The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06989

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Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
OCALA

EVEN

NG

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Weather Forecast: Partly cloudy
tonight and Saturday, probably local
shower. ; ,J

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Americans Vie With French in the Great
Allied Counter Attack

PEUniCG BY THE THIS OF THOUSANDS OUT OF THEIR TRENCHES, OUR MEfi AND THElR
COMRADES DRIVE HUIIS FROM POSITION AFTER POSITION

With the American Army in France,
J- July 18. The Americans took part in
today's big offensive.
TRI-COLOR AND OLD GLORY
WENT OVER TOP TOGETHER
With the American Army in France,
July 18 American troops went over
the top with a cheer this morning, in
the launching of the allied surprise
attack on the front northwest of the
Chateau Thierry. The enemy was
taken completely by surprise all along
the line.
The American troops were brought
up in the night, together with their
French comrades of crack units, and
lay in their positions until 5 o'clock
this morning. At that hour the Am American
erican American and French artillery opened
fire.
The Americans advanced behind a
' terrific barrage to their first : objec-
times in less than half an hour. While
they were digging in, more Ameri Americans,
cans, Americans, in most cases, passed over the
first objectives, and then advanced be behind
hind behind the resumed barrage to the sec second
ond second objectives, which were speedily
taken, especially at the north end of
the attack, opposite the Paris-Sois-sons
road.
Numerous tanks participated in tht
offensive.
The American infantry went into
the attack without previous artillery
preparation. In their advance behind
the rolling' barrage, they captured
many guns, machine guns, prisoners,
equipment and material.
The Germans in most places offered
feeble resistance, but here and there
they put up a stubborn fight which
the American shock units quickly ov overcame
ercame overcame at the point of the bayonet
and at the muzzles of their weapons.

UNS SURRENDER BY WHOLE WHOLE-7
7 WHOLE-7 SALE
London, July 18. The French have
progressed to Monte de Paris, within
a mile of Soissons, according to ad advices
vices advices here.
The Americans captured four thou thousand
sand thousand prisoners, thirty guns and other
material as yet unestimated.
An American division with French
troops captured Vierzy and advanced
three miles beyond the town. This
message was filed at 6 p. m.
AMERICA IS ELATED
Washington, July 19. The heart of
the American nation is in France. It
marches and fights proudly with the
boys who went "over the top" yester yesterday
day yesterday morning and still are gallantly
smashing tneir way ahead beside their
French comrades.
It was a tale of splendid victory
and dating that news reports and
even the terse official statements told.
Hour by hour the extent of the vic victory
tory victory grew. What the full effect of the
blow will be cannot be estimated un until
til until details of the action along the
whole twenty-five mile front from
Chateau Thierry to Soissons, from
which the surprise attack was launch launched,
ed, launched, are available.
It was clear beyond mistake, how however,
ever, however, that in the rush of the first day
of this answer of General Foch to the
German attack east and west of
Rheims, the enemy had been placed
in a position from which he may have
great difficulty in extricating himself.
Not only may the Germans' effort
west of Rheims and south of the
Marne be wholly nullified, but all
they have accomplished since the Bat Battle
tle Battle of the Aisne began months ago
may be overturned.
PERHAPS QUENTIN IS A PRIS PRISONER
ONER PRISONER New York, July 19, Lieut. Quen Quen-;CRoosevelt,
;CRoosevelt, Quen-;CRoosevelt, reported missing after
La aerial engagement, probably land landed
ed landed unhurt, and is a prisoner in Ger-

n
u
i
(Associated Press)
IT
Austria's Leading Newspaper In In-forms
forms In-forms Its Readers the Amer Americans
icans Americans Have Arrived
(Associated Press)
The Hague, July 19. The Arbeiter
Zeitung of Vienna says there is no
doubt more than a million American
troops in France. The paper says this
feat is as amazing as creating the
British army and increases the Ger German
man German task to great magnitude.
SUPPLY SHIP SUNK
' (Associated Press)
Washington, July 19. The Ameri American
can American steamer Westover, an army sup supply
ply supply ship, manned by navy men, was
torpedoed and sunk in the war zone
on July J.lth. She was bound for
Europe. Ten men and officers out of
a crew of ninety-two are missing, in including
cluding including i;ftanan James Brown Estis
of Hartweil, Ga.
LAYING OUT A NEW ROAD
The board of county commissioners
is in session today to arrange for the
construction of the county hard road
in the Dunnellon district from Dun Dun-nellon
nellon Dun-nellon west to the Inglis. road in Levy
county. Material suitable for road
building seems to be scarce near the
proposed route, arid the board is con
sidering the proposition of hauling
from a splendid deposit located near
Oklawaha.
t As we go to press the board, ac accompanied
companied accompanied by Mr. J. R. Moorhead, as
civil, engineer, and others interested
in the Dunnellon road, are at Okla Oklawaha
waha Oklawaha investigating the feasibility of
getting this material for use in road
construction throughout the county
generally.
TEMPLE PROGRAM
FOR THE WEEK
Today: Pathe News. Dorothy Dal Dal-ton
ton Dal-ton in "The Mating of Marcella."
Saturday: Little Zoe Rae in "The
Danger Within."
'Monday: Vivian Martin in "Molly
Entangled."
Tuesday: Mabel Normand in "Joan
of Plattsburg."
Wednesday: George Beban in "One
More American."
Thursday: J. Stuart Blackton in
"The World for Sale."
REWARD!
One Hundred Dollars reward will
be paid for information leading to the
arrest of the parties who entered my
pasture field between the 5th and 14th
of July and drove therefrom between
thirty and thirty-five head of cattle,
consisting of cows and yearlings.
19-6t C. P. Howell, Ocala, Fla.
many, according to a cable to his
father last night. T
. -. ; v
AMERICA HAS MADE AN OFFER
London, July 19. The Japanese
government has reached a decision
als from the United States, says &
dispatch from Tokio to the Times un under
der under date of July 13 for joint American-Japanese
intervention in Siberia.
The American proposals, the dispatch
adds, were different from those made
by Great Britain and France.
Norris Candies fresh every week at
the Court Pharmacy. Phone us and
let us send it up. 15-tf

ARBITER

T

ADMITS

OCALA, FLORIDA, Fill

D
ft
ALLIED AHACK WAS
HOT EXPECTED
Hun Officers Were Asleep and Their
Men Gathering the French
Peasants' Harvests
(Associated Press)
On the French Front in France,
July 19. French and American at attacks
tacks attacks on a broad front north of the
Marne were an absolute surprise and
many German officers were taken
while asleep and numbers of men
taken while harvesting rye. The
greatest stupefication was created
among the enemy troops by the sud suddenness
denness suddenness of the attack, prisoners de declared.
clared. declared. They had been told it was
impossible for the allies to take the
offensive for some time.
OUR SINGING ARMIES
The allied troops showed wonderful
spirits and advanced singing." At one
place an infantry battalion crossed
the river breast high in water.
ALLIES CARRY ON
Paris, July 19. Between the Aisne
and Marne rivers, despite the new ar
rivals of German reinforcements, the
Allies are making sensible progress
and capturing a large number of
prisoners, states an official announce announcement
ment announcement today.
The battle continues with violence
along the whole front between the
Marne and Aisne. A vigorous French
attack south of the Marne ejected the
enemy from the outskirts of Ocuilly.
Italian troops between Rheims and
the Marne have captured Moulin Dar Dar-dre.
dre. Dar-dre. French troops between Rheims
and the Marne have recaptured Mont Mont-voisn,
voisn, Mont-voisn, made progress in the Roi wood
and, Courton wood, capturing four
cannon and 400 prisoners.
The Herald says that more than a
hundred guns have been captured on
the Aisne and Marne front.
REGISTRANTS, TAKE NOTICE
The following named registrants of
the class of 1918 have not returned
their questionnaires. These men are
delinquents and will .be so reported
unless their questionnaires are re
turned at once.
Order No. 76 Manuel Harris,
Jacksonville, colored.
" Order No. 82 Maxwell Arnold
Bogue, Burbank, white.
Order No. 90 Joseph Lee Plair,
Gaiter, colored.
Order No. 99 James Ira Tugger Tugger-son,
son, Tugger-son, Blitchton, colored.
Order No. 127 Elbert R. Hayes,
Oak, white.
Order No.
Ocala, colored
Order No.
Ocala, white.
135 Henry Shealey,
158 Charles Nelson,
Order No. 161 Jeroel Hankerson,
Ocala, colored.
Order No. 162 Orsbon Heath,
Reddick, colored.
Local Board Marion County,
W. L. Armour, Chief Clerk.
JOIN WIN THE WAR LEAGUE
The public of Ocala is urged to join
the Win the War League. It entails
no expense whatever, and ,all loyal
American citizens, over the age of
twelve, are entitled to membership.
The Boy Scouts will call on you with
membership cards for your signature.
Please give the scouts your attention
when they call on you, and sign the
membership cards.
Publicity Committee,
Ocala Win the War League.

be IE

DAY, JULY 19, 1918.

