The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06801

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
OCALA

A TTV

H h. Wok. l.L jJmt

Weather Forecast: Probably rain
tonight and Wednesday except fair in
'south and central portion tonight; not
quite so cold.
OCALA, FLORIDA. TUESDAY. DECEMBER II, 1917.
VOL. 21, NO. 297.

K

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i J
3

fl iullll J 3fli

Overwhelming Western Allies
' is Teuton Aim

ALL REPORTS FROM RUSSIA
THAT COUNTRY IS

(Associated Press

London, Dec. 11. The Amsterdam
correspondent of the Daily Express
reports the Germans rushing troops
to the western front with the idea of
crushin gthe Entente Allies before
America is able to act and adds "one
result of this was the collision of two
German ammunition trains Thursday
in which several hundred soldiers
were killed and wounded."
FIGHTING NEAR YPRES AND
v ARRAS
London, Dec. 11. Unusual active
artillery fighting and aerial opera operations
tions operations on the western front yesterday
are reported in today's official an announcement.
nouncement. announcement. Activity was particulr particulr-ly
ly particulr-ly noteworthy on the Ypres and Arras
fronts.
MUCH TROUBLE AT MOSCOW
London, Dec. 11. The situation at
Moscow is reported to be grave, ac according
cording according to a Times dispatch from
Petrograd. The Bolsheviki are said
to have placed machine guns in the
streets in fear of an uprising of hos hostile
tile hostile parties. The garrison, however,
shows signs of insubordination and is
reported to have disobeyed the Bo Bo-sheviki'
sheviki' Bo-sheviki' commander. A considerable
force, the dispatch adds, is being de detached
tached detached from the western front to be
sent against the Cossacks.
CITY MAY BE STARVED
Street fighting has occurred in Mos
cow and the Swedish consul here has
w.advised all Swedes to leave the city,
according to advices received at Hap Hap-aranda.
aranda. Hap-aranda. It was added that starvation
seems to threaten the city. ,;
DID LITTLE DAMAGE
Tampa, Dec. 11. Reports here
from all sections of Florida indicate
that Sunday night's cold did no harm
to citrus trees or the fruit, according
to the Florida Citrus Exchange.
Only a few localities reported the
temperature as reaching 26, and then
only for a short time. Tender vege vegetables,
tables, vegetables, particularly head lettuce and
unprotected strawberries were dam damaged
aged damaged in some places.
KEEPING HIS OWN COUNCIL
Washington, Dec. 11- President
Wilson will go to congress for special
legislation to bring about the unifica unification
tion unification of railroads during the war, prob probably
ably probably before the Christmas holidays.
This decision became known last night
after the President had canvassed the
whole transportation situation in con conference
ference conference with' Senator Newlands.
The President's advisers are divid divid-f
f divid-f ed as to. what is necessary to be done
but most of them have come out for
government operation of the roads,
some declaring the executive already
has the power to operate the roads
under army appropriation act.
The President has confided his full
intentions to none of his associates.
PROTECT THE, QUAIL
A dispatch from Bronson says that
, because Robert Cannon found the crop
of a quail which had been killed o
his farm loaded with bool weavils he
come to Bronson, a distance of about
twenty miles, to confer with county
Judge John R. Willis, and to ascer ascertain
tain ascertain if he could keep hunters off his
land which is rot fenced. Mr.' Can Cannon
non Cannon was very much disappointed when
informed that he could not.
It is stated on good authority' that
on farms, in this county where the
quail and other 'insect-destroying
lirds have been protected the bool
Peevil is but seldom seen, while oh ad adjoining
joining adjoining farms where the public are
permitted to hunt, cotton crops have
"been practically devastated by this
pest. -Gainesville Sun.
Advertise in the Star.

INDICATE THAT ANARCHY 11

THE INCREASE
Taking Out and Shooting a Few Food
Brokers- Would Put an End
to the Trouble
(Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 11. Charges by
the food administrator, Herbert
Hoover, that some dishonest whole wholesale
sale wholesale dealers, retail dealers and food
brokers have been criminally respon responsible
sible responsible for food shortages and rising
prices were taken under investigation
today by the Federal Trade Commis Commission.
sion. Commission. Victor Murdock will be in charge of
the inquiry which will be "prpsecuted
with vigor and all the trade commis commission's
sion's commission's broad investigative powers
behind it." : Speculation in foods was
declared today in a statement by
Commissioner Murdock to have far far-reaching
reaching far-reaching results in causing unrest.
REPORTED, NOT RECOMMENDED
The constitutional amendment foi
woman suffrage was reported with without
out without recommendation today by the
House judiciary committee.
GETTING READY TO SWEAR OFF
By unanimous consent today tie
House agreed to consider Monday the
constitutional amendment for nation nationwide
wide nationwide prohibition, which has already
passed the Senate.
INSURANCE FOR OUR
SOLDIERS AND SAILORS
If a soldier or sailor is killed, and
he has a wife and children, the gov government
ernment government will provide compensation for
the wife, so long as she remains un unmarried,
married, unmarried, and support for the children
until they, become 18 years of age.
These payments range from $25
for a widow alone to $57.50 for &
widow and four children. If the man
is totally disabled the government will
make a fixed monthly payment to him
ranging from $30 a month, if he is
married, to $75 a month, if he has a
wife and three or more children.
Should he be so helpless as to require
a nurse or attendant he will be. given
up to $20 additional. Should he lose
both feet, both hands, or both eyes, oi
be permanently bedridden, he will be
paid $100 a .month, whether he is a
bachelor or married.
CITRUS COUNTY HAS
LOST A SOLDIER
W. F. N. Nettles of Solder Among
the Dead at Camp Wheeler
,The following died at jCamp Wheel Wheeler
er Wheeler base hospital yesterday from pneu pneumonia:
monia: pneumonia: Robert R. Owens, Washington, Ga.;
Robert White, Sulligent, Ala.; Ison
Johnson,' 106th supply train; Corporal
W. F. N. Nettles, Holder Fla.; Pri Private
vate Private Alva Bergenbremer, Company S,
105th train; Private W. C. Tuttle.
Company H, 124th Infantry; Private
Robert White, Company D, 122nd In
fantry.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
The entire time of the circuit court
up to 2 o'clock today was taken up
with the trespass case of H. W. Page
vs." the Martel Lumber company.
Zewadski & Zewadski represent Mr.
Page and H. M. Hampton is attorney
for the Martel Lumber Company.
The jury rendered a verdict in favor
of the plaintiff for $131.62.
i ii
Do you read the want ads?

SPECULATION ILL
CAUSE STARVATION

OPPEBAT flt

I OF
FOR
SOME

(Associated Press"

Washington, Dec. 11. At the open
ing of the hearing today by the joint
congressional committee investigat
ing transportation problems, Chair Chairman
man Chairman Adamson of the House com
merce committee, declared the presi president
dent president probably would have to take over
the railroads during the war and hold
them after the war until Congress
can provide some plan for their
proper management and efficient op operation
eration operation in peace and war."
IMMENSE APPROPRIATION
Washington, Dec. 11. Debate on
the postoffice appropriation bill be be-eran
eran be-eran in the House todav. The measure
carries an aggregate of three hundred
and thirty-three millions.
CALLED FOR A CONFERENCE
Waashington, Dec. 11. The rail
roads' war board .today asked the
president to receive its members f oi
a conference which has .been arrang arranged
ed arranged for Wednesday afternoon.
TO THE FRONT
Even the Spiggoties at Panama are
Ready to Fight for
America
(Associated Press)
Panama, Dec. 11. Panama declar
ed war on Austria yesterday.
WIFE OF MEANS
ON THE STAND
(Associated Press)
Concord, N. C, Dec. 11. Mrs. Julie
P. Means took the stand today in tht
defense of her husband, Gaston B.
Means in his trial for the murder of
Mrs. Maude A. King. She testified
that she never observed any evidence
that her husband sought to restrain
Mrs. King's liberty or dominate her.
MAY BE NEEDED IN MEXICO
Washington, Dec. 11. A division of
regular cavalry, the first since the
civil war, is being formed at El Paso.
Officials said the step is being taken
in preparation for eventualities abroad
but had no significance as regards the
Mexican border control.
The division will be organized under
the old army plan, and will consist of
about 11,000 men.
FELLOWSHIP
Fellowship, Dec. 10th. We are cer
tainly having some cold weather.
Mrs. Fred Smith and two children
are visiting relatives in. Jacksonville.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Connor and
little son, Deyton, of Ocala, accompan
ied by Mrs. V. B. Potts were callers
last Saturday.
The sing at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. S. J. McCully last Sunday night
was well attended and all seemed to
enjoy it. The singing was extra good.
Mr. C. C. Stephens has been on the
sick list but we are glad to hear that
he is improving.
The W. O. W. lodge elected the fol following
lowing following officers last Wednesday night:
A. S. Pickett, C. C; S. J. McCully, A.
L.; H. L. Shears, Banker; Z. A. Cru ni niton,
ton, niton, Jr., Clerk; A. Gallipeau, Escort;
H. J. McCully, Watchman; Dr. S. H.
Blitch, Physician;. B. B. Beck, Centry;
The W. O. W. Circle held its regular
meeting Friday afternoon and elected
the following officers: Mrs. S. J. Mc McCully,
Cully, McCully, Guardian; Mrs. H. J. Clark, Ad Advisor;
visor; Advisor; Mrs. R. W. Ferguson, Banker;
Mrs. T. E. Carter, Clerk; Mrs. J. A.
Carter, Chaplin; Miss Janie Mae Per Perry
ry Perry Attendant; Mrs. V. B. Potts, As.
sistant Attendant; Mrs. Fred Smith,
Inner Centinel; Mrs. N. H. Lanier,
Outer Centinal and Mrs. S. B. Brooks,
Mrs. H. L. Sheares and Mrs. N. H. La Lanier,
nier, Lanier, Managers.
Rev. J. C. Boatright will preach at
Fellowship church next Sunday, Dec.
16th, and at eleven o'clock, a. m., all
are cordially invited.

