The Ocala evening star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06900

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Weather Forecast: Fair tonight,
Sunday increasing cloudiness, proba probably
bly probably showers and thunder storms in
north portion.

II
U

Campaign For Third Liberty
Loan Has Commenced
At 9 O'CLOCK THIS MOffllG, TWO LITTLE FLORIDA TOWNS
HAD TAKE1I THEIR FULL

Associated
Washington, April 6. One year
from the day the United States enter entered
ed entered the world war the nation started
today collecting three billions of dol dollars
lars dollars from its citizens as the third
Liberty Loan to finance fighting, and
it was a day of patriotic celebrations
everywhere. The principal speakers
of the day's program, were the presi president,
dent, president, who goes to Baltimore for an
evening address of unusual import importance;
ance; importance; Secretary of the Treasury Mc Mc-Adoo,
Adoo, Mc-Adoo, who went to Philadelphia; Vice
President Marshall, who went to St.
Louis, and Secretary Daniels, who
will speak in Cleveland. Before 9:30
three towns had telegraphed they had
subscribed their full quotas.
FLORIDA TOWN AT THE FRONT
Bradentown, Fla., April 6. Brad Brad-entown
entown Brad-entown subscribed its full allotment
of $131,000 to the third Liberty Loan
promptly at 8 o'clock this morning,
the earliest possible moment, and
wired Secretary McAdoo asking when
they might expect his visit.
OLDSMAR ALSO
Washington, April 6. By ten
o'clock more than twenty towns had
wires claiming the distinction of be being
ing being the first to subscribe their quotas.
Among the communities reporting be before
fore before 9 o'clock, the hour set, were
Oldsmar, Florida, LaGrange, .Ga., and
Troupe county, Ga.
TAKE YOUR CHOICE
Washington, April 6. Unless Ger Germany
many Germany is beaten America can hope for
no freedom.
This is the note running through
statements by cabinet members sup supporting
porting supporting the third Liberty Loan.
"Remember, the Germans issue no
bonds for money' extorted from con con-querer
querer con-querer peoples," said Benedict Crow Crow-ell,
ell, Crow-ell, acting secretary of war.
t "What shall a hoarded penny profit
us if we may spend it only as slaves?"
said Attorney General Gregory.
PHOTOGRAPHERS NEEDED
BY THE GOVERNMENT
The government needs photograph photographers.
ers. photographers. It needs them for service in the
army. The most efficient are to go up
in airplanes and take pictures of the
enemy's lines and fortifications one
of the most magnificent and useful
services a man can perform for his
country. Each local board in Florida
has received the following from Cap Captain
tain Captain Edward Anderson, the officer in
charge of the draft for Florida:
"This duty is one of the most de desirable
sirable desirable assignments in the army and
it is therefore believed that the call
herein announced can be completely
filled by voluntary induction. Pleas
give the widest publicity to this call,
urging registrants experienced in
photography to present themselves to
their local boards for induction into
the military service and assignment
to this duty.
"The allotment of your state is 25
. photographers. This quota must be
filled but not exceeded. You are there therefore
fore therefore authorized to permit daily tele telegraphic
graphic telegraphic report of inductions from
local boards under this call in order
that you may have complete control
of the situation."

"" Buy Thrift Stamps of us and keep
i, your skin nice and soft with Rexall
' Skin Soap. Gerig's Drug Store, tf
Ask anybody about our repair
work. William & Fox Auto Service
Station. 18-tf

' We will close at 8 o'clock p. m. on
. Saturday, 6th inst. We sell War Sav-
ings and Thrift Stamps. Gerig's

Drug Store. 5-Zt
Florida and, Spanish Peanut, Seed
for spring planting. Ocala Seed
Store. 8-tf

u

Press)
raiti
Wilson Decides to Pardoni the Ex Ex-Chief
Chief Ex-Chief of the Structural
Iron Workers
(Associated Press)
Washington, April 6. President
Wilson has decided to commute to ex expire
pire expire at once the' sentence of Frank M.
Ryan, former president of the Inter International
national International Structural Iron Workers,
now in Leavenworth penitentiary.
Ryan was convicted in the "dynamite
conspiracy."
FAIR PRICES FOR FLOUR
The investigation of flour milling
and jobbing costs was completed to today
day today by the Federal Trade Commission
and the report sent to the president.
The figures will be used by the food
administration as a basis for deter determining
mining determining fair prices for flour.
ASSISTING WAR INDUSTRIES
President Wilson today signed the
bill creating a government corpora corporation
tion corporation with a capital of half a billion
and authority to issue three billions
in bonds for assistance of essential
war industries.
FILLED TWO IMPORTANT POSI POSITIONS
TIONS POSITIONS The president today appointed Ed Edward
ward Edward R. Stettinius and Fred P. Kep
pel second antl third assistant secre secretaries
taries secretaries of war, respectively. Both po positions
sitions positions were created by Congress this
week. I
CAN USE CORN
Washington, April 6. The nation
is now in position to be put on a corn
ration if it should become necessary
to totally abstain from wheat, the
Food Administration announces, thru
an increase of two hundred per cent
in the corn milling capacity of the
country over last year.
CAN USE ENEMY CAPITAL
Washington, April 6. With the
suggestion that it would be an effect effective
ive effective stroke for the government to use
enemy capital in this country to build
ships, A. Mitchell Palmer, alien prop property
erty property custodian, has offered Chairman
Hurley of the Shipping Board for this
use the total timber supply of the
German-American Lumber company,
of Millville,'Fla. This company is en enemy
emy enemy owned and was recently taken
f over by the custodian.
BART CORLEY
The Leesburg Commercial pays the
following compliment to a man well
known and much esteemed in Ocala.
"Ordinarily the comings and goings
of linotype operators and other em employes
ployes employes of a newspaper plant are of
small interest to outsiders, but when
we announce that Bartley Corley is
tack on his pld job as linotype opera operator
tor operator on the Commercial, we are giving
news that will be appreciated by a
great many people in Leesburg. Since
Bart left less than a month ago we
have answered scores of inquiries.
The Masons were anxious for him to
come back, the members of the Lake
County Guard were anxious for him
to come back, all his friends were
anxious for him to come back, and as
for us, we were 'turrible' anxious for
him to come back. We hope he'll stay
put this time."
Dr. H. W. Henry's office telephone
is number 456; residence telephone is
number 32M, Harrington Hall hoteL

RYAN OUT

OCALA, FLORIDA, SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 191S.

1

f

HIT TO MARIOII
Those present at the food produc-'
tion meeting Thursday afternoon must
realize the etern necessity of increas increased
ed increased food production and conservation
after listening to the spaekers. The
crowd was rather slim, owing to the
rain, but farmers were present from
all sections of the county.
Mr. W. D. Cam presided and intro introduced
duced introduced Mr. A. P. Spencer, assistant
director of extension for Florida. Mr.
Spencer explained that the meeting
was held upon the receipt of an earn earnest
est earnest request from the government. He
said that the real need of the world
for food was not understood by our
people and that those present should
try to impress the urgent necessity of
increased food production upon tht
farmers in their neighborhood who
were not at the meeting.
Mr. Spencer stated that while
Florida produced about 14,000,000
bushels of corn last year, she would
be expected to produce more this
year. All crops used for human and
animal consumption must be increas increased.
ed. increased. Mr. Clarendon. Davis of Huntsville,
Ala., was the principal speaker and
brought a message direct from the
government. Mr. Davis caid that he
had been drafted by the government,
ordered to Washington and told the
xeal truth about the food situation.
He told of conditions in Europe and
stated that the real reason for the col collapse
lapse collapse of Russia and the costly break breaking
ing breaking down of the Italians was the lack
of food. He said that the feeding of
the soldiers of our Allies and of our
own army is but a small matter. The
real problem comes in the feeding of
the civilian population of our Allies.
He told in a very impressive manner
how the morale of any fighting force
goes when they know that their loved
ones behind them are starving.
Mr. Davis asked that the farmers
forget the cost when raising food for
home consumption. It is all right to
figure on producing a money crop but
the food for home consumption must
be produced no matter what the cost.
Mr. Davis told of the German meth methods
ods methods of starving the civil population of
the conquered territory so as to drive
the able-bodied into the German fac factories'
tories' factories' and to depopulate the land so
that it can be re-populatd by Ger Germans
mans Germans so as to increase German terri territory
tory territory and augment German power. The
treatment of the women and girls of
the conquereed sections makes every
red-blooded American determined that
such shall not be the fate of our
women and girls.
Mr. Emanuel Martin spoke a few
minutes for the Liberty Loan. He
said that while he didn't know exact exactly
ly exactly what it cost to kill a German, he
hoped that every person present
would buy enough of the next Liber Liberty
ty Liberty bonds to send ""'one Hun to hell."
IN STATU QUO
The industrial school girls are yet
in the county jail. The sheriff and
jailer both report that they are behaving-
themselves well and keeping
quiet. Three more girls left the school
yesterday; however, they went
straight to Sheriff Galloway's home,
and when he told them they must go
back to the school they went without
making any trouble. Governor Catts
has riot been able to come here yet,
but Controller Amos spent yesterday
afternoon and evening in town, in investigating
vestigating investigating the trouble. He informed
the Star that it was impossible for
him to solve the problem but he and
some of the other state officials will
probably be here tomorrow. Nobody
has had time to send the girls any
lunches today, but they will probably
be remembered tomorrow. The re report
port report circulated yesterday that they
tore their lunches to pieces and pelt pelted
ed pelted each other with the fragments
was untrue. They have been very ap appreciative
preciative appreciative of what has been done for
them, and since they have found out
that the town has a kindly feeling for
them have been trying to deserve it.
The Star hopes the people will spare
them a part of their Sunday dinners
tomorrow, and also send them some
reading matter, and some flowers
wouldn't hurt them.
Victor records for April at THE
BOOK SHOP. 3t

mm

T FROM THE G0VERT1-
COUIITV FARMERS
AMERICANS WILL
An Optimistic Prophecy Made This
Morning by the Premier
of England
(Associated Press)
London, April 6. "During the next
few weeks America will give the
Prussian military junta the surprise
of their lives," Premier David Lloyd Lloyd-George
George Lloyd-George telegraphed to the lord mayor
of London today, on the occasion of a
luncheon given to celebrate America's
entrance into the war.
II
BY THE MAYOR
Auto Owners and Drivers Requested
to Keep Their Cars Out of the
Way of this Evening's
- Pageant
In order to eliminate the automo automobile
bile automobile nuisance on the occasion of our
patriotic pageant on the night ofSat ofSat-urday,
urday, ofSat-urday, April 6th, the automobile pub public
lic public is requested to vacate Main street,
from Fort King avenue to Oklawaha
avenue, and Broadway street from
Magnolia street to the A. C. L. rail railroad,
road, railroad, beginning at 7 o'clock. The
streets within these limits will be
roped off at 7:15 and remain so until
the conclusion of the program.
J. E. Chace, Mayor.
A FEARFUL STORY
OF TEUTON ATROCIJY
(Chattanooga Times)
Whitesburg, Ky., March 30. That
the Hun is determined to flood this
country with his propaganda even
though his lies are forced upon the
people of the United Spates is evi evidenced
denced evidenced by a letter received by a young
lady from her sweetheart, who is a
prisoner of war.
The Mountain Eagle, .under the
caption, "Read Ponder," publishes in
its current issue the following:
"A few days ago a Miss Lewis of
Harlan, Ky., received a letter from
her sweetheart, who is a prisoner of
war in the hands of the Germans.
With the letter he enclosed his wrist
watch.
"The letter in part reads: 'Dearest:
I am a prisoner in the hands of the
German guards; they treat me nice;
they are a great people and will win
the war. Then I will return to you
and other dear ones at ome.' Tht
young woman received the watch, but
when wound it refused to run. Upon
examination by a jeweler a piece of
tissue paper, tightly rolled, was found
under the fly wheel. Upon it was
written: 'All I have said in my letter
is untrue; I am suffering untold agon agonies.
ies. agonies. They have cut off both ears, the
end of my nose, and otherwise ser seriously
iously seriously maimed me. You will never
see me again. Good-bye, dear.'
"The Eagle comments: 'Is it not
enough to make the blood run cold?
Is it not enough to fire the heart of
every true American? Do we really
love our country, our flag and our
true-hearted boys on the other side
and in the camps? If so, let's turn
ourselves loose to blot forever from
the earth the perpetrators of such
hellish deeds.
"The above records only one of the
thousands of such instances often
more fiendish. Americans, Kentuck Kentuck-ians,
ians, Kentuck-ians, brave mountaineers, arouse and
to the task of hurling such devils into
their rightful place prepared for them
from the beginning."
Our terms strictly cash, our service
the very best. Williams & Fox Auto
Service Station. 19-tf
Bring your car to Williams & Fox,
a reliable repair shop. 19-tf

1

II f SSllffili

1
Second Attack of the Teutons
Checked with Fearful'
Slaughter
FIERCEST AIID GREATEST BATTLE DF THE WAR IS GQIIIG Oil
ALOHG THE SOMME

(Associated Press)

With the British Army in France,!
Germans for Amiens appeared to be
under way early this morning. At 6:30
this morning the enemy was reported
to be advancing in waves near the
Vaire wood, which lies in the Somme
valley east of Corbie.
"BRITISH POSITION IS BETTER
London, April 6. The Germans, t
daybreak this morning, attacked the
little town of Corbie, in the Somme
valley. Reuter's correspondent at
British headquarters reports that the
enemy advanced in dense waves. The
outcome is unknown at the time thisi
dispatch is filed. The main German
thrust appears to be west of the
aire wood, toward the principal
Amiens road.
The British improved their positions
east of Fonguevilliers and north of
the Somme yesterday. -.
TEUTONS MADE NO HEADWAY
London, April 6. British positioat,
south of the Somme were somewhat
improved by a counter attack in the
neighborhood of Hangard late yester yesterday,
day, yesterday, the war office announces. Along
the whole front below Ayette in the
sector north of the Somme, the strug struggle
gle struggle continued with violence until late
yesterday, but the Germans made no
further success than attended the
morning effort.
FRENCH FOUGHT TEUTONS TO
A STANDSTILL
Paris, April 6. German attacks
along the French sector of the battle
front ceased today, the official state statement
ment statement says. There was violent artil artillery
lery artillery fighting north and south of Avre,
but no 'infantry actions.
SLINGING 70-MILE SHELLS
t
Paris, April 6. Thfe long range
bombardment of Paris by the Ger Germans
mans Germans was resumed at 11:40 this
morning.
ANOTHER CHURCH SMASHER
Amsterdam, April 6. According to
Les Nouvelles, Maastricht, another
long range gun, similar to those al already
ready already bombarding Paris, passed thru
Belgium from Essen Monday. The
length of the barrel was from twenty
to twenty-five meters and the calibre
to twenty-five centimeters.'
JAPS AT VALDIVOSTOCK
Washington,. April 6. The landing
of Japanese naval forces at Valdivos Valdivos-tock,
tock, Valdivos-tock, to protect life and property, has
been reported to the state department
by ttie American consul there. It is
learned officially that the American
government does not regard this in incident
cident incident as being connected with the
much discussed possibility of Japan Japanese
ese Japanese intervention in Siberia.
Mr. van Engelken, president of the
Farm Loan Bank, arrived in the city
yesterday and is the guest of C. M.
Clayton, whom he accompanied to
Arcadia today and tomorrow he and
Mr. Clayton will motor to Tampa to
attend the State Bankers' Associa Association,
tion, Association, which Mr. van Engelken will ad address.
dress. address. Mr. van Engelken is the gen gentleman
tleman gentleman who, with Senator D. U. Flet Fletcher,
cher, Fletcher, toured Europe in the interest or
the farm loan. Although a German by
birth, Mr. van Engelken is a loyal
American citizen and spends his time
in the interest of the United State's,
and most especially for theFarmers'
Loan Association. Lakeland Star.
Careful prescription service, using
I Squibb's chemicals, at Gerig's Drug
fctore. War Savings and Thrift
Stamps sold. tf
A 4
Some SPECIAL pictures on sale
this week. THE BOOK SHOP. 3t

VOL. 25, NO. 84

E CALL FOR
GEORGE CREEL
Chairman of the Committee of Public
Information Came Down Too
. Fast from the Clouds
(Associated Press)
Baltimore, April 6w Georere CreeL
chairman of the committee on public
information and Aviator O. M. Bounds
had a narrow escape this morning
when the airplane in which they ar arrived
rived arrived from Washington was disabled -while
making a landing. Both escap--ed
with a slight shaking up.
INJUSTICES OF THE ...
PEACE IN ILLINOIS
Afraid or Unwilling to Issue War War-.
. War-. rants for Pragers Assassins
(Associated Press)
Collinsvillel 111., April 6. The cor coroner
oner coroner of Madison county today applied
for warrants for the arrest of five
men whom he had heep. informed
were in the mob that lynched Praeg Praeg-er.
er. Praeg-er. Four justices of the g)eace refus refused
ed refused to issue the warrants.?
UNIVERSAL MILITARY
TRAINING VOTES
176 Congressmen and $-2 Sena Senators
tors Senators Are Recorded for Meas Measure
ure Measure by Security League.
The National Security League an announces
nounces announces today that it has recorded In
favor of universal military training.
176 members of "the House of Repre-;
sentatives and 42 members of the Sen Senate.
ate. Senate. The flgures'ln the canvass which;
the League has been conducting stood
179 In the nouse of Representatives
and 45 in the. Senate in Its last an announcement.
nouncement. announcement. These figures were re reduced
duced reduced by the retirement from Congress
of three New York representatives
who were committed to universal
military training viz. Congressmen
Griffin, who was elected sheriff of
Kings county; Murray Hulbert, ap appointed
pointed appointed dock commissioner by Mayor
Hylan, and Congressman Bruckner,
elected borough president of the
Bronx. The advocates in the Senate
were reduced by three by the death of
Senators Brady of Idaho. Newlands of
Nevada and Hn?hes of New Jersey.
A big assortment of Bath Caps on
the road and will be displayed soon at
Gerig's Drug Store. Don't buy until
you see them. In the meantime come
to us for Thrift Stamps. tf
win the war, and have us fill your
prescriptions for accurate service
The Court Pharmacy tf
In accordance with the mayor's re request
quest request to all merchants, THE BOOK
SHOP will close Saturday night from
eight o'clock until ninerthirty, and
will the nbe open until 10:30. .- St
We will close at 8 o'clock p. m. on
Saturday, 6th inst. We sell War Sav Savings
ings Savings and Thrift Stamps. Gerig's
Drug Store. 5-2t
Our toilet articles are the best to be
had at any price. Try them and "buy
war savings stamps' with the sav savings.
ings. savings. The Court Pharmacy. tf



PAGE TWO

OCALA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, APRIL 6. 1918

Upon America de
volves the sacredduty
of keeping alight the
torch of Liberty and
upholding justice and
democracy through
out the world. Let
us not falter or count
the cost, for in jhe:
freedom of the world
lies our only safety,
and the preservation
of our American lib-
erties and institutions.
Iet Us Invest
To the Limit m
Liberty
This Space Paid For and
Contributed By -.

