The Ocala evening star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06763

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
TT
iC5 ii ii
WEATHER FORECAST
Generally fair tonight and Sunday;
cooler in northeast portion tonight;
slightly cooler north portion Sunday.
OCAL A, FLORIDA, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1917.
VOL. 23, NO. 260.
SOUTHERN RATES:
WERE TOO STIFF
AUSTRO-GERMAUS
ANOTHER NATION
IS GONE
RUSSIAN MORALE
REINS RES1DRED
LAST' OAY OF THE
LIBERTY LO
WARMING f

PTTVTJ TJ ITV

IRVFN NO

A

UUA

AMERICANS ARE

1
i
III

PRESS ITALIANS

A

Are Making the Most Strenuous En En-T
T En-T deavors to Retrieve Their
Disasters Elsewhere

(Associated Pre3s)
The recent Freacli success on the
Aisne and British pressure in Fland Flanders
ers Flanders are offset by the Auotro-German
blow against the left wing of the Ital
ian line on the Isonzo. While the Teu
ton advance has not- progressed far
enough to be considered dangerous for

the future of the alued aims, a semi semiofficial
official semiofficial Rome statement says the sit situation
uation situation is "certainly grave." The of official
ficial official statement later stated that the
Teutons were repulsed in the efforts
on the Carso front.
T The strongly reinforced Teuton
armie sare reported to be in command
of Emperor Charles of Austro-Hun-armie
j3are reported to be in command
gary.
Not entirely successful in. Russia,
being pushed back in France and
Belgium, the Teutons may be making
' a gigantic effort againstthe Italians

in the hope or crusmng on'? oi tne ai-
The French and British continue to
advance. The French eained trenches

beyond their objectives, white the
British repulsed counter attacks and
consolidated the ground won yester yester-'
' yester-' ;, day.
EVIDENT EXAGGERATION
. Berlin, Oct. 27. Sixfy thousand
' Italians and 450 guns have been cap-

" tured, the war office claims.
A MODERATE DEMAND
Copenhagen, Oct. 27. Austrian so socialists
cialists socialists in convention at "Vienna de demanded
manded demanded that the government proclaim
the principle of.no annexations and
no indemnities. This is the first, party
of the Central Powlrs to reject the
idea of veiled annexation.
. , :', ':'
' INDUSTRIAL PARADE

A conynittee appointed by the fair
association to arrange for the indus industrial
trial industrial parade met at the board of
trade rooms Friday afternoon.. Ten
of the sixteen members were present.
Mr. D. N.v Ferguson was elected
chairman and Mr. B, Stephens 'secre 'secretary
tary 'secretary of the committee. The follow following
ing following from nearby towns are asked to
co-operate with the men from Ocala
and to arrange for participants from
their sections:
Mcintosh E. L. Price and D. H.
Pitts. "' .. -Vv"V : : :-
Dunnellon B. J.. Benson and J. D.
lIetcalf.
Cltra W: T. Dupuis, W. J. Crosby.
Anthony George Pasteur, E. C.
Beuchler.
Sparr-J. Thomas, Miss Jessie
, Owens. ,'. -.
Belleview Mr s. W. M. Fielding,
Dr. B. M. Tanner. ; ,
Lake Weir John Carney, Dr. E. B.
vLytle, J. E. Klock and.W. R. Lee.
Flemington Mrs.. Gray.
Fairfield-John Smoak and L.
' Payne. ' " ; "'
Fessenden W. B. Barnwell.
Reddick E. D. Rou.
Lowell Bruce and Fred Meffert.
Blitchton Landis Blitch.
.Fellowship J. D. McCully.
Martel Walter Ray.
A committee .. composed of Fred
Hocker, W. M. Palmer and Max -Is-r:elson
was appointed to solicit1 a
fund of $50 from the Ocala people to
be offered as" a prize for the best float
in the parade; $25 for the best Ocala
w. jfloat and $25 for the best out of town
. float. -y
. Every possible effort is to be put
forth by the committee to make this
r the best industrial parade in the, his history
tory history of the fair association. Every
merchant is appealed to on behalf of
this endeavor and it is hoped that
each will make some kind of demon demonstration
stration demonstration in this parade. ;
The publicity committee for this
x feature of our fair is B. Stephens, C.
W. Hunter, P. W. Gollens and Paul H.
- Nisle.
':1 The committee hopes to arrange
farthis parade to move at 11 o'clock
Thursday, Nov. 29. The churches are
asked to xonsidsr the possibility of
arranging the Tranksgiving service
for 9:30 and thereby lend their co-
operatietfthi- movement and its
WOOD
When you want wood call my, resi residence,
dence, residence, phone 349, or call Teapot
Grocery, phone 16. Prompt delivery. J
24- J. H. J. Counts.
Chesapeake Bay Oysters received
daily at the Delicatessen Shop, Ocala
House block. 17-tf
- Chesapeake Bay Oysters received
daily tt the Delicatessen Shop, Ocala

Every Day Some of Our Soldiers Go
Onto the Trenches with
the Allies

(Associated Press)
With American Army in France,
Oct. 27. The first official statement
from American headquarters says:
"In continuation of their training and
as a nucleus for instructions later,
j avcontingent of. some batteries of our
first contingent and in association
with veteran French battalions, are
in the first line trenches of a quiet
rsector on the Frencli front. They
a"re supported by some batteries of
our, artillery in association with vet veterans
erans veterans of French batteries. The sec sector
tor sector remains" normal. Our men have
adapted themselves to actual trench
conditions -in a most satisfactory
manner."
The Americans fired their first
shots at a German working party.
Intermittent firing 'has been partici participated
pated participated in since.
FIRST SHELL FIRED
General Sibert has the case of the
first shell fird by American gunners,
and will send it to the president. The
Americans entered the front line
trenches with the utmost caution
during a heavy downpour of rain. It
has rained every day since they have
been there and the men are covered
with mud, although the trenches they
occupy are well constructed.
Officers are certain the Germans
know American troops are opposing
them, but there has been no ontice ontice-able
able ontice-able increase in artillery fire. The
men went to their new task cheer cheerfully,
fully, cheerfully, it being necessary to suppress
whistling at times y
BOY SCOUTS NOISY
Last night about 7:30 o'clock the
people attending the picture show
and otherwise engaged in that, section
of town were brought suddenly to
"attention" by the roar, of .boyish
voices. Upon inquiry it was ascer ascertained
tained ascertained that Scout Master Stephens
was conducting the Scouts in their
first rehearsal of some re.al live Boy
Scout yells. Boys always have a yell
lurking somewhere close under the
surface of their talking apparatus.
They are likely to put some "pep" in
this Ocala atmosphere in the near
future. Mr. Stephens led the boys in
the first steps of "tumbling" last
night. If some of the boysiave sore
shoulders and, thighs today, that is a
sure sign that' anotner "night will
find them working it out on the mat.
The usevbfCo. A's gym is in good
hands and not likely to get dusty, any
time soon. C v
Have your prescriptions filled at the
COURT PHARMACY, where you can
pe certain that they are compounded
of the best drugs, the utmost care and
without delay. x 17-tf
Have your prescriptions filled at
Gerig's by Registered pharmacists, tf
A
Office

Brazil, Greatest of South American
Republics, has Joined the
Allied Line of Battle

s (Associated Press)
Rio de Janeiro, Oct. 27 The cham
ber of deputies by a vote of 149 to
1 has declared that a state of war
exists between Germany and Brazil.
This action followed an address of
the Brazilian president the day be before,
fore, before, in which he refused to ignore
the existing state of affairs between
Germany and Brazil.
The president sanctioned the act of j
the Brazilian congress by issuing a
proclamation declaring that a state of
war existed between Brazil and" Ger Germany.
many. Germany. "'' ..
Furnished the Readers of th Star by
the Commercial Bank of Ocala
New York Jan. ,Oct. Dec.
Open .. 26.80 27.60
Close 26.62. 27.25
Market steady. Spots quiet. Mid Middlings
dlings Middlings 28.60.
New Orleans Jan. Oct. Dec.
Open . s.... 25.80 26.31
Close ..... .25.61- 25.96
Market steady. Spots steady. Mid Middlings
dlings Middlings 27.75. Sales, 2,750.
Consolidated net receipts, 30,741.
ADVANCING CHURCH WORK
The pastors and Sunday school
superintendents met at the Methodist
church last night at 8:30 for the pur purpose
pose purpose of discussing the advisability of
conducting a thorough "home, visita visitation"
tion" visitation" in Ocala. After some informal
discussion a motion vas made and
carried calling for the appointment of
a committee from the Sunday schools
of Ocala to conduct this campaign.
The committee will be. made up as
nearly as possible in the following
numbers, From the Baptist Sunday
school twenty-five members, from the
Christian ten, from the Episcopal ten,
from the Methodist twenty-five and
from the Presbyterian fifteen. Messrs.
Duval and Gary were 'appointed to
district the town. The committees
wilj be thoroughly organized and
drilled before tnis work is under undertaken.
taken. undertaken. The plan n)w is to hold this
visitation Saturday afternoon of the
17th of November. The cards will be
divided among the churches accord according
ing according to the "church preference" indi indicated
cated indicated by the individual. It is expect expected
ed expected that this campaign will give the
pastors and their churches some very
valuable information and be the
means of accomplishing great good.
The pastors are planning to follow
this canvass by a series of meetings.

COTTON MARKET

Each pastor will hold services in his ine greatesr numan care ana we
own church. highest human intelligence ought to
go into the filling of every p'rescrip-
Ford tops re-covered, $12.50, at thetion- This describes our service. The
Ocala Wagon Works. Phone 84. tf Court Pharmacy. 17-tf

TV
T y

jAmm m Gweiriiieil:
Caitoimeit:

AGES S2.20.PEM DAY

Apply in Person to
EMf LEY & DM

- ..
United States Cantonment Contractors

Foot of Laura St.

that
(Associated Press)
t Petrograd, Oct. 27. Preparations
are being made for the evacuation of
Helsingors, according to a report
received here. A news report from
slockholm says the Germans evident evidently
ly evidently hope to sever communication be between
tween between Russia and Sweden by cutting
the railroad at Tornea in Finland.
ARMIES HAVE AWAKENED
General Tcheremissoff, commander
of the Russian armies on the' northern
front, has reported the condition of
the Russian forces improving, stating
that he has managed to prevent fur further
ther further advance's of the German forces,
and has secured the safety of the en entrance
trance entrance to Petrograd.
"The armies have awakened to
consciousness," he said.
It is understood the government
has changed its view of moving the
capital to Moscow. Russian soldiers
on me bouwern, xrunu are peuwuimis
uieir councils aga-iiiai. liic mccuiig ui
the centfal council of soldiers' and
workmen's deputies in Petrograd jm
Nov. 2nd. They declare the meeting
of the constituent assembly should be
awaited.
COMPANIES OF FIRST
FLORIDA. SCATTERED
Young Catts Transferred Into An
other Regiment
Tallahassee. Oct. 27. Rumors here
V
the last 'few days that Capt. Sidney
Catts Jr. had been relieved of his
command are unwarranted, it is said.
All depot brigades have been dis disbanded
banded disbanded and the men of the old First
Florida regiment will be transferred
to fill vacancies in other units, every
man holding "his 'same rank. Catts
wjll be captain of the 118th Field ar-
rtillery. Letters from the boys at
Macon say the troops will soon go to
France.
SILVER SPRINGS
See Silver Springs through the j
glass-bottomed boat. Scenery not to
be had in any other part of the Unit United
ed United States. Largest flowing and most
beautiful springs in the world, some something
thing something that can't be described -or ex exaggerated;
aggerated; exaggerated; real geisers under water,
the Blue Grotto, Bridal Chamber,
Florida Snow Storm, Ladies' Parlor
and other beautiful spots too -numerous
to mention. Price, $1 and $1.50;
children under 12 years of age half
fare. If dissatisfied, money refunded.
C. (Ed.) Carmichael,
Owner and Manager.
A A A A A A A A
vv v r v T Y V T

Petition Made by the Soldiers
Capital Remain at
Petrograd

- Jacksonville,

Cotton Exchange of New Orleans
Had to Appeal to Interstate
Commerce Commission

(Associated Press) -Washington,
Oct. 27. The com
plaint of the New Orleans Cotton Ex Exchange
change Exchange tha prices on cotton from
points on the Southern Railway with within
in within a radius of 300 miles of New Or Orleans
leans Orleans as unreasonable was upheld by
the Interstate Commerce Commission.
A maximum charge of 50 cents a hun hundred
dred hundred was prescribed.
WEATHER NEXT WEEK
(Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 27. Fair weath weather
er weather until Wednesday, rain Thursday
and fair thereafter with lower tem temperatures
peratures temperatures the last half of the week,
is the forecast for the South Atlantic
and gulf states next week.
GUNS FOR THE HOME GUARDS'
Tallahassee, Oct. 27 Five, hundred
rifles and 7,500 rounds of ammuni-
the home guards in he first congres
sional district. The state has no
funds with which to equip homb
guard companies, but if other con congressmen
gressmen congressmen and senators will do a
Congressman Drane has done all com companies
panies companies can get equipment:"
In no direc- --
tlon can Am
erican women
so greatly fV
5 i
assist as by
enlisting In the
service of the
Food Adminis Administration
tration Administration and
cheerfully ac accepting
cepting accepting its di direction
rection direction and
advice.
i
wv wukuw president Wilson.
EiupoU
Daring
"Pledge
Week."
Beautiful bed room suits just re received
ceived received in walnut, mahogany, gum,
Circassian walnut, quartered oak and
white ivory. Marion Furniture Company.-
- 25-3t
There is bread and bread, but the
best bread to eat is the famous But Butternut
ternut Butternut bread, made at Carter's Bak Bakery,
ery, Bakery, and on sale at retail grocers, tf
You can buy your bread, pies,
cakes, buns, etc., cheaper from us
than you can bake them
yourrx.r.
Carter's Bakery. tf
.. j.
.
lkiMAl
Jkr
V;
Jyt
i
jj
C
JjAf:
ZIZ
tfz
ti
Fla.
Ill
f

i firs
" v.

K .-y
r.....t,, rvM. r.

Subscriptions Steadily Rolling In
but Result Will Not be Known
This Week

(Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 27. Special ef efforts
forts efforts will be given in the Liberty
Loan campaign tonight toward wage
earners who get their pay envelopes
today. Encouraging reports have
been received of the farmers' re response.
sponse. response. Treasury officials do not hope
for even an approximate statement
of the total before next week.
FOUR BILLIONS SOLD
Washington, Oct. 27. The treasury
announces that revised reports indi indicate
cate indicate that four billion in bonds have
been sold and that additional sales of
a billion today seemed not only pos-
sible but entirely probable. i
PARTIAL REPORT THIS EVE EVE-NING
NING EVE-NING (Special to the Star)
Atlanta Oct-. 27. We have wired
every committee in the Sixth Federal
Reserve district to wire us a final re report
port report as full as possible at 5 o'clock
this afternoon. We will wire you
probably after six o'clock as full a
report as possible from the entire
district for your Sunday paper.
. Massengale, Chairman.
SOLDIERS NEED
GOOD AMERICAN SMOKES
Star readers do not seem to be in interested
terested interested to the extent which they
should in the Tobacco Fund which we
are, constantly trying to raise for" the
American soldiers in France. The
L Marion county troops have not yet
been sent to foreign battle fields, but
the day will undoubtedly come when
they will be, and we shall then expect
the whole country to do for "our"
boys just what we are doing for
others today, viz: Send them every
comfort possible. If every subscriber
would only donate 25 cents the fund
would reach proportions that the
whole of Maarion county would feel
proud of.
Writing to a San Francisco paper
Frances Joliffe tells how badly our
boys heed our tobacco and cigaretfes.
' "The1 boys are more contented with
their French lot than when I had talk talked
ed talked with them ten days ago." Ameri American
can American tobacco had at last arrived and
been distributed. A young sgldier
told me that the first packet of Am American
erican American cigarettes he received were the
prettiest things he .ever saw. One
boy pulled out a half -used package of
Bull Durham and caressed it. His
companion informed me that they
had paid as high as 40 francs ($8)
for. a package of Bull Durham."
And here is a letter from one of
our boys himself. -He didn't -pay 40
francs, but he paid too much. It is
up to us to make it unnecessary. He
writes:
"In Camp 'Somewhere in France.'
I will tell you- what conditions are
r ?re. A 5-cent sack of 'Bull Dnr.
hm' tobacco sold yesterday for four
francs (80 cents), while I have a
standing offer of six francs ($1.20)
van ui MJUUCCU. r ive
francs a package is offered for any
kind of American cigarets and those
who have them won't selL"
; Now, there's a moral in this for
every one of our readers:
A quarter sent to our fund gives
him three sacks of Bull Durham and
two packs of Lucky Strike cigarettes
and a tin of Tuxedo.
Subscriptions to date are as fol follows:
lows: follows: Previously reported .$45.75
Miss Alice Bullock, Ocala, Fla. .25
W. S. Hilands, Ocala, Fla...
1.00
1.00
1.00
.25
.25
l.00
W. J. Wilson, Fort M'Coy, Fla.

;Mrs. Wm. Hocker, Ocala, Fla.
U?; Frank Ditto Jr., Ocala, Fla...
.'L. W. Barnett, Ocala, Fla....
Jt;Mrs. E. C. Beuchler,

Anthony, Fla."
,. -" $50.50
In the language of some great man.
"Don't be a titewad." Send in your
j donations to the tobacco fund.
Beautiful bed room suits just re-
jCeived in walnut, mahogany, gum,
Circassian walnut, quartered oak and
white ivory. Marion Furniture Com-
pany. 25-3t
'
W. K. Lane, -M. D., Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
lhroat. Law Library Building, Ocala,
Florida. tf
Beautiful bed room suits just re received
ceived received in walnut, mahogany, gum,
Circassian walnut, quartered oak and
white ivory. Marion Furniture Com-
pany.
25-3t

J

KtSJ5vSt50SJ$S0t Do you read the want ads 7

House block. J7-ti



PAGE TWO

OCALA EVENING STAR. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1917

School

OF MARION-COUNTY, FLORIDA FOR THE TERM OF
FOR WHITE SCHOOLS

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD
G. S. Scott, Chairman, Ocala; C. R. Veal, Cotton Plant; A. J. Stephens,
Sparr. J.. II. Brinson, Secretary to the Board and Superintendent of Pub Public
lic Public Instruction, Ocala.