FIDO RUSHES

(I

RAILROADS DURING THE WAR

AIID
TIME AFTER
CITY OF HALIFAX
Raging Blizzard Drove to Cover the
Rescue Parties Which Were
Working Amid the Ruins
(Associateu tress
Halifax, N. S., Dec. 11. A roaring
blizzard, the third to strike this sore sorely
ly sorely afflicted city since the blast from
the exploding munitions steamer
made 25,000 persons homeless four
days ago, burst from the northeast
late yesterday. Raging with all the
fury which these northern winter
storms are noted, it all but crushed
the hearts of the brave band of work workers
ers workers struggling against overwhelming
odds to alievate suffering.
For a while the contingents of the
Canadian army stationed here toileflf
doggedly amid the ice-shrouded ruins
for the unrecovered dead but when
the wind veered suddenly to the
southeast and blew with redoubled
force the soldiers were obliged to
withdraw. Pungs bearing hospital
supplies and food to the numerous
relief stations were storm-bound. The
crippled lighting system broke down
again, leaving the city in darkness.
Burial parties who had volunteered
their services when the medical au authorities
thorities authorities announced that the recovered
dead must be disposed of at once,
were driven to cover. From the de devastated
vastated devastated area of two and a half
square miles, hundreds of men and
women patiently seeking their dead
gave up their task.
Relief trains bringing workers and
supplies reached the city in the
height of the blizzard but those so
eager to help found themselves help helpless
less helpless and knew not which way to turn
in the confusion of the storm, the un un-lighted
lighted un-lighted city and the wreck of famil familiar
iar familiar landmarks.
In tents, barracks, private homes
and public buildings, the homeless
have been given shelter. Reports
from the six thousand wounded stat stated
ed stated that for them at least the storm
brought no added danger, so well had
they been provided for.
INTEND TO HOOVERIZE
THE COUNTRY'S ELECTRICITY
Washington, Dec. 11. Regulations!
limiting electric display have failed
to conserve the fuel hoped for by the
administration, and it is planned to
stop all outdoor lighting save street
lights at least three nights a week.
This would extinguish the white
way in cities and darken all window
display lights, theatre, hotel and res restaurant
taurant restaurant fronts on the night named.
IRVINE
Irvine, Dec. 11. Mrs. C. L. Thig Thig-pen
pen Thig-pen and Mrs. H. J. Jernigan of Fair Fairfield
field Fairfield were Tuesday afternoon callers.
Mr. L. K. Edwards left Tuesday for
a few days trip to Jacksonville.
Miss Mamie Fant visited Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Tuesday.
Mr. F. E. Smoak of Flemingtoii
was here Wednesday.
Mr. Henry Waits of Gainesville
was here Thursday.
Mr. Tom Ferguson of Mcintosh
was here Thursday attending to busi business.
ness. business. Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Jones of Fair-
field passed through Friday on their
jway to Mcintosh.
Mr. R. B. Fant of Fantville was
the guest 61 his sister, Mrs. J. L. Da Davis
vis Davis Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Mathews of
Flemington, were guests of Mrs. L.
I K. Edwards Saturday night.
Quite a number from ehre attend attended
ed attended services at Flemington Sunday.
Mrs. S. H. Blitch and Messrs. Lan Lan-dis
dis Lan-dis and Loonis Blitch of Blitchton and
Mr. J. A. Triplett of Chester, S. C,
were guests of Dr. and Mrs. J. L. Da Davis
vis Davis Sunday.
Messrs. Neil aMthews, J. K. Harri Harrison
son Harrison and son of Flemington, were here
Saturday attending to business.

A T

P.

U
II

Colored Soldiers of 24th Expi Expiate
ate Expiate Their Crime

HEAVY PEIIALTJ LAID Cll

WHICH

(Associated Press)

San Antonio, Dec. 11- Thirteen ne negroes
groes negroes were hanged at Fort Sam Hous
ton this morning for complicity in the
not at Houston Aug. 23rd. All were
enlisted men of the 24th United
States Infantry. An announcement
of the action on the court martial'
verdict was made at southern depart department
ment department headquarters at 9 o'clock by the
chief of staff.
IMPRISONMENT FOR OTHERS
Forty-one of the negroe soldiers
participating in the riot were sen sentenced
tenced sentenced to life imprisonment, one was
sentenced to two and a, half years im imprisonment,
prisonment, imprisonment, three sentenced to five
years and five were acquitted.
SEEKING TO HELP
THE SOLDIERS
Conference in Atlanta by Church
Workers from All Parts of
the Country
(Associated Press)
Atlanta, Ga., Dec. 11. Prominent
church workers from ail parts of the
south gathered here today for a con
ference of Southern Presbyterians for
the purpose of organizing their forces
for more effective work among' sol soldiers
diers soldiers outside of camps.
. j, m v
WAR-SAVINGS STAMPS
In offering "War-Savings Stamps" to
the public the United States govern
ment has made" immediately available
for every man, woman and child in
the country a profitable, simple, and
secure investment.
War-savines stamps are the answer
of a great o.imocracy to the demand
for a democratic form of government
security. They are "little baby bonds."
Like Liberty Bonds, they have behind
them the entire resources of the gov
ernment and people of the United
States. They have the additional ad
vantage that they steadily increase in
value from the date of purchase until
the date of maturity, and this increase
is guaranteed by the government.
These stamps are issued in two de denominations,
nominations, denominations, the 25-cent stamp and
the $5 stamp.
For the convenience of investors a
"thrift card" is furnished to all pur
chasers of 25-cent stamps. This card
has spaces for 16 stamps. When all
the spaces have been filled the "thrift
card" may be exchanged for a $5
stamp at postoffices, banks, or other
authorized agencies by adding 12
cents in cash prior to Feb. 1, 1918,
and 1 cent additional each month
thereafter.
Those who prefer may buy a $5
stamp outright. These will be on sale
from December 3, 1917, until January
31, 1918, for $4.12. They automatical automatically
ly automatically increase in value a cent a month
every month thereafter until January
1, 1923, when the United States will
pay $5 at any postoffice or at the
treasury in Washington for each
stamp affixed to a war-saving certi certificate.
ficate. certificate. When you purchase a $5 stamp,
you must attach it to an engraved
folder known as a "War-Savings Cer Certificate"
tificate" Certificate" which bears the name of the
purchaser and can be cashed only by
the person whose name appears upon
the certificate, except in case of death
or disability. This certificate con contains
tains contains 20 spaces. If these are all filled
with war-savings stamps between
December, 3, 1917, and January 31,
1918, the cost to the purchaser will be
$82.40, and on January 1, 1923, the
government will pay the owner of the
certificate $100 a net profit to the

THE

BO REGIMENT

TIP

HOUSTON

HEAVIEST PRODUCTS

III HISTORY
Value of This Year's Crops in the
United States Over Twenty Twenty-One
One Twenty-One Billion Dollars
(Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 11. A reduction
of over a million bales in the cotton
crop from the last estimate made
was shown in the final estimate to today,
day, today, when the production of this year
was placed at ten million nine hun hundred
dred hundred and forty thousand bales. The'
total value of the country's farm pro products
ducts products was unofficially estimated at
twenty-one billions, exceeding any
other year in the history. Florida's
cotton production was forty thousand
bales.
holder of $17.60. This is based on an
interest rate of 4 compounded quar
terly from Jan. 2, 1918. The amount
of war-savings stamps sold to any
one person at any one time shall not
exceed $100 (maturity value), and no
person shall hold such stamps or war-
savings certificates to an aggregate
exceeding $1000 (maturity value).
If the holder of a war-savings cer
tificate finds it necessary to realize
cash on it before maturity, he may at
any time after January 2, 1918, upon
giving 10 days' written notice to any
money order postoffice, receive for
each stamp affixed to his certificate
the amount paid therefor plus 1 cent
for each calendar month after the
month of purchase of each stamp. A
registered certificate may be redeem redeemed,
ed, redeemed, however, only at the postoffice
where registered.
In other words, the plan is simple,
straightforward, and certain. The
holder of the certificates can not lose
and is certain to gain. He is buying
the safest security in the world in
the most convenient, form in which
the security of a great government
has ever been offered to its people.
The main reason for the purchase
of war-savings stamps is' because
your country is at war. Your country
needs every penny which every man,
woman, and child can save and lend,
in order to feed, clothe, arm and
equip the soldiers and sailors of Am America,
erica, America, and to win this rightous war in
defense of American honor and the
cause of democracy throughout the
world.
If we are to win the war, we must
win it as a united people. The sav savings
ings savings of "every man, woman and child
are necessary if we are to hasten the
victorious ending of the war. War
stamps are life savers.
A single strand in the cables which
uphold the great Brooklyn suspension
bridge is not very strong, but thou thousands
sands thousands of these strands bound to together
gether together uphold one of the great thor thoroughfares
oughfares thoroughfares of the world.
When our fathers and sons and
brothers were called by our country
to "take up arms in her defense, you
did notjhear an individual soldier re refuse
fuse refuse to serve because his services
alone would not win the war. Each
man was ready to do his part. The
great army thus formed is going for forward
ward forward to face the fire of battle and to
risk everything for the safety and
security of Our homes and our fami families,
lies, families, and for the very existence of ou
country.
These are the men for whom you
are asked to save and lend your dol dollars.
lars. dollars. A country worth fighting for is a
country worth saving for.
To save money is to save life.



