The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06789

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
1

m W

WEATHER FORECAST
OCALA, FLORIDA. TUESDAY. NO VE3IBER 27, 1917.
Fair tonight, warmer north and
central portions; Wednesday fair.
VOL. 23. NO. 286.

i

BRITISH WING
TO BOURLOH

Italians Certain to Drive the Teutons
Back, Now that Their Allies
Have Come Up
(Associated Press)
London, Nov. 27, British troops
have repulsed another German coun coun-.ter
.ter coun-.ter attack at the northeast corner of
the Bourlon wood, west of Cambrai,
Field Marshal Haig reports today.
VICTORY FOR THE FRENCH
NEAR VERDUN
Paris, Nov. 27. The French last
night overcame the resistance of the
Germans still holding in the area of
the French attack on the Verdun
front Sunday, it is officially announc announced.
ed. announced. Many prisoners were taken.
Raids are reported elsewhere on the
battle line.
BOLSHEVIKI DENIES
BREAD
THEM
London, Nov. 27. The Russian
army on the northern front has been
without bread for several days, ac according
cording according to reports by a correspondent
of the Daily Express. Army delegates
are reported to have recommended the
withdrawal of troops in order to pre prevent
vent prevent a general flight with its conse consequent
quent consequent excesses.
RED CROSS IN RUMANIA
Petrograd,, Sunday, Nov. 25. An
American Red Cross relief train ar arrived
rived arrived at Jassy, Rumania, Nov. 18th.
It consisted of fifty-five cars of hos hospital
pital hospital supplies from American and
food stuffs.

BERLIN'S BULLETIN
Berlin, Nov. 27. The situation on
the Italian front is unchanged, army
headquarters announces. In the
Cambrai area a repulse of the British
'""on Bourlon wood and village is an-
' nounced. -
FIGHTING ON THE ITALIAN
FRONT

' 'V "Throughout yesterday and the day
before the battle in the mountains has
developed into a steady succession of
heavy attacks and counter attacks
with occasional brief intervals for re reforming
forming reforming the line and reorganizing the
troops. Twelve different enemy at attacks
tacks attacks were made in as many hours but
the Italians did not yield a foot, and
Gen. de Giorgo was confident that this
line would hold until reinforcements

-arrived. Staff officers from the head-
" quarters were touring the front and
oon there was seen a struggle just
ahead. Along the route long lines of
Italian infantry were reforming to
return to the fight. They showed the
efk ects of the strain, but there were
' no signs of wavering.
In another zone another fight
which stirred the blood was when sol solid
id solid ranks of allied reinforcements
crowded the roads. Already they were
well within sound of the rumble of
the guns and the boom from the bat battle
tle battle off in the distance could be heard
over the gallop of the cavalry, the
. tramp of the infantry and the roar
. of the artillery.
The day was dark but it seemed to
light up with the Italian gray being
interspersed with the British khaki

A-ana tne rrencn reu arm juiue. xma
if? Tvas the first British and French sol

diers seen in force.
The correspondent talked with some
of the men who said they had just ar arrived
rived arrived by forced marches and that
others were following. Others came
in view just then and the party pass passed
ed passed through endless lines of French.
There were squadrons of cavalry m
the road and nearby fields and long
lines of new artillery trains and sup supplies.
plies. supplies. Field Tritchens had been set up
at one point and a midday meal was
being served. The men looked in the
best of condition and did not show a
trace of fatigue. Just beyond here
the color turned from blue to khaki
as long lines of the British came into
sight. In the lead were cyclists and
then came engineer trains. Follow Following
ing Following were" long ranks of infantry, cav cav-iairy
iairy cav-iairy and artillery. At one point head headquarters
quarters headquarters had been temporarily estab established
lished established along the road and guards were
sat the gate as the officers went and
came.
Farther on a British general and
Iris staff, all finely mounted, were
cantering forward.
The artillery horses were especial especially
ly especially marked for their sleek appearance
and well fed condition, and observers
noted how all the brass work on the
guns and harness glinted with the
thorough care they had had. One en engineer
gineer engineer corps was rumbling to the
rear with huge pontoons on Camions,
as it had been found these were not
needed but all the rest of the force
was moving forward.
The men looked hard as nails and
were anxious to know how the fight
was getting on and to get to it. Talks

ENCOURAGING

TO THE ALLIES
Favorable Result of Operations Last
Week on French, British and
Italian Fronts
(Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 27. "The week
ended Saturday has been one very
favorable, to the allies arms," says the
war departments official communique,
issued today. The statement declares
the success of the British offensive in
the Cambrai section and the steady
resistance of the Italians are two fac factors
tors factors which may be considered corre correlative
lative correlative elements of one and the same
movement, and points out the dispatch
of offensive operations on the western
front.
WILSON'S BUSY DAY
The president had a busy day today
with cabinet meetings and several en engagements.
gagements. engagements. William E. Gonzales of
Columbia, S. C, American minister to
Cuba, was a caller.
THE MORTUARY RECORD
Nearly a third of the million deaths
in the United States during 1916
were caused by heart disease, tuber tuberculosis
culosis tuberculosis and pneumonia. There were
more than ten thousand suicides, but
this is far below the ten year average.
f
NEW REGULATIONS
'
Regulations to govern transmission
from the United States of communi communications
cations communications now in the regular course of
the mails will be issued within a few
days under the trading with the en enemy
emy enemy act.
AilARCKISTS ROUNDED UP
Many Arrests Made in Consequence
of Saturday's Bomb Out Outrage
rage Outrage in Milwaukee
(Associated Press)
Milwaukee, Nov. 27. With the ar arrest
rest arrest of a large number of suspects
early today in connection with Satur Saturday's
day's Saturday's bomb outrage which resulted hi
the death of ten- persons, the police
are hopeful that they will soon secure
something definite on which to fasten
responsbility. The men rounded up
today are supposed anarchists.
ARE TRYING TO NOMINATE
SUCCESSOR FOR ADAMSON
(Associated Press)
Columbus, Ga., Nov. 27. The
Fourth district democratic convention
resumed sessions today, following its
failure at Greenville last week to
nominate a successor to former Con Congressman
gressman Congressman W. C. Adamson.
BANKS WILL OBSERVE
THANKSGIVING DAY
Thursday, November 29th, 1917,
(Thanksgiving Day) being a legal
holiday in the state of Florida, the
undersigned banks of this city will, be
closed for business on that day.
The Commercial Bank.
The Ocala National Bank,
The Munroe & Chambliss r
National Bank.
WILL CLOSE THURSDAY
. In order that our clerks may fully
enjoy the day at the fair Thursday
(Thanksgiving Day) we will be closed
all day.
. 2t O. K. TEAPOT GROCERY.
The most beautiful line of Christ Christmas
mas Christmas cards ever, shown in Ocala now
on sale, at the Specialty Shop, A. E.
Gerig.
with these men along the road gave
an idea of what they had been doing.
The start was made every day at 3
a. m., with an early breakfast and
with rations subsequently served at
11 a. m. and 3 o'clock in the after afternoon.
noon. afternoon. Along the route their head headquarters
quarters headquarters were in village schools,
houses, barns and public buildings.
The men carried loads of about 70
pounds, including rifles, blankets, kits
and the day's rations. This looked
like a heavy load but they men did
not mind it, although they said the
long marches had been hard on the
feet. The regimental bands were in
line and Italy may hear music again
if things go right. All the Italian
bands have disappeared in. the fierce
carnage of recent days and the bands bandsmen
men bandsmen are charging with bayonets.
The whole appearance of the Brit British
ish British and French gave a feeling of great
power because of taa perfect organi organization
zation organization and ardor of all ranks, accen accentuated
tuated accentuated by the timeliness with which
they are arriving in the vicinity of the
battle front.

ITS PREVIOUS
EFFORTS WILL
BE OUTDONE

Marion County's Tenth Annual Fair
Opened With Excellent Pros Prospects
pects Prospects this Morning
The tenth annual Marion County
Fair opened this morning, with pros prospects
pects prospects of outdoing all its former ef efforts.
forts. efforts. With the first rays of the morning
sun the people began to arrive in the
city with Marion county products of
every description for exhibition at
our big fair, and by noon the space
allotted for each department was well
filled.
The first number on the day's pro program,
gram, program, a practical demonstration of
dipping cattle for tick eradication,
conducted by Dr. Chipman, the local
state agent, and Prof. Niblack of the
University of Florida, came off with without
out without a hitch, and was witnessed by
many interested in our most import important
ant important industry cattle raising.
At, 10:30 President Cam of tht
fair association, after a short speech,
introduced Senator D. U. Fletcher,
Mr. Fletcher began his speech by
throwing many bouquets at Marion
county for the conspicuous position
she has always maintained as a farm farming
ing farming and stock growing county, and
he said he was especially proud of
her on this occasion for having the
spirit to conduct a fair under the
present conditions of the country,
when many like organizations had
temporarily abandoned such projects.
He said that a successful fair like
that launched today was the biggest
advertisement that a county could
possibly have, and to prove "it pays
to advertise" cited many of the larg largest
est largest corporationswho are today spend spending
ing spending millions of dollars annually for
this purpose alone. He said that
county fairs do more for the develop development
ment development of agriculture and good fellow fellowship
ship fellowship than any other agency. Senator
Fletcher named as the most import important
ant important item in a farming county's de development
velopment development tick eradication. good
roads and the proper use of the farm
loans now bein,g made by the gov government.
ernment. government.
He also made a most patriotic
speech upon the present world war.
As Congressman Clark was being
introduced an American flag was re released
leased released from the fireworks stand in
the center of the racetrack and the
audience stood and sang the Star Star-Spangled
Spangled Star-Spangled Banner.
Mr. Clark's speech also dealt with
the great possibilities of Florida and
said that though it was at present in
a more or less undeveloped condition,
it offered greater opportunities than
any other state in the Union. He
highly praised the spirit that made
county fairs possible, and like Sen Senator
ator Senator Fletcher, declared that nothing
aided more in the development of a
section than these same annual gath gatherings
erings gatherings together of the products of a
section.
Mr. Clark's address concluded with
a most patriotic appeal to everyone to
aid in every way the great cause into
which the country is at this time con concerned
cerned concerned war for world democracy. He
cited that as important as the fur furnishing
nishing furnishing of shot and shell is the proper
care of our boys at the front and that
through no other channel can this be
done in as efficient manner as the
Red Cross Society is doing it. He
urged every possible assistance to this
worthy organization.
Both these speeches should have
been heard by every citizen of Mar Marion
ion Marion county instead of by the compai.
atively few who were present on the
grand stand today.
The various departments of the
fair are being ably presided over by
the committees appointed, and by to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow morning it is expected to
have everything in more presentable
shape than was possible today.
In its present rather unsettled con condition
dition condition it, is impossible for a descrip descriptive
tive descriptive write-up of the fair, but this will
be attended to as the big show pro progresses.
gresses. progresses. Suffice to say that it prom promises
ises promises to be the biggest yet, not only as
to exhibits of our products but also
in attendance.
Especially do we want the ladies to
feel that they are welcome to the use
of our Fair Grounds phone (173).
Gerig's" Drug Store.
Chesapeake Bay Oysters received
daily zt the Delicatessen Shop. Ocala
House block. 17-tf
We put in a telephone at our Fair
Grounds Store for the use of the pub public,
lic, public, and it's yours to use whenever
wanted. The number is 173. Gerig's
Drug Store.
Let us do your BANNER, PEN PENNANT
NANT PENNANT and SIGN work. Smith Sign
Co., 215 N. Magnolia St. 23-6t

