The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06990

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
BE 0 C ALA

EVENING

STAR

Weather Forecast: Probably local
showers tonight and Sunday, except
fair northwest portion.

In Spite of Stubborn Resistance of the Huns,
Allies Continue to Advance

OVER TWELVE HUNDRED THOUSAND AMERICANS IN

Washington, July 20. Official re reports
ports reports to the War Department show a
vimnrn Tiprmfrnf Inn hv Ti'ranm-
American counter attack of ten miles
and a average penetration of seven
miles on a 22-mile front, General
March told the newspaper men today.
The Allied military opinion, March
said, is unanimous that the German
offensive Is completely stopped. The
counter offensive will continue as long
as it is possible to force the Germans
back.
TWO HUNDRED THOUSAND OF
OUR MEN
About two hundred thousand Amer Americans
icans Americans are taking part. Gen. March
said, and the attack is still being
pressed against heavy German re reserves.
serves. reserves. The American troops engaged on
this front are the first, second, third
and fourth regular divisions, and the
twenty-sixth and twenty-eighth of the
National Guard. The Rainbow divis division
ion division is in the Champagne region. An
unattached negro regiment from the
ninety-third division National army,
is in each sector.
A MILLION AND A SIXTH OF OUR
MEN
General March also disclosed that
the embarkation of American troops

Y had passed the million, two hundred

thousand mark
SOISSONS STAGGERS
The War Department has no infor information
mation information that Soissons has fallen, but
it is under a heavy fire from Ameri American
can American artillery and its fall seems immi imminent.
nent. imminent. AMERICANS ADVANCE
Paris, July 20. An official an announcement
nouncement announcement states that the Ameri-
. . ii

L-ans continue to advance Detween me
irsne and Marne. South of the Marne

the French have thrown back the en enemy
emy enemy between Fossey and Oeuilly and
have retaken eround towards the
Marne. The allied advance has reach
ed the line of Vierzy beyond the wood
of Mauley, east of Villers-Helon and
the Neuilly front.
BRITISH MAKE CONSIDERABLE
GAINS
London, July 20. An official an announcement
nouncement announcement today states the British
advanced last night on a one-mile
front south of Hebuterne. The British
line as a result of yesterday's opera operations
tions operations in Flanders was advanced along
a four thousand yard front in the
Meteren sector. The villages of Me Me-teren
teren Me-teren and Lewaton have been occu
pied by the British, who took 436
prisoners.
BERLIN ADMITS THE BREAK
Berlin, July 19 Admission is made
by a German official communication
thflt. the allied trooDS. througn sur
prise in a counter offensive Thursday,
hrnVe the German mfantrv ana arxn
lery lines at isolated points between
the Aisne and Marne and forced back
tVie fJermnn line. The statement
claims that strengthening of German
. . 1 All"
positions later prevented tne Aines
irom breaking tnrougn.
STEADY POUNDING NEAR SOIS
SONS
With the American Army on the
Aisne and Marne Fronts, July 20.
The battle is being extended south
toward Chateau Thierry. Steady
pounding near Soissons continues,
but the movement lacks the dash of
? the first day. The battle is apparent-
ly approaching a giant struggle.
APPROACHING THE EMBANK
MENTS
With French Armies in France,

July 20; The Allies are driving back

01
P

A

pip MS
lll0ni

FRANCE

A

ARE FIGHTING Oil THE MARNE

AND THE
(Associated Press)
TAKING PRISONERS
Crowds of Huns Deciding to Finish
the War in the Prison
Camps
(Associated Press)
London, July 20. The French have
extended their advance from south southwest
west southwest of Soissons, but have not ad advanced
vanced advanced much further towards Sois Soissons.
sons. Soissons. The French have advanced a
thousand yards on the Rheims front.
The total number of prisoners taken
in the Franco-American drive is
18,800.
the Germans on the southern bank of
the Marne and are approaching the
embankments.
FRENCH MADE A BIG HAUL
London, July 19. In a counter of
fensive between the Aisne and the
Marne, the French captured 16,000
prisoners yesterday, according to
news reaching here this afternoon.
. .
LIST OF LOSSES
Washington, July 20. The army
casualty list made public today con contains
tains contains 120 names.
The casualties of the army includes
Corporal Douglas Gammons, of Tam
pa, wht died of disease.
FIRE TOO HOT FOR HUN FLYER
London, July 20. A German air airplane
plane airplane crossed the Kentish coast this
morning, but was driven back by the
anti-aircraft guns, says an official
announcement.
DOESN'T WANT DICE
Red Cross Will Not Help Boys in
Khaki to Roll the Bones
(Associated Press)
New Orleans, July 20. A Red
Cross ban has been placed on dice so
far as their distribution in the four
army cantonments in the gulf divis division
ion division of the Red Cross is concerned. A
call for games, issued throughout the
division recently, brought to Red
Cross headquarters here not only
cards, dominoes, checkers and chess
boards, but a complete assortment of
dice. Now there has gone forth from
Red Cross headquarters a request to
the public not to contribute dice as
the Red Cross does not favor the
playing of games to which thew usu usually
ally usually are devoted.
RED CROSS WILL SEND
SUPPLIES TO RUSSIA
(Associated Press)
Washington, July 20. A large cai cai-go
go cai-go of relief supplies, principally food foodstuffs,
stuffs, foodstuffs, clothing and medicines will be
dispatched to Russia by the American
Red Cross at the earliest possible
moment. A special ship for the pur purpose
pose purpose will be accompanied by Red
Cross representatives.
BIG LEAGUE PLAYERS
GOING TO FRANCE
(Associated Press)
New York, July 20. Manager Mc Mc-Graw,
Graw, Mc-Graw, of the New York Giants, has
promis'ed to take the team of big
league players to Paris for a series
of games with professional players in
the army and navy.
For ,sale cheap, a Dodge Touring
Car, in excellent condition. The Max Maxwell
well Maxwell Agency, Ocala. 20-tf

A

OGALA, FLORIDA, SATURDAY, JULY 20, 1918.

o
II
AISIIE
MEETING OF LIVE
Crusade Against the Tick Will be
Actively Prosecuted in Mar Mar-I
I Mar-I ion County
While it is true that, aside from the
work of whipping the Hun the eradi eradication
cation eradication of the cattle tick is among the
most important duties that confront
the Florida farmer today, the meet meeting
ing meeting held Friday was better attendecr
than was even anticipated by those
who have these matters in charge.
Long before the hour set for the
session called to meet at the court courthouse
house courthouse many stock men and farmers
from all sections of the county were
on hand. When the hour arrived
however, the court room was occupied
in the trial of some case, and the
meeting was held at the Marion
County Board of Trade room, which
proved entirely too small to comfort comfortably
ably comfortably accomomdate the number pres present.
ent. present. Dr. W. F. Blackman, member of
the Florida State Live Stock Sanitary
Board, was introduced by County
Agent Blacklock, and made an ap appeal
peal appeal to the Marion county farmers to
save themselves thousands of dollars
annually by dipping their cattle. He
proposed a court-martial on the tick,
with Dr. L. M. Nighbert as prosecut prosecuting
ing prosecuting attorney, and anyone present who
desired to so so, for the defense. He
said that he was prepared to make
the charge that a tick is a loafer,
thief and murderer, as he served no
good purpose, stole from the farmers'
pockets the dairy products that right rightfully
fully rightfully belong to infants and soldiers on
the fighting lines and killed thousands
of human beings by causing a food
shortage in various sections of the
world. Dr. Blackman expressed re regret
gret regret that here were not sufficient
seats for all present, but said that it
was beter so than to have a lot of
empty seats to talk to.
Agent Blacklock, as judge advocate
of the court, introduced Dr. L. M.
Nighbert, sent out by the United
States bureau of animal industry to
assist the Florida board in its work
of tick eradication. Dr. Nighbert has
been on the trail of the cattle tick
in the southeastern states for the
past sixteen years, and as a result
of his efforts, combined with those of
state boards, many sections of the
country have been cleared of this
great enemy to farmers and the quar quarantines
antines quarantines that existed against them
have been raised.
Dr. Nighbert complimented Marion
county upon its progress in the cattle
raising industry, and said that with
dipping vats and other advanced
methods for properly caring for stock
it would be one of the leading sections
of thex southeast as a stock growing
:enter. He displayed a large piece of
leather showing the injury done by
the tick, and showed why tick infest infested
ed infested hides brought from $1.25 to $2
less than those free from the pest.
His lecture was made doubly interest interesting
ing interesting by a number of charts which he
referred to, giving actual photograph
reproductions of cattle treated for
tick destruction and those not so
treated. Just how a practical stock
grower could look at so practical a
demonstration of the advantages of
dipping and not be convinced that he
was annually losing large amounts of
money by the tick ravages is hard to
conceive. He stated that Congress
had appropriated millions of dollars
to assist the states in getting rid of
this menace since 1906, and that Flor-
(Concluded on Fourth Page)

TWO

HUNDRED

THOUSAND

T

MEN

I

Cool Heads and Strict Discipline Saved Lives
of Nearly all the Crew
FIRST NEWS OF THE OCCURENCE CAUSED REPORT THAT SUBMARINES WERE OFF COAST RUT
IT IS 1101' RELIEVED THE VESSEL STRUCK A MINE