No. 1. OCALA
Ocala High School
Teachers: W. II. Caassels, Princi
pal; Isabel Stuart Mays, Lulu K.
Doke, Marie Pitchford. Felicia Wil
liams, Florence M. Conibear, Y. A.
Henderson.
Ocala Grammar School:
Teachers: Mrs. Rex Todd, Mrs. H.
S. Wesson, Minnie Lee Carlisle,
Value Boyd, Marion Dewey, Anna
McDowell, Mrs. B. D. Adams. Avis
Walker, Eugenia Fuller, Marion
: Liddy.
Ocala Primary School:
Teachers: Nellie Stephens, Princi Principal;
pal; Principal; Marcella McLean,Mrs. Maude
Rochford, Edith Griffin, Lulu Grif Griffin,
fin, Griffin, Mrs. W. T. Evans, Fannie
Clark, Eunice Marsh.
North Ocala School:
Teachers: Agnes Crago, Collie
Clark.
Trustees: J. L. Edwards, Mrs. Wm.
Hocker, Dr. H. C. Dozier, Ocala.
No. 2. McINTOSII
Teachers: H. C. Bennett, Principal;
Lottie Warran.
Trustees: J.K. Christian, E. W. Rush,
Dr. A. C. Walkup, Mcintosh.
No. 3. BELLE VIEW
Teachers: A. E. Ash worth, Mrs. A
E. Ashworth.
Trustees: J. A. Freeman, A. L. Nott,
J. W. Brown, Belleview.
No. 4. FANTVILLE
Teacher: Austin H. Baird. I
irustees: k. ts ant, J. B. George,
jt.i. iuesser, iyiornsion, k. r. JJ.
-No 1. ..
No. 5. DUNNELLON
Teachers: J. M. Feagle, Principal;
Nell Morris, Clarissa Whitaker,
Olive Jones, Louise Booe, Marguer Marguerite
ite Marguerite Ruff, Wynona Wetherbee, Pansy
Souter.
Trustees: Dr. Wm. Griffith, Thos K.
North, G. W. Neville, Dunnellon.
No. 6. REDDICK
. Teachers: Mrs. Ethel Wilson, Prin Principal;
cipal; Principal; Sadie Dansby.
Trustees: J. W. Wilson, C. M. Cam,
J. B. Devore, Reddick.
No. 7. PINE LEVEL
Teacher: Blanche Salts.
Trustees: J.- T. Ross, E W. W. Jor Jordan,
dan, Jordan, W. L. Brooks, Gaiter.
No. 8. MAYVILLE
No School.
Trustees: W. B. Coggin, S. S. Knight,
R. C. McNatt, Weir sdale.
No. 9. WEIRSDALE
Teachers: Nellie Clyburn, Mabel
McClain. "..
Trustees: W. A. Guthrey,, Stanton;
J. D. Walling, Weirsdale; E. C. Al Al-bertson,
bertson, Al-bertson, South Lake Weir.
No. 10. CITRA
Teachers: : H. G. Shealy, Nellie
Vause, Ethel Crosby. ;
Trustees : JV. J; Crosby, D. T. Sher Sher-ouse,
ouse, Sher-ouse, R. S. Shortridge, Citra-.
No. 11. GRINER FARM
Teachers: B. D. Adams, Ocala;
Donnie Proctor.
Trustees: F. P. Cahoon, Ocala, Route
A, Box 87; J. A. Luff man, Ocala,
Route A; Mrs. J. M. Luff man,
Ocala, Route A. x
No. f2. BUCK POND
Teachers: Clarine A. .Williams,
Louise Niblack.
Trustees: T. F. MorgarJ Romeo; W.
D. Young, Juliette; J. D. Wiggins,
Romeo.
No. 13. SPARR ;
Teachers: Frances Ramsey, Mrs.
Grace Grantham. '.
Trustees: D, O. .Riker, E. Clemons,
J. E. Thomas, Esparr.
No. 14. CANDLER
Unsupplied.-
Trustees: Dr. A. Belcher, J. E. Mar Marshall,
shall, Marshall, C. WOui"ck. Candler.
No. 15. FELLOWSHIP
Teachers: Mary Nash, Janie Mae
Perry.
Trustees: V. P. Potts., Ocala, Route B;
SD. Atkinson, Ocala, Route B; G.
-W. Mills. Ocala, Route B, Box 56.
No. 16. ELECTRA
Teacher: Lilla Brown.
Trustees: Geo. W. Brant, J. M. Mock,
M. LiDpincott, Electra.
NNo. 17. BLlTCHTON
Teacher: Ann Pope Eaerleton.
Trustees: Xandis Blitch, O'. S. Sand Sanders,
ers, Sanders, J. W. Coulter, Blitchton.
Fo. 18. iMARTEL
Teachers: Carrie Holly, Imogene
Stephens.
Trustees: Walter Ray, D. A. Walker,
J. Seckinger, Martel.
' No. 19. FORT KING
Teacher: Pearl Forbes.
Trustees W. J. Young. J. E. Baxter,
F. C. Clayton, Ocala, "Fort King
Route.
N6 20. CAPULET
Teacher: Mrs. R. A. Jordan.
Trustees: E. F. Brooklen, Ocala,
Route 1, Box 68; O. C. Barker,
Ocala, Route 1, Box 72; .P, H.
Hampton, Ocala, Route 1. -No.
21. LINADALE -,
" Teacher: Mrs-. Mabel W. Marshall.
Trustees: C. 'A. McCraney, Mitchell
Rigdon, Umatilla ; I. B. Roberts,
Higley.
. No. 22. COTTON PLANT
Teacher: Mrs.H. S. Chambers.
Trustees: J. S. WTeathers, Leroy; A.
W. Woodward. D. M. Baxco. Cotton
Plant.
No. 23. ORANGE LAKE r.
Teacher: Mrs. Ethel Kershaw.
Trustees:, Mrs. Ruby Hatcheit, Dr, F.
P. Walker, Mrs. Lena Burry, Or Orange
ange Orange Lake.
No. 24. OAK HILL
Teacher: Betaie Mae Wyche.
Trustees: F. E. Smoak, Reddick R. F.

Directory

1917-1918
D. No. 1; Mrs. Ella, Fant, Fair
field; J. M. Mathews, Reddick R. F.
D. No. 1.
No. 25. 3IOSS BLUFF
Teacher: Mrs. Winnie T. Belote.
Trustees: J. S. Martin, Oliver Fort,
S.-'A. McKinney, Moss Bluff.
No. 26. FAIRFIELD
Teacher: Mrs. R. F. Proctor, Daisy
Ross.
Trustees: R. H. Scott. J. A. Jones. R.
C. Yongue, Fairfield
No. 27. COTTAGE HILL
Unsupplied.
Trustees: A.' S. Pickett, H. L. Shear
er, L. D. Beck, Ocala.
No. 28. CHARTER OAK
Teacher: Lillie E.. Mercer.
Trustees: W. A. Redding, T. W. Bar-
nett, W. J. Piatt, Summerfield, R.
F. D.
No. 29. PEDRO
Teachers: J. W. Sparkman, Evelyn
Grimes.
Trustees: H. P. Oliver, S. G. Lovell,
Walter Nichols, Summerfield.
No. 30 KENDRICK
Teachers: Mary Youner. Mary Jeter.
Trustees: J. J. Guthrie, W. B. Living
ston, J. E. Turnipseed, Kendrick.
No. 31. OCKLAWAHA
Teacher: E. H. Miller.
Trustees: C, E. Connor, W. E. Mc-
D.Li mr l: y-v-i-i t
i uaiuigui, ivuui. martin, ucuawana.
! No. 32. HEIDTVILLE
Teacher: Eupha King. :
Trustees: C. L. Strickland, F. H. Mil-
ler, J. T. Townsend. Heidtville.
No. 33. PLEASANT HILL
Teacher: Enal Howard. '
Trustees:. Willard Blitch, Elbert
Mills, R. D. Mills, Morriston, R.F.
D. No. 1.
No. 34. FORT McCOY
Teachers: Ida Vause, Earl A! Gran Grantham.
tham. Grantham. Trustees: W. J. Wilson, W. S. Priest,
E. L. Boshardt, Fort McCoy.
No. 35. ANTHONY
Teachers f'Josie Parish, Mabel Hall,
Hettie Harwell
Trustees: H. A. Meadows, B. K. Pad Padgett,
gett, Padgett, C. C. Priest, Jr., Anthony.
No., 36. SUMMERFIELD
Teacher: Elizabeth Mizelle.
Trustees : C. P. Davis J. M. Harral-
son, Mrs. Nora Mayo, Summerfield.
No. 37. HOMELAND.
Teacher: Ollie Mills. t -,
Trustees: D. N. Barco, W T. Strick-
land, J. p. Williams, Leroy.
No. 38. SHILOH
Teachers Nora Creekmore, Mary
. Gladney.
Trustees:. E. A. Smith, R. R. Whit-
tington, A. J. Wyche, Micanopy.
No- 39. LQWELL .
Teacher: Rae Folks.
Trustees : Matt ReiflV S. F. Rou, C. B.
Howell, Lowell.
No. 40. GREENWOOD
Teacher: Mary Forbes, Citra, R. A.
Trustees: G. D. Turner, Fort McCoy;
Harmon Hall, A. P. Monroe, Citra,
Route A. v
No. 41. BURBANK
Teacher: Effie Sherwood.
Trustees : Geo. S. Bowen, George H. 1
Dyke, W. C. Bogue, Burbank.
No. 42. IRVINE
Teacher: Mary Flewellyn.
Supervisor: .W. P. Sa'pp, Irvine.
No. 43. GOINS
Teacher: Sallie Whitfield.
Supervisor: F. Lightsey; Ocala.
No. 44. MARSHVILLE
Unsupplied.
Supervisor: L. B. Marsh, Burbank.
No. 45. EUREKA
Teacher: Ellie Hugh Milling.
Supervisor; J. N. Brinson, Eureka.
No. 46. BAY LAKE
Unsupplied.
(Supervisor: D. M. Waldron, Bay Lake
No. 47. ORANGE SPRINGS'"
Teacher: Pauline Smith!
Supervisor: J. B. Hall, Orange Spgs.!
No. 48. MARTIN
Teacher: Mary Revels.
Supervisor: Samuel Slack, Martin.
No. 49. GRAIIAMVILLE
Teacher: Mamie McNatt.
Supervisor: Wyatt MTJonald,' Connor.
No. 51. KEY POND
: Teacher: Gladys Ellis.
Supervisor: C H. Rogers, Lynne.
No. 52. BADGER
Teacher: Ruth Colson.
Supervisor: S. D Atkinson, Ocala, R.
F D
No. 53. ROMEO
Teacher: Fae Beck.
Supervisor: T. F. Morgan, Romeo.
No. 54. SHADY
"Teacher : Mrs. R. H. Terry.
Supervisor: J. T. E. Gaskins, Ocala,
Shady Route.
No. 55. LAKE KERR
Teacher: Sarah Forbes.
Supervisor: J. O. Boatright, Lake
-Kerr. .. ';
No. 56. LAKE BRYANT
Teacher: Mattie Millt.
Supervisor: C. H. Rogers, Lynne.
No. 57. PATTS ISLAND
Unsupplied

Supervisor: R," M. Long. Astor. Park. Supervisor: S. P. Gallowav, Summer Summer-No.
No. Summer-No. 58. EBENEZER, I field.

Teacher: Hattie Akin.
Supervisors H. E. Coldin, Williston!
No. 59. CENTRAL
Teacher: Mrs. C. R Curry.
Supervisor: C. R. Curry. Micanopy,
P.urr.l Route.
Na 60. GOOLSBY v
Teacher: Jesslyn Shervood.
Supervisor: Geo. Goolsby, Burbank.
No. 61. MILL CREEK
Teacher: Mrs. Missie Teuton .. ..
Supervisor: D. B. Brinson, Citra R. R.
No. 62. DALLAS

I Teacher: C. W. Person.
:' Supervisor: J. D. Proctor, Dallas.
jNo. 63. KNOBLOCK i
Teacher: Effie Rawls.
I Supervisor: J. H. Knoblock, Martin.
No. 64. PAISLEY j
Teacher: Claude McCully. I
No. 66. TURNER FARM
Teacher Harrv W. Masspv.
Supervisor: A. W. Wrells, Bay Lake.
f If k--V A- II T 1
!Xo 67 KEYSTONE
Teacher: Paul Simmons.
Supervisor: John Balliet, Ocala, Mar-
tel Route.
No. 68. DERBY
! Teacher: Lizzie Lamb.
Supervisor: S. D. Stewart, Ocala,
Route A.
iNo- 69- SILVER SPRINGS
Unsupplied.
Supervisor: H. A. Caruthers, Silver
Springs.
COLORED
No. 1. HOWARD ACADEMY
Teachers: J. D. McCall, Principal;
Ida T. McCall (Mrs.), G. C. How Howard,
ard, Howard, Sadie L. Hunter, Alice Meach Meach-am
am Meach-am (Mrs.), Petrona Bonner, Camilla
Alexander, Fannie Aver. Winifred
L. Perry, Ada L. James (Mrs.),
Ollie Adams, Henry G. Alexander,
G. P. McKinney Jr.
Trustees: J. L. Edwards, Mrs. Wm.
Hocker, Dr. H. C. Dozier, Ocala.
No. 2. FESSENDEN ACADEMY
Teachers: Edith McCall, Mymie
Ward.
Supervisor: Stephen Brown.
No. 3. MOUNT TABOR
Teacher: Bertha McDuffy.
Monitor: Girlie Pawley.
Supervisor: Grant James. Kendrick.
No. 4. GUM SPRINGS
Teacher: Theresa Dorsev.
Supervisor: Geo. Johnson, Lowell.
No. 5. MT. ZION
Teachers: Idella Nottage, Minnie
Luteman; Monitor, Mafireie White.
Trustees: J. W. Wilson. C. M. Carn,
J. B. Devore, Reddick.
No. 6. LAKESIDE
Teacher: Ora Haynes.
Supervisor: Arnette A. Brown, Or-
ange Lake
No. 7. BOARDMAN
Teacher: C. A. Adams; Monitors,
Lillian Ward, Mabel Gamble.
Supervisor: Geo. Gamble, Mcintosh.
No. 8. CLARKSVILLE
Teachers: Fannv Beattv. Viola
Calvin.
Supervisor: Grant Mickens, Micanopy.
No. 9. MOORE'S POND
Teacher: Malissa Hendley.
. Supervisor : L. Reeves, Micanopy.
No. 10. HARD ROCK
Teachers: S. F. Hadley, C. E. Tay Taylor,
lor, Taylor, Estelle Bellamy; Monitors, An Annie
nie Annie E. Martin, Mattie E. Arnold.
Trustees: Dr. Wm., Griffith, Thos. K.
North, G. W; Neville, Dunnellon.
No. 11. WETUMPK A
Teacher: J. J. James.
Supervisor: G. W. Washington, Fair Fairfield.
field. Fairfield. No. 12. BLAZE POND
Teachers:-Wylma McDuffy, Beat Beatrice
rice Beatrice Davis; Monitor, Lugenia
James. 4
Supervisor: W. B. Burton, Blitchton.
No. 13. ELM WOOD
Teacher: Nancy C. Henderson, Mrs.
Supervisor: C. H. Hamilton, Williston.
No. 14. PINE GROVE
Teacher, Herman Tunsil. y
Monitor: Martha Simmons.
Supervisor: Ean Rogers, Morriston,
R. F. D. No. 1, Box 68.
No. 15. BETHLEHEM
Teacher: Lottie Street.
Monitor: Josie Street.
Supervisor: P. J. Williams, Ocala,
Route 'B.
No. 16. WESLEY CHAPEL
Teacher: Mary P. Johnson.
Supervisor: J. H. Nelson,' Cotton
Plant.
No. 17. HOG POND
Teacher: Laura Adams.
I Supervisor: Henry Butler, Ocala,
Route B. ,
No. 18. ST. PETERS
Teacher: Will Montgomery.
Supervisor: John Picketon, Martel.
No. 19. MAGNOLIA
Teacher: Addie Ward.
Supervisor: A. B. Edwards, Martel.
No. 20. SULPHUR SPRINGS
Teacher: Victor L. Postelle.
Supervisor: J. J. Calhoun York.
No. 21. FREESTONE
Unsupplied.
Supervisor: Lewis Michael, Ocala,
bhady Route.
No. 22. PALMETTO
Teacher: Ernest Shipp.
Supervisor: Jerry Allen, Ocala, Shady
Route.
No. 23. EVERGREEN
Teacher: Cherry E. Grier.
Supervisor: Allen Burl ey, Ocala.
No. 24. MT. PLEASANT
Teacher: Mary A. Certain.
Supervisor: Hinton Howard, Sum Summerfield.
merfield. Summerfield.
No. 25. MONTAGUE
Teacher: H. H. Williams.
Monitor: Gladys Brown.
Superrisor: T. M. McCants, Ocala,
Montague Route. -No.
26. ROPER'S FARM
Teacher: H. W. Bartley; Monitors,
Lydia Posey. Edward Maxev.
1 Supervisor: E. A. Maxev, Santos.
No. 27. MT. PELIER
Teacher: Mayme E. Mobley."
.No. 28. MT. ROYAL
Unsunnlied.
SuDervisor: Geors-e. Ross. T?pllpvipw
No. 29. CHRISTIAN
Unsupplied.
Supervisor: C. J. Boiling, Candler.
.No. 30. STANTON
Teacher: A. A. Sharperson.
Supervisor: Jas. Bass, Stanton.
No. 31. ROCK SINK
Teacher: Nancy Jones, Ocala.
Supervisor: John Harvey, Ocala.
No. 32. JERUSALEM

PI

MMEIS

ni
On
z
.