CONGRESSMAN CLARK OKU
IN OCALA

Says he Has No Intention of Trying
to be Either Governor or
Senator
Congressman Clark arrived in the
city yesterday, and was kept busy un until
til until bedtime talking to his friends.
The congressman is one of the most
accessible men in the world, and takes
pleasure in meetings folks. While he
had much business affairs to talk of,
he seems to regard getting out in the
communities of his district as a vaca vacation
tion vacation from the grind of Washington.
Mr. Clark had a bunch of friends
around him at the Harrington last
night, and gave them many sidelights
,on public work in Washington.
One thing he made plain is that
many men s6nt to Washington at con considerable
siderable considerable expense by communities af affect
fect affect little or nothing. They hang
around hotel lobbies and the corridors
of the capitol, and are generally in the
way of a hardworking senator or rep representative,
resentative, representative, and then go back and
either claim credit for success or
blame the failure on the congress congressman.
man. congressman. Mr. Clark made it plain that we
need not expect any improvements for
the Oklawaha, Withlacoochee nor any
other small stream until the war is
over. He says, for one thing, the
president won't allow it.
In regard to talk about his possible
candidacy for the governorship or a
senatorship, Mr. Clark retold that old
rable of Aesop, how the dog with a
piece of meat in his mouth, crossing a
stream, saw himself reflected in the
water, supposed it was another dog
and another piece of meat, snapped at
the imaginary piece of meat, thereby
losing his own. Mr. Clark says as
long as the people of the second dis district
trict district want him to represent them, he
isn't likely to try for any other office.
Mr. Clark returned to Gainesville
today. From there he will make a
brief trip down the East Coast, and
then will go to Washington, where
next Monday Congress will enter on
another session which may last until
its successors come in March 4, 1919.
FREEZING WEATHER IN
NORTHERN NEW YORK
(Associated Press)
Watertown, N. Y., Nov. 27. The
northern part of New York state is
in the grasp of a severe cold wave,
the coldest for November in sixteen
years. The official temperature today
at Watertown was two above zero.
BOLD ATTACK OF BANDITS
(Associated Press)
Toledo, Ohio, Nov. 27. Five ban bandits
dits bandits today attacked a Huedner Brew Brewers
ers Brewers Company paymaster and escaped
with $37,000, according to the report
of the police. s
READS LIKE A ROMANCE
Escape of a Daughter of the Ex-Czar
of Russia From Serbia to
America
New York, Nov. 27. Miss Tatiana
Nicolaevna Romanoff, second daugh daughter
ter daughter of Nicholas Romanoff, deposed
emperor of Russia, has escaped from
Siberia through a fictitious marriage
to to young man named Frederick, a
son of the former chamberlain of the
emperor arid now is on her way to
the United States chaperoned by an
English woman, according to infor information
mation information made public here tonight by
persons connected with the Russia
civillian relief.
The former grand duchess, who is
twenty years old, made her escape
from Tobolsk, the present home of
the exiled emperor, to Harbin, in Man Manchuria,
churia, Manchuria, and thence to Japan where
passage was taken on a steamship
for the Pacific coast.
The New York officers of the Rus Russian
sian Russian civillian relief included Daniel
Frohman Ivan Narodny, and Rt.
Thomas Darlington, have been in informed
formed informed the young woman will arrivt.
in New York some time in December
to play a prominent part in the work
of the recently formed organization.
According to an announcement to tonight'
night' tonight' by the news bureau of the Rus Russian
sian Russian postoffice department Miss Ro Romanoff
manoff Romanoff intends to remain one year in
this country and while in New York
her guardian and companion will be
Mrs. Margaret Barry Carver, of Den Denver,
ver, Denver, who left this city last Friday for
the Pacific coast.
Call Deng's Drug tSore (173) at
the Fair Grounds if you want to find
an yone, as that is what the phone is
there for.
Chesapeake Bay Oysters received
daily at the Delicatessen Shop, Ocala
House block. 17-df
Do you read the want ads?

iWJUH VALLEY

T OPERATE
After November 30 Unless Money Can
be Found at Least to Pay
. Its Expenses
In Gainesville yesterday, Judge.
Wills of the circuit court granted an
injunction against the road ceasing to
run trains.
Mr. William Hocker, attorney for
the road, told the judge that the road
would have to cease operating, in injunction
junction injunction or no injunction, Nov. 30,
because there was no money to pay
the men. This is an argument that
even an injunction can't overcome.
The only way to keep the road in
operation is to put it in the hands of
a receiver. This can be done by its
creditors, but the road is already in
the hands of its creditors. It does not
owe any local debts.
Of Admission to the Fair Grounds,
Single Tickets and Season, Day and
Night; Also, to the Grand Stand,
and for Transportation
It being reported around town that
75 cents admission to the fair is be being
ing being charged, and other misleading in information
formation information being given, the tSar pre presents
sents presents the following information, re received
ceived received direct from the secretary:
Admission to Fair Grounds
Season ticket $1.50
Exhibitor's ticket 1.00
Single ticket 50
Children under 15 25
Grandstand (daytime) ......... .25
Grandstand (night) 10
Admission to grounds at night. .10
Auto fare, one way .25
FEMALES WERE FREED
(Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 27. Twenty-two
woman's party militants, hunger
striking in the district jail here, were
suddenly released today before the
expiration of their terms. Alice Paul,
chairman of -the party, and Lucy
Burns, vice chairman, were among
them.
NEW COMERS TO OCALA
Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Dixon of Mas Mas-cotte,
cotte, Mas-cotte, have moved to Ocala to reside.
Mr. Dickson is a very pleasant young
man and makes friends wherever he
goes. Mr. Dixon has been represent representing
ing representing the Maxwell agency in his home
section for some time, but Ocala is
more central for the big territory of
ten counties and he has moved to
headquarters to assist the sales force
of Messrs. Yonce and Bailey.
K. of P. DISTRICT MEETING
The Knights of Pythias who at attended
tended attended the session of the district
meeting at Castle Hall in this city
last evening were in no way disap disappointed,
pointed, disappointed, however much their anticip
pations may have led them to believe
they were to witness.
After the regular meeting of Ocala
lodge the district session was called
to order by District Deputy Charles
B. Howell, and a general "good of the
order" program was staged. Six can candidates
didates candidates were given their first step in
Pythianism, and allowed seats in the
open session of the district meeting.
The Orlando lodge had the largest
delegation present, that city sending
about twenty members, among them
many of the uniformed rank.
Grand Chancellor Yowell of Or Orlando,
lando, Orlando, District Deputy I. N. Kennedy
of Eustis, and U. S. Senator Duncan
U. Fletcher of Jacksonville, were
among the prominent visiting Pyth Pyth-ians
ians Pyth-ians present, and each made rousing
speeches to the gathered clans.
A violin solo by one of the visitors
from Orlando was greatly enjoyed.
The Ocala lodge had prepared a
bird supper for the occasion, and
when it is stated that about a hun hundred
dred hundred Pythians preesnt made way with
other 300 quail further comment as to
how well the repast was enjoyed is
superfluous.
These district meetings are becom becoming
ing becoming very popular in the organization
over the state, and this one of the
eighth and ninth district was in every
way up to the expectations of those
who engineered it.
Let us do' your BANNER, PEN PENNANT
NANT PENNANT and SIGN work. Smith Sign
Co., 215 N. Magnolia St. 23-t
Select your Christmas cards early,
The Specialty Shop, A. E. Gerig.