Washington, July 19, 7:35 p. m.
The navy department announces that
the cruiser San Diego was sunk ten
miles southeast of Fire Island at
11:30 this morning. Cause undeter undetermined.
mined. undetermined. No lives lost, so far as is
known.
SAW NO SUBMARINE
Washington, July 20. Capt. H. H.
Christy, commander of the armored,
cruiser, San Diego, sunk off Long Is Island
land Island yesterday, reported to the Navy
Department today that he believed
the ship was torpedoed, although
there was no positive evidence of a
submarine. The department is still
without evidence of the loss of life,
although it is known that nearly all
were rescued.
PROBABLY STRUCK A MINE
That there was little or no loss of
life is indicated by the fact that the
San Diego was abandoned in good
order. The statement that five or six
mines were destroyed in the vicinity
last night confirmed the belief of of officials
ficials officials that the ship was not sunk by a
submarine.
SAN DIEGO'S GALLANT SAILORS
Point O' Woods, N. Y., July 19.
Survivors of the United States cruis cruiser
er cruiser San Diego, sunk ten miles off Fire
Island shortly before noon today, de declared
clared declared tonight that many members
of the engine crew must have been
killed by the explosion which wreck wrecked
ed wrecked the warship. They were uncertain
whether the vessel was sunk by a tor torpedo
pedo torpedo from a submarine or by a mine.
The cruiser remained afloat thirty-six
minutes after she was struck.
The torpedo or mine struck the ship
just aft of amidship, blowing up the
boilers. One of the sailors declared
the guns of the cruiser were fired at
what appeared to be a periscope. The
survivors who landed here numbered
thirty-five, including six officers. The
captain and first officer of the San
Diego were the last to leave the sink sinking
ing sinking cruiser..
Heavy explosions heard here late
today were believed to indicate that
some of the patrol boats which dash dashed
ed dashed to the aid of the cruiser had met a
German submarine and were giving
battle. The explosions continued un until
til until 8 o'clock tonight and mariners
living here declared they sounded as
if depth bombs were being dropped.
, Several barrels of crude oil, one of
them badly charred, floated ashore
near here and this was believed to in
dicate the possibility that a tank
steamship' also had been sunk.
HEROIC FIGURE
The sailors told of the heroic death
of a quartermaster who had been or ordered
dered ordered to stand on the bridge while the
men were being sent to the boats.
He remained at his post, the sailors
said, until it was too late to save him himself
self himself or be saved. Just as the San
Diego sank, they said, the quarter quartermaster
master quartermaster turned until he faced towards
the shore where hundreds of his com comrades
rades comrades were floating about in boats,
and calmly saluted. Then he went
down with his ship.
EN ROUTE TO NEW YORK
The San Diego was bound from the
Portsmouth, N. H. navy yard for
New York when she was sunk.
Capt. H. H. Christy was in com command
mand command and on board were fifty-one of officers,
ficers, officers, 1030 enlisted men and sixty sixty-three
three sixty-three marines. The vessel had been
undergoing repairs at the navy yard.
The San Diego served for years as
flagship oi the Pacific fleet and she
and similar craft have been found
very valuable in connection with con convoy
voy convoy work, although classified as of
limited military value for ordinary
naval operations.
The ships of this type were built
a number of years ago and do not
contain modern devices to protect
them from submarine attacks.

dUUkUrrint will)

(Associated Press)
Report of the Death of the Unfortu Unfortunate
nate Unfortunate Nicholas is Now
Confirmed
(Associated Press)
London, July 20. Former Emperor
Nicholas was executed July ICth, a
Russian wireless statement announc announced
ed announced today. The former empress and
young Alexis, the former heir appar apparent,
ent, apparent, have been sent to a place of se security.
curity. security. It was decided to execute
Nicholas on account of a counter rev revolutionary
olutionary revolutionary plot.
CALLEO OFF
Fight Between the Company and Its
Employes Seems to Have Re Resulted
sulted Resulted in a Dog Fall
(Associated Press)
Atlanta, July 20. Street car serv service
ice service was resumed today, following last
night's agreement which "recognized
the union as a fact," but granted the
company the open shot privilege and
placed other questions in. dispute be before
fore before the National War Labor oBard.
IIGli CITY
Will Speak to the People of Ocala
Tuesday Evening on Matters
of Vital Interest
Tuesday night at 8 o'clock at the
court house, Mr. Franklin Fort of
Washington, volunteer assistant to
the U. 3. food administration and a
prominent speaker for the administra administration,
tion, administration, will deliver an address .to the
people of Ocala and Marion county.
As Ocala and Marion county are in intensely
tensely intensely patriotic, it is hoped that they
will give Mr. Fort a large audience
Tuesday night. He is a delightful
and interesting speaker and will pre present
sent present some of the government's most
important problems.
The message that Mr. Fort will
bring the people here will be in invaluable.
valuable. invaluable. He will give inside infor information
mation information concerning the needs and the
use of the food administration, what
the administration has accomplished,
both in this country and in Europe, in
helping win the war.
Mr. Clarence Camp, Marion county
food administrator, and Mrs. William
Hocker, one of Florida's most promi prominent
nent prominent club women, have both recently
heard Mr. Fort speak and can assure
the people of Ocala and Marion coun county
ty county that they will be both greatly
benefited and charmed if they will
come out and hear Mr. Fort speak
Tuesday night.
REWARD!
One Hundred Dollars reward will
be paid for information leading to the
arrest of the parties who entered my
pasture field between the 5th and 14th
of July and drove therefrom between
thirty and thirty-five head of cattle,
consisting of cows and yearlings.
19-6t C. P. Howell, Ocala, Fla.

EMPEROR WAS
EXECUTED

ATLANTA S STRIKE

. Ml FORT

OF WW

VOL. 25, NO. 174

QUEIITIN ROOSEVELT
WAS KILLED
German Aviators Notified Americans
of His Death by Dropping
a Note
(Associated Press)
Paris, July 20. German aviators
have "dropped a note into the Ameri American
can American aviation camp confirming the
death of Lieut. Quentin Roosevelt.
FOR PROTECTION
Certificates Will be Furnished to En Enable
able Enable Them to Buy Flour in Pro Proportion
portion Proportion to Their Corn
In view of the fact that a tremen tremendous
dous tremendous crop of corn is now reaching
maturity in the state of Florida, and
in order to protect the farmers who
have so loyally responded to the gov government's
ernment's government's call to produce more food,
Federal Food Administrator Braxton
Beacham has authorized the use of a
new farmer's certificate, which will
enable the farmer who produces corn
and has it ground into meal or grits,'
and who produces other crops, which
are listed as wheat substitutes, to pur purchase
chase purchase from the retailer wheat flour
without buying additional substitutes.
This certificate is designed so that
it can be printed by grocers, or others
who have use for them and farmers
can use the certificates when apply applying
ing applying at the grocery store for their sup.
ply of wheat flour, the only require requirement
ment requirement being that the grocer must
know beyond all doubt that the ap applicant
plicant applicant is actually a farmer and has
really produced the substitutes as
claimed.
Mr. Beacham has also authorized
the use of miller's certificates, by
which a retailer is privileged to buy
meal or grits, or other substitutes
from a miller, taking a certificate of
purchase tnd submitting this certifi certificate
cate certificate to a wholesaler or jobber in lieu
of an order for wheat flour substi substitutes.
tutes. substitutes. The wholesaler or jobber can
in turn usethis certificate for his
purchases, making a chain transac transaction
tion transaction that works no hardship on any
dealer and relieves them from neces necessity
sity necessity of buying their substitutes from
the same one who sells them then
flour. In other words it permits the
mills to sell their meal and grits to
retailers and there are hundreds of
mills in Florida, which will be benefit benefited
ed benefited by the new order.
Mr. Beacham has also established
rulings that cover this, and these rul rulings
ings rulings have been sent to all county
food administrators in the state, mak making
ing making the new conditions clear to .all.
Buy War Savings Stamps.
BUY
TIRES and TUBES
AT
J
"WHY PAY MORE"
Ask for Price List

FARMERS



OCALA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, JULY 20, 1918

OCALA EVENING STAR
Pnbilahed Every liny Except Sandiy by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY
OF OCALA, FLA.

