of Miss Mae
Parr will regret to learn of her ill illness
ness illness which has confined her to her
bed for "several days.
Mr. R. M. Perry, ex-farmer of Mar Marion
ion Marion county, now managing a fine place
over in St. Johns, is here for a brief
visit to his numerous friends.
, v.-
Mr. William Hocker is in the city
for a few days from Haven Beach,
near Indian Rocks, where with his
family he is spending the summer.
Mr. C. A. Tremere and daughter,
Miss Minnie, and Miss Tremere 's
guest, Miss Cliffie Goode of Gaines Gainesville,
ville, Gainesville, came up from Belleview last
night to see the pictures.
Miss Irene Fletcher of Williston,
who accompanied her aunt, Mrs. E.
G. Peek to Daytona Beach, is now
the guest of Dr. and Mrs. Peek at
their home on Oklawaha avenue.
. -
Mrs. Jessie Palmer Alsopp of
Jacksonville, arrived in the city last
night and will be the guest of Mrs.
Arthur Williams at the residence of
Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Maughs for a
week.
-. '.'
Mr. A. R. Sandlin of Orlando, who
took Mrs. Sandlin over to their for former
mer former home in Alabama a few weeks
ago, and returned last week, is call calling
ing calling on his Ocala friends. Mrs. Sand Sandlin
lin Sandlin is yet in Alabama, and Mr. Sand Sandlin
lin Sandlin intends to take a business trip
north in a few days.
., ...
George Beban, the prince of movit
actors, never showed so well cn the
movie screen as he did at the Temple
yesterday in "One More American."
It was a picture full of excellent per performance
formance performance and human interest. The
picture tonight will cover a big trans transaction,
action, transaction, "The World for Sale' by that
adept in movie interest, J. Stewart
Blackton. Mutt and Jeff will also be
present.
PERSHING
El Paso, Tex., July 24. Americans
who accompanied General Pershing
to Mexico in the various civilian ca capacities
pacities capacities never tire of talking of the
little sidelights on the character of
the general commanding the Ameri American
can American forces in France,-- as shown to
them while he was in the desert of
western Chihuahua.
"I saw a better character sketch
of General Pershing than any of the
writers can picture," said one battle battle-man
man battle-man here. "He squatted in front of a
camp fire at San Geronimo frying
his hard-tack in the bacon grease of
his mess pan, "with the wind blowing
sand into his face and food and the
general grinning good naturedly all
the time as one of our cowpuncher
scouts spun a yarn about a buffalo
hunt he was on in the Little Canadian
up in the Panhandle."
These men tell many incidents of
General Pershing's stay onthe border
and in Mexico as illustrations of his
regard for his men and for the serv service.
ice. service. :
On an inspection trip from Mami Mami-quipa
quipa Mami-quipa to Colonia Dublan he saw a
mule driver beating his team be because
cause because they would not pull an over overloaded
loaded overloaded wagon out of a rut. Jumping
from his automobile, General Persh Pershing
ing Pershing lectured the mule driver, forced
him to lighten the load, deftly swung
the team around and drove the wagon
onto the high road. '.-....
Again he reprimanded a colonel
who forced his men to march all day
with a 60-pound field pack when
empty motor trucks were passing
all day en route to the same desti destination.
nation. destination. "An American soldier will fight
harder, live on less food and accept
more hardships than any other sol soldier
dier soldier in the world," General Pershing
said, in commenting on the incident.
"But he can see no reason why his
pack should not be hauled in empty
trucks if trucks are passing. Neither
do I." :
A camp sutler at Colonia Dublan
smuggled in an automobile load of
bad whisky. After disposing of his
stock, the man appeared at General
Pershing's headquarters to ask, for a
pass back to the border. He got the
pass and a free ride as a prisoner and
was forced to dig latrines and repair
roads en route.
The announcement that General
Pershing had adopted two French or orphans
phans orphans recalled a flood of tender mem memories
ories memories to friends of General Pershing
on the border for it was while he was
in command here that his wife and
two children were burned to death at
the Presidio in San Francisco. Gen General
eral General Pershing's hair, a chestnut
brown, slowly turned to gray after
his loss and he could be seen fre frequently
quently frequently riding on the mesa beyond
Fort Bliss alone with his great grief.