Sole Ditributor for the Famous
"WALR 0EM" SHOES
For Men and Women
The Best Shoe in the World For The Money

y -lay More

: 1
For Flowers,
CARL
1

V V

"WAH SMWGS STAMPS
ISSUED BY THE
UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT

MONEY TO LOAN
On Good Real Estate Security.
Low Interest Rates. Monthly
or Yearly Payments
F. R. HOCKER, OCALA.

P 1

39

CEMENT VASES AND URNS
Porch and Lawn Decorations.

Ferns and Small Shrubbery
Manufactured by
VVENZEL & SONS

For Sale by
OCALA SEED STORE

t.

I 1. M

DR. L. T. ROGERS
GRADUATE VETERINARIAN
805 Fort King Ave.
Telephone 522 Ocala, Fla.

PATRIOTIC PAGEANT

Program of the Demonstration to be
Given April 6 by the Woman's
Liberty Loan Committee
The parade will start at 7:30 p. m.
The line of march will begin at the
armory "n Fort King, thence to the
corner of Harrington Hall, turning to
the right, again turning to the left in
front of the Court Pharmacy. At the
Marion Hardware cornpr the nawant!

will turn to the rie-ht and nroceedUB!!

down Magnolia street to Gates' gar gar-ag;e
ag;e gar-ag;e when it will swing around the
federal building to the Elks' club,
turn and come up Main street to the
Ocala House, where the respective
divisions will line up according to
plans arranged. -. All chairmen with
their divisions are requested to meet
early so the demonstration may start
promptly. Each division will form
according to the following numbers:
Pageant
1. Miss Liberty, represented by
Mrs. Charles Fox, escorted by sailors
and soldiers.
2. Uncle Sam. ;
3. Allies (as they entered the
world war, with their colonies): Bel Belgium,
gium, Belgium, Misses Agnes Burford, Eliza Elizabeth
beth Elizabeth Davis and Sidney Perry; France,
Misses Onie Chazal, Charlotte Cha Cha-zal
zal Cha-zal and Annie MacKay; Serbia, Miss
Kathleen Leitner; Greece, Miss Dor-
Florence Leitner; Scotland, Miss Sue
iioore; n.ngianu, miss marguerim re
wards; Ireland, Miss Katherine Liv-
ingston; Canada, Miss Caroline Har-

SCo" VT ZgL tapers
Mrs. Frederick Hooker; Portugal, fi"?
Miss Emma Perry; Brazil, Miss Sid- Fires Burning"
ney Harold; America, Miss Marie ? g "America"
Hickman; Cuba, Miss, Nellie Gottlieb;, R rn1f'H MvUi' 'itu eom:na

Hawaii, Miss Helen Jones; Philippine
Islands, Miss Mabel Meffert; Japan,
Miss Jewel Bridges.
4. Band. Mr. Lester Lucas, musi
cal director, escorting Miss Marguer
ite Porter, who trained the choruses,
leading divisions.
' 5. Navy division, led by Commo
dore Sewall 'Light Welch and a sailor
representing the battleship Delaware,
carrying silver star memorial of Sim Simeon
eon Simeon LaGrange Sistrunk.
6. Star division, led by boys car
rying gold star memorials of Lieut.
Wiley Burford and '- Homer Rodgers,
killed in action "over there," and sil
ver star memorials of boys who died
in service in the United States.
7. Service flag division. Marion
county service flag carried by young
women.
8. Taper brigade. Red taper for
each star on service flag, carried by
young women Red symbolic of their
blood, and the light symbolic of the
light of liberty from the darkness of
Prussianism for which they are fight fighting.
ing. fighting. 9. Mrs. Jennings, state chairman
of the liberty loan committee, carry carrying
ing carrying U. S. flag.
10. Mrs. Moorhead, county chair chairman,
man, chairman, escorted by Mr. Lorenzo D.
Case, orator of evening.
11. Mrs. William Hocker, state
chairman national defense unit, es
corted by Mayor Chace, master of
ceremonies.
12. W. C. T. U. division, led by
Mrs. E. Van Hood, district chairman,
and Mrs. E. M. Osborne, bearing the
national prohibition banner "For God
and Home and Native Land."
13. Red Cross division, led by Mrs.
C. S. Cullen.
14. Red Star division, led by Mrs.
B. T. Perdue.
15. Young ladies' brigade, led by
Mrs. W-V. Newsom. 1
16. Episcopal church, led by Mrs,
F. T. Schreiber and Rev. G. A. Ott Ott-mann.
mann. Ott-mann.
17. Methodist church division, led
by Mrs. Harry Holcomb and Rev.
Smith Hardin.
18. Baptist church division, led by
Mrs. R. S. Hall and Rev. Wrighton.
19. Catholic division, led by Mrs.
J. R. Dewey and Father Bottolacio.
20. Presbyterian church division,
led by chairman and Rev. Herndon.
21. Christian church division, led
by Mrs. J. E. Chace and Rev. C. E.
Wyatt.
22. Woman's Club division, led by
Mrs. Emily Green and Mrs. W. T.
Gary, k
23. Eastern Star division, led by
Mrs. L. E. Yonce.
24. King's Daughters, led by Mrs.
Bittinger.
25. Rebekah division, led by Mrs.
W. T. Moremen.
26. Ocala Banner division.
27. Star division.
28. Ocala Country Club division,
led by Miss Stotesbury.
29. Boy Scout division, led by Mr.
Duncan MacDonald, followed by fife
and drum corps.
31. School division, led by Prof.
Cassels and Prof. Brinson.
32. Primary school division.
33.
34.
High school division.
North Ocala school division.
Men's Division
35. Liberty Loan committee,
led
by Chairman T. T. Munroe.
36. War Savings Stamp division,
led by Chairman L. WT. Duval.
37. Board of Trade division.
? 38.
County commissioners' divis-
ion.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
Elks' division.
Woodmen division.
Masonic division.
County Divisions
Dunnellon division.
Mcintosh division.
Belleview division.

i'i ill!

HELPING YOU WITH YOUR LIVE STOCK.

rpHE Federal Reserve Banking System, established by the government, stands
back of the range. Through' our membership in it we can help our patrons
carry live stock which they are raising or fattening for market.
Farmers' notes, with not over six months to run, given for raising or car carrying
rying carrying live stock, can be rediscounted by us with our Federal Reserve Bank,
thereby increasing our ability to extendto our patrons such helpasthey may need.
If you are in the live stock business come in and talkfwith us.
THE OCALA NATIONAL BANK
Members of the Federal Reserve System. v

III
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50. Military division.
51. School division.
52. Church division.
Program
1. Pageant will halt and group as
planned.
2. Call to service by Uncle Sam.
3. Allies respond with national
- 45. Citra division.
46. Kendrick division.
Colored Division
47. Colored band.
48. Service flag division.
49. Taper division.
""T" Z7,
4. Call to service by Uncle Sam.
5. Service flag division offers flag,
which is raised on pole while chorus
fl- to cJlto seWke bv
."JT .rSSntS
My Country."
9. Colored service flag is placed in
position and taper division places
tapers at foot of service flag.
10. Music by colored band. Color Colored
ed Colored division retires to street in front
of Court Pharmacy and Rheinauer's.
12. Miss Liberty, symbolic of lib liberty
erty liberty and purity of the whole world
after the establishment of a whold's
peace and democracy and the down downfall
fall downfall of Prussianism.
33. Song, "The Two Grenadiers;
Hybias the Cretan: Mr. Lester Lucas.
14. Mr. Lorenzo D. Case, speaker
of the evening.
15. Music by the band.
16. Miss Liberty.
17. Roll of honor sale of bonds.
18. Taps.
19. Benediction.
Musical program subject to change.
MEET MR. MILLER
Mr. C. Y. Miller asks all loyal Am American
erican American citizens of German birth or
descent to meet him on the Ocala
House piazza this evening at seven
o'clock sharp, in order to take part
in the patriotic pageant.
NOTICE TO MASONS
All members of the Masonic order
in the city are requested to meet at
the hall at 7 p. m., to take part in the
patriotic pageant.
NOTICE TO WOODMEN
All Woodmen are urged to be at
the W. O. W. hall at 7 p. m., to take
part in the patriotic pageant.
. We will close at 8 o'clock p. m. on
Saturday, 6th inst. We sell War Sav Savings
ings Savings and Thrift Stamps. Gerig's
Drug Store. 5-2t
Victor records for April at THE
BOOK SHOP. 3t
J. H. BRINSON
Dealer in
REAL ESTATE
Ocala, Florida
Get My Bulletin
H
W
r"
W
o
w
0
We-Announce
The Best Equipped
TRANSFER & STORAGE
COMPANY
In Central Florida
Dur Equipment is at Your Service
and for Your Convenience. If you will
Help Us We will Make it the Best in
the State. We Expect to Make the
Service Prompt, the Price Reasonable,
and "Everybody Happy." If We Don't,
Tell Us and Well "Come Across."
WHITE STAR LINE
Dealers in BEAVER BOARD

ANNOUNCEMENTS

FOR STATE SENATOR
To the Voters of Marion and Sum Sumter
ter Sumter Counties: I shall be a candidate
for the office of state senator from the
20th senatorial district, subject to the
democratic primary. C. B. Howell.
FOR COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3
I desire to announce my candidacy
for the position of county commis commissioner
sioner commissioner from district No. 3, Marion
county, subject to the democratic pri primary.
mary. primary. J. W. Davis.
Summerfleld, Florida.
FOR REPRESENTATIVE
To the Democratic Voters of Marion
County:
I hereby announce my candidacy for
Representative and solicit your sup support
port support in the June Primary. I join
group one (1.) Respectfully,
S. J. McCully.
FOR REPRESENTATIVE
I hereby announce my candidacy
for representative from Marion coun county,
ty, county, subject to the democratic primary
in June of this year, and solicit the
support of the people. I enter group
one (1). Very, respectfully,
N. A. Fort.
FOR STATE ATTORNEY
To the People of the Fifth Judicial
Circuit of Florida: I hereby announce
my candidacy for re-election to the
office of state attorney. Fifth Judicial
Circuit of Florida, in the approach approaching
ing approaching primary. I have tried to merit
and will greatly appreciate your sup support.
port. support. George W. Sofield.
January 4, 1918.
FOR STATE ATTORNEY
To the Democratic Voters, Fifth
Judicial Circuit:
I hereby announce myself a candi
date for the office of state's attorney
for the fifth judicial circuit, of the
state of Florida, in the approaching
democratic primary, and subject to
the result thereof.
Fred L. Stringer.
Brooknville, Fla., March 14,-1918.
FOR COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 4
According to my own Inclination
and the solicitation of friends, I here
by announce myself a candidate for
county j commissioner for the fourth
commissioner's district of Marion
county, subject to the action of the
democratic primary of 1918. If elect elected,
ed, elected, I promise a faithful discharge of
the duties of the office and I shall
strive to ive satisfaction to all con concerned
cerned concerned by giving the duties of the of office
fice office my personal attention. I shaU be
thankful for the support of all inter interested.
ested. interested. Very respectfully,
O. H. (Bob) Rogers.
Lynnc, Fla.
FOR SENATOR 20TH DISTRICT
To the Democratic Voters of Marion
and Sumter Counties (Comprising
the 20th Senatorial District):
I am a candidate for senator in the
primary election to be held June 4th,
1918. I thoroughly appreciate the
honor of having served as one of Mar Marion's
ion's Marion's representatives in the last two
sessions of the legislature. I served
my people faithfully, loyally, honest honestly
ly honestly and conscientiously. I realize that
the knowledge and experience as rep representative
resentative representative two terms will enable me
to make the people of the twentieth
district a better senator. I will ap appreciate
preciate appreciate your support and if nominat nominated
ed nominated I pledge faithful service to the
people of Marion and Sumter coun counties,
ties, counties, working for their best interests,
as well as for the whole state.
Respectfully yours, W. J. Crosby.
Citra. Fla., Feb. 6, 1918.
NOTICn OF FIVAL SETTLE 51 EXT
AND UISViiauue:
Xotlce Is hereby given that on the
10th day of April. A. D. 1918. the un undersigned
dersigned undersigned will present my account
and vouchers to the Judfre of probate
in and for Marion county, Florida, at
his office at the courthouse in Ocala,
and will make my final settlement and
will apply for final discharge as such
executrix of the estate of Edward
Dreyfous. deceased.
This 2nd day of October. 1917.
LILY S. DANZIG ER,
A3 Execu-.rix of the Estate of Edward
Dreyfous, Deceased.
Our toilet articles are the best to be
had at any price. Try them and "buy
war savings stamps" with the sav savings.
ings. savings. The Court Pharmacy. tf