PAGE TWO,

OCA LA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1917

OCALA EVENING STAR

Publlnbed Every Day Except Sunday by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OF OCALA, FLA.
- H. K. Carroll, Freiddeni
P. V. I.eavenrHl, Seereiary-Treamirer
J. II. Benjamin, Editor
Entered at Ocala,
second-class matter.
Fla., postofflce as
TELEPHONES
BnatneKN Offtee Five-One
Editorial )epartment ..... Two-Seven
Society Editor Two-One-FIve
MEMnEIt ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Pres3 is exclusively
entitled for the use for republication of
all news dispatches credited to it or
.not otherwise credited in this paper
herein. All rights of republication of
special dispatches herein are also re reserved.
served. reserved. SCBSCIIIPTIO-V RATES
Domeatlc
One year, in advance .......
Six months, in advance. . ..
Three months, in advance...,
One month, in advance.
Foreign
One year, in advance
Six months, in advance
Three months, in advance-.'.,
One month, in advance......
1. 15.00
. 2.50
. 1.25
. .50
.$8.00
... 4.25
, 2.25
- .80
ADVERTISING RATES
Ilplays Plate 10c. per Inch for con consecutive
secutive consecutive insertions. Alternate inser insertions
tions insertions 25 per cent, additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charged on ads. that run less than
six times 5c. ner inch. Special (position
20 per cent, additional. Kates based on
4-inch minimum. .Less than four Inches
will take higher rate, which will be
furnished on antliation.
Reading: -ot loess 5c. per line for first
insertion; 3c. pe.' line for each-subsequent
insertion. One change a -week
allowed on readers without extra com
position char res.
Lesral advfc, -isements at legal rates.
Electros must be mounted, or charge
will be made for mounting.
The high school boys and girls, who
are publishing the Ocaleean Ensign
intend to have an eight-page paper
for their Christmas number. The
Ensign is a very bright little sheet
and our advertisers will find it to
their interest to patronize it.
Secretary McAdoo advises children
to save their pennies, which will sav
candy, which will save sugar, which
will save teeth. A sort of endless
chain of benefactions. Tampa Tri
bune.
A sugar famine is the. only thing
that will cause Mr. McAdoo's advice
to be taken.
J. Fred de Berry is criticising
Frank Clark and W. J. Sears because
they voted against the draft. We ex expect
pect expect Clark and Sears f ayor the volun volunteer
teer volunteer system in order to give- men "like
de Berry a chance to prove their pat patriotism.
riotism. patriotism. Mr. de Berry is a young man
and seems to be able-bodied, but we
haven't heard of his volunteering yet,
What amuses us is that some of the
people who are now most vigorously
kicking on high taxes are the very
men who three years ago tried to sad
die a disproportionate bond issue on
the city, saying in excuse, "You
can't have things unless you pay for
them and it is better to have things
you have to pay for than to do with
out."
We find that in referring -to the
muffler on the oil engine at the water
works, we inadvertently slighted our
old college chum, Joe Caldwell, who
planned the whole thing and had it
laid out weeks ago, waiting, to obtain
enough fuel for the old plant, so he
could shut down the new ione long
enough to do the work. If we ever
slight Joe, it is unintentionally, for he
is one of the most faithful little will
ing workers Ocala ever had.
it is believed that uerman spies
were at the bottom of the Halifax ex explosion,
plosion, explosion, starting the fire which caus caused
ed caused the munition ship to leave its dock
just in time to be rammed by another
vessel. There is probably too much,
of a disposition to charge things to
German spies. However, if some spy
pulled off this stunt he deserves
seat in hell beside his master, the
kaiser. It was a deed that would make
the devil envious.
Representative Frank Clark has
become a factor in deciding the
issue of national woman suffrage,
having been appointed on the new
House committee on woman suffrage.
Mr. Clark is against woman suffrage
and makes no bones of saying so,
in which he is unlike many other
statesmen who oppose it, but are
afraid to do so openly. As a major majority
ity majority of the members of the committee
are in favor of equal suffrage, the
speaker wasted some of -"Mr.- Clark's
time in putting him on it.'
Mr. E. A. Osborne, candidate for
alderman, in the second ward, is sure surely
ly surely one fair-minded man. In conver conversation
sation conversation with a Star reporter this morn morning
ing morning he admitted that his opponent,
Mr. J. J. Gerig, has never done any
harm. Pity Mr. Osborne's fairness or
mind has not been imitated by some
of his supporters, who for the last
few weeks have been trying to con convince
vince convince the voters that Mr. Gerig was a
bungler, a grafter and a pocket-sized
tyrant.
Ocala furnishes a good example of
the inferiority of the referendum io
representative government. Under the
initiative, the referendum and recall,
we could never have anything done in
Ocala. A bunch of the discontented

would call for an election at least
once a month. They would start out
with a petition, and not only all the
discontented would sign it, but all the

paperbacks who are. afraid to say no
to any petition shoved at them, and
then the city would have the discom discomfort
fort discomfort and expense of an election. We
are a firm believer in the represejita-
re form of government laid down
by the founders of this nation, and we
hink the referendum is an infernal
nuisance.
A GOOD MAN GONE
TO HIS REWARD
The many friends of Rev. J.J3- Ley,
pastor for four years of the Ocala
Methodist church, and since 1913
serving the church in Orlando, will
sincerely mourn his death, which oc
curred in Orlando yesterday.
The Orlando Reporter-Star says of
Mr. Ley:
Rev. J. B. Ley: Born September
23, 1855. Died, December 10th, 1817.
This is a very brief statement but
between the years and between the
ines much remains to be told.
Rev. John B. Ley was born in
Thomasville, Ga., and at a very tender
age was brought to Florida, his par
ents locating at Micanopy.
His father, Rev. John C. Ley and
mother, Mrs. Martha Pottle Leywere
pioneer Methodists and to their unit-
ed and faithful efforts, amid many ;
hardships of pioneer life Methodism
was planted in many places in thv
state.
John, the son, was educated at
West Point and at Vanderbilt Univer
sity, receiving a liberal education
which stood him in good stead all
through his life, especially in his
chosen profession, the ministry of the
gospel.
He was married to Miss Mary Es-
tell Roux in January, 1880. His first
church given him after being ordain
ed was the Volusia Mission, and his
life work ever since was given with
out reserve to many of the hardest,
and following that to many of th
finest churches in the state, among
them Tallahassee, Tampa, .Lakeland,
Ocala, Jacksonville and Orlando.
His three years service in Orlando
were among nis best and the last
year proved a crowning effort.
He was a hard worker, a fine
preacher, a godly man, a ray of sun
light, a cordial pastor and a firm
f riend. Everybody loved him and the
visitors to our city were with one ac
cord great admirers of him and his
sermons. His home life was the most
sacred and consistent thing about
him. Never an impatient mood or a
chss word, always ready to meet his
children" on an equal footing and, no
matter howvpressing his other duties,
patiently explaining every difficult
problem.
He rounded out the three years of
his work in Orlando, coming to the
church at a time when the new edi
fice had just been built, with a load
of debt upon it and each year of his
pastorate he had a large addition to
the membership and was instrumental
in meeting every obligation.
During the past year all obligations
were met and twenty thousand dollars
of debt upon the church was paid and
Brother Ley had one of the finest re reports
ports reports of his life to read to the an annual
nual annual conference which met at Miami.
He had planned toigo to confer conference
ence conference with the presiding elder and his
sin-in-law, Mr. T. F. Alexander of
Tampa, in his automobile, but Sunday
a ; week ago was taken ill and though
it was thought he would soon recover
he grew worse, suffering greatly dur during
ing during the following d.ys.
Wednesday he tf elt so much better-
that he was .about his room, but soon
had a relapse and Saturday it became
necessary to operate. At first it was
thought he might rally, but the burst
ing of an abscess, speedily terminated
his useful life, for at two in the morn
ing of Monday he -slept away into the
other life of which it was his dearest
pleasure to tell to mortals below.
He is survived by his wife, his
daughters, Mrs. T. F. Alexander of
Tampa, Mrs. Frank Smith of Orlan Orlando,
do, Orlando, Mrs. L. A. Bell of Cairo, Ga., Miss
Ruth of this city, and his son, J. C.
Ley of Tampa.
The funeral will take place tomor
row at 3 p. m. in the Methodist
church. The pallbearers will be chos chosen
en chosen from among the board of stewards
Rev. B. K. Thrower of Tampa, who is
now in Miami attending conference,
will preside, f
JiiVen tne opponents oi the new
charter will admit there is one good
2?L??5?A d, aJ
the nuisance of annual elections. Un
der the former system, by the time a
council had organized and settled to
its work, people who were either dis dissatisfied
satisfied dissatisfied with the election of a part
of its members, or, with something it
had done' since organization, were pre preparing
paring preparing to trp to oust half or four four-ninths
ninths four-ninths of its members and put their
own favorites in their places. But
under the new charter the men elect elected
ed elected today will have either a fair oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to demonstrate their ability to
serve the city, or they will prove their
incompetency or perhaps their dis dishonesty.
honesty. dishonesty. Ocala politics makes us
tired. It lacks symmetry and per perspective;
spective; perspective; also, the men who try the
most earnestly to serve the city re receive
ceive receive the greatest amount of hostile
criticism. If the people do not mend
their ways in this respect, gang pol politics
itics politics will obtain sway, for the better
class of-citizens will refuse to serve.
And whenever they do so, our experi-
ment with municipal ownership will
come to gnei, ior xnere is no city tnat
can honestly and efficiently operate j
its public utilities unless its affairs

THE

(New York Herald)
There are roads choked up by the infantry in columns of slanted steel,
And the grasslands swarm with the batteries that roll into line and wheel;
There are hills alive with quick signal flags, half way to the bending" sky,
And slow plodding mules and giant gray trucks in an endless stream go by;
There are miles upon miles where the cotton was white and the pines had
seen years past our ken,
Covered uphill and down now with tentage of brown in our city of fighting
men.
There are men who shouldered the haversack when "Cuba libre!" was the
call
And boys who have passed from the book and desk to the greatest school
of all;
There are men whose world was the walls of home and men whose home
was the world;
Lad, lover and rover, they follow the trail of a battle flag unfurled.
There are sons of the North, there are sons of. the South, there are sons of
the town and the glen,
Who live side by side, work, sweat, drill, march and ride in our city of
1 fighting men.
There are ringing calls from the brassy throats of bugles that greet the sun
And the throbbing beauty of "Taps" to crown the work of a day well
done;
There are songs that float through the countryside when the regiment'
hiking back,
And khaki a-revel cares nothing for dust or wearying pounds of pack;
There is laughter at noon, ther is longing at night for a past that will
live once again
All the heartache and mirth of an army in birth in our city of fighting
men. Steuart M. Emery,
Company A, 104th Military Police, Camp McClellan, Anniston, Ala.

