The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06742

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
4
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OCALA

FVFN

ASSOCJATFlY
SERVICE
LOCAL NFAVS
TO
PRESS TIME
s
4
r
WEATHER FORECAST
OCALA, FLORIDA, MONDAY, OCTOBER I, 1917.
VOL. 23, NO. 287.
Fair tonight and Tuesday.
r

ii iiiiu

7

I
V
r

T An Escadrille of
...

J Against It Sunday Evening

ATTACKS OF TEUTONS ON WESTERN FRONT PROVED UNAVAILING AUSTRIANS HAVE LOST

While the British apparently are I
preparing for another offensive stroke
in Flanders, the German crown prince
is again harrassing the French in the
Verdun section. The Germans attack attacked
ed attacked last 'night on both sides of the
Meuse where their artillery work has
been intensive for the past few days.
Paris announces the attacks were re re--
- re-- pulsed.
.After yesterday's three futile at attempts
tempts attempts to drive the British from the
,-high ground on both sides of the
Menin-Ypres road .the Germans con contented
tented contented themselves with bombarding
lasi night. The British official state-
ment is silent on the British response.
It is believed that Gen. Cadorna's
latest success on the Italian front
will be followed up as the new ground
has been held against all counter at attacks.
tacks. attacks. SLIGHT GAIN MADE BY SLAVS
The Russians have advanced eight
to ten thousand yards on the Riga
sector.
BRITISH AIR BARRAGE
London, Oct...l. Of the German
airplanes participating in last night's
raid on London, two were destroyed,
one brought down and a big Gotha
plane descended apparently damaged.
All the British machines returned
safely. The raid, which was the .fifth
in seven nights, accomplished little
for the enemy. The claim that the
"air barrage" acts as a powerful de
terrent is further justified. The Times ,'
says it is assured in the belief that i
adequate defense has been solved, j
Many newspapers demand reprisals.
ENGLISH LOSS INSIGNIFICANT
Nine were killed and forty-two hurt
in last night's air raid.
One German machine was brought
down near Dover. In a raid over Bel Belgium,
gium, Belgium, the British destroyed, two Ger German
man German machines and brought down two.
BRITISH STRONGER THAN THE
' ROCHES
Washington, Oct. 1. That the Ger Germans
mans Germans are shaken but still powerful
on the western front is the estimate i
of Germar-irength given in the offi official
cial official UiS, "States communique. The
superiority of the British over the
Germans is proved, the statement
says.
AGITATORS IN PETROGRAD LIE
ABOUT AMERICA
Petrograd, Oct. 1. The Bolsheviki
mass meeting was harangued by agi agi-tator?r"recently
tator?r"recently agi-tator?r"recently from the United
States into adopting resolutions pro protesting
testing protesting against the imprisonment of
Alexander Berkman in the United
Spates and his reported sentence of
death. When the speakers scoffed at
American liberty they were only mild mildly
ly mildly applauded. The threatened dem demonstration
onstration demonstration at the American embassy
.war not carried out. The government
snt -troops there, though the Amer American
ican American ambrssador had not requested
them.
IS RIDING THE WAVES AGAIN
American Battleship Stranded Last
Week Did Not Remain Long
Aground
(Associated Press)
An Atlantic Port, Oct. 1 The Unit United
ed United States battleship which went
aground Friday in. home waters has
,been, floated. The large fleet pulled
tKe vessel off at high tide.
SKILLED MAXWELL MECHANIC
I am located at the Maxwell Ser Service
vice Service Station, on the corner of Osceola
and Fort King avenue (Yonge block),
where I will be prepared to do' all
kinds of automobile repair work and
regulating. I have had a good many
years experience' with all kinds of
motors, electric appliances, magneto,
generator and carburetor traubles a
specialty. Any kind of motor work
done at reasonable prices. Maxwell
work a specialty. Satisfaction is as assured
sured assured all who come to me.'
Respectfully, -29-tf
L. W. Sterrett.
A full assortment of the famous
PAKRO Seedtape. Just the thing for
the small fall garden. Ocala Seed
Store. tf

Teuton Planes
ID TO
(Associated Press)
PEHSACOLA IS
Damage Footed Up Hundreds of
Thousands, but No Loss of
Life Reported
(Associated Press)
Pensacola, Oct. 1 (By wireless to
New Orleans). Property damage
from Friday's hurricane is estimated
at one hundred thousand dollars.
The same amount of damage is esti estimated
mated estimated at the United States naval sta station.
tion. station. No reports of casualties have
been made. Wire communication is
still impossible. Ten small boats and
one steamer are aground in the har harbor.
bor. harbor. Several boats were driven
ashore but not much damaged.
One of the Results of the Attempt of
Witless William to Conquer
the World.
(Associated Press)
New York, Oct. 1. The slaughter
with axes of all the Armenian faculty
members of Anatolia .College, Mar Mar-sovan,
sovan, Mar-sovan, Northrn Asia Minor, together
with 1,200 others by Turkish peas peasants
ants peasants whose pay for the work was the
privilege of stripping the clothing off
their victims' bodies, was described
here yesterday by Rev. George E.
White, president of the college, re recently
cently recently returned to this country. The
massacres were committed at night
by order of the Turkish government,
he said ,the Armenians being sent
out in lots" of a hundred or two to
their doom and their bodies rolled into
prepared burial trenches.
"The situation for Armenia became
excessively acute in the spring of
1915 when the Turks determined to
eliminate the Armenian question by
eliminating the Armenians. The Ar Armenian
menian Armenian questions arises from politi political
cal political and religious causes.
"These thii.gs are typical of what
took place through the six provinces
of the Turkish Empire known as Ar Armenia.
menia. Armenia. The Armenians are the
Yankees of the East the merchants,
manufacturers, capitalists, artisans
and among the best of the farme'rs.
One quarter of a million people suc suc-ceede
ceede suc-ceede din escaping' into Russian Cau Caucasus
casus Caucasus and among them American rep representatives
resentatives representatives have done wonderful
work in caring for the sick, giving
bread to the hungry, clothing the
naked, caring for orphans. Probably
a million 5 more went to Syria and
Mesopotamia where they have been
dependent upon A'merican relief which
is helping this worthy people to pull
through alive."
The number of Armenians who
have been massacred, said Dr. White,
is estimated by the American Com Committee
mittee Committee for Armenian and Syrian Re Relief
lief Relief in New York city at from 500, 500,-000
000 500,-000 to 1,000,000 while there are a
million still living in need of imme immediate
diate immediate aid.
SETTLEMENT OF A BIG STRIKE
Among Kentucky and Tennessee Coal
Miners is Announced
(Associated Press)
Lexington, Ky., Oct. 1. It is semi semiofficially
officially semiofficially announced that a settlement
has been reached in the strike be between
tween between seventeen, and eighteen thou thousand
sand thousand coal miners in Kentucky and
Tennssee.
Have your prescriptions filled at the
COURT PHARMACY, where you can
ie certain that they are compounded
of the best drugs, the utmost care and
without, delay. 17-tf

MORE

GRQU1

TAL1ANS

A

HI STORY OF
ARMENIA

Came to Grief

SUPREME COURT
IN SESSIO
Draft Law and Other Cases Caused
by the War Among the First
to be Decided
(Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 1. Five big anti antitrust
trust antitrust cases involving the dissolution
of the United States Steel Corpora Corporation,
tion, Corporation, the International Harvester com company,
pany, company, the United Shoe Machinery
company and the Lehigh Valley rail railroad
road railroad and the Reading companies and
affiliate coal companies, the so-called
anthracite coal trust cases, together
with proceedings from four states to
test the constitutionality of the draft
law, are before the United States Su Supreme
preme Supreme Court, which reconvened to today
day today following the annual summer re recess.
cess. recess. Among the first cases disposed of,
it is expected, will be those growing
out of the enforcement "of the draft
law. If these were permitted to
come up in their regular order, they
would not be reached for eighteen
months, but Attorney General Greg Gregory
ory Gregory plans to ask that they be advanc advanced
ed advanced for early decision. While govern government
ment government officials, and especially those
connected with the war department,
feel there is no question about the
validity of the law, a decision by the
highest court would do much to dis discourage
courage discourage contrary sentiment mani manifested
fested manifested in various sections of the coun country.
try. country. Appeals from the decision of Judge
Speer in Georgia, who upheld the
constitutionality of the law and cases
from Minnesota, Ohio and New York,
which include those of Emma Gold Goldman
man Goldman and Alexander Berkman, con convicted
victed convicted of attempting to oppose the
carrying into effect of the law by
urging men within the draft ages not
to register, have been filed. All are
expected to be decided at the same
time.
AMUSEMENT FOR THE
AMERICAN ARMY
Colossal System of Recreation and
Instruction at the Train Training
ing Training Camps
. (Associated Press)
Washington, Sept. 30. Community
recreation for soldiers and sailors in
camp in training for the new Ameri American
can American army, and the manner in which it
is to be carried on, was explained in a
report made public today by Raymond
B. Fosdick, chairman of the war and
navy department commissions on
training camp activities.
Three dollars for each soldier and
sailor a total of $3,750,000 is to be
raised for this purpose. A national
committee, on which prominent men
and women are serving, has been
named by Secretary Baker to conduct
the campaign for the war camp com community
munity community recreation fund.
Mr. Manning shows the relation of
the war camp community recreation
fund to the work which is being done
inside the camps by such agencies as
the Young Men's Christian Associa Association
tion Association and in the exclusion of vice and
visious resorts from the camp neigh neighborhood.
borhood. neighborhood. Mr. Manning reports that in each
city near a camp, social and recrea recreational
tional recreational forces will be brought together
in one committee representatives of
ichurches, clubs, lodges, schools, col
leges, recreation centers, parks, mov moving
ing moving picture agencies, women's agen agencies
cies agencies in fact, every force for good in
the community that can be used in
working for the highest welfare of
the enlisted men. A census will show
the men's church preference, trade
or profession, of what societies they
are members, what their special in interests
terests interests in dramatics, athletics, music
or other amusements or recreation
may be, and what other special inter interest
est interest they have.
Ford tops re-covered, $12.50, at the
Ocala Wagon Works. Phone 84. tf

lIdlhTY mil uEiilll 111 If rlK
ENTHUSIASTIC RESPONSE FROM AMERICA WILL :

