The Ocala evening star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06737

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
w

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
SERVICE

i HE

WEATHER FORECAST
Probably local rains tonight
Wednesday.

and

Tjjrftll
r n nil bH

Unit EUUMHH

h mm iaa m w h h

Punished Severely Another Attack Ordered
on Verdun by Brain-Cracked Crown Prince
NUMBER OF CIVILIANS KILLLED IN AIR RAID OVER ENGLAND BY THE GERMANS LAST NIGHT

The Germans are keeping up their
activities around Verdun. They are
f;till bombarding the French positions
in the Champagne wood where a Ger German
man German infantry attack yesterday failed.
A new attack was delivered last night
in the Baumont region southeast of
the Chaume wood in which the Teu Teutons
tons Teutons employed liquid fire, but failed to
gain ground and the French inflicted
heavy losses.
The British front has quieted down
considerably but the artillery is ac active
tive active in Flanders. London reports
German guns especially active north
and east of Ypres.
- AIR RAID ON ENGLAND
London', Sept. 25. Fifteen were
killed and seventy injured in an air
raid over London last night, which
was part of a simultaneous attack by
Zeppelins on Yorkshire and Lincoln Lincolnshire
shire Lincolnshire and airplanes on the London
district. The Zeppelins were driven
off without penetrating the provinces,
but two airplanes penetrated to Lon London.
don. London. NO TRUTH IN THE STORY
British Headquarters in France (By
Mail). A careful investigation by
the Associated Press disproves the
stories spread broadcast of friction
between British and American medi medical
cal medical officers.
INTEND TO STAND BY THEIR
ALLY
Petrograd, Sept. 25. Minister of
war Kerkhovsky told the soldiers'
and workmen's delegates that France
and England gave assurances yester yesterday
day yesterday not to conclude a seperate peace
to the detriment of Russia.
WERE NOT ANXIOUS FOR WAR
President Wilson has Corectly Esti
mated the Sentiment of the
German PeoDle
With the American Troops in
France President Wilson is absolute absolutely
ly absolutely right in assuming it is the German
autocracy, and not the rank and file,
that is behind this world war.
I have just "had the rare privilege
of interviewing a -number of German
war prisoners.
There was not an officer among
them. They were all enlisted men, so
their views are apt to reflect the sen sentiments
timents sentiments of the millions of Germans
plunged into the war without any
sayso on their part.
There were two spokesmen for the
50 odd German prisoners who gather gathered
ed gathered around me. One was a man of
30, who had lived in Buffalo, N. Y.,
three years preceding the war. The
other was an architect of 28, a gradu graduate
ate graduate of a great German university.
Both spoke excellent English.
"What are your feelirigs toward
America now that we have come into
the war against German?" I asked
them. "Do you hate us?"
"Not at all," the architect replied.
"You'd be surprised how many of us
have relatives and good friends in
America. We can't forget them. I
might get into the war but I had hop hoped
ed hoped it would all be over before that."
He told his comrades in German
what he had said and they all nodded
approval.
"How many of you fellows wanted
the war?" was my next question, di directed
rected directed at the German from Buffalo.
"Take a poll."
He did. There was a chorus of
"Naw."
"Why should we want war?" he
asked. "Take my case. I have a
wife and two children. I was just
getting a good start in America. Ear Early
ly Early in 1914 I returned to Germany to
take my family back to America. My
father got sick. I remained with him.
The war came and I was sent into
the first line. I would have been an
American citizen by now."
He added he and his family were
going to America as soon as the war
is over.
"Eight or ten others in this crowd
of prisoners are also going to Araer-
" ica to live," he said. "That wouldn't
indicate our masses hate America,
would it?"
"The masses in Germany had noth
ing to say in the making of the war,"
said the architect. "We were called
out and we either had to go or be
shot.
"Hundreds of thousands of us have
been killed, many more wounded, our
businesses ruined and our families