It. It. Carroll, Prextdc-nt
P. V. Learengrood, Secretary-Treasurer
J. II. Benjamin, Editor
Entered at Ocala, Fla.., ostofflce as
. Jlecond-class matter.
TELEPHONES
Ilualaea Of flee Five-One
Editorial Department Two-Seven
Noelety Editor Eire, Doable-One
ADVERTISING RATES
DUpIayt Plate 10c. per inch for con consecutive
secutive consecutive insertions. Alternate inser insertions
tions insertions 25 per cent, additional. Compoai Compoai-tion
tion Compoai-tion charged on ads. that run less than
ix times 5c. per inch. Bpecial position
20 per cent, additional. Kates based on
4inch minimum. Less than four Inches
will take higher rate, whieJi will be
furnished on application.
Reading: Notice 5c. per line for first
insertion; 2c. per line for each subse subsequent
quent subsequent insertion. One change a week
allowed on Teaders without extra com composition
position composition charges.
Lgal advertisements at legal rates.
Electros must be mounted, or charge
will be made for mounting.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Domestic
One year. In advance $5.00
Six months, in advance 2.50
Three months, in advance 1.25
One month, in advance.... 50
Foreign
One year, in advance ..$8.00
Six months, in advance 4.25
Three months, in advance 2.25
One month, in advance...' .80
Secretary Baker says professional
baseball players must work or fight,
and the country will approve his de decision.
cision. decision. The Ocala Star says, "Florida is not
democratic any more." What is it,
then?-Punta Gorda Herald.
Demoralized.
Tht Allies may have starttd for
Berlin, but let us not forget the way
is long and there are many rough
places in it.
A dispatch to the Star late Friday
afternoon announced that the French
had taken at least sixteen thousand
prisoners during their counter attacks
Friday and the day before.
Says the Leesburg Commercial:
"Little pests known as tingids .are
nibbling some of the castor bean
plants throughout Florida and the
various experimental stations are
working on disinfecting compounds."
Tom Watson sasy that Arthur Bris-
bane invents historical facts when whenever
ever whenever he needs them to illustrate his
arguments, and if Tom had always
told the truth" that way the Star
would be strong for him.
The ; Leesburg Commercial alludes
to an awful possibility as follows:
"We congratulate Mr. Blitclr upon his
promotion but feel somewhat appre
hensive. What, if Mr. Batch's succes
sor should happen to be another like
Burke?"
When the people of Florida are in
formed that Mr. Paderick, who is to
take the position of private secretary
to the governor, is Catts' son-in-law
they will probably- understand why
Mr. Blitch, who filled the position so
well was assigned another and less
important tho probably better paying
office.
The Cunard liner Carpathia has
been1 sunk by a Teuton submarine off
the coast of Ireland. The Carpathia
is the ship that raced with the full
speed of her engines to the rescue of
the Titanic survivors when that ill ill-fated
fated ill-fated vessel went down in the north
Atlantic in April, 1912. No ship in
the German marine has such a deed
of mercy to its credit. The Carpathia
was of 13,160 tons gross and was used
by the British as a transport. No
lives were lost with her.
Says the Palatka News: "Florid "Florid-ians
ians "Florid-ians will mourn the death of Judge
Wm'.4A. Hocker, one of the leading
jurists of the state, who it is learned
died at a Jacksonville sanitarium ear early
ly early in the week. Judge Hocker served
for two terms as judge of the fifth
judicial circuit, and later served sev several
eral several years on the supreme bench,
when he voluntarily retired. He wa
a noble gentleman of unimpeachable
character, as well as- a jurist of great
and generally recognized ability."
Of the four nations now fighting
against the Entente Allies, the
Turks come the nearest to obeying
the rules of civilized warfare. They
do not use gas nor liquid fire, bomb
hospitals fire on the Red Cross nor
ill-treat prisoners. They come pretty
close to observing the decencies of
modern warfare. Even the Armenian
butcheries, which are scored against
their nation, were performed mostly
by Kurds' and irregular soldiers. Per Perhaps
haps Perhaps if he is freed from the baleful
influence of the Hun, the Turk will
turn out to be a tolerably fair citizen
of the world.1
Rear Admiral Kemp of the British
navy has taken over the northern
section of the Murman railroad with
British, American and Serbian. forces,
says Max Behrmann, the Stockholm
correspondent of German newspapers,
under date of July 13. The allied
forces will advance southward "in ac accord
cord accord with the local soviet authorities
and at the request of the local popu population
lation population for help," the admiral announc announced.
ed. announced. A zoologist named Schmidt, who

has just returned to Petrograd from
a trip to north Russia, reports, ac according
cording according to the Norddeutsche Allge Allge-meine
meine Allge-meine Zeitung, that the British are
busy making Kern a strongly fortified
place and that the garrison is fully
supplied with food.
Fletcher, Catts, Powell and Stock-ton--these
will be the entries in the
senatorial race two years hence, ac according
cording according to intimations from the gath gathering
ering gathering of politicians at Jacksonville, in
connection with the meeting of the
state democratic executive committee.
This paper makes the prediction that
wlffen the votes are counted the stand standing
ing standing of the candidates will be Fletcher,
Catts, Powell and Stockton Fletcher

first, and the rest at various stages of
nowhere. Lakeland Telegram.
The Cattriots are counting on the
democrats making- fools of them
selves in 1920 as they did in 1916
this is, a bunch of them running
against Catts with the same result.
Catts has no right to run in a demo-
catic primary. He was elected on
the prohibition ticket an dset demo
cratic rules at defiance.
The man who has made such a suc success
cess success of Florida's prison farm has
"resigned" to give place to one who
is more in harmony with the Talla Tallahassee
hassee Tallahassee administration. The man se se-selected
selected se-selected to fill the vacancy is Mr. J. S.
Blitch, for the past several months
the efficient secretary to Governor
Catts. Mr. Blitch is a most excel excellent
lent excellent gentleman and a politician in
whom there is no guile, but whether
he can make good in the management;
of criminals remains to be seen. The
outgoing man had proved his worth
and there was nothing against him,
except perhaps that he didn't bo tow
with sufficient grace to Sidney J. It
is a case of political man-handling
which finds its justification in the good
old democratic principle that "to the
victor belongs the spoils," and one
which we should all accept cheerfully
even when it puts a good and game
official on the shelf. Palatka News.
It has been very well understood
ever since Catts took office that Capt.
Purvis was to be put out as soon as
an excuse could be made.
The fireless cooker is in the first first-line
line first-line trench. No longer is it a first aid
only to the dainty bride and the mov
ing picture devotee. It supplies steam steaming
ing steaming hash and hot soup to the boys in
khaki. Today, miniature fireless
cookers are at. the front in quantity.
They are five-gallon pails, cork-jacketed,
or with- some other nonconduc nonconductor
tor nonconductor between the walls. Swung on
poles, they are borne by soldiers thru
the communication trenches. The
passageways are so narrow that only
small containers can pass betweei.
the walls. And, how those cans are
welcomed when they reach the boys!
SOLDIERS
The boys of '76 and the lads of '61
Were handy with the bayonet, the
sabre and the gun;
They hurried to the muster,
And they didn't brag or bluster
When they rode with Lee or Custer
Or they marched with Washington.
They were made of proper stuff
When they wore the blue and buff,
And were ready, ever ready for the
game;
They were brisk and ready, too,
When they wore the gray or blue,
And our soldier boys in khaki are
the same.
The boys of '76 and the lads of '61
Were cheerful in the blizzard and
were happy in the sun;
All soldierly and willing
In their marches and their drilling,
If their rations weren't filling
They could still be full of fun.
They were straight as mountain pine
In the Continental line,
And they took the luck of battle as
it came.
They were hardy as could be
In the ranks of Grant and Lee,
And our soldier boys in khaki are
the same.
The boys of '76 and the lads of '61 -Were
always keen for fighting and
were bound to yield to none.
Their cannon might be mired,
But they dragged them out, untired,
And they loaded, aimed and fired
Till the work to do was done.
They were made of proper stuff
When they wore the blue and buff,
And were ready, ever ready for the
m v game;
They were brisk and ready, too,
When they wore the army blue,
And our soldier boys in khaki are
the same.
Arthur Guiterman in Life.
Uncle Sam is backing the concrete
ship as a factor to beat the U-boat.
The shipping board will invest $50, $50,-000,000
000,000 $50,-000,000 in building that type of ves vessel.
sel. vessel. Five government yards are to be
constructed in addition to the three
private ones now operating. Two of
these will be on the Atlantic coast,
two on the Pacific and one on the Gulf
of Mexico. The immediate program
calls for 42 ships with hulls of rein reinforced
forced reinforced steel concrete. Concrete ships
cost-less than steel or wooden ones.
They can be built more rapidly and
I with less expert labor. And they add
to our total tonnage without inter interfering
fering interfering with the construction of other
boats. Two years ago the world would
have laughed if anyone had suggested
a self-propelling, seagoing ship built
of stone. Today it is an accomplished
fact. The Faith, built in record time,
has weathered the high seas and is
steaming them victoriously. With that
demonstration of the valiant ship
Faith, our shipbuilders are preparing
to remove mountains of concrete and
convert them into ships "and still
more ships." Most of these stone ships

I will be tankers of 7500 tons, with a

capacity of 50,000 barrels of oil. Each
of them will have 2800 horsepower
and a speed of more than 10 knots an
hour. One very great use for them
will be to bring wheat from Australia
across the Pacific to America. Aus Australia
tralia Australia has immense quantities of
wheat, which the submarines have cut
off from Europe. But the submarine
can't do much in the Pacific, across
which the concrete ships can plow,
bringing wheat to America, which in
turn can ship its own wheat under
convoy to Europe.
AT THE CHURCHES TOMORROW

Grace Episcopal
(Rev. Gilbert A. Ottmann, Rector)
9:45 a. m. Sunday school.
7:30 a. m. Holy communion, every
Sunday.
11 a. m. Holy communion and
sermon, first Sunday.
11 a. m. Morning prayer and ser sermon,
mon, sermon, except first Sunday.
All seats free. Every one welcomt
at all services.
Methodist
9:30 a. m. Sunday school. Chil Children's
dren's Children's Day.
11 a. m. The preaching hour will
be taken up by the program for Chil Children's
dren's Children's Day. The program will begin
about 10:30 a. m., after Sunday school
and close about 11:45 a. m. The com committee
mittee committee has an excellent program and
I urge our parents, members and
friends to turn out and encourage this
service for the children. If any par parents
ents parents have children to be baptized,
bring them and this will be attended
to. It is Decision Day Our young peo people
ple people should decide definitely for Christ
and His church in early life.
7 p. m. Senior League.
8 p. m. Preaching. Text Rev. 12:1.
Topic, Great Wonder in Heaven.
8 p. m. Wednesday, prayer meet meeting.
ing. meeting. Come and pray.
4:30 p. m. Friday, Junior League.
Yo uare invited to these service and
you will have a cordial welcome..
Smith Hardin, Pastor.
Baptist
People are no longer satisfied with
the old Sabbath of quietness and
worship. They want a new day, a dif different
ferent different sort of day. Paul describes the
citizens and strangers of Athens as
spending "their time in nothing else
but either to tell or to hear some new
thing." They wanted new gods, new
doctrines. People today are demand demanding
ing demanding a new Sabbath in place of the
peaceful, worshipful day that came
down from their fathers. Athletics,
moving pictures, excursions, enter entertaining
taining entertaining have made inroads upon the
old-fashioned Sabbath. Those of us
who were brought up to respect the
sanctity of the Sabbath can't help but
feel the tide is running in the wrong
direction. Leslie's Weekly.
Services of an attractive character
will be held at the First Baptist
church Sunday.
11 a. m. Morning worship. Sub Subject,
ject, Subject, "A Delightful Sabbath."
8 p. m. The pastor will preach the
second sermon of the series of charac character
ter character sermons entitled "Scene at a
Well." Come yet that love the Lord.
Young people are specially invited to
our evening meeting.
First Presbyterian
9:30 a. m. Sunday school.
Eric Collier, superintendent.
11 a. m. Public worship.
8 p. m. Public worship.
8 p. m. Wednesday, midweek
prayer meeting.
7 a. m. Thursday, union prayer
meeting.
The pastor will preach for the Pine
street Presbyterian church (colored)
at 3:30 p. m. tomorrow.
The public is urged to attend the
Thursday morning prayer meeting. It
has been noticed that at the last
meetings very few of the families of
the city who have boys in the service
were represented. It would seem that
these are the families that would be
largely represented. Those who gather
are praying especially for these boys,
and at the least their loved ones
ought to come to the prayer meetings
LOOKS BETTER, LASTS LONGER,
COSTS LESS PER JOB THAN THE
OTHER KINDS
WHY NOT BUY IT
is all Paint. It costs no more per gal gallon
lon gallon than the Ready-Mixed kind, and
you get two gallons for one.
Ask the dealer or get our color
card for explanation. 6
For Sale By
THE MARION HARDWARE CO,
Ocala, Florida
BUY
TIRES AND TUBES
"WHY PAY MORE"
Ask for Price List