are managed by representative men
backed by a large majority of its
better element.
MR. TUCKER'S LETTER
Our young friend, H. W. Tucker, j
was in such a deuce of a sweat to
have his letter printed in the Star
yesterday afternoon, that he had the
type set at the Banner office, he hav having
ing having brought the copy in entirely too
latefor the Star to set' it. He was
so anxious to have it printed that he
shouldered the galley of type and
brought it right up to the Star com composing
posing composing room and set it down on the
imposing stone, right by the page
where it was to go.
Mr. Tucker, in this, was following
out the old, established trick of the
politicians, to get t something in too
late for it to be answered- This trick
is always a confession of weakness,
for man who thinks he has a good
argument is never afraid to have it
answered.
We. might not have let it go in the
paper, lor we don't Deneve m print printing
ing printing anything unless the. other fellow
has a show to answer it. We refrain refrained
ed refrained from election argument yesterday,
and think everybody else should have
done the same thing. However,
glancing over Mr. Tucker's copy we
found nothing in it any more than he
has been preaching for the last sev several
eral several months and has by this time im
parted to everyone in town who would
listen to him. He could have written
it any day last week, or last month,
as easily as yesterday, and probably
would have done so if he hadn't known
anybody on the other side could have
demolished it.,
There is some truth in Mr. Tucker's
argument, but most of it is bunk. We
admit that the council made a mistake
in employing Twombly and Henney,
but we don't know that one of Mr.
Tucker's pets would "have done any
better,. We have looked over Mr.
Meffert's statement, and we do not
see how Mr. Tucker is going to prove
his interpretation of it without jug juggling
gling juggling the figures.
It is not out of place to say here
that the present council can hardly
be said to be responsible for Twombly
and Henney. They were employed on
city work by a previous council, that
presided over by Mr. Hunter, we
think, and went on doing work for the
city until they almost logically came
into supervision of the electric plant.
To do them justice, with the exception
of allowing the noisy oil engine to be
substituted, they did their work well.
In another place, Mr. Tucker says:
"In this new city charter, the people
that got it up could have exempted
themselves from taxes for the rest
of their lives if they saw fit."
Qn this statement, Mr. Tucker
shows either a vast ignorance of law
or a reckless disregard of truth. The
gentlemen who drew up the chartei
might have been just as dishonest as
the rest of us, and willing to grab off
anything not nailed down or redhot,
but they certainly didn't try to ex exempt
empt exempt themselves from taxes, and they
certainly couldn't have done so if
they had tried, as any lawyer will tell
Mr. Tucker without stopping, io look
at his books.
Mr. Tucker, is also unjust to Robert
TUn T4. : nr n -en
when he came here, took the first job
that offered, of driving a car, but that
was no discredit to him. He soon
found bigger work, which he was
competent to do, and did t faithfully
to the end.
The following tribute by the Or Orlando
lando Orlando Reporter-Star to Rev. J. B. Ley,
who died in that city Monday, will ex express
press express the sentiments of Ocala people,
who learned to highly value Mr. Ley
during his work among them:
"AH Orlando was grieved and
shocked at the announcement of the
death of Rev. J. B. Ley, which oc occurred
curred occurred this morning. The state of
Florida has lost a valuable citizen,
the ministry of his church a worthy
apostle. As. a man Mr. Ley, was
above reproach, as a minister of th
gospel he eminently carried out the
teachings of the lowly Nazarene.
Perhaps no minister ever filled the
Methodist pulpit of this city who was
more tenderly loved than he, not only
by his own congregation, Dut Dy au
others as well, for Mr. Ley met all as
his Christian brothers
That they

CAMP

differed in faith from his made no ;
difference, so long as they were sin-
cere, and had they no faith at all, Dr. ;
Ley by his brother-love and comrade-j
ship showed them the true Christian
spirit. ,in tne puipit ne was an eio--quent
orator; his sound analysis of
every day facts; his frank and earnest
way of putting these before his con congregation,
gregation, congregation, made his sermons among
the most enjoyed in the city. Truly
Orlando and the state have suffered
a loss by his death."
The capture of Jerusalem is of
value from a sentimental rathe? than
a material standpoint. It is so sit situated
uated situated that it can hare but little strat strategic
egic strategic influence on the war. However,
it is a city sacred to three great re
ligionsChristian, Jewish and Mos Moslemand
lemand Moslemand the fact that it is in Chris Christian
tian Christian hands will greatly impress the:
Mohammedans, many of whom favor
Great Britain more than they do Ger
many. Jerusalem is one of the holy
cities of Islam, the Mohammedans
holding it in esteem next to Mecca
and Medina. They also reverence
Moses, Solompn and Jesus next in
order to their xwn prophets and some
few who were nearest to him. Moses
and Solomon are. held in as high es esteem
teem esteem by them as by the Jews, and
Jesus (Issa) is reverenced as a proph prophet
et prophet and a wise man. When Jerusalem
was taken by the army of Godfrey de
Bouillon in the second crusade, the
Mohammedans in it" were massacred
and everything sacred to them was
destroyed or defiled. The British will
doubtless be very careful not to do
anything to offend the religious sen sensibilities
sibilities sensibilities of the Mohammedans, a
large number of wh6m are their allies.
If it remains in the hands of the Brit British,
ish, British, it and the remainder of Palestine
will probably he made an open land to
people of all religions, for it is very
unlikely that any great number of
Jews' will ever go there to live.
BOY SCOUTS AND
THE LIBERTY LOAN
The report of the work of the Boy
Scouts of America in the second Lib Liberty
erty Liberty Loan drive has been made pub
lic. It shows that the Boy Scouts
were directly responsible for the sale
of $101,133,600 m bonds.
This means that they procured
about 5 per cent of the total sub
scriptions to the loan, and the number
of bonds they sold show that they se
cured one subscription out of every
18.
This is a splendid record for the
boys of America and a hopeful sign
for the future of the country when the
boys of the land are willing and able
to perform such valuable public ser
vice.
It is to leave them such a national
heritaee as our forefathers of the
revolution bequeathed to their de
scendants that the proceeds of hte
Liberty Loan are to be used.
OUR BABY LEAVES
... Mr.
R. E. Curtis (our baby)" leaves
the 15th to take a position' in
us on
Jacksonville, at wich place he is con
templating on letting Cupid be happy
in wedlock once again. All the girls
will miss his cheerful laugh and
smile, on the corner of the Merch
ants block.
Another member, Mr. Earle Lewis,
of Oklawaha, leaves the 15th, and
I after spending the holidays with his
parents, will then join the navy to
fight for the cause of his country.
These two boys will be greatly
missed by the population of Ocala as
they have nearly become ai)art of our
town. Sincerely submitted,
Ocala Fire Department.
P. S. An ex-fire fighter, Mr. R.
Mock, has purchased the motordome
motorcycles of the late Rutherford
Shows and gives free exhibitions daily
up Fort King and around the square.
PLUMBING AND ELECTRICAL
CONTRACTING
When you have plumbing or elec electrical
trical electrical contracting, let us furnish you
estimates. No job too large and none
too smalL tf H. W. Tucker.
VICTROLAS
BOOK SHOP.
for Christmas. THE
3t
Fresh milk, Hewett Dairy, at the
j Delicatessen Shop, 15c. quart. 12-tf

TP a
1 116

OCALA.

CAPITAL STOCK S50.000.00.
State, County and City Depository

The

20TH CENTUBY
Converts Any Ford

Until December 24th the Price is $150 F. O. B.
Fon du Lac, Wisconsin.
GET YOURS NOW V
AT THE LOW ?RICE
ADVANCES TO $200 JANUARY 1
FARM TRACTOR SALES COMPANY

Distributors.

Box 96
FAST 'THROUGH
TO THE EAST
"Coast Line Florida Mail"
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"St. Louis-Jacksonville Express"
Steel Sleeping Cars Between Tampa and Washington, Philadelphia
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and Indianapolis. Observation Cars, Dining Cars.

Atlantic
STANDARD RAILROAD
For tickets and reservations call on
W.T.GUY,
IV A., Ocala, Florida.

-r
OUR JOB PRINTING Department is.
thoroughly equipped for all kinds
of commercial Printing. Our facilities
for handling

PAMPHLETS, BOOKLETS, PROGRAMS.
W EDDING and BUSINESS
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JOB PRINTING
TELEPHONE FIVE-ONE (51)

Chesapeake Bay Oysters received
aaily f-t the Delicatessen Shop, Ocala
House block. 17-tf
See that new stationery at Ceng's
Drug Store, adv.

ercia.
FLORIDA
FABffi
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r-.-
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Ocala, Florida
TOURIST TRAMS
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"Seminole Limited"
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oast low
OF THE SOUTH
J G. KIRKLawivD- P- A.
Tampa, Fla.

f HORSE

UNEXCELLED

Correspondence Cards, 600 boxes zt
29cts. per box while they last. Gang's
Drug Store.
Toys and Dolh? of many kinds &i
THE BOOK SHOP ANNEX.
9V



OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, DECfcMfiEfc li. 1M7

PAGE THREE

We Have the Equipment and Ability
To serve you as you ought to b servied, and when, you are not let us
ask you again, to let us know, for thi is the only way we can accomplish
ur desire. .......
Of course, sonnetimes, little things go wrong, but- they an not inter,
tional, and, if you will call us up, they wili be corrected IMMEDIATELY

Ocala"Ice.'&
PHONE 34
That
ter and
utensils that are

TMIfPTrTiTl IT RFnTn

r um LM3MU

Hi SI ivvt" :

made, but light in weight, bright looking

and sanitary utensils that

(guaranteed for 2U years but in actual

daily service havclasted
for 25 years. Such is
the class of Ware
you can see
demonstrated
at our store by
factory expert
today and every
day this week.
Hod)'

By reason of its extra thickness "18-92" ILLINOIS Aluminum
Ware distributes its heat more evenly thoroughout the entire
utensil, lessening the usual concentration of heat at the bottom;
, this means less chance of burning and a great saving in food as
well as fuel. It also means more even cooking, better flavor
cad greater nutrition.
Just a trial will convince ycm of the superiority of "18-92" ILLINOIS
Ware, Guaranteed for 20 years. Therefore we suggest that you take
advantage of the opportunity now offered to secure one of the out-of-the-ordinary
extra-thick 9-inch '18-92' Fry Pans at the special introduc introductory
tory introductory price of $1.76 and thus tttve 59 cent,
If yon see It you will surely buy It. Then you won't be satisfied until

QUALITY FIRST you nave replaced your present Kitcnen utensils oi tnc
; VS 1892 5. Wear-out kind with a complete assortment of the longer

, lasting il.l.ijnuis utensns selected iron our

344 Shapes and Sizes
A Utensil for Every Purpose

fT ft t ii.Cr i "'iif-Q
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TRADEMARK
fcUOCJN AMERICA
' Manufactured and

ILLINOIS PURE ALUMINUM GO. fec5J?5J,i
Blfl Free Demonstration o! "18-92" Aluminum
Ware to Our Store Beaming Thursday, Dec 13th.
Watch the Btg Show Window y

HOLIDAY
All Kind
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and
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WATCHES
NICE LINE OF LADIES

?8S LAVAL1ERS SA
RUBIES LuIX V l-X Lai La I kJ AQUAMARINE
Signet Rings, Ladies' Rings in Cameo, Diamond, Ruby, Pearls, Etc
FINE LINE OF CAMEO BROOCHES
Watch Fobs and Yaldemar Chains, m Solid Gold and Gold Filled
ALL GOODS SOLD UNDER GUARANTEE
Be Sure to Call and See My Line While Doing
, Your Christmas Shopping
J. E. AILLEMAND
. Next Door to Express Office.
OCALA FLORIDA

lis now a universally acknowledged necessity. No business man is
prepared to meet the daily affairs of his business if he is not pro protected
tected protected with

FIRE INSURANCE

We represent not only the best .fire insurance companies, but
also the highest class INDEMNITY AND BONDING concerns in
the world. Talk is over with us.