PHI ES

SENATOR FLETCHER

II THE CITY
Addressed the People at the Opening
of the Marion County Fair
This Morning
Mr D. U. Fletcher, Florida's senior
senator, arrived in Ocala yesterday
evening, and met a warm welcome
from our people.
He put up at the Ocala House, and
altho he aVrived late he had time to
meet a considerable number of his
friends before bedtime.
He was a welcome guest at the K.
of P. banquet, where he was taken by.
Messrs. Gary and Cam. Mr. Fletcher
is not a knight, but the banquet de degree
gree degree was conferred on him in open
lodge, and he proved himself worthy
of the honor.
This morning, he gave a pointed
and eloquent address, which was
heard at the fair grounds by hun hundreds.
dreds. hundreds. He left on the limited for Miami,
where he will attend the waterways
convention, he being one of the most
vigilant workers in America for water
communications.
Senator Fletcher is very popular in
Ocala, and if he decides to try for a
third term he can be reasonably sure
of -good support in Marion county.
TWO FAMOUS TRIALS
That of Mrs. De Saulles in New York
and of Gaston Means in
North Carolina
(Associated Press)
Mineola, Nov. 27. Contrary to pre predictions,
dictions, predictions, Mrs. De Saulles returned to
the witness stand this morning for
cross examination by District Attor Attorney
ney Attorney Weeks, who is conducting the
prosecution. Her mother, Mrs. Er Er-raruriz,
raruriz, Er-raruriz, will be the principal witness
examined today.
Replying to questions on cross ex examination,
amination, examination, Mrs. De Saulles said had
recollection of being interviewed by
Attorney Weeks at the jail the morn morning
ing morning after the shooting. Regarding cer certain
tain certain letters to her husband, she said
she wrote them because she 'thought
the best way to hold her husband was
to flatter him to death."
ENOUGH .VENIREMEN
Concord, N. C, Nov. 27. Enough
veniremen of the 150 ordered for the
trial of Gaston B. Means for the mur murder
der murder of Maude A. King have been no notified
tified notified for the selection of a trial jury
to begin. The little courthouse is
again crowded.
Three jurors had been selected be before
fore before the noon recess.
THE INDUSTRIAL PARADE
The following persons and business
organizations of Ocala will take part
in the industrial parade Thanksgiving
morning and compete for the $25
cash prize:
The Maxwell Agency, The AuU
Sales, Co., O. K. Teapot Grocery, H.
B. Whittington, Ocala Chero-Cola Co.,
B. Goldman, Marion County, Ocala
Seed Store, Theus Bros., M. Frank,
Moses Grocery Co., Ocala Coca-Cola
Co., The Texas Co., Standard Oil Co.,
Davies the Tire Man, Blalock Bros.,
B. F. Condon, White Star Transfer
Co., C. W. Hunter, L. R. Chazal &
Sons Co., Ocala Ice and Packing Co.,
Carter's Bakery, Dempsey Mayo,
Jake Brown.
A large number of entries will
come in from the county. Others will
come from Ocala. The committee will
hold a meetng this afternoon at foui V
o'clock at which time representatives
from the Woman's Club and Red
Cross will attend with a view of in increasing
creasing increasing the number of decorated au automobiles.
tomobiles. automobiles. Don't forget: $25 for the best in-
dustrial float; $10 for the best dec decorated
orated decorated automobile.
BOARD AND ROOMS
I have at the dormitory corner 5th
and Lime streets, comfortable rooms,
with or without board, also furnished
rooms for light housekeeping. Hates
in either case very reasonable
24-6t Mrs. D. M. Roberts.
Crane's exclusive stationery the
best made in holiday packages, at
The Specialty Shop, A. E. Gerig.
There is bread and bread, but the
best bread to eat i3 the famous But Butternut
ternut Butternut bread, made at Carter's Bak Bakery,
ery, Bakery, and on sale at retail crrocers. tf
W. K. Lane. M. D- Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat. Law Library Building, Ocala,
Florida. tf

1



PAGE TWO

OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 27. 1917

OCALA EVENING STAR
PnblUhed Every Dajr Except Sandar 7
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OF OCALA, FLA.

R. II- Carroll, Preftideat
IeaTeairood, Seereary-Treanrer
J. II. neajamia, Editor
p. v.
Entered at Ocala. Fla.,
cond-clas3 matter.
postofflce as
TELEPHONES
Balae Office Fire-Oae
EdltoHal Department Two-Smi
Society Editor Tvr -One-Five
MEMBER ASSOCIATED
PRESS
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entitled for the use for republication or
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not otherwise credited in this paper
and also the local news published
herein. All rights of republication of
special dispatches herein are also re reserved.
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Readlair. Notlceai 5c. per line for first
insertion; 3c. per line for each subse subsequent
quent subsequent insertion. One change a week
allowed on readers without extra com composition
position composition charges.
Legal advertisements at legal rates.
Electros must 'be mounted, or charge
will be made for mounting.
NEGLECT
The Star is sorry to say that there
seems no doubt that the death of Ser Sergeant
geant Sergeant James Leitner of Company A,
in the hospital at Camp iWheeler, was
due to neglect. t
Nobody who knew the strong, rug rugged
ged rugged young man and well trained sol soldier,
dier, soldier, who left here a few weeks ago,
and hears from his sister the story of
the pitiful condition she found him fn,
can doubt that careful nursing at the
right time would have saved him. His
father and sister could have savea
his life if they had been sent for at
once. His comrades at the camp
could have saved him if they had been
allowed to do so. There are a hun hundred
dred hundred of his personal friends in Com Company
pany Company A who would have cared for
him with a tenderness and interest
that no stranger nurse could feel.
As his life went, so, we doubt not,
others have gone, and so we feat
others will go.
"" A discharged soldier, a man who
had to leave the service, for a slight
defect, but who will probably be need needed
ed needed before the war is over, was in the
Camp Wheeler hospital for a few days
several weeks ago. He was not very
sick, so he did not suffer much, but
he saw others that, did. The story he
tells of the conduct of some of the
hospital attendants is enough to make,
a man's blood boil. He was in the
hospital during the October cold spell
and says -t the attendants in his ward
would crowd around the- stove at night
and pay little or no attention to the
sick men in their charge. They
would not even bring them water, and
he has seen sick, half -naked men arise
from their cots and stagger barefoot barefooted
ed barefooted across the cold floor to the water
supply in order to obtain a drink.
.. We wonder if. the officer in com command
mand command at Camp Wheeler knew of this,
and if he did, why didn't he have the
attendants flogged out of the camp?
Shooting them would not have been
any too severe punishment. Talk
about 4Geerman f rightfulness, but
such two-legged skunks are worse
than Germans.
This sort of business must be
punished and prevented if the coun country
try country is to win the war. If there are
many more such incidents, they will
take the heart out of our people. We
can send our sons to the front, bear
the agony of suspense of their ab absence,
sence, absence, bear the misery of knowing
they die or are wounded in doing their
duty. But if we begin to feel like it
is equivalent to a sentence of death
for one to be sent to a hospital, .we
will lose heart, for its few of them
who will go thru the war without
spending some time in hospitals.
One of the saddest things about
conditions at the t"amp Wheeler hos hospital
pital hospital is the fact that all the relief and
comfort the men needed was near and
could. have been had for the asking.
Macon is a good-sized town and has
thousands of the kindest-hearted peo people
ple people in the world. If any, bunch of its.
leading men if one of its newspap-
ers had had the bravery to tell of
conditions at the hospital, and said to
the Tjeonlp nr fh "TTo Ufa

, 1 wvj "ic, o uau no- savea mm, nau not Deen ap ap-nelp
nelp ap-nelp these boys." the sick could have plied.
had blankets and pillows in abundance Mr. Leitner visited the camp and
lor their cots indeed, we believe Ma- saw his son's comrades. He was glad
con would have given them good beds to see the boys were being well cared
--and careful nurses to look after for, but the hospital, he said, was dif dif-tnem,
tnem, dif-tnem, and help them to get well, and ferent.
delicacies to feed them while they We hope Camp Wheeler hospital U
were getting well. So far as that is the only one of its kind in the nation,
concerned, all Georgia would have Its reputation is beginning to rival
helped if it had been appealed to. that of Andersonville, some sixty
These training camps are a neces- miles away

sny, mil we are airaia tney are rum-
uig a large numuer ox our people. To
begin with, every city in the country
wants one, and wilr do anything to
obtain one. There has been enough
lying done in the last few months to

obtain these camps to fill the lake of
fire and brimstone so full of liars
that the fires would be choked and
tramped out. There is not a fever
plagued hole in the country that
wouldn't have at least a regiment ab absorbing
sorbing absorbing malaria on its outskirts if it
could.
Having obtained a camp, a city
works it for all it is worth. The big
business men sell to the government
for all the traffic will bear. Tin lit little
tle little ones gougj the private soldiers.
The big thief will take a thousand,
ten thousand or a million excess
profit from his over-taxed nation; the
lit-Je thief will charge a private sol soldier
dier soldier a nickel for a rotten apple.
Against such exactions, the soldiers
are as helpless as babies. Their of officers
ficers officers are not much better off. They
are all dependent on the civilian con

science.
A little over ten days ago, the
"Macon City Hospital Commission,"
whatever that is, "acting on Governor
Catts' alarming reports, visited Camp
Wheeler to offer the new hospital, one
of the largest and best equipped in
the South, to the Thirty-first division.
The commission made a thorough in
spection and issued a statement say saying
ing saying that the percentage of sickness
is remarkably low; that not a case
has developed from local conditions;
that 'conditions were better than ex expected'
pected' expected' and that the officers at the
base hospital Tiave arranged to take
care of the patients very well.'
These men must have been lying,
for shortly after that time James
Leitner was taken to the hospital, and
eight days after the commission's
visit, he died of neglect. Also, since
then the number of deaths in the
hospital, as shown by the Associated
Press reports, has been sometimes as
high as four a day.
Funeral of Sergeant Leitner
The funeral of Sergeant James E.
Leitner was held at thd Anthony
cemetery Monday afternoon. It was
attended by hundreds of people,
many going out from Ocala. The
death of the young soldier had been
'announced in the Ocala churches Sun Sunday
day Sunday night and the people of our little
city were deeply grieved, many of
them knowing Sergeant Leitner as a
personal friend.
The funeral services were conduct conducted
ed conducted by Rev. C. A. Sanders of Anthonj
and Rev. R. Strickland of Oak. Sev
eral beautiful hymns were sung by a
choir from Ocala, consisting of Rev.
J. R. .Herndon, Mrs. Mclver, Mr.
Frank Gates and his sister, Miss
Mary. ...
All passed the casket for a last
look at their friend. The features of
the dead soldier were wasted and
drawn. .He had evidently suffered
greatly.
The grief of the bereaved ones was
sorrowful to witness, and even the
strongest men found it hard to keep
dry eyes when the father broke down
and sobbed with his head bowed on
his dead boy's coffin.
The grave was dug at the foot of a
young and ,; growing oak tree, which
will make a noble monument in the
years to come". The coffin was care carefully
fully carefully and revently laid in its resting
place, the earth heaped upon it and
the gathering slowly and sadly, dis dispersed.
persed. dispersed.
The Star reporter saw Sergeant
Leitner's sister, Mrs. Robert Bruce
Dyall, who reached his bedside in
time to comfort him in his last hours.
In. a voice that she could hardly
steady she told how she found her
brother lying unattended on his cot,
the bedding of which could never
have been enough to keep him warm
or giye comfort to his pain-rached
body. She told how, when she saw
that uncalled for noises around him
were adding to his suffering, she
remonstrated, but could not have them
stopped. Then she begged to have
him moved to a quieter place, and
the attendants carried the cot into a
room that had just been scoured and
where the walls and floor were still
dripping with moisture.
In these uncomfortable surround surroundings,
ings, surroundings, the boy breathed his last, and
if his sister had not arrived in time
no one would, have been with him.
Mrs. Dyall saw but two nurses,
they overworked. Most of the men
attendants were careless and unfeel unfeeling.
ing. unfeeling.
She did not pass all her time by
her brother's bed. There were half a
dozen other soldiers as neglected,
tho' not so sick, and several times
when her brother seemed easier she
left him for a few minutes to help
the others. She obtained a hot water
bottle for one shivering boy, and did
such other little things-as she could.
' Of course Mrs. Dyall did not see
but one ward, but there is no certain certainty
ty certainty thai others were not as badly off.
The death roll continues to lengthen.
Mr. Leitner did not reach Macon
until the morning after his son died.
He declares that the dead boy's body
i nnlv tnn nlainlir tVM Vi a Vi o r? Voon noer.
lected, and that some remedies that
'might have made him easier, if they
i j i i i
The reporter on his return to Ocala j
met Congressman Clark and told him
the story. Mr. Clark promised to
wire the war department at once,
which was all he could do.
But the war department is not all