AT ;
uOLOLHf S I

FLORIDA
to show their appreciation and to join
in the concerted prayers. Some of the
church people do not seem to think it
matters. But it matters much. We
read of crowded prayer meetings in
many places. The Christian people of
Ocala should get in touch with this
mighty movement, for God and hu humanity.
manity. humanity. Let us fill the house next
Thursday morning.
The public is cordially invited to all
services in this church.
John R. Herndon, Pastor.
St. Phillip's Catholic Church
Mass Sunday at 9 a. m.
Sunday evening service, Rosary and
instruction at 6 o'clock.
Mass on week days at 7 a. m.
Christian Science Society of Ocala
(Yonge's Hall)
10 a. m. Sunday school.
11 a. m. Sunday service.
7:45 p. m. first Wednesday in each
month.
Free reading room and library open
on Tuesdays and Fridays from 3 to 5.
SUNDAY SCHOOL AND
DECISION DAY
Sunday school and Decision Day
will be observed at the Methodist
church, Sunday morning, July 21, at
10:30 o'clock.
Theme In the Days of Thy Youth.
Processional Onward Christian
Soldiers.
Pledge of Allegiance America.
Prayer Song Hear O Father Ele
mentary Division.
Invocation Rev. Smith Hardin.
Children Day Ode Miss Nan
Brooks ; musical accompaniment, Miss
Isabel Davis.
Song The Children's Hosanna
Elementary Division.
Address by Supt. L. W. Duval.
Greeting The King's Garden
Gene Bitting.
Recitations
When We Grow Big Elizabeth
Talley, Lucile Vogt.
Remember Jesus Orphia Melin.
Welcoming Mothers Audrey Con Con-drey,
drey, Con-drey, Lunita Phillips, Justace Fouth,
Johnson Rivers, Mary Rentz, Elsie
Burnett.
Welcome to Cradle Rollers Lenora
Taylor, Muriel Galloway.
Roll Call by Cradle Roll Supt! Mrs.
C. W. Moreman.
Baptism of Babies.
Recitations
God Needs the Children Fred Vogt,
William Richie.
When Jesus Was a Little Child Child-Mary
Mary Child-Mary Frazier.
Prayer Song Jesus Friend of Little
Children Beginners and Primary De Departments.
partments. Departments. Story Jesus Teaching How to
Pray Harvey Hardin.
The Lord's Prayer School and
Congregation.
The Savior and the Children Inez
Teuton.
What Jesus Thinks Frances
Green.
Solo Mrs. H. M. Hampton.
Offertory.
Recitation Weeds and Deeds Pol Polly
ly Polly Smith.
Anthem Remember Now Thy Cre Creator
ator Creator by Young Peoples Department.
Flower Exercise H. M. Baxter,
Katherine Green, Edward Brown,
Marguerite Condrey, Paul B. Rentz,
Patricia Wetherel, Hubert Bitting.
Louise Bryant, Malcolm Davis, Dora
Bennett, Howard Curtis Bilbro, Fran Frances
ces Frances Louise Clark.
Reading Mother Hearts in the
Garden Miss Rhoda Thomas.
Musical Accompaniment Miss Ruth
Simmons.
Exercises Those Who Do Not
Sing Ethel Thayer Pillans, Evelyn
Brown, Katherine Green, Polly Smith
Jeanette McCrea, Frances Clark,
Clotilde Bilbro, Dora Bennett.
Reading I Cannot See the Power
Cora Mae Pillans.
Exercises Jesus Our Helper Mat-
tie Belle Cameron; assisted by Mar Martha
tha Martha Rivers, Jeaa Bitting, Natalie Min Min-shall,
shall, Min-shall, Cora Mae Pillans, Carrie
Brooks, Mary Louise Atkinson, Mary
Frazier, Audrey Condrey, Inez Luton,
Jeanette McCrea.
Reception of children Into the
church.
Doxology. 5 .
Benediction.

Liberty Bonds.
This bank has received an another
other another shipment of LIBERTY
BONDS and we will be glad for
those who subscribed to call
that the same may be delivered.
MUNROE & CHAMBLISS
NATIONAL BANK

TIRE

QUESTIONS

v

If you have tire questions bring them to
us for adjustment. We have a booklet an answering
swering answering any tire question you may ask. It
is published by the Hood Tire Company, and
is yours for the asking Free. Our VUL VULCANIZING
CANIZING VULCANIZING department is equipped with ma machinery
chinery machinery for VULCANIZING by the latest
improved methods. Why buy new a tires
when you can get thousands of miles out of
the old one by having us VULCANIZE it ?

D A V IE S
" The Tire Man

OCALA AGENCY
FOR HOOD TIRES M

A. HJ X O S
Passanger
was
4UB WT TK
UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT
long and Short Hauling

WHITE ST AW LINE

50:
8s
rit
&.

The ChalmerslSix.
17 miles to the gallon of gaso gasoline
line gasoline The best SIX cylender car
in the world, under $2,000. One
Five Passenger the latest model
and refiriments in stock for im immediate
mediate immediate delivery. Price
$1650.00
Freight and War Tax included.
R. CARROLL, Dealer
Ocala, Florida.

:r

Read the Star Want Ads. It pays

? ?

E RV I C E
and Baggage
' Storage and Packing
PHONE
296



f

OCALA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, JULY 20, 1918

tlUL IfATOT

BULLETIN

Smoked Sausage in oil
Sliced Breakfast Bacon
Chipped Dried Beef
Minced Ham
Saiomi
American Swiss Cheese
New York State Cheese
Limburger Cheese (call
- it what yen please.)
Philadelphia Cream
Cheese
Camembert Cheese
Brick Cheese
Phones 16 & 174

liionirm
UNITED STATES
OOVERKMEMT
Yours for All Kinds Of
SHEET METAL WORK
V. MEASEK
210Soutli Osceola St.
BUY
TIRES and TUBES
AT
"WHY PAY MORE"
Ask for Price List
BLI 'IHAUOSJIDBf
03 P31U19l3 90U3J
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tjJBnQ ''029 azis $uij
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4
Fenole Is sold in Ocala by Anti Anti-Monopoly
Monopoly Anti-Monopoly Drugstore, Clarkson Hard Hard-Co.,
Co., Hard-Co., Ollie Alordis. Tydings Drug Co.,
The Court Pharmacy, Smith Grocery
Co., Cam-Thomas Co., H. B. Masters
. Co., Ocala Seed Store.
And Sour Stomach Caused Tlris
Lady Much Suffering. Black Black-Draught
Draught Black-Draught Relieved.
Meadorsvllle, Ky. Mrs. Peart Pat
rick, of this place, writes: "I was
very, constipated. I had sour stomach
and was so uncomfortable. I went to
the doctor. He gave me some pills.
They weakened me and seemed to
tear up my digestion. They would
gripe mo and afterwards it seemed
I was more constipated than before.
I eard of Black-Draught and de decided
cided decided to try it. I found It just what I
needed. It was an easy laxative, and
not bad to swallow. My digestion soon
Improved. I got well of the sour stom stomach,
ach, stomach, my bowels soon seemed normal.

mm

mi
-
4 UUi m

h rU -" 1 j j l--tjfr v
E:;j:Bftj
I 1 1 I I I I I i 1 1 I f VI I iN lilt

no more griping, and I would take a
dose now and then, and was in good
! Shape.
. I cannot say too much for Black Black-,
, Black-, Draught for It Is the finest laxative
' K one can use."
Thedford's Black-Draught has for
- many years been found of great value

I; In the treatment of stomach, liver and
pVel troubles. Easy to take, gentle

and reliable in Its action, leaving no
bad Itfter-effects, It has won the praise
of thousands of people who have used
St NO-US

OCALA SOCIAL AFFAIRS
If You Have Any News for this De Department,
partment, Department, Call Five Double-One
or Two-Seven