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SCnOOL DISTRICT ELECTIONS
Ocala, Fla., March 5, 1918.
Notice la hereby grveji that on Tues Tuesday.
day. Tuesday. April 16. 1918. there will toe held
in the following special 'tax school
districts elections for the purpose of
determining who shall be trustees of
said districts for the ensuing term of
two' years and also to determine the
rate of taxation for school purposes
that shall te assessed and collected
for the ensuing two years In each of.
said districts.'
The 'following duly qualified electorsA
are named as Inspectors and clerks fori
said election In each of the said dis districts
tricts districts and if it be impracticable or Im Impossible
possible Impossible for either of these to serve he
Is requested tq secure a suitable an.d
legal person to take his place.
Ocala, District No. 1
J. L. Edwards, E. VT. Krayblll, Isaac
Stephens, inspectors, J. T. Lancaster,
clerk.
Mclntotih, DIstTtet No. 2
J. K. Christian. E. W. Rush, E. I
Trice, inspectors, D. H. Pettys, clerk.
Bellevlew, District No. S
J. A. Freeman, A. Nott, J. W.
Brown, inspectors, 1. C. Stanley, cleric
FantvlUe, District No. 4
R. B. Pant, J. B. George, P. J. Messer,
inspectors, M. R. Godwin, clerk.
Dnnoellon, District No. 5
Dr. William Griffith, T. K. North, O.'
VT. Neville, inspectors. C E. Hood,
Reddlck, District No. 8
J. W. Wilson. C. M. Cam, J. B. De De-Vore,
Vore, De-Vore, inspectors, E. D. Rou, clerk.
Pine Level, District No. T
J. T. Ross, E. W. W. Jordan, W. 1
Brooks, inspectors, Geo. C Turner,
cleric
Mayrllle, District No. 8
W. B. Coggins, 8. 6. Knight, R. C.
McNatt, inspectors, Alton B. Coggins,
clerk
Weirsdale, District No. O
W. A. Guthery, J. D. Walling. E. C
i clerk
Albertson, Inspectors, C. S. Gates,
Citra, District No. 10
W. J. Crosby, D. T. Sherouge, R. S.
Shortridge, inspectors, C. W. Drive,
clerk.
Grtner Farm. District No. 11
F. P. Cahoon, J. A. Lai ff man, H. I
Grlprgs, Inspectors, J. P. Luffman,
clerk.
Flack Pond, District No. 12
T. F. Morgan, W. D. Youni?. J. D.
Wiggins, inspectors, J. T. Ilutchlna,
cleric
Sparr, District- No. 13
D. C. Riker, J. E. Thomas, E. Clem Clemens,
ens, Clemens, Inspectors, J. N. Simmons, clerk.
Candler, District No. 14
Dr. A. Belcher, J. N. Marshall, C. W.
Quick, inspectors, A. McClain, clerk.
Fellowship, District No. 15
V. P. Potts. S. D. Atkinson. O. W
Mills, inspectors, J. L. B. Hudgens.IS
clerk.
Klectra, District No. 16
Geo. W. Brant, J. M. Mock, M. Llp Llp-plncott,
plncott, Llp-plncott, inspectors. J. C. Pillans, clerk,
niltchton, District No. 17
Landis Blitch. O. S. Sanders. J. W.
Coulter, inspectors, B. C. Blitch, clerk.
Mnrlfl District, No. 18
"Walter Ray, D. A- Walker, J. Seck Seck-inger,
inger, Seck-inger, inspectors, B. I. Freyermuth,
clerk
Fort Klnsr, District No. 19
W. J. Young. J. E. Baxter, F. C. Clay Clayton,
ton, Clayton, inspectors, C. G. Parker, clerk.
L'npnlct, District No. 20
E. F. Brooklen, O. C. Barker, P. H.
Hampton, inspectors, C. E. Foglestrom,
clerk.
Llnadnle, District No. 21
C. A. McCraney, Mitchell Rigdon, L
B. Roberts, inspectors, F. P. McCraney,
clerk.
Cotton Plant, District No. 22
J. S. Weathers, A. W. Woodward, D.
M. Barco, inspectors, C. A. Carter,
clerk.
Orange Lake, District No. 23
Dr. F. P. Walker, D. H. Burry, C. E.
Cork, inspectors, J. C. Waits, clerk.
Oak Hill, District No. 24
F. E. Smoak, J. M. Mathews, H. W.
Nettles, inspectors, J. JJ. .rant. cierK.
Moss Ilia IT, District No. 25
J. S. Martin, Oliver Fort. B. A. Me Me-Kinney,
Kinney, Me-Kinney, inspectors, A. W. Fort, clerk,
Fairfield, District No. 26
R. IL Scott, J. A. Jones, R. C. Young,
inspectors. G. A. Osteen, clerk.
Cottage I Illl, District No. 27
A. S. Pickett, H. I Shearer, I D.
Beck, inspectors, F. W. Ditto, clerk.
Charter Oak, District No. 28
W. A. Redding, T. W. Barnett, W. J.
Piatt, Inspectors, J. A. Sroggln, clerk clerk-Pedro,
Pedro, clerk-Pedro, District No. 29
II. P. Oliver, a G. Lovell, Walter
Nichols, inspectors, M. M. Proctor,
clerk.
Kendrick, District No. 30
J. J. Guthery. W. B. Livingston, J.
K. Turnipseed, inspectors, B. C. Webb,
clerk.
Ocklavraha, District No. 31
' O. E. Connor, W. E. McOahagin,
Robert Martin, inspectors, J. T. Lewis.
' HeldtvlIIe. District No. 32
a Strickland. F. 11. Miller. Ge
M Dorr. Inspectors, J. T. Town send;
clerk.
Pleasant Hill, District No. 33
Wlllard Blitch, Elbert Mills. R. D.
Mills, inspectors. L. D. Curry, clerk.
Fort McCoy, District No. 34
W. J. Wilson, W. S. Priest, E. L.
Beshart, inspectors, S. II. Martin, clerk.
Anthony, District No. 35
IL A. Meadows, B. K. Padgett, C. C.
Triest Jr., inspectors, C. W. Turner,
clerk.
ammrfield. District No. 31
C. P. Davis, Nathan Mayo. li. U Cly Cly-burn,
burn, Cly-burn, inspectors, H. C. Groff, clerk.

Homeland. IJIMrict JNo. 37
D N.. Barco, W. T. .Strickland, J. D.
Williams, inspectors, II. R. Rodden Rodden-berry,
berry, Rodden-berry, clerk.
Sfalloh, District No. 38
' E. A. Smith. R. R. Whittington, A. J.
Wyche, inspectors, Willie Dreher.
clerk.
Lo veil. District No. 39
Matt Reiff. F. Rou, C. B. Howell,
inspectors. II. T. Hall, clerk.
;reenvood, District No. 40
G. D. Turner, Harmon Hall, A- P.
Monroe, Inspectors. L. P. Martin, clerk,
rtnrbank. District No. 41
Geo. S. Brown, W. E. Bogue, J. K.
Priest, Inspectors. F. M. Chaffee, clerk.
Al?o. the patron? of all colored
schools and the patrons of all white
schools not within special tax school
district territory are called upon to
meet on this date and make recom recommendation
mendation recommendation to the board of public in instruction
struction instruction of suitable persons to be ap appointed
pointed appointed supervisor of each school to
strve for the enduing four years.
It is ordered that this call for elec election
tion election phall be duly published in the
Ocala Banner and Ocala Star in each
-weekly edition from this date to the
time of holdlnc the election and also
in the daily editions of said piper-yf
once each week until said election.-'
Dne by order of the Board of Pul-
lie Instruction. v,
G. 8. SCOTT. Chairman.
J. IL BRINSON. Secretary. 3-9dw



OCA LA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, APRIL 6. 1918

page three
AT THE CHURCHES TOMORROW
SUMMER CAPITAL OF INDIA

m

M Iff jL

Meet Your Uncle

"He's got a bagfull of the best securities on
behind it you know what that means. He's putting
into the homes of our folks from Maine to California,
chance of a lifetime to help this grand old country,
and to lay something by for that little house on the
hill you have been dreaming about
"Honest goods? Believe me, there never
was such goods.
"What! You were looking everywhere
for just this chance ? Fine Open the bag, Uncle
He's one of us. Hell take a dozen."
BIlIlltJIIIIIIHHIl THIS SPACE PAID FOR AND CONTRIBUTED DY IlIIIIIIIIIIIIfllllHIII

MARION FURNITURE COMPANY
2. 4, 6 West Fort King Avenue
Dealers in Furniture, Mattings, Rugs, Stoves, Trunks, Bags, Etc
We Sell On The Easy-Pay Plain.
C. A. FORT, Proprietor.

T

E WIMBSOR HOTEL
JACKSONVILLE.FLORIDA

.V f g '

In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every moaern convenience in each room. Dining rocm service is
second to none.
RATES From $1.50 per day per person to $6.
ROBERT M. MEYER, J. E. KAVANAUGH
Proprietor. Mnxer

til
b
ijm. s
rS
who are staying at home
0 the money every dollar,
pay master in the world.

& 4 w

5xz

The Murderous Kaiser
Has a Good Cause for Fright,!
Now that Uncle Sam Has Called!
for the Third Liberty Loan pj
This means that the. nations battling for World &
Freedom will' no longer be bandinnrmpH in thAir dnrH5iS

work by the shortae of finances. Uncle Sam has asked

you for Three Billion Dollars,
scribed your share you have

to your country, bhouting and singing pariotic songs -p
Hnpcin'r win n war if tol-oc K 1 A nnA v ifl

-ww a n luiivo uiuuu aiiu niuiicy. ,iuu
are not furnishing the blood. SO lt'siin tn inn fn fnrnich

with interest to be paid back
Buy a Liberty Bond.

Sam

earth he stands
these "fighting bonds
Why; man, this is the
Meet Your
Uncle Sam
at any Bank or
Bond Booth,
and get into
the fight- and
get in big!
COMMITTEES FOR
MARION COUNTY
To Work for the Third Liberty Loan,
Beginning April 6th, 1918
Fairfield: M. L. Payne, chairman,
J. L. Davis, M. D., and L. K. Edwards.
Ocala and Marion County at Large:
T. T. Munroe, chairman, D. E. Mcl Mcl-ver
ver Mcl-ver and John L. Edwards.
Mcintosh: E. L. Price, chairman,
S. H. Gaitskill and, J. K. Christian.
Reddick: S. L. Fridy, chairman, E.
D. Rou and O. H. Billings.
Citra: J. C. DuPree, chairman, W.
J. Crosby and J. fi. Williams.
Anthony: A. R. Griffin, chairman,
Geo. D. Pasteur and Harry Meadows.
Summerfield: Nathan Mayo, chair chairman,
man, chairman, H. J. Wall and J. W. Davis.
Belleview: C. A. Tremere, chair chairman,
man, chairman, II. L. Hopkins and A. E. Ash Ash-worth.
worth. Ash-worth. Dunnellon: G. W. Neville, chairman,
J. T. Rawls and J. G. Baskln.
We repair all makes of automo automobiles.
biles. automobiles. Our service is the very best.
Williams & Fox Auto Service Sta Station.
tion. Station. 19-tf
W. K. Larte, M. D Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat. Law Library Building, Ocala,
Florida. tf
'Af'JLT 4 "JL A Ji AAA
r. r. ir r. iY
and if you have not sub-
not done your whole duty
by Uncle Sam, the bestir
'
WORKS i

How amiable are thy tabernacles,
O Lord of hosts. Psalm 84.
9:30 a. m. Bible school and Bible
classes.
11 a. m. Morning worship. Sub Subject,
ject, Subject, "The World's Great Event." The
Lord's Supper will be observed at the
morning service.
6:30 p. m. B. Y. P. U.

A hearty welcome for all young J
people.
7:30 p. m. Gospel service. Sub Subject,
ject, Subject, "The Crucifixion of Paul." At
the evening service the Baptist or orchestra
chestra orchestra will, assist the choir in the
leading of old favorite gospel songs.
Don't miss this service.
On Wednesday at 7:30 p. m. a big
prayer rally will be held in the main
auditorium.
Christian
9:45 a. m. Sunday school.
11 a. m. Preaching and the Lord's
supper.
Subject of sermon, "The Light of
the Resurrection."
4 p. m. Baptismal service.
7:30 p. m. Evening service.
We wll at this hour unveil our
"Service Flag," upon which there will
be eleven blue stars, one silver (Will (William
iam (William Clayton), one Red Cross emblem
and the Y.' M. C A. triangle.
The program will be as follows:
"America," audience standing.
Chorus, "Abide With Me."
Prayer.
"The Boys at the Front," a prayer
and a wish.
Duet. "Oh. It Is Wonderful" Mrs.
H. S. Chambers and Mr. Gaes.
Roll call for those in service and
those yet to go, Mr. Hyneman and
Mr. Hooper.
Presentation of "Service Flag,n
irom the Ladies' Aid to the church",
by Mr. C. E. Winston.
In behalf of the. church receiving
the flag, by C. E.,Wyatt, minister.
Solo Mr. Gates.
Scripture reading.
Chorus, "Loyalty to Christ."
Talk by the minister on loyalty.
"Bless Be the Tie That Binds."
Benediction.
C. E. Wyatt, Minister.
"
Grace Episcopal
. (Rev. Gilbert A. Ottmann, Rector)
7:30 a. m. Holy communion, every
Sunday.
ll a. m. Holy communion and
sermon, first Sunday.
11 a. m. Morning prayer and ser sermon,
mon, sermon, except first Sunday.
Until further notice the Sunday
night services at Grace Episcopal
church will be held at 7:30 p. m.
9:45 a. m. Sunday school..
Air seats free. Every one welcomt
at all services.
First Presbyterian
9:30 a. m. Sunday school.
11 a. m. -Preaching service.
2:30 p. m. Junior Society.
7:30 p. m. Preaching service.
At the morning service tomorrow
the sacrament of the Lord's Supper
will be celebrated.
The session of the church will meet
at the close of Sunday school tomor tomorrow.
row. tomorrow. The public is. cordially invited to
worship with us.
John R. Hemdori, Pastor.
'
Methodist
9$30 a. m. Sunday school.
11 a. m. Preaching.
Text, Exodus 20:8.
3:30 p. m. Junior League.
6:30 p. m. Senior League. Please
be on time.
7:30 p. m. Preaching.
Text, Psalm 62:1-2.
Mid-week prayer meeting Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday at 7:30 p. m.
I will be thankful if all our mem members
bers members and friends will attend the serv services.
ices. services. Durirfg this terrible war we need
to wait before God at His house of
prayer.
Let every member of our church
pnd Sunday school and every friend
that attends pur church march to tonight
night tonight (Saturday) at 7 p. m.
Smith Hardin, Pastor.
i
St. Phillip's Catholic Church
Mass at St. Phillip's Catholic church
will be said on Sunday at 10 o'clock,
and on week days at 7 o'clock. Sun Sunday
day Sunday schooj tomorrow will be at 9 a.
m. and stations oi the Cross at 4:30
p. m.
Christian Science Society of Ocala
(Yonge's Hall)
10 a. m. Sunday school.
II a. m. Sunday service.
Free reading room and library open
on Tuesdays and Fridays from 3 to 5.
SILVER-TONGUED SPEAKER
Col. Robert W. Davis of Gainesville,
well known all over Florida as one
of the most eloquent of orators, will
deliver a speech from the bandstand
at the conclusion of the patriotic
pageant this evening.

Help Me
Help to Win the War
Let me paint your roof for
you. Bear in mind, tin roofs
don't wear out they rust out.
Composition roofs don't wear
out they dry out.
On all work intrusted to me
in response to this appeal, I
will give a discount of 5, on
condition that said 5 be in invested
vested invested in War Savings Stamps.
V. MRASEK
210 Osceola St, Ocala, Fla.

Simla, the Most English City From
London to Melbourne, Increases in
Population During Year.
The British empire never gives the
sun a chance to set on it, but of all the
cities from London to Melbourne that
fly the Union jack, the most English
is Simla, summer capital of India. It
Is more English than anything In Eng England,
land, England, as though the English In India
were stirred to a more aggressive
Anglicism by their distance from
home.
Simla has been pictured to all the
world in Kipling's "Plain Tales," states
a writer, but it has changed a good
deal since the era set forth In those
sketches. The railroad from Kalka
was completed years figo and the long
journey from the rail head to Simla
In the tonga, or native cart, which
was one of the unforgettable experi experiences
ences experiences of the visitor in the early days.
Is hardly a memory now. The sailing
time from the Indian ports to Europe
has been cut in half since Kipling
wrote and, altogether, Simla is much
more a part of the world. Yet It
keeps its characteristic flavor in spite
of modern improvements.
It is a summer city. In winter there
are perhaps 15,000 people there, most
of them natives. In the hot weather
the population goes up to 40,000 or
more. Most of the newcomers are
officers of some Importance In the In Indian
dian Indian world men on leave from a hun hundred
dred hundred scattered districts, men from
lonely frontier posts and fever smitten
southern provinces, men who act as
official advisers to the kings of semi semi-Independent
Independent semi-Independent native states, meeting
their own people in numbers for the
first time In a twelvemonth.