A Better Car Than Any Other
Three Hun dr ed Dollars of

Ask
3
tip

11 Wo iiNo

Mawel-Clhaniiiiiieirs

Z-'
Ocala
. ;;
Teacher: Etta Ward.
Monitor: Cora White.
Supervisor: Charles Lewis, Martel.
No. 33. SILVER SPRINGS
Teacher:. Fanny Butler.
Supervisor, Henry Vreene, S. Springs.
No. 34. MT. OLIVE
Teacher: Benj. A. Perkins.
Monitors: Roberta Wilson, Ethel
'Brunson.
Supervisors. W. N. "Witherspoon, An Anthony.
thony. Anthony. No. 35. RIVERSIDE
Unsupplied.
Supervisor: Julius Harris, Eureka.
No. 36. HOPEWELL
Unsupplied.
Supervisor: W. P. Bagley, Sparr.
No. 37. BLACK SlNK
Unsupplied.
Supervisor: J. C. James, Sparr.
No. 38. HAWTHORNE
i Teachers: Nellie Hughes, Annette
;! Limbric.
Trustees: W. J. Crosby, D. T. Sher-
ouse, R. S. Shortridge, Citra.
No. 39. BALDWIN
Unsupplied.
Supervisor: E. L. Baldwin, Burbank.
No. 40. ORANGE CREEK
Teacher: Josie Cooper.
Supervisor: Henry -Wiggins, Orange
Springs.
No. 41. LIBERTY CHAPEL
'Teacher: Annie "Fisher.
Supervisor: L. R. Jacobs, Fairfield.

"Gee. I Wish I Had.

That's what our boys are saying who are aover there"
and fighting for you so that this world may he a better
place for you to live in. Will, you supply your soldier
friend with his favorite smoke and satisfy his longing?
He is doing his bit will you do yours? Sending tobac tobacco
co tobacco to our boys is almost as important as rolling, ban bandages
dages bandages or psoducing munitions, as far as their comfort
is concerned.
The Ocala Star Tobacco Fund
has just been started, to. supply our boys with their favorite smoke. Will you help to make it a suc success?
cess? success? This has been endorsed by the Government Through the efforts of the STAR, arrangements
have been made with the American Tobacco Company to send 45 worth of tobacco for 2oc.
Here is what they will get:

2
3
3
1
4
books of Tuxedo

: A return post card is enclosed in each package, so that every contributor will receive a personal
acknowledgement of hi3 gift. You will treasure this message from the trenches. Everybody wants to
give a little. Will you help make it a success by doing your bit?.' . :
CONTRIBUTE ORGANIZE YOUR CLUB, YOUR CHURCH, YOUR TOWN, YOUR OFFICE, YOUR
FACTORY AND GIVE THE BOYS JUST A LITTLE COMFORTTHEIR FAVORITE SMOKE.
THE OCALA STAR TOBACCO FUND
OCALA. FLORIDA.

Seven Passenger Car
Display in Ocala

for a Demonstration

C1B(Q)ILIL
-m

No. 42. JACOB'S WELL
Teacher: Martha Crawford.
Supervisor, J. S. Smith, Sparr.
No. 43. EASTLAKE
Unsupplied. .
Supervisor: E. D. Williams, Eastlake.
No. 44 WACULA
Teacher: Mattie Menchan.
Supervisor: Charley Mitchell, Ocala.
No. 45. HOPE
Teacher: Rosa Williams.
Supervisor: J. E. Summers, Belleview.
No. 46. MT. CARMEL
Unsupplied.
Supervisor: J. H. Bethea, Ocala.
No. 47. ROMEO
Unsupplied.
Supervisor: King Bell, Romeo..
No. 48. FT. McCOY N
Unsupplied.
Supervisor: Pomp Faison Ft. McCoy.
No. 49. SUMMERFIELD
Unsupplied.
Supervisor: G G. Gadson Summer-
field.
No. 50. CANDLER
Unsupplied.
Supervisor: Lewis Coleman, Candler.
No. 51. HEIDTVILLE
Teacher:, A. E. Leslie.
Supervisor: Solomon Archie, Dunnel Dunnellon.
lon. Dunnellon. No. 52. ROCK SPRINGS
Unsupplied.
Supervisor: Harrison Blackman,
, Ocala.

packages of Lucky Strike Cigarettes. Retails at
packages of Bull Durham. Retails at .................
books 'Bull Durham Cigarette papers
tin of Tuxedo Tobacco. Retails at

Cigarette Papers

M

He
ill
Made Within
Its Price
;- FlorMa
DAVIS CARRIAGE PAINTS
are colors ground Jin tough, elastic
Coach Varnish and one Mat will moto
your faded automoBile or carriage
look like new. They. are easy to ap apply
ply apply and dry with a strong, high gloss gloss-clinching
clinching gloss-clinching Enamel finish. Made for
wear and tea. .2-8
For Sale By
THE MARIO HARDWARE CO,
Ocala, Fla.
Mclver Mi MacKay
UNDERTAKERS and EMBAIMERS
. PHONES 47, 104, 305
OCALA, FLORIDA
Army trench mirrors 25c. Army
shaving brushes 50c. and 75c. at
Gerig'g. ; 29-tf
99
moke
si
20c
15c
10c
45c

(5)

1



OCALA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1917

PAGE THREE

I I
1 -i jf-

$

Wh

at Food Saving Involves

WOODMEN AT SPARR

9 !2I!ti!J7J

Sign the pledge and enroll as a member of the United;
States Food Administration, and you will be asked to dot
tWp things: ;

Preach and prac practice
tice practice the "gospel of
the clean plafe."

Eat plenty, but
wisely, and without
wast..
) Buy less; cook no

more t lan necessary; SilM0 Use local and sea

serve smaller por sonable supplies:

jtion. j watch out for we.
Whenever possible K use poultry, game and sea foods in

place of beef, mutton and pork.
Use potatoes and other vegetables freely,
r, f
Save wheat by substituting, in part, corn meal and
other "cereal flours for wheat flour.
Save butter and lard. Use butter on the table, but sub substitute
stitute substitute vegetable oils for cooking.
Save sugar. Use less candy and sweet drinks and less su sugar
gar sugar in tea and coffee.
"This is a duty of Necessity, humanity and honor.
As a free people we have elected fo discharge this duty,
not under autocratic decree, but without other restraint
than the guidance of individual conscience."
. . Herbert Hoover.

PLEDGE CARD FOB UNITED STATES FOOD ADMINISTRATION
If you have already signed, pass this on to a friend.
TO THE FOOD ADMINISTRATOR :
'

I am erlad'tn inin vmi in thA OTvif nf fnrr nnneervatinn fn-n m-m

o W v- ..w VJ. vvwvt SK AJ XX lUi VIU
nation and I hereby accept membership in the United States Pood Ad Administration,
ministration, Administration, pledging myself, to carry out the directions and advica
of the Food Administrator in my home, insofar as my circumstances
permit' t -..;.. ::

9

Name ......

Btreet ........ . ; ... . . . .............. .

City ...

State

. There are no fees or dues to be paid. The Pood Administration
wishes to have asmembers all of those actually handling: food in the home.
Anyone may have the Home Card of Instruction, but only those those-Blrnlnar
Blrnlnar those-Blrnlnar pledges are entitled to Membership Window Card, which will be
f4iivrd uDon receipt of the signed pledge.

Put an Ad in the Star

A number of the members of. Fort j
King Camp No. 14, Woodmen of thej
World, want to Sparr last evening to :
be with that camp at its regular j

semi-monthly meeting. Four auto
loads left Ocala and the Sparr camp
being considerably smaller in num numbers
bers numbers than Ocala it looked almost like
a .meeting of the Ocala camp. How However,
ever, However, a most pleasant evening was
spent. Fort King is blessed with sev several
eral several real good orators and a whole lot
of "near" and "would-be" speakers,
so there wasn't a dull moment from
the time the gavel fell at the opening
ur.til the meeting closed.
Sparr camp No. 425, while not a

j large one, is a hustling one, made and

kept so by the enthusiasm of its effi

cient officers. The officers for this

term are E. W. Luff man, C. C; S. E.
Civil, A. L.; J. A. Stephens, clerk; H.

D. Grantham, banker; E. S. Stephens,

escort; Tom Lovell, watchman.

A movement was started last eve evening
ning evening to form a Marion county asso association
ciation association of Woodmen. The object of

this is to have a "get together" meet

ing once a month, at which it is ex

pected that each camp will have rep representatives
resentatives representatives present.

FELLOWSHIP
Fellowship, Oct. 26. The weather
man is certainly bringing us some
cold weather for this season of the
year. Next thing will be cane grind

ing and then hog killing.
Fall gardens are certainly fine in
this section.
Mr. S. D. Atkinson and family with
Mr. Arthur Gallipeau are spending
this week in St. Augustine. They
made the trip in Mr. Atkinson's car.
Supt. J. H. Brinson visited Fellow Fellowship
ship Fellowship school today and made quite an
interesting talk.
Mr. L. H. Pillans of Ocala was a

caller this afternoon.
. Mrs. W. D. Graham has returned
after spending several days very
pleasantly with relatives and .friends
in Micanopy. Mrs. Graham is spend spending
ing spending awhile with her sister, Mrs. V. B.
Potts.
Messrs. W. B. Rawls, T. M. Phillips

and Z. A. Crumpton Jr. have gone

to Hodges Island for a hsmng trip.
We wjsh them good luck.
Mr. Coyl W. Roe spent the week

end at Island Grove with friends and

relatives.

Mr.'J. M. Hudgens of Asheville, N.
C, spent several hours, in this vicin

ity last Monday.

Mr. Harry McCully and sisters,

Misses Winifred and Geneva, attend

ed church at Oak-Griner Farm last

Sunday and had a pleasant time.

m

aiflei $11 JW of

We will insert the the advertising of Florida firms in the
newspapers of this State or periodicals published anywhere,
at the regular rates of these, and take in payment Liberty
Bonds at 102.
This will enable firmf which have accumulated surplus
funds for purpose of business-building through advertising to
go right ahead with their plans in this connection, and at-the
same time loan the government th e use of the money through
the purchase of Liberty Bonds.
V. ; Conditions in the trade territory of Jacksonville and
throughout the country were rfever so favorable for the ex expansion
pansion expansion of any business engaged in the manufacture or sale of
goods which contribute to the efficiency and happiness of the
people. Advertising is the most economical form of sales effort,"
" when properly done
- Keep up your business activities but at the same time
loan the United States the money necessary for the successful
. prosecution of the war. Unless our country and the allies Win,
there won't' be business for any of us. Buy Liberty Bonds to today
day today to the full extent of your surplus funds. Then come to see
us or communicate with us on the matter of exchanging these
bonds at a premiun for:any State or national advertising you

mayT

He lliom Service

Advertising Headquarters. of the Southeast

card National Bank Blflg., Jacksonville, Fla.

Jefferson Thomas, President and General Manager
Tampa OHicc Sto vail Bldg., Clyde Glenn, Mgr.
. Member Southern Association of Advertising Agencies and Association of
American Advertising Agencies. Accredited by the American Newspaper Pub Publishers
lishers Publishers Association, the Agricultural Publishers Association, the Florida State
Press Association, the National Periodical Association and other publishers' or organizations.
ganizations. organizations. The only advertising agency southeast of Atlanta with the recog recognition
nition recognition and co-operation of these bodies. 4

A NARROW
ESCAPE

By ALAN HINSDALE

"What's your name?" asked Farmer
Doyle of u younj: man about seventeen
years old who had applied to hiin.to be
taken on to the crop gathering force.
"Peter Simple." replied the youth.
"Know anything about farniin?"
No."
"What wages do you expect?"
"Whatever you choose to give."
"Well, considerin' that you loo
strong and are willing to leave the
wages to me I reckon I'll take you oa
I'll feed you and give you $13 a mouth'
So Feter Simple the next day went
to work on the farm. U was the sea
son when io war between the United
States and Germany had been declared
and the raising of cereal food was of
great importance.
"Amanda," said Farmer Doyle to his
daughter that evening when she was
wiping the dishes after supper, "I've
took on a new man today, and I want
to ay to you that you're not to get
mixed up with him."
"La, pa! Do you think I'm goin' to
take up with a farm hand? I want
somepin better'n that."
Nevertheless Amanda scrutinized each
new hand her father employed with an
eye, if he was young, to discover
whether or not he would be worth ap appropriating.
propriating. appropriating. When she inspected Peter
Simple he was in shirt and trousers
tossing hay on to a wagon with a
pitchfork. lie had a fine figure, and
it showed to advantage in the costume
he wore. It seemed to Amanda that
he was worthy of consideration. She
went into the dairy house, got a pitch pitcher
er pitcher of buttermilk and took it out to him
He drank it with thanks and an admir admiring
ing admiring gaze at Amanda. ,
" Feter was secretly Amanda's favor favorite
ite favorite till her father hired Josh t Whit Whit-taker.
taker. Whit-taker. Whittaker was a man of thirty,
red headed and freckled. lie owned
a farm, but that season he'got an idea
into his head that with so many farm farmers
ers farmers in the field prices were bound to go
down. So he leased his farm and U
put in his time in July and August
went to work for Farmer Doyle. As
soon as Amanda learned of Whitta Whitta-ker's
ker's Whitta-ker's farm and that he had $2,500 in invested
vested invested in mortgages she dropped Peter
and took up with Josh.
"When a man, or, rather, a boy, of
seventeen falls in love he goes down
clear over his head and keeps on go going
ing going down till he touches bottom. Pe Peter,
ter, Peter, who was in a worldly heaven
while Amanda was smiling at him.
was ready for suicide when he found
himself supplanted. Amanda's par parents
ents parents saw it all and, though they had
scolded her for encouraging Peter,
urged hereon when she encouraged
Josh. Many a smile passed between
the couple when at supper. X ;
. A week before the end of September
an engagement was announced be between
tween between Amanda Doyle and Joshua
Whittaker. It seemed to Peter that
the bottom had dropped out of his life.
He tried to find Amanda alone that
he might beg her before it was too late
not to blight his life. He had made
up his mind to tell her something that
might induce her to change her mind.
Lucky Peter! Farmer Doyle came
along and saw him waiting for Aman Amanda
da Amanda at the hour she always weut to milk
the cows. Doyle called Peter Into" the
house, paid him his wages to date and
told him to vacate the premises. Peter
surrendered and was never again seen
on the Doyle farm.
Amanda in the autumn was married
to Whittaker and on the wedding trip
stopped over at a New England city.
A football game between the teams of
two colleges was advertised, and, the
bride persuaded the groom to take her
to see it. There was the usual kick kick-bag
bag kick-bag about of the ball by "small boys
and the shouts of the cheer leaders
aad the yells of the crowd, and then
the teams pranced onto the field like
acrobats Into a circus ring.
"Good gracious. Josh!" said Amanda
"Look at here!"
"Where? What?"
"That feller is, Peter Simple as sure
as my name's Mandy."
. "So he is. Dy gum!"
There was Peter sure enough In the
toggery of a football man. Both bride
and groom scanned the score card to
find Peter's name among the players
It jvas not there.
, "Say. mister." said Josh to a young youngster
ster youngster on the ground directly beneath
him, "can you tell me who that young
man Is over there taking off his sweat sweater?"
er?" sweater?"
"That? That's Harkinson.. the rich richest
est richest man in his college. They say he's
worth millions."
There was no more comfort for ei either
ther either Mr. or Mrs. Whittaker on their
bridal trip. Ainanda looked sour
enough to turn lemonade to vinegar,
and Whittaker could not look pleasant
when his wife sulked. When" they
went home and the bride had told who
Peter Simple was Farmer Doyle and
his wife turned as sour as their daugh daughter.
ter. daughter. Jimmie Harkinson in May. becoming
aware of the fact that he would be
flunked at his graduation school ex
aminations. availed himself of the na national
tional national demand for food producers to
go farming, for the board of education
promised payment to all boys who
would do so. Harkinson, not caring to
be known as himself, chose the name
of Peter Simple that he had picked out
of a story book book-Had
Had book-Had Farmer Doyle not discharged
him he would have avowed his wealth
to Amanda and gone to college In the
fall with a millstone about his neck In
the shape of a sweetheart he forgot In
a fortnight.

tltmiTTT"!

1 i: iM..i-. i. i
.1.1' I 1 I .-H'

m a i hi ;
liUtfhliWi! hi:;iii!l!!il!

Lilliiillillaillilllilsiiiallili!!;

I 1

(I 1

r

- -fe&jt for -tfKe ptd;e
AS. -' A C OCA -CO LJ ttP
I ; 'TTLIXG WORK
V .rVk
JJ

FAST THROUGH TOURIST TRAMS

TO THE EAST

TO THE WEST

"Coast Line Florida Mail" "Seminole Umited"
"Palmetto Limited'' "The Southland-
"Havana Limited'' "Dixie Flyer"
- "St. Louis-Jacksonville 'Express"
Steel Sleeping Cars Between Tampa and Washington, Philadelphia
and New York: Jacksonville and Chicago, St Louis, Cincinnati, Louisville
and Indianapolis. Observation Cars, Dining ,Cars.

UkT LA NT fl O OST LBN
STANDARD RAILROAD OF THE SOUTH
For, tickets and reservations call on

W. T. GUY, J. G. KIRKLAND. D. P. A.

T. A, Ocala. Florida.

.Tampa, Fla.

( )

WHITE 'STAR LINE

.rciVERED VANS V
auto. QTTThra A PUT

TKf'l K SERVICE

Dealers In

FEME

W(U)E

Collier Bros, water Phone 296

DOUBLES TIRE MULE AGE

-

AJpracticalrubber tire filler,
as resilient as air with none
of its imperfections Elimi Eliminates
nates Eliminates blowouts, rimcuts and
punctures. Address,
J. J. BEARD
Ocala Floriba

THE WINDSOR' HOTEL'
JACKSONVILLE.FLORIDA

. . '4 C ? . .... - i ... :
v? "till Ci-r

In the heart of the city wth Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room service""is"
second to none.
RATES From $1.50 per day ptr pe-son to 6.
ROBERT M. MEYER, i. E. KA VAN A UGH
Proprietor. fnarer



PAGE FOUR
OCALA EVENING STAR,

OCALA EVENING STAR
PubHbedKver y Day Except Snaday by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OF OCALA, FLA.
. .. .,-
R. It. Carroll, President
P. V. LearenKood, Secretary-Treasurer
J. II. Ilenjantfa, Editor
i
Entered at Ocala, Fla., postofflce as
second-class matter.