ORGANIZATION OF THE
MIDDLE FLORIDA COTTON
GROWERS ASSOCIATION

(Continued from First Page)
for consumption; until transportation
can conveniently move it; and as a
plan that "will not overburden the
financial institutions with unneces unneces-cary
cary unneces-cary responsibilities in time of war.
"The board earnestly asks the co cooperation
operation cooperation and help of all producers,
merchants and bankers in the cotton cotton-growing
growing cotton-growing area, in its organized effort
to meetthe present situation and to
solve if in a way which we believe
will involve no great hardship or ex extraordinary
traordinary extraordinary responsibility upon any
individual or institution, but will sub subserve
serve subserve the interests of all and prevent
less waste and constant adversity
among the producers."
It is stated, says the Bulloch Times,
that the work of organization in the
various counties and school districts
will begin practically at once.
Chairman Blacklock next addressed
the meeting of growers. He went
carefully and technically into all the
details of the present situation both
as regards the cotton crop itself and
the labor shortage, stating that he
felt that if there was too much trou trouble
ble trouble in obtaining labor in this section,
he believe dthe? government would
take it in hand and demand that all
wha were capable must either "work
or fight" at this critical period. He
suggested that some sort of a bureau
of exchange be established to keep
down confusion and to distribute la labor
bor labor in such a manner that all could
be served fairly and without friction;
that in sections where labor was
abundant these communities could
render assistance to less favored lo localities,
calities, localities, or where labor was scarce.
The chairman then called for ex expressions
pressions expressions from the various growers
as to the condition of the cotton crop
and labor in their respective neigh neighborhoods,
borhoods, neighborhoods, with the following re responses:
sponses: responses: Dr. Woods of Webster said he
thought there would be about a 75 or
80 per cent crop in his vicinity this
year; that 400 acres had been plant planted
ed planted in his section; that they had plenty
of labor, but that he looked for some
trouble during the year; that the la labor
bor labor was ample, if it could be utilized,
etc. v v.
Mr. George J. Griffin of Eustis con considered
sidered considered that the crop in his part oi
the -country was fairly good; laboi
was plentiful; that there were no
other crops that would interfere with
the picking of the cotton, as he
thought it would be out of the way
before orange gathering time.
Mr. Pettys of Mcintosh anticipated
only about a 50 per cent crop this year
in his section, on account of the boll
weevil; that there was about 2500
acres planted, with sufficient labor, to
harvest the crop, if the labor could bt
utilized; he thought the average yield
of cotton there would be 350 pounds
per acre.
Mr. W. A. Baxley of Summerfield
expressed himself as satisfied with
present conditions in his locality" and
believed the crop would average about
70 per cent in his section; that they
had no boll weevil and that he had
had success in obtaining enough labor
to hoe the cotton but that they would
need twice as many hands to pick
the crop, which would end in Novem November.
ber. November. Mr. Wadsworth of LadyLake stat stated
ed stated that there were about 1000 acres
of cotton planted in his section; that
labor was scarce but that he expect expected
ed expected to be able to bring in labor from
elsewhere to gather the crop; and
that he believed there would be an
average of 350 pounds to the acre in
his locality.
Mr. W. A. Collins of Bushnell con considered
sidered considered that they had a very good
crop; labor was scarce; there is about
1500 acres planted in his section,
that he had considerable trouble in
getting cotton chopped but there was
sufficient labor, if the hands could be
made to work.
Mr. Todds of Center Hill reported
that their crop was about a 70 per
cent average crop in his part of the
state; that they had planted from
800 to 1200 acres; labor was scarce;
there was no boll weevil.
Mr. Thomas Bailey of Oxford be believed
lieved believed their crop would average 70
per cent, with an acreage of about
three to four times as large as last
year; he judged the acreage would be
1500 in cotton; labor condition all
right,' if it can be controlled.
Mr. Walter Nichols of Pedro, said
there were 400 acres of cotton plant planted
ed planted in his locality; that they had more
or less trouble with labor last year,
but he thought they would have
enough labor this year.
Mr. J. F. Hammett of Leesburg re reported
ported reported that the crop was fairly good
in his section and he believed there
would be about 1500 to 2000 acres un under,
der, under, cultivation around Leesburg;
that there was plenty of labor and
he didn't anticipate any difficulty in
getting the crop picked.
Mr. P. W. Bamett of Avon believea
they had plenty of labor with three
times as large a crop as last year. He
thought there would be a 70 per cent
average crop ha hi3 section.
Dr. Kite of Sumterville stated that
there would be in the neighborhood of
1500 acres planted in his section;
that labor was scarce but he intended
to bring in labor from Alachua coun county..
ty.. county.. .
Mr. Baxter of Candler reported
that there would be about three or
four hundred acres planted in his lo locality;
cality; locality; labor was plentiful.
Mr. Roundtree of Belleview looked
for no trouble as to labor, and that
their crop was a fairly good one.
Mr. J. Q. Baker said there was