n
IVI
ii

Have Driven a Harpoon Right Thru the Main
Line of the Huns

UNLESS THE TEUTONS CAN IMMEDIATELY CHECK TflE ALLIED
READJUST ENTIRE POSITION OF THEIR

With the American Forces on the
Aisne Front, July 19, (By the As Associated
sociated Associated Press). The American and
French forces at 1 p. m. continue to
advance their spearhead midway be between
tween between Soissons and Chateau Thierry.
The Americans took several towns
during the night.
UP TO AFTERNOON, HUNS HAD
MADE NO COUNTER ATTACK
The Americans also advanced this
morning. German reinforcements
were coming last night from the
riorth but up to early afternoon the
expefcted counter attack had not ap appeared.
peared. appeared. The Americans continue to hold the
plateau southwest of Soissons, where
the first German counter attack yes yesterday
terday yesterday was repulsed after the sever severest
est severest struggle in which American artil artillery
lery artillery participated.
EIGHT DIVISIONS WERE IN IT
Washington, July 19. Eight divis divisions
ions divisions of American troops are believed
to have been represented in the Aisne
and Marne offensive. General March
today told the House military com committee.
mittee. committee. It was stated that the pres present
ent present offensive would not hinder nor re replace
place replace the preparations for the great
allied offensive planned for later in
the year.
TOOK PRISONERS AND CANNON
Paris, July 19. ( Ha vas Agency)
The "Homme Libre" newspaper
says the number of prisoners and
guns captured are fully equivalent to
the number the Germans claim they
captured Monday. The Germans
claimed Tuesday they had captured
13,000 prisoners; did not say how
many guns. x
CUTTING LINES OF COMMUNI COMMUNICATION
CATION COMMUNICATION London, July 19. On the left wing,
which includes the Soissons sector,
the Allied troops have cut, or have
under fire, the high road from Sois Soissons
sons Soissons to Chateau Thierry, says a Reu Reu-ter
ter Reu-ter dispatch from the French front.
The railway from Soisons to Vilters
Cotterets has been cut by the Allied
advance,
American troops are unofficially re reported
ported reported as being in a position that
would put them across both the Sois Soissons
sons Soissons and Chateau Thierry high road
and the Soissons and Villers Cotteret
railway.
CAVALRY ARE ACTIVE
v
At several points, infiltration move movements
ments movements have been carried out by cav cavalry.
alry. cavalry. They advanced thru the gaps
in the retreating enemy line and
established themselves in the village
further ahead.
BOCHE LINE-UP MAY BE
BROKEN
London, July 19. The French are
again advancing according to advices
received here this afternoon, and the
Germans will probably have to make
a big readjustment of their lines un unless
less unless they can immediately throw back
the French.
PERSHING CONFIRMS IT
Washington, July 19 General Per
shing's communique for yesterday
confirms press reports of the complete
success of the Allies on the Aisne and
Marne front. The communique says
that American anoT French troops ad advanced
vanced advanced several miles, capturing many
prisoners and guns.
You never saw more attractive
prices in millinery than those to be
offered Saturday at Bostick's Millin Millinery,
ery, Millinery, corner Harrington Hall hotel. It
Our prescription department offers
you the best in PURE DRUGS and
CHEMICALS. Your doctor will tell
you. Court Pharmacy. Phone 284. 15tf

N

NPU

PiTOlli THC
uuNi lhlUlL J HE

(Associated Press)
But Whether He Does or Not, Gover Governor
nor Governor Whitman Will be
in the Race
(Associated Press)
Saratoga Springs, N. Y., July 19.
A movement to bring about the nom nomination
ination nomination of Roosevelt for governor by
the republicans of New York, took
definite form late last night when At Attorney
torney Attorney General Lewis, the chief rival
of Whitman for nomination, announc announced
ed announced he would withdraw if the colonel
became a candidate.
INTENDS TO STAY IN
Saratoga Springs, N. Y., July 19.
Governor Whitman will remain
candidate for re-nomination by the
republicans for governor whether or
not Theodore Roosevelt consents to
enter the primaries, the governor's
secretary announced today.
BRITISH ARE BUSY
(Associated Press)
- London, July 19. An official an announcement
nouncement announcement states that German raids
were repulsed along the Somme river
and the British made successful raids.
FELL IN FLAMES
(Associated Press)
Amsterdam, July 19. A zeppelin
fell in flames Monday evening at the
German frontier near Dalheim, the
Rotterdamsche Courant announces.
HANGING AT MOBILE
(Associated Press)
Mobile, Ala., July 19 Albert San Sanders,
ders, Sanders, a negro, was hanged today for
the murder of Mrs. Julia May Hess,
of Fulton, Ala. Sanders died protest protesting
ing protesting that Fisher Brocks, already hang hanged,
ed, hanged, alone was guilty of the crime.
ECONOMY SALE
. BEGINS TOMORROW
As will be seen by the advertising
announcement elsewhere in today's
Star, Hayes & Guynn will tomorrow
morning inaugurate a big special
price sale known as the Economy
Sale.
Mr. Hayes says the prices he is of offering
fering offering to sell shoes and hats for dur during
ing during the sale are real bonanzas to the
public, and he will be surprised if the
goods remain long. He says that in
many instances these goods can not
be bought today wholesale at the
prices he is making for a short time,
and that it will certainly pay the con consumer
sumer consumer to buy now, even if there is no
immediate need for them, as prices
are on the up-grade. t
During the shoe and hat sale at attractive
tractive attractive prices have also been placed
on all summer dress goods, as it is the
desire of the firm to get this line re
duced to a minimum to make room
for the new fall good3 which will
shortly be put on- display.
The special drive in ladies' low
quarter shoes is bound to prove a win winner.
ner. winner. DON'T FORGET

ROOSEVELT A

The executive committee of the
Ocala Win the War League meets to tonight
night tonight at the city council chamber. All
members are requested to be on hand
promptly at 8 o'clock.
Don't fail to see the $1.98 millinery
display at Mrs. M. A. Bostick's store,
Harrington corner, tomorrow, morn morning.
ing. morning. It
Buy War Savings Stamps.

VOL. 25, NO. 173

0
ATTACK, THEY WILL HAVE TO
ARMIES
Said Roosevelt of America in His
Speech at Saratoga
Springs
(Associated Press)
Saratoga Springs, N. Y., July 19.
Col. Roosevelt delivered a stirring
patriotic address before the republi republican
can republican state convention here yesterday.
He did not either publicly or privately
discuss state politics. His reception
was most enthusiastic, but no at
tempt was made to stampede the con convention
vention convention to nominate him for gover-
nor.
During his address Colonel Roose
velt was frequently interrupted by
applause, which reached its height
when he declared the sinking of the
Lusitania was like firing on Fort
Sumter of this war, and had the Unifi Unified
ed Unified States declared war then we would
have had a couple of million of men
across seas months ago. Russia
would never have broken and the war
would be over. Roosevelt emphasized
the necessity of electing a republican
Congress to give the administration
vigorous support and yet supervise
and investigate when necessary what
had been done.
"Peace," he said, "should be con conditioned
ditioned conditioned only on the complete over overthrow
throw overthrow of Germany."
IT WAS A GREAT PICTURE
"The Kaiser, the Beast of Berlin,"
at the Temple yesterday was a great
picture. It was an awful indictment
of the kaiser and his hordes, but
judging by the best proven incidents
of the last four years it was not over overdrawn.
drawn. overdrawn. It was certainly the best war
picture seen here yet, and was wit witnessed
nessed witnessed by large crowds. The reels
were run four times, and there were
at least three full houses, and a good
filler in between. People came from
all over the county to see it. There
were more people here from out of
town than to see any picture since
"The Birth of a Nation."
Right in the middle of the third
performance, the Star received a dis dispatch,
patch, dispatch, telling of the great French and
American victory on the Marne, and
Mr. Bennett threw the news on the
screen at the "psychological minute."
The Temple has another fine picture
today, "The Mating of Marcella,"
with Dorothy Dalton as the star. It
is a photoplay affording a fine con contrast
trast contrast between the frivolous showgirl
and sturdy types of American young
womanhood. There will also be the
ever-interesting Pathe News.
320 ACRES
Good land near Ocala. Part in culti cultivation.
vation. cultivation. Not cheap land, but the price
is right. W. W. CONDON,
19-2t 1 Ocala, Fla.
Have you bought a W. S. S. today?
- BUY
TIRES and TUBES
at
uin i
"WHV PAY MORE"
Ask for Price List

m

SHOULD HAVE HE
IN SOOH



OCALA EVENING STAB,

FRIDAY, JULY 19. 1918

OCALA EVENING STAR
Published Every Day Except HumAmy fcy
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY
OF OCALA, FLA.

R. R. Carroll, President
P. V. UiTtKHd, $ecretary-Treiirer
J. If. Beajamla, Editor
Entered at Ocala, Fla, -ostof fice as
econd-clasu matter.
TELEPHONES
BuniarM Ufffe ............. .Flre-Oae
Editorial Department . . .Two-Sev w
ttoeletr Editor Five, Doable-One
- ADVERTISING RATES
DUplayt Plate 10c. per inch for con consecutive
secutive consecutive Insertions. Alternate Inser Insertions
tions Insertions 25 per cent, additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charged on ads. that run less than
ix times 5c. per inch. Special position
20 per cent, additional. Rates based on
4-inch minimum. Less than four inches
will take, higher rate, which .will be
furnished on application.
Reading Xotleeat 5c. per line for first
insertion; 3c. per line for each srubse srubse-ruent
ruent srubse-ruent insertion. One change a -week
allowed on Teaders without extra com composition
position composition charges.
.Legal advertisements at legal rates.
Klectros must "be mounted, or charge
will be made for mounting.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Domestic
One year. In advance.........
Six months, in advance
Three months. In advance....
One month. In advance
Foreign ;
One year, in advance
Six months, in advance. ......
Three months, in adva-nce...,
One month, in advance.......
.$5.00
,. 2.50
.. 1.25
.. .50
..$8.00
4.25
. 2.25
. .80
The river Marne is proving a river
Styx for Teuton ambition.
King George recently ordered a
new suit costing only $15.
Richard, son of the late President
Cleveland, has enlisted in the marine
corps.
i
. The war industries board proposes
to ban ribbons and laces for the per period
iod period of the war.
Workers in American ship-building
yards have increased in number in
one year from 45,000 to 550,000.
am i nmm mm m
The shades of Washington and La La-Fayette
Fayette La-Fayette must have been the two best
pleased indentities in the spirit land
yesterday.
Many automobiles in New York
carry conspicuously signs reading
"Men of the service have a lift as far
as we go."
"Trench mouth" ulceration and
bleeding of the gums a new disease,
has been found in the British and
German armies. V
. Under governmental control ex express
press express drivers are forbidden to carry
trunks downstairs because of the
shortage of labor.
The Mormon church in Utah has
just turned over to the government
its wheat reserve of 250,000 bushels,
collected from tithes.
Tailors in some sections of the
country are making a specialty of
turning men's suits inside out, as a
war economy measure. v
Frank H. Buhl, the millionaire steel
magnate who died recently, left $2,-1
nnn nn x Al 'I
uuu,uuu w war suuerers in nuruierii
France and Belgium.
Daniel Willard, president of the
Baltimore & Ohio railroad, says his
theory of success is that he ; always
tried to suit his employer.
Thirty thousand women and girls of
Austria have been driven by hunger
to join the labor battalions working
near the Austrian front.
Wall street financiers are raising
millions of dollars to provide for the
cultivation of 16,000 acres of wheat
land on our Indian reservations.
To prevent heavy emigration after
the war, Germany has passed a law
taxing all those leaving Germany 20
per cent of their capital or property
holdings. '; . ..3
Equal pay for equal work done by
women filling the places of men in
war industries has been announced as
a policy of the army ordnance de department.
partment. department.
-v : :
Some boys who were burning a
mattress thrown out of a Brooklyn
house uncovered $1800 sewed inside
it by its former owner who died
shortly before.
Japan is now printing text books
for California schools and making
bats for; American baseball 'teams,
because these industries are not pro protected
tected protected by our tariff.
A cargo of peanuts saved a ship
from sinking recently when subma submarined
rined submarined off the Atlantic coast. The pea peanuts
nuts peanuts swelled, filled the bomb holes "and
hept the ship afloat.
The decrease in births and the in increase
crease increase in civilian population in Ger Germany
many Germany has assumed alarming propor proportions.
tions. proportions. Next year Germany will be
seven million persons below normal
number, counting the three million
lost in war.
Loyal farmers in Oklahoma recent recently,'
ly,' recently,' commandeered 27 wagon loads of
wheat from a pacifist farmer, sold the
wheat, celebrated with a banquet, de-