to blame. Our stay-at-homes must
rouse up and keep awake to prevent
such things.
We folks who have lived in Florida
all our lives, or, at least, for many
years, have to be told of the state's
attractions by new comers. Mr. Chas.
E. Hill, of the' Florida Automobile
Association, recently told us of the
beauties of Silver Springs, near Ocala,
in such enthusiastic terms that we de determined
termined determined to visit this great natural
wonder at the first opportunity,
though we have lived within easy
reach of it for many years without
our interest having previously been
greatly aroused. Mr. Hill, who has
traveled extensively, considers these,
springs one of the most remarkable
and beautiful sights he has ever seen.
Lakeland Telegram.
And be sure to stop by the Star of office
fice office coming and going.

OCALA FRATERNAL ORDERS
ODD FELLOWS
Tulula Lodge No. 22, I. O. O. F.,
meets every Tuesday evening in the
Odd Fellows' hall on the third floor of
the Star office building at 8 o'clock
promptly. A warm welcome always
expended to visiting "brothers.
Oscar Andrews, N. G.
W. L. Colbert, Secretary.
OCALA LODGE NO. 286, B. P. O. E'
Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and fourth Tuesday even evenings
ings evenings in each month. Visiting breth
ren always welcome. Club house oppo opposite
site opposite postoffice, east side.
C. W. Hunter, E. R.
E. J. Crook. Secretary.
WOODMEN OF THE WORLD
Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
the K. of P. hall at 7:30 p. m. every
second and fourth Friday. Visiting
sovereigns are ailways welcome.
T. D. Lancaster, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk
MIRIAM REBEKAH LODGE NO. 15
Miriam Rebekah Lodge No. 15
meets the first and third Monday eve evenings
nings evenings in each month in the Odd Fel Fellows'
lows' Fellows' hall at 7:30 o'clock.
Emma C. Burnett, N. G.
Irma Brigance, Secretary.
MARION-DUNN MASON'C LODGE
Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. &
A. M., meets on the first and third
Thursday evenings of each month al
8 o'clock, until further notice.
Jke Brown, Secretary,
II. M. Weathers, W. M.
ORDER OF EASTERN STAR
Ocala Chapter, No. 29, O. E. S.,
meets at Yonge's hall the second and
fourth Thursday evenings of each
month at 7:30 o'clock.
Mrs. Susan Cook, W. M.
Mrs. Rosalie Condon, Secretary.
KNIGHTS OK PYTHIAS
Ocala Lodge No. 19. Conventions
held every Monday night at 7:30
at the Castle Hall, over the James
Carlisle drugstore. A cordial welcome
to visiting brothers.,
G. A. Nash, C. C.
Chas, K. Sage. K. of R. S.

MM

(By SAMUEL HAMILTON, M. D.)
A French physiologist described man as a "digestive tube with arrangements for locomotion and guidance."
It is commonly said that most people wdig their graves with their teeth." The disastrous effects of constipation
have always been well known. It is easily understood how serious are the troubles which are caused by

stagnation of decayed matter in the large intestines
poison reabsorbed and taken into the circulation this
is called auto -intoxication. It is apparent, there therefore,
fore, therefore, that the first necessity is to cleanse the intestines
thoroughly.
The best method for cleansing the whole
intestinal tract and urging the liver into activity is
to take as much outdoor exercise as possible, drink
hot water before meals, and take a pleasant, laxative,
vegetable pill occasionally. Such a one is made up
of May-apple, leaves of aloe, root of jalap; made
into a sugar-coated pill that gives tone to the bowels.
This was first made nearly fifty years ago, and sold by
almost all druggists as Dr. Pierce's Pleasant Pellets.
Such simple means will prevent auto-intoxication.
People are realizing that the kidneys, just
as do the bowels, need to be flushed occasion occasionally.
ally. occasionally. The kidneys are an eliminative organ and

are constantly working, separating the poisons from the blood. Uric: acid backs up into the system, causing
rheumatism, neuralgia, dropsy and many other serious disturbances.
This can be avoided by stimulating the kidneys to increased; action, and because of its tonic effect
on these organs I would advise any one to purchase Anuric (double or triple strength), which is to be had'
nowadays at almost any drug store, and take it three times a day. Also drink hot water before meals.

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4i
A- Suddestion To
. ripe bmokers
fe1
rxT tomond a little -,
TOaham with yc-
wotvepipe tobacco
Sugar in Your
PLUMBING AND ELECTRICAL
CONTRACTING
When you have plumbing or elec electrical
trical electrical contracting, let us furnish you
estimates. No job too large and none
too small, tf H. W. Tucker.
Our phone at the Fair Grounds is
at your service. The number is 173.
Call us there or if at the grounds feel
at liberty to come in and use it.
Gerig's Drug Store.
Syrup bottle corks. Anti-Monopoly.

-

- I V" H i
. J

. 111 i HHnVMMHBKHHBW m

Corporal A. Simonin, U. S. A-irt,,r, "rolling his own" with
"Evil" Durham, just before making a flight at a Government
Aviation Fild.
"It is surprising the BULL
DURHAM boys are ever
evident, and the familiar tag
may often be seen swinging
from the muddy tunic pocket
of Jack Canuck on his way
from the trenches weary,
yet smiling"

writes JOSEPH K SHIMMEN.
1st Canadian Field Ambulance,
with the British Expeditionary Forces.

GENUINE

nnn n ninniv

77ie"Maings" of
Guaranteed

Coffey , . J

1 t

mlX - jUf....., ...,.., ...;!..?! L! yf

ST. LEO COLLEGE
SAINT LEO, PASCO COUNTY, FLORIDA
IDEAL BOARDING SCHOOL FOR YOUNG GENTLEMEN
Courses in Classics, Science and Commerce. Also
Primary Department, Send for Catalogue.
Rcy. F. Benedict, Director.
OPENS FOR THE FALL TERM, WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 12, 1917.

J81M1KI

' y

a Nation
by

.

1



OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27. 1917

PAGE THREE

THE 20TM CENTURY FARM HORSE
Converts Any Ford into a Power Powerful
ful Powerful arm Horse
Docs All Farm Work Hts Any Size Farm
The new attachment which 'converts any Ford into a strong, dur durable
able durable tractor, capable of doing the work of four good horses on any
farm, is the most wonderful application of low cost power ever de developed
veloped developed for farm work. The well known efficiency and durability
of the Ford car combined with its 22-horsepower especially adapts
it for the purpose.
It can be easily attached or detached in a very short time without
the least injury to the car.
No holes to drill no vital parts to be removed.

Reasons why Every Farmer Sholud Have a
20th Century Earm Horse
1. Tractors are cheaper and more efficient than horses.
2. Every foot of your land can be put under cultivation in the
most modern way.
3. Horses have to be fed and cared for every day in the year
a 20th Century Farm Horse only when in use.
4. The 20th Century Farm Horse is always ready and will
work steadily 24 hours if necessary. It doesn't get tired, flies ana
hot weather don't bother it.
5. Labor is a serious problem on any farm any woman, any
boy or inexperienced farm hand who can drive a Ford can easily
operate a 20th Century Farm Horse.
(J. The 20th Century Farm Horse will do your hauling around ...
the farm and -to town. It will also do your road work.
7. The 20th Century Farm Horse will do the work" of 4 good
horse3 on any farm with an investment of less than the cost of
a single horse.
8. Why you should buy a 20th Century Farm Horse in prefer preference
ence preference to other makes: It is closely coupled and chunky, making it
not only more serviceable but .allowing you to plow close to the
fences and in the corners. You have more pulling power and great greater
er greater durability and it has a positive water cooling system.
See It at The Fair Grounds

Farm Tractor Sa

Distributors

Box 96

We Have the Equipment and Ability
To serve you as you ought tr be servied, and when you are not let u
mk you again, to let us know, for thr is the only way we can accomplish
ur desire.
, Of course, iotnetiices, little things go wrong, but they an not inten intentional,
tional, intentional, and, if you will call ns up, they will be corrected IMMEDIATELY.

Ocala' Ice -&
PHONE 34
FAST THROUGH
TO THE EAST

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"Palmetto Limited" "The Southland"
"Havana Limited" "Eixie Flyer"
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and New York: Jacksonville and Chicago, St. Louis, Cincinnati, Louisville
and Indianapolis. Observation Cars, Dining Cars.
J&Y O ST L M E
STANDARD RAILROAD OF THE SOUTH
For tickets and reservations call on
W. T. GUY, J. G. KIRKLainia L. P. A.
T. A., Ocala, Florida. Tampa,' Fla.