D. W. DAVIS, iS?Z OCALA, FLA.

ttil-!lm

5X. LEO COLLEGE
SAINT LEO, PASCO COUNTY, FLORIDA
IDEAL BOARDING SCHOOL FOR YOUNG GENTLEMEN
Courses in Classics, Science and Ccirrnerce. Also
Primary Department. Send for Cataltgue.
Rev. F. Benedict, Director.
OPENS FOR THE FALL TERM, WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 12, 1917.

Read the Star Want Ads Itp ays

Packing Co.

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will coot food quicker, bet
save 56 to 14 fuel expense
very thick and strongly
are positively
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fD Inch Size)
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Guaranteed by ;.
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FACE
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Hunting
CASES
WATCH BRACELETS
tl' !'?!!

in i

If You Have Any News for this De Department,
partment, Department, Call Two-One -Five
or Two-Seven
After 11:15 A. M, Three-Five-Seven
Some Bad Advice
I fear that my philosophy
Is not the proper kind,
The proper sort of sophistry
To feed the youtnlul mind.
"While other officers will advise
To labor night and, day
I am inclined to think it wise
To have a little play.
When other authors say to do
Two dollars worth of toil
For ev'ry dollar paid to you,
That sentiment I spoiL
Do all the work to do, I say,
But ask for more than praise;
Just do the work the proper way
And strike them for a raise.
Some other authors say that we
Should never waste a jit
But save our money faithfully
And bank it, ev'ry bit,
So when we're sixty anyhow
Well have a million yen.
I'd rather hire a taxi now
Than own a Packard then.
There are a lot of fallacies
. That pass for good advice,
And most of these who fell for theso
Are still' as poor as mice.
I know-some fellows who are gray
Who otherwise have done
And they, are just as poor but they
Have had a lot of fun.
1 Selected.
Christmas Bazaar
St. Margaret's Guild and the Altar
Guild- of Grace Episcopal church will
hold their annual Christmas sale of
fancy work next Thursday, Dec. 15,
at the Style Hat Shop.
Mr. Grider Perkins will go back bu
the road tomorrow, having recovered
from his recent attack of grippe.
Mrs. Hal -Edwards and Mrs. A. L.
Paterson were visitors in town today
from Crystal River.
i
Mr. Cameron Gamsby of Chatta Chattanooga,
nooga, Chattanooga, Tenn., is expected to arrive on
Friday to spend Christmas with his
grandmother.
i m- .-
Mrs. Clarence Zewadski will enter entertain
tain entertain the Junior sewing circle of the
Methodist church at 3 o'clock Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday afternoon. '...-
mm
Mrs. Harvey Clark and -.little
daughter, Frances expect to leave this
afternoon for Chicago on a visit to
Mrs. Clark's sister, Mrs. L. A,. Shep Shep-pard.
pard. Shep-pard.
v
. Mrs. Jessie- Bishop has just return returned
ed returned f from a visit to her niece, Mrs.
John Benton, in Gainesville.' Mrs.
Benton is- the -sister of Miss Felicia
Williams of this city.
Ocala friends of Miss Marshall will
be interested to know she has given up
her position as superintendent at the
Marion County Hospital to go as a
Red Cross nurse. She expects to go
shortly to France.
Mr. Welsh Dewey will leave Erie,
Pa where he has made his home for
the past year and a half, on the 21st,
stopping -a day in Columbus, Ohio, to
visit his uncle, Mr. T. B. WelshJ and
will arrive in Ocala Christmas eve
for a visit to his family.
J On. Thursday the sale given by the
ladies- of St. Margaret's Guild of
Grace Episcopal church will have
among other novelties knitting bags
of all .descriptions and the daintiest
silk samisoles. Mrs. W. J. Hilands
with her usual generosity to the guild
has sent a box of most attractive
Christmas novelties for the sale.
Tjieut. Bert Maloney was honored at
a most delightful little dinner given
by his sister, Mrs. C. W. Hunter, at
the Ocala House last evening. Those
present besides Lieut. Maloney were
Mrs. S. A. Rawls, Misses Ruby Gis-
sendaner, Callie Gissendaner, Adela
Ax, Lieut, Hugo Mcintosh and Mr.
Frank Harris Jr.
The. last of a series of parties giv given
en given for Miss Blanche Whaley was a
handkerchief shower given yesterday
afternoon by Miss Sue Moore, who en entertained
tertained entertained besides the members of the
A Club, the following friends of the
bride: Mrs. Harry Walters, Mrs. E.
L. Carney, Mrs. Charles Lloyd, Miss
Mary Piatt, Mrs. T. B. Pasteur, Mrs.
J. F. Chipman, Mrs. E. L. Bridges,
Miss Florence Conibear, Miss Marie
Pitchford and the bride's aunt, Miss
Dickinson of Madison and Mrs. Ca Ca-hill
hill Ca-hill of Talbotton, Ga. The color
scheme was red and green, being car carried
ried carried out in holly and poinsettias and
red shaded lights. Miss Whaley wore
a beautiful costume of dark blue
sati nand georgette embroidered in
gold and green with a black, and gold
hat. Refreshments were served at a
late hour, consisting of a salad course
and hot chocolate.
Mrs. Preer entertained the Presby Presbyterian
terian Presbyterian Sewing Circle yesterday after afternoon.
noon. afternoon. The afternoon was snent in a
beautiful service flag for the church
for which they can now claim twelve
stars. Later refreshments of hot
chocolate, fruit cake and orange cake
were served in the dinine room where
the table was laid witha handsome
crocheted and linen cover with white
chrysanthemums as a centerniece.
Hearst News, The Fighting Trail,
a popular serial now running and a
two' reel comedy at the Temple today.

(Continued on Fourth Page)

J. WALTER BELL

(Bushnell Times)
Oxford, Fla., Dec. 5, 1917.
The sad intelligence of the death of
J. Walter Bell who died in Camp
Wheeler at Macon at Macon, Ga re recently,
cently, recently, reached us last Saturday. He
volunteered for service in the stage
of the war. but died of pneumonia in
training camp. He is tha first of our
boys to fall, as it were, on the battle-
I field, and row, we are beginning to
feei the horrows, and sorrows of war.
He died not upon the battlefield at
the hands of the enemy, but while
training for service, but the effects is
to us almost the same.
His remains was brought back to
Oxford and viewed with sadness by
rrpny cf his friends, then laid to rest
in the Oak Grove cemetery by the side
cf ether relatives.
This is a sad occurrence to us all.
For many years, Walter has been one
of 'the Oxford boys and his friendship
amonjr us was very strong. He was
kind to all, was free-hearted, and his
benevolence to those in need knew no
bounds. In sickness he could hardly
be excelled 3 a nurse, and to those
that need?d helr in other ways, his
charity cften relieved.
He is gone from us, but his remem
bered kindness and friendship will re
main with us for a long time.
"Kis Associate.
LAKE WEIR W. C. T. U.
The Lake Weir W. C. T. U. opened
its December 6th meeting with song,
"A 11 Hail the Power of Jesus Name,"
Miss Iona Walling presiding at the or or-ganJ
ganJ or-ganJ An interesting scripture lesson
was read by the president, Mrs. Sig Sig-mon,
mon, Sig-mon, from Acts 27:1-44, followed with
a prayer for our soldiers. A welcome
letter was read from Miss Nellie
Stevens, district superintendent of
scientific temperance instruction in
our public schools. It was moved and
carried that we send boxes of home
made cake to our ten young men in
the training camps for Christmas.
The committee on the soldiers mem memory
ory memory book reported seven letters re received
ceived received in answer to previous letters
written 4hem. It was indeed a pleas pleasure
ure pleasure to hear them read. The prevail prevail-ing
ing prevail-ing sentiment was "leave, for France
soon." All reported plenty to eat and
to wear. Eleven members responded
to roll call with a name 'and address
of "one of our boys at the front" or
on their way. Mrs. L. B. Walling,
superintendent of the soldiers' and
sailors' department, conducted th
program which was:
"Plans for Work by the Superin-tendent"-i-Mrs.
Walling.
"The Part Drink Played in the Bat Battle
tle Battle of the Marne" Mrs. Straub.
Special Work Among Soldiers and
Sailors" Mrs. Merchon.
"The Need and Value of Comfort
Bags" Mrs. J. M. Douglas.
"Don't Forget to Write to the Sol Soldiers"
diers" Soldiers" Mrs. Knoblock.
"The Letter All Important" Mrs.
Reed.'
It was moved and carried o make
bandages in the near future.
x Reporter.
THFRnnOFQ RY
-mm m mm w m m. m
Tea Rooms ?
SERVICE A LA CARTE
8 A. M. to 7:30 P. M. J
N. MainSt., Opposite PostofHce
PLASTERING AND
CONCRETE WORK
I have just completed the
plastering and concrete work on
the Ocala union station, and am
now prepared to figure on all
kinds of work in this line.
CARL WENZEL & SON
OCALA, FLA.
TEeeiOLYSWOLLEH
Suffering Described As Torture
Relieved by Black-Drangbt.
Rossville, Ga. Mrs. Kate Lee Able, o!
this place, writes: "My husband is an
engineer, and once while lifting, he in injured
jured injured himself with a piece cf heavy ma machinery,
chinery, machinery, across the abdomen He was
so sore he could not bear to press on
himself at all, on chest or abdomen. He
weighed 1C5 lbs., and fell off until he
weighed 1 1 0 lbs. in two weeks.
He becarre constipated and it looked
like he woul J die. Wo had three different
doctors, yet with all their medicine, his
bowels failed to act. He would turn up
a ten-cent bottle of castor oil, and drink
it two or three days in succession. He
did this yet without result. We became
desperate, he suffered so. He was swol swollen
len swollen terribly. He to!d me his suffering
could only be described as torture.
I sent and bought Thedford's Black Black-Draught.
Draught. Black-Draught. 1 trade h:m take a big dose,
and when it began to act he fainted, he
was in such misery, but he got relief and
began to mend at once. He got well,
and we both feel he owes his life to
Thedford's Black-Draught."
Thedford's Black-Draught will help you
to keep fit, ready for the day's work.
Try it! NC-131
Star ads. are business builders.