HEARTEN
(Associated
Washington, Oct. 1. The big drive
for the second Liberty Loan bond is issue
sue issue began at noon throughout the
country. In New York, where sales
must total sixty-two and a half mill million
ion million daily to make up the quota, expert
bond salesmen enlisted in the cam campaign
paign campaign marched to the city.
Whistles blew for forty-five min minutes
utes minutes in Cleveland, where Secretary
McAdoo opened the campaign with
the first of several speeches he will
deliver throughout the country.
BASEBALL STAR BOUGHT BOND
Tris Speaker purchased the first
bond sold in Cleveland, handing Sec Secretary
retary Secretary McAdoo his check for one thou thousand
sand thousand dollars.
ELEVEN MILLIONS IN AN HOUR
New York, Oct. 1. During the first
hour of the Liberty Loan campaign
eleven million in subscriptions were
announced by two banks. The Union
Pacific and Southern Pacific took five
million each.
INDUSTRIAL WORKERS
ARE BEING INDICTED
Federal Grand Jury Vigirously Backs
Up Work of the
Officers
(Associated Press)
Chicago, Oct. 1. Federal authori authorities
ties authorities announced today that 45 of the
166 men indicted in connection with
the Industrial Workers of the World
investigation have been arrested.
THE LIBERTY LOAN
For the purpose of equipping with
arms, clothing and food our
gallant soldiers who have been
called to the field;
For maintaining our Navy and our
valiant tars upon the high
seas;
For providing the necessary means to
pay the wages of our soldiers
and sailors and, if the bill now
pending in the Congress passes,
the monthly allowances for the
support of their dependent
families and to supply them
with life insurance;
For constructing a great fleet of mer merchant
chant merchant vessels to maintain the
line of communication with our
brave troops in France, and to
keey our commence afloat upon
the high seas in defiance of the
German kaiser and his sub submarines;
marines; submarines; For creating a great fleet of aero aeroplanes,
planes, aeroplanes, which will give com
plete supremacy in the air to
the United States and the brave
nations fighting with us against
the German military menace;
and for other necessary war
purposes.
The Congress of the United States
has authorized the secretary of the
treasury to sell to the American peo people
ple people bonds of the United States bear bearing
ing bearing four per cent interest, with valu valuable
able valuable tax emeptions, and convertible
under certain conditions into other is issues
sues issues of United States bonds that may
be authorized by the Congress. Tht
official circular of the treasury de department
partment department gives full details.
There is now offered to the Ameri American
can American people a new issue of $3,000,000, $3,000,000,-000
000 $3,000,000,-000 of bonds to be known as the Sec Second
ond Second Liberty Loan. They will be is issued
sued issued in such denominations and upon
such terms that every patriotic citi citizen
zen citizen will have an opportunity to assist
the government by lending his money
upon the security of a United States
government bond.
It is essential to the success of the
war and to the support of our gallant
troops that these loans shall not only
be subscribed, but over-subscribed.
No one is asked to donate or give his
money to the government; but every everyone
one everyone is asked to lend his money to the
government. The loans will be re repaid
paid repaid in full with interest at the rate
of four per cent per annum. A gov government
ernment government bond is the safest invest investment
ment investment in the world; it is as good as
currency and yet better, because the
government bond bears interest and
currency does not. No other invest investment
ment investment compares with it for safety,
ready convertibility into cash, and
unquestioned availability as collateral
security for loans in any bank in the
United States.
People by thousands ask the treas treasury
ury treasury department how they can help
the government in this war. Through
the purchase of Liberty Bonds, every
one can help. No more patriotic duty
can be performed by those who can cannot
not cannot actually fight upon the field of

OUR ALLIES AIID
OUR ENEMIES

E
Press)
OE
Demands for Expulsion from Senate
of LaFollette, Stone and Gronna
on the Increase
(Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. ""1. Petitions of
New York organizations seeking the
expulsion from the Senate of Sena Senators
tors Senators LaFollette. Gronna and Stone
were presented. The petitions were
referred to the committee on privi privileges
leges privileges and elections.
CUT DOWN BY AN UNKNOWN
CRAFT
An American patrol ship was ram rammed
med rammed and sunk by an unidentified craft
while on duty off an Atlantic port.
The official report does not mention
any casualties.
HERBERT PHILLIPS REAPPOINT REAPPOINTED
ED REAPPOINTED Among the nominations sent to the
Senate today were the following Flor Florida
ida Florida nominations: Herbert Phillips of
Tampa, United States attorney foi
the Southern district, and James Per Perkins
kins Perkins of Pensacola, United States mar marshal
shal marshal for the Northern district.
E FII FOR
THE CROWDS
New York and Chicago Baseball
Parks During World's Series will
Accommodate Only a Re Restricted
stricted Restricted Number
(Associated Press)
New York, Oct. 1. If the seating
capacity of the baseball parks in
which play will be staged were not
limited there is no question that new
attendance records would be estab established
lished established in the coming World Series be between
tween between the Chicago Americans and the
New York Nationals. So keen is the
interest and enthusiasm created by
this intersectional struggle for dia diamond
mond diamond supremacy between the teams
of the two largest cities of the nation
that under certain conditions it is
likely the figures of 1912 may be sur surpassed.
passed. surpassed. In the coming games the New York
Polo Grounds will seat 37,000 spec spectators,
tators, spectators, in round numbers, while the
Chicago White Sox park, with due al allowance
lowance allowance for any temporary stands
that President Comiskey may elect to
erect, will not exceed this paid seat seating
ing seating capacity. As a basis of compar comparison,
ison, comparison, therefore, the maximum capac capacity
ity capacity of either park may be placed at
approximately 37,000. Many close
followers of the playin gability of the
two teams involved have reached the
conclusion, that. given anything like
and even break in the luck of the
game, the series will go at least six
games before a decision is reached.
battle than to furnish the govern government
ment government with the necessary money to en enable
able enable it to give our brave soldiers and
sailors all that they require to make
them strong for the fight and capable
of winning a swift victory over our
enemies.-
We fight, first of all, for America's
vital rights, the right to the unmolest unmolested
ed unmolested and unobstructed use of the high
seas, so that the surplus products of
our farms, our mines and our fac factories
tories factories may be carried into the har harbors
bors harbors of every friendly nation in the
world. Our welfare and prosperity as
a people depend upon our right of
peaceful intercourse with all the na nations
tions nations of the earth. To abandon these
rights by withdrawing our ships and
commerce from the seas upon the or order
der order of a military despot in Europe
would destroy prosperity and bring
disaster and humiliation upon the
American people.
We fight to protect our citizens
against assassination and murder
upon the high seas while in the
peaceful exercise of those rights de demanded
manded demanded by international law and
every instinct and dictate of human human-ity.
ity. human-ity. We fight to preserve our'democrat-

01

TRAITORS

CLOS

Story Sent Out from Washing Washington
ton Washington is Baseless

AMPLE FACILITIES FOR MOVING PERISHABLE CROPS OF THE
STATE WILL BE AVAILABLE

(Special to
Jacksonville, Oct. 1 Deny emphat emphatically
ically emphatically on authority of the Interstate
Commerce Commission and Food
Commissioner Hoover, the rumor of
an impending embargo on the ship shipment
ment shipment of Florida perishable fruits and
vegetables. Dispatches from respon responsible
sible responsible Washington sources, based on
interviews ha'd this morning with of officials,
ficials, officials, give absolute assurance that
no embargo is intended. Edward
Chambers, chairman of the transpor transportation
tation transportation committee of the food commis commissioner's
sioner's commissioner's office, assures ample facili facilities
ties facilities for moving Florida crops.
Jefferson Thomas.
Furnished the Readers of the Star by
the Commercial Bank of Ocala
New York
Jan. Oct.
Opening .. ..23.55 24.10
Noon 22.88 23.48
Close 23.63 24.27
Dec.
23.70
22.87
23.83
Market steady. Spots quiet. Mid
dlings 25.25. No sales.
New Orleans
Jan. Oct. Dec.
Opening .. ..22.84 22.75
Close 22.93 23.49 22.91
Market steady. Spots steady. Mid Middlings
dlings Middlings 24.13. Sales 3,625.
Consolidated net receipts, 2,735.
Galveston spots steady. Middlings,
24.40 Liverpool receipts 83,000;
American, 64,500. Sales 3000. Mid Middlings
dlings Middlings 17.20.
DOCK LABORERS MAKE
THEIR DEMANDS
Will .Tie Up Ocean Traffic if They
Cannot Obtain More
Wrages
(Associated Press)
Boston, Oct. 1. It the strike of a
thousand dock laborers inaugurated
today is maintained, a serious tie-up
of ocean-going freight is feared.
WILL GO AWAY WEDNESDAY
Four of Our Young Selects Will Leave
for Camp Jackson Day
After Tomorrow
The following named young men
will leave for Camp Jackson Wednes
day: Orus Hicks, Geo. W. Batts, Sam
J. Gore and Thomas L. Fort.
These young men, all wrell known
here, will report to the exemption
board tomorrow afternoon, and will
leave on the 1:14 p. m. train Wed Wednesday.
nesday. Wednesday. There is only a little party of them,
but they are as brave and devoted .as
any, and deserve the same apprecia
tion.
The local board with the approval
of the district board has made up the
full Marion county quota, the last
number on the list as printed in the
Star being 389, and the next draft to
be taken on from that. This does
not allude, however, to further in increments
crements increments of this draft.
The colored men in this draft will
probably leave for Camp Jackson
next week.
ic institutions and our sovereignty as
a nation against the menace of a
powerful and ruthless military auto autocracy
cracy autocracy headed by the German Kaiser,
whose ambition is to dominate the
world.
WTe fight also for the noble ideal of
aniversal democracy and liberty, the
right of the smallest and weakest na nations
tions nations equally with the most powerful
to live and to govern themselves ac according
cording according to the will of their own peo people.
ple. people. We fight for peace, for the just and
lasting peace which agonized and tor tortured
tured tortured humanity craves and which not
the sword nor the bayonet of a mili military
tary military despot but the supremacy of vin vindicated
dicated vindicated right alone can restore to a
distracted world.
To secure these ends I appeal to
every man and woman who resids
upon the soil of free America and en enjoys
joys enjoys the blessings of her priceless in institutions
stitutions institutions to join the league of pat patriots
riots patriots by purchasing a Liberty Bond.
W. G. McAdoo,
Secretary of the Treasury.