THE WINDSOR HOTEL
JACKSONVILLE.FLORIDA

In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every moaern convenience in each room. Dining ro;m service is
second to none.
RATES From $1.50 per day pr person to $6.
ROBERT M. MEYER, J. E. KAVANAUGH
Proprietor. Mper

Iclvcr &l MacKay
UNDERTAKERS and EMBAIMERS
PHONES 47, 104, 303
OCALA, FLORIDA

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FOND M IAC, WISCONSIN
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Packing Co.
OCALA, FLA.
TOURIST TRAINS
TO THE WEST
480 ACRES
on beautiful Lake Weir
big bargain
See BRINSON at Once
Ocala-Florida

1

U SOCIAL AFFAIRS

If You Have Any News for this De Department,
partment, Department, Call Two-Ont-Five
or Two-Seven
After 12 M., Double-One, Five
Supplication
(Leigh M. Hudges of the Vigilantes)
America, my homeland,
Fair haven of the free,
Where only man can stand between
Himself and liberty
: O, let my life be true to all
That s true and just in thee;
My hand be ready at the call
Which voices need of me!
America, my heart's land,
Whose promise leads men on
To where thy sun of brotherhood
Shall light the peaceful dawn
Of nations rich in righteousness
And purged of hate and greed
O, fire me with a zeal to bless
The world with freedom's creed!
America, my other soul,
So may I live for thee
That when I near the outer goal
My spirit-eyes shall see
The hands of all thy heroes held
To welcome even me,
Because my heart in yearning swell'd
To serve my God through thee!
m m
Red Cross Notes
On Dec. 17, 1917, the American Red
Cross will launch a campaign its
Christmas membership drive for ten
million new members. By January 1,
1918, the American Red Cross will
have ten million new members. It
will have them because, lacking them,
it cannot do all that the world, from
out this agony of war against war, is
crying upon it to do, and do quickly.
Now, if never before, all of you should
belong to the American Red Cross.
There should be not ten million, but
twenty million, forty million new
members!
A collection of war relics is bein&
made to be sent eventually to .the
United States for exhibition to en encourage
courage encourage subscriptions to the Red
Cross fund.
The Red Cross recently1 supplied
two schools in the devastated area
with school desks and other furni furniture.
ture. furniture. A motor to run a circular wood
saw was furnished for the civilian
population.
The first nurses' conference of the
American Red Cross in France was
held in Paris recently, with fourteen
head nurses attending. Miss Martha
M. Russell, chief nurse, was in charge.
The Carnegie library in Ocala each
day receives official Red Cross bulle bulletins
tins bulletins from Washington. These bulle bulletins
tins bulletins should be of great interest to
everyone for they announce correctly
the names of all our men who are
either killed or wounded at the
front; the conditions and wants that
are needed in Europe for the welfare
of our brave fighters.
The library has many new pam pamphlets
phlets pamphlets which bear on every phase of
the war, and the people of Ocala
would do well to real all these import important,
ant, important, up-to-date matters.
Miss Minnie Gamsby's friends are
sorry to hear she is ill.
Mrs. A. T. Thomas' friends will re regret
gret regret to hear that she continues quite
ill.
Mr. Whit Palmer, after spending a
few days in Jacksonville and Orange
Park, will return home today, driving
his car.
Mrs. R. H. Purdom has returned
from a visit to South Georgia, and
Mr. Purdom will probably be home to tomorrow.
morrow. tomorrow. Mrs. J. Fred Redding and two chil children
dren children and Mrs. Hanberry and daugh daughter
ter daughter from Inverness were Monday vis visitors
itors visitors in Ocala.
Miss Elizabeth Mizelle who is
teaching school this year at Summer Summer-field,
field, Summer-field, will spend Thanksgiving at her
home at Orange Lake.
Mrs. W. O. Brewer of Romeo ac accompanied
companied accompanied by her sister and brother-in-law
Mr. and Mrs. MacKenzie, were
shoppers in Ocala yesterday.
Mrs. H. V. Cassels is expected to
morrow from Island Grove to be the
fair guest of Mrs. Grace Burkhalter
at the home of Mrs. Geo. L. Taylor.
m m
Miss Frances Tarver is expected
home Friday from Macon, where she
has been visiting her brother, Mr.
John Tarver at Camp Wheeler, and
other relatives in Valdosta, Ga.
Mrs. Harry Holcomb will have as
her Thanksgiving guest her nephew,
Mr. Garland Upchurch, who attends
the University of Florida at Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville. Judge D. S. Williams arrived in tht
city Saturday afternoon after three
or four months spent in New York
state. The judge's friends are glad to
greet him home again and know he is
looking so well.
Miss Olive Jones, one of the popular
teachers from Dunnellon, spent the
week-end in the city. She came es especially
pecially especially to attend to business connect connected
ed connected with the agricultural exhibit-at the
fair.
Mrs. B. H. Seymour, chairman of
the home economics committee of the
Woman's Club, and her efficient co coworkers
workers coworkers have been busy today prepar preparing
ing preparing and serving dinner out at the fail
grounds. These ladies will sell each
day sandwiches and soup exclusive of

the regular dinners. Thursday a de delicious
licious delicious turkey dinner will be served,
so let everyone in Ocala and sur
rounding country come to the fail
and partake of a fine Thanksgiving
donner.
Miss Whaley Honored
Mrs. E. L. Carney gave a beautiful
party Monday afternoon at her home
on Ocklawaha avenue, in honor of one
of Ocala's most charming young girls,
Miss Blanche Whaley, who on Dec.
11th will become, the bride of Mr.
Dudley Spain of Georgia.
For this enjoyable affair the house
was adorned with yellow and red
roses, poinsettias and growing plants.
The electric lights were shaded with
American Beauty crepe paper bells,
the general effect being most pleasing.
Mrs. Carney and the honoree cordial cordially
ly cordially received the guests at the parlor
door.
Among those invited were Misses
Dorothy and Marie Hickman, Caro Caroline
line Caroline Harriss, Mabel Meffert, Eliza Elizabeth
beth Elizabeth Davis, Onie Chazal, Sue Feaster
Moore, Mary Harriet Livingston and
Mrs. Charles Rheinauer, Mrs. Ed Edward
ward Edward Holder, Mrs. Leon Fishel, Mrs.
E. G. Peek, Mrs. H. M. Hampton,
Mrs. Howard Minshall and Mrs. S. R.
Whaley.
Auction bridge was the game for
the afternoon and Miss Meffert made
the highest score. No prizes were
given.
At the conclusion of the games
Mrs. Carney served a delicious three three-course
course three-course supper, fruit and nut salad
and wafers, strawberry jelly with
Bavarian dainty and whipped cream,
angel food cake and coffee with whip whipped
ped whipped cream.
A Pathetic Picture
Probably very few of the people at
the Temple theater last evening who
enjoyed the picture in which beautiful
Florence LaBadie took a dual part,
knew that Miss LaBadie died on the
24th of October from injuries sustain sustained
ed sustained in an automobile accident several
weeks prior to that time.
n m
Mr. W. W. Condon returned home
last night from a business visit to
New York. While in the metropolis,
Mr. Condon was entertained by Mr.
and Mrs. Como Massey, formerly of
Ocala, and as their guest attended
the large ball given by the Equitable
Insurance Co., of which Mr. Massey
is cashier in the New York office, to
its employes and their families at the
Waldorf-Astoria hotel.
There was a meeting of" the Rea
Cross Society called in the library
building last night, but on account of
the few members present there could
be no delegates elected to the conven convention,
tion, convention, that meets in Jacksonville at a
near date. It's a great pity the mem members
bers members of this organization do not re respond
spond respond more readily to these urgent
calls.
Ocala friends of Mr. Guy Zewadski
are greatly interested to hear that h
has received his commission as sec second
ond second lieutenant in the army. Mr. Ze Zewadski
wadski Zewadski has been in the officers' train training
ing training camp at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga.,
and has been ordered to report at
Nogales, Ariz. He will arrive in Ocala
today for a week's visit with his fam family
ily family and friends.
m
Congressman Clark did not have his
picture of Washington shown at the
Temple last night. He found Mr.
Bennett had a full bill and that few of
the school children could be present
anyway. He will make other arrange arrangements,
ments, arrangements, and will have the picture
shown at some time when the attend attendance
ance attendance of children can be large.
Mrs. Osco Zewadski and baby of
Tampa, arrived in Ocala yesterday to
be the guests of Mr. W. K. Zewadski
and Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Zewadski.
Wednesday Mr. Osco Zewadski will
join his wife and baby in the city for
the remainder of the week.
Mr. and Mrs. William Colmore are
the happy parents of a little son born
last Thursday morning. Mrs. Colmore
was before her marriage Miss Mary
Landers of this city.
Mrs. Louie W. Strum arrived the
first of the week for a short visit with
her mother, Mrs. Charles M. Gray, at

THEGOOD FAIRY
Tea Rooms
SERVICE A LA CARTE
8 A. M. to 7:30 P. M. J
N. MainSt., Opposite Postoffice
Come in and inspect my pat patent
ent patent stove pipe fastener and
adjustable stove pipe and
stove pipe shelf. You need it,
can't get along without it.
V. MRASEK,
210 Osceola SL, Ocala, Fla.
160 ACRES OF LAND
Pr ce $1000 Cash
Locat2d Six Miles from Ocala
See SAVAGE
Masonic Building, Ocala, Fla.

Comme:

OCALA.

CAPITAL STOCK S50.000.00.
Slate, County and City Depository

SUMMER TOUEIST FARE

From Jacksonville to

New York and return ... $38.00
Baltimore and return ... $33.90
Philadelphia and return. $36.00
Washington and return. .$34.00

Through tickets to all Eastern resorts, with return limit October
31, 1917, with privilege of stopovers at principal points. Sailings
from Jacksonville via Savannah to Baltimore Wednesday, direct Sun Sunday.
day. Sunday. To Philadelphia direct Thursday.
Wireless telegraph on all ships. Accommodations unsurpassed. Res Res-ereyations,
ereyations, Res-ereyations, fare or any information cheerfully furnished on appli application.
cation. application. ftlERGHANTS & MINERS MUM MM

Jck8or ille, Florida
J. F. W4RD. T. P. A..