Sunrise on the Hills
If thou art worn and hard beset
With sorrows, that thou wouldst for forget,
get, forget,
If thou wouldst read a lesson, that
will keep
Thy heart from fainting and thy soul
sleep,
Go to the woods and hills! No tears
Dim the sweet look that nature
wears. Selected.
Dinner Party for Mrs. Hornstein
Mrs. I. Arthur Hornstein of Savan Savannah,
nah, Savannah, is the attractive guest of her sis sister,
ter, sister, Mrs. Jake Goldman, arriving in
the city" yesterday afternoon. She will
remain for several weeks. A number
of parties have been arranged by the
friends of Mrs. Goldman, who is her herself
self herself a recent bride, for Mrs. Horn Hornstein,
stein, Hornstein, the first being a six o'clock
dinner party tomorrow at which Mr.
Goldman's parents will entertain the
young couple and their guest.
Sam Phillips is entertaining his
cousin, Sigmon Phillips of Tampa.
-
Mr. J. II. Strunk, who has been at
home on a short visit to his wife and
son, has returned to Leesburg.
Mr. R. J. Rivers arrived home this
afternoon from Jacksonville for a
week-end visit with his family.
Mr. Ellis Yonge of Jacksonville is
in the city the guest of his grand grandparents,
parents, grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Yonge.
it it-Mrs.
Mrs. it-Mrs. Belle Mershon, who has been
the guest of her son and family in
Arcadia for some weeks, has return returned
ed returned home.
Mrs. Hood and Mrs. James .Baskin
came up from Dunnellon yesterday in
the latter's car, an dspent the day
with their old friends and former
neighbors, Mr. and Mrs. S. C. M.
Thomas.
Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Smith and chil children
dren children leave tomorrow in their car for
Rodman. Mr. Smith will return Mon Monday,
day, Monday, but Mrs. Smith and the children
will remain for a week, the guests of
relatives.
Mr. Perry Anthony will arrive in
town tomorrow at noon from Camp
Johnson. He will remain with his
wife and mother for only half a day,
returning to Jacksonville on the mid midnight
night midnight train.
. Mrs. R. F. Rogers and daughter
have returned to Ocala after a de delightful
lightful delightful vacation which Mrs. Rogers
spent with her daughter in Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, while Mrs. Perry visited rela relatives
tives relatives in Lake City.
m
Mrs. J. R. Durrance of Tarpon
Springs, formerly Miss America Pil Pil-lans,
lans, Pil-lans, is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. J.
C. Pillans of Electra. She will visit
her brother, Mr. L. H. Pillans and
family here, before returning home.
.
Miss Mildred Bullock, who has been
spending a few days with her sister,
Mrs. T. S. Trantham at the lake, has
returned home and is confined to her
bed with fever, Which her friends
trust will prove to be. only a slight at attack.
tack. attack. Mrs. Holcomb and son, Harry, re returned
turned returned yesterday from Jacksonville,
where they have been visiting Mrs.
Holcomb's mother, Mrs. Upchurch.
John Norris of Jacksonville, return- i
ed with Harry and will be his guest
for several days.
Mr. and Mrs. Elmer DeCamp are
enjoying a visit from Mrs. DeCamp's
brother, Dr. Robert Davis of Stam Stamford,
ford, Stamford, Conn. Dr. Davis has been tour touring
ing touring the south and is making an ex extended
tended extended visit through Florida, having
under consideration the idea of per permanently
manently permanently locating here.
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Fraser of Lake Lakeland,
land, Lakeland, arrived in the city yesterday,
bringing with them Mrs. Fraser's lit little
tle little sister, Marjorie Burnett, who has
been their guest for some time. Mr.
and Mrs. Fraser are visiting Mrs.
Fraser's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jerry
Burnett.
..'."'
Miss Katharine Strunk writes her
Ocala friends that she is greatly de delighted
lighted delighted with the summer school in
Tallahassee. Splendid work is being
done by the large body of students,
over four hundred being in attend attendance,
ance, attendance, which is the largest number of
students the summer school has had
for some "years.
Mrs. Lester Lucas returned yester yesterday
day yesterday form a pleasant visit to Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, where she was the guest of her
niece, Mrs. J. M. McDonald. Mrs. Lu Lucas
cas Lucas also had a most en joyable week's
visit to Pablo Beach, where she rested
and recuperated from the long siege
of illness through which she has so
faithfully nursed her mother, Mrs. R.
E. Yonge, who we are pleased to state
is greatly improved.
Mr. and Mrs. Carlton Price and
children, Carl, Lucy, Bedford and An Anna
na Anna Elizabeth and Mrs. Price's grand granddaughter,
daughter, granddaughter, Mrs. Pherigo and little
daughter, Dorothy Frances, will ar
rive this afternoon in their car from
their home at WestPalm Beach, for
a few days visit to Mrs. Price's sis sister,
ter, sister, Mrs. J. A. Bouvier and family.
Both Mr. and Mrs. Price are former

Marion county residents, and their
occasional visits here are looked for forward
ward forward to with great eagerness by
numberless friends.
Stamp Sale Postponed
The stamp sale which was to have
been held today has been postponed
until next Saturday, owing to Mrs.
Holcomb having been out of town all
week.
The little city of Mcintosh was
well represented in Ocala Friday.
Several cars were in evidence, all
containing happy and prosperous citi citizens.
zens. citizens. Among the number we had the
pleasure of talking with the follow following:
ing: following: Mrs. G. A. Flewellen, Mrs. E. W.
Rush and daughter, Mr. S. H. Gaits Gaits-kill
kill Gaits-kill and Mr. E. L. Price. Mr. L. K.
Edwards and daughter, Ruby of Ir Irvine,
vine, Irvine, also brought the following Mc Mcintosh
intosh Mcintosh people to town: Mr. Will Ded Ded-man,
man, Ded-man, Mrs. Howard Bateman, Miss
Bobbie Baldwin, and Mrs. Dunham.

(Concluded on Fourth Page)
UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
WANTED, LOST, FOUND, FOP
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS
RATES: Six line maximum. one
time 25c; three times 50c; six times
75c; one month S3. Payable In advance.
WANTED Owner of small saw
mill to contract to cut a million
feet of yellow pine timber. Will
deliver logs to mill at sidetrack.
Good loaction and plenty of labor.
Address, "T," care the Ocala
Star. 19-6t
WANTED To buy a shotgun. Must
be in first class shape and a bargain.
Will pay cash. Apply to J. H. J.
Counts, Ocala, Fla. 13-3t
C. O. D. This is the name of a wood
yard which is at your service at all
times. Stove wood, pine or oak. North
Magnolia street, phone 339. 29-tf
CASH FOR OLD FALSE TEETH
Don't matter if broken. I pay $2 to
$25 per set; also cash for old gold,
silver, platinum, dental gold and old
gold jewelery. Will send cash by re return
turn return mail and will hold goods 10 days
for sender's approval of my price.
Mail to L. Mazer, 2007 S. 5th street,
Philadelphia. Pa. 7-5-lm
ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE
OF TRAINS AT OCALA
Seaboard Air Line, Northbound
No. 4: Arrives 1:15 p. m. Departs
1 :30 p. m.
No. 16 (Limited): Arrives and De Departs
parts Departs 4:15 p. m.
No. 2: Arrives 1:50 a. m. Departs
1:55 a. m.
Seaboard Air Line, Southbound
No. 3: Arrives 1:10 p. m. Departs
1:30 p. m.
No. 15 (Limited): Arrives and de departs
parts departs 4:15 p. m.
No. 1: Arrives 1:45 a. m. Departs
1:50 a. m.
Oklawaha Valley,, Southbound
No. 71: Arrives 11:35 a. m.
Oklawaha Valley, Northbound
No. 72: Departs 2 p. m.
Atlantic Coast Line (Main Line)
Northbound
No. 10: Arrives and departs 5:42 a.
m.
No. 40: Arrives 1 p. m. Departs
1:20 p. m.
No. 38: Arrives and departs 2:27
a. m.
Atlantic Coast Line (Main Line)
Southbound
No. 37: Arrives and departs 2:16
a. m.
No. 39: Arrives and departs 2:35
p. m.
No. 9: Arrives and departs 9:03 p.m.
Atlantic Coast Line Branches, North Northbound
bound Northbound No. 48: From Homosassa: .Arrives
12:53 p. m.
No. 150 (Sunny Jim): From Wil
cox, Monday, Wednesday and Friday,
arrives 5:45 p. m.
, No. 32 (Sunny Jim): From Lake Lakeland,
land, Lakeland, Tuesday, Thursday and Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, arrives 9:48 p. m.
No. ,140: Daily except Sunday,
leaves 3:45 p. m. for Wilcox.
Atlantic Coast Line Branches, South Southbound
bound Southbound No. 151 (Sunny Jim): For Wilcox,
Monday, Wednesday and Friday,
leaves 6:10 a. m.
No. 35 (Sunny Jim): For Lakeland,
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday,
leaves 6:40 a, m.
No. 141: Daily except Sunday, ar arrives
rives arrives 10:50 a. m. from Wilcox.
No. 49: For Homosassa, leaves 2:25
P- m.
DON'T FORGET
The executive committee of the
Ocala Win the War League meets to tonight
night tonight at the city council chamber. All
members are requested to be on hand
promptly at 8 o'clock.
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER
AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Con Contract
tract Contract work. Gives More and Better
Work for the Money than any other
contractor in the city.