ducted the cost of the latter from the
proceeds of the sale, bought $300
worth of Liljerty Bonds and turned
the balance over to the slacker. In
Oklahoma this is called "the cooling
process."
AMERICAN COURAGE

It's the Star's opinion that Amer American
ican American courage will win the war.
It is not that we believe that the
American is braver than the French Frenchman,
man, Frenchman, the Briton, the Belgian, the Ital Italian,
ian, Italian, or even the German. Men could
not show more courage than those
who had fought and suffered two
years and a half before we entered
the war.
The courage that will make the
American win the war will be the
courage of confidence. His Entente
comrades will have the same courage,
because he brought it to them. They
have, the high courage that prefers
death with honor to life without it,
but no doubt until American began to
develop her full might, they were
very fearful of the result. And with
all their courage, they are very weary.
Some of them haven't been able to
keep from feeling that nothing mat matters
ters matters any more. ."..
The American army krows that
with an aroused and united country
behind it that all the powers of evil
cannot prevail against it. Our sol soldiers
diers soldiers realize the task before them.
They know they can perform the task,
and they want to do the work thor thoroughly
oughly thoroughly and go back home.
How different is the state of mind
of the German soldier.
The Hun has learned what he is up
against. He has fought and fought
and fought for four long years. He
has seen or heard of victories in other
parts of the world, but on the west western
ern western front that inexorable rampart of
French and British steel has unfail unfailingly
ingly unfailingly barred his way, and he has al always
ways always known that until it is broken
victories elsewhere were useless.
And now he knows the rampart is
rising higher and soon it will roll
forward and over him.
The German soldier is not so dense
as many people make him out to be.
He is educated and he knows some something
thing something about America. He knows it is
a much greater nation than his own.
He may have believed that America
was cowardly, that it was divided,
that it couldn't send soldiers to the
front. But he is finding otit he has
been mistaken in all these tilings, and
as soon as he fully finds it out despair
will enter his heart.'
The American isn't tired and he
doesn't know what despair is. He
knows that man for man he is as good
as anybody; he knows that the. full
power of his great country is behind
him; he knows his home folks are
safe, and he knows that if he falls to today,
day, today, tomorrow two other Americans
will take his place. He has not the
experience of his veteran comrade
nor his veteran enemies. But he has
something that is better at this-stage
of the game. He knows he is going
to win.
The time isn't far when that line
from Switzerland to the sea is going
to recede toward Berlin, and once it
begins to recede it will move faster
and faster. The Allies will make
gaps in it here and there, the pieces
will begin to tangle, the Boche will
find out it is safe to surrender, and
he will surrender by thousands and
tens of thousands democracy will
triumph and autocracy will go down
in everlasting defeat.
It has been suggested that the Ger German
man German fleet will come out, break thru
the Allied cordon and start on a
world-raid. If it does, where will it
go? At the very utmost, no ship can
carry coal to steam on, under easy
draft, more than a month and war warships
ships warships would use up all they could
carry in less than two weeks. Once
out of coal they would be helpless,
and every port in the world where
they could obtain fuel is either con controlled
trolled controlled or hemmed in by their ene
mies. Neither could they do any great
harm, for no sooner would they be
out before convoys and merchant
ships in the Atlantic would be run running
ning running for cover, which they could ob obtain
tain obtain a long time before the Germans
could reach them. Meantime, the
Allied warships, supplied with coal
from every quarter of the compass,
would be hard on their heels. .When
German cruisers did so much harm at
the beginning of the war, they were
supplied with coal from ships sent
out to meet them before the war -began
also, they had neutral ports to
run into, but neither is available now.
If the German fleet comes out, it will
be to engage in desperate battle with
a naval force twice its size, and if the
Germans had any hope of winning
such a fight they would have made
the attempt long ago.
On the other hand, the Ocala Star,
conservative and correct in about eve
ry position it assumes, takes the other
view of the subject. Miami Herald.
A few more like this and we will
become too conceited to talk to our our-self.
self. our-self. f i
The following from the Tampa
Times will be of interest to people of
Marion county, where Willie Cham Chambers
bers Chambers was born: "Wm. B. Chambers,
son of W. J. Chambers, who went out
with the first drafted men Sept 19 to
Camp Jackson, has been commissioned-
as first lieutenant and sent to Lon Lonoke,
oke, Lonoke, Ark., where he will be conserva conservation
tion conservation and reclamation officer in full
charge of that work in the camp. The
camp is one of the aviation fields. Mr.
Chambers goes from private to lieu lieutenant
tenant lieutenant without any intermediate
steps except for a short stay in the

training camp at Camp Jackson. The
usual course in training for this work
is six weeks, but Mr. Chambers had
finished the work in three and was
sent to camp at the end of that time,
showing that he must have been an
apt pupiL"
London newspapers demand the re recall
call recall of British officers who are in the
United States engaged in various
missions who may disregard the mil military
itary military conventions of this country.
The suicide of a wealthy merchant
of Tokio has unearthed a graft scan scandal
dal scandal that is setting Japan by the ears.
Seven ,have hanged themselves to
avoid "investigation" and 100 persons
have been arrested.

Every company of American sol soldiers
diers soldiers abroad is allowed to adopt one
war orphan. The total cost to each
soldier is 25 cents a month. Each
company is enthusiastically doing its
share.
The proper one to appreciate a
propaganda is a propagoose. Times Times-Union.
Union. Times-Union. :
If they will teach the foregoing in
the schools the next forty years, it
may prevent another world war.
The Times-Union thinks there is
danger of the pineapple industry be becoming
coming becoming extinct. This would be a
great pity, as pineapples are among
the most delicious of fruit and those
raised in Florida, like the oranges,
are probably the best in the world.
Business men in Germany, former
Ambassador Gerard says, urge on the
war as they hope to be saved from
ruin by large indemnity and by de destroying
stroying destroying our carrying trade. Mr.
Gerard declares that if our anti -trust
law is not repealed his country will
not be able, after the war, to compete
with German economic schemes.
"DIXIE"
The South's Gift of Music to the
Fighting World
As our first ten thousand sailed out
of harbor for their unknown port in
France, so the published Story goes,
it was "Dixie" that broke the tense tenseness
ness tenseness of the final moments and stirred
the crowd to heart-ease and to cheers.
First there was "Tipperary," rais raised
ed raised by a blithe young soldier voice as
if to break the heavy portent of dra dramatic
matic dramatic understanding that threatened
to overwhelm the waiting crowd. But
"Tipperary" would not do. 'It was
the marching song of English boys
too newly dead to be forgotten. It
but added to the strain. v
There was a silence, then a quaint
note or two, with that breath-catching
pause that we know so well, then
a whirling uplift of quick melody, and
the ship's band had burst into the
ringing strains of "Dixie."
It was that same "Dixie" that Lin Lincoln
coln Lincoln proclaimed a national, possession
when he had it played by the govern government
ment government band in Washington on the fate fateful
ful fateful day of Lee's surrender. It is lov loved
ed loved by Americans, north and south. It
now bids fair to encircle the earth.
This was the South's battle song of
the sixties. It tells the story of he heroic
roic heroic armies long ago dissolved, and
of blood-red banners furled these
many years. It Stirs the heart to
memory and to tears.
Yet it is not a martial air. We do
not stand to its strains, nor do we
uncover when it is played. It is in intimate
timate intimate and human, filled less .with
grandeur than with joy. It is more
than a war song, it is the heart song
of the South, j
It is our song of childhood and soft
lullabies, of youth, and pride, and
happiness. ; It holds the perfume of
magnolia and of jessamine. It is ten tender
der tender with the sound of the south wind
blowing through long moss. It is vi vibrant
brant vibrant with the rustle of- palmetto
leaves, and sweet with the melody of
slave voices singing in the cotton and
the cane.
In the heart of its lightness, it car carries
ries carries the patriotism and sacrifice of
splendid youth, the eternal young young-ness
ness young-ness of our long-gone heroes. Its
strains defy regret and grief. They
bring to us, through many years, the
spirit of' a generation that held to
the joy of life even in the midst of
desolation and defeat. In their mel melody,
ody, melody, the dauntless hope of such youth
lives again.
"Dixie" is the home song of a brave
and lovely land. It holds no bitter bitterness,
ness, bitterness, it makes no plea. It goes
straight from heart to heart.
And now, of this dear southern song
of ours, we make a gift to the armies
of our allies across the seas. It will
take to them something of the same
exultant eagerness that it always
brings to us. It will carry to them
also a message from the south more
full of truth and meaning than any
that mere history can teach. Annie
Rankin, in Southern Woman's Maga Magazine.
zine. Magazine.
Have you bought a W. S. S. today?
. BUY
TIRES AND TUBES
AT
i
win
"WHY PAY MORE"
Ask for Price List V

iCfll

UULUI

IU

LANGARTH'S JOB
By VINCENT G. PERRY.