BUND REPAIR WATCHES BEST
Sightless Men Known to Detect De De-fects
fects De-fects That Other Tradesmen
Failed to Discover, j
Blind people those who have been
born blind are, as is well known, ex exceedingly
ceedingly exceedingly clever with their fingers," but
it Is not often that one bears of a
watchmaker who was born blind, and
yet there have been instances of the
kind. i
A famous blind watchmaker lived at
Holbeach, notes an exchange. His
name was Itippin, and, although com completely
pletely completely blind, he could take to pieces
and put together again watches of most
delicate construction with the greatest
ease and In quicker time than most
watchmakers who have the advantage
of good eyesight.
On one occasion some of the tiny
wheels and screws used in his trade
were stolen from him, but the thief
was captured with the property on his
person, and Itlppln identified It by his
delicate sense of touch. Another watch
and clockmaker brought up his blind
sou to his trade, and he proved so skil skilful
ful skilful that on more than one occasion he
detected faults in timepieces which oth other
er other tradesmen had failed to discover.
Polite Burglars.
Occasionally the operation of bur burglary
glary burglary Is. performed by a gentle and
thoughtful thief, says London Tit-Bits.
A boarding house was some rears ago
robbed of a handbag and some 20
belonging to "the landlady, a wallet,
containing important documents, the
property Of a gentleman guest, and a
few valuables, Including a miniature of
the gentleman's wife. The thief had
taken out the landlady's eyeglasses
from the.bag and lef them on the" ta table,
ble, table, and a few days later a parcel
arrived at the boarding house, marked
'7d.' to pay,", containing the missing
documents and the miniature stripped
of its frame.
A lady teacher, awakened by a noi5
in the night, went on the landing and
saw a man on the stairs. "Kindly let
me out," said the man. He put on
his boots, shook hands with the school schoolmistress,
mistress, schoolmistress, and, as he went added : "Not
a word I Go to bed like a good girl!"
She did not. She went to' the police,
and the. polite burglar was finally
tracked and captured.
Introduced rle Spider.
The solicitor had been away in the
country calling upon a client, but on
his return there were signs of loafing
nnlazlness on the part of th junior
clerk.
"Thomas, that- typewriter has not
been touched today'." snapped the man
of law.
"Oh, sir!" ejaculated the junior.
"Why, I was using it only an hour
agol"
"Then," thundered the employer,
"how comes It that there's a spider on
the machine, end that he's woven a web
over the keyboard?"
"Sir," remarked the lad, "I'll tell the
truth. There was a fly In the works
of that machine. Rather than waste
my ttme in entrapping the Insect, sir,
I er introduced the spider, sir!"
London Tit-Bits.
Papa in the Telephone.
Vhen the late President Cleveland's
daughter was quite young her father
once telephoned to the White House
from Chicago and asked Mrs. Cleveland
to bring the child to the phone. Lift Lifting
ing Lifting the little one up to the instrument,
Mrs. Cleveland watched her expression
change from bewilderment to wonder
and then to fear.
It was surely her father's voice yet
she looked at the telephone incredu incredulously.
lously. incredulously. After examining the tiny open opening
ing opening in the receiver, the little girl sud suddenly
denly suddenly burst Into tears. "Oh. mamma !"
she sobbed, "how can we ever get papa
out of that little hole?" London Tit-Pits?

The Orange
. Flavor
One of the most delicious
flavors that nature's laborator laboratories
ies laboratories ever distilled is the taste of
a ripe orange. This unsurpass unsurpassed
ed unsurpassed goodness is perfectly pre preserved
served preserved in

mm
IN THE BOTTLE
The wonderful.' orange drink
which is flavored with the
juices of crushed California
"oranges, sun-kissed and ca caressed
ressed caressed into yellow ripeness.
When your palate craves a
real treat, make it "Orange
Crush in the bottle."
CAJLA
Bottling Woltrs
BUY WAR SAVINGS STAMPS.
Ovn Your Own Home
A House and Two Lots
$850
A House and 3 Acres
$2,000
A House and 2 Lota
$1,200
Can be Bought With Monthly Pay Payments
ments Payments of
$10
L M. MURRAY
Room 5, Holder Block.
Ocala. Florida
WHEN YOU ARE TIRED
of paying retail PAINT price for the
Linseed Oil, in Ready-Mixed Paints,
ouy one gallon oi
if
which is ALL PAINT, then add one
gallon of Pure Linseed Oil, at Linseed
Oil Price, and you will have TWO
gallons of Pure Linseed Oil Paint, at
a clear saving to. YOU of one dollar
or 2l ORE according to. the price of.
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have one of the most durable 'paints
obtainable, since it is Pure Linseed
Oil Paint. 2
For Sale By
THE MARION HARDWARE CO.,
Ocala, Florida
Evening Star
Unclassified
Ads.
Bring
Results
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OCALA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 1918

T

OCALA EVENING STAR
Publlnhed Every Day Except Sunday by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OF OCALA, FLA.
R. It. Carroll, Preatdeat
P. V. Leavengood, Seeretr-Treaarer
J. II. Ben iambi,. Editor

!

man appeared in the school with his teachers employed, we would have
little boy and demanded to know of j more. We would have them paid
the teacher why his boy could not use j more, so more men could be employed,
the old blue book. He told the teacher Too large a proportion of teachers

'I lamed in this book and my boy can are women, and this explains the

larn in it and he was honest in his drift into pacifism and mollycoddlism
position. The only trouble was that 'that made our country the spitrag of

the world had erone off and left him." 1 Mexico and Germany for so lone. A i

We respectfully submit that there j woman teacher is an absolute neces- i
A-1 i il 1 J 1 1 i 1 1 J PI L4. -T Al I

is no eviuence umi me woriu nau ifone : sity 10 a cniiu. one is ucsi xur iiie

Entered at Ocala, Fla., postofflce as
ccmd -class matter.

TELEPHONES
BmIuu Office Flve-Oae
ftdltoiial Department Two-Smi
Society Editor Two-Oae-FTre

MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS

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entitled for the use for republication of
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not otherwise credited in this paper
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herein. All rights of republication of
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OUR SCHOOL SYSTEM

off and left that worthy man. The
schoolboard, at the diction of the
teachers, had gone off and left him.

smaller boys and should accompany
the girls to graduation. But boys

over ten need men to guide and influ-

The world had not been consulted. fence them men who can sympathize

Only a tiny part of At had heard of 'with and lead them in sport as well

the change. A little bunch of teachers

with a really comic egotism assumed
they were the world.

Now, about that blue-backed spel

ler, we may be prejudiced in its favor.

We learned how to spell in it, and our

friends know we can spell. Mr. Brin-

son learned how to spell in the same
book, and we vouch for the fact that
he can spell. Either Mr. Brinson oi

ourself could spell down the average

college graduate of the present day.

About twenty years ago, it became

our duty and our pleasure to teach a

very small boy his a-b abs and his

b"-a ba's. We couldn't find a blue
backed speller just then, so we bought
one of those new "wordbooks." It cost
more than an old blueback, and took
the boy about one-fourth as far in
spelling. It took three or four such
books to take him from b-a ba to "re-puWican-ize."
"
This one item will show how much
more' heavily the school patron must

pay for books. His father paid 15; school books.

cents, for a speller he must pay at j. We'ard going to close this by giv giv-least
least giv-least 75 cents fpr the different spell- ing the following opinion from one

ers for his child. of our citizens who has had a college
And yet they can't spell as well as education and who. has also read deep
the oldsters. The other day in dis-'and wide and had a lot of experience
cussing the matter of spelling with with human nature. We do not entire entire-an.'
an.' entire-an.' up-to-date teacher, he said, "A; ly endorse it but it expresses quite

great deal "of the time once given to j faithfully what we have been, hearing
spelliner is now given to more import- and readme about our Dublic school

ant studies." I system for the last score of years
Now, wouldn't that jar you? A 'reading, by the way, from some of

student should neglect spelling to, the most noted newspaper and maera

make astab at some more "important zine writers, in the country. He says:

study" botany or zoology, for in instance,
stance, instance, neither of which can be mas

tered in books, and are of little use

as study. We do not think we have
too many women teachers, but we
think we should have a great many
more men.

We maintain, however, our posi position,
tion, position, that teachers have no special (
grievance and are not entitled to
special sympathy. They are doing
about as well as other people bet better,
ter, better, for the state doesn't keep up nor normal
mal normal schools to improve the proficien proficiency
cy proficiency of young men and women in other
callings. If teachers think they are
not making enough money or they are

working too hard, they are like all
the rest of us theycan go at some something
thing something else.
Altho Mr. Brinson wrote at rather

lengthy article, he did not touch of

one of the our most ; important points
the number and cost of book.?. He
can have some more space if he wants

to try to reconcile the school patron
with an average family t to paying

three or four hundred dollars for

j FLORIDA

-
In trying to reply to Superintend

ent Brinson, we had perhaps better

state at the beginning that we do not
desire to tear down the present sys system
tem system or construct another.
It might 6eem unnecessary to make
such a statement, as we have never
written anything that could be con con-strued
strued con-strued into a desire to act either as a
razer or an upraiser, but some of the

teachers have jumped to that conclu conclusion.
sion. conclusion. One of our most efficient high
school teachers taxed us ? with them
sentiments the other day if she can't

fully, she should refrain from criti-

, cism.
We believe in the public, school sys system,
tem, system, as one of the stoutest pillars of
our social fabric. We would not for
anything tear it down if it was torn
, down, we do not possess the -ability
necessary to construct another, but
as a citizen, and a journalist we have
a right to criticise what we consider
faulty, in the structure.
Mr." Brinson is much nearer the
people than the averagf teacher, but
he is a teacher, all the same,' else he
, ould hardly be competent to fill his

position, and considers the subject

principally from a teacher's stand standpoint.
point. standpoint. ;-

It was hardly necessary for the

ancient sage to write, "Let the shoe shoemaker
maker shoemaker stick to his last." It is almost
impossible for any person, in consid considering
ering considering a public matter, to isolate him
or herself from the principal occupa occupation
tion occupation of his or her lifetime.

Editors, like everybody else, arc
swayed by their calling. But it's an
editor's business to "think more about
other people's business than his own.
If .he cannot', to a certain extent, put
himself in other people's places he
doesn't hold the attention of his read readers
ers readers nor his job very long.
Mr. Brinson says we are mistaken
in our views in regard to the scope
of the work anc! real theory and pur pur-'
' pur-' pose of public education.
Perhaps so. According to Mr. Brin Brin-son's
son's Brin-son's own statement there are so
many theories among teachers it
would be difficult to pick out the one

become such a patchwork that no man
can cut a pattern of its scope without
using a jigsaw.
Mr. Brinson says
"The questions raised" have been
discussed by school people from the
time of the beginning of the system.
There is hardly a meeting of teach teachers
ers teachers either formal or informal that
some feature of these criticisms is
not touched upon. v The teachers
themselves vary much in their edu educational
cational educational theories and any course of
study of the methods pursued is a
compromise."
This is just about what we have
maintained. The teachers hold a jaw jaw-f
f jaw-f est over a method and decide in the
"only way- possible. "Where Greek
meets Greek," the side wins that has

the most Greeks. And you may ob observe
serve observe that the barbarians (thatisto (thatisto-say,
say, (thatisto-say, the school patrons) are not con consulted.
sulted. consulted. All they have to do is to pay
more taxes and buy more books.;
Mr. Brinson says:
"I very distinctly remember an in incident
cident incident that occurred when I was a boy
in a backwoods school in Marion
county and the board of public in in-.
. in-. struction had made an adoption of
text books for the legal five-year per period,
iod, period, and in this, had been so sacrile

gious asuo discard the old Blue Back
Spelling Book in which I prided my myself
self myself in becoming a good speller. A

"Mr. Brinson seems to think that

an education consists of an accumu

lation of tacts, etc. Education is a

growth, and like a plant, the mind re

quires only a few simple elements to

make it strong. Teaching is a correla

,tive word and implies "learning; the
mind must take up and transmute

into the brain fiber the thoughts and

OVER THE TOP
Get ready for the Third Liberty Loan.
Campiagn begins April 6th, 1918
The Munroe & Chambliss
National Bank
Ocala - - Florida

- "-- i-- lm Um -wi hI.- S fW ''IS vl i- -3-

...
s

too

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...
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anyhow,

We venture to say that no scholar
is really well educated in books un unless
less unless he or she knows how to spell.
Mr. Brinson says:
' "I, challenge you or any critic of

our sahdol system to visit any of our principles taught, and not merely car

schools, at any time and observe the ry around like baggage a conglomer conglomer-work
work conglomer-work and study the general trend of ate mass of 'facts and fancies.' It
the training that is given and then; seems strange that to develop phys phys-make
make phys-make up your, mind as to whether it;ical power all men advise, and exper exper-is
is exper-is wholesome' or not. You will not fimTience teaches, that a simple but strong
it, perfect, you will find some poor 'diet is best: while, when it comes to

teaching, you will find some lapses of the mind, the majority of teachers de-

disciplme, you will hnd possibly a few sire to feed the mind up on all the
pupils overcrowded with work, you different things that can be found on
will find some pupils not being work-' the face of the earth. A great many
ed to their capacity, but with it all .teachers have not the minds to teach
you will find it the best that we have the simple but strong studies, there there-had."
had." there-had." 1 fore they introduce into the school
It was unnecessary for Mr. Brinsen room some light and fancy study,
to write this. We have also preached .that, perhaps (not necessarily true)
the same doctrine ourself. they had some knowledge of and could
After summing up the studies we get by with. This has consequently
criticise, Mr. Brfnson says we would brought -into the school room all tht:
have mighty little left but the dry varied things that are taught (taught
bones. 'at) in the. public schools. You can
Good spelling, the ability toNread educate a man in one line and he is
aloud with the proper intonation and broad; hence a learned doctor, lawyer,
pronunciation, a good working knowl-' minister, statesman, engineer, scien scien-edge
edge scien-edge of arithmetic and geography, an tist can all meet on the high plain
acquaintance with grammar that of clear thinking, good reasoning and,
would keep the pupil from writing must I say it, common sense. Under
"the committee are," proficiency in the present system, in the small time
penmanship, a fair acquaintance with that the average pupil has, his time
history, may be dry bones, but if is scattered over more than he can do
thoroughly learned they would be thoroughly, and like a farm that is

SOlld. A large number Of Studies that half tilled, his mind is wppHv and

the pupil learns to recite parrot-like, grassy. In a footrace we strip the
and forgets in a few years, or often contestants, but in the race of life we
months, are not even dry bones they let our schools load our boys and
are shadows giris up with stuff they will never
. It's bur opinion that if the public need. I am in favor of a liberal educa educa-school
school educa-school must teach the students how to tion, Tiut that should come after the
sew and cook and sing it should also i public schools. If the public schools
teach them how to put their clothes will teach a boy to read, I mean read
on it should teach them how to wash understanding, he will get the lib lib-their
their lib-their faces, cut wood, build fires, say fcral education on his own hook in
grace at the tabled wind up clocks after years. A real taste for good
and run autoes. It should not leave reading, thoughtful reading, will be
their parents anything to do in teach- of more real worth to a boy than the
ing them. ; whole of the other stuff they give him
The Star thinks if the public school now."
is to teach the farmer to farm,, the L-

future civil engineer to work geome-j We close promptly at

six-thirty.
3t

trical problems, the future lawyer or THE BOOK SHOP.

druggist to read Latin, it should

teach the elements of his calling to ri-nr if nfiini I r-ll
the futyre merchant! dentist, machin-' I Ha.H Y" SV1 III I PW
ist, etc. All classes pay taxes; either: 1 -lii!L 1 w 11 ULBJLIl
all classes or none should receive spe-!
ciai education. Suffering Described As Torture
Mr. Krinsnn is rmsrakpn nhnnt. tnprp &

having been a popular demand a fewj
years ago for teaching agriculture
and civil government in the public

schools. The great mass of the

Relieved by Black-Draught.

Pnccvlllf C- Mrs Kitit I aa Ihla -f

peO- iv,fc nhrf xi'rifpc- "Mv hitchanil ic on

pie never heard of ny such demand 0 Tu:ia i;r: u :
r .v ii j A u engineer, and once while n.tincr, he ln-
until they were called on to buy somei. ..' ... r
more books for their children. Th(,!'u.ed himse!f wi j a piece of heavy ma ma-public
public ma-public schools play the dickens teach- chmery, across the abdomen he was
ing agriculture. Not 10 per cent of so sore he cou,d not bear to Press cn
the teachers could teach a boy how to himself at a!!, on chest or abdomen. He
hitch a mule to a plow. weighed 165 lbs., and fell off until he

Mr. Brmson says of our recommen recommendations:
dations: recommendations:
"These things will come when you

weighed 110 lbs., in two weeks.

He became constipated and it looked

like he would die. We had three different

can cage and confine human thought doctors, yet with all their medicine, his
and human intelligence as you would towels failed to act. He would turn uo

a ten-cent bottle of castor oil, and drink
it two or three days in succession. He
did this yet without result. We became

I desperate, he suffered so. He was swol

len terribly. He told me his suffering
could only be described as torture.
I sent and bought Thedford's Black Black-Draught.
Draught. Black-Draught. 1 made him take a big dose,
and when it began to act he fainted, he

was in such misery, but he got relief and

cage and confine a monkey or a pir

rott,"
That is just what the public schools
are trying to do. They are drifting
toward the Prussian system of the
state thru the teacher directing
thought in every channel.
We agree with Mr. Brinson in
thinking that teachers don't receive
pay enough. If they will make us gov governor
ernor governor we don't want the office, but

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we mignt consent to taKe it lor their began to mend at once. He got well,
sake we will recommend that thejand we both feel he owes his life to
legislature cut off every graft m the Thedfos Black-Draught."
state, so it can pay the teachers bet- Bedford's Black-Draught will help you
ter salaries. It would be both a great . j c t j ,
savins ann a hotter invpstmpnt sn ep fit, ready for the day's work.

far -from reducing the number of,
Try it!

NC-131

Mly ffiiy
Mterlly idDils f

By DARWIN P. KINGSLEY

PRESIDENT, NE W YORK LIFE INSURANCE CO.