TELEPHONES
BaIae Of flee .............. Five-One
Editorial Department ..... Two-Seren
Society Editor ..... ... Two-One-Five
MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively
entitled for the use for republication of
all news dispatches, credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper
and also the local news (published
herein. All rights of republication of
special dispatches herejn are also re reserved.
served. reserved.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Domestic
One year, In advance ............15.00
Six months. In advance 2.50
Three months. In advance ........ 1.25
One month, in advance.... ,.50
Foreign
One year, in advance. .......... ..$8.00
f?ix, months, in advance 4.25
Three months,, in advance 2.25
One month, in advance .80
COMPANY A TRUCK FUND
J. H. Benjamin ....... .......$ 5.00
W. T.- Gary
Mrs. W. S. Bullock ........
A. A. Vantfenbrock
Ed.' Tucker ...............
N G. Sherouse
Handkerchief contributed by
Mrs. W. S. Bullock. ...
: &ext?
10.00
5.0j0
5.00
10.00
2.50
3.Q0
The war is going to do a whole lot
of unexpected things to us before it is
over.
That pound of wheat flour YOU
save every week will weigh very
heavily on the kaiser's mind.
mt ii i
.
' - ;
The railroad men inform us that
the union passenger station will be
ready for occupancy by Nov. 1.
. Qcala kids are bating corn bread
like good little fellows. When some
of us older folks were kids, corn bread
was about all we could get.
Most of the immorality in the vi vicinity
cinity vicinity of our training camps is due
to the efforts of ignorant people to
make healthy, fightirfg men liye like
monks.
You can't do too much for the Red
Cross and Y. M. C. A.' .They are
doing noble work for 'our soldiers,
and our men in France would feel
lost without them. 1
America wilL deserve to lose this
war if, through unwillingness ; to
practice 'economies, it fails to save
the food necessary to keep our allies
in the fight until victory is won.
The Austro-Germahs are making
their best play in trying to drive
back the Italians. If they can retake
any of the ground won at such sacri sacrifice
fice sacrifice byrthe Italians, boththe material
and mral effect will be great.
America is requested to save fats
to make the German ranks thin. That
will do it and you can help. Use a
third of an "ounce less every day.
Every square meal you save for the
bys in the trenches and their folks
back home brings kaiserism that
much nearer starvation. V
, In "Following the Red Cross,"; an
article written by Elizabeth "Frazer,
an American writer in France, the
author says she asked a colonel of
marines what did his men nded most
to. make them comfortable and happy.
And he promptly replied, "Tobacco."
' For the last three years,, passenger
traffic on the railroads, on account
of the increase in autoeS, has .been
diminishing. The war may change
this, as it is within the possibilities
that the government will require so
much gasoline that the use of the
auto wiH become much restricted.
The skyscraper goes up stone by
stone, brick by brick, foot by foot,
day by day, slowly. There is no other
way to build it.- Europe's war food
shortage rnust be made up by 'indiv 'individual
idual 'individual Americans through saving, bit
by bit, ounce by ounce, day by day,
persistently. There is no other way
to do it.
We are not blood-thirsty by nature,
but we honestly believe we could pull
the trigger of a trap bearing a Ger German
man German spy with one hand and eat a
banana with the othe rand never bat
a .lid.- Tallahassee Record.'
When so mild a person as Felkel
xccio vuttt wuut- rdu vuu expect
j ; ... . .
The sect known as holy rollers kas
been so quiet in this part of the coun country
try country thepast few years that most peo people
ple people had forgotten it existed. It is
however called back into public at attention
tention attention by an occurrence In Manatee
county a few days ago. There is a
bunch of th&ee, people at Lockridge, a
settlement, near Manatee, and .they
have, been. holding meetings there re recently.
cently. recently. Thoy announced that deadly
serpents could be handled with im-

punity by the faithful, and tried to
make their words good by experi experimenting
menting experimenting with a six-foot rattlesnake.
The reptile promptly bit one of the
congregation, an 18-year-old girl.
She refused medical attention and
consequently died in a few hours.

Why take Ihe breatf and bacon
away from a good, faithful and effi efficient
cient efficient employee to give it to one who
already has it and can keep it by
holding on to hi3 present job? We
refer to the appointment of a, man, a
perfect stranger, unacquainted with
the route, as carrier of the mail for
"Route A Summerfield." The present
carrier, Mr. Geo. B. Lawton, has had
the route, under the civil service, for
three years, and lately passed a high
re-examination, in fact the highest.
He is liked by all the patrons and at attends
tends attends to business in a most efficient
manner. Mr. Lawton is 'thoroughly
equipped for the work and should not,
under the civil service laws, be re removed,
moved, removed, but re-appointed. What is the
good of a civil service law if a com competent
petent competent I government' employee, who
won his position in competitive, exv
amination, is not assured his position
as long as he does his duty faithful faithfully?
ly? faithfully? Summerfield Chronicle.
The new mail carrier is Mr. A. A.
Vandenbrock of Ocala, a very compe competent
tent competent young man and one doubtless
well able to fill the position. The peo people
ple people of Summerfield, however, very
naturally desire their neighbor to
continue to serve them,' and as he
stood .first in the examination, they
want to know why the civil service
rules have been set aside. The Star
understands they are making a vig vigorous
orous vigorous protest to the officials at Wash Washington.
ington. Washington. BOARD OF TRADE
There was a very good attendance
upon the"""meeting of the board of
trade last nieht. The board of trade
will endeavor, through our members
m Congress, to secure of the govern government
ment government aviators for an exhibition dur during
ing during the Marion County Fair, Nov.
27-30. 9 .
The president was authorized to
name a committee of ten to visit the
Orange Springrs Fair, which will he
held Nov. 21-23. and
dividual exhibitors with a view' of
getting them to brine their exhihits
to the Marion County Fair. The sec
retary was authorized to assist the
fair management in any manner pos pos-siblethat
siblethat pos-siblethat does not interfere with the
work of his office.
Mr. D.-X.. Stiles Jr. expressed the
opinion that if we would make an another
other another effort, he thought it possible
tnat we migtit build a packing plant
in Ocala. He sub-crests a diffprpnt
method of handling the matter than
tnat employed the last time. This
important matter ; was taken up, and
the meeting was unanimously of the
opinion that we should again under undertake
take undertake the building of a packing plant.
Mr. Stiles was appointed chairman of
a committee for this purpose and he
IS to select the mom Viot-c Af ciA
- - w .. WJ. klUlU
committee to work-with him on the
proposition. J V ;
Mr.' R. Simmons, formerly of
Statesboro, Ga., but .now .-' residing
here, was present at the meeting and
spoke at leneth on the imnortanfe
of bfiilding a cotton warehouse in
ucaia He said that he had been of offered
fered offered a Jiinety-year, lease on a site
on the railroad, by the railroad com
pany, and, that it would only cost five
or six thousand dollars to erect the
warehouse. Mr. D. E. Melver snoke
at length regarding the advantages
f-f CIIaIi -... 1. A 1
. ... : -x 1
vi ouui a waicuouse. ciune" one or
two instances of, his friends having
piacea tneir cotton m the warehouse
at Gainesville and beinsr allowed tn
draw cash receipts on the cotton
stored m the warehouse, vhich are
honored bv the banks the same na
checks. It was, brought out in the dis-
!. ' ii . . Z
cussion oi tne matter tliat the farm
ers in the northern nart of Marion
county carry a "great deal of their cot-.
ton to Gainesville because of the ad
vantages afforded-at the warehouse.
A mi
a meeung wm De called m the near
future to orsranize and p-ef. funds tr
gether to build this cotton warehouse
in Ocala It is an l'innnrto?Tt rnnvn
for the town and every one interested
In the improvement of conditions
here is requested to lend sunnnrt.
These things are essential for the
welfare of Ocala and must be attend attended
ed attended to.
The Atlantic Coast Line trains will
be stopping at the union station at
the time of our fairnd last night a
motion was adopted that we request
the A. C. L. to allow its northbound
trains No. 10 and No. 40 to stop at
the old depot during the fair for the
convenience of those wishing to at attend,
tend, attend, the, fair.-:-
The board of trade, is your local
business organization and it is in incumbent
cumbent incumbent upon the s business men of
this town to get behind the new in industries
dustries industries and .support them. It was
brought out in statements last night
that if we erect a cotton warehouse
in Ocala, and build a- narki
here, there won't be a vacant house
and Homes to "s-ive awav" verv innr
So let's change things so they will be"
that way. s
PLUMBING AND ELECTRICAL
CONTRACTING
When you hare plumbing cr elec electrical
trical electrical contraet-ng, let us furnish you
estimates. No job too large and nne
t0 Sa1- tf H- Wi Tucker.
' A full assortment of the famous
I'AKRO Seedtape. Just the thing for
t small fall garden. Ocala Seed
.Store ..." tf ;

HONOR -ROLL

Of the Ocala Graded and High School
For the First Month
Students neither absent nor tardy
during the month:
Fourth Grade, A Pinckney Clem
ent, Martin Roess, Tom Sexton, Ho
mer Wolf, Louise Clement, Fanita
Cobb, Maude Gary, Evelyn Hill, Fran
cis Lummus, Adeline Malever, Dalzell
Pasteur.
Fourth Grade. B Earl Caldwell.
Margaret Chase, Carl Hendricks, Jack
Igou, Pat Jarman, Natalie Mmshall,
St. Clair Oldfield, Chloe Olds, Edgar
Roberts, Martha Rivers, Jennie Rog Rogers,
ers, Rogers, Alice Roller, Sam Savage, Alfred
Sweat, India Smith.
Fifth Grade, A Lewis Blalock,
Louis Knierht, Russell Thomas. Joe
Moses, Lola Louise Adams, Charlotte
Chazal, Alice Cullen, Violet Jones,
Francis Mclver, Mary Flemming
Rawle, Pauline Shafer, Chivajette
Smith.
Fifth Grade, B Louise Adams. An?
nie Laurie Boyd, Theresa Condrev.
Marguerite Counts, Nettie Mathews,
Elizabeth Murray, Margaret Spencer,
Nell Wallace, Alta Watson, Ivia Wat
erman, George Blowers, Albert Bui
lock, William Gober, Leland Rooney,
lladley Shaw, Tom Whiteman.
Sixth Grade, A James Brinson,
Ben Culverhouse, J. W. Davis Wilber
Gary, Elton Henderly, Carl Henderly,
Gerald Smith, John Troxler, James
Demetree, Emily Billings, Majorit
Burnett, Jessie Ray Culverhouse, Ma Mamie
mie Mamie Hogan, Clara Hogan, Mary Caro Caroline
line Caroline Logan, Helen Leitner, Dorothy
Needham, Sara Rentz.' ;
. Sixth Grade, B Frank Adams,
Fred Boyd, Charles Brown, Henry
Camp, Harold Cullison, Albert Framp Framp-ton,
ton, Framp-ton, John Hardee, Melville Little:
Chester Robertson, Herchel Roberts,
Kenneth Stroman, Edgar Weber, Wil William
liam William Wilkes, Ray Barchan, Grace Fau Fau-sett,
sett, Fau-sett, Marion Hunter, Juanita Jones,
Mary Jones, Jonnie Olds, Carolyn
Pey-er, Mabel Priest,- Louie Smoak,
Aurie Williams. V
Seventh v Grade, A Claud Barnett,
Otto Beard, Wallace Canova, J. W.
Crosby, William Hall, Lynn Hollin Hollin-rake,
rake, Hollin-rake, Reese Hunnicutt, Francis Pas Pasteur,
teur, Pasteur, Lindsay Troxler, Susie Mae
Counts, Mildreds Crosby, Janett Cul Culverhouse,
verhouse, Culverhouse, Clara Curry, Jess Dehon,
Cornelia Dozier, Wildon Gilmore, Ma Ma-ble
ble Ma-ble Goldman, Edna Goolsby, Genevive
Haile,Emma Miller Haile, .Mea Do Dozier
zier Dozier Haile, Alleyne .Rogers, Clifton
Sexton.
Seventh Grade, B Fletcher Baker,
Earnest Beaton, Hugh Chace, Robert
Igou, James Knight, Marion Lummus,
Francis Polly, Leon Purvis, Joel
Thomas, Mildred Bullock, Sidney, CulT
len, Margaret Hocker, Mary Jackson;
Marion Meffert, Nellie Olds, Dorothy
Spencer, Mary Woods, Brent Woods.
Eighth Grade, A Irene Carn, Edith
Edwards, Maude Lillian Little, Alipa
Priest, Olive Whaley, Elizabeth Weth Weth-erbee,
erbee, Weth-erbee, George Aikin, Robert Blowers,
Arthur Douglas, Earl Bryce, Archie
Fant, Junie Counts, Joe Smedley,
Lawson Cassels, Moultrie Thomas,
John Cook, Walter Troxler. ';
Eighth Grade, B Edna Bryce,
Maudie Blalock, Juanita Lyles, Maud Maud-ie
ie Maud-ie Marshall, Lyndall Matthews, Marie
Robertson, Inez Vaughan, Nannie
Lou Watsort, John Bouvier, Cliff ort
Fausett, Wilford Harold, HarrV Hol-
combe, Ralph Lopez, Guy Lowe, t

How Uric Acid Causes Gout, Rheumatism, Lumbago

It was not until the
uric acid in an excessively
Write him your symptoms

FLORIDA
Frank Rentz, Harold Smith, Jack Wil Williams.
liams. Williams. 1
Ninth Grade Ulane Barnett, Eliz Elizabeth
abeth Elizabeth Bennett, Lily Clayton, Alma
Hall, Elizabeth Hocker, Ethel Home,
Willie May Lang, Mable' Lytle Mar Mar-jorie
jorie Mar-jorie Miller, Hazel McAteer, Marjo-
ne Rogers, Annie Rooney, Rhoda
Thomas, Rachel --Veal, Rose Wolf,
Rarph Cleveland, Duncan Elliott, Van
Ferguson, Robert Hall, Reginald Mac Mac-Kay,
Kay, Mac-Kay, Sam Phillips, Ray Priest, Jack
Robertson, Ralph Simmons, Lambert
Steinhous, Thelbert Troxler, Francis
Talbott.
Tenth Grade Virginia Beckham,
Jewell Bridges, Mary Bryce, Lenore
Calby, Miriam Connor, Dovie Gates,
Callie Gissendaner," Lucile Gissendan Gissendan-er,
er, Gissendan-er, Winnie Gordon, Annie Hadsock,
Irene Henderly, Kathleen Leitner,
Henrietta Livinfirston. Estelle McA
teer, Cevie Roberts, Yoome Seckinger
Grace Smith, Ellen Strinline. Irene
Tompkins, Eva Theus, Helen Veal,
Homer Agnew, Lamar Barnett, Mar Mar-shall
shall Mar-shall Carn, Ralph Cullen. Willie Mef
fert, Robert Smith, Frederick Winer.
Eleventh Grade Mollie BlalockC
Meme Davis, Ruth Simmons, Mamie
Smedley, Allyn Hollinrake, Ernest
Nott, .Clyde Seckinger, Tom Wallis,
Lebnard Wesson.
Twelfth Grade Beatrice Bonev.
Theo Beckham. Mvrtle Brinson. Pearl
Fausettv Annie Benton Fuller, idne
Perry, Dixonia Roberts. Louise SDen.
cer, Rozelle Watson, Annie Belle
Wesson, Leonard Todd. Reuben Bla
lock, Harold Klock, Harold Talbott.
Students making not less than 90
per cent in any subject: '.
Fourth Grade, A Pinckney Clem
ent, Louise Clement, Maude Gary,
94 3-5; Francis Green.
Fourth Grade. B Tom Bond. Ed
ward Dorsey, 92; Margaret Chace;
92; Natalie Minshall, 92; Martha.
Rivers, India Smith.
Fifth Grade. A Lewis Blalock.
Louis Knight, Fred LeSeur, Charlotte
Chazal, Alice Cullen, Violet Jones,
Frances Mclver, 93 3-5; Mary
Fleming Rawle, Pauline Shafer.
Fifth Grade. B Nettie Mathews.
93 3-5 ; Theresa Condrey, Marguer Marguerite
ite Marguerite Counts,' Annie Louise Boyd, Eliza
beth Murray, Nell Wallis. Ivia Wat-
ermon, George J31owers, Tom ,White-
man.
Sixth Grade, A Mary C. Loeran.
Mamie E. Hogan, 93 3-5
Sixth Grade, B Edsrar Weber.
Seventh Grade. A Mildred CrnsW I
' r" j
Cornelia Dozier, Emmie Miller Haile,1
sLJ J La
(By L. H.

discovery by Sir Arthur Gerod, in 1848, that the blood of gouty patients contained
large amount, that much attention was paid to this subject. Later scientific men

and send a sample of. urine for test.

CAPITAL

We solicit new business with a view
of making it mutually profitable.

We Have the Equipment and Ability
To serve you as you ought to b servied, and when you are not let us
ask you again, to let us know, for this is the only way we can accomplish
vur desire.
"
Of course, sometimes, little things go wrong, but they ars not inten intentional,
tional, intentional, and, if you will call us up, they will be corrected IMMEDIATELY.
: Ocela lee Packtiiq Co.'
PHOSF OCALA. FLA

iUMMER-TOURIST FAKE:

From Jacksonville to

New York and return. ..$38.00
Baltimore and return ... $33.90
Philadelphia and return. $36.00
Washington and return. .$34.00

Through tickets to all Eastern resorts, with 'return limit October
31, 1917, with privilege of stopovers at principal points. Sailings
from Jacksonville via Savannah to Baltimore Wednesday, direct Sun Sunday.
day. Sunday. To Pviladelphia direct Thursday.
Wireless telegraph' on all ships. Accommodations unsurpassed. Res Reservations,
ervations, Reservations, fare or any information cheerfully furnished on application.

MERCHANTS 8 Will

Jacksonville. Flonda

II. C. Avery, Agent.
Mea Dozier Haile, 941-5.
Seventh Grade, B James Knight,
Mildred Bullock, Dorothy Crawford,
Margaret Hocker) Marion Meffert,
97 1-6. '
Eighth Grade, A Irene Caxn, 962
per cent.; Edith Edwards, Olive Wha Whaley,
ley, Whaley, v Elizabeth Wetherbee, Lawson
Cassels, Walter Troxler, Alfred
Meadows.
Eighth Grade, B John Bouvier,
97& ; Harry Holcomb, Jack Will Williams.
iams. Williams. Ninth
91 3-5.
Grade Willie Mae Lang,
Tenth
94 4-5.
Twelfth
93 1-5.
Grade Miriam
Grade Agnes
Connor,
Burfo'rd,
Star ads. are business builders.
SMITH, M. D.)

iwiucu mai in guut, aiso nicumausm, me Kianeys ao
not work .properly to throw off the uric acid poison ;
consequently uric acid crystals are deposited in and
about the joints, in the muscles, where anv inflam

mation is set up in the nearby tissues.