V. ........... . ..... .4
(Copyright, ISIS, by the McClure .Newspa
per synaicaie.)
It was one of the quietest seaside
resorts in existence and Murray Lan Lan-garth
garth Lan-garth fully realized this, as he sat on
the beach and stretched, lazily. The
place was almost deserted of male, but
there were plenty of ladies, old and
young. There was no consolation for
Murray in that, though, for he had
made a grave mistake, his first week,
by writing a story about the Indecent
bathing suits and hoop-skirts. It made
a great story, but after that It was all
the more difficult to get news, and for
a time Murray took it to heart, but
then he met June Thompson, the only
girl who really counted, and she was
not long In showing him that the opin opinion
ion opinion of the others didn't count with her.
As Murray sat on the beach, hoping
something would, happen to make a
!short news item at least, he heard a
light step behind him and turned to
meet the laughing gaze of June.
"Oh, you look so doleful I" she laugh laughed.
ed. laughed. "Smile, Murray, smile 1 If you
knew how a frown Ill-becomes you, you
would never let those wrinkles stay in
your forehead for an Instant. What
is the trouble?"
Murray tried to smile as he confessed
the grave outlook.
"Let's see if we.can't make a story,"
she suggested, as she spread out her
skirt and sat down beside him. They
put their heads together and planned
for nearly half an hour, stopping now
and then to indulge in a laugh. With
a last word of instruction she left him
and starred out toward the dock.
Murray looked after her longingly.
Heavens I He couldn't swim well
enough to rescue 1 anyone What a
dough-head he had been!
The thought paralyzed him for the
moment, but he recovered sufficiently
jto jump to his feet and race after June.
She was not in sight, but he knew she
would wait for him before she fell off
the dock into the water, as they had
arranged. The plan 'would have to go
now and with It the story. Wasn't
there someone else who could rescue
her nobody he could trust. What if
she fell in at his approach, before he
had an opportunity to warn her not to?
That was exactly what she did and he
gave a gasp as he saw her topple off
the dock the minute he hove in sight.
There was only one thing to do, and he
did it, but he forgot that as he struck
out feebly for the spot where June had
gone down for the third time. He
couldn't support her long he knew, but
it was better to die with her than live
without her. Something was keeping
them up. What was it?' June enlight enlightened
ened enlightened him.
"I thought you could swim better
than this," she panted, for she had
swallowed a great deal of water to
make the rescue realistic "You're
fagged out, but I can swim well enough
to keep us both up."
Murray 'was able to help a little, but
June was a remarkable swimmer and
willing hands helped them when they
reached the dock. A crowd had col collected
lected collected in that brief time and the first
person Murray's eyes lit on when he
put his foot on firm ground was Mc
Nulty, a reporter for the Tribune, the
rival sheet,
"Don't say anything about this,
Mac," he was able to gasp.
"Leave It to me," was MaCs answer.
The next morning the Tribune had a
full account of it. There was nothing
to do but go home and then get out of
the city as soon as he could. He would
have to see une before lie lef t hei
owed it to her.
With head In the air he made his
way to the Thompson summer cottage.'
June was there to welcome him. Her
father wasn't going to deny her that
privilege at any rate.
"Oh, Murray, Isn't It terrible," were
her first words.
"The Tribune write-up was the true
one, though."
"True 1 Who said it was true?"
"Why Murray began, but a step
behind him and a warning glance
caused him to stop and face a stout
man. It was June's father. He had
not seen the Tribune, that was appar apparent
ent apparent by his smile, Murray felt.
"This Is Mr. Langarth, daddy," June
smiled her sweetest.
"So this Is the brave young man
who saved your life, dear," Mr. Thomp Thompson
son Thompson said, as he grasped Murray's hand.
"But you have seen the write-up in
the Tribune?" Murray asked, doubt doubtfully.
fully. doubtfully. "Yes, and I think It's one of the
worst pieces of spite work I have ever
seen. Nobody will believe It,"
"I'm afraid they will, sir. I think It
will mean I have lost my position."
"Never mind, Murray," June said as
she linked his arm with her, "daddy
is the managing editor of a much big bigger
ger bigger paper than either the Journal or
Tribune, and he is going to give you a
good position, aren't you, daddy?"
"But Murray began.
"June and I have talked it over, and
she will tell you all about it."
Hawalians Fish by Torchlight.
Torchlight fishing off the Walkiki
shore Is a nightly feature with the
Hawaiian and Japanese residents of
that district, the flares of a score of
lights Illuminating the shallow waters
where the fishers men, women and
children spear squids or octopii, weke
and other toothsome fishes. This
method was "used a generation ago by
the Hawalians. It was one of the chief
ways by which a native supplied his
home with fish, and is today being used
by many as a source of getting fresh
fish for their tables.

A.HLJ T OsE R I E

Passanger
W.
4tua rr the.
UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT
MOV
long and Short Hauling
WHETE STAR
17 miles to the

line. The best SIX cylender car
in the world, under $2,000. One
Five Passenger the latest model
and relinments in stock for im- y
mediate delivery. Price
Freight and War Tax included.
E. CAEMdDLIL, Uteata
Ocala, Florida.

S II$
UNIVESITY OF FLORIDA
Gainesville ;
Military Training Under Army Officers
Courses in Arts and Sciences, Ag Agriculture,
riculture, Agriculture, Chemical, Civil, Electric and
Mechanical Engineering, Law, Teach Teachers'
ers' Teachers' College.
Tuition Free. Send for Catalog.
A. A. MUKPHREE, President

A DOLLAR W ASTED HELPS THE ENEMY
That is not a loyal thing to do, of course, and few of us realize
that we are helping the enemy when we waste money. Pretty bard
to define what waste is. One man's waste may be another man's
economy. In a general way, waste in war time may be defined as the
buying of anything net essential to Tiealth and efficiency. Every
dollar one spends for unnecessary things commands goods and ser services,
vices, services, that is, labor and materials, needed by the United States Gov Government
ernment Government for war purposes. And, if you invest the money you save)
in War Savings Stamps, you are again helping by loaning your mon money
ey money to your Government, v
Ocala Ice & PacMogj Co.

TEE WSNBSOU HOTEL
JACKSONVILLE, FLO RID A

A: -Ji -;--' t
m"Zr" ';

In the heart of the city with Hem ming Park for a front yard.
Every moaern convenience in each room. Dining room service ii
3con' to none.
EATES From $1.50 per day per person to $6.
ROBERT M. MEYER, J. K A VAN A UGH
Proprietor," v Htnf rr

Read theStar Want Ads. It pays

-A BEACON TO MOTORISTS
Who wish to escape from the high
cost of tire upkeep is offered by our
tire repairing service. We can dou double
ble double the life of a weakened or blown blown-out
out blown-out casing for little money. Before
you accept an unfair adjustment on a
tire, come in and get our price for re repairing
pairing repairing it. v
BLAIOCK BROTHERS
VULCANIZING
PHONE 78 107 OKLAWAHA

and Baygsgc T.
I N G
Storage and Packing
LINE
PHONE
2H5
gallon of gaso
:i:
lit
:i:
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:i:
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FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE
FOR women;
Tallahassee
559 Students from 25 Florida Coun Counties
ties Counties and 17 States 1917-18. Total 951
including Summer School and Short
Course.
Write at once for Catalog.
EDWARD CONRADI, President



OCALA EVENING STAR, FRIDAY, JULY 19. 1918

V

OCAIA SOCIAL
If Yoo Hare Any News for this De Department,
partment, Department, Call Five Doable-One
mr Two-Seven

A Lay of Longing
The day is a golden glamour,
And the emerald of the sod, 5
As it stretches its coolness round me,
Where the morning breeze has found
me,
Lies fresh from the hand of God.
The night is a silver silence,
And the starlight, dim and pale,
As it sleeps o'er the dreaming river,
Where the white-robed aspens quiver,
Gleams soft as a bridal veil veil-Yes,
Yes, veil-Yes, the day is a golden glamour,
And the night is a silence, dear;
But the sunbeam's glance would be
-. : fleeter
And the silent stars the sweeter
For the light of your) presence here!
Lewete B. Pollock.

Red Cross Work
The workers at the Red Cross
rooms Thursday morning were Mrs.
Jones, Misses Stella, Nina, Nettie and
Carita Camp, Mrs. A. T. Thomas,
Mrs. M. G. Chambers, Mrs. J. A. Bou Bou-vier,
vier, Bou-vier, Mrs. H. B. Baxter, Misses Susie
Lou and Hannay Ellis, Mrs. R. R.
Todd, Miss Moeta Todd, Mrs. C. L.
Bittinger, Mrs. W. J. Cotton, Mrs. F.
T. Schreiber, Mrs. Stovall, Mrs. J. R.
Dewey, Mrs. Van Engleken, t Misses
Annie Rooney, ; Lucile Gissendaner,
Ruth Simmons, Ullaine Barnett, Mrs.
A. G. Gates, Mrs. W, W. Clyatt, Mrs.
L. E. Warner, Mrs. J. T. Lancaster,
Miss Theo Wallis, Mrs. J. E. F ramp ramp-ton,
ton, ramp-ton, Miss Lejla Frampton, MisS Leo Leonora
nora Leonora Colby, Mrs. E. W. Merrill, Miss
Ruth Rentz, Mrs. George Rentz and
Mrs. Smith Hardin.

.
Mr. William ; Hocker returned to
.Indian Rocks this morning to join his
family who are summering there.
:.;
Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Howell came
in from their home at Lowell yester yesterday
day yesterday afternoon to witness the picture
at the Temple.
; : .. ''
" :- .
Mr. and Mrs. Way Shockley -and
daughters, Misses Annie and Kathar Katharine
ine Katharine of Lowell, were shoppers in the
city yesterday.
' Mrs. R. E. Downs, who has been
spending several months in. Pennsyl Pennsylvania,
vania, Pennsylvania, has returned to Florida and is
now with Mr. Downs at Summerfield.
' Mr. A. B. Efird of Leesburg is in
the city the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
- Louis Duval, 'coming especially to at attend
tend attend the funeral of Judge William A.
Hocker.
''; ''-VA
Mrs. Ida Smith and Mr. and Mrs.
Junius Flewellen motored to the city
from Mcintosh yesterday and spent
the day with friends, attending the
picture show" in the afternoon..