THIS IS THE TIME FOR EVERY CITIZEN TO SUPPORT THE
$ UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT
Many are doing so at a considerable cost or sacrifice to themselves.
This Bank is a member of the Federal Reserve Banking System established by
j the Government to give greater financial stability and strength to the member
& banks and protection to their depositors. We invite you to become one of our
customers, so that you may enjoy this protection.
I Tine Ocala National Bank
Ocala - Florida

PRESIDENT WILSON
TO MRS. POTTER
The following letter has been res.
ceived by Mrs. Elizabeth Hern don Pot Potter
ter Potter at the National American Woman
Suffrage headquarters In Washington,
D. C. Mrs. Potter Is third vice presi president
dent president and congressional chairman of
the Texas Equal Suffrage Association.
The President's letter reads: -The
White House,
Washington, March 8.
My Dear Mrs. Potter :
Through the courtesy of Senator
Sheppard I have received your letter
of March 7. I feel It a privilege to
express my earnest hope that the leg legislature
islature legislature of Texas may see Its way to
adopt a statute which will give women
the right to vote In the primaries. The
Democratic party Is so clearly commit committed
ted committed to the principle of woman suf suffrage
frage suffrage that I feel It my duty as the
leader of the party to urge this action
by the legislature, and it Is also a
privilege which I value to yield to my
own personal convictions In this mat matter
ter matter and urge such action on Its merits.
I sincerely hope that the measure may
become law.
Cordially and sincerely yours,
(Signed) WOODROW WILSON.
Mrs. Elizabeth Herndon Potter.
COST OF ELECTIONS.
Does woman suffrage increase cost
of elections?
Take first hand testimony on this
question from the states where women
vote. Do not let yourself be deceived
by anti-suffrage gossip.
The following answers from gover governors
nors governors and secretaries of equal suffrage
states have been received in answer
to the question, "Does woman suffrage
greatly increase election expenses and
make additional taxation possible?
WYOMING. "Woman suffrage has
not Increased taxes in this state nor
cost of elections.
COLORADO. "Only Increase in
cost of elections : what naturally ac accrues
crues accrues from added number to elector electorate."
ate." electorate." IDAHO. "Added election expense
infinitesimal."
WASHINGTON. "Election expense
only Increased by slight cost caused by
effort to keep voting precincts under
250 voters."
CALIFORNIA. "Increased cost of
elections because of women voters very
little."
OREGON. "Woman suffrage has
Increased election expenses only so far
as naturally they would increase pro proportionately
portionately proportionately to increase in number of
voters."
KANSAS. "Increased cost of elec elections
tions elections Insignificant"
ARIZONA. "Increased cost of elec elections
tions elections through women voting not worth
considering."
MONTANA. "The argument of in increased
creased increased taxation because of woman
suffrage Is absurd."
NEVADA "Slightly Increased cost
for printing additional ballots and
compensation for election clerks."
In considering this question it must
be remembered that women pay their
full pro rata share of the taxation for
election expenses and that they have
been doing so for more than a century
while deprived by law from casting a
vote.
DR. K. J. WEIHE
EYESIGHT
SPECIALIST
(With Weihe Co., Jewelers)
OPTOMETRIST AND OPTICIAN
Thone 25
South Side of Square
OCALA, FLORIDA

Is now a universally acknowledged necessity. No business man is w
. .. 1 x. iL J 1 A m TT

yiepareu to m?tt lue cany an airs ex uis easiness u ne is not pro protected
tected protected with

FIRE INSURANCE

tVe represent not only the best fire insurance companies, but
also the highest class INDEMNITY AND BONDING concerns in
i the world. Talk is over with us.
D. W. DAVIS, Ho?derNmk OCALA, FLA.

A DOLLAR WASTED HELPS THE ENEMY
That is not a loyal thing to do, of course, and few of us realize
that we are helping the enemy when we waste money. Pretty hard
to define what waste is. One man's waste may be another man's
economy. In a general way, waste in war time may be defined as the
buying of anything net essential to health and efficiency. Every
dollar one spends for unnecessary things commands goods and ser services,
vices, services, that is, labor and materials, needed by the United States Gov Government
ernment Government for war purposes. And. if you invest the money you save
in War Savings Stamps, you are again helping by loaning your mon money
ey money to your Government.
Ocala Ice & Packing Co.

TEE WINDSOR HOTEL
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

U r v"tr Six" 4 i -V -V 7 V i
V -1, - tcz1

In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room service is
second to none.
RATES From $1.50 per day per person to $6.
ROBERT M. MEYEY, J. E. KAVANAUGH
' Manager. Proprietor.

.
Casl For

We Want several hundred
pounds of clean rags table and bed lin linens
ens linens preferred.

":t?
jr -. y--. .- V: j"-.
JOIN WIN THE WAR LEAGUE
The public of Ocala is urged to join
the Win the War League. It entails
no expense whatever, and all loyal
American citizens, over the age of
twelve, are entitled to membership.
The Boy Scouts will call on you with
membership cards for your signature.
Please give the scout3 your attention
when they call on you, and sign the
membership cards.
Publicity Committee,
Ocala Win the War League.
A very nice line of Wash Cloths on
display at Gerigs Drug Store. We
also sell War Savings and Thrift
Stamps. tf

32

i::i:::ii:immniinimni;I:
m jTm
lap!
Star 0
-O-. .. S": z-. .O-. Ju'-Jm.
WANTED t oil LIMITED
MILITARY SERVICE
The following types of wnite men
qualified for limited military service,
are wanted, to be engaged in the pro production
duction production of spruce for airplanes in the
great northwest woods: ;
Fallers or timber cutters exper experienced
ienced experienced in the falling of timber. Head
loaders (men experienced in loading
cars by machinery). While men quali qualified
fied qualified for general military service may
also volunteer from classes two, three
and four.
For further information apply to
the local board.
Have you bought a W. S. S. today?

lice



OCALA EVENING STAB, SATURDAY, JULY 20. 1918

Mr. L. D. Grantham, the Sparr
merchant, is in the city today.
Mr. Roscoe Mathews of Flemington
was a business visitor in Ocala Fri Friday.
day. Friday. Dodge Touring Car for sale cheap;
good condition. Apply at the Max Maxwell
well Maxwell Agency. 20-tf
Nunnally's Candies fresh every
week at Gerig's Drug Store, where
you can also get thrift stamps, tf
Careful prescription service, using
Squibb's chemicals, at Gerig's Drug
Store. War Savings and Thrift
Stamps sold. tf
Mr. W. O. Brewer, manager of the
Romeo Turpentine Company, is a
business visitor to the city today.
Mr. Whitfield Palmer, accompanied
by Mr. D. C. Stiles Jr. went to Tampa
today in Mr. Palmer's new Bufck.
This is Mr. Stiles' first trip to Tampa.
Phone No. 451 Is the American
Restaurant, Temple & Davis, proprie proprietors,
tors, proprietors, the best in the city, at the union
passenger station. 16-tf
Dr. W. F. Blackman, who assisted
in the anti-tick demonstrations here
yesterday, left this morning for his
stock ranch near Sanford, to rest up
a few days from his labors.
Mrs. Sidney Haile and daughters,
Amelia Dozier, Amy Miller and Gene Genevieve
vieve Genevieve Haile lef this afternoon for
Kanapaha, where they will remain
with Mr. Haile at his plantation until
school opens.
Buy Thrift Stamps of us and keep
your skin nice and soft with Rexall
Skin Soap. Gerig's Drug Store, tf
Mr. V. B. Potts, one of the suc successful
cessful successful farmers of the Fellowship
section, is among the visitors in the
city today, and called at the Star of office
fice office to renew his allegiance to his
favorite paper, the Weekly Star.
Mr. F. B. Beckham has returned
from a two weeks stay in Fernandina.
Mr. Beckham's smiling countenance
has been missed and his host of
friends are glad to see he has gained
in weight and that the smile has in
no wise been rubbed off.
Norris Candies fresh every week at
the Court Pharmacy. Phone us and
let us send it up. 15-tf
Mr. Hugh Geiger was kept very
busy yesterday shaking hands with
his numerous Ocala friends, having
just arrived from Meridian, Conn.,
where he has been working in a mu munition
nition munition plant in the government's em employ.
ploy. employ. He expects to go to Palm
Beach tomorrow, and will enlist in the
navy on his return next week. While j
i t. ir t; i i at
in iumiecucub air. jreiger nau me
pleasure of meeting Mr. Robert
Clarkson, of whom he speaks in fine!
terms. He says Robert was making
a splendid success in the business
world when he enlisted, and had made
not only a name for himself but
many friends.
MEETING AT MARIANNA
President Z. C. Herlong of Micanc
py, announces the next meeting of the
Florida State Swine Growers' Asso Association
ciation Association to be held at Marianna, Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday and Thursday, October 9th
and 10th, 1918. Besides an interest interesting
ing interesting program which is now being plan planned,
ned, planned, the executive board of this or organization
ganization organization has under consideration
the matter of holding a fig auctiop
sale of pure bred swine at this meet meet-iiig.'
iiig.' meet-iiig.' Swine growers from all parts of
Florida are urged to keep this date in
mind and arrange to attend the meet meeting.
ing. meeting. Will M. Traer,
Sec'y. Florida Swine Growers' Assn.
Despise the Savoyards.
Even to the present day the Gen Gen-evese
evese Gen-evese hate and despise the Savoyards,
their hereditary enemies, calling the
contemptuous attention of the stranger
to the fact that these neighbors of
theirs are unthrifty and still make
their women work in the fields, as they
did in former days. Fifteen minutes'
ride in a motorcar will carry one from
Geneva Into Savoy.
Peculiar Pronunciation.
The pronunciation of English proper
names Is established arbitrarily and
independent of ordinary rules. In
England they pronounce the name of
the poet Cowper, Cooper ; that of Lord
Cockburn, a former chief justice, Co-
burn; that of Earl Cholmondeley, an
English general and poet, Chumly.
Marjoribanks Is pronounced March-
banks, and Bolingbroke is Bulllng-
brook. The name of Hawarden castle,
where Gladstone died, is pronounced
Harden, and that of Colonel St. Leger,
who served in the revolutionary war, Is
pronounced Silijer.
When Letters Were a Luxury.
In our modern speed of railroad
travel, and the consequent facilities
In the transmission of mail matter all
over the civilized world. It Is well
enough to look back to the time when
letter writing was a luxury indulged
In only by a few. and communication
between friends at a distance well nigh
an impossibility. In Its first applica
tion the word "post" meant a courier
or carrier of messages.