m

(Associated Press)
ITALY TO ENGLAM
Almost a Mile a Minute Through the
Air Across Western
Europe
(Associated Press)
London, Sept. 25. Capt. Lauriat,
an Italian, has made the first Italy to
England flight in an airplane, the
flight covering seven hundred miles
in seven hundred and twenty-two
minutes. Capt. Lauriat brought mail
for the Italian ambassador.
A CHEMICAL ANALYSIS
Being Made by New York Experts of
the Vital Organs of
Mrs. Bingham
(Associated Press)
New York, Sept. 25. Secrecy is
being maintained regarding the
chemical analysis of the vital organs
from the body of Mrs. Robert Worth
Bingham, exhumed at Wilmington,
N. C, at the direction of her family.
The organs are at the Bellevue hos hospital
pital hospital being subjected to a rigid test
which will take several days.
A MUSICAL TREAT
There will be a musical entertain entertainment
ment entertainment Thursday evening, Sept. 27th,
at 8 o'clock at the Mount Zion A. M.
E. church. There will be, a contest
between the choir of Bethel A. M. E.
church, Gainesville, and the Mount
Zion A. M. E.. church of this city.
Special accommodations for our
white friends. For benefit of Mount
Zion church. Admissinn 25 cents. 3t
left to get along as best they can.
Want war? There isn't a prisoner
that wouldn't cry for joy if peace
were declared today. We want to get
home."
Again the crowd voiced approval
when he explained what he had said.
One young German pushed his way
through and offered me his hand,
talking rapidly in German.
The Buffaloian, interpreting for
him, said:
"He says he has two cousins native
born Americans, one now a soldiei
with the American army in France.
He wonders if you know them?"
I didn't happen to, but I suggested
he ought to be glad he was a pris prisoner
oner prisoner so he wouldn't have to fight his
cousin.
"What do you think of your sub submarine
marine submarine warfare?" I asked.
"Not as effective as we thought,"
the architect replied. "We believed
we could starve England in a few
months, but they seem to be building
ships as fast as we can sink them.
America will probably make matters
worse for us."
He said he understood Germany
had 250 submarines.
The architect had been taken pris
oner since America entered the war.
He exploded the theory, Held in Amer America,
ica, America, that the German armies had been
kept in ignorance of America's en entrance.
trance. entrance. "I heard of it within a few days.
You can't keep such a thing secret. It
spread like wildfire. That was about
all we talked about for days."
"Do you honestly believe Germany
can win this war?" This to the archi architect.
tect. architect. "Not now," he replied. "I think
the best we can hone for is a draw.
The enemy has become too strong.
America has given the allies renewed
courage, and will furnish a big army.
The average German would be satis satisfied.
fied. satisfied. I think, with a draw."
"But the allies won't agree to a
draw," I insisted.
"In that case." he replied, "it will
be very bad for my country. We can
do only so much. There's a limit to
everything, you know."
Chesapeake Bay Oysters received
daily at the Delicatessen Shop, Ocala
House block. 17-tf
Ford tops re-covered, $12.50 at the
Ocala Wagon Works. Phone 84. tf

OCALA

OCALA. FLORIDA, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1917.

he fin
SJ.
Much Damage Done by Explosion on
Pacific Coast Steamer
this Morning
(Associated Press)
Richmond, Calif., Sept. 25. An ex explosion
plosion explosion which occurred on the Stand Standard
ard Standard Oil tanker J. A. Moffett at the
pier here this morning, killed two
men and tore out the forward works
and superstructure. The local Stand Standard
ard Standard Oil superintedent said the ex explosion
plosion explosion was probably caused by gas.
EXAMINATION WILL BE
HELD IN OCTOBER
Tallahassee, Sept. 25. The next
regular examination of applicants
for admission to practice law in the
courts of Florida will be held by the
supreme court at Tallahassee, begin beginning
ning beginning on the morning of Tuesday, Oct.
16, 1917. Interested persons should
communicate with the clerk of the
supreme court.
TO HOUSEKEEPERS:
This is What the Food Administra Administration
tion Administration is Asking of You.
Is it Too Much
The wise and careful use of wheat,
meat, butter fat, milk and the use of
other fats in place of butter in cook cooking.
ing. cooking. The use of other cereals for
part of the wheat in bread. Trie use
of other meats, such as game and
fish, or the use of eggs and cheese,
to reduce the demand for beef, pork
and mutton. The larger use of fruits
and vegetables. The proper nourish nourishment
ment nourishment of every member of your fam family
ily family is your first duty. The substitu substitution
tion substitution of the foods that are plentiful
for the foods that are scarce or es especially
pecially especially needed for export does not
imply any cutting down in the ra ration
tion ration of nourishing foods. Waste
must be eliminated. Perishable foods
locally grown must be consumed
more freely.
Food Conservation Committee,
Ocala Woman's Club.
AN INTERESTING TRIP
Mr. John Andrews of this city, ac accompanied
companied accompanied by Mr. Frederick Lang Lang-worthy
worthy Lang-worthy of the Daytona Record, have
just returned to Ocala from one of
the most interesting trips that the
state of Florida affords. Mr. An Andrews
drews Andrews w'ent to Daytona from here,
and with Mr. Langworthy took a 22 22-foot
foot 22-foot launch with seven feet beam,
which Mr. Andrews, had purchased
there some time before, their boat
trip starting from a little place call called
ed called Bulow, and cruised down the Hali Halifax
fax Halifax river, through the narrows, into
the Indian river and beyond. They
stopped at many places of interest,
including Hobe Sound, West Palm
Beach and Fort Lauderdale. At the
latter place they turned into New
River and went up the 61-mile canal
to Lake Okechobee and saw a won wondrous
drous wondrous sight a perfect sunset in the
Everglades. They crossed the lake,
went forty miles up the canal again
to the new town o f Moore Haven,
with its woman mayor, took the other
canal to Little Lake Hicpochqe and
on to and through the Caloosahatchie
river and some of the grandest scen scenery
ery scenery of the -South. From there they
cruised to Fort Myers and thence up
the coast, inside and out to Big Sar Sarasota
asota Sarasota Pass, where they left the boat
with Mr. Max Tobleske, who recently
moved there from Ocala. The two
gentlemen then took train for Ocala,
having been 17 days on the water
and enjoyed every minute of it. Mr.
Tobleske will care for Mr. Andrews'
boat and Mr. Andrews expects to
make many more trip in her.
EMPLOYMENT FOR ALL
Five to ten thousand mechanics,
carpenters and laborers, will soon be
needed for constructing the military
camp at Black Point. If you would
be interested in going there to work,
come over to the board of trade and
give me your address.
L. R. Trammell,
Secretary Board of Trade.