Mr. and Mrs. Sylvan McElroy of

Orlando, are spending the week-end
at Daytona Beach, going over espe especially
cially especially to secure a cottage for the
month of September. Mrs. McElroy
and son will spend" the month of Au August
gust August with her parents;; Mr. and Mrs.

John Dozier in this city and Mrs.
Dozier will probably spend at least a
part of September at the beach with
her daughter.
Picnic Supper at Silver Springs
This evening promises to be a very
happy one for the young society set
who are planning a most enjoyable
outing at the springs. The party will
go to the springs in the late after afternoon,
noon, afternoon, and at six o'clock a delicious
spread will be enjoyed. After supper
a swim and dance will be the attrac attractions.'."
tions.'." attractions.'." -V::-
Those invited to this party, which
has been arranged especially in honor
of a charming visiting girl, Miss
Mary Pace of Albany, Ga., are Misses
Ethel and Elizabeth Home, Virginia

Beckham, Sara Pearl Martin, Margu Marguerite
erite Marguerite Edwards, Loureen Spencer, Hel Helen
en Helen Jones, Mary Pace, Sarah Dehon
and Lynn Sanders, Holmes Walters,
William Long, Tom Wallis, Hansel
Leavengood, Paul Brinson, John
Batts, Marshall Cam, James and Bob
Chace, Charles Cullen, George Loon-

ey, Wellie and Rosco Meffert, Hugh
Geiger, Thelbert Troxler, Foy Car Carroll
roll Carroll and William Avery.
A health clinic has just been held
at the University of Florida, under
the direction of Dr. Byrd and other
noted physicians. The Woman's Club
of Gainesville also took an important
part in xf orwarding the work. Miss
Nellie Stevens returned yesterday
from Gainesville, where she was in

attendance upon the clinic, and where

she delivered a series of health les lessons
sons lessons in the school. .Medical inspec inspection
tion inspection of school children has been a
batter of great importance brought
before the public, and Drs. Winthrop
of Washington and Small of Boston,
lectured before the student body yes

terday.

11 U M i f? W U II V

ma
"WAX. SAYINGS
.ISSUED BY THE.
UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT

NOW is the time for all good patriotic citizens to
. economize. This may be done in many ways, but
in no wav can savins' be more effectively accomplished

than ECONOMY in your purchased of SHOES and HATS.
That's where we propose to help by reducing prices. Our BIG
ECONOMY SALE will begin on

0 oy

WW

mm

LIFE

FIRE

A. E. GERIG
INSURANCE
.
Ocala, Florida
ACCIDENT AUTOMOBILE

, BULLETIN

Sxnoited Sausage in oil
Sliced Breakfast Bacon
Chipped Dried Beef
Minced Ham
Salomi
American Swiss Cheese

New York State Cheese

Iimtraroer Cheese (call

it what yen please;)

Philadelphia Cream

Cheese

Camembert Cheese
Brick Cheese
Phones 16 & 174

Mr. and Mrs. John Dozier received

a most interesting letter yesterday

from their errandadughter, Cornelia

Dozier, at Manhattan, Kan. Cornelia

says, "One day it's hot and the next
day cold as ice. Today my feet are
frozerf." She says Dr. Dozier is now
at Camp Funston. His assistant at
the camp has already been called over

seas-and Dr. Dozier thinks it possible

that he may soon follow. In this case,

Mrs. Dozier and children will m all

probability spend the coming winter

in Ocala.

Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Lummus and

daughter, Frances and nephew, Fred
Winer, left last night in Mr. Lum

mus' car 4 for a short visit to Miami.
After a few days in the Magic City,

the party will return home, accom

panied by Mr. Lummus' son. Marion

Lummus, who has been the guest of

relatives there for several weeks.

Mrs. R. L. Harper left last night
for Jacksonville, where she will be

the guest of her daughter, Mrs. M,

B. Newman, wife of Capt.' Newman,
fleet paymaster in the U. S. navy.

Mrs. Newman is spending a short

while in Jacksonville, after which she

will' accompany her mother: to this

city for an indefinite visit.

- Mrs. L. L. Bow, chairman of child's

welfare work in Lake county, who

has been attending the child's wel welfare
fare welfare clinic held at the university at
Gainesville, will arrive in Ocala today
and will be the week-end guest of Mr.
and Mrs. B. H. Seymour.

Mr. and Mrs. Chandler Yonge of
Apopka, who have been visiting
friends in Williston and Anthony, are i
it. r Hr.1 m'r. Orn I

II UW cut; guests ui nxx. aiiu xrxxs. jjjjcii-
cer of North Ocala; driving through
in their car. Next week they will be

guests of Mr. and Mrs. II. B. Baxter.

- -. i- m m m i-.--
Mr. and Mrs. Seipp of Buffalo, N.

Y., have taken the residence formerly

occupied by Mr. Zewadski and fam family
ily family on Oklawaha avenue, and will oc occupy
cupy occupy the same at an eariy day. Mr.
Seipp has a position in the Commer

cial Bank.

The classes under, the instruction' of

Dr. Moermen, Mrs. D. W. Tompkins
and Mrs. J. H. Holcomb are requested
to meet at the Methodist church to tonight
night tonight at 8 o'clock to practice for de decision
cision decision day.

": ..'"
Mr. and Mrs, Lanier, Mr. Hanson

and Mrs. Spicer, prominent residents
of Leesburg and old friends of the

Hocker family, attended the funeral

of Judge Hocker in this city yester

day.

yi JL We cannot enumerate all of the splendid values we are offering
fJX during this ECONOMY SALE, but name only a few of our lead-
ers. Other prices throughout our store are equally attractive.
One Lot Men's Straw Hate, One Lot Men's Tan Oxfords, One Lot Ladies' Hats, One Lot Ladies' White Canyas
Worth Up to $3.50, Worth $7.00, Worth Up to $2.50, ; Pumps, Worth $i25,
SALE PKICE SALE PRICE SALE PRICE SALE PRICE
49 Cents I $5.88 98 Cents gL7
One Lot Men's Felt Hats, One Lot Men's" Black Gun Metal One Lot Ladies' Hats, One Lot Ladies' WTiifcr Canvas
Worth Up to $4.00, Oxfords, Worth $4.50, Worth Up to $5.00, High Top Shoes, Worth $30
SALE PRICE SALE PRICE SALE PRICE SALE PRICE
$2.98 g2.88 02.98
1 One Lot Men's Oxford Shoes, One Lot Men's Elk Shoes, One Lot Ladies' Leather Bottom, One Lot Ladies' High Top Canvas
Worth $4.50 to $5.00, Worth $4.00, Cloth Top Shoes, Worth $2, Shoes, Worth $3.00,
SALE PRICE SALE PRICE SALE PRICE SALE PRICE
83.98 1 MM $2.49-
One Lot Men's Oxfords, One Lot Men's Silk Hats, Ladies' Patent and Kid Pumps, One Lot Men's Canvas Oxfords,
Worth $6.00, Worth $1.00, Worth Up to $5.00, Worth $20,
SALE PRICE SALE PRICE SALE PRICE SALE PRICE
$4.98 I 49 Cents $3.98 $11,98
One Lot Men's Gun Metal Shoes, One Lot Ladies' Oxfords, One Lot CWldren's Tan and Black One Lot Ladian and Black
Worth $3.23, Worth $2.50 to $4.00. Play Oxfords, WTorth $2.50, Pumps, Worth $5.00,
SALE PRICE SALE PRICE SALE PRICE SALE PRICE
$2.49 $1.98 $1.98 1 $2.g9
This is no "Going: out of Business,,, "Removal" or Jhr
other catch-penny proposition, but our Spring and
yV. Summer goods must begin to clear P
( out to make room for late summer 0y
VK and fall goods. If real values at very rjf O
vs. moderate prices will move them,
V they will go in a Jiurry at our
ECONOMY SALE Figures. 1 L J

OCALA,

ATTRACTIVE PR1GES ON ALL LINES OF DRY GOODS AND LAP1ES READY-TO-WEAR

Rwmm

mm

v7 -mi

OCALA,
FLA.

THE WEEKLY STAR AND
THRICE-A-WEEK NEW YORK
W6RLD ONE YEAR $25

: buy

7

TIRES and TUBES
AT
wtn
"WHY PAY MORE"
Ask for Price List

.

Mrs. Todd and daughter, Miss
Rexie Todd,; Mrs. E. A. Osborne and
Mr.. Archibald McNeil Withers form formed
ed formed a pleasant party spending the day
in Orlando today.

Miss Isabel Mays will arrive in

Ocala today and will be the week-end

guest of Mrs. G. W. Martin. Miss

Mays is one of the instructors at the

summer school in Gainesville.

y Mrs. W. A. Hocker will be the

guest of Mr. and Mrs. F. R. Hocker
for several days. She will probably
spend the summer with relatives in

Virginia. ;

, The children of the Methodist Sun

day school who are practicing for

children's day exercises will please

meet at the church this afternoon a

4:30 o'clock and tomorrow morning at

9 o'clock.

Mr. and Mrs. Gamble will leave
Monday for Sanf ord for an extended

visit to their daughter.

The value and need of a newspaper

in the household was never greater

than at the present time. We have

been forced to enter the great world
war, and a large army of ours is al

ready in France. You will want to

have all the news from our troops on

European battlefields.

No other combination of newspap

ers at so small a j)rice will furnish

such prompt and accurate news 01

these world-shaking events, it is not

necessary to say more.

We offer the Weekly Star and the

Thrice-a-Week New York World to

gether for one year for $2.25. Don t
ask for credit on this proposition. Ad

dress Ocala Weekly Star, ucaia, x? la.