COTTON MARKET.

the Star)

BIG MONEY Hi
Both Winners and Losers in the
World's Series will Rake Off
a Large Bonus
(Associated Press
New York, Oct. 1. The biggest
financial bonus of the baseball year
is to be distributed soon in the form
of a division of the gate receipts of
the World Series games of 1917.
When the New York National and
Chicago American League players re receive
ceive receive their share of the money, paid
in the form of admission charges by
the thousands of spectators who will
attend the contests, they will be able
to deposit to the credit of their bank
accounts sums larger than the yearly
income of many of the fans who will
witness the play.
GERMANY'S DARK
SOUL REVEALED
Raemaekers, the celebrated car cartoonist
toonist cartoonist of Holland, now in this coun country
try country said:
"Maximilian Harden has honored
me by saying that my cartoons have
done more to hurt the German cause
than all the articles that have been
written against Germany, but he com complained
plained complained that I represent the Germans
as a nation of burglars. So I did. 1
That is what they are.
"Twenty years ago I realized that
this war was coming. How did I
realize it so long ago? Because I
knew many Germans and read many
German books. I knew that the Ger German
man German people believed that they were
destined to be the conquerors of the
world, and that the lower races that
is what they call the Latins are
made to' serve them. Even then they
bragged openly they must have Bel Belgium
gium Belgium and Holland and northern -France.
Today they preach from
their pulpits that God is a German
that approves of the submarine war warfare;
fare; warfare; that, under the kaiser, Germany
will rule the world. It is foolish to
blame the kaiser only. He is merely
the chief maniac in a nation gone
mad a nation of burglars; a nation
which practices systematically sadis sadistic
tic sadistic cruelties upon the women, and
children.
"I say to you now, whatever you
may have heard of Germany, of the
conduct of German troops in France,
in Belgium, in Serbia, you have not
heard all, you do not know the worst.
I have seen photographs, so many
that if they were piled on that. table
over there they would reach the ceil ceiling,
ing, ceiling, photographs taken in" Serbia by
a Dutch doctor whom I know, rows
on rows of the dead bodies of little
children upon whom the most fright--ful
crimes had been committed be before
fore before they were slashed to death across
the body. I have seen photographs
of woman after woman whose breasts
have been cut off. This I have seen in
France. I know the terrible stories
of the young girls who were deported
from Lille 'to work in the fields
they said. Why, the German officers
tooktheir choice of them.
"Every officer was entitled to take
an orderly from among them. That is
nothing extraordinary to a German
officer. It's what he did with the
women of his own race before war be began.
gan. began. Every one of these officers in
time of peace took a girl of the people
and lived with her when in garrison.
If there were consequences, he paid
her a smalr sum. And when he mov moved
ed moved to another garrison he took an another
other another girl. That wa3 all. The Ger German
man German people do not protest, though
their own daughters are taken. Is
the man not an officer? What redress
would they have?"
PLUMBING AND
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING
. When you have' plumbing or elec electrical
trical electrical contracting, let us lurnish you
estimates. No job too large and none
too small, tf IL W. Tucker.

BASEBALL



' -t i Ci 1" o

OCALA EVENING STAR, MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1917

OCALA EVENING STAR

rUHUSTIED BVKItY

DAY EXCEPT
COMPANY OF

SUNDAY BY THE STAR PUBLJSHINO
OCAL., FLA.

WINTER HAVEN
AND POLK COUNTY

It. Ii. Carroll,
I'rrxMeitt

Port V. I.eavend,
!e?retary and Treawarer

J. II. Itrnjamiu, VUllUtT

Kntt-rt-il at Ocala, Fla., postofflce as second class matter

TKLKIMIOXKS

liuHlnrM OftW-et Fivr-Onr

Ktlltorial KKiin: Ftve-OneY

MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for republi republication
cation republication of all news credited to it or not otherwise credited in this paper
and also the local news published herein. All rights of republication
of special dispatches herein are also reserved.

SI "HS HIPTIOX HATES
Foreltcn Domestic
(.ne year, in advance 15.00 On year. In advance ft.OO
Hlx months. In advance ........ 2.&0 Six month, In advance 4.25
Three months. In advance 1.25 Three months, in advance 2.25
One mouth, In ad vane 50 One month, in advance SO

General orders issued by the war like every other conscientious citizen,
department by direction of President : is simply arising to the occasion. Its
Wilson provided that promotions in the American way, and it generally
the army are to be made solely on gets what it goes after.

merit.

Asked what he thought of Ameri American
can American soldiers training in France, an
English drill sergeant said: "They're
as keen as mustard; we can't give 'em
too much."
There will be a change in the per personnel
sonnel personnel of the state railroad commis commission
sion commission in the next election, and we
think it will be a good time to retire
Czar Burr.

The Allies are facing a grave
shortage in merchant vessels, said the
British shipping controller in a plea
to America for renewed efforts to
curb the U-boats.
Germany's elaborate plots to em embroil
broil embroil Japan and the United States
have failed utterly, said Viscount
. Ishii, at a supper given by the Jap Japanese
anese Japanese Society in New York.
Lord Milner declares that some something
thing something stronger than any paper ties
bind America and Great Britain and
that the Allies cannot discuss peace
with "unrepresented German rulers."
Colonel E. M. House, personal ad advisor
visor advisor of President Wilson, has been
appointed to gather material and sta statistics
tistics statistics for use in the international
peace council that will be held when
peace is declared.

A gigantic plot to overthrow the
government and aid Germany through
a reign of terror has been thwarted
by thp arrest of William D. Haywood
and other national leaders of the I.
W. W. at Chicago.

A good many people want to send
Kaiser William to St. Helena when
the war is over. Seems to the Star
that it would be an insult to the mem memory
ory memory of Napoleon to send a hereditary
accident like William to St. Helena.

John McClain, of Dayton, Ohio, is
the first American soldier to receive
the French war cross and palm. A
German airplane dropped a bomb near
McClain and he picked it up and
threw it into a river.

Mr. H. M. Hampton of this city is
notonly a lawyer of marked ability
but an enterprising farmer. Some
months ago, Mr. Hampton, who by
the way was raised on a farm, and
has never weaned himself from a love
of the soil, decided it was his duty,
and it would be his pleasure, to add
to the productiveness of this section.
He bought from various parties near
Montague tracts of land aggregating
305 acres and combined them into
quite a goodsized farm. Mr. Hamp Hampton
ton Hampton displayed good judgment in pick picking
ing picking the location and has as fine a
tract of upland as can be seen any anywhere.
where. anywhere. Part of it was old land which

had been allowed to lie fallow, part of

it new ground, which he is clearing.
Although it is his first year and he
started late, he has made fine crops

of corn and cotton and is preparing

the land for a "big. drive" next sea season.
son. season. The land is so prettily and con conveniently
veniently conveniently situated that jt is likely
that Mr. Hampton will build a coun country
try country residence out there some time in
the near future. Every man who re reclaims
claims reclaims or improves an acre is doing
his country a service these days, and
Mr. Hampton's example in utilizing

some of the fertile territory lying
around the city should be followed by
all who can do so.

Palm. Beach county will hold a wet
or dry election Oct. 30. Palm Beach
is the home county of Joe Earman,
the Mary Magdalene of our present
state administration. We confidently
look to see Joe's paper, the Palm
Beach Post, work for prohibition.

Council meets tomorrow night and
the Star hopes that it will not neglect
taking the necessary measures to
open South Fourth street. The con condition
dition condition of the ground affected by this
street is an imposition on the whole
town by imposing on all its children.
Members of the American Bankers'
Association shouted approval when
Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler declared
Congress should expel Senator, La La-Follette
Follette La-Follette and that the soldiers would
take care of the enemy, but it was up
to the citizens at home to fight sedi sedition
tion sedition and treason.

The railroad commission has grant granted
ed granted the petition of the Seaboard and
Atlantic Coast Line to extend the
time for completion of the Ocala union
station to Nov. 1. Every day the
present Seaboard station is in use it
breaks the law, but we suppose it
doesn't 'mind a little thing like that.

The "Linotype South" for Septem September
ber September contains the portrait of Louis H.
Dosh, a clever Ocala boy who learned
the printer's trade in Ocala, and is
now one of the smartest linotype
operators in Macon, Ga. Louis is a
brother of the Star's very efficient
operator, Mr. R. N. Dosh. The "South"
says of him: "Mr. Dosh is the capable
machinist-operator on the model 5
linotype in the plant of the J. W.
Burke company, Macon, Ga. This
young man has had a wide experience
in printing and linotyping, and his
model 5 produces some splendid work.
He has been connected with the Burke
company for seven years. The Burke

company handles high grade book,
catalog and commercial work, most

of which is linotyped."

We find the following in the grand
jury presentment of Palm Beach
county:
"We regret very much that a cer certain
tain certain paper in a neighboring town
should cast aspersions upon the Hon Honorable
orable Honorable E. B. Donnell, judge of the
fifteenth judicial circuit."
The fact that the grand jury did

not name the paper referred to looks
like it was afraid it might be indicted
for libel itself. Its reference to a
case yet to be tried was something
for which a newspaper might be jus justifiably
tifiably justifiably denounced, and, in our opin opinion,
ion, opinion, the judge should not have allowed
it published. It will give the defend defendants'
ants' defendants' lawyers justifiable reason for
objection, and, if the case goes
against him, appeal.
At the present writing, Sheriff
Galloway remains in charge of his of office,
fice, office, and the opinion is beginning to
prevail that the governor has not
found the charges against the sheriff
of sufficient weight to warrant his re removal.
moval. removal. It will be a good thing for
the governor, if he has come to that
conclusion. It will prove that he can

sometimes rise superior to factional factionalism
ism factionalism and personal politics and judge a
case on its merits. We shall be glad
to see and commend such evidence in

his favor as often as possible.

A special cable dispatch Saturday
described the furious onslaught by the
British which resulted in the capture
of Zonnebeke. The Prussians, order ordered
ed ordered to die rather than yield, died.
Wonder, how much longer a brave
people will be foolish enough to suf suffer,
fer, suffer, to keep a scrofulous degenerate
on his throne.

In the board of trade rooms this
morning, we picked up a copy of
"Facts and Photos," the little Marion
county booklet compiled with care and
genius by "Rooney" four years ago.
The present secretary sends away
several copies of this volume almost
every day. It was the best piece of
advertising Marion county ever had.
The commissioners of Polk county
have brought suit for criminal libel
against Bloom of the Lakeland Star.
Its our opinion the commissioners
have made a mistake. If Bloom's
criticisms are unjust, they should go
on about their business and pay no at attention
tention attention to him. Whether he is right
or wrong, it isn't likely a jury will
convict him.
Collier's Weekly, which has been a
constant critic of Secretary of War
Baker, contains an article which ad admits
mits admits that Mr. Baker has evoluted
from a pacifist into a war secretary,
and is still evoluting. There is not
much to wonder about in this. Four
years ago, everybody in America was
a pacifist, and if the great majority of
us are for war now it is because we
see that only thru war is there a
hope of permanent peace. Mr. Baker,

We might also add in passing, that

if "Brother" Benjamin's hide was

lashed as often as it deserves it
would be so thick that the little
strafing we gave it would not show
him up to be so thin-skinned and

peevish. Arcadia Enterprise.