WILSON'S INFLUENCE ON
V VOTES FOR WOMEN

(Speeial to the Star)
Washington, Dec. 11. Those per persons
sons persons who have professed doubt as to
the influence, of the president and
have advised the pickets to take up
their stand elsewhere than at the
Whits House gates should have been
present as I was when the Senate con considered
sidered considered and passed the resolution de-;
daring war cn Austria-Hungary. I
Senator Stone of Missouri, chairman
of the resolution committee, Senator -Lodge
of Massachusetts and other
speakers urged the passage of the
resolution, without amendment, be because
cause because if President Wilson had wished
to declare wrr on the other German
allies, then he would have so stated in
his message. The resolution went
through without any amendment even J
being suggested:
Speaking of the passage of the fed
eral suffrage amendment, Mrs. John
Rogers of New York, who presided at
Friday afternoon's meeting, said:
"Whatever happens to the amendment
when it eoriies before the House for
a vote.. President Wilson will be re
sponsible." Mrs. Rogers brought this
statement to the conference as a mes message
sage message from the women voters of New
York, who are supporting the federal
amerdment.
A big delegation is attending,' the
conference with many southern states,
leven Georgia and Florida and Louis
iana, being represented. The two
Florida representatives are myself
little5 Mrii Mary Nolan of Jackson
ville, a member of the United Daugh
ters of the Confederacy, and an en enthusiastic
thusiastic enthusiastic Red Cross worker. ;
Mrs. Nolan told me that she gave
up her Red Cross work to come to
Washington to picket when she heard
of the inhuman treatment accorded
Alice Paul, the leader of the party,
and many other incarcerated women
whose offense was picketing, a right
accorded to them under the Clayton
act. It is wise to remember that the
District authorities avoided complica
tions in sentencing the women f oi
blockading traffic.
All the pickets1 who are able are
attending the conference where they
are naturally honored figures and I
have been privileged to meet most of
them. At the close of the"session the
pickets were presented with pins sym symbolic
bolic symbolic of their imprisonment. Some of
the women who- were imprisoned are
gray-haired and quiet, little women,
like your mother or mine. Mrs. Nolan.
Florida's representative in the prison
crowd, is 73 years of age. College-
bred girls and social workers, society
matrons and working women fought
side by side for their right to peace peacefully
fully peacefully petition for the passage of the
Susan :B. Anthony amendment. I met
one little girl, a government clerk,
who had done "tim" for picketing.
She was not only taL s back into ser service
vice service but given ar raise in salary.
Just what the reversal of the policy
in setting free all the suffrage pris prisoners
oners prisoners means, no one is quite sure but
one one point everyone does agree
and that is that the amendment will
pass the House when it comes up for
a vote.
Jf 'the amendment fails then the
policy of the party will be' practically
the same, it has been brought out at
the conference. Only more so, if you
see what I mean. Organizations will
be strengthened and of course lobby lobbying
ing lobbying will go on as usual. For five
years the Congressional Union, or
woman's party, as it is j now called,
has maintained a lobby during the
sessions of Congress and has been
given audiences beforeMhe president
and been active in every way in
spreading propaganda for the amend amend-of
of amend-of strength in working for mall
suffrage favors..
Several members of the Woman's
Suffrage Association have remarked
to me that the party was simply
working for the glory and to get
their name before the public so that
the work of the association which has
been organized fifty years, would re receive
ceive receive no credit. For my part I will
take' the vote and let the credit go.
The association need not worry about
the honor. They will nominally be
given the honor because of good be behavior.
havior. behavior. Politicians however, wise in the
way of thfr world, have also told me
that if it had not been for the pickets
the amendment would have been lost
in the committee
I had been warned that the picket
ers were a bunch of naggers; that
they were well meaning women but
working as tools for Germany; that
theyrwere anarchists seeking to over overthrow
throw overthrow the government. Oh, yes, all
of thisl
What I did find when I arrived was
that the women were simply busy
women, working for suffrage and the
Red Cross and other war charities
just as you and I. Even at sessions ;
of the conference the women sit and!
knit on gray or khaki colored yarn, j
Sentiment has changed here too.;
Since the pickets were released peo peo-t)le
t)le peo-t)le who would like to belong but
were a trifle afraid of public opinion, i
dared to come out openly to help m
the work of passing the amendment,
which is after all the great thing that
all factions are working for.
As for the party we expect none of
the honor and glory. Our reward is
to be knowledge of work well done.
Susie Pope, Florida Press Chmn.
VULCANIZING .
Sure, we do it, and guarantee it too.
7-t BLALOCK BROS, Phone 78.
The CHRISTMAS STORE is THL
BOOK SHOP. 3t

WEARING
QUALITIES
made the imputation of
Don't
Be Deceived!
The original By Scout
Shoes cinnot be purchased
anywhere in Ocala except at
the ONLY SHOE STORE
in the city. L'ook for the Boy
Scout sea! on the Box.
PRICES $3 50 and $4.00
LITTLE'S
l
H0
ARLl
Commercial Bank Block
BUSINESS
PROPOSITION
Open in Florida
See at once.
J. D. Brinson - Ocala
ROOF
CONSERVATION
Your roof needs painting.
I have the material.
J have the labor.
Prices are right.
If you' don't let me do your
work, we both lose money.
V.'M'HASEK
210 Osceola SU Ocala, Fla.,
WHEN YOU HAVE PAID YOUR
RENT YOU HAVE
KISSED IT GOODBYE
Why not pay a small amount each
nonth and see it go into
YOUR OWN HOME
have a number of houses you can
-uy that way at
' $10 A MONTH
call and see' my list of houses from
i 1 000.00 up.
L P1. MURRAY
Room 5 Holder Blk.
Ocala, Fla,
SEED POTATOES
Maine-Grown Spauld-
ing Rose 4 and Bliss
Triumphs
3 J.R.RnTER, Hastings, FIa,
3 ,., ,,,.,
Mclvcr z MacEay
UNDERTAKERS and EMDALMERS
PHONES 47. 104, 305
OCALA, FLORIDA
DONT BE HOODWINKED
into the belief that Lead and Oil hand hand-mixed
mixed hand-mixed paint is either as durable or
economical as paint made by modern
machinery provided always that
proper materials only are used.
KRP.
is ALL Faint, finely ground and thor thoroughly
oughly thoroughly incorporated by powerful ma machinery
chinery machinery to which you add an equal
amount of Linseed Oil which YOU
BUY YOURSELF at oil price the"
result is an extremely durable, good"
bodied Pure Linseed Oil Painty at -a
very economical price.
WILL YOU TRY IT?
IT MAKES NO DIFFERENCE
For SaJje By
THE MARION HARDWARE CO,
Ocala, Fla.

'WV'I

L I -1



PAOS fogu

OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, DBCfittBER 11, 1917

mm inn

Odd Fellows meet tonight.
City election proceeding quietly.
Everybody confident, or making a
good bluff. At 3:30, 455 votes cast.
Tell you about it tomorrow.
Mr. Ed. Cannichael returned today
from a business trip to Palatka.
? Mr. Sibbald Wilson expects to leave
Friday for a visit to Atlanta.
A select line of JEWELRY at THE
BOOK SHOP. 3t
Mr. T. 0. Livingston of Palatka
was in town today on a business trip.
Try that famous Jonteel Talcum
Powder. Sold only at Gerig's Drug
tore at 25cts. the can.
. Mr. R. S: Hall left this afternoon
for a visit to Jacksonville.
Mr. Anderson, a government in inspector,
spector, inspector, is in town on official busi
ness.
Smock BABY CAPS made to order
just the thing for a holiday present.
The Style Hat Shop. 4 6t.
Mr. J. P. Phillips, who-has been at
tending the Methodist conference at
Miami, is expected .home tomorrow.
We have had a spell of mighty cold
weather. The temperature yesterday
morning was 25 and the morning be
fore zy.
No more Hiley's Poems at 60c af
ter present stock is exhausted. THE
BOOKSHOP. St
Frank Churchill of the Ocala Na
tional Bank leaves today for Jackson
ville, where he will offer his services
to the government.
A postal card from genial Ned An Anthony
thony Anthony at Camp Wheeler says he and
the other boys are 0. K. He says
Horace Whetstone is getting fat, but
nobody noticed Horace being thin
when he went away.
. A full assortment at the famnni
PAKRO Seedtape. Just the thing for
toe sma'i tail garden, ucaia seed
More. v tx
Our former marshal, W. Frank
Adams, now a soldier in the 306th
engineers, at Camp Jackson, is home
on a brief furlough. Frank is a fine fine-looking
looking fine-looking soldier and his friends are
mighty glad to see him. He likes the
service and the camp 'very much.
Camp Jackson, by the way, is undei
quarantine, several cases of menin meningitis
gitis meningitis having developed there.
The nicest line of Correspondence
Cards we have ever shown at the low
price of 29cts. per box. Gerigs Drug
Store. r
And now Mr. D. C. Stiles, the ca
pable cashier of the Commercial
Bank, is trying to break t into" the
army, lie is past military age, but
thinks he can do his bit in one of the
clerical branches, and fight some if
he has to. Mr. Stiles is a fine ac
countant and can draw from any cor
poration or private firm more than
the government will pay him. But he
wants to help win the war.
.
Some Holiday lines will be exhaust
ed long before Christmas. You should
shop early in order to supply your
needs. Our lines are complete. THE
BOOK SHOP. 3t
BOYS BASKET BALL
(Ocaleean Ensign)
Although various teams throughout
the state have been playing basketball
for the past two months, the. true sea season
son season for these games begins at the close
of the football season, which is
Thanksgiving day.
Inverness, Dade City, Eustis, Tar Tarpon
pon Tarpon Springs, Leesburg and Brooksville
are among the teams with which our
team 'expects to play. Inverness claims
the honors for Central Florida as she
has defeated all of the above named,
excepting Leesburg and Eustis, unfa unfavorable
vorable unfavorable conditions having prevented
games with them. -.
Ocala expects to play the Leesburg
boys this coming Saturday. This game
being the second of the season, will, of
course, be watched with the keenest in interest
terest interest by the student body, v.
If you don't think we are going to
.have any basketball games this year,
glance over the following schedule:
December 15, Starke at Ocala.
January 5, Ocala at Starke.
January 12, open.
January 18, Ocala at Sanford.
January 19, Ocala at Orlando.
January 25, open.
February 1, Sanford at Ocala.
February 8, Orlando at Ocala.
- Other games. will probably be ar arranged
ranged arranged with Eustis, Inverness, Brooks Brooksville
ville Brooksville and Palatka. So, boys, let's get
busy and show the school and the peo people
ple people of Ocala that we have some red
blooded American boys in our team.
Remember the old saying, "Practice
makes perfect," not that we expect
to" become perfect, you know, but be because
cause because we want to be familiar with the
game. Let's each and every one of
us come out every afternoon and put
the best we have into our practice.
Fresh milk Hewett Dairy, at the
Delicatessen Shop, 15c quart. 12-tf