'HY do you save to build a home? It is

usually cheaper to pay rent.
Why do you plan to give your children

a good education? Will you get any money divi dividends
dends dividends from that? K
Why do you pay fire insurance premiums and life
insurance premiums? You personally will get little
if any thing from that
Why do' you call the doctor quickly if the children
are ailing? You don't stop to think whether you
can afford it. Do you?
None of these expenditures are what w;e call good
investments. They don't pay in money, yet all pay
the finest of dividends.
Liberty Bonds represent the home, the school, the
children; they represent all the great deeds of our
fathers and grandfathers; they represent Bunker
Hill and Yorktown and Gettysburg; they represent
the blessed freedom under which we all live, they
also represent the ORDER that makes freedom
blessed.
They represent the boys "over there;" they represent
devasted Belgium and homeless Serbia and murder murdered
ed murdered Arjnenia;
They are the defence that shall keep from our shores the monster criminals
who outraged the women of Belgium and Northern France and made the
men slaves;
They represent the strength that shall restore Belgium and rebuild France
and avenge Serbia;
They are the voice of those who are too young or too old or too weak to
tight; they are the sword of the women and the'eannon of the children; they
are the voice of free people calling to cruelly wronged, freedom-loved men
and bringing them succor.
Buy them? Of course you will buy them. You'll
borrow to buy them. 4
You don't have to be urged, You would be ashamed to go home to your
children if you did not buy them.
The rate of interest is important but not of first importance. They would
pay, they would appeal to you, if they bore no interest whatever.
Add to the rate of interest the dividends they pay in self interest, in safety,
in public order, in liberty and law and you have a larger return than you
receive from any other thing that you own. s
They will never become "scraps ot paper.
They are the best secured investment in the world.

Ym Stand-' JBelM
1 Should- ley

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TfflS SPACE PAID FOR AND CONTRIBUTED BY-S-Ssmmm

Ocala Bar Association

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BY WAR SAVINGS



0CALA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, APRIL 6. 1918

is in. m

If You Have Any News for thi De Department,
partment, Department, Call Two-One-Five
or Two-Seven
Afterwards
After the wild whirl silence,
After the worst, the best;
After the white heat, shadows,
After the stones, soft meadows,
After the conflict rest

After the tempest, harbor, :
Port and golden bar;
After the rugged weather,
Drifting to port together,
Sleep, ana the morning star.
After th,e silence, waking
Fragrance and cool and dew;
After the great thirst slaking,
After the long heart-breaking
Heaven and peace and you.
Will Allen Dromgoole.
Monday is a wheatless day.
D. O. B. Club
The members of the D. O. B. Club
which was organized about a month
ago, entertained their boy friends at
a most enjoyable supper last night at
six o'clock at the home of one of the
members, Miss Florence Guilfoyle.
The other club members who are
Misses Christine Close, Jessie Dehon,
Clifton Sexton and Mildred Crosby
gathered at Miss Guilfoyle's home in
the afternoon and prepared the sup supper
per supper which consisted of creamed pota potatoes,
toes, potatoes, rice, pork chops, hot biscuits, to tomatoes,
matoes, tomatoes, fruit salad, iced tea, jello
cake and candies.
The guests arrived at six o'clock

and found their places at the pretty

table adorned with pink roses by the
aid of clever and original cards. The

guests were Messrs. Marion Lummus,
James Ellis, Hugh Chase, Lindsay
Troxler and Lynn Hollinrake. After

the supper the guests gallantly help

ed their hostess "clean up" after
which they departed for their boy
scout duties; the young ladies going to

the movies.

The D. O. B. Club has a business
meeting every Wednesday afternoon,

and their supper party last night was

their first social affair.
s

Mr. and Mrs. W.L. Dixon and son,
Bernard are home from a several days

visit to their relatives in Mascotte.

Miss Eunice O'Dell of Micanopy,

arrived in Ocala Friday afternoon to
be the week-end guest of her cousin,

Miss Irene Tompkins. Miss Tompkins

invited Miss Ulanee Barnett, Miss Lu

cile Gissendaner, Messrs. Fred Winer,

Harry Holcomb Jr., Walter Hardin
and Frank Rentz to her home last
night to meet her cousin. The eve evening
ning evening was spent very informally play playing
ing playing rook and later they all went into
the kitchen and made candy. The eve evening
ning evening was a delightful one, and the
piano selections by Mr. Rentz were
particularly enjoyed.
Senior Dance
The members of the graduating
class of the O. H. S. and a number of
their junior friends, making about fif

teen couples in all, gathered informal-1 talk to the girls yesterday morning
ly last night at the O. H. S. dormitory : and took them some literature for
and danced for several hours. which they were most thankful. Mrs.
Chalker talked to the girls for nearly

an hour and she says they were at-

party as a surprise for Mr. and Mrs.
Kelly, and had arranged several other
delightful affairs in their honor. Mr.
and Mrs. Kelly passed thru Ocala
Thursday afternoon en route to
Gainesville, where they will reside
with Dr. and Mrs. Kelly temporarily.
Industrial School Girls
There is a report that the twenty twenty-one
one twenty-one industrial school girls in the
Marion county jail are unappreciative.
Mrs. Chalker, herself, informs us that
is a great mistake. She went up to

present were Misses Caroline Peyser,
Juanita and Marie Jones, Elizabeth
Euff, Marion Hunter, Nellie Olds,
Messrs. Chester Robertson, Joe Caldwell,-Henry
Camp, Ralph Stanaland,
Charles Brown and A. T. Thomas Jr.
Notice to W. C. T. U.
Members of the W. C. T. U. who
intend marching in the parade this
evening will please meet on Mrs. T.
M. Moore's lawn at 6:30 o'clock.
For the Benefit of the Red Cross
"The Piper's Pay," so successfully
given at the Temple Theater last
Monday evening, will be repeated at
the Woman's Club house next Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday evening, April 9, for the benefit
of the Red Cross. There will be a
short musical program preceding the
play. This is to take the place of the
Liliputian Fete which cannot be
staged at the Woman's Club' Admis-

life behind' the scenes and intimate U-"JC,1 u a i on 10r aI1' Zo cents eacn' tne ennre
views of incidents on the stage. There Lbors asked Mrs. Chalker if they had!proceeds to go to the Red Cross as a
are also scores of pretty Jrirls in fash- Leen removed They claim to be sorry !gift from the educati0nal committer

?nhl ttirP rPn PSPn in, th ests 1S lD lrOUDle lneV naVe S1Ven'. of the Woman's Club

, TvTio i Y W-n-v holiarae f ham onH chD

V11C1XV1 KJll V WAV-111 j CJV4

At the Temple

rv u ti. it wn;, ? tentive and lady-like and that many
Dorothy Phillips and WiHiam Sto-jb them firgt
well star at the Temple today in a ereatlv disturb-
Bluebird photo play, "Broadway grlweie he L u u ffc
t u l u r u r t ed Mr. and Mrs. Chalker, but last
Loveof the bright lights of Broad- , . '.
, , T, .v night, true to their promise, they
way and the lure of the .stage the: b .

TIRES FOR TOURING
over the rough roads to points of
great scenic beauty must and should
be of the highest type. It does not pay
to start out on a tour with only aver average
age average tires on your car. The enjoyment
will turn into disappointment when
the punctures and blow-outs come.
Avoid this almost absolutely by using
Goodrich Road Tested tires.
BIALOCK BROTHERS
VULCANIZING
PHONE 78 107 OKLAWAHA

The story "Broadway Love is an . . .

intensely interesting and rapidly school assured
movinf one. entire! v too lone to crive ...

,. Mrs. Lhalker they would give no more

"The Woman God Forgot"
The following extracts from the
Review by Peter Milne in the Motion

-r a t mi i a

u.i uuu. wic i trouble if thev had another superin- ricture ews win De oi interest as
so surprising and unexpected that the .tendent The food at the jail fs the;that feature will be shown at the
time s.t the Temple will fly on wings game m and d but Temple next Thursday,
cf enjoyment. Midge (Dorothy Phil-i. ... A. The SDectacle in which Jesse Laskv

and there is plenty of it. Neverthe- presents the brilliant Geraldine Far Far-less
less Far-less it is tiresome and some kind- rV "The Woman God Forgot, is a
hearted people have been sending! Picture of old Mexico at the time of
them lunches and another friend hasjthe Montezumas and the Spanish

ah 1 conquests, its magnincent scenes

r i. i 1. 1 ir.Tr;

lips) goes to the city to win fame on

the stage, and is followed by her per

sistent country lover. She makes the

acauaintance of a stage favorite, 1

Cherry Blow, who also has a persis- j
tent suitor. Then the love affairs get
into peculiar and funny tangles.
There is also a great deal of plot in j

"Broadway Love," declared to be one
of the best Bluebirds.

been sending soda water.

attentions the girls have appreciated.

Mr. D. W. Davis and Mr.
Palmer left yesterday for a
days business trip, to Atlanta.

representing the ancient city of the

Aztecs, people with hundreds of bar-

Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Rivers hav J

j x-L j i women, alternate wilii uie nuiuiacies
named their handsome little son , A, .

Clarence Manning Rivers.

Mr. and Mrs. O'Brien of

of the story in holding the spectator
spellbound. Miss Farrar lends of her

W. M. best to the role of Tecza, daughter of

several : Many triends oi little iietnenne j Montezuma, and her best is truly
, Rivers, the three-year-old daughter j something superlative.
; of Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Rivers, who has The love story of Tecza and Alvar-

Ocala, been seriously ill lor tne past weeK, ado furnishes an appealing angle,

were Fruitland Park visitors last Sun- rejoice to hear that she was consider-

day. Leesburg Commercial. j ed out of danger yesterday.

I

Miss Dnris Murrv evnents tn co to A

----- X- O TTT 1 1 ii-

Clearwater this afternoon to spend Atlanta on weanesaay wirea nis pa pa-Sunday
Sunday pa-Sunday with her cousin, Mrs. Donald rents this morning that everything
Dyrenforth of Denver, Colo. Miss was O. K., and that he will return
Murry will return home tomorrow home on Monday to wait until he is
night. called.
j
Mr. and Mrs. J. Lawrence Kelly Jr., Melville Little entertained about a
who were married here Easter Mon- dozen of his classmates at a very de-

while the fate of the proud and haugh

ty Montezuma when the Spaniards
take nossession of his rich citv and

D. Lancaster, Jr., who went to;cast him in cnains attracts much of

day and left afterwards in their car,
supposedly for Gainesville and At Atlanta,
lanta, Atlanta, went instead to Crystal River,
where they were the guests of Mr.
and Mrs. Holder and daughters until
Thursday Afternoon. 'Mr. and Mrs.

lightful little party Friday night at
the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs.
M. M. Little. Games and music were
greatly enjoyed, after which the
young host and his sister, Miss Maude

Little, served ice cream, cake, candy,

Holder had planned a jolly house-, jellatin and lemonade. Among those

il 1 m

' J77 at. fl
You are asked to spend wisely to buy jJ ml
only the things honestly needed to ihatn- 0m
tain your health and efficiency. This 'nJ&S 1 iSll
is intelligent thrift. .The Government J0Z BSfel
asks it of you as a war measure : :
Bond Are Not S

Thrift requires the ex

ercise of restraint and self-denial
-qualities without which you cannot achieve the success in
life which it is your ambition to achieve and for the lack of
which you are likely to suffer in later years.
The money you acquire by thrift you are asked to
loan not give to your country. It will come back
to you when you may need it far more than you
do now, and you will be paid interest for it3 use.
This war is a frightful thing, but it may prove of inestima inestimable
ble inestimable benefit to you, if it teaches you the good habit of thrift.
Help Your Country and Yourself by Investing in Liberty Bonds
THIS SPACE PAID FOR AND CONTRIBUTED BY

Marion County Medical Society

the spectator's sympathy.

The settings of "The Woman God

Forgot" are stupendous. One in par

ticular, representing the exterior of

the Aztec temple, is one of the big biggest
gest biggest ever seen in a picture. On this
is one of the final scenes the soldiers

of Montezuma and the forces of Cor

tez.do battle for the possession of the

city-" There is thrill after thrill in the
scene, particularly when some of the
participants, struck down by adver adversaries
saries adversaries fall the whole length of its
slightly slanting wall.

Wallace Reed is again Miss Farrars
leading man and makes a most engag engaging
ing engaging figure of Alvarado.
Miss Farrar's gowns in this picture
arein' keeping with the gorgeous old olden
en olden -'Spanish style, though her head
head dresses are similar to those of
Gaby Delys. This feature has beei.

ieen by many Ocala people who claim

it ranks with all of Farrar's other

great successes.
"The Piper's Pay"
The Piper's Pay put on at the Tern

pie Monday night by local talent will

be given again next Tuesday night at

the Woman's Club house for the ben

efij of the Red Cross. The price of
admission will be 25 cents, and there

wijl also be a delightful musical pro
gram.

About twelve members of the Friend

ship Bible Class met last night at the
home of Mrs. L. N. Green for their
regular monthly business meeting.

This class sends two boxes of jcloth

ing a year to a little orphan enter

prise, and they planned and discussed
the clothine that is be made at once

for this little girl. After the business

meeting, Mrs. Green served hot choc-

olaJ?a and cake.
::

Mr 'Charles Whitesides of Maeno-

lia Springs, is in the city the guest of
his brother, Mr. P. W. Whitesides and
family. He has been connected with
a tourist hotel at Magnolia Springs,
which has closed for the summer. Af After
ter After a short visit here Mr. Whitesides
will go to Balsam, N. C, to take
charge .cf a summer hotel.

Dr. and Mrs. H. K. Morrison, ac

companied by Misses Ruth Bourlay,

Marie Fussell, Mary Miller and Belle

Fussell, motored to Silver Springs one

afternoon this week in their Sedan,
and snent a delightful afternoon at

the Springs and in Ocala. Leesburg
Commercial.

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Kinard and son,
Cov arrived last' night and will again

make Tallahassee their home. Mr.

Kinard has accepted a position with
the Seaboard here, leaving a similar
positfon on this road in Ocala. Talla Tallahassee
hassee Tallahassee Democrat.
Mrs. William Tooke and daughter,
Sara of Montezuma., Ga., who have
been visiting their cousins, Mr. and
Mrs. J. A. Walters and family, left
Friday for Coleman to visit Mrs. Ar Armour
mour Armour and children until next Tuesday.

Miss Stella Leonard of Bartow, who
is spending the winter with relatives
in Hastings, returned there this morn morning
ing morning after a three days visit to her
aunt, Mrs. G. G. Maynard.
Miss Rose Wolff is staying with
Mrs. D. C. Stiles during her parents'
visit in Oklahoma.

The county judge has issued a mar marriage
riage marriage license to Mr. Everett I. Steph Stephens
ens Stephens and Miss Ethel M. Riker of Sparr.
Mr. Stephens is a son of our school

ClTTTwTTX A TTAM

The industry arid the thrift
of American farms, American
factories, American shops,
American homes the indus industry
try industry and thrift of every citizen
in the land the industry and
thrift that invest in Liberty
BoncU this is the sure foun foundation
dation foundation of American Victory.
"We must lick or be licked
Thia Spacm Paid for and Contributed By

j.

E. AL LEM AND

The Jeweler
Naxt to Southern Express Office.

Ocala

Florida

t::i:i::; : iti:u;t:ii::a

f

lis now a universally acknowledged necessity. No business man is
prepared to meet the daily affairs of hisr business if he is not pro protected
tected protected with

FIRE INSURANCE

We represent not only the best fire insurance companies, out
also the highest class INDEMNITY AND BONDING concerns in
the world. Talk is over with us.

D. W. DAVIS, iSJWSZ. OCALA, FLA.

txsasssxmttn

H'iSitttZtSt

commissioner A. J. Stephens and Missj

Riker is a daughter of an enterpris-j
ing western family which moved to

our state a year or so ago. The Star

understands that the wedding will
take place at the home of the bride's
parents tomorrow.
Temple Program for Next Week
Many treats are in store for movie
lovers at the Temple next week, foi
it is a whole week of stars. Every
week we have one or two of the best
stars on the screen, but next week
we will have six.
Monday, Wallace Reid, the idol of
stage-struck girls and the best fight fighter
er fighter on the screen, will star in the "Man
of the Music Mountain," a Para Paramount.
mount. Paramount. There will also be a Fox
comedy.
Tuesday, Dustin Famum will star
in a six-reel feature, "The Spy."
There will also be a Fox special.
Wednesday, George Beban in a
five-reel Paramount, "Lost in Tran Transit."
sit." Transit." And a Pathe News.
Thursday, Geraldine Farrar in a
six-reel Artcraft, "The Woman God
Forgot."
Friday, Harry B. Walthall, the hero
of The Birth of a Nation in a five-reel

Perfection, "Saints' Adventure." And
a Pathe News.
Saturday, Franklyn Farnum, who
made such a hit here in "Anything
Once," will be seen in a Bluebird,
"Fighting Gin." Billy Rhodes .will
star in a comedy.
The Star regrets to learn of the
severe illnes sof Sam, the little son
of Mr. and Mrs. John Knight.
SEVERAL .Hundred fine Easter Lil Lil-lies,
lies, Lil-lies, at $1.25 per dozen. The Ocala
Green House. 4 4-t.