(Concluded on Fourth Page)

Mr. Claude Lippincott of Electra,
were in Ocala Monday intending to
volunteer for the navy. We wish them
good luck.
Most of the canning club girls are
busy canning tomatoes this week.
Miss Annie Sellers returned home
Monday afternoon after spending a
pleasant visit with relatives at Belle Belle-view.
view. Belle-view. Quite a crowd from here attended
church Sunday at Electra. The serv

ices were conducted by the pastor,
Rev. Boatwright of Lake Kerr.
Miss Frances Marsh of Electra was
a visitor of Miss Alma Fort Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Fort, Mrs. Jim
Fort and Mrs7L. D. Marsh were visi

tors of 'Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Griggs

Sunday.

WANTED FOR LIMITED

MILITARY SERVICE

MOSS BLUFF

Moss Bluff, July 18. Mrs. Caro

line Moorhead, our county demon demonstration
stration demonstration agent of Ocala, was over last

Monday afternoon among the canning
club girls. We were glad she came,
but sorry she couldn't stay any longer

with us.

Mrs. Tom GriErsrs and little son,

Thornton were guests of Mrs. Oliver

Fort Tuesday afternoon.
Mr. Ben Vaughn was a caller Sun Sunday
day Sunday at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Oli Oliver
ver Oliver Fort.
Mrs. Earl Green and children are
visiting relatives at Cornell for a
couple of weeks or more.
ATf niivpr Fnrt and Mr. IL P.

Griggs carried a carload of peas to
pears apiece to Ocala Monday to sell
Mr! understand Mr. George Brant
Jr., Mr. Oscar Lippincott and brother,

The following types of white men,
Qualified for limited military service,

are wanted, to be engaged in the pro

duction of spruce for airplanes in tne

great northwest woods:

. Fallersjor timber cutters exper experienced
ienced experienced in the falling of timber. Head

loaders (men experienced in loading

cars by machinery). While men quali qualified
fied qualified for general military service may
also volunteer from classes two, three
and four. ;
For further information apply to
the local board.
NOTICE

Is now a universally acknowledged necessity. No business man is
prepared to meet the daily affairs of his business if. he is not pro protected
tected protected with

FIRE INSURANCE

We represent not only the best fire insurance companies, but
also the highest class INDEMNITY AND BONDING concerns in
the world. Talk is over with as.

D. H. DAVIS, Hdc?mu. OCALA, FLA.

miiniuttm

NOTICE

The annual 'meeting of the Clark Clark-son
son Clark-son Hardware Co. will be held at the
office in Ocala, Fla. July 27, 1918.
F. E. Wetherbeej
17-tf Secretary and Treasurer.'

In the Circuit Court of Marlon County,
Florida In Chancery.
T. T. Munroe, et al. Complainants, vs.
' W. E. DIcken et al. Defendants.
The complainants having filed a
sworn bill fn this cause alleging that
they believe there are certain persons
interested In the property Involved
herein whose names axe unknown to
them, and having demanded this order
and otherwise complied with the law.
all parties claiming Interests in the
property hereinafter described under

j. T. Elliott, Jr., deceased, or nnder

wm. J. iveun, aeceasea. or unaer

Spencer M. Nah, deceased, or other-

est in said property situate in Marion

county, iriorwa. io-wu:

N of neVL lying west of the Ocala

ana xrunneuon puoiic roaa;

Sw'i of ne14'west of the Ocala ana

Lmnnexion puoiic roaa; tu i c"uu
c itnm.iin 1 -t mnx'i'n ran vet 21 east:

Sar4 of se o section 23, township
15 south, range 21 east;
West 158 acres of n of Perpall

Grant lying east or ucaia ana s"
Grove hard road and being in section
25. otherwise described as: that part

of Ocala and Shady Grove hard road,

in section 25, township 1$ south, range

x eas, io-wu: commencing &i iss
northwest corner of said grant, toeing
the westernmost point of said grant In
section 26, township 16 south, range 21
east, thence north 55 degrees, east

cnains, tnence sou in b degree,
east 10 chains, thence west 55 degrees,
south 41.25 chains, north 25 degrees,
w.iil An Vi al-n, t r rvnlnt of bS'lnnJnBr.

all In section 25, township 15 south,
range 21 east.
And each of them be and they art
hereby required to appear to the bill
of complaint heretofore filed in this
cause on the
5th day A u groat, 1918,
the same being a rule day.
It la further ordered that this order

te published once a week for twelve
(12) consecutive weeks in the Ocala
Evening Star, a newspaper publlshea
in said county and state.
Witness my hand and the seal of
said court at Ocala. Florida, this the
25th day of April, 191S.
(Seal) P. IL NUGENT,
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Marlon
County, Florida,
By Ruth Ervln, D. C.
HOCKER & MARTIN.
Complainants Solicitors. 4-2-TRT
NurmaUsnCanesfiresh every
week at Gerigs Drug Store, where
you can also get Thrift Stamps, tf



OCALA EVENING STAB, FRIDAY, JULY 19. 1918

I

IB

Miss Ruth Ervin has received the
welcome news that her brother, Carl Carlton,
ton, Carlton, has arrived in France.
Messrs. Edwin Spencer and F. B.
Terrell of Lakeland arrived in Ocala
yesterday and are stopping at the
Colonial.
News comes that Clarence Meffert
has been ordered to Camp Mills,
which probably means that Clarence
will soon be added to the troubles of
the kaiser.
Careful prescription service, using
Squibb's chemicals, at Gerig's Drag
Store. War Saving and Thrift
Stamps sold. tf
Roy Luckie, a former Ocala boy,
has been heard from again. He is
now at Camp Morrison and has gain gained
ed gained promotion since his entry into the
service, as supply sergeant for his
company.
Messrs. W. W. Stripling and J. C.
Jackson leftthis morning in Mr.
Stripling's car for DeLand. Mr. Strip Stripling
ling Stripling will visit his family until Monday
and Mr: Jackson will go on down the
coast.
Those $2.98 hats that will be on dis display
play display at Mrs. M. A. Bostick's Millinery
Store tomorrow are worthy your at attention
tention attention if you are inclined to save
money on seasonable millinery. It
Sergeant B. R. Leigh of Jackson Jacksonville
ville Jacksonville is somewhere in France. He is
a brother of the popular traveling
man, Sam Leigh, and is well known to
many of our people, being for some
years a member of the Crystal River
Drug Co.
Phone No. 451 is the American
Restaurant, Temple & Davis, proprie proprietors,
tors, proprietors, the best in the city, at the union
passenger station. 16-tf
The many Ocala friends of John
and Walter Kaiser, who grew up
here, will be interested to learn thav
both are now in the American army
in France. John has been "over there"
since May, while Walter went over in
June. While "Johnny," as his Ocala
friends called him, is only 18 years
old, he could no longer resist the call
of his country, and is connected with
the motor truck service at the front.
Buy Thrift Stamps of us and keep
your skin nice and soft with RexaU
Skin Soap. Gerig's Drug Store, tf
Kenneth MacKay, Paul Brinson,
Hansel Leavengood, Thelbert Troxler
and Foy Carroll are home from At Atlanta,
lanta, Atlanta, where they took examination
for the navy. MacKay and Brinson
were accepted and came home to
await orders. Leavengood and Troxler
were not accepted in the departments
in which they applied for service.
They will try again soon. Carroll was
not quite able to measure up to the
physical standard, but hopes to get
v in when he is a few months older.
Those $2.98 hats that will be on dis display
play display at Mrs. M. A. Bostick's Millinery
Store tomorrow are worthy your at attention
tention attention if you are inclined to save
money on seasonable millinery. It
Among the interested viewers of
"The Kaiser" yesterday, was Mrs.
Krago, who lives north of the city,
and is one of the Star's best friends.
Mrs. Krago paid the Star a pleasant
call and told us she had just received
' a cheerful letter from her son, Ar Arthur
thur Arthur Krago, now on the battle front
in. France. His letter indicated he had
been "strictly in it." Arthur is a fine
young man and a graduate of our
high school. His mother is justly
proud of him, and for all the danger
she is glad he is where he can best
help to uphold the old flag.
Phone us your wants anything in
pure drugs or druggist's sundries.
Court Pharmacy, phone 284. t 15-tf
MSi" Perkins, one of the most pop popular
ular popular traveling men that makes the
Ocala territory was a caller at the
Star office today. He leaves tomor tomorrow
row tomorrow for Bowling Green, Ky., for his
annual month's vacation, and will be
accompanied by Mrs. Perkins. As Mr.
Perkins 'territory has been extended
he will in the future made his head headquarters
quarters headquarters at Leesburg in order to live
near the center of his field. His Ocala
friends had hoped that the change
would again make him a resident of
this city. Mr. and Mrs. Perkins haw
been residing in Palatka since leaving
Ocala.
A very nice line of Wash Cloths on
display at Gerig's Drug Store. We
also sell War Savings and- Thrift
v Stamps. tf
You never saw. more attractive
prices in millinery than those to be
offered Saturday at Bostick's Mulin
ery, corner Harrington Hall hotel. It
Time for Discretion.
"Why, Tve got one foot In the grave
and the other foot on a banana
peel, so to speak," responds a man of
sixty-five, sued for breach of promise
In New York, under such circura
stances there is every reason why a
man should exercise discretion. Bos
ton Globe.
Nunnally's Candies fresh every
week at Gerig's Drug Store, where
you can also get Thrift Stamps, tf