VPN
V iUl N

lists

OF ARGENTINE CONGRESS
OF A BREAK

(Associated
Buenos Ayres, Sept. 25. The con conservatives,
servatives, conservatives, who control the chamber
of deputies, have agreed to vote to tonight
night tonight for the rupture with Germany.
From all indications they will have a
majority of thirty. It is expected the
chamber will virtually forve the gov government
ernment government into a break. The govern government
ment government wants to postpone, action until
it receives translations of the 415
telegrams sent or received by the
Swedish legation. Strikers have cut
telegraph wires to Valparaiso, par paralyzing
alyzing paralyzing direct cable facilities to the
United States.
NAVY WILL MOBILIZE
Official advices state that the gov government
ernment government has ordered the mobilization
of the navy at a rendezvous 73
kilometres from Buenos Ayres. Unus Unusual
ual Unusual military activity has been seen
on all sides. Ostensibly the prepara preparations
tions preparations are attributed to the railroad
strikes and other difficulties, but high
government officials admit that the
general staff has its eyes open for
"other necessities." German influ influence
ence influence is believed to be behind the
strike which begun last night and
spread to eleven Argentine railroads
and absolutely paralyzed traffic in
the interior. The government is
utilizing naval vessels for carrying
the mails to river towns.
RINGING SPEECH
FROM ROOSEVELT
Presents in Emphatic Fashion the
Difference Between American and
German Governments and People.
(Associated Press)
Kansas City, Mo., Sept. 25. The
attitude of the German-American
press and the -German alliance in this
country "in their hearty support of
the German government" and the at attitude
titude attitude of the Germans at'home toward
their government shows that they
are back of it, Colonel Roosevelt said,
in a speech at the Old Glory week
festival here last night in .comment .commenting
ing .commenting on the theory that the United
States is fighting the German gov government
ernment government but not the people.
"For no nation does Germany feel
and express such bitter and con contemptuous
temptuous contemptuous hostility as for the United
States," he said. "There is no nation
on the face of the globe which they
would be more delighted to ruin and
plunder. Under such circumstances
the public men and newspapers en engaged
gaged engaged in defending Germany or as assailing
sailing assailing England and our other allies
or in protesting against the war and
demanding an inconclusive peace are
guilty of moral treason to this coun country,
try, country, and while the German-American
papers have achieved an evil prom prominence
inence prominence in this matter the professional
anti-English Irish papers are as bad
and the purely sensational demagogic
and unpatriotic section of the native
American press is the worst of all.
"Germany embodies the principles
of successful militaristic autocracy.
Much has ben said about our being
against the German government but
not against the German people. The
attitude oV the German-American
! press and the German Alliance in this
country in their hearty support of the
German government and the prac practically
tically practically unanimous support of that
government heretofore by the Ger Germans
mans Germans at home shows that at present
the Germans are back of the German
government.
"They have enthusiastically sup supported
ported supported its policy of brutal "disregard
of the rights of others. Until they
reverse themselves, until they cast
off the yoke of militaristic autocracy
they identify themselves with it and
force us to be against them. It is
for the German people themselves to
differentiate themselves from their
! government. Until they do this they
J force us to be against the German
j people as a necessary incident of be-
ing against the German government.
"The Germans govern from above
down. The people of this republic,
like the people of France, like the
people of England, believe in govern government
ment government from below up. In other words
we believe in government by our ourselves.
selves. ourselves. The Germans believe in be being
ing being governed by an autocratic dvnas-
i ty which rests primarily on a great
militaristic class and a great bu bureaucratic
reaucratic bureaucratic class. No man who sup supports
ports supports Germany at this time can claim
to be a real democrat or a real lover
of free institutions. He is false both
to democracy and freedom."
Germany had well matured plans
for the conquest and oppression of
the United States, he said. This was
evidenced, he said, by the conversa conversation
tion conversation of some recently captured offi officers
cers officers who talked to their English cap-