MEETING OF LIVE STOCK MEN

(Continued from First Page)
ida had ben peculiarly fortunate in
securing an extra large part of this
appropriation. He made the assertion,
and said he could prove it, that Flor Florida
ida Florida had been peculiarly fortunate in
all other causes combiner. Now that
the government and state are putting
such valuable assistance at the serv service
ice service of the farmer it is up to the
farmers of the various counties to
take advantage of and profit by it.
Thirty-eight counties in Florida
have began actively the fight against
the tick officially, and it is proposed
to have Marion county take a vote on
the proposition at the November elec election.
tion. election. Safe to say, there will be little
opposition to the movement, as it is
undoubtedly worth more to the farm farmer
er farmer and stock grower than anything
that has been offered them in the way
of improving their opportunities in
this part of the country.
Besides Dr. Nighbert's arraignment
of the tick, short talks were made by
Messrs. McClane, Chambliss, Ed Edwards,
wards, Edwards, Gaitskill, Light and others;
and when it came time for the de defense,
fense, defense, there was no one present who
would undertake the task. So his
"tickship" was pronounced guilty of
every charge made against him and
then some.
The meeting was a most interest interesting
ing interesting and enthusiastic one and much
good may be expected as a result.
Messrs. Blacklock and McClane, the
local agents, will probably arrange
for other meetings over the county at
dates which will be made known
through the newspapers.
TOT
FAIL TO GRASP
WAR'S MEANING
By ELIHU ROOT,
Honorary President of the National
Security League.
There are doubtless some who do not
understand what this struggle really is.
Some who were born here resent inter interference
ference interference with their
comfort and pros
perity and the de demands
mands demands for sacri sacrifice,
fice, sacrifice, which seem to
them unnecessary,
and they fail to see
that the time has
come when, If
Americans are to
keep the independ independence
ence independence and liberty
which their fathers
won by suffering
j and sacrifice, they
In their turn must
v fight again for the
preservation of
that Independence
and liberty.
Ellhu Root
There are some born abroad who
have come to this land for a greater
freedom and broader opportunities and
have sought and received the privi privileges
leges privileges of American citizenship who are
swayed by dislike for some ally or by
the sympathies of German kinship aud
fail to see that the time has come for
them to make good the obligationsof
their sworn oaths of naturalization.
This is the oath that the applicant
for citizenship makes:
That he will support the Constitu Constitution
tion Constitution of the United States and that he
absolutely and entirely renounces all
allegiance and fidelity to any foreign
prince, potentate or sovereignty; that
he will support and defend the Consti Constitution
tution Constitution and laws of the United States
against all enemies, foreign and do domestic,
mestic, domestic, and bear true faith and alle allegiance
giance allegiance to the same.
"False to Their Oaths."
All these naturalized citizens who
are taking part in obstruction to our
rovernment In the conduct of the war
are false to their oaths, are forfeiting
their rights of citizenship, are repudi
ating their honorable obligations, are
requiting by evil the good that has
been done them in the generous and
unstinted hospitality with which the
DeoDle of the United States have wel
comed then to the liberty and the op
portunities of this free land. We must
believe that in many cases this is doue
because of failure to understand what
this war really Is.
This is a war of defense. It Is per
fectly described "in the words of the
Constitution which established this na
tion, "To provide for the common de defense"
fense" defense" and "To secure the blessings of
liberty to ourselves and our posterity,
The national defense demands not
merely force, but Intelligence. It re
quires foresight, consideration of the
policies and purposes of other nations,
understanding of the inevitable or
probable consequence of the acts of
other nations, judgment as to the time
when successful defense may be made,
and when it will be too late, and prompt
action before It is too late.
By entering this war the United
States availed itself of the very last
opportunity to defend itself.
DORGE CAR FOR SALE We have
a Dodge Touring Car in excellent
condition, for sale cheap. The Max Maxwell
well Maxwell Agency. 20-tf
Our prescription department offers
you the best in PURE DRUGS and
CHEMICALS. Your doctor will tell
you. Court Pharmacy. Phone 284. 15tf
W. K. Lane, M. D., Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat. Law Library Building, Ocala,
Florida. tf

HOSE WHO

i if if: jooxk e&.f

-4 n mmvui

THE HOPE CHEST j
By VINCENT G. PERRY.

(Copyright, 1918, by the McClura JNewspa
per syndicate.)
There never was a chaperone like
Aunt Flo ; both Leslie and Nora agreed
on that Leslie and Nora had been
engaged for over a year. He had a fine
position and an Income capable of tak taking
ing taking care of a wife, so he thought it
time they were married.
"Why, Leslie," she said one day near
the end of the season, "you talk as if
I was on the verge of being an old
maid like auntie. I'm Just In my early
twenties the age when a girl gets the
very best out of life. My good times
have just begun."
"That doesn't say that they will
cease when you become my wife," he
argued. "You know that I love you
and that your happiness is my first
consideration."
But arguing only made each more
stubbornly sure of his own opinion, and
finally Leslie left Nora in tears.
Aunt Flo was waiting for them on
the veranda of the hotel. The minuted
she saw Leslie appear alone she knew
something had happened and was
ready with her sympathy when he
poured out his troubles.
T agree with you; Nora is foolish;
to wait," she said after he had fin finished
ished finished "Have patience, though, for I
have a plan."
Near the end of the week, a trunk
arrivedfor Aunt Flo. She had not said
anything about its being expected and
Nora was rather curious to know why
it had been sent. Surely her aunt had
not bought new clothes. She had more
than she would be able to wear there,
as it was.
"It contains, some things I have had
sent here for you, dear," Aunt Flo ex explained
plained explained when Nora questioned her
about it. "They are some things of
mine that I have Intended giving you
and they can go home with your lug luggage."
gage." luggage." "You're a dear! What are they?"
Nora asked eagerly.
"Some things that I started collect collecting
ing collecting when I was younger than you. I
prize them and would not let anyone
have them but my favorite niece."
Nora found the trunk in' her aunt's
room and the key was in the lock. It
was an old-fashioned trunk but it look looked
ed looked as If It had done very little travel traveling.
ing. traveling. She looked It over reverently be before
fore before she opened It. Somehow there
seemed to be something sacred about
It. Carefully, she lifted the lid and
the odor of fresh cedar filled the room.
The trunk was lined with green silk.
On top was a picture of a very beau beautiful
tiful beautiful girl. She picked it up and looked
at it wonderlngly. Why it was Aunt
Flo when she was a girl.
-The picture, however, was forgot forgotten
ten forgotten in the wonders found in the trunk
linens of all kinds in sheets, pillow
cases, towels and many other things.
Before she reached the bottom she
knew what the trunk had been. It was
Aunt Flo's "Hope Chest." Now she
knew why it had seemed so sacred to
her. Poor Aunt Flo, he had never
been married I As she leaned over the
trunk something caught her glance.
A neat pile of letters tied with a pale
ribbon rested at the bottom. They
were her aunt's love letters, she knew
without looking Inside.
. Letter after letter she read. They
read like Leslie's letters, only more re reserved
served reserved and old-fashioned. What a
wonderful lover It was that Aunt Flo
had had, and how anxious he had been
that they get married! Why hadn't
they? Some of his arguments were
just the same as Leslie's. How foolish
Aunt Flo had been to let his pleadings
go by unheeded. The last letter was
addressed in a drfferent hand than the
others. The stationery was edged In
black. As Nora read this letter the
tears started to her eyes. So he had
died in a foreign country that was
why Aunt Flo had never married
Nora sat for a long time in medita meditation.
tion. meditation. A step sounded. It was Leslie.
"Aunt Flo sent me up here," he nrol nrol-ogized
ogized nrol-ogized "Oh, Leslie," she cried as she Jump Jumped
ed Jumped to her feet; "come and read these
letters. It is the saddest thing I Poor
Aunt Flo 1"
It was not necessary for him to read
the letters. Nora told him what they
contained almost before he had a
chance to open one of them. He read
the last one, however, and as he read
he realized just what a "brick" Aunt
Flo was, to keep smiling. He did not
speak for some moments, for he found
that tears, after all, were not solely
monopolized by women.
"Isn't their case like ours?" he ven ventured,
tured, ventured, when he thought Nora was ready
for it.
,"A11 but the dying part," she smiled
through her tears.
"That might happen."
"Oh, no I will get married as sooa
as you like, Leslie."
"Then let's make it today. There is
the dearest little vine-covered church
in the village."
Production of Pearls.
The fisheries of Lower California
have experienced the prosperity and
decline characteristic of every pearl
fishery known. During the first years
after the Spanish conquest these, wa
ters yielded an immense revenue to the
crown of Spain. In 1715, 1,280 ounces
of pearls were shipped to Spain, and
many of the pearls that today grace
the Spanish crown came from these
waters. According to a correspondent.
systematic planting somewhat similar
to that done in the Chesapeake bay
with the edible variety of oyster is to today
day today being conducted on a large scale in
the Gulf of California, the oyster ma

turing In from four to six years.

mmm
(Continued from Third Page)