ORANGE LAKE

Orange Lake, July 18. Mr. B. P.
Hatchett has gone to Rochelle to re relieve
lieve relieve the A. C. L. agent at that place
for two weeks. While he is away
Mrs. Hatchett will have charge of the
office here.
Dr. F. P. Walker left Monday for
Jacksonville and points in South, Car Caroline.
oline. Caroline. Mrs. Cora Whitney came down
from Jacksonville last week, called by
the illness of her mother, Mrs. J. S.
Whitney. Mrs. J. S. Whitney is much
improved. She has seen her ninety-,
second birthday, and her many friends
hope for her many other happy years.
Both ladies returned to Jacksonville
Monday.
Mrs. B. P. Hatchett and two sons,
Jack, and Paul, visited friends in
Jacksonville last week.-
Evidently Orange Lake is the place
for fish and the first are in their
places in the greatest abundance, for
it is becoming more and more popular
with fishing parties. Every day num numbers
bers numbers of cars from far and near may
be seen making their way to the land landing
ing landing with the tell-tale fishing tackle.
This week several came from New Newberry,
berry, Newberry, a distance of about forty miles.
VAPOR BATHS IN LAPLAND
Writer's Strenuous Experience of
Cleansing Process Finishes With
Being Bastinadoed.
In Wide World Frank Hedges But Butler
ler Butler describes a vapor bath in the land
of the Lapps. He says:
The bathhouse Is a small wooden
structure generally situated some way
from the dwelling house. It is divided
into two compartments, one to undress
In, while the other contains the oven
which produces the steam. The oven
is arched with large stones or pebbles,
and heated by a fire placed beneath.
Undressing in the first room, one en enters
ters enters the heated compartment. After a
short rest on a wooden form or bench,
which contains a place for the head,
the attendants come In and bathe you.
Cold water Is thrown over the stones
and the hissing vapor soon sends up
a cloud of steam. The higher you sit
from the floor the greater the heat. As
more water is thrown over the red-hot
stones the vapor becomes bo intense
that one can hardly breathe. We were)
soon gasping for breath and covered
with a profuse perspiration which is issued
sued issued from every pore of the skin.
Hanging up In the room were tender
branches or twigs in a green state and
retaining their leaves. Dipping these
in water, the attendant began lashing
and whipping me across the legs,
shoulders, loins and back, till my body
seemed quite red with the switching.
The bastinadoing over, I was then
washed with a soft flannel covered
with soap, after which a Jug of the
coldest water was thrown over my
head and hodv.
UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
WANTED, LOST, POUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS
RATES: Six line maximum, one
time 25a: three times 50c: six time
75c; one month S3. Payable in advance.
WANTED Owner of small saw
mill to contract to cut a million
feet of yellow pine timber. Will
deliver tygs to mill at sidetrack.
Good loaction and plenty of labor.
Address, "T," care the Ocala
Star. 19-6t
LOST Small hand satchel contain
ing baby garments, war savings
stamps and $5 in money. Lost Friday
between Ocala and Dunnellon. Reward
to finder if returned to Star office. It
WANTED To buy a shotgun. Must
be in first class shape and a bargain.
Will pay cash. Apply to J. H. J.
Counts, Ocala, Fla. 13-3t
C. O. D. This is the name of a wood
yard which is at your service at all
times. Stove wood, pine or oak. North
Magnolia street, phone 339. 29-tt
CASH FOR OLD FALSE TEETH
Don't matter if broken. I pay $2 to
$25 per set; also cash for old gold,
silver, platinum, dental gold and old
gold jewelery. Will send cash by re return
turn return mail and will hold goods 10 days
for sender's approval of my price.
Mail to L. Mazer, 2007 S. 5th street,
Philadelphia- Pa. 7-5-lm
LOST Last Saturday evening, be between
tween between Ocala and Belle view, a hub
cap for an Everitt automobile. Finder
prease return to Star office. 15-tf
DR. K. J. WEI0E
-H' SPFfTTATJST
(With Weihe Co., Jewelers)
OPTOMETRIST AND OPTICIAN
Phone 25
South Side of Square
OCALA, FLORIDA
L ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER -AND
BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Con
tract work. Gives More and Better
Work for the Money than any other
contractor in the city.

Oil Mm AN HONEST MAN I;
. 1. v By H. FIELDING.
(Continued from Third Page) ;

Red Cross Rooms Closed.
The Red Cross work rooms will be
closed until further notice, as the al allotment
lotment allotment of surgical dressings has
been finished. Mrs. D. C Stiles.
mm :
The Star is glad to say that Mrs.
Tom Pasteur, now at the hospital, is
somewhat better.
;
Mr. and Mrs. Mallory Liddon and
son are guests of Mrs. Liddon's sis sister,
ter, sister, Mrs. H. A. Waterman and family,
arriving yesterday from Jacksonville.
. "'
Dr. Davis of Stamford, Conn., a
brother of Mrs. Elmer DeCamp, is
here on a brief visit. Mr. and Mrs.
DeCamp have taken him to see Lake
Weir today.
Mr. and Mrs. T. P. Drake returned
to their home in Yalaha this morning,
after a short stay in Ocala, coming up
to attend the funeral of Mrs. Drake's
father, Judge W. A. Hocker.
Miss Marguerite Porter, now at
summer musical school at Lake For Forest,
est, Forest, Ills., is a member of a quartet of
young lady singers, who go to the
Great Lakes naval training station
nearby every few evenings and sing
for the young men receiving instruc-.
tion. She and her friends take great
pleasure in this duty, and they are al always
ways always given an enthusiastic reception
by the young sailors.
Mrs. Thomas W. : Beckett, wife of
the governor of North Carolina, will
go to France for Y. W. C.'A. to study
the war work being carried on by
French woman and to learn how best
the American women can co-operate
with them. The committee will also
investigate the work being done by
the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. in
France. Information gathered by the
committee will be used in connection
with the campaign to be launched in
October jointly by the tw organiza organizations
tions organizations for funds for relief work.
Don't fail to see the $1.98 millinery
display at Mrs. M. A. Bostick's store,
Harrington corner, tomorrow morn morn-ing.
ing. morn-ing. It
Might Have Saved French.
In the Franco-Frussian war a dis dispatch
patch dispatch was "lost" which might have
averted the French defeat in 1870. B& B&-zaine,
zaine, B&-zaine, whose message Marshal Mac Mac-Mahon
Mahon Mac-Mahon never received, was after the
war ordered shot for treason, a sen sentence
tence sentence which was commuted to 20 years'
Imprisonment.
W. K. Lane, M. D., Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat. Law Library Building, Ocala,
Florida. tf
; ... t .
"We Must Sail, Not Drift."
I find the great thing in this world is
not so much where we stand, as in
what direction we are moving, writes
O. W. Holmes. To reach the port of
heaven, we must sail sometimes with
the wind and sometimes against it
but we must sail, and not drift, nor
lie at anchor.
ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE
OF TRAINS AT OCALA
Seaboard Air Line, Northbound
No. 4: Arrives 1:15 p. m. Departs
1:30 p. m.
No. 16 (Limited): Arrives and De Departs
parts Departs 4:15 p. m.
No. 2: Arrives 1:50 a. m. Departs
1:55 a. m.
Seaboard Air Line, Southbound
No. 3: Arrives 1:10 p. m. Departs
1:30 p. m.
No. 15 (Limited): Arrives and de departs
parts departs 4:15 p. m. :
No. 1: Arrives 1:45 a. m. Departs
1:50 a. m.
Oklawaha Valley, Southbound
No. 71: Arrives 11:35 a. m.
Oklawaha Valley, Northbound
No. 72: Departs 2 p. m.
Atlantic Coast Line (Main Line)
Northbound
No. 10: Arrives and departs 5:42 a.
m.
No. 40: Arrives 1 p. m. Departs
1:20 p. m.
No. 38: Arrives and departs 2:27
a. m.
Atlantic Coast Line (Main Line)
Southbound
No. 37: Arrives and departs 2:16
a. m.
No. 39: Arrives and departs 2:35
p. m.
No. 9: Arrives and departs 9:03 pan.
Atlantic Coast Line Branches, North Northbound
bound Northbound No. 48: From Homosassa: Arrives
12:53 p. m.
' No. 150 (Sunny Jim) : From Wil Wilcox,
cox, Wilcox, Monday, Wednesday and Friday,
arrives 5:45 p. m.
No. 32 (Sunny Jim): From Lake
land, Tuesday, Thursday and Satur
day, arrives 9:48 p. m.
No. 140: Daily except Sunday,
leaves 3:45 p. m. for Wilcox.
Atlantic Coast line Branches, South
bound.
No. 151 (Sunny Jim): For Wilcox,
Monday, Wednesday and Friday,
leaves 6:10 a. m.
No. 35 (Sunny Jim): For Lakeland,
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday,
leaves 6:40 a. xn.
No. 141: Daily except Sunday, ar arrives
rives arrives 10:50 a. m. from Wilcox.
No.49: For Homosassa, leaves 2:25
p. m.