We never give a gentleman any
reason for lashing our hide, and any

scalawag who thinks it should be

lashed, can always find us inside of it.

The St. Petersburg Independent
makes a justifiable protest against

teaching German in the public schools

of that town. Its our opinion that
the average American public school
has all it can do to teach its pupils
English. If it is to teach any foreign
language, they should be French and
Spanish, either of which is more nec necessary
essary necessary to an American than German.

By the way, has anybody heard of
Larue county, Ky., lately? The cor correspondents
respondents correspondents of the Louisville papers
bragged one day on this county as be being
ing being the one perfect county from a
draft standpoint in the United States.
Next day, the Associated Press dis dispatches
patches dispatches told a different story, but
they do not seem to have been adver advertised
tised advertised much.

At Quincy Friday, Circuit Judge E.
C. Love, granted a temporary re restraining
straining restraining order to prevent State
Comptroller Ernest Amos from issu issuing
ing issuing warrants to pay the salaries of
the three state tax commissioners for
the quarter ending Sept. 30, amount amounting
ing amounting to $750 each. The case will be
argued before the supreme court Oct.
8th.

Belleview, Sept. 29 I have just re

turned from a little journey to Polk
county, where I saw som" wonderful

things. I made a little stop of sev several
eral several hours in Plai.t City and when my
Coast Line train pulled in I was two
blocks from the depot. When I reach reached
ed reached the train it was ready to pull out,
but I told the conductor very posi positively
tively positively and emphatically that I was go going
ing going on that train and that I had not
yet bought my ticket or checked my
trunk. It is needles3 to state that I
traveled on that train and found the
conductor a perfect gentleman, like
all railroad conductors usually are.

At Lake Alfred I alighted for the

purpose ot changing cars to Winter

Haven. Now there is a peculiarity
about changing cars at Lake Alfred.
The last time I changed cars there the

train pulled out of the depot like any
well regulated train would with the
engine at the head of the procession,
and as I sat in the coach musing over
events this particular train began to
back and it kept on backing and then
backing some more, until I got un uneasy
easy uneasy and sent for the conductor and
asked him if he knew where he was
going. He told me perfectly frank
and clear that the train was headed
for Winter Haven and Bartow, and I
told him that it was going about it
the wrong way. That I thought we
were backing into Tampa, and to ver verify
ify verify his statement in a few minutes
we pulled into Winter Haven back backwards,
wards, backwards, and there standing on the de depot
pot depot platform was Miriam Thompson
Bailey, her husband and baby Elea Eleanor.
nor. Eleanor. They were just as glad to see
me as I was to see them, and from
that on I proceeded to visit to my
heart's content.
Winter Haven is a very progressive

town. They have a brand new depot

and the citizens there are very proud

of it. They also have a number of

I large new brick business blocks that

are pointed to with pride. The stores

and mercantile establishments are up-to-date
and the proprietors are pro

gressive business men, wrho take a

real live interest in the welfare of

the town, and all of them without ex exception
ception exception belong to either the church or

the board of trade, a great many of
them belong to both.
The churches display a very liberal
spirit. Instead of meeting in a hot
stuffy church on a summer night,
they all with the exception of the
Catholics and Baptists, bunched to together
gether together and secured the use of the
public park for Sunday night and
each Sunday night they would hold
a union service in the open air. The
Methodist minister would discourse
one Sunday, the Christian preacher
would tell his story the next Sunday,
and so on through the Sunday each
denominational preacher would take
his turn to talk to the assembled
multitude. It was a very populai
move and the park was crowded on
each occasion.
I also found Southern College well
represented in this little town. The
principal of the high school is a grad graduate
uate graduate from Southern, the Methodist
preacher is a graduate from Southern
and Southern was well represented in
other lines and branches.

The real live wire in this commun

ity, the moving spirit in all popular

and progressive moves, is a man
named J. Walker Pope. He is more

than anyone else responsible for Win

ter Haven being on the map. He has

sold more real estate than any man

in that section. He knows more peo

ple than any other man in Polk coun

ty. He it was that diverted the Dixie

Highway from the main line and
switched it around the corner at Lake

Alfred so that it pointed right

straight through Winter Haven on its

way to Tampa. To him as much as

to any other man is due the fifty

miles of 15-foot wide macadam roads

throughout Polk county. Wherever
and whenever anything tending to
advance the interest of Winter Haven

and Polk county is broached there one
will find J. Walter Pope, marching in

the van, waving the flag and doing his
utmost for his home community. He

is a mover that moves things.
Winter Haven boasts of a news

paper that is a credit to itself and

surrounding country. Every now and

then it proves its progressiveness by

going out and buying in some little

weakling newspaper that mistook its

calling and thereby enlarges its cir

culation and makes it a factor in the
county. This little paper, by the

way, owns its own building, has a fine

big cylinder press, job presses and a
fine linotype machine just like the

Star has. When the writer hit the

town they gave me just two lines

which goes to prove the high price of

paper and ink.
Winter Haven boasts of a gold sea

hotel just like the Colonial in Ocala
mi ii

iney also nave a very progressive

chapter of Eastern Stars. I attended

one of their meetings and worked my

way in. I also went on one of their

picnics to Lucerne Park. This Lu

cerne Park is a great proposition

Only a few years ago it was a wilder wilderness
ness wilderness of white sand hills and poor pine

trees. The Gillettes of Tampa, see

ing the vast possibilities, gathered it

in, planted it out to citrus trees and
sold the land, before they could get it

fenced and today it stands as a mon

ument to their thrift and foresight

teeming with intelligent and well to

do people from the north who have

filled up the vacant spaces and made
of several thousand acres a veritable

garden spot in the winderness. The

only objection that I find to Lucerne
Park is that it has a railroad service

that backs in instead of pulling in

These Gillette people that I have
just mentioned are the ones that our

Mr. Chas. V. Miller of Ocala is iden

tified with, which goes to prove my

contention that they are very pro

gressive people.

This section of Polk county is filled
with lakes. There are about one hun hundred
dred hundred and fifty lake in and around Win Winter
ter Winter Haven and a number of these
lakes are connected together by can canals
als canals so that a person can take a
launch and sail from lake to lake

CI PRE

For the Tenth Annual Marion
c
County Fair
TO BE HELD If) OCALA NOVEMBER 2, 28, 29, A! 30 HEX!

FRUIT BUTTER
78 Jar guava butter 50
79 Jar peach butter 50
80 Jar pear butter 50
81 Jar plum butter 50
82 Jar grape butter 50
WINES, CORDIALS AND VINEGAR
83 Quart grape wine 1.00
84 Quart scuppernong wine 1.00
85 Quart blackberry wine 1.00
86 Quart orange wine 1.00
87 Quart sparkling wine 1.00
88 Quart elderberry wine 1.00
89 Quart blackberry cordial 1.00
90 Quart home made grapejuice 1.00
91 Bottle sweet fruit juice 1.00
92 Best collective exhibit wine, vinegar, cordial and grape grape-juice
juice grape-juice 2.00
CANNED FRUITS
(Put up in Glass)
93 Jar of plums 50
94 Jar of strawberries 50
95 Jar of grapes .50
96 Jar of pineapples .50
97 Jar of blackberries..- 50
98 -Jar of guavas 50
99 Jar of huckleberries 50
100 Jar of pears 50
101 Jar of peaches 50
102 Jar of mulberries 50
CANNED VEGETABLES
Vegetables may be put up in either tin or glass cans
103 Jar green corn 50
104 Jar English peas... 50
105 Jar field peas 50

CANNED VEGETABLES Continued

106 Jar sweet potatoes 50

07 Jar of okra 50
08 Jar pumpkin 50
09 Jar of tomatoes 50
10 Jar beans 50
PICKLES, CATSUPS, ETC.
11 Jar of sweet pickled peaches .50
12 Jar sweet pickled pears 50
.13 Jar of sweet pickled watermelon rind 50
14 Jar of sour cucumber pickles 50
.15 Jar mustard pickles 50
.16 Jar bean pickles 50
17 Jar piccalilli 50
.18 Jar onion pickles '. 50

119 Jar of sour green tomato pickles 50
120 Jar of green stuffed tomatoes 50

.25
.25
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.25

.50
.50
.50
.50
.50
.50
.50
.50
.50
1.00

.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25

.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
.25
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.25
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.25
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.25
.25
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.25

121 Jar of chow chow 50

122 Jar mixed pickles 50

123 Jar. of mangoes 50
124 Jar of cabbage pickles 50
125 Jar of pickled beets 50

126 Jar of pickled artichokes 50

127 Jar corn salad 50
128 Bottle tomato catsup 50

129 Bottle walnut catsup 50
130 Bottle pepper sauce 50
131 Bottle of chili sauce 50

132 Jar of pepper hash 50
133 Jar corn chowder 50

134 Best collective exhibit canned products, pickles, honey

etc., from the farm 4.00 2.00
PICKLES", CATSUPS, ETC., Continued
SPECIAL PRIZE 1st 2nd

List No. Prem. Prem.

135 Best display of canned vegetables, preserves, jellies and

pickles grown in an Ocala garden 5.00

136 Best grown in any town garden outside of Ocala 5.00
137 Second best exhibit of above 1.00

Exhibitor must bring not less than one pint or more than four pints of

each product. Exhibit must be accompanied by statement showing exact
number of pints of each product put up and number of square feet in
garden plot on which same was raised. The winners will be required to make
affidavit that these products were grown by themselves in town gardens,

and put up by themselves or some member of family.

CRYSTALLIZED FRUITS
138 Jar crystallized peaches 50 .25
139 Jar crystallized cherries 50 .25
140 Jar crystallized pears -50 .25
141 Jar crystallized kumquats 50 -25
142 Jar crystallized oranges 50 .25
143 Jar crystallized grapefruit 50 .25
144 Jar crystallized lemon -50 .25
145 Jar crystallized figs 50 .2o
146 Jar crystallized citron 50 .o
147 Best collective exhibit srystallized fruit 2.00 1.00
148 Best collective exhibit jams, jellies, marmalades and pre preserves
serves preserves 2.00 1.C0
DAIRY
149 Best home made cheese I-00 0)
150 Best cottage cheese -5
151 Best pound butter I-00 .-5?-
152 Best collection and display for dairy uses 2.00 1.00
DEPARTMENT G NEEDLECRAFT
Mrs. L. E. Yonce, Manager
EXPLANATION
In the needlecraft department we have offered prizes for the best speci specimens
mens specimens in the different divisions. To illustrate: Under the head of lace and
crochet, we have offered a great many special prizes for individual articles,
and then at the close of the list, a prize for the best and second best, speci specimen
men specimen crochet. This means that everything in the line of crochet work not
previously listed may be entered under this number. However, nothing will
be listed under this number for which a special prize has been offered in the
preceeding list. We have done this to make a place for every piece of fancy

worK onerea ior exniDVi. ine same ruie appues to an uie amerem aivisions.