Nu

I

IIS

III FAVOR

Press)
IS. KING'S MURDFR
Is to be Sifted to the Bottom by
North Carolina Jurors
(Associated Press)
Concord, N. C, Sept. 25. When
the second day of the preliminary
hearing of Gaston B. Means, charged
with murdering Mrs. Maude King
opened, counsel for the defense an announced
nounced announced that they would offer no evi evidence
dence evidence but would argue for dismissal.
Counsel for the defense denied last
night's reports that a writ of habeas
corpus had been requested.
HELD FOR THE GRAND JURY
Means' counsel has consented to
his being held for the grand jury, on
the charge of murdering Mrs. Maud
King.
I
Furnished the Readers of the Star by
the Commercial Bank of Ocala
New York
Jan. Oct. Dec
Opening .. ..23.81 24.45- 23.90
Noon .. ....23.74 24.30 23.83
Close .. 23.54 24.12 23.60
Market barely steady; spots quiet;
middlings 25.36. No sales.
New Orleans
Jan. Oct. Dec.
Opening .. ..23.12 23.45 23.00
Close 23.88 23.32 22.87
Market steady; spots steady; mid middlings
dlings middlings 23.88.
Liverpool spots dull, prices 15
lower, sales 2,000; receipts, 7,000;
American, 6,700; middlings, 18.77.
Consolidated net receipts, 38,106.
tors freely without knowing that an
American officer was pesent.
"These Germans announced that
Germany was going to win and that
they were going to smash the Unit United
ed United States and bleed it white with an
enormous indemnity and make it pay
the whole expense of the war," he
said. "They had no thought of peac
and no man in his senses doubts that
this would be the policy adopted as a
matter of course by Germany.
"If at this moment, while we are
still helpless, France and England
were defeated, the German fleet would
be at our doors in a fortnight and
an army of conquest have landed here
within a month. Some years ago I
saw openly published in Germany a
pamphlet written by a member of the
German general staff containing a
well worked out plan for the conquest
of the United States which the Ger German
man German staff regarded as easy and for
the levying of enormous contribu contributions
tions contributions at our expense."
Saying that the preparedness
measures we are taking now should
have been carried out three years ago,
the colonel declared that "if Ger Germany
many Germany could land a single small army
of 50,000 men in this country we
would be wholly unable to match it
for we have neither artillery nor air airplanes
planes airplanes that could be put against them.
If at this moment our allies suddenly
made peace, we would be a helpless
prey to Germany or any other first first-class
class first-class European or Asiatic military
power."
IMPORTANT MEETING ON
THE 2ND OF OCTOBER
Attention is called to a meeting ar arranged
ranged arranged to be held in the courthouse
in Ocala, Fla., at 1:30 p. m. Tuesday,
October 2, 1917.
The meeting is called for the pur purpose
pose purpose of discussing tick eradication
and cattle improvement with the view
of organizing a Marion county live
stock association, through which the
movement can be properly represent represented
ed represented and fostered, which will mean a
great deal to the agricultural inter interests
ests interests of Marion county.
Congress has made an especial ap appropriation
propriation appropriation for the extension of tick
eradication work. The movement is
really a war measure to encourage
tick eradication and cattle improve improvement
ment improvement in order than the beef and dairy
supply may be greatly increased, par particularly
ticularly particularly in Florida and the southeast southeastern
ern southeastern states.
Government and state representa representatives,
tives, representatives, cattlemen, farmers and busi busi-ness
ness busi-ness jnen will be present to discuss
these important matters, which con concern
cern concern the county, state and nation.
Ladies are especially invited.
By Order of Committee.