I

Judging by her latest appearance
on the Temple screen Dorothy Dal ton
will soon have a name for appearing
in roles of sacrifice and high charac character.
ter. character. She showed up beautifully in last
night's picture play, "The Mating of
Marcella." Thru some mix-up, the
films for tonight were not sent to the
Temple, but its patrons will not be
the losers, as they will see Pauline
Frederick in "The Resurrection."
There will also be a film of the "Al "Allied
lied "Allied Official War Review," which is
gotten out under the authority of the
government by the Commission on
Public Information. It is a very in interesting
teresting interesting piece of pictured informa information,
tion, information, and worth the price of the show
by itself.
PHILADELPHIA LETTER
- Florida people are so used to brag bragging
ging bragging about their weather that when
away from home they pay especial
attention to Ihe brand handed out to
them, and just now this section of the
country is getting the most unseas unseasonable
onable unseasonable specimen that has visited it
since 1812 (at least so some papers
claim) when the only successful
crops raised were those whose own!
ers kept fires burning around their j
fields. It certainly is cold and dis disagreeable
agreeable disagreeable and to a Florida cracker
people wearing overcoats in July is
something of a novelty and not at all
a pleasant one at that. But while the
masculine gender are sporting their
winter rig, the suffragettes are go going
ing going to the other extreme and the way
they are conserving clothing above
and below together with thickness or
rather thinness, would make some of
our most up-to-date Ocala belles look
like back numbers.
Writing of conservation reminds
me of an article in the Star recently
urging people to carry home all pur purchases
chases purchases and thus reduce expense. That
plan is in very general use here; and
on many of the windows of grocery
and meat stores there is a large sign
consisting of but two letters, "C. C,"
which being interpreted means "Cash
arid Carry." These stores charge- an
extra five cents for delivering and
then only for eight squares; beyond
that distance they will not deliver at
all.
On the 14th of this month Philadel Philadelphia
phia Philadelphia celebrated what they term a
French fourth of July, commemorat commemorating
ing commemorating the fall of the Bastille and the
birth of liberty 129 years ago. Some
of the exercises were held in the old
state house in the room in which the
declaration of independence was sign signed,
ed, signed, and which is still furnished with
the same desks, chairs and tables that
were used by Jefferson, Hancock,
Franklin and the others on that mem memorable
orable memorable occasion. This Bastille cele celebration
bration celebration held for three days, the
French flag flying from the state
house, fire station and all public
buildings, together with parades,
music and a talk-fest. A military
band had been sent over from France,
every member of which had been on
he firing line and every one a wound
ed man. Some of these men had but
one arm. others had lost a leg, while
others were totally blind. They made
beautiful music and air appeared to
be extremely happy, but to the on onlooker
looker onlooker it was a sad sight and seemed
to bring the war zone very near.
Tonight, July 15, Philadelphia is to
inaugurate a system of lightles
nights. Four nights in each week
there will be no public lighting or
electric, signs, offices will have to cut
out elevators at 6:30 and not run
them at all on Sundays; lights and
hot water in hotels are to be cut in

P

Don't talk patriotism show it! Prove your
patriotism by "signing the pledge" to save and
invest your savings in War Savings Stamps.

w
t

I

half, while trolley cars instead of
stopping at the end of each block will
now run four to six blocks and pas passengers
sengers passengers will have to use she leather
to reach their destination, all of which
is being done to save some millions
of tons of coal for the coming win-

i ter. H. C. P.
TEMPLE PROGRAM
FOR THE WEEK
Today: Pauline Frederick in "The
j Resurrection," the "Allied Official
VVar Review."
Monday: Vivian Martin in "Molly
Entangled."
Tuesday: Mabel Normand in "Joan
of Plattsburg."
Wednesday: George Beban in "One
More American."
Thursday: J. Stuart Blackton in
"The World for Sale."
NOTICE
The annual meeting of the Clark Clark-son
son Clark-son Hardware Co. will be held at the
office in Ocala, Fla., July 27, 1918.
F. E. Wetherbee,
17-tf Secretary and Treasurer.
320 ACRES
Good land near Ocala. Part in culti cultivation.
vation. cultivation. Not cheap land, but the price
is right W. W. CONDON,
19-2t Ocala, Fla.
Cause of Cold Feet.
Cold feet may be habitual, constitu constitutional
tional constitutional or from general ill health, com commonly
monly commonly they are so by habit. Tight
shoes, a sedentary life and overeating
are often guilty, asserts an authority.
When there is too little ventilation of
the feet or the stockings are too thick,
the relief isn't easy. The feet are
kept warm better by wearing thin hose
and low shoes, cold baths and vigorous
massage, active exercise outdoors es especially
pecially especially walking than by inactive In Indoor
door Indoor life. Frequent daily washing of
the feet helps to restore their warmth.
Water wings and bathing caps at
the Court Pharmacy. 15-tf
BUY WAR SAVINGS STAMPS
Own Your Own Home
A House and Two Lota
$850
A House and 3 Acres
$2,000
. A House and 2 Lots
$1,200
Can be Bought With Monthly Pay
menta of
$10
1.1 MURRAY
Room 5, Holder Block,
Ocala. Florida
Melver & MacKay
UNDERTAKERS and EMBALMEKS
PHONES 47. 104, 305
OCALA, FLORIDA
BUY
TIRES and TUBES
AT
"WHY PAY MORE'
Ask for Price List
ISSUED BY TH2
UNITED STATES
CQYBRNAiENT

OCALA FRATERNAL ORDERS

ODD FELLOWS
Tulula Lodge No. 22, I. O. O. F
meets every Tuesday evening in the
Odd Fellows' hall on the third floor of
the Star office building at 8 o'clock
promptly. A warm welcome always
exienaea to visiting Drotners.
H. D. Stokes, N. G.
M. M. little, Secretary.
MARlON-mrw MARnvir inrmw
Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. &
A. M., meets on the first and third
Thursday evenings of each month at
8 o'clock, until further notice.
Stephen Jewett, W. IL
Jake Brown, Secretary.
WOODMEN OF THE WORLD
Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
the K. of P. hall at 8 p. m. every
second and fourth Friday. Visiting
sovereigns are ailways welcome.
P. W. Whitesides, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk
OCALA LODGE NO. 286, B. P.O. EL
Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and fourth Tuesday even evenings
ings evenings in each month. Visitine breth
ren always welcome. Club house oppo opposite
site opposite postoffke, east side.
C. W. Hunter, E. R.
E. J. Crook. Secretary.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Ocala Lodge No. -19. Conventions
held every Monday evening at 8
at the Castle Hall, over the James
Carlisle drugstore. A cordial welcome
u visiting brothers
H. B. Baxter, a C.
CLas. IS. Saee. K. ol fcc t.
MIRIAM REBEKAH LODGE NO. 15
Miriam Rebekah Lodge No. 15
meets the first and third Monday evtv
nings in each month in. the Odd Fel Fellows'
lows' Fellows' hall at 8 o'clock.
Clara Moremen, N. G.
Georgia Ten Eyck, Secretary.
R. A. M. CHAPTER NO. 13
Regular convocations of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13, R. A. M-, on the
first Friday in every month at 8 p. m
J. A. Bouvier, H. P.
Jake Brown. Secretary.
ORDER OF EASTERN STAR
Ocala Chapter, No. 29, O. E. S.,
meets at Yonge's hall the second and
fourth Thursday evenings of each
month at 8 o'clock.
Mrs. Alice Yonce, W. M.
Mrs. Snsnn fYvolc Rpcwtflrw
Phone us your wants anything in
pure drugs or druggist's sundries.
Court Pharmacy, phone 284. 15-tf
DAVIS CARRIAGE PAINTS
are colors ground in tough, elastic
Coach Varnish and one coat will make
your faded automobile or carriage
look like new. They are easy to ap apply
ply apply and dry with a strong, high gloss
clinching Enamel finish. Made for
wrear and tea. 2-8
For Sale By
THE MARION HARDWARE CO.,
Ocala. Florida
It



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METS:name UF,University of Florida
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Go UFDC FDA Preparation Tool
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UFAD\renner
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mods:genre authority marcgt newspaper
sobekcm newspaper
mods:identifier type OCLC 11319113
ALEPHBIBNUM 2052267
LCCN sn 84027621
sn 84027621
mods:language
mods:languageTerm text English
code iso639-2b eng
mods:location
mods:physicalLocation University of Florida
UF
mods:note dates or sequential designation Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
funding Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855
mods:originInfo
mods:publisher Porter & Harding
mods:place
mods:placeTerm marccountry flu
mods:dateIssued July 20, 1918
marc point start 1895
end 1943
mods:frequency Daily (except Sunday)
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normalized irregular
mods:recordInfo
mods:recordIdentifier source UF00075908_06990
mods:recordCreationDate 841027
mods:recordOrigin Imported from (OCLC)11319113
mods:recordContentSource University of Florida
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OCLCQ
mods:languageOfCataloging
English
eng
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mods:physicalDescription
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series
mods:part
mods:detail Enum1
mods:caption 1918
mods:number 1918
Enum2
July
7
Enum3
20
20
lccn 84027622
oclc 11319138
mods:titleInfo
mods:title Ocala weekly star
mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
mods:geographic Ocala (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ651_2
Marion County (Fla.)
Newspapers
mods:hierarchicalGeographic
mods:country United States
mods:state Florida
mods:county Marion
mods:city Ocala
mods:nonSort The
Ocala evening star
uniform
Ocala Evening Star
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Evening star
Star
mods:typeOfResource text
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sobekcm:VID 06990
sobekcm:EncodingLevel #
sobekcm:Publisher
sobekcm:Name Porter & Harding
sobekcm:PlaceTerm Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
sobekcm:Source
sobekcm:statement UF University of Florida
sobekcm:SortDate 693595
sobekcm:serial
sobekcm:SerialHierarchy level 1 order 1918 1918
2 7 July
3 20 20
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