1 Best specimen imported Fancy work Ribbon
2 French embroidered and lace negligee 1.50 1.00
3 French embroidered wThite luncheon set, not less than sev seven
en seven pieces 1.50 1.00
4 French embroidered white table cloth and six napkins. . 1.50 1.00
5 French embioidered pillow cases 1.00 .50
6 French embroidered bed room set (scarf, sheet and pillow
cases) 1.00 .50
7 French embroidered teddies 1.00 .50
8 French embroidered night robe 1.00 .50
9 French embroidered skirt 1.00 .50
10 French embroidered shirt waist 1.00 .50
11 French embroidered dress (childs) 1.00 .50
12 French embroidered dress (adults) 1.50 1.00
13 French embroidered, hand made, baby outfit (cap, dress,
petticoat, pillow cover and slumber robe) 2.00 1.50
14 Pair French embroidered towels '. . 1.00 .50
Any Other Specimen of French Embroidery, Than Listed Above, Most be
Entered Under
15 Best French embroidered piece, household linen 1.00 .50
16 Best French embroidered garment 1.00 .50
MISCELLANEOUS EMBROIDERY
it i i i : j j. f aa r r

xt vjoiurtu emuroiuery center piece l.uu .uu
18 Specimen colored embroidery sofa pillow 1.00 '.50
19 Specimen coronation embroidery L00 .t0
20 Specimen colored embroidery, any article not listed 1.50 .75
21 Specimen Madeira embroidery 1.00 .50
22 Specimen Cut work 1.00 .50
23 Specimen Hardanger 1.00 .50
24 Specimen Eyelet embroidery 1.00 .50
2Fi Snpcimpn A nnlirmfi emhrniHorr 1 ftfl FLO

v.. ... v.v. J .......... a............ A.vr .w
26 Specimen cross stitch work 1.00 .50
27 Specimen any other embroidery or stitch not listed above
to be entered in one class 1.00 .50
LACE AND CROCHET
28 Specimen Honiton lace 1.00 .50
29 Specimen Duchess lace 1.00 .50
30 Specimen Point lace 1.00 .50
31 Specimen Battenberg 1.00 .50
32 Specimen Bobbin lace 1.00 .50
33 Specimen Filet lace (hand made) 1.00 .50
34 Specimen Filet lace (crocheted) 1.00 .50
35 Specimen Macrame lace 1.00 .50
36 Specimen Irish lace 1.00 .50
37 Crocheted luncheon set 1.00 .50
38 Crocheted lunch cloth ... .7 1.00 .50
39 Best collective exhibit crocheted laces.. 1.00 .50
40 Crocheted bedspread 2.00 1.00
41 Crocheted basket set, (not less than seven pieces) . 1.50 .75
42 Crocheted curtains, (pair in solid crochet) 1.50 .75
43 Crocheted piano scarf, (solid crochet) 1.50 .75
44 Specimen crocheted lace, on any article household linen. 1.00 .50
45 Specimen crocheted lace on any article of wearing apparel 1.50 .50
46 Lace dress, crocheted 2.00 1.00
47 Specimen woolen crochet 1.00 .50
48 Specimen crochet, any article or kind not listed above to
to be entered in one class 1.50 .75
KNITTING
49 Collective exhibit knitted laces i.OO .50
50 Knitted slippers 50 5
51 Knitted slumber robe 50 25
52 Knitted shawl 50 5
53 Knitted Sweater 50 j
54 Knitted bed spread 2.00 1.00
55 Knitted baby sack 50 .25
56 Any other specimen knitting 1.00 .50
57 Knitted cap for adult 50 25
(Continued on Fourth Page)

mi

rn

UfJ

T2DATDKI

(By SAMUEL HAMILTON, M. D. )

(Concluded on Third Page)

A French physiologist described man as a "digestive tube with arrangements for locomotion and guidance."
ft is commonly said that most people "dig their graves with their teeth." The disastrous effects of constipation

1 i 1 11 1 1 z 1 . 1 1 u : ..1 11 i-i t-

iiavc always uccn wen miuwu. 11 is casuy uuucisiuuu nuw &criuus arc uic rxouuies wnicn are causea Dy

stagnation of decayed matter in the large intestines
poison reabsorbed and taken into the circulation this
is called auto-intoxication. It is apparent, there therefore,
fore, therefore, that the first necessity is to cleanse the intestines
thoroughly.
The best method for cleansing the whole
intestinal tract and urging the liver into activity is
to take as much outdoor exercise as possible, drink
hot water before meals, and take a pleasant, laxative,
vegetable pill occasionally. Such a one is made up
of May-apple, leaves of aloe, root of jalap; made
into a sugar-coated pill that gives tone to the bowels.
This was first made nearly fifty years ago, and sold by
almost all druggists as Dr. Pierce's Pleasant Pellets.
Such simple means will prevent auto-intoxication.
People are realizing that the kidneys, just
as do the bowels, need to be flushed occasion occasionally.
ally. occasionally. The kidneys are an eliminativc organ and

are constantly working, separating the poisons from the blood. Uric acid backs up into the system, causing
rheumatism, neuralgia, dropsy and many other serious disturbances.

This can be avoided by stimulating the kidneys to increased action, and because of its tonic effect
on these organs I would advise any one to purchase Anuric (double or triple strength), which is to be had

nowadays at almost anv drue store, and take it three times a dav. Also drink hot water before mW



OCA LA EVENING STAR, MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1917

r
1

J ......
0m J i ..I.
x r

Affleck Millinery Parlor
Takes pleasure in extending patrons and friends a
cordial invitation to attend the twelfth
Fall Opening
of Imported and Domestic
Pattern Hats
Monday night at eight o'clock, October first,
Tuesday, October second
and Wednesday, October third,
Nineteen hundred seventeen.

OCA LA HOUSE BLOCK
South Side

THE WINDSOR HOTEL

JACKSONVILLE.FLORIDA

l 7
fl II I in ,' I

"In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a frond yard.
Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room service is
second to none.
RATES From $1.50 per day per person to $6.
ROBERT M. MEYER, J. E. KAVANAUGH
Pronrietor Manager.

ASHEVILLE
and the Mountains of Western North Carolina are
now Only Seventeen Hours from Florida by the
Through Service of the
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY
SOUTHERN RAILWAY SYSTEM
SCHEDULE
Lv. Ocala S. A. L. Ry ...4:15 p.m.
Lv. Jacksonville S. A. L. Ry 8:10 p.m.
Lv. Columbia Sou. Ry. System 7:05 a.m.
Ar. Hendersonville Sou. Ry. System 1:00 a.m.
Ar. Asheville .Sou. Ry. System 2:10 p.m.
Ar. Cincinnati Scu. Ry. System 8:10 a. m.
Electrically lighted Pullman Standard Berth and Drawing-room
Sleeping Cars daily from Jacksonville to Asheville and Cincinnati.
Dining Car Service Columbia to Asheville.
Low Round Trip Fares. Lon Limits. Liberal Stop-overs.
For Literature and Information Apply to
JOHN BOISSEAU, C. P. T. A., G. Z. PHILLIPS, A. G. P. A.,
Ocala, Fla Jacksonville, Fla.

We Cave the Equipment and Ability
To serve you as you ought to be servied, and when you are not let us

fhSk ycor again, to let us know, for thi is the only way we can accomplish

ur Jesire.
Of course, sometimes, little things go wrong, but they are not inten intentional,
tional, intentional, and, if you will call us up, they will be corrected IMMEDIATELY.

Ocala Ice ik Packing Co.

GALA Sim IIS

citizens of Pine, as they will keep and'

in their property here also, but

urchased Ocala property fori

Uhe purpo.-e of giving their children!

. . v !the benefit of the Ocala schools and j
If You H.ve Any New. for this De-S h h faciHtie3 Mr. Turner i3 one-

parwneni, cau l wo-une-r lve ,of our lar?e stock raisers ami js

or Five-One Y quite able to enjoy such advantages, j
"TZZTZTTZT ; Pine notes in Tribune. :

t viu ir-s i Mr. and Mrs. Turner bought the

i nmup fipfuriiPfl nv Mr. ann Mr. .1.

j Sister Susie's shucking spuds for sol-!Jackson but have' decided not to move!
j jers to Ocala until the first of the year and j
I Bettys baking Boston bread and'probably not until next falL

j wmib, ;
j Polly's planting parsnips and persim-i c5 tt.-.i

! mons, 1 1 x' j
I Maggie's making mittens for ma- A prominent society woman, in
' L-riQol'inrp 1'c v1qt' rf Vla Vori(TO ITS f

Nellie's knitting nighties for the the pIan3 for fhe coming season said:j

navy, ; lnis is no time to spend money m
Brother Bob is busy with his bit, gayeties, and to bring out our daugh daugh-Bill
Bill daugh-Bill is buying bonds to boost the bat- i ters- There are too many serious
tie ; things to be done now."
Father's rinding finances that fit, Such institutions as the Metropol Metropol-Helen's
Helen's Metropol-Helen's hoeing hominy for heroes, iitan Opera and the annual National
Ed has edged into the engineers, Horse Show, which is to be held this
Mike will make his mrrk in the mil- season for the American Red Cross,
itia, will attract society as of old, but the
Steve sits in a submarine and : routine of balls and formal debutante
steers; affairs is doomed. New York Times.
Folks are going into it in earnest :
A fact the kaiser very soon will The regular meeting of the Worn-see-
an's Auxiliary of Grace Episcopal
So wireless him across the broad At- church will be held Tuesday after after-lantic
lantic after-lantic ; noon at 3 o'clock at the rectory. This
He's got to fight the whole darn w511 be the first meeting in over a
familee. Bill Osborn. month and all members are especially
; requested to attend. 2t
Tuesday Auction Club
w- i-,,, -..i .i 1 Mrs. C. R. Tydings, Miss Annie Da-
Miss Ellen Clarkson invites the r u t V j-
v rr j A- i u 1 V1S and Mr. Robert Tydings are ex ex-members
members ex-members of the Tuesday auction club , j t i
i u t j pected home Friday from a delightful
to play with her Tuesday afternoon y ,T , u-
at 3'90 o'clock ; summer in Maryland and Washington.
They will make the trip in their car.
. I Mr. and Mrs. William Stroud, who
Jsotice, Ocala Chapter No. 29, O. E. S. :have been in the Tydings home this
The worthy matron has called a re- summer, will make their home with
hearsal for Wednesday afternoon at Mrs. Stroud's parents, Mr. and Mrs.
3 o'clock, to prepare for the grand F. B. Beckham and family for the
matron's visit. All officers of Ocala present,
chapter are urged to be present.
Mrs. F. E. McClane came up from
Mr. N. I. Gottlieb arrived home St. Petersburg Saturday noon and
Saturday night to spend a few days ; was the guest of Mrs. F. G. B. Wreihe
with his family. until this afternoon, when she left
i on the limited for Fort Oglethorpe,
The Woman's Missionary Society i& where she will visit Dr. McClane until

meeting this afternoon at the Metho-! Friday. Mrs. McClane will then go

k -1 1 n

MMifMglMtlMBHiiaWlBaMHMailiiilMR

I ".V-f Ti f lt "x..jr

she will move Monday

notes in Times-Union. I y "g

dist church.

to Oklahoma where she will probably
spend the winter with relatives.