One Tropical Spot.
Only at one place in the United
States is there ral tropical vegeta vegetation,
tion, vegetation, says the Popular Science Month Monthly.
ly. Monthly. Florida and California have what
is called "sub-tropical" vegetation. In
the midst of a desert in. the extreme
southern part of California is a true
oasis. The oasis. Palm Springs, lies
250 feet below the sea level. So hot
is it there that there is a riot of vege vege-tatioq.all
tatioq.all vege-tatioq.all the year round. Enormous
fig trees and mammoth grape fruit
and oranges are always to be had.
The lemorrs that grow there weigh
two and a half pounds apiece. The
responsibility for all tL may be raid
to a beautiful little stream which Is
fed by the Colorado river and which
flows through the oasis only to disap disappear
pear disappear Into the ground at Its end.

Did Not Fool the Bear.
Bruin is self-educated, but excep exceptionally
tionally exceptionally wise In the way of mankind.
A prospector proved that. Having
suffered the loss of much food, he pre prepared
pared prepared a particularly tasty morsel for
the bear and left It in the cabin, with
a notlca on it to warn any prospectors
or hunters that might enter that It
was intended for bruin, and bruin
alone. The bear arrived in due course
and ate everything edible and some
things that were not, but passed up
the meat that had been prepared for
him.? And it was bacon, too. Thl
prospector declares that the bear must
be able to read.

Nunnally's Candies fresh every
week at Gerig's Drug Store, where
you can also get Thrift Stamps, tf
If you can't spare your car in the
dav. hrincr it to us at night. Williams

& Fox Auto Service Station. 18-tf



PAGE SIX

3
if:
2&
A
4
:i:
A
3fc
T.
A
A
w T
A

OCALA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY. APRIL 6. 1918

inl

lie .liberty Bell Was leari

esflera fciisptoere

W

Your forefathers fought a noble
fight to make it possible, and have
continued to do so for over a hun hundred
dred hundred years. Many are the sacri sacrifices
fices sacrifices that have been niade, and to
-
what avail if the present war on
democracy by German militar militar-ism
ism militar-ism should succeed? Such a
world catastrophe would mean in
a few years world domination by
the hellish forces that are now
murdering women and children
in our sister republics in Europe.
You can't afford it. It's up to the
people of the United States to fur furnish
nish furnish money not only for our own
soldiers, but also to pro

vide a large portion of the
funds necessary for other
nations battling for world
democracy. For this pur purpose
pose purpose Uncle Sam has asked
you to loan him
Three Billion

ollars I

!

M Tie Libenv Bell list 1

all Over tie

I fi Whole World J

I
I

It

lit

Irk J'$: is, ,;-:

4 rc

' f .: ''

D

Mf 5
. mmmi

Ml toil II

Every real American is now call called
ed called upon to do his duty. Many of
our boys are now on the fighting
front, sacrificing their lives on the
altar of freedom. Their success
depends largely upon the finan financial
cial financial support given them and their
allies by the American people.
Are you going to be a "slacker"
or are you going to buy a portion
of the bonds that your country
offers you on April 6th? The rais raising
ing raising of Three Billion Dollars is no
small undertaking and it's up to
everyone to help. Uncle Sam
is liberal in his proposition, and
will pay you 41-4 per cent inter interest
est interest for the use of your money.

Don't get it into you mind

I come to you about this
matter. It's YOUR DUTY to get in
your subscription for a bond right
away. This is YOUR war and you
know YOUR duty. Wiil you do it?
We believe you will, but don't de delay
lay delay Get into communication with
your bank at once and make your
arrangements to assist in raising

hree Billion

Dollars!

If You Can Not Pay All Cash the Banks Will Loan You the Balance at a Low Rate of Ineres
The Ocala National Bank The Munroe & Chambliss National Bank

0

T..T..T.rrTTTVf1



OCALA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 1918

BELGIANS FORCED
TO AID GEidNS
Kaiser's Officers Showed Open
Disregard of Interna International
tional International Law.

WORKMEN SEIZED AS SLAVES

Cardinal Mercier Moved to Bitter Con Condemnation
demnation Condemnation of Acts of German Au Au-v
v Au-v thorities Which Aroused Detes Detes-1
1 Detes-1 tation of Christendom.

Contrary to rules laid down by
the Hague convention, and all prin principles
ciples principles of civilized warfare, German
authorities forced Belgians to aid
them in the prosecution of the war.
The committee on public informa information
tion information gives the facts concerning
these atrocious deeds in a pamphlet
recently made public, from which we
take the following :
October 12, 1915, the German author authorities
ities authorities took a long step In the develop development
ment development of their policy of forcing the Bel Belgians
gians Belgians to aid them In prosecuting the
war. The decree of that date reveals
the matter and openly discloses a con contempt
tempt contempt for international law.
"Article 1. Whoever, without reason,
refuses to undertake or to continue
work suitable to his occupation, and In
the execution of which the military
administration is interested, such work
being ordered by one or more of the
military commanders, will be liable to
Imprisonment not exceeding one year.
He may also be transported to Ger Germany.
many. Germany. "In voklng Belgian laws or even In International
ternational International conventions to the con contrary,
trary, contrary, can, in no case, justify the re refusal
fusal refusal to work.
"Article 2. Any person who by force,
threats, persuasion, or other means
attempts to influence another to refuse
work as pointed out in Article 1, is
liable to the punishment of imprison imprisonment
ment imprisonment not exceeding five years.
"Article 3. Whoever knowingly by
means of aid given or in any other way
abets a punishable refusal to work,
will be liable to a maximum fine of
10,000 marks, and in addition may be
condemned to a year's imprisonment.
"If communtrs or associations have
rendered themselves guilty of such an
offense the heads of the communes will
be punished.
"Article 4. In addition to the penal penalties
ties penalties stated in Articles 1 and 3, the Ger German
man German authorities may, in case of need,
Impose on communes, where without
reason, work has been refused, a fine
or other coercive police measures.
"This present decree comes Into
force immediately.
"Der Etappeinspekteur,
"VON UNGER,
"Generalleutnant.
"Ghent, October 12. 1915."
"Slavery," Said Cardinal Mercier.
Cardinal Mercier's brief comment Is
as follows: "The injustice and arbi arbitrariness
trariness arbitrariness of this decree exceed all that
could be Imagined. Forced labor, col collective
lective collective penalties and arbitrary punish punishments,
ments, punishments, all are there. It Is slavery, nei neither
ther neither more nor less."
Cardinal Mercier was in error, for
the German authorities were able to
imagine a much more terrible measure.
In October, 1916, when the need for
an additional labor supply In Germany
had become urgent, the German gov government
ernment government established. the system of
forced labor and deportation which
has aroused the detestation of Chris Christendom.
tendom. Christendom. The reader will not be misled
by the clumsy effort of the German au authorities
thorities authorities to mask the real purpose of
the decree.
"I. People able to work may be
compelled to work even outside the
place where they live, in case they
have to apply to the charity of others
for the support of themselves or their
dependents on account of gambling,
drunkenness, loafing, unemployment or
Idleness.
"II. Every Inhabitant of the country
is bound to render assistance in case
of accident or general danger, and also
to give help in case of public calami calamities
ties calamities as far as he can, even outside the
place where he lives; In case of refu refusal
sal refusal he may be compelled by force.
"III. Anyone called upon to work,
under Articles I or II, who shall re refuse
fuse refuse the work, or to continue at the
work assigned him, will incur the pen penalty
alty penalty of Imprisonment up to three years
and of a fine up to 10,000 marks, or
one or other of these penalties, unless
a severer penalty is provided for by
the laws in force.
"If the refusal to work has been
made in concert or in agreement with
several persons, each accomplice will
be sentenced," as if he were a ring ringleader,
leader, ringleader, to at least a week's imprison imprisonment.
ment. imprisonment. "IV. The German military authori authorities
ties authorities and military courts will enforce
the proper execution of this decree.
"THE QUARTERMASTER GEN GENERAL,
ERAL, GENERAL, SAUBERZWEIG.
"Great Headquarters, 3d October,
1916."
Military Rulers Responsible.
The responsibility for this atrocious
program rests upon the military rulers
of Germany, who had labored so zeal zealously
ously zealously to Infect the army and the
People with the principles of ruthless ruthless-ness.
ness. ruthless-ness. It is significant that the decree
of October 3, 1916, followed hard upon
the elevation of Hindenburg to the su supreme
preme supreme command with Ludendorf as his
chief of staff. In his long report of
January 1G, 1917, Minister Whitlock

says: (On me in state department)
"Then, in August, Von Hindenburg
was appointed to the supreme com command.
mand. command. He is said to have criticized
Von Hissing's policy as too mild; there

j was a quarrel ; Von liisin went to
I Berlin to protest threatened to resign,
i but did not. He returned, and a Ger-

! man official here said that Belgium

would now be subjected to a more ter terrible
rible terrible regime would learn what war
was. The prophecy has been vindicat vindicated.
ed. vindicated. Recently I was told that the dras drastic
tic drastic measures are really of Ludendorf s

J inspiration; I do not know. Many Ger

man ofneers say so."
If Von Bissing had opposed the pol policy
icy policy of deportation when his own judg judgment
ment judgment was overruled, he consented to
become the "devil's advocate" and de defended
fended defended the system In public Espe Especially
cially Especially instructive Is the following con conversation
versation conversation reported by Mr. F. C. Wal Wal-cott:
cott: Wal-cott: "I went to Belgium to investigate
conditions, and while there I had op opportunity
portunity opportunity ... to talk one day with
Governor General Von Bissing, who
died three or four weeks ago, a man
seventy-two or seventy-three years
old, a man steeped in the 'system,
born and bred to the hardening of the
heart which that philosophy develops.
There ought to be some new word
coined for the process that a man's
heart undergoes when It becomes
steeped in that system.
"I said to him, 'Governor, what are
you going to do If England and France
stop giving these people money to pur purchase
chase purchase food?
Von Bissing Relied on Starvation.
"He said, 'We have got that all
worked out and have had it worked
out for weeks, because we have ex expected
pected expected this system to break down at
any time.
"He went on to say, 'Starvation will
grip these people in thirty to sixty
days. Starvation Is a compelling force,
and we would use that force to compel
the Belgian workingmen, many of
them very skilled, to go to Germany
to replace the Germans, so that they
could go to the front and fight against
the English and the French.'
"'As fast as our railway transpor transportation
tation transportation could carry them, we would
transport thousands of others that
would be fit for agricultural work,
across Europe down Into southeastern
Europe, into Mesopotamia, where we
have huge, splendid irrigation works.
All that land needs is water and It
will blossom like the rose.
'. The weak remaining, the old and
the young, we would concentrate oppo opposite
site opposite the firing line, and put firing
squads back of them, and force them
through that line, so that the English
and French could take care of their
own people?
"It was a perfectly simple, direct,
frank reasoning. It meant that the
German government would use any
force In the destruction of any people
not Its own to further its own ends."
Frederick C. Walcott, In National Geo Geographical
graphical Geographical Magazine, May, 1917.
A brief general view of the character
of the deportations can perhaps be
gained best from the report of Minis Minister
ter Minister Whitlock.
"The deportations began In October
in the Etape, at Ghent, and e Bruges,
as my brief telegrams indicated. The
policy spread ; the rich industrial dis districts
tricts districts of Hainault, the mines and steel
works about Charleroi were next at attacked;
tacked; attacked; now they are seizing men in
Brabant, even in Brussels, despite
some Indications and even predictions
of the civil authorities that the policy
was about to be abandoned.
The etapes were the parts of Bel Belgium
gium Belgium under martial law, and included
the province of western Flanders, part
of eastern Flartders, and the region
of Tournai. The remainder of the oc occupied
cupied occupied part of Belgium was under
civil government
Pitiable and Distressing Scene.
"During the last fortnight men have
been impressed here In Brussels, but
their seizures here are made evidently
with much greater care than In the
provinces, with more regard for the
appearances. There was no public an announcement
nouncement announcement of the Intention to deport,
but suddenly about ten days ago cer certain
tain certain men in towns whose names are
on the list of chomeurs received sum summons
mons summons notifying them to report at one
of the railway stations on a given day ;
penalties were fixed for failure to re respond
spond respond to the summons and there was
printed on the card an offer of employ employment
ment employment by the German government, ei either
ther either in Germany or Belgium. On the
first day out of about 1,500 men or ordered
dered ordered to present themselves at the
Gare du Midi about 750 responded.
These were examined by German phy physicians
sicians physicians and 300 were taken. There
was no disorder, a large force of
mounted Uhlans keeping back the
crowds and barring access to the sta station
tion station to all but those who had been
summoned to appear. The commis commission
sion commission for relief in Belgium had secured
permission to give to each deported
man a loaf of bread, and some of the
communes provided warm clothing for
those who had none and in addition a
smair financial allowance. As by one
of the ironies of life the winter has
been more excessively cold than Bel Belgium
gium Belgium has ever known it, and while
many of those who presented them themselves
selves themselves were adequately protected
against the cold, many of them were
without overcoats. The men shiv shivering
ering shivering from cold and fear, the parting
from weeping wives and children, the
barriers of brutal Uhlans, all this
made the scene a pitiable and dis distressing
tressing distressing one.
"It was understood that the seizure
would continue here in Brussels, but
on Thursday. last, a bitter cold day,
those that had been convoked were
sent home without examination. It is
supposed that the severe weather has

moved the Germans to postpone th8
deportation."

NOTICE,

i Notic: is hereby j:iven that the following land in the city of Ocala will be
j ioM at public auction on
! MONDAY, TIU; SIXTH DAY OF MAY, A. IJ. 11S,
1 at lh- CiTt HALL, in Ocala. Marion county. Florida, or .so much thereof as
1 may be necessary to pay the amount Ju- f ir itv uxm herein t nnnfttt

the same, together with the cost of sue.) .-ale and" advertising.

Buy War Stamps Now

DESCi'.II'TIOX CF LAND

XA-Mi: OF OWNER OR
l i : o vi. it f: p p. e s k x t ati v e

Com 6 4 ft s of nw cor blk 13
s S ft 22 ft n 120 ft w 134
Old Survey, s 43 ft e 112 ft
feet
Lot A i-ub of block 115 Old
Survey
X lot 1 blk 17 Old Survey..
Lot 2 block 19. Old Survey..
NM lot 4 blk 18 Old Survey.
All blk 21, Old Survey
Com 50 ft e of sv cor ,blk 25
Old Survey, n 112 ft e 27 ft
s 112 ft w 27 ft
72 ft n and s by 56 ft e and w
in nw cor blk 27 Old Survey
E lot 3 blk 27 Old Survey ex
6 ft e and w off e side and ex
10 ft n and s off n side....
E lot 4 blk 27 Old Survey..
S lot 1 blk 33 Old Survey..
Lot 2 blk 33 Old Survey
All ex 124 ft sq In nw cor blk
34 Old Survey
Com 56 ft w of lie cor blk 35
Old Survey, w 18 ft s 57 ft
e 18 ft n 57 ft
S blk 35 Old Survey
Com 25 ft s of ne cor lot 4 blk
4 5 Old Survey, s 29 ft w 126
ft 7i 59 ft e 70 ft s 30 ft e
119 feet
Com 78 ft s of ne cor blk 46
Old Survey, w 105 ft b 49 ft
e 105 ft n 49 ft
Com 75 ft w of ne cor blk 47
Old Survey, w 43 ft 8 124
ft e 18 ft n &4 ft e 45 ft n
UJ St w 20 f t n 60 ft
56 ft e and w 'by 224 ft n and
s on w side oik 47 Old Sur Survey
vey Survey W lot 2 blk 50 Old Survey..
Lots 3 and 4 blk 51 Old Survey
Com at nw cor blk 52 Old Sur Survey
vey Survey e 134 ft s 120 ft w 15 ft
s 12 ft w 119 ft n 131 ft
All blk 53 Old Survey
W of e iblk 55 Old Survey
Lot 10 Holder's eu'b w blk
57 Old Survey
N blk 63 Old Survey
Com 56 ft s of nw cor lot 2
blk 64 Old Survey, s 28 ft e
112 ft n 28 ft w 112 ft
Nw lot 2 blk 78 Old Survey
50 ft e and w by 112 ft n and
s In se cor lot 4 folk 79, also
com at se cor 'blk 79 Old
Survey, e 26 ft n 112 ft w 26
ft s 112 ft
All ex 30 ft e and w on e side
lot 3 blk 79 Old Survey..
Lots 1 4 blk 16 New Survey
South
N lot 1 iblk 18 New Survey
South
N lot 4,01k 18 Now Survey
South
S lot 1 -blk 19 New Survey
South
N lot 3 blk 19 New Survey
South
S lot 4 blk 19 New Survey
South
Lot 1 blk 20 New Survey
South
40 ft e and w on w side lot 1
blk 23 New Survey South..
S lot 2 blk 25 New Survey
South
50 ft n and s Iby 73 ft e and w
in ne cor lot 4 'blk 26 New
Survey South
E lot 1 blk 34 New Survey
South
Blk 35 New Survey South...
S lot 3 iblk 8 New Survey
North
N lot 3 blk 14 New Survey
North ...
Com 165 ft n of se cor blk D
Dunn's Central Addition, w
231 ft n 198 ft e 231 ft s 198
ft 4
Com 105 ft s of nw cor blk B
Allred's Add s 35 ft e 205 ft
n 35 ft w 205 ft
W lot 2 blk I Allred's Add
N lot 3 blk I Allred's Add.
Lot 4 blk 1 Allred's Add
E'i lot 3 blk 2 Allred's Add..
W lot 3 blk 2 Allred's Add.
Sw'i lot 4 blk 2 Allred's Add
Lot 4 blk 3 Allred's Add
Lot 12 3 blk 4 Allred's Add
Lot 4 blk 1 Fla. Cen. Land Co.
sub blks 3 and 4 Allred's
Add
Lots 10 11 Fla. Cen. Land Co.
sub of blks 1 and 2 Allred's
Add
Lot 50 Fla. Cen. Land Co. sub
blks 1 and 2 Allred's Add..
Lot 1 blk Y ex 50 ft e anu w

by 90 ft n and s in ne cor!