(Copyright. J918. Western N'ewiptpci Union.)
George was a thief at 2 o'clock in
the afternoon. Half an hour earlier
be had been merely an imprudent
young man who had neglected a mat matter
ter matter of $25 borrowed by him from
"cash.
If his account had been turned over
to anybody else -but Williams the mat matter
ter matter might not appear so black, but
George had been promoted over Wil Williams
liams Williams head; the matter would go
straight to the supreme head of every everything.
thing. everything. Even now, If he" could borrow the
$25 but he had tried all his friends
in the office and It would not "be easy
to get out." Yet It must be done ; the
alternative was criminal prosecution prosecution-sheer
sheer prosecution-sheer ruin.
George laid his hand upon the lid of
his desk to pull it down. With or
without an excuse, he must go out and
find that money.
Just as he arose from his seat a
hand was laid upon his arm and he
turned to face Old Ben, the soft-footed
messenger, mysterious as a demon of
Eastern fable, who did the will of the
supreme head of the establishment.
"Mr. Harriman" wants to see you,
said this slave-of-the-ring.
"I wonder if there is anything in
making a clean breast of It?" he. said
to himself, as he walked toward Har Har-riman's
riman's Har-riman's room ; and then he remem remembered
bered remembered what had happened to a certain
young man who had done that very
thing. It seemed that the floor was
no longer on a level and he saw four
knobs on Harriman's door, as he
stretched his hand to open it.
There was a flat-topped desk as large
as a dinner table in the middle of the
room, and at the opposite side of it sat
Harriman. His eyes smaller, his
nose was larger, his chin was fatter,
and his coloring was a brighter red,
than ever before In George's recollec recollection
tion recollection of him.
George had been in the great man's
presence pftenerrduring the past year,
than any other minor employee in the
main office. He was an object of envy
on that account. The idea of appear appearing
ing appearing before this man as a thief was a
thing to die of.
"Lang," said Harriman, Tm going
to give you a chance."
George's brain made 500 rapid revo revolutions
lutions revolutions in his head.
"Ninety-nine clerks In a hundred,"
Harriman continued, "will always be
clerks. I believe that you are the
hundredth man. You've been handling
some correspondence with our agents
under my direction and you have
shown a comprehension of the subject
that has made me think well of you."
George merely bowed. He could not
speak aloud. All his faculty of lan language
guage language was occupied in interior, sound soundless
less soundless cursing of himself for his incred incredible
ible incredible folly.
"Our man Bobbins, In Johnstown,"
Harriman proceeded, "has been having
trouble, as you know."
He paused, and in the interval, the
effort of remembering who Bobbins
was, cleared George's mind.
"Bobbins is not the man for the
place," he said. "He doesn't seem to
know what he Is there for."
Harriman slapped the desk gently
with his fat hand.
"Precisely," said he; "and that Is
why I am going to put you in his
shoes."
The sweat started out suddenly in
the palms of George's hands, and he
felt at the same time the sensation of
a cold grip on the back of his neck.
"You will leave for Johnstown to tonight,"
night," tonight," said Harriman. "Here is the
order superseding Bobbins. You will
, draw the same salary and get the same
commissions that he does. This is an
exceptional opportunity. No man gets
such a tfhance as this twice In his life lifetime.
time. lifetime. You must prove yourself wor worthy,
thy, worthy, and do it In a hurry."
He leaned over the desk and looked
earnestly at George, who, in that mo moment,
ment, moment, would have given his right hand
to be an honest man.
T expect you to crush competition
out there," continued Harriman. "That
fellow, Wellbrook, who is running an
independent racket, must be done up.
I don't care how you do it, or what
it costs. Lay him out. We want all
the business wherever, we go."
He laughed pleasantly, and George
tried to Join him, but the thought of
Williams restrained his mirth. It was
dreadful to think that at the moment
when he was about to be trusted with
so Important a mission, the stigma of
dishonesty would be placed upon him.
"Mr. Williams wishes to see you,
sir," said Old Ben, appearing suddenly.
Harriman nodded to George, who
was moving toward the door, and then
said to the messenger: "All right; Til
see him."
Williams entered hurriedly, and
started with surprise at sight of
George. The latter nodded coldly.
"By the way, Williams," he said,
"there's twenty-five dollars In an en envelope
velope envelope In my desk that I forgot to turn
over to you. HI lay it out on your
table."
He ; passed out, leaving Williams
standing with his mouth open, and his
eyes like two glass marbles.
To draw his money from the cashier
to arrange the amount for Williams,
and to escape from the office, required
but" little time.
George hurried home, his heart light.'
his mind full of plans for the ruin of
Wellbrook.
"How pleased father will be," he
said again and again. "Thank heaven
that I go home to him this day an hon honest
est honest man I"

ANOTHER SAD SIDE OF WAR

Many Man Who Have Wen Honors
Have Lost Comrades and Feel
La ok of Companionship.
. An American was sitting In Simpson's
restaurant recently having dinner when
a hardy man In Canadian uniform
started to converse with him. The
Canadian was working in a large
automobile factory In Windsor when
the war started, but enlisted in a
Canadian regiment and has been in
five of the worst battles of the war.
Hardly a handful of the men who
started with him are still on the roster.
This particular soldier was about to
leave for the trenches again after com completing
pleting completing his leave. There was nothing
remarkable in that, but this is his
story:
Inside his coat he wore the Victoria
Cross. He got It at Ypres, where he
carried a captain three hundred feet
through No Man's Land with bullets
flying all about him. He has no ac acquaintances
quaintances acquaintances in England. He hasn't a
relative In the world. He was just
hungering for some one to talk to
when he saw the American. He re reluctantly
luctantly reluctantly showed his decoration, and
said It would give him great happiness
if he had some one somewhere In the
world who was close epough to him to
slap him on the back and say, "Good,'
old chap I"
Still he wasn't maudlin about It. He
was just one of thousands who are
carrying honors around with them and
have no relative or intimate friend
to congratulate them. It's war.
This particular soldier said as he
left X- :
"If I ever get through I'm going
back to the States, but the odds are
against me. We cant always beat this
fighting game. It's like roulette. It
gets you -In the long run. There is
only one man of my original company
left besides myself." London MaiL
TO RESTORE PERSIA'S STATUS
Russian Bolshevik Authorities An Announce
nounce Announce intention of Giving It
Its Former Independence,
A little more than ten years ago, in
1907, Persia ceased to be a sovereign
nation In anything but name and was
resolved Into twin "spheres of Influ Influence."
ence." Influence." The northern half was a Rus Russian
sian Russian sphere, the southern half British.
The pressure from north and south
grew until it forced out the American,
Morgan Shuster, who had come to put
Persia on its financial feet.
That was an incident of imperialism.
It was a British-Russian alliance to
block' off 'Germany from getting into
Persia from the west by way of Turkey
and the Berlin-Bagdad line. Under
the Queensberry rules of imperialism
It was a fair stroke, with plenty of
historical precedent, says the Boston
Globe.
Now the foreign minister of a Rus Russian
sian Russian government that has no regard
for imperialism and its rules has sent
word to Persia that the 1907 agree agreement
ment agreement is all off, null and void, and that
Russia will now try to relieve her of
Turkish and British troops, too.
In announcing this doctrine of Per Persia
sia Persia for the Persians, and putting It
Into practice, the Russian bolshevik
government immeasurably strength strengthened
ened strengthened the position it took at Brest-Lit-ovsk
and at Petrograd in demanding
liberation for all subject nationalities.
It Is fair to say that the British min ministry
istry ministry to-day would be slow to apply
the mailed fist of imperialism as in
Persia in 1907. Much water has flow flowed
ed flowed under the bridges since, and the im imperialistic
perialistic imperialistic tide is ebbing fast.
British Geological Photos.
A committee of the British Associa Association
tion Association for the Advancement of Science
has been engaged for many years In
forming a national collection of photo photographs
graphs photographs Illustrating the geology of the
British Isles. According to the last
report the collection now includes up upward
ward upward of 5,600 pictures. More than a
thousand of these were taken In
Yorkshire. A collection of the same
character has been made by the geolo geological
gical geological survey of Great Britain, which
has" recently published a list of its
Scottish pictures. Both the B. A. com committee
mittee committee and the geological survey offer
prints and lantern slides for sale. The
Tunbridge Wells Natural History so society
ciety society offers prizes for photographs of
scenery illustrating geological features.
Scientific American.
Siamese Study in United States.
About fifteen students from Slam
have registered at American educa educational
tional educational institutions this year to qualify
in the professions of law. medicine and
civil engineering. Several such stu students
dents students have in the past graduated from
American colleges and engineering
schools and are now employed by their
own government In Important public
works.
Incidentally they have been the
means of introducing American ma machinery,
chinery, machinery, scientific apparatus and other
manufactures- Into their country.
Among the students who left the Unit United
ed United States In August were four holders
of king's scholarships, and these young
men will be educated at the expense
of the Siamese government.
Dash or
General. Ian- Hamilton, who has a
pretty talent for writing, complains
that his descriptive messages from
the front were sadly garbled by un unlettered
lettered unlettered censors. Which reminds us
of tUe story how some writer protest protesting
ing protesting the historic charge that, Oar
ormy swore terribly in Flanders," said
it was really an erroneous rewriting
by some lunkhead of: "Our arsny ad advanced
vanced advanced with great dash." Boston
Transcript. t

OCALA FRATERNAL ORDERS 1

ODD FELLOWS
Tulula Lodge No. 22, L O. O. F
meets every Tuesday evening in the
Odd Fellows' hall on the third floor of
the Star office building at 8 o'clock
promptly. A warm welcome always
extended to visiting brothers.
EL D. Stokes, N. G.
M. M. little, Secretary.
MARION-DUNN MASON'C LODGE
Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19 F. &
A. M., meets on the first and third
Thursday evenings of each month at
8 o'clock, until further notice.
Stephen Jewett; W. 1L
Jke Brown, Secretary.
WOODMEN OF THE WORLD
Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
the K.. of P. hall at 8 p. m. every
second raid fourth Friday. Visiting
sovereigns are ailways welcome.
P. W. Whitesides, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk
OCALA LODGE NO. 288, B. P. O. EL
Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and. Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and fourth Tuesday even evenings
ings evenings in each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Club house oppo opposite
site opposite postoffice, east side.
C. W. Hunter, E. R.
rl 4. Crook. Secretary.
KNIGHTS UP PlTHiAS
i
Ocala Lodge No. ID. Conventions
held every Monday evening at 8
st the Castle Hall, over the James
Li.r lilt wutrrtore. A cordial weleonie
! to, visiting bro;h re r
1 H. B. Baxter, C. C
! Tie i; Sarrt;. K. of iL S.
i MIRIAM REBEK AH LODGE NO. 15
Miriam Rebekah Lodge No. 15
(meets the first and third Monday eve evenings
nings evenings in each month in the Odd Fel
lows' hall at 8 o'clock.
Clara Moremen, N. G.
Georgia Ten Eyck, Secretary.
R. A. M. CHAPTER NO. 13
Regular convocations of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13, R. A. M., on the
first 'Friday in every month at 8 p. in.
J. A. Bouvier, H. P.
' Jake Brown. Secretary.
ORDER OF EASTERN STAR
Ocala Chapter, No. 29, O. E. S.f
meets at Yonge's hall the second and
fourth Thursday evenings of each
month at 8 o'clock.
Mrs. Alice Yonce, W. M.
Mrs. Susan Cook, Secretary.
Water wings and bathing caps at
j the Court Pharmacy. 15-tf
BUY WAR SAVINGS STAMPS
Own Your Own Homo
A House and Two Lots
$850
A House and 3 Acres
$2,000
A House and 2 Lots
v $1200
Can be Bought With Monthly Pay Payments
ments Payments of
$io
L. M. MURRAY
Room 5, Holder Block,
Ocala, Florida
Mciver & MacHay
UNDERTAKERS and EL1DAIIES
PHONES 47, 104. 3C5
OCALA, FLORIDA
Dest Attention,
Quickest Service
On Palm Deach and
Cool Cloth Suits.
tteala Steam
i 1
Phone
101
Z BUY t
: HUES and TUBES
at ;

If niinEi

fillfll
toy LiJJiijilUut

: VTXY PAY T.ORE" l
Ask for Price List

V



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