H. C. Avery, Agent.
rwsk f"ssfr rSk rn fr?v

lis now a universally acknowledged necessity. No business man is H

prepared to meet the daily affairs of his business if he is not pro protected
tected protected with

FIRE INSURANCE

We represent not only the best fire insurance companies, but
also the highest class INDEMNITY AND BONDING concerns in

3 the world. Talk is over with us.

I d. W. DAVIS, iSAKi OCALA, FLA.

ttrtttttt?

STORAGE BATTERY SERVICE
ANY STORAGE BATTERY RE-CHARGED OR
REPAIRED
Special attention to Prest-o-Lite Batteries in Maxwell Cars. Bring
me your Battery Work. Charge? Reasonable and Service First Class.
YONGE'S BATTERY SERVICE

MAXWELL STATION
her home on Lakeview avenue. She
is the wife of Commander Strum, of
the navy, and they expect soon to
leave for a Pacific coast port, where
Commander Strum has been assigned
to duty. St. Petersburg items in
Tampa Tribune.
,
Miss Avice Walker, one of the pop popular
ular popular teachers at the high school, will
accompany Mr. and Mrs. Adams to
Jacksonville tomorrow afternoon to be
Thanksgiving guests of friends and
relatives. Mr. Adams is principal of
the Griner Farm school and Mrs.
Adams teaches the fifth grade in the
Ocala school.
Dr. W. H. Dodge of South Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, was the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
H. M. De Montmolen yesterday. He
was here to assist in the installation
of Dr. Donald MacQueen as pastor of
the Presbyterian church. Palatka
Morning Post.
Mr. Charles H. Lloyd, who has been
at the officers' training camp at Fort
Oglethorpe, Ga., returned home this
afternoon for a furlough of two
weeks. Mr. Lloyd's friends are con congratulating
gratulating congratulating him as second lieutenant
in the officers' reserve. He has been
assigned to duty at Camp Gordon,
near Atlanta.
Rev. Ira Barnett returned home last
night to see his little daughter, Miss
Veda Barnett. This paper is glad to
state that Miss Veda, who has been
seriously ill with pneumonia at the
hospital ,is now out of danger.
(Continued on Fourth Page)
SILVER SPRINGS
See Silver Springs through the
glass-bottomed boat. Scenery not to
be had in any other part of the Unit United
ed United States. Largest flowing and most
beautiful sprirgs in the world, some something
thing something that can't be described or ex exaggerated;
aggerated; exaggerated; real geiscrs undr water,
the Blue Grotto, Bridal Chamber,
Florida Snow Storm, Ladies' Parlor
and other beautiful spots too numer numerous
ous numerous to mention. Price, $1 and $1.50:
children under 12 years of age half
fare. It dissatisfied, money refunded.
C. (Ed.) Carmichael,
Owner and Manager.
Should you want us to look up your
doctor at the Fair Grounds, call our
phone number, 173, and we will be
glad to find him if possible. Gerig's
Drug Store.

9

TCI
FLORIDA
Savannah and return... $ 7.00
Boston and return $46.00
Atlantic City and return $38.25
Niagra Falls and return. $48.90
L. D. JONES, C. A.
sr.?
3d :
OCALA, FLORIDA
your building will look well, the Paint
will wear well, the cost will be lowest,
since you will have fewer gallons to
buy, because its all paint, and you
get two for one.
A coat now and then of DAVIS'
OLD COLONY WAGON PAINT pre preserves
serves preserves your wagons and farm imple implements
ments implements and makes them look like new.
For Sale By
THE MARION HARDWARE CO.,
Orala. Fla.
WHEN YOU HAVE PAID YOUR
RENT YOU HAVE
KISSED IT GOODBYE
Why not pay a small amount each
month and see it go into
Y01R OWN HOME
I have a number of houses you can
Miy that way at
$10 A MONTH
call and see my list of houses from
; 1000.00 up.
L M. MURRAY
Boom 5 Holder B!k.
Oala. Fla:
Taking Cathartics Every
Day for Weeks Don't
Cure Stomach Tronble
They do not eliminate the poisonous
Bile Accretions from the System, so de declares
clares declares a leading Chicago Stomach Spe Specialist.
cialist. Specialist. Often Gall Stones, Cancer ana
Ulcers of the Stomach and Intestines,
Auto Intoxication, Yellow Jaundice,
Appendicitis and other dangerous ail ailments
ments ailments are the consequences. Mayrs
Wonderful Remedy is the ideal pre prescription
scription prescription for Stomach, Liver and Intes Intestinal
tinal Intestinal ailments. It has restored millions.
One dose will prove that it will help
you. Mayr's Wonderful Remedy is for
sale by The Court Pharmacy. No. 2
You can buy your bread, pies,
cakes, buns, etc., cheaper from us
than you can bake them yourself.
Carter's Bakery. tf
Vick's Salve 25c Anti-Monopoly, tf

IF YOU USE



FOUR

OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27. 1917

mm

Messrs. E. K. Nelson and son, Ed Edwin,
win, Edwin, are in town from Tampa.
Mr. B. M. Dozier of Jacksonville
was a guest in the city yesterday. He
left today for Tampa.
Mr. Van Boney arrived from Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville last night, bringing his big
and comfortable Cadillac to aid the
fair traffic.
Let us do your BANNER, PEN
NANT and SIGN work. Smith Sign
Co., 215 N. Magnolia St. 23-6t
Vttval T'onrnitincr Officer Sfhler
eth, aided by Able Seaman Earl
Smith, unfurled the recruiting of office's
fice's office's beautiful flag from the staff on
the public square this morning.
Mr. Mark. Temple has a mighty
nice little dining room and lunch
counter at the union station. He is
doing good business, and will do bet
ter as soon as the A. C. L. can put in
another track, enabling No. 40 to
stop there while the Homosassa train
backs in.
TEifflBE NOTES
(By the National "Woman's Chris Christian
tian Christian Temperance Union.)
BREWERS WASTING GRAIN.
Barley mixed in the bread makes a
bread which has as fine a texture us
wheal. . And would enable us
to release just exactly that quantity of
wheat. . There is a certain de
duction from the barley the total
barley used in brewing to account for
the, malt which is given back to the
feed, but even then there Is a Ian;?
margin of saving if the brewing coulr
be cut out. . The difference be
tween the feeding value and the fori
der and the intake of the breweries in
grains means just that much more
foodstuffs to our allies. . We
could save from 50,000,000 to 60.000,
000 bushels of grain 'on the brewing
side after having allowed for the fod
der proposition, and that grain is of
utmost value to our allies. Herbert
C. Hoover, pages 389, 417, Hearing Be
fore Senate Committee on Agriculture
MOVING FOR A DRY CHICAGO.
Chicago is in a wet and dry cam
paign. Its citizens, ,men and women
will vote upon the question next April
"It is the largest city in the work
that ever organized to put its saloons
out of business," says Rev. Philip Yar
row, superintendent of the Dry Chica
go federation, who is firm in his belief
that the drys will win, provided all vot
ers opposed to the saloon will register
and vote. The federation has a special
committee which will look after per persons
sons persons who are thrown out of employ employment
ment employment by the prohibitory law. Where
one man loses his job by the closing of
saloons, it is stated ten will be opened
for him.
A CONVERTED MAYOR.
Rev. W. J. Johnson, secretary of the
Presbyterian Boar,d of Missions for
the middle West, to Mayor J C. Dahl Dahl-man
man Dahl-man of Omaha, who during the Ne Nebraska
braska Nebraska wet and dry campaign was a
( pro-liquor advocate : "Mr. Mayor, I
have come out here from Chicago to
see the harm that prohibition has done
to your city."
Mr. Mayor : "Well, sir, you've come
to the wrong place. You'll find a city
vastly improved, both from a moral
and a business standpoint Prohibition
has done wonders for Omaha, and I
am thoroughly converted to the dry
cause."
GOOD PLACE FOR ARMY.
In an address at 'Little Rock, Ark.,
Gen. Leonard Wood told the audience
that Arkansas is a fit place for training
the Twelfth division of the army be because
cause because the state Is under prohibition.
"That will eliminate three-fourths of
our troubles," he. said. "Whisky is the
soldier's worst enemy."
Evening Star
Unclassified
Ads.
Bring
Results
RATES Twenty-five words
or less one time 25 cents;
three times 50 cents; six
times 75 cents. Over twenty-five
words,- and under fif fifty,
ty, fifty, double above rate. y
This rate is for consecutive
insertions. Special rate by
the month. Try them out.
PHONE