Allred's Add
Lot 3 blk Y Allred's Add
Lots 6 11 12 13 18 Clyatt's sub
Lot 17 Clyatt's sub..
X lot 12 Smith and Dough Dougherty's
erty's Dougherty's Add
El-3 lot 24 Smith A Dangh Dangh-erty's
erty's Dangh-erty's Add
N lot 38 Smith and Daugh Daugh-erty's
erty's Daugh-erty's Add
Lot 51 Smith and Daugherty's
Add
N lot 6 Reardon's Middle Middle-town
town Middle-town S lot 6 Reardon's (Middle (Middle-town
town (Middle-town Lot '7 Reardon's .Middletown.
Com at se cor lot- 1 Reardon's
Middletown. e 69 ft n 162 ft
w 69 ft s 162
W 1-3 lot 1 Caldwell's Add..
169 ft n and s by 178 ft e and
w on e side lot 5 Caldwell's
Add
112 fit n and s .by 140 ft e and
w in se cor lot 8 Caldwell's
Add
122 ft e and w by 224 ft n and
s on w side lot 26 Caldwell'
Add. ..
90 ft e and w toy 133 ft n and
s in ne cor lot 26 Caldwell's
Add
Com 56 ft e of nw cor lot 27
Caldwell's Add. e 84 ft s 112
ft w 84 ft n 112 ft
Com 70 ft w of ne cor lot 29
Caldwell's Add, w 70 ft s
140 ft e 70 ft n 140 ft
Com 70 ft e of sw cor lot 29
Caldwell's Add, e 140 ft n 70
ft w 140 ft s 70 ft
212 ft e and w by 210 ft n and
s in ge cor lot ,36 Caldwell's
Add
70 ft e and w 'by 120 ft n and
s in nw cor lot 37 Cald Caldwell's
well's Caldwell's Add

lots 40 41 Caldwell's Add. I
Lot 11 Teague's re-survey of
lots 54 5! 60 Caldwell's Add!

Lot 65 Caldwell's Add
Lot 64 "Caldwell's Add
Lot 2 Ocklawaha Park
Lots 8 9 10 11 Ocklawaha Park
Lot 117 Lynwood Park
Lot 126 Lynwood Park
Lots 1G 17 36 37. Lynwood
Park
Lot G blk 4 Woodrow's sub
plat book A page 129
Com 100 ft w of sw intersec intersection
tion intersection of Ocklawaha ave and
Watula st, s 119 ft w 66 ft
n 119 ft e 66 ft
Lot 4 Steroberger's survey..
Lots 8 16 and w lot 9 Stem Stemberger's
berger's Stemberger's survey
Com 691 ft w of a point 150 ft
s of se cor of sw
w 237 ft n 425 ft e 420 ft s
274 1-3 ft w 147 2-3 ft
Com 444 ft ti of a point 1492

ft e of sw cor

n 52 w rt e 210 t s o-'
ft w 210 ft
Com 4 63 ft s of nw cor

e 210 ft s 105 ft w 102 ft n
csi: ft ir.s ft t ssii ft I

45 ft e and w on e side of
nw1; of lot east of and ad adjoining"
joining" adjoining" blk 71 Old Survey
Com 220 ft e of nw cor lot A
Caldwell's Add, e 103 ft s
12 ? ft w 105 ft n 127 ft
Lot 27 Magnolia Place

Lots 68 69 Magnolia Place..
Lot 75 Magnolia Place

Costello, P. I.
Fausett. II. A.
Oliver. C. J.
Livingston. N.
Wilson, Eliza
Boozer, J. C.

Boozer, J. C.
Unknown .

15

8'15
I?! 15
!
I

Unknown. .
McDuffy, J. D.
Unknown

McDuffy, J. D.

McDuffy, J. D.

McDuffy, J. D.
Unknown

Carmichael and Son

jLaRoche, J. S

tsrooKs, j. l.

22

Carmichael and Son Co.
Carmichael and Son .

Woodrow, D. S

Giles, George
Met. R. and I. Co.
Rawls, O. C

Bonner, J. H. ....
Bonner, J. H.
Bailey, Mrs. E. H.
Crook, O. L.
Fatio, T. H
Unknown
Unknown
Woodard, Mary E.
Woodrow, D. S.
Graden, Sallle
Brooks, J. L.

Bagley, Julia

Bell, Arch
Woodrow, D. S.

Hall, J. F.
Carmichael and Son
Carmichael and Son

Unknown
Carter, R. L. ...
Alexander, J. W.
Unknown
Kellum, Sam ....
Tucker, A. W. ..
Kellum, Jennie .
Williams, J. O. ..
Boyd, Frances .

Seymour, B. II.

Marshall, Mary C.

22, Seymour, B. II.

Unknown
Boozer, J. C.
Hodge, Sam .
McCormick, M.

Boney, Mrs. M
Lon g, S. B
Flynn, R. W
Long, S. B.
Carmichael and Son

Unknown
Spencer, 'Mrs. F. G.

Spencer. J. H.
Carmichael, C.

Berry, Mrs. A. M.
Unknown

Hood, E. Van

Carmichael and Son
Unknown

Stein, G. B
t

Morri, C. E.
Hall, Beulah

Hunter. C. W.
Benjamin, S.

Hoeker, F. R
Mote. E. H
Unknown
Hickson, Mrs. Sue
Woodrow, D. S.

Woodrow. D. S.

Bailey. C. C

Carmichael, C.
Unknown .

Spencer, J. H.

Tooley, Florida
Bonner, J. H.

Bluett, J. B.

Hodge, Sam.

Carmichael, C.

Unknown .

Tone?. J. T. :
Woodrow. D.

I Unknown
iHooper, S. M.

J $ 10 55

Roberts. Mary O

Elks Club (B. P. O. E.)

Edwards, 'Mrs. D. C.
Boozer, J. C

16
8

9
8
12
10

43
43
44
44
39

02
73

03
43
42
43

70 58

9
20

91
100

03
40

03
80

41 25

25
10
25

30
199
90
75
70

35
5

7
8
14
8
8
14
10
8
14
3
8

98
43
38

93
95
23
56
25

67
44

64
73
72
24
2
72
73
73
72
75
73

4 05

12
50
8
10

72
33
73
73

230 78

05
44
45
45
05
96
05
05
96

2 05

1
1
2
2
5
1
10
6
6
1
25
18
32

19
80

13
16
90
30
28
21
7

45
26
05
2b
44
05
73
74
74
75
69
71
87

01
25

02
i
02
83
98
49
00
04

60 90

27

20
2 5
30
50
21
1

20
1

99
74
68
39
Z
40
45
Ps
70
75

11
4

4 4
75
34

4
16
16

16

02
02

02
05

1 45

Save Food By Using Our Ice Freely It's Cheap and
Food is High Prompt Service, FulFWeight and Cour Courteous
teous Courteous Treatment go with our Ice, and if you don't get
them, phone us at once.
Ocala Ice -Packing Co.
PHONE 34 OCALA. FLA.

Gas!

This space will in a few days
contain interesting inf orama orama-tion
tion orama-tion to Ocala Citizens. .

Florida Utilities Co.

T. ILEO COOtEGE
SAINT LEO, PASCO COUNTY, FLORIDA
IDEAL BOARDING SCHOOL FOR YOUfIG GEOTLEI.IEI!
Courses in Classics, Science and Commerce. Also
Primary Department. Send for Catalogue.
Rev. F. Benedict, Director.
OPENS FOB THE FALL TERM, WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 12, 1917.

DESCRIPTION OP LAND

Lots 4 5 iblk 2 Palmetto Park
Lot 10 .blk 3 Palmetto Park
Lot 8 blk 6 Palmetto Park..
348 ft n and s on s end lot O
and six acres on e end lot Q
or G and all lot P Cald Caldwell's
well's Caldwell's Add

NAME OF OWNER OR
LEGAL REPRESENTATIVE

09 m
2

bit

Blk 3 Hillview Add
Lots 3 4 blk 4 Hillview Add..
Com 40 ft vr of nw cor blk 8
Hillview Add, w 105 ft 8 180
ft e 105 ft n 180 ft
Com at n w cor of ne M
s 210 ft e 220 ft n 210 ft w
220 ft
Nw lot 82 Gary's Add
W of swi of lot 83 Gary's
Add
E Vs. of sw 4 of lot 83 Gary's
Add....'
Nwli lot 86 Gary's Add
Com 90 ft w of aie cor lot 88
Gary's Add, w 45 ft s 112 ft
e 45 ft n 112 ft. .'.
Com at nw cor lot 88 Gary's
Add. w 45 ft s 112 ft e 45 ft
n 112 ft
Com at sw cor lot 88 Gary's
Add, n 112 ft w 45 ft s 112
ft e 45 ft...
Com 70 ft w of ne cor lot 92
Gary's Add, w 70 ft s 112 ft
e 70 ft n 112 ft
Com 221 ft w of ne cor lot
100 Gary's Add, w 50 ft s
112 ft e 50 ft n 112 ft
Lots 12 3. blk 5 Lincoln
Heig-hts Heights
Lot 5 blk 6 Lincoln Heights
Lots 14 15 Connor's sub of
lots 5 6 Scott's survey
Lots 34 35 Connor's sub of lots
5 and 6 Scott's survey...."..
Lot 6 blk 1 ex 14 1-3 ft off n
end Ditto's revised ;plat,
"book A, page 143
Lot 1 blk 2 Ditto's revised
plat, book A, page 143
Lots 5 and A blk 3 Ditto's re revised
vised revised plat, book A, page 143

Blk 4 Ditto's revised plat.

BOOK A, paf?e 143
Com 40 ft e of nw cor lot 5 E
G. Smith's Add, e 45 ft s
138 ft.w 45 ft n 138 ft
E of e lot 10 E. G. Smith's

Add

Lots 9 10 11 12 12 27 28 30
31 32 42 .Mitchell's revised

plat

Lots 38 39 .Mitchell's revised

plat

Lots 39 43 Mitchell's revised

plat
Lots 6 8 blk 9 West End
Lot 22 blk 9 West End
Lots 1 3 5 7 'blk 10 West End

Lots 1 to 10 inclusive blk 50

West End
Lots 3 4 blk 3 Western Add..
Lot 5 blk 4 Western Add...
Lots 12345678 11 blk 51
Santa Maria Place
Lots 21 23 blk 55 Santa Maria
Place ;..
Lots 30 32 blk 74 Santa Maria
Place .....
Xe4 of nw'i ex 2 acres ne
corner
NwJ4 of nwU and s of sw",
Sw'i of .wU ex n',i of nwV4
of sw',i of sw4
Com 210 ft w of se cor of
nw4 of neV4
w 210 ft n 198 ft e 210 ft s
1?8 ft
Com 417.21 ft s of ne cor of
nwVi
s 100 ft e 204 ft n 100 ft w
204 ft
Corn 56 ft e of sw cor lot 3
Cline's Ad.l. n 86 ft w 56 ft n

68 ft e 112 ft n 40 ft w 112
ft n 14.6 ft e 208.6 ft s 208.6
ft w 152.6 ft
.wU lot 9 Cline's Ad1
SwU lot 21 Cline's Add
15 Tucker Hill
N"' lot 5 Dunn's X W Add..
K1.. lot 6 Dunn's X W Add..
;J7 ft e and w on w end of sJ-?
of nVi lot 11 Dunn's X W
Add
E 1 of ne'j of lot 17 Dunn's
X W Add
Lot 11 blk B Dunn's X W Add
Lots 6 8 10 blk B Dunn's X W
Add
Lot 13 blk D Dunn's X W Add
ixt 9 blk E Dunn's X W Add
Blk H Dunn's X W Add
Lot 8 blk I Dunn's X W Add
Lots 1 2 3 4 6 8 10 blk K
Dunn's X W Add....
Lot. 1 3 blk L Dunn's X W
Add
Lots- 1 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 13 blk
X Dunn's X W Add
Lot? 1 3 blk P Dunn's X W

dd.

19

18

15

22

Unknown.
Unknown.
Unknown.

Lang, L E
The us, P. J
Jeffcoat, Irene B.

Hurst, L

Lake, Willie .....
Martin, iMrs. A. T.

Berlack, L J.
Mills, Annie E.
Edwards, J. T.

51
1
5

6 04

5
15

2 26

Blackwell, Ed
Richardson, B.
Jones, A. E. .

Mcintosh, H.

XeLson, J: D.

Bonner, J. IL
Morgan, Martha

White, E. V. ...
Lambright, Julia

Unknown
Graham, Thomas
Scriven, Clara..
Hampton, II.

Murray, TL C
Fausett, H. A.
Fausett,' H. A.
Williams. B.

Unknown.

McDuffy, J. D.

Green, Q. V.

Carmichael and Son Co.

Fausett, II. A.
Fulgeon, J. G,

Black, Hock

Fausett, H. A.
Hampton, Sam.,
Unknown

22 Walker. Mrs. B.

15

15 z. Howell, 2.

Lots 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 blk R and
ail blk S Dunn's X W Add..
Lot 13 blk li Dunn s X W Add

Lot 7 blk i Dunn's X W Add
X1-. lot 2 blk 1 ranze 2 Goss!
Add
Lota 2 ?. 4 5 7 8 9 10 13 14 re-'

vised plat BUg's Add .. ..18l

22

Walker, Mrs. B.

Hampton, H.

I

Williams, Dollie

Fausett, IT. A.
Ditto. F. W
Alexander, Thomas
Scott. Daniel .
Williams. Jno. O.

j Woodrow, D. S. ..

JEJoozer( J. C.
i

Bradley, P. ...
Harris, Rachel

3 Oi

2 05

2 56

4
1
3
2
2
1
4
6
4
2
8
3
2
3
1
5

3
1
1
24
2
1
20
10

25 69

6 24

Alexander, W. A.
Footman, L
Unknown
Sabie. Catherine
Howard, James ..

Carmichael and Son
Small, Amanda.. ..
Theus, P. J
Small, Amanda
Wilson. Spencer .
Stark. Delia. .
Pratt. M

15

Anderson, Sarah

!22! Fausett, 11. A.

8
1
4

2 05

,W. AV. CLYATT,
City Tax Collector.

45
45
45

23
45
44
04
42
26
45
04
0
05
74
45
75
75
05
75
74
74
05
75
54
05
45
45
44
75
65
96
69
75
2
70
43
64
4 5
45
41
44
44
i -i
45
75
85
96
43
85
4 a
75
74
85
85
15
26



OCALA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, APRIL 6. 1918

I

Mr. R. J. Rivers went to Jackson Jacksonville
ville Jacksonville Friday on a two days business
trip.
Mr. Frederick Hocker's friends will
te interested to hear he went to Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville Friday afternoon to try for
the naval reserve.

They are keeping Dr. Dunn, the vet vet-ran
ran vet-ran veterinary busy these days. He
frequently is called to towns as much
as fifty miles away.
Another gallantyoung man, J. W.
Chamberlain the clever day clerk at
the Harrington, is. going into the
navy. He is'from Jacksonville, but
Ocala feels like he .'belongs to her."
The county jifdge this morning is issued
sued issued a marriage license to Mr. Jessie
George Meadows and Miss Louise
Wade. The marriage ceremony was
performed by Justice Jeffcoat.
The town is decorating for the
pageant this evening. Specially no noticeable
ticeable noticeable is the sign over RheinaueVs
front. -It advises the people to buy
liberty bonds in letters that make
those on a boxcar need a macmifvine

slags.