MAIL

i Ala

Frank A Vanderlip, Leading
American Financier

DEVOTES HIS VAST EXPERIENCE TO NATION FOR THE AfiSIL
SALARY OE ONE DOLLAR

(Associated
Washington, Sept. 25. Frank A.
Vanderlip, president of the National
City Bank, the largest national bank
in the United States, has severed his
connection with that institution and
all the other organizations with which
he was connected to aid Secretary
McAdoo in Liberty Loan financing.
His salary will be one dollar a year.
NO TRADE WITH THE ENEMY
The conference report on trading
with the enemy bill was adopted to
day by the House without roll call.
The report was adopted by the Sen Senate
ate Senate yesterday.
GEN. FRENCH HAD TO LEAVE
CAMP JACKSON
Major General French, command commanding
ing commanding Camp Jackson, Columbia, S. C,
has been granted two months leave
on account of illness. It js consid considered
ered considered possible that Gen. French may
be succeeded by Major General Scott.
GREAT STORM IN THE GULF
Jamaica suffered severely from the
hurricane which struck the island
Sunday and is "now sweeping across
the gulf. The fruit crop was de destroyed.
stroyed. destroyed. No reports of loss of life
have been received from the United
States consul at Port Antonio.
TORNADO MAY STRIKE TEXAS
The Caribbean tropical disturbance
this morning centered off the extreme
western coast of Cuba, and is moving
westward, the weather bureau re reported
ported reported APPRECIATE OCALA
Editor Star: We wish to thank the
people of Ocala for their generous
hospitality and kind treatment of our
son who is a member of Company A,
and was stationed in your city for six
weeks.
We appreciate every act of kind kindness
ness kindness shown him while there and take
this means of expressing same.
With best wishes to all.
Very respectfully,
Mr. and Mrs. M. L. McQuaig,
302 S. 13th St., Palatka, Fla.
MARY'S CHECKS FINALLY
CHECKED UP MARY
As the result of a disposition to get
rich quick and easy, with the handi handicap
cap handicap of being a bum penwoman, Mary
Smith, colored, now occupies a cell in
the county jail awaiting trial on
charges of forgery.
Mary, it appears, has been circu circulating
lating circulating checks among our merchants
for the past six weeks which are
signed with very crude imitations of
the real signatures of the parties
whose names appear on them as the
makers. Little's Shoe Parlor, the
Globe, G. A. Nash and E. T. Helven Helven-ston
ston Helven-ston are among the firms who havt,
cashed Mary's worthless paper. Her
method was to present a check in
payment of a small purchase and get
the balance in real coin of the realm.
The officers have been looking for
Mary for some weeks, but she evaded
arrest until last night, when City Of Officer
ficer Officer Smith captured her at her home
in the fourth ward with the goods,
and placed her in the county jail to
await trial, which will take place to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow before Judge Smith.
It seems that Mary had as her as assistant
sistant assistant in the game her daughter
aged about fourteen, who is also lock locked
ed locked up as an accessory.
NOTICE TO OUR
SOLDIERS AND SAILORS
Names of Every Marion County Man
in the Service Requested by the
Marion County Red Cross
The Marion County, Florida, chap chapter
ter chapter of the American Red Cross is
making a list of the men who have en enlisted
listed enlisted from Marion county in either
the army or the navy. The citizens of
the county will aid a great deal by
sending in the names of their rela relatives,
tives, relatives, their postoffice address and the
branch of the service they have en enlisted
listed enlisted in. The Red Cross wishes to
get this information as promptly and
accurately as possible. When com completed
pleted completed it will be placed on the chap chapter's
ter's chapter's minutes as a roll of honor.
Star ads. are business builders.