HONOR ROLL OF OCALA

GRADED AND HIGH SCHOOL
FOR FIRST QUARTER
Those neither absent nor tardy
during the quarter:
Fourth Grade, A: Pmckney Clem
ent, Tom Sexton, Homer Wolfe, Del Del-zelle
zelle Del-zelle Pasteur, Louise Clement, Fran
ces Lummus, Adeline Malever.
Fourth Grade, B: Earl CaldwelJ,
Carl Hendricks, Jack Igou, Pat Jar Jar-man.
man. Jar-man. Sinclair Oldfield. Sammy Sav-
age Margaret Chace, Natalie Min-
shall, Chloe Old, Alice Roller.
Fifth Grade: Lewis Blalock, Fred
erick Cullison, Carlton Holleman,
Louis Knight, Joe Moses, Louis Ad Adams,
ams, Adams, Charlotte Chazal, Alice Cullen,
Violet Jones, Frances Mclver, Mary
Fleming Rawle, Pauline Shafer, Chiv-
alette Smith.
Fifth Grade. B: George Blowers,
William Gober, Leland Rooney, Had-
lev Shaw, Tom Whitman, Louist
Adams, Theresa Condrey, Marguerite
Counts, Nettie Mathews, Elizabeth
Murray, Ivia Waterman.
Sixth Grade. A: Edward Cook, Ben
Culverhouse, J. W. Davis, Elton Hen Hen-derley,
derley, Hen-derley, Karl Henderley, Randolph
Mathews, Gerald Smith, John lrox lrox-ler,
ler, lrox-ler, A. T. Thomas, James Demetrie,
Emily Billings, Marjorie Burnett,
Jessie Ray Culverhouse, Clara Ho-
gan, Mary Caroline Logan, Helen
Leitner, Sara Rentz, Gladys Watts,
Margaret Gerig.
Sixth Grade, B: Frank Adams,
Fred Boyd, Charles Brown, Harold
Cullison, Albert Frampton, Melville
Little, Chester Robertson, Herchel
Roberts, William Wilkes, Rae Bar Bar-chan.
chan. Bar-chan. Grace .Fausett, Marion Hunter,
Juanita Jones, Marie Jones, Johnny
Olds, Carolyn Peyser, Mabel Priest,
Louise Smoak, Aurie Williams.
.Seventh Grade, A: Otto Beard,
Wallace Canova, William Hall, Lynn
Hollinrake, Reese Hunnicutt, Francis
Pasteur, Lindsey Troxler, Susie Mae
Counts, Mildred Crosby, Jessie De De-hon,
hon, De-hon, Cornelia Dozier, Whiddon Gil Gil-more,
more, Gil-more, Mabel Goldman, Edna Goolsby,
Emmie Miller Haile, Mea Dozier
Haile, Clifton Sexton, Janet Culver Culver-house.
house. Culver-house. Seventh Grade, B: Mildred Bullock,
Christine, Close, Sidney Cullen, Mar Margaret
garet Margaret Hocker, Mary Jackson, Marion
Meffert, Minnie Slott, Dorothy Spen Spencer,
cer, Spencer, Sophie Turch. Mary Woods, Brent
Woods, Nellie Olds, Fletcher Baker,
Ernest Beaton, Robert Igou, James
Knight, Marion Lummus, Francis
Polly, Joel Thomas.
Eighth Grade, A: Robert Blowers,
Moultrie Thomas, Lawson Cassels,
Joe Smedley, John Cook, Walter Trox Troxler,
ler, Troxler, Archie Fant, Earl Bryce, George
Aiken, Edith Edwards, Olive Whaley,
Elizabeth Wetherbee, Irene Carn,
Maud Lillian Little, Alma Priest.
Eighth Grade, B: Edna Bryce,
Juanita Lyles, Maudie Marshall, Lyn Lyn-dal
dal Lyn-dal Mathews. Marie Robertson, Inez
Vaughan, Nannie Lou Watson, John
Bouvier, Wilfred Harold, Harry Hol Hol-comb,
comb, Hol-comb, Ralph Lopez, Frank Rentz,
Harold Smith.
Ninth Grade: Ralph Cleveland,
Duncan Elliott, Robert Hall, Reginald
MacKay, Sam Phillips, Roy Priest,
Jack Robertson, Ralph Simmons,
Francis Talbott, Thelbert Troxler,
Elizabeth Bennett, Lily Clayton, Al Alma
ma Alma Hall, Elizabeth Hocker, Ethel
Horne, Willie Mae Lang, Mabel
Lytle, Hazel McAteer, Annie Rooney,
Rhoda Thomas, Rose Wolf, Rachel
Veal, Marjorie Miller.
Tenth Grade: Homer Agnew, Mar Marshall
shall Marshall Carn, Wellie Meffert, Frederick
Winer, Jewell Bridges, Mary Bryce,
Lenore Colby, Miriam Connor, Dovie
Gates, Callie Gissendaner, Lucile Gis Gis-sendaner,
sendaner, Gis-sendaner, Winnie Gordon,. Annie Had Had-sock,
sock, Had-sock, Irene Henderly, Kathleen Leit Leitner,
ner, Leitner, Henrietta Livingston, Estelle
McAteer, Cevie Roberts, Ellen Strip Stripling
ling Stripling Eva Theus, Irene Tompkins,
Helen Veal, Virginia Beckham.
Eleventh Grade: Allyn Hollinrake,
Leonard Wesson, Tom Wallis, Meme
Davis, Ruth Simmons, Mamie Smed Smedley.
ley. Smedley. Twelfth Grade: Reuben Blalock,
Harold Klock, Leonard Todd, Harold
Talbott, Myrtle Brinson, Beatrice
Boney, Pearl Fausett, Ann Benton
Fuller, Blanche Horrell, Louise Spen Spencer,
cer, Spencer, Rozelle Watson, Anna Belle
Wesson.
Students not making less than 90
per cent, in any subject in the first
quarter's examinations:
Fourth Grade: Jean Bitting, Louise
Clement, Sara Scott 96; Pinck Pinck-ney
ney Pinck-ney Clement, Edward Dorsey, 94-,
Martha Rivers, Margaret Chace, In India
dia India Smith.
Fifth Grade: Louis Knight, Fred
LeSuer, 95;" Francis Mclver, Paul Pauline
ine Pauline Shafer, Theresa Condrey, Nettit,
Mathews, Annie Laurie Boyd.
Sixth Grade: Mary Caroline Logan,
92.
Seventh Grade: Cornelia Dozier,
98 4-5; Whiddon Gilmore, Mildred
Crosby, Genevieve Haile, Emmie Mil Miller
ler Miller Haile, Mea Dozier Haile, Clifton
Sexton, Mildred Bullock, 96 4 5;
Marion Meffert, Margaret Hocker,
Dorothy Crawford, James Knight.
Eighth Grade: Edith Edwards,
98 1-6 : Irene Carn, Alice Colbert,
Olive Whaley, Elizabeth Wetherbee,
Harry Holcomb, 981-6; John Bou Bouvier,
vier, Bouvier, 981-6.
Many other grammar school pupils
made an average of 90 or above,
but fell below 90 in some subjects.
The following high school puptts
made an average of 90 or above in
the first quarter's examnations:
Ninth Grade: Annie Rooney, 98 5-6
per cent; Elizabeth Bennett, Elizabeth
Hocker, Francis Talbott.
Tenth Grade: Virginia Beckham,
Miriam Connor, 96 1-5; Winnie
Gordon, Sara Dehon, Estelle McAteer.
Eleventh Grade: Sara- Herndon,
97U.
Twelfth Grade: Agnes Burford, An-

!! SOCIAL AFFAIRS

(Continued frora Third Page
Mrs. E. C. Bennett has been quite
ill for several days, but her friends
are glad she is much better today,
Miss Rebecca Gist from Mcintosh
is in the city for a few days coming
especially for work connected with the
Woman's Exhibit at the fair.
Little seven-year-old Frederick
Weihe is ill with bronchitis. His host
of friends and playmates wrish him a
speedy recovery.
The pictures at the Temple theatre
tonight will be the Pathe News, a Bil Billy
ly Billy West comedy, and the third episode
of "The Fighting Trail." It is to be
hoped that Miss Marguerite Clark who
is gracing our little city, and was
quite an attraction at the Temple last
evening will again attend the movies
tonight.
WILL CLOSE THURSDAY
In order that our clerks may fully
enjoy the day at the fair Thursday
(Thanksgiving Day) we will be closed
all day.
2t O. K. TEAPOT GROCERY.
UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
WANTED, LOST, FOUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM-
ILAR LOCAL NEEDS
RATES: Six line maximum, one
time 25c; three times 50c; six times
75c; one month $3. Payable in advance.
DR. D. M. BONEY
"My Optician"
EYESIGHT
SPECIALIST
I especially offer my services to the
people of Central Florida, and invite
personal visits or mail ordezs.
202-204 Hogan St., Park Hotel Bldg.,
JACKSON VILLE, FLORIDA
WANTED Four young men to trav travel
el travel and demonstrate; good money.
Must have $5-deposit. Money, Colon Colonial
ial Colonial hotel, after 6 p. m. It
WANTED A first class hotel por porter.
ter. porter. Must furnish references. Apply
to L. & B., at Star office. 27-3t
FOR SALE Three Indian motor motorcycles,
cycles, motorcycles, $125. Inquire at the Motor Motordrome,
drome, Motordrome, fair grounds. 27-2t
DOG STRAYED A big white setter
dog, with few blue specs, from Silver
Springs night of 26th. Reward for his
return to J. F. Corley, at the fair
grounds. 27-
FOR RENT Large house, known
as the Ra-.vls home on Nonth Sanchez
street. All modern improvements.
Apply to C. Rheinauer. 11-26-tf
FOR SALE: Good, reliable horse;
sound. Price $165. C. M. Livingston,
Ocala, Fla. 23-6t
FOR TOURING CAR FOR SALE
A 1913 model, in good condition. Ap Apply
ply Apply at the Maxwell Agency. 22-4t
GLASSES LOST Somewhere be between
tween between town and my desidence on the
Anthony road, a pair of eye-glasses.
Finder please return to W. L Col Colbert
bert Colbert and receive reward. 22-6t
WANTED An office boy with a bicy bicy-cle.
cle. bicy-cle. Apply at Star office.
FOR SALE A Conover piano in
splendid shape. Collier Bros., phone
296, Ocala, Fla. 19-tf
FOR SALE One carload nice beef
steers. Write Fairfield Naval Stores
Co., Fairfield, Fla. 19-6t
LOST Between Fairfield and Ocala,
on 19th inst., one 32x3 tire and rim.
Finder will please leave with H. A.
Davies, Ocala, or G. A. Osteen, Fair Fairfield.
field. Fairfield. 19-6t
FOR RENT A five room cottage, all
modern conveniences; one block from
primary school building on South
Third street. Apply to R. R. Car Carroll,
roll, Carroll, Star office. 19-tf
MULES FOR SALE A pair of good,
second-hand mules, tough and sound,
and in perfect condition; working in
turpentine business. Apply to R. R.
Carroll, Ocala, Fla. 19-tf
FOR RENT House on East Broad Broadway,
way, Broadway, six rooms and bath. Apply to
Mrs. McDowell, Ft. King avenue, or
phone 179. 11-10-tf
FOR SALE-r-Small Buick four-passenger
touring" car in good repair;
new tires. Belleview Trading Co.,
Belleview, Fla. 9-19t
FOR SALE Nice lot 70 x 112 in sec second
ond second ward also nice residence lot at
$200. W. W. Condon. 21-tf
FOR SALE About 200 bushels Sol Sol-noski
noski Sol-noski early Sea Island cotton seed, isl
and erown. free from boll weevil:
$3.50 per bushel f. o. b. Savannah. W.
E. Clark, Savannah, Ga.. 24-5t
na Belle Wesson, Harold Talbott,
94'.