A Ford, driven by H. T. Hall of
Lowell, and containing beside Mr.
Hayy Way Shockley and three of

Charlie Howell's children, upset at

the corner of Teuton's store yester yesterday.
day. yesterday. All the occupants were scratch scratched
ed scratched but none seriously hurt. Of course,
the Ford wasn't hurt.

Mr. H. S. Hall, president of the fair
association, was mighty well pleased

today to be able to tell the Star that
$6500 had been raised for the fair.
Mr. Hall gives most of the credit for
the work to Nathan Mayo, who he
said kept going after people when he
and Mr. Hunter were walked off their
feet.

CARE OFTriE HUNTING DOGS
Little Washing and Much Brushing la
- Regarded Best for the Health
of Any Canine.
In the matter of grooming, says Out Outing,
ing, Outing, a cardinal principal is expressed
in the bench show handler's apothegm
"little washing and much brushing."
Soap and water are bad for any dog's
coat. They wash away the natural
oils, making the hair dry and brittle,
and consequently the less washing the
better the coat will be. The dog, how however,
ever, however, must be kept clean. A good

stiff brush vigorously and regularly

applied will keep a pointer clean as a
whistle, and the bristles act as a fine
tonic, stimulating the growth of the
hair and keeping the skin underneath
clean and healthy.
For fhe setter's long "coat the old
English recipe Is eggs rubbed In, al allowed;
lowed; allowed; to dry and then brushed out
again. The best combination Is to use
the whites for cleaning and to feed
the yellows raw mixed up with brea
or biscuits. This la the most effec effective
tive effective use, for the whites contain no oil
and ; make the cleaning easier, while
the yolks are most valuable food. If
the price of eggs, however, Is prohib prohibitive,
itive, prohibitive, ccrnmeal (white cornmeal very
finely ground is the better) will an answer
swer answer the same purpose.

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS

WANTED, LOST, FOUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS

RATES: Six line maximum, one
time 25c.; three times 50c; six times
75c; one month S3. Payable in advance.

Our staunch friend, Mr. S. E.
Fraser, one of the A. C. L's. veterans,
this morning brought us in three fine,
large Red Bliss potatoes, raised in his
own garden. The three potatoes would
make a satisfactory meal for two
people, but they looked almost too
pretty to eat. They are going to be
eaten, however, and our mouth is set
for the treat.

Mr. B. Goldman has a practical
way of showing that he is in earnest
when he advocates raising food pro products.
ducts. products. He allows his clerks one day
in each week in which to raise garden
truck, and the pay envelope is the
same as though full time were put in
at the store. His example might well
be followed by others, and such a
movement made general would mean
jnany a ton of vegetables for home
consumption and a consequent saving
of that much food for sending to the
armies of world freedom in Europe.
AIR SLACKED LIME
Just the thing for gardens and san sanitary
itary sanitary purposes Price 75 cents per
barrel f. o. b.' yards.
6-tf Welch-Tomm Lumber Co.

. "Church of Gold."
There Is no structure just like St.
Mark's, in Venice, in the world, notes
the Kansas City Journal. Its bulb bulb-shaped
shaped bulb-shaped domes and minaretlike belf belfries
ries belfries remind the visitor of the Orient..
It seems more 'like a Mohammedan
than a Christian temple. In the facade
are scores of variously colored marble
columns, each one a monolith and all
possessing an eventful history. Some
are from Ephesus, others from Symr Symr-na,
na, Symr-na, others from 'Constantinople and
more than one even from Jerusalem.'
St. Mark's is the treasure house of
Venice, a place of pride as well as
prayer. The work of beautifying this!
old church was carried on for five cen centuries,
turies, centuries, and each generation tried to
outdo all that had preceded It. The
walls and roof are so profusely cov covered
ered covered with mosaics and precious mar marbles
bles marbles that It is easy to understand why;
St. Mark's has been called the "Church
of Gold."

Rats .Enemies-of Birds,
The number of useful Insect-eating
birds nesting on the ground or in low
bushes which fall victims to rats Is ex extremely
tremely extremely large and is one of the many
kinds of injury done y these perni pernicious
cious pernicious animals which cannot be com-,
puted, writes E. W. Nelson In the Na National
tional National Geographic Magazine. Proba Probably
bly Probably few. frequenters of the countryside
have returned to look into a bird's nest
to observe its condition without many
times finding it 'destroyed and frag fragments
ments fragments of egg shells lying about. Un Unquestionably,
questionably, Unquestionably, a large percentage of
such nests located in the neighborhood
of buildings have been raided by rats.
On one of the small Danish islands

it has been authentically recorded that,

the progeny, of a single pair of rats,
which escaped from captivity, in two
years time -exterminated a great colo colony
ny colony of birds for which the Island had
been noted.

"mi ii WiimuMi i'tmt in in a i.Ti.iiiiiiiBiiiiiriiiiiiiiti -mm iriWwi i. M --J
f is." i sr-

FEATHER
YOUR NEST

VjfHEN you invest, your money in
liberty Bonds you rare not giving
money to your country, You are
making the safest investment in the
world, and your money' will come
'v back, to you, with interest, at a time
when you may need it far more than
you do now. And remember

EVery "Bond you Invert In
May S"axe a S'oldler'j Life
Tbl Space Paid For and Contributed By

WANTED Deputy, competent to
take charge of auditing department
of clerk's office. P. H. Nugent,
clerk. 4-5-3t
FOR SALE Duroc boar pigs, eight

weeks old, $10 each; ten months old,

$40 each. Address Ridge & Gale,
Belleview, Fla. o-2t 4

FOR SALE Household furniture,

consisting of beds, mattresses,1!

springs, washstands, dressers, tables,

chairs; large new refrigerator, cook cooking
ing cooking utensils, dishes and glassware.
Apply to B. B. Baum, at Empire Cafe

building, opposite old A. C. L. pas-

senger aepot. o-av

WANTED Chauffeur at once to
drive car for hire; $12 per week. In Inquire
quire Inquire at Ocala House Taxi Co. 3-3t

WANTED Wind mill and frame.

Must be in good condition. Address

Dr. J. G. Baskin, Dunnellon, Fla, 5-3t

WANTED A second-hand fireless

cooker. Must be in first class condi

tion. State lowest cash price. Address

Fireless," care Star office.' 2-3t

WANTED Cypress logs. Address
Landeck Lumber Company, Tampa,

Fla., stating what you can furnish

for continuous shipment. 3-16-lm

WALL PAPERING Sample books

"will be taken to customers for in

spection. Agent for the Henry Bosch

Co., New York and Chicago. P. S.
Staggers, Painter, Box 58 Route B,
Ocala. Phone 2M. 3-1-tf

FOR RENT A desirable six-rrom
residence; all modern conveniences;
automobile shed. Located close in on
Watula street. Apply to Dr. J. W.
Hood. 2-16-tf

WANTED Your consignments of

vegetables and strawberries. We

make prompt returns and will appre appreciate
ciate appreciate your shipments. Give us a trial
and be convinced. Georgia Produce
Co.. Macon, Ga. 3-2-2-2m

i -11 "- m 11 n 1

DR. D. M. BONEY
"My. Optician"
EYESIGHT
SPECIALIST

I especially offer my services to the
people of Central Florida, and invite
personal visits or mail orders.
202-204 Hogan St., Park Hotel Bldg,
JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA

Therute.
"Where have you been tonight?"
she asked bitterly, as he sauntered In
about 11 o'clock. "Was It business
again this evening?"
He made no reply, but sat down to
the cold supper that was on the table.
"Aha, the difference In a short
time !" she went on. T have been try trying
ing trying to solace myself tonight by read reading
ing reading some of your love letters. Here
Is one," holding It up, "that you wrote
one month before we were married;
In this you say that you feel as if
you could eat me. Oh, the affection,
the passionate love expressed In those
words I It is one month after mar marriage,"
riage," marriage," she continued, beginning to
weep pearly tears, and sob like the
throb of a steamboat engine, "only one
month after marriage, and now
"I wish to goodness I had !" mum mumbled
bled mumbled the unfeeling brute, with his
mouth full of ham.

IF. C O N D O M
Agent for

co, Premier, Dort and Overland

Automobiles
AotomoMle Accessories, Electrical Supplies, Etc.
Next to Fire Station, Osceola Street
CCALA - - FLORIDA

Novel Bed for Paralytica.
One of the great problems In certain
cases of spinal wounds with paralysis
Is how to move the patient sufficiently
to make his bed and tend his wounds
without increasing his sufferings by
moving him. The new bed solves the
problem. Surrounding the bed just at
the edge of the mattress Is a rectan rectangular
gular rectangular framework of hollow metal pip piping.
ing. piping. Connecting the two parallel sides
are broad bands of webbing stretched
across the mattress, and on these the
patient lies. The two short sides of
the framework, the one at the head of
the bed and the other at the' foot, are
connected by a geared wheel with a
vertical steel post so that by simply
turning a handle at the head or foot
of the bed the framework, with the
patient lying on the webbing, can be
lifted off the mattress without his po position
sition position being changed in the least.

Cornmeal in Honduras.
Because of the marked success of
recent governmental and private ef efforts
forts efforts to promote the production of
more cereals during the period of the
war, writes Consul Walter F. Boyle,
Puerto Cortes, an American company
has Imported and erected the first mill
for the milling of cornmeaL This was
purchased in the United States and
has been erected at San Pedro, Sula,
Honduras. It Is a small equipment,
but marks the beginning of a new in industry.
dustry. industry. A very nice line of Wash Cloths on
display at Gerig's Drug Store. We
also sell War Savings and Thrift
Stamps. 4 tf
Sea Island Cotton Seed, direct from
Edisto Island, just received at Ocala
Seed Store, 8-tf

Keep tKe pot

Loam

YdDeir Moimey?
Me Meedls It
-M5W'2

Your government has protected you for over
a hundred years, and the time has come when
you are asked to help to protect your govern government.
ment. government. Don't be a slacker. Do your duty.
There never was a time when your assistance
could be as valuable to Uncle Sam as it is to today.
day. today. ...
Besides lending your dollars it is also the duty
of every loyal American to grow everything
he can-in the way of food productions. In or order
der order to do this to the full capacity improved la labor
bor labor saving machinery is necessary.

OUR BUCKEYE RIDING DISC CULTIVATOR
will come nearer getting everything out of
your labor expended than any other method.
Come in and let's talk it over.

CILMIM IM1WME CI

OCALA

FLOMPA

OCALA FRATERNAL ORDERS

ODD FELLOWS

Tulula Lodge No. 22, I. O. O. P.,
meets every Tuesday evening in the
Odd Fellows' hall on the third floor of
the Star office building at 8 o'clock
promptly. A warm welcome always
extended to visiting brothers.
H. D. Stokes, N. G.
M. M. Little, Secretary.

MARION-DUNN MASON'C LODGE

Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. &
A. M., meets on the first and third
Thursday evenings of each month' at
8 o'clock, until further notice.
Stephen Jewett, W. M.
Jake Brown, Secretary.

We will close at 8 o'clock p. m. on
Sattyxlayth inst. We sell War Sav Savings
ings Savings and Thrift Stamps. Gerig's
Drug Store. 5-2t

Buy war savings stamps to nelp
win the war and have us fill your
prescriptions for accurate service.
The Court Pharmacy. tf

GH THEATIESS USB

USE NO ZSCLtSXCUCXHS.
lASIKf OT. MEAKEXST
IDODS CONTAINING

WOODMEN OF THE WORLD

Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
the K. of P. hall at 8 p. m. every
second and fourth Friday. Visiting
sovereigns are ailways welcome.
P. W. Whitesides, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk

OCALA LODGE NO. 286, B. P. O. E.

Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and fourth Tuesday even evenings
ings evenings in each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Club house oppo opposite
site opposite postoffice, east side.
C. W. Hunter, E. R.
' E. J. Crook. Secretary.

KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS

Ocala Lodge No. 19. Conventions
held every Monday evening at 8
at the Castle HalL over the James
Carlisle drugstore. A cordial welcome
to visiting brothers.
H. B. Baxter, C. C.
CLas. K. Sage, K. of R. S.
R. A. M. CHAPTER NO. 13
Regular convocations of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13, R. A. M., on the
first Friday in every month at 8 p. m.
J. A. Bouvier, H. P.
Jake Brown. Secretary.

MIRIAM REBEKAH LODGE NO. 15
Miriam Rebekah Lodge No. 15
meets the first and third Monday eve evenings
nings evenings in each month in the Odd Fel Fellows'
lows' Fellows' hall at 8 o'clock.
Clara Moremen, N. G.
Georgia Ten Eyck, Secretary.

ORDER OF EASTERN STAR
Ocala Chapter, No. 29,' O. E. S
meets at Yonge's hall the second and
fourth Thursday evenings of each
month at 8 o'clock.
Mrs. Alice Yonce, W. M.
Mrs. Susan Cook, Secretary.

STATEMENT OF THE OWNER OWNERSHIP,
SHIP, OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, CIRCU CIRCULATION,
LATION, CIRCULATION, ETC., REQUIRED BY
THE ACT OF CONGRESS OF AU AUGUST
GUST AUGUST 24, 1912,

Of Ocala Evening Star, published

daily at Ocala, Florida, for April 1st,

1918.
State of Florida,
County of Marion, ss.
Before me, a notary public, in and
for the state and county aforesaid,
personally appeared R. R. Carroll,
who, having been duly sworn accord according
ing according to law, deposes and says that he is
one of the owners of the Ocala Even Evening
ing Evening Star, and that the following
is, to the best of his knowledge and

belief, a true statement of the own ownership,
ership, ownership, management (and if a daily
paper, the circulation), etc., of the
aforesaid publication for the date
shown in the above caption, required
by the act of August 24, 1912, em embodied
bodied embodied in section 443, postal laws and
regulations, printed on the reverse of
this form, to-wit:
1. That the names and addresses
of the publisher, editor, managing
editor, and business managers are:
Publishers, Star Publishing Com Company,
pany, Company, of Ocala, Fla.
Editor, J. H. Benjamin, Ocala, Fla.
Managing editor, none.
Business manager, P. V. Leaven Leaven-good,
good, Leaven-good, Ocala, Fla.
2. That the owners are:
R. R. Carroll, Ocala, Florida.
Mrs. Helen J. Bittinger, Ocala, Fla.
Miss Adele Bittinger, Ocala, Fla.
P. V. Leavengood, Ocala, Fla.
J. H. Benjamin, Ocala, Fla.
3. That the known bondholders,
mortgages, and other security holders
owning or holding 1 per cent or more
of total amount of bonds mortgages,
or other securities are:

Estate of J. C. Porter, deceased.
4. That the two paragraphs next
above, giving the names of the own owners,
ers, owners, stockholders, and security hold holders,
ers, holders, if any, contain not only the list
of stockholders and security holders
as they appear upon the books of the
company but also, in cases where the

DAVIS' CARRUGE PAINTS
are colors ground in tough, elastic
Coach Varnish and one coat will make
your faded automobile or carriage
look like new. They are easy to ap apply
ply apply and dry with a strong, high gloss gloss-clinching
clinching gloss-clinching Enamel finish. Made for
wear and tea. 2-8
For Sale By
THE MARION HARDWARE CO.,
Ocala, Florida

Mclver $i MacKay
UNDERTAKERS and EMBALMERS
PHONES 47, 104, 3S5
OCALA, FLORIDA
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER
AND BUILDER

Careful Estimates made on all Con
tract work. Gives More and Better
Work for the Money than any other
ntitrctnr in th rttv

stockholder or security holder appears
upon the books of the company as
trustee or in any other fiduciary rela relation,
tion, relation, the name of the person or corpor corporation
ation corporation for whom such trustee is acting,
is given; also that the said two para paragraphs
graphs paragraphs contain statements embracing:
affiant's full knowledge and belief as
to the circumstances and conditions
under which stockholders and security
hclders who do not appear upon the
books of the company as trustees, hold
stock and securities in a capacity other
than that of a bona fide owner, and
this affiant has no reason to believe
that any other person, association, or
corporation has any interest direct or
indirect in the said stock, bonds, or
other securities than as so stated by
him.
5. That the average number of
copies of each issue of this publica publication
tion publication sold or distributed, through the
mails or otherwise, to paid subscrib subscribers
ers subscribers during the six months preceding;
the date shown above is 600.
R. R. Carroll,
President and One of the Owners.
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 7th day of April, 1918.
(Seal) Mamie E. Fox,
My commission expires March 17th,
1921.



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