LOCAL NEWS
TO
PRESS TIME

VOL. 23, NO. 232.
M
it n
It
y
L iniil
Press)
STRIKE FOR IE
Ai CLOSED S
Another Obstruction to the National
Needs Has Broken Out
in Oregon
(Associated Press)
Portland, Oregon, Sept. 25. Police
officers are on duty in the Portland
steel ship building .plants, where ap approximately
proximately approximately four thousand workmen
struck yesterday for increased wages
and a closed shop. City officials said
they would not tolerate picketing.
DISTRICT MEETING K. OF P.
The Ocala Lodge Knights of Py Pythias
thias Pythias has issued an .invitation to the
district lodge to meet here sometime
during November. The district of
which Marion county is a .part is the
ninth and is composed of Citrus, Her Hernando,
nando, Hernando, Marion, Sumter, and Pasco
courities. At the same time there will
be a joint meeting of the eighth and
ninth districts. The eighth is com composed
posed composed of the counties of Lake, Or Orange,
ange, Orange, Osceola, Seminole and Volusia. Volusia.-The
The Volusia.-The Ocala lodge is making prepara preparations
tions preparations for entertaining its guests on
this occasion.
SENATOR TRAMMELLS WORK
The Star has received the following
letter from Senator Trammell:
Washington, Sept. 19. It is ex expected
pected expected that the conference of the
Senate and House on the war revenua
I will will soon report the measure to
Congress for final ratification and it
is understood that they are sustain sustaining
ing sustaining the Senate in most of the changes
that body made in the ball.
In discussing the measure today,
Senator Park Trammell of Florida,
stated that when the bill 'was first
presented to the Senate he felt some
amendments were needed to make
the measure more in the interest ot
masses. Continuing, he said:
"WTien the bill was reported by the
Senate finance committee I was con convinced
vinced convinced from study of it that:
"First, we should get a larger por portion
tion portion of the necessary taxes from cor corporations
porations corporations making enormous profits
out of the war, and more revenue
from the big incomes; ;
"Second, we should eliminate the
proposed tax on articles of home con consumption
sumption consumption such as sugar, coffee, sir sirups,
ups, sirups, etc.;
"Third, we should eliminate the in increase
crease increase proposed on letter postage
from two to three cents; and,
"Fourth, on the income taxes we
should allow a larger exemption from
taxation to men of small salnt-ioc onrl
i incomes.
' "Tin, u
Tfjicu me opportunity, came l
fought for these principles and voted
for amendments seeking to accom accomplish
plish accomplish them. When we began the
fight we were in the minority in the
Senate but soon the sentiment, par particularly
ticularly particularly for increased tax on big in incomes
comes incomes and excess war profits became
the views of a decided majority; and
while in some instances the schedules
obtained were not all that I desired
i yet they were a very great improve
ment over what the committee report reported.
ed. reported. We secured to quite an extent
three out of the four propositions for
which I was fighting.
"The increase made in the rate of
taxation on war profitsand Jarge in incomes
comes incomes amounts to about one-half
billion dollars annually, and, the tax
on articles of consumption was en en-tirel
tirel en-tirel yeliminated as well as the pro proposed
posed proposed increase in letter postage."
During the consideration of the
war measure in the Senate Senator
Trammell voted with a group of pro progressive
gressive progressive democrats 1 among whom
were such men as Senators Kirby of
Arkansas. Hollis of New Hampshire,
King of Utah. Husting of Wisconsin,
McKellar of Tennessee-, Beckham of
Kentucky and Johnson of South Da Dakota.
kota. Dakota. Engraved cards and wedding invi invitations
tations invitations at Gmg's Drug Store. tf.

d?



fAGK TWO

OCALA EVENING, STAR, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1917

OCALA EVENING STAR

PUBLISHED K V K II Y DAY KXCEPT SUNDAY BY THE ST A R PUBLISHING
COMPANY OF OCALA, FLA.
It. It. Carroll, Port V. I.eavrneood,
L'renMent Secretary anil Treasurer
J. II. Benjamin, I'.JHor
Entered at Ocala, Fla.. po:--toffice as second cla.-'s matter
ti:m:imioks
Hiim1d-m order: Fl n- Editorial Itoom: Five-One-V

MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for republi republication
cation republication of all news credited to it or not otherwise credited in this paper
and also the local news published herein. All rights of republication
of special dispatches herein are also reserved.