Hague has said, that gout, is rheumatism, and
rheumatism is gout." If uric acid is formed in excess
witriin the body it is passed on to the kidneys, which

act as a filter to pass off this poison. If the excess is
not excreted' by the kidneys, it is distributed thru the
tissues. The choice sites for such storage are in rhf

joints, muscle -sheaths, where the circulation is weak weakest,
est, weakest, and where also the alkalinity of the blood is lowest..
Consequently we must do everylhitig to throw ofJtmT'
uric acid poison, and simple methoasare bestFlush
the kidneys by drinking- six to eight glasses of water
between meals. During winter months the circulation
is apt to be sluggish and the blood stream retarded.
Eat less meat, drink more -water, and take Anuric
(double or triple strength), after each meal and'af"
bed time for several weeks at a time and you will be
free from uric acid and the diseases that follow.
The urine is often cloudy, full of sediment;
channels often get sore and sleep is disturbed two
or three times a night. This is the time you should
consult some physican of wide experience such as
Doctor Pierce of the Invalids' Hotel and Surgical
Institute, in Buffalo, New York. Send' him ten
cents for samole of his new discoverv; Anttrtp

and SURPLUS

Savannah and return... $ 7.00
Boston and return. .... .$46.00
Atlantic City and return $38.25
Niagra Falls and return. $48.90
TRANSPORTATION COMPANY

J. F. WARD, T. f. A.. L, D. JONES, C. A.

SKILLED MAXWELL MECHANIC
I am located at the Maxwell Ser
vice Station, on the corner of Osceola
and Fort King avenue (Yonge block),
where I will be prepared, to do all
kinds of. automobile, repair-work and
regulating. I have had a gooM many
years experience with all kinds of
motors, electric appliances, magneto,
generator and carburetor traubles a
specialty. Any kind of motor work
done at reasonable prices. Maxwell
work a specialty. Satisfaction is as-
sured all vho come to me.
Respectfully,
29-tf L. W. Sterrett.

To make room for ever l,O00fel,
books, we offer some book bargains at

ouua. onuf. 3t



OCA LA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1917

PAGE FIVE

,V'

.

WHEN YOU HAVE PAID YOUR

RENT YOU HAVE
KISSED IT GOODBYE
Why not pay a small amount each
month and see it go into
YOUR OWN HOME
I have a number of houses you can
buy that way at
SI O A MONTH
calLand see my list of houses from
11000.00 up. 4
L M. MURRAY
Room 5 Holder Blk. Ocala, Fla.
SICK MAN AND WOMAN,
WHY ARE YOU SICK?
NATURE intended everyone to
enjoy good HEALTH. The
CAUSE of it is there is some something
thing something WRONG (or Subluxated)
with your SPINE (backbone).
Let me remove the CAUSE by
ADJUSTING the SUBLUXA SUBLUXATIONS,
TIONS, SUBLUXATIONS, and NATURE will re restore
store restore you to HEALTH.
CONSULTATIONS FREE
E. L ECCER, D. C. Chiropractor
HOLDER BLK., ROOMS 4 and 5
is all Paint. It costs no more per gal gallon
lon gallon than the Ready-Mixed kind, and
you get two gallons for one.
Ask the dealer or get our color
card for explanation. 6
. For Sale By
THE MARION HARDWARE CO,
Ocala, Fla.
Come in and inspect my pat patent
ent patent stove pipe fastener and
adjustable stove pipe, and
stove pipe shelf. You need it,
can't get along without it.
... V. MRASEK, i
210 Osceola SV Ocala, Fla.
J. H. BR IN SO W
DEALER IN i
REAL ESTATE
Ocala Florida
"A SPLENDID TONIC"
Syt Hixson LaJy Who, On Doc Doctor's
tor's Doctor's Advice, Took Cardai
And Is Now Well.
Hixson, Tenn. -"About 10 years ago
I was..." Bava Mrs. J. 'li. Gadd. of

w "
: I 1 T-IP Lh

3--wtllls-PIace- "I suffered with a pain In

my left side, could not sleep at nignt
with thl3 pain, always in the left
side... : 1
My doctor told me to use Cardui. I
took one bottle, which helped me and
after my -baby came, I was stronger
and better, but the pain was still
there.
I at first let It go, but began to get
weak and In a run-down condition,
' bo I decided to try some more Cardui,
which I did.
This last Cardui which. I took made
me much, better, in fact, cured me. It
has "been a number of. sears, still I
have no return of this trouble.
J, I feel It was Cardui tat cured me,
and I recommftnrl It as a splendid fe female
male female tonic"
- Don't allow yourself to become
weak and run-down from womanly
"troubles Take Cardui. It should sure surely
ly surely help you, as It has so many thou thousands
sands thousands of other women in the past, 40
years. Headache, backache, sideache,
nervousness, sleeplessness, tired-out
feeling, are all signs of womanly trou trouble.
ble. trouble. Other women get relief by taking
Cardui. Why not you? All druggists.
NC-132
" PHONE 1 17
Or A. R. Blott
Veterinarian
TOMPKINS STABLE
Florida
GOOD INSURANCE

By having Blalock Brothers VUL VULCANIZE
CANIZE VULCANIZE your initials on your tire
when it needs repairing, free of
charge, yo uare insured against theft
and loss. 23-6t
We are agents for Kodaks and the
Eastman N. C. films. Gerig's. .29-tf
Militalic Minors, guaranteed non non-rust,
rust, non-rust, at THE BOOK SHOP. 3t
Advertise in the Star.

iifi mm

If You Have Any News for this De Department,
partment, Department, Call Two-One-Five
or Two-Seven
Italy
Land loved by gods and men as none
before'
Of Art and Song long since the scep-
tered Queen,
Gracious of gift and exquisite of
mien mien-Besprent
Besprent mien-Besprent with memories from her
- golden store,
And steeped in sunshine to her deep
- "heart's core,
She lies resplendent in the two-fold
, sheen ?
An opal set two sapphire seas be between
tween between A. miracle of beauty and of lore.
But lo! concealed beneath her haunt haunting
ing haunting grace, .-
Such power of purpose bides such
royal will
Such splendor of endurance, and of
skill.
To outwit Eatand spurn Death face
to face M -'
That praise lags palsied on the
astonished tongue,
And harps that yearn to laud her, lie
unstrung.
Grace Denio Litchfield.
Informal Dance at the Ocala House
A merry crowd of young folks
gathered at the Ocala House last eve
ning and enjoyed an informal dance.
The- music was furnished by a dar darkey.
key. darkey. Mrs. C. W. Hunter and Mrs.
A. Burford chaperoned the party.
Among those, dancing were Misses
Louise Spencer, Sarah DeHon, Helen
Jones, Blanche Whaley, Winnie Flip Flip-pen,
pen, Flip-pen, Ellen Stripling, Callie Gissen Gissen-daner,
daner, Gissen-daner, Agnes Burford and Marion
Dewey, Messrs. Tom Wallis, Frank
Churchill, Holmes Walters, Carlton
Ervin, John Batts, George Looney,
George Chamberlain of .Jacksonville,
Reuben Blalock, Sybald Wilson, Mar Marshall
shall Marshall Bouvier, William -Hall, Freddy
Winer, Dudley Spain of Georgia,
William Avery and Mr- and Mrs. J.
J. Blalock.
Mr. Dudley Spain of Talbotton, GaM
arrived in Ocala yesterday to spend
Sunday with friends. 4
- Mrs. George Mathews has returned
home,froma brief visit to her sister,
Miss Elizabeth Carroll in Dunnellon.
Ttie members of the Baptist sewing
circle will be entertained Monday af afternoon
ternoon afternoon by Mrs. Charles in .Linwood
Park. v
;
''-:...
Mr. and Mr3. J. D. MacDonald went
brief stay, combining business and
pleasure.
' -. : ,v:.
Mrs. N. Hickman, who was expect expected
ed expected this afternoon from Philadelphia,
will not arrive in Ocala until Sunday
afternoon.
.. :;" f
The ladies of the Christian church
will have their regular meeting Mon Monday
day Monday at 3 p. m. at the home of Mrs.
J. E. Chace.
.... : ... ... 7 ,-;-
F. A. Alderman left Monday morn morning
ing morning f or'Ocala to accept a position with
a dry goods store at that place.
Bartow Record.
...
Dr. and Mrs. H..C. Dozier returned
home last evening from a three weeks
business and pleasure trip to Roches Rochester,'
ter,' Rochester,' Minn., and Chicag6.
,
Mrs. A. E. Burnett returned home
Friday afternoon from an extended
visit to her daughter, Mrs. Clenden-
ning in Springfield, Mass.
Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Sanders and
family, of Hampton have moved to
Ucala. Mr. banders will be connected
with the Seaboard freight office.
Mrs. Sonhie Germain of Pnnfj
Gorda, who has ; been visiting Miss
Irma Bncrance at the Wisteria for thp
past week, left yesterday for a week's
visit to friends in Tampa.
, ..
Mr. stnd Mrs. J. E. McLeon and
family have gone to Hampton, where
they will reside in the future. Mr.
McLeon has accepted the position of
operator at the union depot there.
-
Mrv and Mrs. H. S. Chambers and
little son and Mrs. Chambers' mother
have moved frorn Mrs. McDowell's
house on Broadway back to one of
their own cottages on the Anthony
road. m
Mrs. Wnlfpr T, TVTnnro loff -.ow
! for her home in Jacksonville, after
several days' visit with he r sister,
Mrs. Fred E. Weihe. Mrs. Moore
visited her sister, Mrs. Quincy Mas
ters at Okahumpa Jast week.
Mrs. D. S. Woodrow is expected
shortly from Ocala, to loin Mr. Wood
row. They have many friends who
will be delighted to know that thev
will spend sevef al months here.
, Times-Union.
Ocala friends of Mrs. B. F. Duke
' of Dunnellon, who has frequently
visited her father,. Capt. J. A. Tucker
, here, will regret to hear of her ser ser-iious
iious ser-iious illness. Mrs. Edward Hanne-
xacker of Tampa, Capt. Tucker and
Miss Winifred Tucker have gone to
Dunnellon to be with Mrs. Duke.
x
Mrs. William Rogers, the daugh daughter
ter daughter of General Duncan of Tavares,
and Mrs. E. Ms. Tally arrived in Ocala
today tobe the guests of Mr. and

Mrs. J. V. Tarver and family until

Sunday afternoon. They will return!":

home Sunday with Mr. Rogers andj-.
Mr. Tally, who with motor here Sun-'ho

day morning.
Delightful Hallowe'en Party
' The Hallowe'en party given last
night by. Mrs. D. W. Tompkins for
her Suhday school class was a most
delightful affrir. The forty-five guests
were all dressed as ghosts and found
the Tompkins home alive with cats,
witches, goblins and jack o' lanterns."
As the guests arrived they were serv served
ed served punch, and after several merry
hours spent in telling fortunes and
other Hallowe'en games, were served
fruit salad in little pumpkins, salted
nuts in yellow baskets, cake, cheese
and crackers.
The following enjoyed this cleverly
arranged'' and carried out party:
Misses Hazel McAteer, Lorene Spen Spencer,
cer, Spencer, Jewel. Bridges, Maud Little,
Rhoda Thomas, Ruth Simmons, Maud
Blalock, Louise Simmons, Elizabeth
Bennett, Lucile Gissendaner, Ullaine
Barnett, Alma Hall, Mary Brooks,
Annie Rooney, Irene Henderly, Mary
Li.ne, Ruth Warner, Edna Brice,
Eleanor Price, Ollie Whaley, Mae
Lang, Elizabeth Hocker Florence and
Kathleen Leitner, Irene Tompkins
and Miss Webb, Messrs. Frank Rentz,
Guy Lane, Leonard Wesson, Moultrie
Thomas, Allyn Hollinrake, Wellie
Meffert, James Cotton, Lamar Bar Barnett,
nett, Barnett, Walter Troxler, Robert Hall,
Marshall Cam and others. y
' Our Ocala Friends
Dr. F. E. McClane, who is now at
Fort Oglethorpe, Ga., writes that he
is delighted with his duties there, and
has had several worth while honors
given him. Among others he is now
assistant medical inspector of the
new comers.
- Corporal, Willie Hood, who is with
the C. A boys at Camp Wheeler, is
now in the regimental postoffice,
E. A. Mobley is still kept busy
trench digging. -v
'Sergeant W. A. Altman has been
delegated to th brigade grenade
school. This course of training lasts
sixteen weeks.
"Johnny" Robinson, who is Co. A's
official cook, says he wouldn't swap
places just now with any -one, for it
is freezing cold up there.
Literature in the Trenches
Do you think the boy's in the
trenches read poetry and Shakspere?
Well, Lieut. Coningsby Dawsoni who
wrote the new war story "Carry On,"
says they prefer "The Lives of the
Notorious Pirates." He says its the
same with the trench songs, that no
one ever sings a patriotic song; they
prefer a song that burlesques their
own heroism. One of their favorites
is "The Complaint of the Conscien
tious Objector," which Dawson ; won wonders
ders wonders why has not' reached our ears
before.. V Picture them, a company of
mud-stained men in steel helmets
plodding their way under intermittent
shelling through a 't battered trench,
whistling and humming the following
splendid sentiment:
'Send us the army and the naw. Send
us the rank and file.
Send us the grand old territorials,
they'll face the danger with a
smile. V
Where are the boys of ttfe old bri
gade, who made old Lngland
freer
You may send my mother, my sister
and my brother.
But for Gawd's sake don't send me."
And always this last line is shout
ed. " -,
It's all a mad burlesque of the
splendid things that are being done
a parody of the fineness which our
men are living.
This is a take-off on the song "A
Little Bit of Heaven":
"A little piece of shrapnel fell from
out the sky one day,
It fell upon a soldier in a field not far
away,
And when they went to findhim he
was bust beyond repair,
So they pulled his legs and arms off
and they left him lying there.
Then they buried him in Flanders
just to make the new crops
grow;
He'll make the best manure they say
and. sure they ought to know.
And they put a little cross up, which
bore his name so grand
On the day he made his farewell for
a better promised land!"
"Literature! There's heaps of it at
the front and no one to write it down.
Men say and do more exquisitely
poignant and noble things every day
than have ever been penned.
,..
Mrs. Clara Moore Pyles was re recently
cently recently the very efficient stenographer
in the law office of Mr. H. C. Duncan,
of Tavares, this county, and while in
that city only -a short while, she
made hosts of admiring friends.
Beautiful in mind, soul and body, she
is an accession'to any circle, and this
fact the capital city will quickly
learn. We also do not know of a
more accomplished and wonderful
woman in her sphere than Miss Agnes
Ellen Harris, who is doing marvels
for the domestic economic demonstra demonstration
tion demonstration work in Florida. Eustis Lake
Region.
'
Mr. H. L. Holmes has returned
f romva few davs' visit with his wife
and family at Ocala. Mrs. Holmes is
still confined to her bed. Thi3 visit
THEGOOD FAIRY
Tea Rooms
SERVICE A LA CARTE
8 A. M. to 7:30 P. M.
. N. MainSt., Opposite Postoffice

.

'a:
--
$.
Z-
..
v.
Jt..
Cis.

BECOMING DRESSES
.
rrHE charm of our showing of this season's newest dresses lies
in their simple youth-giving styles. Every type of woman
can wear them to advantage, and from our assortment one may
choose with pleasure and yet pay a modest price,

-r
Cry
5-K:
Ctt.
...
."
:)

MODISH MILLINERY
THOSE elusive distinctive touches that give our millinery so
much of the charm women and misses want in hats are very
attractively incorporated in this new assortment. They are
hats that will win admirers at first glance, and yet they are
priced at only moderate sums, v

OCALA
."T-. -X'- -X--X- 'X- ':SZ:'2S
wasfespecially gladdened by the cele celebration
bration celebration of little Beatrice Holmes
seventh birthday, and the private
christening of little Mary Isabel, Rev.
: G. A. Ottmann of Grace
Episcopal
church, officiating at the service.
...
V Essays on Food Conservation
.The essay! on food conservation,
written by the school children, were
handed in yesterday and were given
to the judges, Mrs. W. T. Gary, Mrs.
R. L. .Anderson and Mrs. Jack Camp
today. The judges expect to be able
to give the names of the winners of
the Temple theater passes Tuesday.
Mr. and Mr. W. A. Wilds returned
home cn the limited last evening at 6
o'clock from. Richmond and Washing
ton, where they spent their honey honeymoon.
moon. honeymoon. In Washington they went out
to see Corporal Green, who returned
their call the next evening to hear all
the Ocala news. Mr. and Mrs. Wilds
moved today into the cottage next to
Mr. Jake Brown's residence, where
they will go to housekeeping.
It is reported .here that Mr. W. P.
Osteen and Miss Ruth Pittman, both
of this city, were married in Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville the other day.- Both these
clever young folks have many friends
in Ocala, and if the report is tru
they will join the Star in congratu congratulations.
lations. congratulations. a m
Gladys Hulette -stars in the "Candy
Girl" at the- Temple today. This is a
cleanf wholesome play that all the
family can see and enjoy. Gladys
Hulette seems .to eet better with
every picture and "The Candy Girl"
is probably the best yet.
. Mrs.G. W. Neville and daughter,
Miss Irene Neville of Dunnellon and
thefr guests, Mrs. Litcher and two
daughters of Indiana, came upv this
morning to spend the day with Mrs.
Walter Freer and family.
Mr. Leon Brigance came from Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville last night to remain until
Sunday night with his bother and sis
ters at the Wisteria. t
FOR FIRST-CLASS
AUTO
SERVICE
i Day or Night
Ctll John Needham, phone 523.
6t
Beautiful bed room suits just re received
ceived received in walnut, mahogany, gum,
Circassian walnut, quartered oak and
white ivory. Marion Furnitur j Com Company.
pany. Company. -25-3t
.
Books, Books, Books, some bar bargains
gains bargains at THE BOOK SHOP. 3t

D

. r w

COATS FOR
LADIES and MISSES
QOATS are very necessary this season to
the wardrobe of Milady as well as to her
stylish appearance. New and late models
recently received add interest to our at attractive
tractive attractive models already in stock. They are
certain tobe prized by their wearers for their
innate qualities and smart styles they are
modestly priced too,

$9.95 tt

o 7

95 S, $
.jt&u1i
OCftLA.

The

capital Stock $50,000.00.
'Stall. Cojmty and City Depository..