METHODIST APPOINTMENTS

A telegram to Mrs. J. M. Gross this
afternoon announces that she and Dr.
Lrross will go to Miami, and that Rev.
Smith Harden, presiding elder of the
Orlando district will take charge of
the. Ocala Methodist church. Rev.
Barnett will be presiding elder in
this districts
Ocala iwill regret to lose Dr. and
Mrs. Gross, but is glad to know they
are sroine to such a crood town and
good church.
TEMPLE PICTURES
Manager Bennett was disaDnointeo
by 'not receiving the films promised
him .yesterday, but immediately tele
phoned to Gainesville, and had an ex excellent
cellent excellent picture sent over by auto. In
this picture, George Beban featured,
and all who saw it were well pleased.
It may have been better than the one
on the program.
Following is the proerram for tnJ
day and succeeding days this week:
Today: instalment of "The Fighting-Trail'
serial, the Hearst-Pathe
News and a King Bee comedy.
Tomorrow: Alice Jovce and Harrv
Morey in "His Secret," Vitagraph.
".Thursday: Jack Gardner in "The
Open Places," Essenay.
.Friday: Ruth Clifford and Monroe
Salisbury in "The Door Between."
Bluebird..
Saturday: Bessie Love in "Wee
Lady Betty," Triangle.
6. HTS- GraLS TAKE PART IN,
; ,,rr,;; thanksgiving parade
r -.JC Ocaleean Ensign)
The Ocala Thanksgiving parade was
formed by a large number of cars and
floats from the city and county. Many
floats deserve special praise for their
originality and beauty.
ir Mrs.' E-c A-c Osborne entered her car
for the benefit of the W. C. T. UT It
was gracefully draped in red, white
and blue, bunting and with its pa patriotic
triotic patriotic streamers and flags, floating in
the breeze the spectators were easily
convinced that there are not, and
could not be any colors as beautiful as
those of, pur national flag.
. Purity is the forerunner of liberty.
With s Liberty stands. Uncle Sam who
"is packed up" by the army and navy.
Thiwats the idea represented by th&
WC;T. U. float. Miss Mabel Mef Mef-feiwearing
feiwearing Mef-feiwearing a white gown and silver
gown, stood for purity. Marguerite
Edwards costumed as liberty with
Sibbald Wilson as Uncle Sam stood in
the center of the 'car, while Sidney
Perry pQrtraying.a sailor and Winnie
Flippen as. a soldier were seated high
at the rear. ,
, -The.spectators reached the height of
their enthusiasm when this float pass passed
ed passed the. grand stand as the band played
the Star, Spangled Banner. At this the
soldier and sailor rose to attention,
which brought to the minds of the on onlookers
lookers onlookers the real love for country and
patriotic idea of the float.
This float won the prize for the best
decorated automobile in the parade,
Thanksgiving day. The girls riding
on the float decided to donate the ten
dollargold piece to the orphan's home
in Jacksonville.
Thecar representing the Dodge
Bros, Motor Company was elaborately
decorated in the national colors. The
entire? body of the car was covered
with frame work on which hung
two American flags made of red, white
and., blue chrysanthemums. These
flags covered the sides of the car while
a-whorl of .flags formed a very at attractive
tractive attractive back. Just above the radiator
on the. artistically draped framework
was a -strong eagle; below this mas massive
sive massive bird sat a minature sailor and
soldier. J Agnes Burford stood high in
the rear, attired in a Columbia's cos costume
tume costume and carried a large American
flag.-'Kit Davis, Ellen Stripling and
CalUe Gissendaner, representing
France England and Italy respective respectively
ly respectively in costume were seated near the
feet of Columbia. These with several
boy scouts and red cross nurses form formed
ed formed a most graceful group for the pa patriotic,
triotic, patriotic, setting. This patriotic float
was designed by those High School
girls taking part. i
O. H S. BOYS IN THE SERVICE
: (Ocaleean Ensign)
Wey think it fitting to make' brief
mention of "the former boys at the
High School who have joined the ar army
my army or navy, and the following is as
near fa correct list as can be obtained:
Alfred Turner, Marine Corps.
Leslie Anderson, Lieutenant, Army.
Patrick Anderson, Lieutenant, Ar
my.
Wiley Burford, Lieutenant, Army.
Robert Anderson, Lieutenant, Army.
Julius Brown,. Lieutenant, Army,
Walter Moorhead, better known as
("Ox") Navy.
George-Newsom, ("Tinker") Navy.
. Ned Smith, Navy.
Ed. Connor, Navy.
Earl Smith, Navy.
Curtis Connor, Navy.
Hubert TenEyck, Navy.
SILVER SPRINGS v
See Silver Springs through the
glass-bottomed boat. Scenery not to
be had in. any other part of the Unit United
ed United States.' Largest flowing and most
beautiful springs in the world, some something
thing something that can't be described or ex exaggerated:
aggerated: exaggerated: real geiscrs undr water,
the Blue. Grotto, Bridal Chamber,
Florida rSnow Storm, Ladies' Parlor
and other- beautiful spots too numer
ous to mention. Price, $1 and $1.50;
children under. 12 years of age half
fare. If dissatisfied, money refunded.
C. (Ed.) Cannichael,
-.-v Owner and Manager.

MEN WANTED FOR
THE NAVAL RESERVE

Editor Star: I would thank you to
give publicity to the fact that an en enrolling
rolling enrolling board for the U. S. ntval re reserve
serve reserve force is now in Tampa for en enrolling
rolling enrolling men in this branch of the ser service.
vice. service. The chance for training and
promotion is greater in this branch
than any other branch of the service.
Both the training conditions and con conditions
ditions conditions of actual service are pleasant
and the demand for petty officers and
commissioned officers is so great that
any one who applies himself will be
quickly rewarded by promotion.
Application should be made at
room 401 city hall, Tampa, Florida,
before noon on Thursday. Applica Applications
tions Applications will be received from 8 a. m. to
9 p. m. and those drafted or subject
t odraft will be enrolled if they bring
a certificate from their local board
that they have not been certified for
service. Yours very truly,
F. M. Anderson, Lieut. U. S. N.,
Section Commander.
TURNER IS IN
ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
Brooklyn, New York, Dec. 6.
Editor Star: I have been transfered
to the navy electrical school here,
where I shall remain for thirty weeks.
New York is a good place, but I'm
coming back to Florida when I'm
turned loose. G. F. Turner.
MEETING OF LIVE STOCK MEN
The Marion County Live Stock As Association
sociation Association will hold a meeting at the
courthouse in Ocala Dec. 15th at 2:30
p. m.
perfect a permanent organization.
and to discuss "tick eradication."
All live stock men, farmers and
business men who have the interest
of our county's development at heart
are urged to attend this meeting.
Jno. L. Edwards,
Temporary President.
FROM A SOLDIER IN FRANCE
Somewhere in Franct, Oct. 30.
My dear Sister: Would bttve writ written
ten written you a couple of weeks ago but I
happened to a little accident about
three weeks ago which prevented my
writing until now. I mashed by right
hand while at work one day. Howeve
it is nearly well, but 'a little more and
I am afraid I would have lost it oar
ruined it for good.
The weather is cold and rainy here.
However it is not so severe yet, but
what we can work every day. You
asked about sleeping conditions". Will
say that I have slept on the ground,
on boards, on straw and last and best
on a wooden bunk with a tick of
straw over a dirt floor, the latter be being
ing being the present method. As to eats
have no kick on that at all. We get
all the staple food we need and it is
cooked very well. We have plenty1
of clothes, overcoat, gloves, etc. The
wife of our lieutenant colonel in At Atlanta
lanta Atlanta gave a few sweaters away and
I was fortunate in getting one, which.
I have been using for a month or
more over here to a good advantage.
Am not getting along very fast with:
the new language now as am quite
busy and too, unless one can talk to to-some
some to-some one in French it is monotonous
studying out of a book alone, but t
expect to get it in the course of time.
We get some magazines here but they
are often several years old. If you
can you might send me the Times-
Union daily, also Literary Digest, and
I will remember you when 'I return return-Had
Had return-Had a nice little surprise sometime
ago, when the front end of our com
pany, where I was, received two loads
of shot from a hunter's shotgun. He
apparently did not see us. I received
several of the shot some in the face-
However it was nothing very seriousv
just enough to make us want to chase
him.
A .few weeks ago I together with
several others had the pleasure of
visiting a big city near here. Some
of. the points of interest were an old
chateau or castle built in the. four
teenth century, now in use; a very
large and noted art gallery, with
thousands of pictures, statues, etc.
natural gardens as well as an im
mense cathedral built in the fourteen
th century which is also in use at
present. I spent the night there and
slept in a real bed once more.
It is raining torrents now; in fact,
it rains now about every day as it
seems to be a rainy season here. Most
all civil work is done here by women,
and considering everything it is done
well. Moral conditions are very bad
here. I have met some nice people,
though. Liberty Bonds sold like hot
cakes over here among us.
With love. Pete Giles.
Come in and look at that new lot of
Correspondence Cards. Fifty and 75c
values for 29cts. the box. Gerig's
Drug Store. H
W. K. Lane, M. D., Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat. Law Library Building, Ocala,
Florida. tf
LEATHER GOODS for gifts at
THE BOOK SHOP. 3t
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER.
AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Con
tract work. Gives More and Better
Work for the Money than any other
contractor in the city.