Foreljcn
One year, In advance
tftx months, in advance ..
Three monthg. In advance
One mouth. In advance...
Investigation of the Korniloff plot
in Russia shows it was a carefully
organized conspiracy, the leader real really
ly really being a tool in the hands of his
chief of staff, General Lokomsky.
Seventeen hundred soldiers of the
national army who arrived in New
York on their first leave, praised the
camp, their food and their officers and
declared Yaphank was a place where
men were being made.
Lurking concealed, after torpedoing
vessels, that they may sink, rescuing
steamships responding to S. O. S.
calls, German U-boats have adopted
the "spurious versenkt" tactics of
Count Luxburg.
Heroic officers of the American
steamship Minnehaha, sunk by a Ger German
man German U-boat on September 7, sacri sacrificed
ficed sacrificed their own lives that the seamen
they commanded might live. The big
vessel went down in four minutes.
A dispatch from Paris says that
the American Young Men's Christian
Association is about to take over big
hotels in the French Alps, where
winter and summer sports, concerts,
moving pictures and theaters will
provide attractions for American sol soldiers
diers soldiers on leave from the French
front.
The St. Petersburg Independent has
administered a deserved lambasting
to the Pinellas grand jury. Judge
Reaves of that circuit rebuked the
said jury because certain information
had leaked out. The grand jury
tried to lay the blame on the St. Pe Petersburg
tersburg Petersburg newspapers, whereupon the
Independent proceeded to show the
jurors up in great shape, saying
IIUI UUb lift ncv J
talked too much.
The negro selects sent to Camp
Jackson are to be trained separately
from the white troops. They are not
to be neglected and their lives are not
to be filled entirely with work. A
special branch of the Y. M. C. A. will
be established for their benefit and
other things will be done to supply
them with needed recreation. This is
only justice to them; they are Amer American
ican American soldiers and the country they
help to guard must do its best for
them.
Owing to the neglect of the legis legislature
lature legislature to pass the necessary law,
Florida soldiers, if they should be
out of the state, will not be able to
vote next year. The state govern government
ment government of Florida has been more neg neglectful
lectful neglectful of its soldiers than any other
state in the Union. While it squan squandered
dered squandered money by the tens of thou thousands,
sands, thousands, it wouldn't give them a paltry
fifty dollars to help them live thru
the five months that the national gov government
ernment government held them in suspense, nor
did it do anything else for them. The
relatives and friends of the soldiers
should see to it that a legislature is
elected that will do justice to those
of our soldier boys who return home
when the war is over.
That is a mighty rough story that
comes from Camp Wheeler, about
powdered glass being found in saus sausage
age sausage served to our soldiers. Of
course, the glass must have been put
in the meat by a German agent at the
packinghouse. This is another evi evidence
dence evidence that America is fighting an en enemy
emy enemy more ruthless and unscrupulous
than the Indians employed against
our early settlers by the French, and
later against our young nation by
the British. When the war began,
the Germans reproached the British
and French with using Arab and ne negro
gro negro troops, but no people since the
hordes of Attila swept over western
Europe have shown themselves so ut ut-terly
terly ut-terly regardless of the claims of hu hu-'
' hu-' manity as the Teutons.
The rapacious relatives of Mrs.
Robert Worth Bingham are adding to
the shadows cast over that unfortun unfortunate
ate unfortunate lady's life. Mrs. Bingham, when
a young lady, was the fiance of
Robert Worth Bingham, whom she
married less than a year ago. Some Something
thing Something came between them and the en engagement
gagement engagement was broken. Afterward
she met and attracted Henry M.
Flagler, the developer of the Florida
East Coast. Mr. Flagler was then
growing old. He was childless and
had a wife, whose mind had failed,
and who was being cared for in a
sanitarium. He desired to obtain a
divorce from her and marry again, in
the hope of obtaining an heir for the
Flagler millions. There seems to have
been obstructions in the way in his
state of New York, so he changed his
citizenship to Florida. The laws of
Florida forbade the divorce he want wanted,
ed, wanted, so he virtually bought the legis legislature
lature legislature and had a law passed to his
liking. This act .was probably the
only stain on his otherwise long and
honorable career, and it seems to
have brought little happiness to all
concerned. He divorced his first wife
(tho he always gave her the best of
care), and married the younger wom woman.
an. woman. It was not many years later that
old age laid its heavy hand upon him,
and he lived his last days in a soli solitary
tary solitary house on the East Coast, cared

SI HM IJIPTIOV KATES
Dommtlr
$5 00 One year, in advance
2 60 Six month, in advance 425
. 1.25 Three months, in advance 2.25
. .60 One month, in advance 10