STORAGE BATTERY SERVICE
ANY STORAGE BATTERY RE-CHARGED OR
REPAIRED
-
Special attentionto Prest-o-Lite Batteries in Maxwell Cars. Bring
me your Battery Work. Charge? Reasonable and Service First Class.
YONGE'S BATTERY SERVICE
MAXWELL STATION OCALA, FLORIDA

ST. LEO COLI-JEC3E
SAINT LEO, PASCO COUNTY, FLORIDA
-IDEAL BOARDING SCHOOL FOR YOOKG GENTLEMEN
Courses in Classics, Science and Commerce. Also
Primary Department. Send for Catalogue
Rev. F. Benedict, Director.
OPENS FOR THE FALL TERM, WEDNESDAY, SEIT.12, 19i7.

lis now a universally acknowledged necessity. No business man is
prepared to meet the daily affairs of his business if he is not pro protected
tected protected with ?

H
I

FIRE INSURANCE

Wf represent not only'the b ft fire insurance companies, but
aiso tr.e highest clas3 INDEMNITY AND BONDING concerns in

i thp -vorld. Talk is over with us.
D. W. DAVIS, ttiS?&L. OCALA, FLA.
to-txLMi:: :: i ::: i i r :: f :::::: ::: : t:: :::: :t r :; r :::: t

"w-

"IfcT
-...
A
L
,
T-
Z-
.
HO
: t
...
FLORIDA
ercia.
FLORIDA
psoas



M

PAGE SIX
OCALA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27. 1917

FAMOUS TUNNELS

The Simplon Is the Greatest and
Costliest of Them AH.

LONGEST HOLE EVER BORED.

Thlt Road Through the Alps Is More

Than Twelve Miles In Length and Its

. J a mm m r m. m m m

von cxceeaed rnteen Minions uur

Own Hoosac Tunnel.

OCALA'S COLORED

CITIZENS ARE PROUD

The costliest as well as the biggest
railroad tunnel In the world la the long
hole burrowed below the Alps between
Urigue, Switzerland, and Iselle, Italy.
This tremendous tunnel, the Slmplon,
is 12 miles 537 yards in length and cost
more than $15,000,000. Several mil millions
lions millions more will be spent in completing
the second chamber. Work was begun
on It in 1808, and traffic began to move
through In 100G.
The Slmplon Is about three miles
longer than the St. Gothard and the
Iidetschberg tunnels and more than
four miles longer than the Mont Cenis,
the three next longest df the world's
railway tunnels.
The Mont Cenis was the first of these
lAg bores. It was completed in 1871
and at once diverted passenger and
freight transportation away from Swit Swit-serland,
serland, Swit-serland, as It furnished a direct route
to Italy from southeastern France.
fhe Swiss determined to win back
their lost traffic, and4n 1871 work was
started on he St. Gothard, which was
not finished until eleven years later.
The St. Gothard is about nine and one one-third
third one-third miles In length and cost $11,500. $11,500.-000.
000. $11,500.-000. In its toll of lives It was the costliest
f all. Faulty ventilation, the terrific
heat and the lack of care in keeping
down the dust caused the deaths of 800
laborers. This -tunnel is wholly in
Swiss territory, and eight years ago It
was bought from the owners by the
government
The Slmplon, located about half way
between the Mont Cenis and the St. St.-Gothard,
Gothard, St.-Gothard, Is a double tunnel, although
only one chamber has been wholly ex ex-cavated.
cavated. ex-cavated. The other will be enlarged
and put Into service when the first be becomes
comes becomes overtaxed. Better arrangements
for ventilation kept the death roll
down to sixty, twenty-five cubic feet
of fresh air being supplied to the labor laborers
ers laborers for every one blown Into the St.
Gothard.

TThe difficulties conquered were tre- i

mentions. The Slmplon Is, not only the
longest, but the lowest of the Alpine
funnels, and the rock temperature
sometimes reached 133 degrees. m
' When the workmen from the 'Swiss
lde reached the center of the great
bore they were halted by an enormous
pring(of hot water. Then the Italians
were stopped, and for some time it
looked as though the whole work might
have to be abandoned. 'But the engi engineers
neers engineers refused to be daunted, although
six months were required to dig out
the last 300 yards of the tunnel.
So slight were the errors made in
the digging that the headings from ei either
ther either side met with deviations of but
eight Inches internally and three and
ne-half inches vertically. -The total
length of the tunnel was thirty-six
Inches less than had been calculated.
. Trains are pulled through the tunnel
In eighteen minutes, at the. rate of

forty-two mlles an hour, by powerful
electric locomotives.
The Loetschberg is the latest of the
big Swiss tunnelsv This ls about the
same length as the St. Gothard and
Is also wholly In Swiss territory, being
located to the north of the Slmplon.
It Is a part of the Bemese Alps rail railway,
way, railway, which has thirty-four tunnels In
its forty-eight miles between Thun and
Brlgue.
The Slmplon will apparently remain
. the biggest of railway tunnels until a
submarine one Is driven under the Eng English
lish English channel or perhaps under Bering
sea. At present the longest projected
mountain tunnel In Europe is a French
undertaking, which is planned to pass
directly under Mont Blanc, the high highest
est highest mountain In Europe, and to form
another highway between France and
Italy. But this tunnel will be only a
little over eleven miles long, so that
It will be merely second In rank If it
Is carried out. v
The Hoosac tunnel, In western Mas Massachusetts,
sachusetts, Massachusetts, was the first really big tun tunnel
nel tunnel In the United States. Begun In
1855, it was not finished until 1876.
Air drills and nitroglycerin were used
In this work for the first time on a
big scale in any American engineering
work. The Hoosac tunnel is four and
three-quarters miles in length. Boston
"Post
, . -.
Geologist's Thermometer.
Quartz is the geologist's thermome thermometer,
ter, thermometer, for it Is formed between narrow
ranges of temperature. If the mate materials
rials materials from which nature makes It are
subjected to more than so much heat
they take oh an entirely different char character
acter character fromquartz. The same is true
If they are subjected to less than a cer certain
tain certain amount of heat

-VOTICE

Whatever may have been lacking
in the patriotism and enthusiasm of
the colored citizens here, has been
more than supplied recently in the
appointment of Levi Alexander Jr. as
first lieutenant in the regular U. S.
army. Lieut. Alexander arrived in
the' city Thursday of last week from
the training camp at DesMoines, la.
For more than a week this finely
uniformed young negro army officer
has been home on a visit to his rela relatives
tives relatives and friends, and his presence
on the streets and around town
among his fellow townsmen has
proven an inspiring sight to members
of hi3 race. Colored citizens have all
been made to feel proud of them themselves
selves themselves and of one of their own num number
ber number who has achieved euch distinction.
The recognition shown by the U. S.
army to the merit and character of
One of our own race and of our own
community has inspired us with hope
and our patriotism and love for the
old flag have been increased.
The cordial manner in which this
young negro officer has been greeted
by our white citizens here is but an another
other another evidence of the fact that the
relations between the races in Ocala
are friendly, and shows that our
white citizens are ever ready to lend
us a helping hand when we prove
ourselves worthy. They have shaken
his hand and congratulated and com commended
mended commended him upon his splendid
achievements.
Beginning with a joyful home homecoming
coming homecoming at the beautiful West Broad Broadway
way Broadway residence of his parents on the
evening of his arrival, the social cir circles
cles circles among the colored 'citizens have
been at full blast until now, and a
number of special dinners, banquets
and receptions of various kinds have
been given in hi3 honor. Perhaps the
most elaborate of these was the
smoker tendered h'm Wednesday eve evening
ning evening in Odd Fellows hall on Broad Broadway
way Broadway by his brother knights of Mar Marion
ion Marion lodge No. 38," K. of P. This bril brilliant
liant brilliant affair-was presided over by
Jas. L. LaRoche, who acted as toast toast-master.
master. toast-master. The following toasts were
made:
Lieut. Alexander as a child, by J.
WV Alexander, his uncle.
- Lieut. Alexander as a school boy,
by F. P. Gadson.
Lieut Alexander as a college stud student,
ent, student, by Dr. R. R. Williams.

Lieut. Alexander as a mechanic,
by Chas. H. Davis.
Lieut. Alexander asvSir Knight, by
R. Mitchell. :
Lieut Alexander as a candidate in
the training samp, by Lieut O. M.
Simmons.
Our Lieut. Alexander, by Rev. A.
L. James.

Presentation of Lieut. Alexander,
by Rev. S. M. Gibbs.
Response by Lieut. Alexander.
The young lieutenant responded
briefly but beautifully, assuring every
one present of his sincerest thanks
and appreciation "for the honor which
they had given him, and modestly
said among other things that thus
far he. had only achieved a right to
try, and expressed his desire to serve
at the front fn the great world strug strug-gle
gle strug-gle for democracy and said that he

was ready to give his life for his

country. He closed with a promise to
all thatT as he went forth to battle he

would keep in mind the fact that
there were ten millions of colored
citizens behind him demanding that

he do his bit toward keeping, the old

flag from ever touching the ground.
A. L. James.

None Worth While.
"There is one thing I am rather
worried about In this suburban club
business.".
"What is that, my dear T
"Do you know if they serve cakes
with these golf tees? Baltimore
American.
An Improvement.
"He left his home all for her."
"Why sor

"Well, you see, hers was the betW

home." Penn State Froth.

. .- : r

To double your .troubles and -lessen
your friends talk about tbem. Youti'

In the Circuit Court of the Fifth Ju Judicial
dicial Judicial Circuit of Florida, in and
for JIaarion County, in Chancery.
T. T. Munroe et al. Complainants, vs.
Cynthia -M. Burnett, et al. Defend Defendants.
ants. Defendants. The complainants having filed a
sworn bill in this ca-use, alleging tha
they believe that there are persona In Interested
terested Interested In the property involved
therein, whose names are unknown, to
them, and having demanded thi3 order
and otherwise complied with the law,
all parties claiming interests in the
property hereinafter described under
William J. Keith, deceased, or under
William Smith", deceased, or under Hib Hib-bert
bert Hib-bert B. Masters, deceased, or under
Daniel M. Porter, deceased, or under J.
T. Elliott, deceased, or under Geo. P.
Hart, deceased, or under Spencer M.
Nash, deceased, or under Gabriel W.
Perpall, deceased, or under Moses E.
Levy, deceased, or under Emily V.
Nash, deceased, or under William B.
Williams, deceased, or under Cynthia
M. Burnett, deceased, or under Nancy
P. Hart, deceased, or under W. E. sick sicken,
en, sicken, deceased, under Harry Nash,
deceased, or tinder Benjamin Wilkin Wilkinson
son Wilkinson Heard, deceased, or under Falkner
Heard, deceased, or under Daniel C.
Murdock, deceased, or under Daniel
Souter, deceased, or under William I.
Keitt,- deceased, or under Ellison S.
Keitt, deceased, or under William J.
Keitt, deceased, or under Mrs. E. O. B.
Gary, deceased, or under Henry S.
Nash, deceaseu, or under E. W. Agnew,
deceased, or otherwise, and all parties
claiming an interest in said property
situate in Marion county, Florida, to to-wit:
wit: to-wit: Sw of seV : of sw. section 23;
All that part of the w of sw4 of
section "24 lying south of Ocala and
Dunnellon hard road;
All of lots three (3) and four (4) of
section 25;
West 158 acres of n of Perpall
Grant lying east of Ocala ond-Shady
Grove hard road and bein in section
25, otherwise described as: that part
of following described lands east of
Ocala and Shady Grove hard road, In
section 25, township 15 south, range 21
east, to-"wit: Commencing at the north northwest
west northwest corner of said grant, being the
westernmost point of said grant in sec section
tion section 26, township 15 south, range 21
east, thence north 55 degrees, east
4L25 chains, thence south 35 degrees,
east 40 chains, thence west 55 degrees,
south 41.25 chains, north 35 degrees,
west 40 chains to point of beginning,
all in section 25;
That part of section 26 described as
follows: Beginning on the north line of
said section and at the west side of
the public road intersecting said sec section
tion section from northeast to southwest,
thence west to the northwest corner of
said section, thence south to the south south-,west
,west south-,west corner of said section, thence
east to .the west side of the said pub public
lic public road, thence in a northeasterly di direction
rection direction along the west side of the said
public road to point of beginning;
Also, that part of the sw4 of swV
and the se of the se of the nw!4 of
the'sw"4, lying east of the said public
road;
Also the s of the se of said sec section
tion section 26;
N of seY except st of ne of
se4 of section 27;
All of said lands being in tpwnship
fifteen (15) south, range twentv-one
(21) east. t
Also lots 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12
of Harris subdivision of lot two (2),
section 30;
Lots three and five, subdivision of
Waldo place in the south half of Per Perpall
pall Perpall Grant, as per plat recorded in Mis Miscellaneous
cellaneous Miscellaneous Book A. page 399 of the
public records of Marion county, Flor Florida.
ida. Florida. All in township fifteen south, range
twenty-two east.
and each of them ibe and they are
hereby required to appear to the bill
of complaint heretofore filed in this
cause on
January 7th, 1918,
the same being a rule day.
It is further ordered that this order
be published once a week for twelve
consecutive weeks in .the Ocala Even

ing Star, a newspaper puDiisnea in saia
county and state.
Witness my hand and the seal of said
court at Ocala, Florida, this 13th day
of October, 1917.
, (Seal) P- H. NUGENT,
Clerk Circuit Court, Marion County,
Florida. By Ruth Ervin, D. C.
HOCKER AND MARTIN, w
Complainant's Solicitors. 10-13-sat

Big Assortment Of
LADIES' HATS
$2 to $5 Values

$1.00

NOTICE
In the Circuit Court of the Fifth -Judicial
Circuit of Florida, in .and for
.MaTinn fmintv. in Ohancerv.

T. T. Munroe etal. Complainants, vs.

vjyninza jo.. Durueu, ei o.i,
ants Order for Constructive Ser-
It is. ordered that the defendants
herein, to-wit: v Cynthia M. Burnett,
John W. Beacey, Richard Croasdale,
Elizabeth Carmen, W. E. DIckem Sunie
H. Dicken, J. T. Elliott, J. M. Earp, I
W. Earp, John W. Ellis. E. D, Freyer Freyer-muth.
muth. Freyer-muth. CVIrs. E. O. B. Gary, Thos. P.
Gary, Emily C. Hart, George P. Hart,
Vorv r Ha rt Rpnlamin Wilkinson

Heard, Falkner Heard, Jas. C
Johnson Jr., Wm. J. Keitt, Wm. J.
Keith, WTilliam I. Keitt, Ellison S.
Keitt, A. J. Lawson, -Moses E. Levy,
Hibbert B. Masters, T. J Musselwhite,
Wm. McCarthy, Daniel C. Murdock,
Spencer M. Nash, Emily V. Nash, Harry
S. Nash, Henry S. Nash, Daniel M. Por Por-no
no Por-no vT-ioi w Ppmn 11, William Smith.

Daniel Souter, Guy W. Toph, David J.

Williams, William s. v imams, jonu
W. Wood. Martha S. Wood, and each of
them be and they are hereby required
to appear to the bill of complaint here

tofore filed in this cause, on or ueiuic

the

lOtb day of December,
T a further nrflered that this

order be published once a week

for eight consecutive wee&s in xue
Ocala Evening Star, a newspaper pub

lished in said county ana swie.
Witness my hand and the sea1 of
said court this 13th day of Octooer,
1917
(Seal)' P. H. NUGENT.
Clerk Circuit Court, Marion County,
Florida. By Ruth Ervin. D. C.
HOCKER AND MARTIN,
Complainant's Solicitors. 10-13-sat

Velvet and Felts
Assorted Colors
Latest Styles.

DOLLAR LIMIT

STORE

Ocnla,

Florida.

I

F. O. B. FACTORY

A motor truck must submit, and PASS,
the acid test of COST.
That is the test we want you to apply to

the one-ton Maxwell truck its first cost
and its operating cost
A Maxwell truck which is a REAL truck,
worm-driven sells at a price that can not.
be met in any other motor, vehicle of like
efficiency,( durability, and economy
A Maxwell truck will cover 100 miles in
a work day twice the distance covered by
two teams and two drivers.
It will do this at an operating cost of less
than that of one team of horses.
Moreover, it is of a size and capacity
adapted to the needs of almost every form and
phase of commerce, industry, or farming.
The question is not, "Can I afford to have
a Maxwell truck ?
The FACT is, Mr. Business Man, you can
not afford to be without one.
One-ton Truck Chassis $865; Chassis
with cab and windshield $900; Chassis,
with cab, windshield, and Stake -Gate
Body $950.

NOTICE OF FINAL SETTLEMENT
AND DISCHARGE

Notice is hereby given that on the
4th day of February, A. D. 193, the
undersigned will, present pur ac accounts
counts accounts and vouchers to the judge of
probate in and for Marion county,
Florida, at his office at the court courthouse
house courthouse in Ocala, and will make our
final settlement and will apply for
final discharge as such executors.
This August 4th, 1917.
A. W. FORT,
OLIVER FORT,
As Executors of the Estate of N. L
Fort, Deceased. 8-4-sat

NOTICE OF FINAl SETTLEMENT
AND DISCHARGE

Notice is hereby given that on the
10th day of April, A. D. 1918, the un undersigned
dersigned undersigned will present my accounts
and vouchers to the judge of probate
in and for Marion county, Florida, at
his office at the courthouse in Ocala,
and will make my final settlement and
will apply for final discharge as such
executrix of the estate of Edward
Dreyfous, deceased.
This 2nd day of October, 1917.
LILY S. DANZIGER,
As Executrix of the Estate of Edward
Dreyfous, Deceased.
' HORSE SHOEING

On account of the advance in prices
on all materials we are forced to
raise the price of horse shoeing to
$1.40; re-setting $1.