The Junior sewing circle of the
Methodist church will meet Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock at the
home of Mrs. C. C. Bryant. 2t

Mr. W. A. Barrett came down from
Jacksonville last night to spend sev several
eral several days with his family.
The Methodist sewing circle is be
iner entertained this afternoon hv

Mrs. A. T. Thomas, after a seven ; Mr- and Mrs- E- P- Thagard will be
weeks vacation. 1 tne Suests of Mrs. Hattie Hopkins at
j her suburban home, Keepsake, for the
Mrs. W. M. McDowell and daugh- coming winter. At present Mrs. Thag Thag-ters
ters Thag-ters are being welcomed home after a j ard is located at the Waukeenah and
six weeks visit to relatives in Vir- 's

ginia and Maryland.

PHONE $4

OCALA. FLA

i
Ocala friends of Miss Georgia Bor- i
ger will be interested to hear she is I
teaching again in the Hillsborough j
high school in Tampa this year. j

t Miss Wynona Wetherbee spent the
.week end with her parents and re-j

turned to Dunnellon this morning,!

where she is teaching school this win winter.
ter. winter. Miss Flora Wishart of Lumberton,
N. C, leaves today for Ocala, after
several days spent in Lake Helen as
a guest of the Jackson House, while
attending the Wishart-Jackson wed

ding. DeLand News.
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Raysor, who j
have been making their home at Red- j
dick, where Mr. Raysor is in business, j

for the past three months, have re returned
turned returned to their home in this city. Mr.
Raysor will spend the week-ends in
the city.
The Ocala and Marion county
friends of Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Downs

and Miss Cecile Downs, who are now

pleasantly located in Ambler, one of j
the pretty suburbs of Philadelphia,!
will be interested to hear that Miss I
Downs is now choir master in one of j
the largest Methodist churches in!
Philadelphia.
j
Miss Dorris Murry, who spent some j
time with friends in Chicago, has been I
the guest of Miss Jane Frey in La-
Grange, 111., for the past two weeks,
and will not return to Ocala until the j
middle of October. Miss Frey will not j
return to Ocala this winter as shej
had planned, but two other young J
lady friends of Miss Murry are con- j
templating spending the winter here, j
j
Mr. and Mrs. G. D. Turner, "pros- i

perous Pimtes, have purchased a
beautiful home in the elite resident
section of Ocala. This does not mean
that we are to lose these people as

LIFE

FIRE

A. E. GERIG
INSURANCE
Ocala, Florida
ACCIDENT AUTOMOBILE

VEGETABLES

Irish Potatoes Special Price
for a few days, pk 45c
Sweet Potatoes, peck 35c
Northern Rutabagas, per lb 04c
Northern Beets, per lb 08c
String Beans, per qt 10c
Cabbage, per lb 05c
Okra, per qt. 8c, two for 15c
Onions, per lb 05c

(D)o

TLf TEAPOT
ii-o GROCERY

PHONES 16174

JVV riTmiiir ili-n.fr

V-' :., -1

v i t I

At 231 tircves a

tke.bes-fc aoswer to fktkie jvK thirst)

sr,

I 7 It AS V

1 I

Delicio-us- RefresKiiv

OCALA COCA-COLA BOTTLING WORKS

mm

Tallahassee

Mr. Leroy Bridges, a student of
the University of Florida, spent tht.
week end with his parents, Capt. and
Mrs. T. E. Bridges.

Mr. Leo Wilson, a student at the
University of Florida, spent Sunday
with his mother, Mrs. C. L. Wilson at
the home of Rev. and Mrs. R. Ira
Barnett and family.
Mr. Rosco MefFert returned to the
University of Florida this morning,
after spending the week-end with his
parents.
Mrs. Jack Rentz and little daugh daughter,
ter, daughter, Emily of Tallahassee, left last
week for Jacksonville, where they will
spend the winter.
Miss Louise Smoak of Ocala, has
returned to her home after a visit
with her sister, Mrs. Tom Day.
High Springs notes in Times-Union.
Miss Smoak will be the guest of her
sister, Mrs. W. A. Goin this winter,
spending the week ends with her par parents
ents parents at Silver Springs.
Messrs. Frank and Claude Clarkson

left Saturday on the limited after a
two weeks visit to Mr. and Mrs. H. B.
Clarkson and family. They will spend
several days in Jacksonville before
going to their homes in Washington
and Bridgeport, Conn.
The Duval county chapter, Ameri American
can American Red Cross, now has a membership
of 2,500, the Marion county chapter
having 990, and Ocala proper 850

members.
Mrs. E. G. Peek and two .pretty
children who have been at Mounds Mounds-ville,
ville, Mounds-ville, W. Va., for several months, are
now the guests of Miss Meredith Mc Mc-Lelland
Lelland Mc-Lelland in Richmond, Va. They will
return home the last of this week.
Sunday's Times-Union contained a
large picture of Miss Gladys Mae
Farris, the pretty sister of Mrs. Cecil
Bryant, who spent the summer in
Ocala. Miss Farris is attending
Washington Seminary in Washington,
this year.
(Concluded on Fourth Page)

WINTER HAVEN
AND POLK COUNTY

(Continued from Second Page )

fishing and enjoying th escenery.
Winter Haven has a high school
that will class with anything of its
kind in the state. It is a magnificent
creation of which these people are
duly proud.
The business men have formed a
home guard and they meet and drill
once each week.
After missing with progressive peo people
ple people and affairs it makes a person
question the advisability of staying
in a less progressive community.

j There is a place out in the wide world
I for anybody that wants to lift them them-I
I them-I selves out of the sleepy hollow, and
j that feeling has a strong lodgement

in my mind. Eleanor A. Tremere.

Dr. Purvis has opened up his dental
office over Troxler's fruit and cold
drink store, by Harrington Hall ho hotel.
tel. hotel. 9-15-lm

. EGGER O. C,
Chiropractor

CHIROPRACTIC IS THE SCIENCE OF REMOVING THE CAUSE
OF DISEASE
To those who have been suffering from diseased conditions and
received no. relief, try CHIROPRACTIC and get well. Others have,
and you can do the same.
REMOVING THE CAl SE IS THE PRINCIPLE
NO MEDICINE, SURGERY OR OSTEOPATHY
OFFICE HOURS: ROOM FOUR
9:30 to 11:30 A. M. HOLDER BLOCK
2 to 5 and 7 to 8 P. M. PHONE 487

STORAGE BilTTERY SERVICE
ANY STORAGE BATTERY RE-CHARGED OR
REPAIRED
Special attention to Prest-c-Lite Batteries in Maxwell Cars. Bring
me your Battery WTork. Charge? Reasonable and Service First Class.
YONGE'S BATTERY SERVICE

MAXWELL STATION

OCALA, FLORIDA

8

EE En3 EEi)S S I

lis now a universally acknowledged necessity. No business man is'
prepared to meet the daily affairs of his business if he is not pro protected
tected protected with

FIRE INSURANCE

We represent not only the best fire insurance companies, but
also the highest class INDEMNITY AND BONDING concerns in
the world. Talk is over with us.

I D. W. DAVIS,

3

AGENCY
Holder Blk.

OCALA, FLA.

ST. LEO COLLEGE
SAINT LEO, PASCO COUNTY, FLORIDA
IDEAL BOARDING SCHOOL FOR YOUNG GEIHEfl
Courses in Classics, Science and Commerce. Also
Primary Department. Send for Catalogue.
Rev. F. Benedict, Director.
OPENS FOR THE FALL TERM, WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 12, 1917.

i lie

.ommercia

OCALA. FLORIDA

CAPITAL STOCK S50.000.00.
Sfac, Cosinly and City Depository.

j -1 r.

ISNT IT n TOO BAD

I NEVER HftVE
MY LUCK-VEY

LADY DEPfE.'?
Pi PARK CLOUP
BmtJD evRY
Silver unng

Y Yes but t?:e

MUST OlVfc

.T-Wr PA

I B s y -.
; fTT s '' )' -Hoi Jf EXCU6E ME (
;- i V :- I ; Vrr Bo' Ho! ( LQPY- BaT Yvtef'S

( WOHDER WOT M IANYW)Y? J F

: -i- fQ J. r .cc S$ rail?

' I ... 1 CpPXR-GHT NBTt

WELL

TAUP IT

from he

YuH .GUOHTTA
RF. 6LAD IF

He Follov v

n

- !iN' FIVE

-T? APT A NEW

6ET OF

TtMBLfc;

coupons

8

.1

, (SjK

a



MGE FOUR
OCA LA EVENING STAR, MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1917

an mm

MRS. W. H. SEALEY

Mr. George Blitch of Williston was
an Ocala visitor today.

Ha

ve your prescriptions filled at

The friends of Mr. and Mrs. A. C.

Cobb will deeply ..sympathize with
them in the lpss they have suffered by
the death of Mrs. Cobb's mother,
Mrs. W. H. Sealey, who passed away
at her home in Alachua Sunday.
Mrs 5vmlov was a most estimable

Gerig's by registered pharmacists, tf j jajy OVed and revered by all in

Alachua, where she and her husband
Mr. Charles Powell of Jacksonville had made their home for many years,
was the week-end guest of Ocala I she was for most of her life a mem mem-friends.
friends. mem-friends. j ber of the Baptist church.
I 7 : i Mrs. Cobb, who went to Alachua
,MtyA!nS,St UPn haVing Cart6r ilart week, was with her mother when
MJfTtRNUT bread. Get it nt yourjshe pas3ed away. Mr. Cobb left on
grocer's of at Carter's Bakery, North jth;s. moi.ninir's train to attend the

Main street.