PROGRAM
MARION COUNTY FAIR
NINETEEN HUNDRED SEVENTEEN
OCALA, FLORIDA

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 28

OLD VETERANS AND YOUNG FOLKS OF THE "60's

9:00 a. m. Judging of Draft Horses and Roadsters, Standard and Non
Standard, Pure and Grades, Mules and Asses.
10:00 a. m. Concert on Court House Sonarp.

1:00 p. m. Concert in Grand Stand.
1:30 p. m. Races.
2:25 Pace for Purse of
2:40 Trot for Purse of

THURSDAY, NOV. 29
FARMERS DAY

9:00 a.

m. Judging at Grand Stand begins as follows:
Saddle Horses, Best Lady Riders, over 16 and under 16.
Best Gentleman Riders, over 16 and under 16.
Judging on Grounds: Cattle, Hogs, Sheep and Goats.
m. Concert on the Square.
m. Industrial Parade will leave East Fort King, Marching to the
Court House Square, thence to Fair Grounds.
m. Address to Farmers by L. M. Rhodes, Commissoiner of Mar Marketing
keting Marketing Bureau.
m- Turkey Dinner, Served by Economic Committee Woman's Club,
m. Band Concert,
m. Races called:
2:15 Trot for Purse of $150.
Free for All for Purse of $300.
Mule Race, Half -Mile Dash, Purse of $20.
Scrub Ponies, Half-Mile Dash, Purse of $25.
Daring, Dangerous Free Act by Dare-Devil Dogerty on Mid Midway.
way. Midway. m. Band Concert on the Square,
m. Free Acts on the Midway.

10:30 a.
11:00 a.
11:C0 a.
12:30 p.
1:00 p.
1:S0 p.
4:00 p.
7:00 p.
7:30 p.

FRIDAY, NOV. 30
CHILDRENS DAY

9:30 a.
10:00 a.
10:30 a.
11:00 a.
1:00 p.
1:30 p.

m. Concert on the Court House Square.
m- Parade of School Children, Girls' Canning Clubs and Boys
Corn Clubs.
m. Awarding of Prizes to Club Members by Prof. Brinson.
m. Address by Hon. R. A. McRae, Commissioner of Agriculture.
m. Concert in the Grand Stand.
m. Races called:
2:20 Trot for Purse of $150.-
Half-Mile Free for All, for Purse of $150.
Half-Mile Dash for Scrub' Ponies, Purse of $25.
m. Grand Daylight Fireworks Display,
m. Band Concert on Court House Square,
m Fee Acts on Midway.

4:00 p.
7:00 p.
7:30 p.

SPECIAL FEATURES
Polack Bros'. Shows, featuring some new and interesting attractions;
never before seen in Ocala, will make the "Fair Playground" a source of
pleasure not only to the children but to the grown-ups as well.
Let, the children see the "Monkey Speedway" and ride on the Whip.
See the Races as there will be some splendid horses on the track.
The Ladies of the Economic Committee of the Woman's Club will serve
both dinners and lunch, and on Thanksgiving a good Turkey Dinner.''
Mr. L. M. Rhodes' address on Farmers' Day will be one of the treats
of the week.
Midway Open until 11 p. m. each night.

Wont you let us prove to you by
one trial that there is no finish that
will give you a lasting satisfaction
like
DAMS VARNISH STAIN
For Sale By
THE MARION HARDWARE CO,
Ocala, Fla.
A NERVOUS WRECK
From Three Years' Suffering. Sayi
Cardci Made Her Well.
Texas City, Tex. In an interesting
statement, Mrs. G. H. Schill, of this town,
says: "For three years I suffered untold
agony with my head. I was unable to
do any of my work.
I just wanted to sleep all the time, for
that was the only ease I could get, when
I was asleep. I became a nervous wreck
just from the awful suffering with my
head.
I was so nervous that the least noise
would make me jump out of my bed. I
hzl no energy, and was unable to do
anytiiing. My son, a young boy, had to
do all my household duties.
I was not able to do anything until 1
took CarduL I took three bottles in all,
and it surely cured me of those awful
headaches. That has been three years
ago, and I know the cure is permanent,
fori have never had any headache since
taking Cardui. .
Nothing relieved me until I took Cardui.
It did wonders for me.'
Try 'Cardui for your troubles made
from medicinal ingredients recommended
in medical bocks as being of benefit in
female troubles, and 40 years of use has
proven that the books are right. Begin
I Ukmg uaraui tocay. NC-134
Fresh milk, Hewett Dairy, at the
Delicatessen Shop, 15c. quart. 12-tf

I.

$150.
$150.
BARGAIN LIST OF
USED AUTOMOBILES
We have the following used car
bargains. Each car is guaranteed to
be just as represented. Come in and
look them over if interested. The list
is changing almost daily:
One 1917 model Maxwell Touring
car, almost as good as new,
.with good tires all around. .. .$475
One 1917 Maxwell touring car,
in good condition throughout. .$400
One Maxwell roadster, 1916
model, fine condition $300
One Ford touring car, good con condition
dition condition but has no top $175
One Ford truck, equipped as a
grocery delivery wagon, only
extra heavy, 1917 model, al almost
most almost new $375
New Cars
Two of the last of the 1917 model
. Maxwell touring cars, wide
tread. No war tax on these, and
are equipped with bumpers
and spare wheel. Hurry if you
want one as it is the last charge
you will ever have to get a wide
tread new car. Each $720
The advancing price of new cars of
all makes, and the war tax of three
per cent automatically increases the
price and value of good used cars and
makes them more in demand. 'This
agency sold seven used cars du ring
the week ending Nov. 10.
Maxwell-Chalmers Agency,
Ocala, Florida.
SEABOARD LOCAL SCHEDULE
No. 9 Leaves Jacksonvile 1:20 p.
m.; Ocala 4:15 p. m. Arrives Tampa
7:35 p. m.
No. 1 Leaves Jacksonville 9:30 p.
m.; Ocala, 1:45 a. m. Arrives St. Pe Petersburg,
tersburg, Petersburg, 7:45 a. m.
No. 3 Leaves Jacksonville 9:30 a.
m.; Ocala, 12:50 p. ra.
Northbound
No. 10 Leaves Tampa at 1 p. m.;
Ocala, 4:15 p. m. Arrives Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, 7:15 p. m.
No. 2 Leaves Tampa 9 p. m.;
Ocala, 1:55 a. m. Arrives Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, 6:45 a. m.
No. 4 Leaves Tampa, 9:10 a. m.;
arrive Ocala, 1:10 p. m.; arrive Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville af 5:10 p. m. -?
A full assortment of the famous
PAKRO Seedtape. Just the thing for
the small fall gardenL Csiala Seed
Store. tf
Advertise in the Star.

PLASTERING AND
CONCRETE WORK

I have just completed the,
plastering and concrete work on
the Ocala union station, and am
now prepared to figure on all
kinds of work in this line.
CARL VVENZEL & SON
OCALA, FLA.
H
H
o
H
9
H
O
w
We Announce
The Best Equipped
TRANSFER & STORAGE
C07.IPANY
In Central Florida
Our Equipment is at Your Service
and for Your Convenience. If you will
Help Us We will Make it the Best in
the State. We Expect to Make the
Service Prompt, the Price Reasonable,
and "Everybody Happy." If We Don't,
Tell Us and We'll "Come Across."
WHITE STAR LINE
Dealers in BEAVER BOARD
AGAIN TO
Ocala
Harrington Hall
Friday, Nov. 30
FOR OXE DAY OXLT.
Will Return in 4 Weeks.
Honrs t 9 A. M. (o 4 P. 3L
H. DICKERSOtn
. Specialists
firings the Knowledge of a Great Medi Medical
cal Medical Organization and Their Ex Experience
perience Experience In the Successful
Treatment of
Thousands of Chronic Disease Cases
OFITEIt SERVICES FREE OF CHARCO
(For This Visit
The Dr. Dickerson's Staff of Specialists
is an organization of licensed physicians,
They are fpecialists. The Doctors treat,
without Surgical Operation diseases of the
blood, skin, and all internal organs, rheu rheumatism,
matism, rheumatism, sciatica, leg ulcers, tape-worn,
weak lungs and all long standing, deep
seated diseases.
Twenty years experience and the
-complete records of thousands of cases
.successfully treated prove that the
methods of these Doctors are right. They
were among the first to be called "Blood "Bloodless
less "Bloodless Surgeons." Each member of the Dr.
Dickerson's stall has at his command the
knowledge and resources of the whole or organization.
ganization. organization. Many people go on suffering
from diseases that can be alleviated
just because they cannot afford to go
to high priced rciaHrts at a distance
from home. Xo community has a suf sufficient
ficient sufficient number of sufferers from the
diseases mentioned to suDoort special
hospitals for their treatment ard cure.
Dr. Dicker-on has solved the problem. His
highly tral.ie:l 5j ?clallst3 travel from place
to place. They t!lagnoe and prescribe a
course of tre.rre?:.: for the sufferers in each
community, and teach them how to
take care cT them -rives a.t home, and
are too voll t. -.',,r:n in this locality to
reed further r..ntion.
"Worn-cut :ml rirri-dotrn men or
women, ro rrtt;r what your ailment
may he; r.c rr.r. iter whnt you have been
told, or Vnt experience you have had
r.'ith cthor' physicians, you should not
fail to grarp this wonderful oppor opportunity.
tunity. opportunity. Yt yorr case is incurable, he
will tell yon o. Consult him upon his
visit. It costs nothing. Married ladles
must come with their husbands and
minors with their parents.
For FREE MEMORANDUM BOOK, ad address
dress address Dr. Ceo. L. D;ckpron and Staff, Jack Jacksonville,
sonville, Jacksonville, Florida, or enclose 10 cents for his
88-page ILLUSTRATED BOOKLET,
-FACTS FOR MEN."
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER
AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Con Contract
tract Contract work. Gives More and Better
Work for the Money than any other
contractor in the city.

sack



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