NOTICE
. Notice is hereby given that the

city council of the city of Ocala will
receive bids at a meeting of said coun-, ;

cil to be neid at tne city nail oi said
city of Ocala, Florida, on the 26th
day of November, A. D. 1917, at 7:30
p. m., covering the construction of
sidewalk along and abutting the fol following
lowing following 'described portion of Exposi Exposition,
tion, Exposition, South or Broadway street, to to-wit:
wit: to-wit: Commencing on the south side of
said street art the intersection of Ex Exposition,
position, Exposition, South or Broadway street
and Pine street, beginning at a point
1 and 8-10ths feet east of the north northeast
east northeast corner of fractional block 6, Old
Survey Ocala, Florida, and running

thence west 202.9 feet, or to a point
1 and l-10th feet west of the north northwest
west northwest corner of block 82 Gary's addi addition
tion addition to Ocala; said sidewalk to be
constructed along the property line
on said. street, and to be five feet in
width. The said sidewalk to be con constructed
structed constructed amounting to approximately
112 square yards.
Said sidewalk shall be constructed
of cement composition urlder the fol following
lowing following specifications: First layer to
be not less than three inches thick,
composed of one part Portland ce cement,
ment, cement, three parts good clean sharp
sand, and five parts broken rock,
the rock to be broken to a maximum
size of two inches. Upon this layer
there shall be a wearing surface, to
be put on before the first layer has
dried, and to be one inch in thickness,
composed of one part clean sharp
sand, one part Portland cement.
All bids must be sealed and filed
with the clerk of the city of Ocala
five days before the meeting of the
council at which all bids for such
work are to be considered. Specifi Specifications
cations Specifications for said sidewalk being now
on file in the office of the city clerk
of the city of Ocala. J. J. Gerig,
This, the 20th day of October, 1917.
President of City Council.
Attest: H. C. Sistrunk,
City Clerk. 10-20-sat

A human life may depend upon the
accuracy and promptness with which
a prescription is looked after. Both
are features at the Court Pharmacy.

jf f Exquisite Articles
oA for iKe. -v
py!et Table

SURROUND YOURSELF AND THOSE YOU LOVE WITH LUX LUXURIOUS
URIOUS LUXURIOUS TOILET NECESSITIES. THEY MAKE LIFE WORTH
LIVING.
WE HAVE A SUPERB LINE OF TOILET REQUIREMENTS
AND USEFUL ARTICLES OF JEWELRY. ..........
WHEN DESIRING PRESENTS FOR OTHERS, OR ARTICLES
FOR YOUR OWN USE, SEE WHAT WE HAVE TO OFFER YOU.
WHEN IT COMES FROM US IT IS RIGHT.
WE MAKE QUALITY RIGHT- THEN THE PRICE RIGHT.
A. E. BURNETT
The Reliable Jeweler

Read the Star Want Ads It pays

3
i

'Companion.

23-6t Smith & Sandifer.

Book bargains at the BOOK SHOP.

1



f :

i
!

1-

k? A A A A A A A A A A A A A i

W. P.
if p
-
'-
V
MM
y Pay More?"
-...

-.1 .

1

-
I ' -

OCALA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1917

PAGE SEVEN

f 9 W if ms &MW$WZ-'&

A A A A A AAAi

5fcJ i? s? iiAt? 5? r'

F If

-4 Ki

i f

IB

aeS'4heTr0abit

n n s

3 m

TD-adomis; WD Efle

1EM

BE SURE You're at My Place, as it Has Become a Habit
With a Would-Be Competitor to Claim That His Place

is GOLDMAN'S. If He Will Deceive You in This, You May Know
What to Expect in His Dealings. V V

Has Been 'lore Goods For Less Money"

My Motto For the Past Twenty-Five Years

n WEST OF
COURTHOUSE

CLOTHING,

IS)
' 0 n

OCALA
F-L-O-R-I-D-A

SHOES, HATS, DRY GOODS, SPORTING GOODS

n ; ; : : 1
;MTMTMTT,,T,,f,v.,,f,V,,T,'VMl"T,.,f,,v,Y,,TMT:

:
:i:
A
Hi
A
m
.
t
A

V.
A
A



PAGE FOUR.

OCALA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1917

IK
. Mr. Raiford Simmons purchased 40
acres of land this morning near hi
new farm.
Judge Smith has issued marriage
license to Mr. Errol Edward Reed of
Lake Weir and Miss Flora May Proc Proctor
tor Proctor of Pedro.
- State Treasurer Luning was in
town yesterday, to make arrange arrangements
ments arrangements with the city for supplying the
new industrial school with light and
water. He met the council in special
session in the afternoon. An agree agreement
ment agreement was made, by which the city
will deliver light and water at the
limits, the state to carry them on
from there to the school.
. Mr Dick Pacetti of Jacksonville,
with-fe Seminole Motor company,
state, distributors for Maxwell and
.Chalmers cars, and Mr. James Cravi--gan
of Detroit, a factory traveling
representative, spent last night in the
city calling on the Maxwell-Chalmers
dealer
Jesse McDuffy today bought a big
seven-passenger Chalmers six from
the local dealer, R. R. Carroll. This
is one of the handsomest cars in the
city and Jesse is Justly proud of it.
He will use it in his rent service, at
the same time keeping his Dodge
five-passenger car. v
LAKE WEIR W. C T. U.
The Lake Weir W. C. T. TT. opened
the meeting" Sept. 20 with the song,
44 Wake for the Night is Coming." Af After
ter After the devotional service the -minutes
of the last meeting were read
and a letter of thanks for the band
ages which the union had majde for
hospital use.
A committee of three was appoint appointed
ed appointed to look over the treasurer's books
and make a report, in the absence of
the treasurer.
The yearly reports of the follow following
ing following departments were made; Flower
Mission, by Mrs. Simpson; Medical
and Mother's department, by .Mrs.
Sigmon; Press and L. T. L., by Mrs.
Douglas; Medal Contest by Miss Har Harriet
riet Harriet Simpson; L. T. L. department by
Mrs. Kimball. The secretary read her
' annual report.
The election of officers followed the
reading of these reports and result resulted
ed resulted in the re-election of all officers
who served for, the past year. Meet-
, ingi aajourn e auntii ucr. 4.
On Oct. 4, the meeting opened with
the usual prayer service. The read reading
ing reading and approval of the minutes of
the last meeting followed, after which
a motion was tarried that the union
adopt a sailors' and soldiers' depart department
ment department for the ciming year. The union
received an invitation to a silver tea
from Mrs. L. B. Walling to take place
at her home on Saturday, Oct. 13.
Two business letters were read from
Miss Neal and Miss Nellie Stevens.
'I'rin TrooilaTiV nmnvAl 4-1. Jl
parcmem supenntenaents lor tne
: year. There were only two changes
in the last year's list.
i --
: REDDICK
' t'r''
. JReddick, Oct. 25. Miss Edith Core
lias just returned from a vacation
trip. While away she enjoyed a beau beautiful
tiful beautiful sail down the Indian River.
Mr. Robert McCauley Jr. is 'here
for a short stay at the home of his
mother, Mrs. R. W. McCauley) He
has 'been in Alabama for. nearly two
years and this is his first trip. home.
Mr. Alton Hammond motored up
from Eustis Sunday and took dinner
with his mother, Mrs. L. W. Ham
A A. m M t m
mond. His sister, Miss Annie Bessie,
returned with him for a short stay.
The school is closed here for two
weeks owing to an epidemic of the
measles.
Miss Annie Kunze. of Citra, who
has been visiting her aunt, Mrs. J. 'C.
Dupree, for the past, two weeks, re returned
turned returned home Monday evening.
The funeral of Mr. J. M. Robinson
was held in the Presbyterian church
here Wednesday afternoon, Oct. 17th.
A large number of relatives and
friends were there to help pay tri tribute
bute tribute to the departed. Rev. Wright
conducted the service. The floral of offerings
ferings offerings were many and beautiful. The
deceased was laid away in a cement
vault at Millwood cemetery.
Mr. Samuel R. C. Billingsley has
frone to Jacksonville. We wish Sam
all kinds of luck this time and hop
lie will be able to sass his examina
tion for admission to the navy. He
tried it a short while ago and lacked
two 'pounds of coming up to the re required
quired required weight, but since his return
he has been busy eating chocolate
candy, peanuts, cream and eggs and
we hope he has reached the required
standard.
There is to be a Hallowe'en social
at the schoolhouse Tuesdav. Oct 30.
and everyone is invited to attend.
There will be a small admittance fee
charged, and we would like everyone
who. wishes to dress and mask for the
occasion. We promise a good time to
all who come.
HORSE SHOEING
On account of the advance in prices
on all materials we are forced to
raise the price of horse shoeing to
$1.40; re-setting $1.
23-6t Smith & Sandifer."
Army trench mirrors 25c Army
.shaving brushes 50c and 75c. at
Ceng's. 29-tf

CORRALED BY CARTER

' Marshal Carter this noon received
the following telegram:
Tampa, Oct. 27. Arrest two young
Germans on Seaboard train No. 3.
They have six very heavy suitcases
as baggage. Wymer, the conductor
on the train, will point them out to
you. Hold until Special Agent Bau Bau-serman
serman Bau-serman arrives from Tampa.
V Bauserman,
Special Agent Dept. of Justice.
Mr. Carter arrested the two men
and put them in the county jail. They
were quiet-looking men and made no
resistance. They had a repeating
rifle, a repeating shotgun and six
suitcase's. They say they are here to
look up some land they have at Silver
Springs.
UNCLASSIFIED ADS.
WANTED, LOST, FOUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS
DR. D. M. BONEY
"My Optician"
EYESIGHT
SPECIALIST
I especially offer my services to the
people of Central Florida, and invite
personal visits or mail ordeis.
202-204Hogan St., Park Hotel Bldg.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
i 3
WANTED To buy ten to twenty twenty-five
five twenty-five tons of velvet beans,, at once.
State price. Address C. P. Howell,
Ocala, Fla. 26-6t
FOR RENT House on JSast Broad Broadway,
way, Broadway, six rooms and bath. Apply to
Mrs. McDowell, Ft. King avenue, or
phone 179.J 26-6t
LOST Seven head of hogs, three
sows and four barrows; from our
farm two miles east of town. Reward
for information. Collier Bros. 26-6t
DRAY FOR SALE-A heavy flat bed,
one-horse dray for sale cheap. Apply
at Star office. 24-6t
FOR RENT The large residence on
Ocklawaha avenue now occupied by
R E. Layton. Possession to be given
Nov. 1st. Inquire of,T. M. Moore at
postoffice. 25-6t
FOR SALE A dandy little -farm
1 miles north of courthouse; .20
acres, all under ence; nice house and
good bearing grape vines. Cheap for
cash. Address "W. T.," care Ocala
Star. 23-lm
FOR SALE Smalk Buick four-passenger
,touring car in 'good repair;
mew tires. Belleview Trading Co.,
Belleview, Fla. 29-ff
FOR SALE My new home in Dunn's
Highland Park addition. Fine location,
near both schools; fruit trees, straw-
Ft 1 -v-v & -a m
Dernes ana garaen. House tnoiougmy
screened; city water, telephone. J. E.
Frampton, 1109 E. 5th St., Ocala, Fla.
Phone 185-G. 8-lm
FOR RENT Front office in the Law
Library building. Apply to R. L.
Anderson. 10-2-tf
HOUSE FOR RENT Located on
Waftula street, north of the Presby Presbyterian
terian Presbyterian church. A f rst class property.
Apply to Dr. J. W. Hood. 26-tf
FOR SALE Nice lot 70 x 112 in sec second
ond second ward also nice residence lot at
$200. W. W. Coiylon. 21-tf
FOR SALE One small mule perfect perfectly
ly perfectly sound. Also red cane for seed;
will average, 5 to 6 feet 'long; prices
right. Call on or write S. J. McCully,
(Fellowship) P. O. Ocala, Route B. tf
FALSE TEETH We pay as high as
$17.50 per set for old false teeth, no
matter if broken; also gold crowns,
bridgework. Mail to Berner's False
Teeth Specialty, 22 Third St., Trop,
N. Y., and receive cash by return
mail. 1-lm
BIG BARGAIN A small farm, 50
acres, two miles west of courthouse,
Ocala, between two hard roads; best
land in the county, good fence, every
foot cleared and ready for plow. A
great bargain, for ten days, at $45
per acre. Inquire at Star office or of
William Littledale, Ocala, Fla. 17-6t
WANTED-Ten teams and 25 labor laborers
ers laborers at the union station Monday
morning. Good wages. Apply to
Floyd Palmer. 27-3t
ADVERTISING RATES:
DAILY
Display: -Plate 10c per inch for consecp- 4
tive insertions. Alternate insertions 25 per
cent, additional. Composition charges on
ads. that run less than six times 5c per inch.
Special position 20 per cent, additional. Rates
based on 4-inch minimum. Less than four
inches will take higher rate, which will be fur furnished
nished furnished on -application.
Reading Notice: 5c per line for first in insertion;
sertion; insertion; 3c. perjine for each subsequent inser insertion.
tion. insertion. One change a week allowed on readers
without extra composition charges.
Legal advertisements at legal rates.
Electro mutt be mounted, or charge will be
made for mounting. ..
A human We may depend upon the
accuracy and promptness with which
a prescription is looked after. Both
are features at the Court Pharmacy.

How the Marburys Came
to Change Their
Residence

By ESTHER VAN DE VEER.
This story is by a crusty old bachelor
who knows nothing of married life.
He says he is tired of hearing women
say that the best way to manage a
man is to feed him well.
Mrs. Marbury had married for love
and when coming to middle age still
loved her husband. But it is an un
disputed fact that persons who are
closely allied become careless of what
thes, say to each other and give way
to fretfulness at slight provocations,
while with others they put a guard on
their tongues. Frank Marbury was a
man not to be easily ruffled and real realized
ized realized that he had a nervous wife. So
when she lost her self control he re retained
tained retained his own and soothed her as
best he could.
But persons who are unrestrained
and do not restrain themselves usually
grow worse instead of better. Mrs.
Marbury was continually getting upset
over some trifle and at such times
would berate her husband unmerci unmercifully,
fully, unmercifully, complaining that of all men he
was the hardest for a woman to live
with. Finally one day during one of
her explosions she ,told him that she
could endure him no longer. Marbury
concluded that she must be curbed
and took his own way of curbing her.
The day after the outburst he came
home and told 4ier that he intended
to set up housekeeping on lifs own
account. He had rented a furnished
house and would move In at once. Mrs.
Marbury looked at him, surprised, but
made no objection.
"Will you keep a servant?" she asked.
"I don't know. I shall leave the
management to my housekeeper."
"Who will be your housekeeper V
"I have not engaged one yet I shall
begin by cooking some of my meals
myself at home; for others I shall go
out to restaurants."
Marbury ha'd a fancy for cooking
and had often supplied the place of a
cook at home when one was not to be
hired. Servants were becoming scarcer
every day, and he was becoming more
valuable on that account. Mrs. Mar Marbury
bury Marbury did not have the knack of cook cookery.
ery. cookery. She had tried to learn the art.
but was not made that way. The. fact
that she was to lose a cook as well as
a husband angered her. She flounced
out of the room without a word.
Marbury kept his word. He remov removed
ed removed what he most needed to hls-new res residence,
idence, residence, removing himself there at the
same time. Mrs. Marbury made no ef effort
fort effort to bring about a reconciliation.
When her husband was about to leave
he called up from the lower hall.
"Goodby.-dearr But, though she heard
him distinctly and found it difficult to
refrain from going down, throwing her
arms about him and retaining him. she
gave him no reply. 1
One of the first things, Mrs. Marbury
did when she found herself alone was
to hunt for a servant who could cook.
She finally found a woman to whom
she agreed to pay three times as much
as she had paid a cook when she was
a bride, but the first dinner that came
on to the table afforded quite ,enough
of her help's handicraft, and the wo woman
man woman was discharged.
Mrs. Marbury hired three cooks
within a fortnight at 'fabulous prices
and sent them all away. She dined at
restaurants and tried occasionally at
getting a meal herself. She loathed
restaurant cooking, and sitting down
alone to a meal she had spoiled was
intolerable. Under the stress her stom stomach
ach stomach was giving out. and her condition
was pitiable, x ;
One morning the postman delivered a
note to her bearing her husband's well
known chirography on' the envelope.
She was delighted. "He's given in,"
she cried, tearing the note in her haste
to open it It read:
Mr. Francis Marbury requests the pres-
, ence of Mrs. Marion Marbury to dinner
this evening. No R. S. V. P. needed. The
dinner will be served promptly at 7 o'clock.
Mrs. Marbury was puzzled. What
did it mean? Of one thing she was
sure she would get an excellent din
ner. But that was the only thing of
which she was sure.
At two minutes of 7 Mrs. Marbury
drove up in a taxicab to her husband's
residence. She tried the front door.
and, finding it unlocked, shewalked in.
A savory odor pervaded the premises.
Passing to the (ear, she entered' the
kitchen., Mr.' Marbury, In a white lin
en Jacket and a spider in his hand.
turned from the range. K
Aha,- my dear!" he said cheerily.
"I thought you might like one of. my
dinners. I've quite a delicate menu-
little neck clams, mock turtle soup, a
bird, sweetbreads"
"Stopr cried Mrs. Marbury. "I'm
starving, and you make me a thousand
times more ravenous!"
"Go and lay aside your traps while
I dish up."
Mrs. Marbury flung aside her "traps'
and played, scullion till the dinner was
served, then sat down with her hus
band and enjoyed the first good meal
she had eaten since her husband had
left her. It seemed that every morsel
that passed down her throat had been
'meant for a god. When the meal was
finished he told her husband that she
had reformed and if he would come
back to her she would never again
complain of anything he did.
"No," he said, ."you are welcome to
come acd live with me, but IH never
co back to you. If you find me as
hard to live with as before you can
return to your own"
The words were stopped by a kiss.
There has been no further moving
by the Marburys.