1 AFFAIRS

(Contirued frors Third Paee

HI U

7-tf

Messrs. C. M. and E. D. Mathews
and J. H. McEwen of Flemington
were in town today.
Army trench mirrors 25c. Army

shaving brushes
Gerig's.

funeral.

0c.

and 7oc.
29-tf

at

Mr. J. M. McDonald has taken a
position in the Harrington barber
shop.
Trade at Gerig's and get the best
drugstore service. 29-tf

LITTLE CHARLES MARTIN

Mr. J. R. Simmons of St. Peters Petersburg
burg Petersburg was an Ocala visitor yesterday
and today.
We are agents for Kodaks and the
Eastman N. C. films. Gerig's. 29-tf
Mr. M. G. Albritton, recently re returned
turned returned from West Palm Beach to
Fort McCoy, was in town today.

, Chesapeake Bay Oysters received
daily at the Delicatessen Shop, Ocala
Houss block. 17-cf
Claude Mcintosh, formerly of De De-Land,
Land, De-Land, but who is now in the employ
of the Atlantic Coast Line, with head headquarters
quarters headquarters in Ocala, spent the first of
the week visiting friends here. De De-Land
Land De-Land News.
Mrs. Minnie A. Bostick's millinery
stock is now complete. The most un unusual
usual unusual distinctive hats ever created are
now being shown." The best Models
and Smart, Desirable Selections are
assured. Ladies are invited to call,
corner Harrington Hall Hotel, Phone
310 29-tf

The friends of Mr. "and Mrs. J. F.
Martin sincerely sympathize with
them in the loss of their bright and
lovable little boy, who died after a
very brief illness Saturday night.
Funeral services were held at the
home on South Sixth street Sunday
afternoon, Rev. H. O. Cole officiating,
and the body of the little one was
laid to rest in Greenwood.
Charles was two years old, and an
unusually brieht and promising child.

He was the favorite of all who knew
him as well as the dearly loved of his
parents, and his death cast gloom
over the neighborhood.
THE AFFLECK FALL OPENING

The Star has been -favored with the
sight of the photo of one of Uncle
Sam's brave yourfg seamen, once one
of our carrier boys, Hubert TenEyck.
He is growing in heft and seamanship
every day.

Besides being the best, Carter's
EUTTERNUT bread is "made in
Ocala." Insist upon having Carter's
bread from your grocer. 7-tf

Deputy Sheriff Grubbs was quite
tired out by his footrace with Joe
Coleman, the negro boy who stole
Sam Phillips' wheel. Mr. Grubbs did
quite an expeditious job in this case.
In default of $100, Joe will await the
grand jury.
The greatest human care and the
highest human intelligence ought to
go into the filling of every prescrip prescription.
tion. prescription. This describes our service. The
Court Pharmacy. 17-tf

Bright and early this morning, 01 01-lie
lie 01-lie Turner, a young man from over
Morristown way, applied to Judge
Smith for a marriage license for tiim tiim-self
self tiim-self and Miss Edith Scriven, a pretty
young lady of the same neighborhood.
W. K. Lane, ju. Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye. Ear, Nose and
Throat. Law Library Building, Ocala,
Florida. t'

Mrs. Annie E. Graham, an estima estimable
ble estimable colored woman, the wife of Philip
Graham, the well-known waiter, died
Saturday, after a long illness, and
was buried from St. Paul's A. M. E.
church, of which she was a member,
Sunday. Mrs. Graham came here
with her husband from Cincinnati
about twenty-five years ago. Most
all the time since she and her hus husband
band husband lived in their little home south southwest
west southwest of the city. She was a diligent
worker for her church, a good neigh neighbor
bor neighbor and possessed the confidence of
the whte people as well as that of
her own race.

FORD TRUCK FOR SALE
A Ford panel body truck, complete completely
ly completely equipped, in use only two months,
all ready to solve your delivery prob problems.
lems. problems. Apply at Star office. 27-6t
Chesapeake Bay Oysters received
aaily at the Delicatessen Shop, Ocala
House block. 17-tf
Harmony Glycerine Soap is still
15c the cake. No advance on it as
yet. Better buy now. Gerig's Drug
Store. tf.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

Notice is hereby given to all cred creditors,
itors, creditors, legatees, distributees, and all
other persons having claims or de demands
mands demands against the estate of Andrew
Olson, deceased to present the same
to the undersigned, duly proven
within two years from this date, to to-wttt
wttt to-wttt This 4th day of August, A. D. 1917.
OSCAR ANDREWS,
As Administrator of the Estate of
Andrew Olson, Deceased. 8-6-mon
. ODD FELLOWS

Tulula Lodge No. 22, I. O. O. F.,
meets every Tuesday evening in the
Odd Fellows' hall on the third floor of
the Star office building at 8 o'clock
promptly. A warm welcome always
extended to visiting brothers.
Oscar Andrews, N. G.
W. L. Colbert, Secretary.

WOODMEN OF TnE WORLD
Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
the K, of. P. hall at 7:30 p. m. every
second and fourth Friday. Visiting
sovereigns are ailways welcome.
T. D. Lancaster, C. C.
Chas- K. Sage, Clerk.

As will be seen in another column
of today's Star, the Affleck Millinery
Parlor will have its annual fall open opening
ing opening during this week. The formal
opening will be in full swing from 8
to 10 o'clock tonight and all day dur during
ing during Tuesday and Wednesday. This is
an annual occasion looked forward to
by the Ocala ladies with a great deal
of pleasure, and it is only safe to pre predict
dict predict that this season's occasion will be
no less attractive than those which
have gone before.
CORN WANTED

The board of county commissioners
of Marion county will receive bids up
to Wednesday, 10 o'clock, Oct. 3rd, for
corn in any quantity, unshucked per
barrel of 80 pounds. The board re reserves
serves reserves the right to reject any and all
bids. W. D. Carn,
Chairman Bd. Co. Com.
P..H. Nugent, Clerk. 24-8t
WOOD

When you want wood call my resi residence,
dence, residence, phone 349, or call Teapot
Grocery, phone 16. Prompt delivery.
24- J. H. J. Counts.

Mr. t.nd Mrs. D. E. Busier and
daughter, Carrie Belle Bu?ler, left to

day on the limited for Memphis,!

Term., where they will reside in the
future.
Mrs. Ola Potter and children, Dolly
and Jean Potter, expect to move to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow into Mr. Jake Brown's cot cottage
tage cottage formerly occupied by Mr. and
Mr.s. Busier and family.
Mrs. Lang Goodyear left yester yesterday
day yesterday noon for Lakeland, where she will
visit Mr. Goodyear's brother and sis

ter-in-law until Wednesday.

Mr. Eugene D. Dodge, who has been
connected with the Chester Ship Shipbuilding
building Shipbuilding Co. in Chester, Pa., for some
time, has been the guest of his par parents,
ents, parents, Dr. and Mrs. W. H. Dodge in
Jacksonville for several days. Mr.
Dodge, better known as "Tucky," left
Saturday for Duluth, Minn., where he
has accepted a position as material
clerk with the Duluth Iron Works, one
of the largest concerns of the kind in
the west.
.
Marjorie Rambeau, the charming
actress who starred at the Temple re

cently in "Motherhood," is the leading
lady in today's attraction, "The Debt,"
a five-reel Mutual feature. Moving
picture fans will be interested to hear
that the fascinating Pauline Fred Frederick
erick Frederick of New York city, who was at
one time the wife of Frank M. An Andrews,
drews, Andrews, a New York architect, was

married last Thursday. to Charles Mc McLaughlin
Laughlin McLaughlin of Mountain Lake, N. J.
The wedding was a quiet one, the
ceremony being performed at the res residence
idence residence of Rev. H. D. Mitchell in
Washington. Mr. McLaughlin's stage
name is Willard Mack and he is now
apeparing in his new play, "The Tiger
Rose," at the Belasco theater in New
York. In applying for the marriage
license Mr. McLaughlin gave his age
as forty and Miss Frederick as thirty thirty-one.
one. thirty-one. Both said they had been di divorced.
vorced. divorced. Miss Marjorie Rambeau, who
stars at the Temple today, obtained
a divorce from Mr. McLaughlin on
June 11th.
Miss Daisy Bell, who had expected
to return to Ocala this week, has de decided
cided decided to remain in St. Augustine until
Christmas.

OS-
o9 o9-GO
GO o9-GO 01
62
G3

04 I

DRAWN WORK
Drawn work table cloth 1.50
Drawn work table cover 1.00
Drawn work luncheon set, not less than seven pieces.... 2.00
Any specimen drawn work, other than above 1.00
HEMSTITCHING
Hemstitched handkerchief 50
Specimen hemstitching 1.00
. TATTING

Best specimen tatting trimmed earment 1.00

05 Specimen tatting trimmed household linen 1.00
CO Tatting collar 50
67 Handkerchief, tatting edging 50
08 Baby cap 1.00
GENERAL FANCY WORK

09 Woven bedspread 1.00
70 Silk quilt 1.00
71 Worsted quilt 1.00
72 Cotton quilt 1.00
73 Home made rug 1.00
74 Hand painted pillow top 1.00
7-5 Fancy bag 50
70 Specimen fancy work not listed in above, or under any
of the list numbers, to be entered in one class 1.00
OLD LADIES CORNER
77 Specimen knitting 1.00
78 Specimen tatting I 1.00
79 Specimen weaving 1.00
80 Specimen crochet 1.00
81 Specimen any kind of lace work 1.00
82 Specimen silk embroidery 1.00
83 Specimen French embroidery 1.00
84 Specimen silk quilt 1.00
85 Cotton quilt '. 1.00
86 Hand made rug 1.00
87 Specimen spinning 1.00
88 Hand made garment 1.00
89 Hand made basket 1.00
90 Bed spread, combination of embroidery and crochet or
knitting 2.00
PRACTICAL SEWING, MACHINE AND HAND
91 Man's tailored shirt 1.00
92 Man's work shirt 1.00
93 House dress 1.00
94 Kitchen apron 50
95 Blouse. 50
96 Little girl's dress 1.00
97 Little boy's suit 1.00

50

THREE FORD TOURING CARS

We have three Ford touring cars
for sale, $200, $225 and $250, re respectively.
spectively. respectively. The Maxwell Agency,
Ocala, Fla.

LET ME SELL YOUR LANDS!
If your title is good and the
price is right, I can find a
buyer.
J.H.BRINSON, OCALA, FLA.

Mclver & MacKay
UNDERTAKERS and EMBALMERS
PHONES 47, 104, 305
OCALA, FLORIDA

WHEN YOU HAVE PAID YOUR
RENT YOU HAVE
KISSED IT GOODBYE
Why not pay a small amount each
month and see it go into
YOUR OWN HOME
I have a number of houses you can
buy that way at
$10 A MONTH
call and see my list of houses from
$1000.00 up.
L M. MURRAY

Room 5 Holder Blk.