8t

A

SAVE

AAAAAAASAAAAAAaAA

Effective August 1918, the Price
On All CHEVROLET Gars Will
advance Fify Dollars. You have
Been Intending to buy a Chev Chevrolet
rolet Chevrolet for some time, so get it now
and save that $50. The present
price delivered at Ocala, is

Let us demonstrate it

OGALA IH WORKS
GARAGE

more cotton planted in his, section,
this year than last and he supposed
there would be a 70 per cent average
crop; had trouble last year getting
labor and expects the same conditions
this season; that there were about
1000 acres planted in his section this
year.
Mr. Arnold of Okahumpka said
there was a small acreage planted this
year in his section but they had
plenty of labor.
Mr. Merck of Eustis made a motion
to the effect that the price to be paid
for picking cotton be on a 2-cent per
pound basis for the coming 1918 sea season,
son, season, which was seconded, and, after
considerable discussion was over overwhelmingly
whelmingly overwhelmingly carried.
The chairman then read a lettev
from Congressman Frank Clark, re- j
gardmg the headway made by the
government towards the eradication
of the boll weevil.
Mr. Mayo moved that Chairman
Blacklock be requested to lend his as assistance
sistance assistance and influence in an effort to
secure a federal agent to control the
labor situation in this section, which
motion was seconded and unanimous unanimously
ly unanimously carried.
Chairman Blacklock assured the
growers that he would do his utmost
to obtain the party in question.
Whereupon Mr. Mayo then moved
that the organization be made a per permanent
manent permanent one with the name "Middle
Florida Cotton Growers Association,"
and that the chairman appoint a com committee
mittee committee of five to draw up the by-laws
and effect the organization. Th
motion carried and the chairman
designated Mr. Hamilton F. Dobbin
of Altoona, Dr. Woods of Webster,
Messrs. Nathan Mayo of Summer Summer-field,
field, Summer-field, George J. Griffin of Eustis and
Mr. Pettys of Mcintosh to act as such
committee.
Thereupon Mr. Mayo moved to ad adjourn,
journ, adjourn, subject to the call of the
chairman, which motion was second seconded
ed seconded and carried.
The chairman the nannounced the
meeting as "adjourned.
R. W. Blacklock, Chairman.
Hamilton P. Dobbin, Secy.

f

THAT

4

$780.00

G E. Simmons, Mgr.

WIN

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room service is
second to none.
RATES From $1.50 per day per person to $6.
ROBERT M MEYER, J. E. KA VAN AUGH
Manager. Proprietor.

DR. K. J. WEI HE
EYESIGHT
SPECIALIST
(With Weihe Co., Jewelers)
OPTOMETRIST AND OPTICIAN
. Phone 25
South Side of Square
OCALA, FLORIDA;
Our prescription department offers
you the best in PURE DRUGS and
CHEMICALS. Your doctor will tell
you. Court Pharmacy. Phone 284. 15tf
Phone us your wants anything in
pure drugs or druggist's sundries.
Court Pharmacy, phone 284. 15-tf

4b A A A

for you.

A :
T

UDR HOTEL

REWARD:
One Hundred Dollars reward will
be paid for information leading to the
arrest of the parties who entered my
pasture field between the 5th and 14th
of July and drove therefrom between
thirty and thirty-five head of cattle,
consisting of cows and yearlings.
19-t . C. P. Howell, Ocala, Fla.
Phone No. 451 Is the American
Restaurant, Temple & Davis, proprie proprietors,
tors, proprietors, the best in the city, at the union
passenger station. 16-tf
Dodge Touring Car for sale cheap;
good condition. Apply at the Max Max-vell
vell Max-vell Agency. 20-tf

1



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PAGE1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
PAGE2
PAGE3
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STRUCT2 other
ODIV1
FILES1