THE OCALA NATIONAL BANK
OCALA, FLORIDA
NVESTIGATE this bank as it stands today trace its history along the
entire course from its beginning in 1911, just a little more than six
ears ao and you will find that tne Ocala National Bank has had a

M
I

sound, steady and vigorous growth.
, It has followed a consistent policy of conservative, yet progressive bank banking.
ing. banking. Its spirit is in accordance witlr the .best spirit of today co-operation
and service. 1
By its policy it has made many friends and we invite you to become one
of its customers. Jno. L. Edwards, President.
TOTAL RESOURCES $672,000.00

I!
1
til!
Hi
AT THE CHURCHES TOMORROW
' Grace Episcopal
(Rev. Gilbert A. Ottmann, Rector)
7:30 a. m. Holy communion, every
Sunday.
11 a. m. Holy communion and
sermon, first Sunday.
11 a. m. Mornine prayer and ser
mon, except first Sunday.
i :ou p. m. ravening prjjyer wm
sermon every Sunday. f
9:45 -a. m. Sunday school.
All seats free. Every one welcome
at all services.
Methodist
9:30 a. m. Sunday school.
11 a. m. Preaching.
Subject, The Satisfying Awakening.
3 p. m. Junior League.
4 p. m. Senior League.
7 p. m. Preaching.
Subject, True Christian Sympathy,
or Burden Bearing.
All cordially invited.
J. M. Gross, Pastor.
Junior League
Meets stt 3 o'clock. Missionary
meeting. Subject, "A Boy's Victory."
Fred Boyd, leader. Mrs. C. D. Bar-
nett, the superintendent of the mis missionary
sionary missionary or fourth department, will
have charge of the meeting and there
will be some interesting features. A
full attendance is desired.
First Presbyterian
9:45 a. m. Sunday -school.
Preaching services, 11 a. m. and
7:30 p. m. 9
2:30 p. m. Junior Society.
Midweek player meeting, Wednes
day, 7:30 p. m.
The Sunday school is showing a
gratifying increase, but we have
room for a goodly number more. Our
organized classes for men and wom women
en women appeal for the attendance of the
adult persons of the congregation.
A committee consisting of Mrs. M.
J.' Roess, Mrs. Clifton Camp r.nd the
pastor canvassed the housekeepers of
the congregation this week, placing
the weekly report cards on the food
saving campaign. They were gladly
received. It is believed that the
Presbyterians of this city will not be
behind-hand in their support of the
administration. It should be remem
bered that the report asked for should
begin "next Sunday morning and in include
clude include all meals served until Saturday
night. This report should then be
made out and brought, preferably
brought, or sent to the church Sun Sunday
day Sunday morning, Nov. 4th. Cards for
future reports will be sent out next
week.
The session of the church will meet
after the close of Sunday school to tomorrow.
morrow. tomorrow. In response to the request of Pres President
ident President Wilson let us all observe tomor tomorrow
row tomorrow as a day of prayer for the suc success
cess success of tlje cause, in which the nation
is contending. Let all the people
pray in faith and submission. And
the public is cordially requested to
attend the public worship tomorrow.
, John R. Herndon, Pastor.
Baptist
9:80 a. m.- Sunday school.
11 a. m. Morning worship.
Text: '"Man doth not live by bread
alone." Deut. 8:3.
6:30 p. m. -B. Y. P. U.
7:30 p. m. Evening service.
""A Tragic Alternative.".
Pastor will preach morning and
evening.
Welcome to all.
A. C L. SCHEDULE
Trains of the Atlantic coast Line
will arrive and depart in Ocala at the
following times:
No. 10, Lee8burg to Jacksonville,
5:40 a. m.
No. 151, Ocala to Wilcox, Monday,
Wednesday and Friday, 6:10 a. m.
No. 35, Ocala to Lakeland (Sunny (Sunny-Jim),
Jim), (Sunny-Jim), Tuesday, Thursday and Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, 6:40 a. m.
No. 141, Wilcox, Gainesville and
Palatka to Ocala, 11:15 a. m.
No. 40, St. Petersburg to Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, 12:54-1:14 p. m.
No. 48, Homosassa to Ocala, 1:01
p. m.
No. 49, Ocala to Homosassa, 2:?f
p. m.
No. 32, Lakeland to OcaIu"( Sunny Sunny-Jim),
Jim), Sunny-Jim), Tuesday, Thursday and Satur Satur-iay.
iay. Satur-iay. 9:W) p. m.
No. 39, Jacksonville to St. Peters Petersburg,
burg, Petersburg, 2:36-2:40 p. hL
No. 140, Ocala to Palatka, Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville and Wilcox, 4:10 p. m.
No. 9, Jacksonville to teesburg,
9:05 p. m.

INSTRUCTIONS

Respecting Increased Postage Rates
. on Letters and Postal and
Post Cards
It is of the utmost importance that
every patron of the postal service be become
come become familiar "with the increased
rates of postage providing for letters,
postal and post cards by the war rev revenue
enue revenue act, as set forth in order No.
755. Failure to prepay the proper
amount of postage 'will delay the dis dispatch
patch dispatch and delivery of mail, cause con confusion,
fusion, confusion, annoyance and inconvenience
and impose upon the postal service
unnecessary labor and expense.
The following features should be
particularly emphasized:
The increased rates become effec effective
tive effective Nov. 2, 1917.
Letters and other first-class matter
(except drop letters and postal and
post cards) will be subject to postage
at the rate of three cents for each
ounce or fraction thereof which
should be fully prepaid. If less than
three cents is prepaid on a letter, or
other first-class "matter, it shall be re returned
turned returned to the sender, if known, for
the deficient postage. If the sender
is not known, it shall, if prepaid at
least two cents, be rated with the de deficient
ficient deficient postage and dispatched to its
destination for collection of the
amount due upon delivery to, the ad addressee.
dressee. addressee. Letters and other first-class
matter prepaid less than two cents
shall ije treated as prescribed by Sec Section
tion Section 545, Postal Laws and Regula Regulations.
tions. Regulations. The rate on drop letters on and
after Nov. 2, 1917, will be two cents
an ounce or fraction of an ounce. This
applies to all letters mailed for deliv delivery
ery delivery within the postal district of the
office where deposited, including de delivery
livery delivery by the city, rural, or other car carriers
riers carriers of such officeThe two-sent drop
letter rate also applies to offices
which have no free delivery service.
All postal cards, whether they
bear written messages or are entire entirely
ly entirely in print must be prepaid two cents
each and, therefore, thes one-cent
postal cards must have a one-cent
postage stamp-affixed to them in ad addition
dition addition to the one-cent stamp impress impressed
ed impressed on such cards.
Post cards, or private mailing cards
bearing written messages will be sub subject
ject subject to two cents postage each.
The rate of postage is not affected
op printed cards bearing the words
"post card" or "private mailing
card" which do not bear any written
additions unauthorized on third-class
matter by tfie provisions of Section
453, such' printed cards still being
subject to postage at the third-class
rate. Printed cards mailed at the
third-class rate can not be forwarded
from the office of original address to
another postoffice without 'a new pre prepayment
payment prepayment of postage.
NOTICE
. Of Animals Impounded
To Whom It May Concern:
-This is to certify that I. have this
day placed in the city pound the fol following
lowing following described animals, which have
been found 'running at large within
the corporate limits of the city of
Ocala, contrary to the ordinances of
said city:
'One red cow, one red heifer mark marked
ed marked two splits and underbit each ear;
one cream bull, split and underbit one
ear, split other; one black cow, two
splits upper and underbit each ear;
brand (C)
The owner thereof, or their agents,
and all whom it may concern, are
hereby notified that if the animals are
not claimed and all expenses of tak taking
ing taking and impounding thereof are not
Eaid within three days from date
ereof, to-wit: On the 3th day of Oc October,
tober, October, 1917, 1 will sell the same to the
highest and best bidder, said sale to
take place .between the hours of 11 a.
m. and 3 p. m. on said day at the city
pound in Ocala, Florida.
R. L. Carter?
Marshal City of Ocala,
C. A. Holloway, Impounder. It
A nation nation-w
w nation-w i d e cam campaign
paign campaign to com complete
plete complete the en'
rollment of
our forces is
conaerv -ation
of our
food supply, is a duty of nec necessity,
essity, necessity, humanity and honor.
Af a free people we have elect elected
ed elected to discharge this duty, not
under autocratic decree, hut
without other restraint than
the guidance of individual
conscience.
HERBIHiT HOOVXB.

iifi

m
i ;
OCALA FRATERNAL ORDERS
ORDER OF EASTERN STAR
Ocala CaaDter. No. 29. O. E. S
ueets at Yonge'b hall the second ana
ourtn rnursday evening of eaca
nonth at 730 o'clock.
Mrs. Rosalie Condon, Secretary.
Mrs. Susan Cook, W. M.
OCALA LODGE NO. 286, a P. O. E,
- Ocala Lodge No. 286, Beftevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and fourth Tuesday even evenings
ings evenings in each month. Visiting breth
ren always welcome. Club bouse oppo opposite
site opposite postoffice, east side.-
C. W. Hunter, E. R.
E. J. Crook. Secretary.
ODD FELLOWS
Tiilnla Tvdi Kn- 99 TOOT?

meets every Tuesday evening in thaasfZT

wuu r enows nan on tne inira noor oi
fha NOT ffio KnitJin,. O 11, "!

promptly. A warm welcome always
extended to visiting brothers.
" Oscar Andrews, N. G.
W. L. Colbert, Secretary.
R. A. M. CHAPTER NO. 13
Regular- convocations of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13, R. A. M., on the
fourth Friday in every month at 8 p.
m. 4 B. C. Webb, H. P.
Jake Brown, Secretary.
KNIGHTS OK PYTHIAS
. Ocala Lodge No. 19. Conventions
held every Monday night, at If If-at
at If-at the Castle Hall, over the Jaz Jaz-Carlisle
Carlisle Jaz-Carlisle drugstore A cordial welcome
to visiting brothers.
G. A. Nash, C. C.
CLas. K. Sage. K. of R. S.
MARION-DUNN MASONTCLODGE
Marfon-Dunn Lodcre No. 19. F. &
A. M meets on the first-and third
Thursday evenings of each month at
O ? 1 1 A 1 1 1
o a ciocK., untu mimer notice.
H. M. Weather
MIRIAM REBEKAH LODGE NO. 15
Miriam Rebekah Lodge No. 15
meets the first and third Monday eve evenings
nings evenings in each month in the Odd Fel Fellows'
lows' Fellows' hall at 7:30 o'clock.
Emma C. Burnett NjG.
Irma Brigance, Secretary.
WOODMEN OF THE WORLDS
Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
the K. of P. hall at 7:30 p. m. every
second and fourth Friday. Visiting
sovereigns are ailways welcome.
T. D. Lancaster, C C.
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk.
SEABOARD LOCAL SCHEDULE
No. 9 Leaves Jacksonvile 1:2() p.
m.; Ocala 4:15 p. m. Arrives Tampa
7:35 p. m.
No. 1 Leaves Jacksonville 9:30 p.
m.; Ocala, 1:45 a. m. Arrives St. Pe Petersburg,
tersburg, Petersburg, 7:45 a. m."'
No. &Leaves 'Jacksonville 9:30 a.
m.; Ocala, 12:50 p. m.
Northbound
No. lb Leaves Tampa at 1 p. m.;
Ocala, 4:15 p. xn. Arrives Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, 7 :15 p. m.
- No. 2 Leaves Tampa 9 p. m.;
Ocala, 1:55 a. m. Arrives Jackson
ville, 6:45 a. m. "--
No. 4 Leaves Tampa, 9:10 a. m.;
arrive Ocala, 1:10 p. m.; arrive Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville at 5:10 p. m.
FAIRS AND CELEBRATIONS "r
October. 16-20 Bradford.
Fair at Lake Butler.
County
October 29 to November f3 Har Harvest
vest Harvest Festival and Fair at West Paha
Beach. 1 x
November 6-lft West Florida Fair
at Marianna.
November 12-17 Escambia Coun County
ty County Fair, at Molina.
November 13-17 Sawanee County
Fair at 'Live Oak.
November 21-23 Orange Springs
Fair at Orange Springs.
November 20-23 Alachua, County
Fairat Gainesville.
Novem ber-273Marfi Ccanty
rair, ai ucaia.
December 4-8 Jacksonville Poul Poultry
try Poultry Show.
January 20 to February 1 Lake
County School Fair, at Tavares.
L. ALEXANDER
. PRACTICAL CARPENTER
AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Con Contract
tract Contract work. Gives More and Better
Work for the Money than any other.
'.contractor in the city.

.1
4
' v 4



Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
fcla fda yes
!-- Ocala evening star ( Newspaper ) --
METS:mets OBJID UF00075908_06763
xmlns:METS http:www.loc.govMETS
xmlns:xlink http:www.w3.org1999xlink
xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance
xmlns:daitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss
xmlns:mods http:www.loc.govmodsv3
xmlns:sobekcm http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm
xmlns:gml http:www.opengis.netgml
xmlns:lom http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm_lom
xsi:schemaLocation
http:www.loc.govstandardsmetsmets.xsd
http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss.xsd
http:www.loc.govmodsv3mods-3-4.xsd
http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcmsobekcm.xsd
METS:metsHdr CREATEDATE 2014-07-31T23:26:36Z ID LASTMODDATE 2009-04-29T15:57:01Z RECORDSTATUS COMPLETE
METS:agent ROLE CREATOR TYPE ORGANIZATION
METS:name UF,University of Florida
OTHERTYPE SOFTWARE OTHER
Go UFDC FDA Preparation Tool
INDIVIDUAL
UFAD\renner
METS:dmdSec DMD1
METS:mdWrap MDTYPE MODS MIMETYPE textxml LABEL Metadata
METS:xmlData
mods:mods
mods:accessCondition This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
mods:genre authority marcgt newspaper
sobekcm newspaper
mods:identifier type OCLC 11319113
ALEPHBIBNUM 2052267
LCCN sn 84027621
sn 84027621
mods:language
mods:languageTerm text English
code iso639-2b eng
mods:location
mods:physicalLocation University of Florida
UF
mods:note dates or sequential designation Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
funding Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855
mods:originInfo
mods:publisher Porter & Harding
mods:place
mods:placeTerm marccountry flu
mods:dateIssued October 27, 1917
marc point start 1895
end 1943
mods:frequency Daily (except Sunday)
marcfrequency daily
normalized irregular
mods:recordInfo
mods:recordIdentifier source UF00075908_06763
mods:recordCreationDate 841027
mods:recordOrigin Imported from (OCLC)11319113
mods:recordContentSource University of Florida
marcorg NPU
FUG
OCLCQ
mods:languageOfCataloging
English
eng
mods:relatedItem original
mods:physicalDescription
mods:extent v. : ; 61 cm.
series
mods:part
mods:detail Enum1
mods:caption 1917
mods:number 1917
Enum2
October
10
Enum3
27
27
lccn 84027622
oclc 11319138
mods:titleInfo
mods:title Ocala weekly star
mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
mods:geographic Ocala (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ651_2
Marion County (Fla.)
Newspapers
mods:hierarchicalGeographic
mods:country United States
mods:state Florida
mods:county Marion
mods:city Ocala
mods:nonSort The
Ocala evening star
uniform
Ocala Evening Star
alternative displayLabel Other title
Evening star
Star
mods:typeOfResource text
DMD2
OTHERMDTYPE SOBEKCM SobekCM Custom
sobekcm:procParam
sobekcm:Aggregation FDNL1
FDNLN
NDNP
sobekcm:MainThumbnail 0006thm.jpg
sobekcm:Wordmark UFPKY
NEH
CHRAM
sobekcm:bibDesc
sobekcm:BibID UF00075908
sobekcm:VID 06763
sobekcm:EncodingLevel #
sobekcm:Publisher
sobekcm:Name Porter & Harding
sobekcm:PlaceTerm Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
sobekcm:Source
sobekcm:statement UF University of Florida
sobekcm:SortDate 693595
sobekcm:serial
sobekcm:SerialHierarchy level 1 order 1917 1917
2 10 October
3 27 27
DMD3
GML Geographic Markup Language
gml:FeatureCollection
gml:featureMember
gml:Point label Place of Publication
gml:Coordinates 29.187778,-82.130556
METS:amdSec
METS:digiprovMD DIGIPROV1
DAITSS Archiving Information
daitss:daitss
daitss:AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT PROJECT UFDC
METS:techMD TECH1
File Technical Details
sobekcm:FileInfo
METS:fileSec
METS:fileGrp USE reference
METS:file GROUPID G1 JP21 imagejp2 CHECKSUM 32e729687b94fb00564dcd2732aa5c94 CHECKSUMTYPE MD5 SIZE 7394283
METS:FLocat LOCTYPE OTHERLOCTYPE SYSTEM xlink:href 0447.jp2
G2 JP22 821e34321548c8e665153c03f0e0cbc8 7366830
0448.jp2
G3 JP23 d704820e2fd11d3d8f077ca903c4a612 7564767
0449.jp2
G4 JP24 17083b7a9ff1c067e7bf3e6eadf296ff 7469589
0450.jp2
G5 JP25 ab98d29a8af0aad70855acbb177612f3 7456790
0451.jp2
G6 JP26 8ddd44596ebc7f9e72d69cabf49b8409 7476635
0452.jp2
G7 JP27 9e6d8766c989b681d876a79bb6d70a11 7156282
0453.jp2
G8 JP28 7e89ad9882ec9e2f6d1776029851f376 7248510
0454.jp2
archive
TIF1 imagetiff a8972567f07aae29a53317182a49ce0d 59127011
0447.tif
TIF2 a5f614d12cf33b2e413dcae59780c0d2 58898310
0448.tif
TIF3 98a2a542116d7c9755ab3eb11f519a8b 60499674
0449.tif
TIF4 320641e5fc267045de79123f2fc23df4 59738385
0450.tif
TIF5 4111819381138243d868cdfdb5d539b7 59635902
0451.tif
TIF6 dc23d783c2d52d652e00bb21bf3df2a1 59785323
0452.tif
TIF7 a5f9c8356aceffea42e8f35605372dc2 57232779
0453.tif
TIF8 900d59c93cb4ca542c194db985bd47c6 57960579
0454.tif
TXT1 textplain bda780b2fa057b367fd02ed97e167184 19348
0447.txt
TXT2 072165294b0910a39557eb959f6bfdd5 17161
0448.txt
TXT3 bdddc62c8603e1de027ea6e9c2b51219 14195
0449.txt
TXT4 7120cab9a12a692b789665073463dc90 20861
0450.txt
TXT5 9e3eefd4cf3893b652b7d8558f49085c 17590
0451.txt
TXT6 1c1170d3022c7048907719e3a117fc9d 20826
0452.txt
TXT7 82a0efa2656df31aff2032ecac341c3f 965
0453.txt
TXT8 f14f63231258ca05b947dceec34cd171 27910
0454.txt
ALTO1 unknownx-alto 8cfa7b3c5001fb03c137050d66d70b77 591001
0447.alto
ALTO2 d37bf92a983af4c9ab3eb171af97eacb 512684
0448.alto
ALTO3 5845ff99ca959d293ccc31e53c3e92b0 463840
0449.alto
ALTO4 cf20318599ec07c93a8df67e7aac703a 625456
0450.alto
ALTO5 5f6d8f2396a4636b61d68dd597a75c1b 558340
0451.alto
ALTO6 4c625c404f06fb7a50ea57478b9152ce 653609
0452.alto
ALTO7 0db506498ab514e3f8d06c16060d9f87 46368
0453.alto
ALTO8 559546ad87df0cf3971dd7d6c78c2a38 871204
0454.alto
METS1 unknownx-mets 466f358e0561633fa81c5aeea3959b07 11513
UF00075908_06763.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ADMID The ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 Main
PAGE1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
PAGE2
PAGE3
PAGE4 4
PAGE5 5
PAGE6 6
PAGE7 7
PAGE8 8
STRUCT2 other
ODIV1
FILES1