Ocala, Fla.

PHONE 117
Dr. A. R. Blott
Veterinarian
TOMPKINS' STABLE
Ocala, Florida

LET US DO YOUR

iOUGH

DRY

7 Cents Per Pound
Miiiimurhof lOpounds. Flat
pieces finished. Try it!
OCALA STEAM
LAUNDRY
Just Phone 101

None but the finest strains of se selected
lected selected garden seeds are used in the
Pakro Seedtape 30 varieties of gar garden
den garden seed -and 18 flowers. Clarkson
Hardware Company. tf

A human life may depend upon the
accuracy and promptness with which
a prescription is looked after. Both
are features at the Court Pharmacy

UNCLASSIFIED Al

WANTED, LOST, FOUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS

DR. D. M. BONEY
"My Optician"
EYESIGHT
SPECIALIST

I especially offer my services to the
people of Central Florida, and invite
personal visits or mail orders.
202-204 Hogan St., Park Hotel Bldg.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
NOTICE After October 1st I will
not work at as low wages as I have
been in the past. I must have at least
75 cents a day and meals. W. H.
Deubel. 29-6t
WANTED Old False Teeth. Doesn't
matter if broken. I pay $2 to $15 per
set. 'Send by parcel post and receive
check by return mail. L. Mazer, 1007
S. Fifth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 29-12t

FOUND A Georgia state license
plate. Apply to the Star office.
STRAY DOG TAKEN UP I have a
white pointer dog, with dark liver
spots; about two years old; long body.
Owner can have same by calling on
me and paying expenses. S. M.
Grubbs, deputy sheriff. 27-6t

L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER
AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Con Contract
tract Contract work. Gives More and Better
Work for the Money than any other
contractor in the city.

LOST OR MISLAID A loose-leaf,
vest pocket visiting list, 3x4 inches
in size, half -inch thick; black leather.
A suitable remard will be paid for its
return to Dr. E. Van Hood, Ocala,
Fla., or the Star office. 27-tf
HOUSE FOR RENT Located on
Watula street, north of the Presby Presbyterian
terian Presbyterian church. A first class property.
Apply to Dr. J. W. Hood. 26-tf
FOR SALE Sugar cane seed, Rib Ribbon,
bon, Ribbon, Green Louisiana, and Red
Cuban; $2 per sundred stalks 4-foot
cane. Order early and secure best
seed. Address Newcomb Barco, Cot Cotton
ton Cotton Plant, Fla. 17-lm
FOR SALE My new home, 6 rooms;
fine location; near both schools. A
bargain. J. E. Frampton, 1109 East
5th St., Ocala, Fla. Phone 185-G.- 12t

FOR RENT Comfortable cottage,
six rooms, corner Tuscawilla and
S. Second streets; sleeping porch, 8 8-foot
foot 8-foot veranda, screens, gas, bath, elec electric
tric electric lights. "Apply to Dr. E. Van
Hood or phone 164. 1-tf
FOR SALE Nice lot 70 x 112 in sec second
ond second ward also nice residence lot at
$200. W. W. Condon. 21-tf
FOR SALE, AT A BARGAIN One
1917 seven passenger Reo six, and
one 1916 five passenger Reo. Both in
first-class condition. A good auto for
hire business goes with the cars. Ap Apply
ply Apply to John Needham. 22-tf
FOR SALE Small Buick four-passenger
touring car in good repair;
new tires. Belleview Trading Co.,
Belleview, Fla. 29-tf

1.00
.50
1.00
.50

.50
.50
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.25
.50
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.50
.50
.50
.50
.50
.25
.50
.50
.50
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.50
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1.00
.50
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.25
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.50
.25

98 Sunbonnet

DEPARTMENT H ARTS AND CRAFTS
MRS. L. E. YONCE, Manager.
PAINTING 1st 2nd
1 Marine view in oil 1.00 .50
2 Landscape in oil 1.00 .50
3 Flowers in oil 1.00 .50
4 Animals in oil 1.00 .50
5 Portrait in oil 1.00 .50
6 Landscape in water color 1.00 .50
7 Marine view in water color 1.00 .50
8 Flowers in water color 1.00 .50
9 Fruit in water color 1.00 .50
10 Pastelle '. . .50 .25
11 Miniature on ivory 1.00 .50
12 Collection of oil and water color pictures 2.00 1.00
13 Collection hand painted china (not less than 12 pieces) . 2.00 1.00
14 Cream and sugar ". 1.00 .50
15 Cup and saucer 1.00 .50
16 Plaque .. 1.00 .50
17 Salad dish 1.00 .50
18 Berry dish 1.00 .50
19 Punch bowl 1.50 .50
20 Specimens of china painting other than above 1.50 .50
MISCELLANEOUS
21 Specimen of burnt wood 50 .25
22 Specimen of wood carving 1.00 .50
23 Specimen leather work 1.00 .50
24 Specimen beaten brass '. 1.00 .50
25 Specimen jewelry and wire work 1.00 .50
26 Specimen wire grass work 1.00 .50
27 Specimen pine straw work 1.00 .50
28 Specimen palmetto work 1.00 .50
29 Specimen cards, score cards, etc 1.00 .50
30 Specimen bead necklaces 1.00 .50
31 Specimen bead work 1.00 .50
S2 Specimen in real basketry 2.00 1.50
33 Specimen shuck work 50 .25
34 Collection of antiques, with history attached 1.50 1.00
35 Collection of curios, with history attached 1.50 1.00
- SPECIAL PRIZES
The home economic committee of the Ocala Woman's Club will again offer
prizes at the Marion County Fair for the best home made labor saving de devices.
vices. devices. The prizes will be as follows:
36 Best fireless cooker 3.00 1.00
37 Best article of another kind 3.00 1.00
Since the prize for the best fireless cooker was won last year by a resi resident
dent resident of Ocala, the prize this year will be awarded to a person not residing in
Ocala but must be a resident of Marion county. The contest for the best
article of another kind is open to all residents of Marion county, whether
residing in Ocala or not.
CHILDREN'S DAY
The Fair management have set aside Friday, Nov. 30th, as Children's
Day, and on that day all children under sixteen will be admitted free of
charge. Let us have the co-operation of teachers and parents in planning
and helping the children throughout the county to take advantage of this
day set aside for their benefit and pleasure.
In this connection we desire to thank the teachers who did such efficient
work, in helping the Superintendent and committee to make the Educational
Department the splendid success that it has been the past two years. Let us
go onward to greater success.
CORN CLUB PRIZES
R. W. BLACKLOCK, Superintendent.
Champion prize Twenty Dollars in Gold
Best Yield Scholarship
Best Ten Ears Scholarship
Best Record t Scholarship
Best Essay .. Scholarship
The Scholarship represents a trip to the "Boys' Short Course" at the Uni University
versity University of Florida.
This meeting is held annually for the benefit of the boys of the Corn and
Pig Clubs. The meeting lasts a week and all necessary expenses including
railway fare, board and lodging, will be paid by the Fair Association.
CANNING CLUB
MRS. CAROLINE MOORHEAD, Cuperintendent.
The Fair Association will set aside, again this year, $50 to be used at the
dircretion of the Canning Club Demonstrator, in furnishing prizes to the
;irls of the Club.
The girls' of the Club are also privileged to contest for the prizes offered
for the "best collective exhibits" under the head of Domestic Science in the
Educational Department.
The girl winning highest honors in Canning Club work will be awarded
a Scholarship in the Woman's College. &
Another valuable prize for which the girls will compete is the watch
offered by Mrs. Okie Painter Williams, president of the E. O. Painter Ferti Fertilizer
lizer Fertilizer Company. If the girl winning the watch has used fertilizer purchased
from Mrs. Williams' company in producing her results, she will receive $10
in addition to the watch.
Mrs. A. Pittelko, Proprietor of the WUdhill Poultry Farm, Summerfield,
Fla., offers:
The girl winning fourth prize, one setting best White Wyandotte -eggs.
The girl winning fifth prize, on setting best White Wyandotte eggs
DEPARTMENT I EDUCATIONAL
PRIMARY
All exhibits of school work shall be taken from regular daily work, and
not prepared for special purpose of exhibit.
1st prize 2nd Prize

R TOURIST :.
From Jacksonville to

A. i?f I?

New York and return . $38.00
Baltimore and return ... $33.90
Philadelphia and return $36.00
Washington and return. .$34.00

Savannah and return. ..$ 7.00
Boston and return $46.00
Atlantic City and return $38.25
Niagra Falls and return. $48.90

Through tickets to all Eastern resorts, with return limit Octobej
31, VJlT, with privilege of stopovers at principal points. Sailings
from Jacksonville via Savannah to Baltimore Welnesday, direct Sun Sunday.
day. Sunday. To Philadelphia direct Thursday.
Wireless telegraph on all ships. Accommodations unsurpassed. Res Res-erevations,
erevations, Res-erevations, fare or any information cheerfully furnished on application.

r

1ERCHANTS & KIRS TRANSPORTATIQR MM

U. C. Avery, Agent.

Jacksonville, Florida
J. F. WUU). T. P. A-

L. D. JONES, C. A.

;.T FROM
OCALA to
$42.05 New York $40.05 Philadelphia
$47.80 Chicago $37.55 Cincinnatti
$41.80 St. Louis
Tickets on sale daily with final limit October 31st.

THROUGH SLEEPERS

DINING CARS

VIA

2i M

WTIC

i.Ht' aMUj 01 f HE SOLI B.
For tickets and reservations call on

M R. WILLIAMS
T. A., Ocala, Florida.

J G. KIRKLAND, D. P. A.
Tampa, Fla.

HAVE YOUR TIRES CHANGED

BY DYNAMITE

Vulcanizing Is Our Specialty
BLALOCK BROTHERS

Phone 78

107 Ocklawaha Ave.

WE HANDLE GOODRICH TIRES

1 rYWr

In every letter to your
boy with the (and forces
or the fleet send him a
few bars or a package of

The times when if s hard
to get are the times they
prize it.
They want the lasting re refreshment,
freshment, refreshment, the cool, sweet
comfort of this handy

confection.

t i

1

1

every

nl

fzr&h r-L ill!

oner rmimKMX Atirin

ffi&$K!"'

i-?-l --""1

Continued Tomorrow)

WHITE STAR LINE

transf:

AND

fOVERED V-NS
A UTO

TRI CK SERVICE

k-' XL JUl. XTfk 13J

Dealers in

FEE

illi

Comer Bros. JB Prom 2

Advertise In The Star.



Full Text
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