Continued fiT Third Page
Spain-Whaley
The wedding of Miss Blanche
Whaley to Mr.. Dudley Spain of Tal-
botton, Ga,, took place at noon today
at the home. of the bride's parents,
Mr. and Mrs. S. R. Whaley. The
bride, a handsome brunette, was
charming in a coat suit of dark green
velour, trimmed in beaver fur with
hat, shoes and accessories in black.
She carried an enormous shower bou
quet of bride roses and valley lilies.
There were no attendants.
Before the ceremony Miss Hattie
Lou Dickinson, the young aunt of the
bride, beautifully sang "At Dawning"
and "Because," two very appropriate
selections, Miss Byrd Wartmann ac
companying her on the piano.
At noon to the strains of Lohen
grin's Wedding March, played by Miss
Wartmann, the bride entered the spa
cious parlor on the arm of the groom
and they took their places in an ar artistic
tistic artistic white pergola placed at one end
of the room. This pergola was grace gracefully
fully gracefully entwined with southern smilax,
which also was used with white chry chrysanthemums
santhemums chrysanthemums to decorate the rest of
the room. The ceremony was per performed
formed performed by Rev. Bunyan Stephens, in
the absence of the bride's pastor, Rev.
J. M. Gross. The ring service was
used.
After the ceremony an informal re reception
ception reception was held. The bride's mother
wore blue broadcloth. Miss Dickin Dickinson
son Dickinson was beautifully gowned in black
charmeuse trimmed in cut steel and
wore chrysanthemums. Mrs. John Ca Ca-hill,
hill, Ca-hill, sister of the groom, wore a
charming gray costume with yellow
chrysanthemums.
In an adjoining room, which was
beautifully decorated in. green with
pink chrysanthemums, was the bride's
cake. It was elaborately decorated in
a heart design. There was much
hilarity over cutting the cake and
Mr. D. W. Davis, cut the ring., Mr.
Albert Harriss, one of our popular
young men, is doomed to live a rich
old bachelor for he cut both the dime
and the thimble.
The guests were then invited into
the living room where a three-course
wedding breakfast of salad, ice and
coffee and cake was served. The din dining
ing dining room was most attractive in
green and yellow, having a profusion
of vines and yellow chrysanthemums.
The table was covered with a beauti beautiful
ful beautiful lace cover and from the f our cor corners
ners corners soft yellow tulle was caught up
in a big fluffy bow at the chandelier
where the yellow shaded light made
a soft glow. On the buffet were yel yellow
low yellow flowers and yellow candlesticks
added to the color scheme.
Mrs. H. S. Minshall was in charge
of the dining room with Misses Sue
Moore, Elizabeth Davis, Catherine
Livingston, Susie Lou Ellis assisting.
Mr. and Mrs. Spain left at one
o'clock for Washington, D. C, and
New York for an extended trip amidst
a shower of good wishes. Mrs. Spain
is one of Ocala's most charming girls,
having been reared here and having
formed many friendships. She was
also a popular student at Madison
Hall, Washington, D. C.
Mr. Spain is one of the well known
and popular young men of Talbotton,
Ga., but is now a valued employee of
the American Thread Co., and travels
out of New York.
After the honeymoon of six weeks
the couple will return to Ocala for a
ime.
The friends, of which these young
people have a host, wish them much
joy and happiness and will be glad to
see them back home again.
Mrs. E. C. Bennett's many friends
will be sorry to hear she continues ill.
,
Mr. J. D. Wilkes is home from
West Palm Beach for a brief visit to
his family.
Mrs. P. J. Theus' friends will be
sorry to learn that she is on the sick
list. r
Mrs. C. C. Bailey and Mrs. Sam
ILeigh are visiting Mrs. Tom Bailey at
Groveland. They will return tomor tomorrow.
row. tomorrow. Mrs. E. M. Howard is at Oldtown
with her cousin, Mrs. Badger, who is
ill and who will accompany her home
when she is able.
Mrs. H. A. Waterman and daugh daughter,
ter, daughter, little Miss Valeta left today for
Jacksonville, where they will spend
the Christmas holidays with Mrs.
Waterman's parents, Mr. and Mrs. B.
J. Potter. Mr. Waterman will join
them Christmas eve.
Miss Onie Chazal will be the pop
ular hostess of the Tuesday auction
club at her home this afternoon in
compliment to her guests, Misses
Marie and Dorothy Hickman and Miss
Adela Ax. Extra guests will be
Misses Elizabeth Davis, Mabel Mef Mef-fert
fert Mef-fert and Susie Lou Ellis. After the
games those holding highest scores
will receive each a box of corres
pondence cards. Refreshments con consisting
sisting consisting of banana salad, wafers and
tea complete this delightful afternoon
party.
- i
King's Daughters
The regular monthly meeting of;
the King's Daughters is postponed j
until the second Thursday of th
month, Dec 13th, when there will be
held an election of officers.
Mrs. C.-.L. Bittinger, President.

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS

WANTED, LOST, FOUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEPS
RATES: Six line 31 ail rt am. one
time 25c.; three times 50c; six times
75a; one month J 3. Payable in advance.
DR. D. M. BONEY
"My Optician"
EYESIGHT
SPECIALIST
I especially offer my services to the
people of Central Florida, and invite
personal visits or mail ordeis.
202-204 Hogan St., Park Hotel Bldgn
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
LOST On the streets, a crochet bae
with several articles inside. Finder
will please return to Mrs. Ed. Canni Cannichael.
chael. Cannichael. 11-
WANTED Three or four furnished
rooms for light housekeeping. Cot Cottage
tage Cottage or bungalow preferred. Address,
Ocala, at Star office. ll-2t
FIRE WOOD For sale. Stove wood
lengths. Phone 185X, for prompt de delivery.
livery. delivery. J. C. Johnson. 10-lm
WANTED Old False Teeth. Don't
matter if broken. I pay $2 to $15 per
set. Send by parcel postnd receive
check by return mail. L. MAZER,
2007 S. Fifth Avenue, Philadelphia,
Pa. 10-18t
WANTED A few of our subscribers
to bring in wood for their dues. Bring
it between the hours of 5:30 a. m.
Monday and 11:45 p. m. Saturday. We
allow market price. The Star. 7-tf
FOR SALE Nice lot 70 x 112 in sec second
ond second ward also nice residence lot at
$200. W. W. Condon. 21-tf
FOR SALE 40-acre farm three miles
from Ocala. Land adapted to the
growing of cotton. Apply to H. D.
Stokes. 6-6t
FOR SALE One 1917 Ford. $310;
two 1917 Fords, $375 apiece; one 1916
Ford, $350; one 1912 Chalmers, $300,
and other bargains in second-hand
cars. Auto Sales Co Phone 348. Ct
FORD BARGAIN A 1914 model
Ford touring car; no top; in, good
mechanical condition. For sale at the
Maxwell Agency, Ocala, Fla. 3-tf
FOR RENT A five room cottage, all
modern conveniences; one block from
primary school building on South
Third street, Apply to R. R. Car Carroll,
roll, Carroll, Star office.. 19-tf
FOR RENT The residence known
as the Rawls home on Nonth Sanchez
street. All modern improvements.
Apply to C. Rheinauer. 11-26-tf
FOR RENT Five-room cottage with
good garden ready for use if taken at
once; $10 per month. Bitting & Com Company,
pany, Company, phone 14. 8-3t
VULCANIZING .
Sure, we do it, and guarantee it too.
7-6t BLALOCK BROS, Phone 78.
TO THE LADIES
We shall be pleased to handle
fancy work for the next few weeks
on 10 per cent, commission. The Hat
Shop. 4 6t
PROTRACTED MEETINGS
Thera will be a protracted meeting
commenced at Capulett, near Cornell,
in the Church of Christ on December
23rd, to last ten days to two weeks.
Rev. R. C. White of Nashville, an elo eloquent
quent eloquent speaker, will conduct the meet meeting.
ing. meeting. All are cordially invited and es especially
pecially especially citizens of Ocala. W. F. Hoop Hooper,
er, Hooper, Treasurer. 12 4 d 6t.
Chesapeake Bay Oysters received
daily at the Delicatessen Shop, Ocaia
House block. 17-tf
Armored Electric Trains at THE
BOOK SHOP ANNEX. 3t

'11 P I I III
:r 5

THE WIMPSOM HOTEL

JACKSONVILLE.FLORIDA

1

1

In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every moaem convenience in each room. Dining ro-m service is
second to none.
-
RATES From" $L50 per day per person to ?6.
ROBERT M. MEYER, J. E. KAVANAUGH
Proprietor. Manager.

VERY CHEAP for CASH
50 H. P. Tubular Boiler.
40 H. P. Engine.
See SAVAGE
Masonic Building, Ocala, Fla,

if

IV

to
o
H
O
I I
w
H
H
O
V-.'
- X
We Announce
The Best Equipped
TRANSFER & STORAGE
COMPANY
In Central Florida
Our Equipment is at Your Servica
and for Your Convenience. If you will
Help Us We will Make it the Best In
the State. We Expect to Make the
Service Prompt, the Price Reasonable
and "Everybody Happy." If We Don't,
Tell Us and Well "Come Across."
WHITE STAR LMI
Dealers in BEAVER BOARD:
DAVIS' PORCH AND DECK PAINT
is made especially to resist all weath weather
er weather conditions so when painting why
not use the thing for the purpose? It
will cost no more will look right and
wear right.
For Sale By
THE MARION HARDWARE CO,
Ocala, Fla.
Evening Star
Unclassified
Ads.
Bring
Results
RATES Twenty-five words
or le?3 one time 25 cents;
three times 50 cents; six
times 75 cents. Over twen-ty-hve
words, and under fif fifty,
ty, fifty, double above rate.
This rate is for consecutive
insertions. Special rate by
the month. Try them out.
PHONE



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