for by hirelings and remembered by
only a few friends whom he made
to form gigantic plans for improve improvement
ment improvement and push them to completion.
He left millions to his widow, but she
did not enjoy them long, and may
have found them more trouble than
they were worth. Last November,
she married her early love, Judge
Bingham, of Louisville. He is a
prominent lawyer and well to do, he
did not need her money, and it is
probable that the oldtime attachment
was entirely responsible for the union.
It is to be hoped she had a few
months of happiness between the mar marriage
riage marriage and her death which occurred
during the past summer. Now, two
months after her death her relatives
have had her remains dug up and cut
to pieces in the expectation and prob probable
able probable hope of finding proof of a crime.
The act is obviously aimed at her
husband, although she left him only a
million dollars out of seventy million,
and he didn't need that. Few women
there be in humble homes who have
any reason to envy the wives of multi multimillionaires.
millionaires. multimillionaires. One of the greatest impositions
that is being perpetrated on the peo people
ple people of this city is the solid dam
formed across South Fourth street
east by the property of one or two
people who will not allow the street
to be cut thru except at an exorbitant
price. This dam whenever there is a
heavy rain converts the land around
the primary school into a lake, and
the most used street on the way to
the high school into a river. Chil Children
dren Children and girls going to school on foot
yesterday morning had to turn back,
the water even on the sidewalks go going
ing going over their shoe tops, while autoes
that drove thru the pond did so at
the risk of being stuck in the mire
that came above their hubs. This
happens a dozen to twenty times ev every
ery every school term, and what is probab probably
ly probably worse, except in a long dry sea season,
son, season, all that part of town is kept in
a condition of dampness that breeds
malaria and sometimes pneumonia.
On account" of the location of the
schools, this state of affairs is an
outrage on the entire town. The city
government has the power, if it had
the backbone, to put an end to the
imposition. Let it send the street
force to the place and cut the street
thru, and then let the stubborn prop property
erty property holders help themselves. They
have no right to hold the town up,
and the council has no right to let
them hold it up.
WHEN YOU HAVE PAID YOUR
RENT YOU HAVE
KISSED IT GOODBYE
Why not pay a small amount each
month and see it go into
YOUR OWN HOME
I have a number of houses you can
buy that way at
- $10 A MONTH
call and see my list of houses from
$1000.00 up.
L M. MURRAY
Room 5 Holder Blk.
Ocala, Fla.
YOU HAVE. TRIED THE. REST REST-MOW
MOW REST-MOW USE THE BEST
It is the best from every angle you
consider it ITS FINISH is glossy
and lasts longest because it contains
no adulterated oil;. ITS DURABILI DURABILITY
TY DURABILITY is assured because the Oil is Pure
the pigments and colors are the best
and they are scientifically balanced
for service. IT IS MOST ECONOMI ECONOMICAL
CAL ECONOMICAL because a can of 2-4-1 is all
Paint Price and your Linseed Oil at
Oil Price, thereby saving from 50
cents to 80 cents per gallon, accord according
ing according to the price of Linseed Oil.
For Sale By
THE MARION HARDWARE CO.,
Ocala, Fla.
This Space Reserved
for
V. MRASEK
The Tinner
"The Secret Witn." arA W f
other new books at THE BOOK
SHOP. 21-3t

COMPANY A IN CAMP

The Star has received a letter from
Captain Drake, commander of Com Company
pany Company A, now in camp at Camp Wheel Wheeler,
er, Wheeler, near Macon, from which we make
the following interesting extracts:
First of all the Company is in good
health and spirits. The men have
been given their prophylactic and
vaccination treatment, which made
them all feel badly and some tempor temporarily
arily temporarily sick, but it is probable that the
disagreeable effect has worn off all of
them by now.
The men will soon be comfortably
houses. Lumber is coming in rapidly
and they are to have floors to their
tents, which will make them snug.
The time passed since the arrival
in camp has been taken up making
themselves comfortable and prepar preparing
ing preparing a place to work, but instruction
is now to be taken up and the men
drilled in all the arts with which they
will circumvent Fritz next summer.
Each of Company A's enlisted men
has been supplied with white enamel enameled
ed enameled plate, drinking vessel, hotel type
of knife, fork and spoon, which en enables
ables enables them to be comfortable and
cleanly about their meals and not
have a messy time washing up after afterward.
ward. afterward. The captain closes by saying, "The
generosity of the folks at home, in
their liberality in cash and eatables,
has done far more than they realize
for the comfort of the boys."
McINTOSH
Mcintosh, Sept. 22. School opened
Monday and is moving off nicely, with
Miss Warren of Starke as assistant to
Mr. Bennett.
Misses Inez and Pauline Collins of
Irvine, are attending school here, as
is Miss Evelyn Smoak of Evinston.
Miss Ruby Edwards of Irvine is a
new pupil in our school.
Miss Allie Rush left last week for
South Carolina to enter collece there.
Misses Pauline Murrell and Eva
Smith entered the Gainesville high
school last week.
Miss Louise Norsworthy returned
last week from Leesburg, where sht
had been visiting he rbrother's fam family.
ily. family. We have recently had a much need needed
ed needed rain. Farmers were anxious for it
on their seed beds, but not on the
mown hay.
Miss Bobbie Baldwin has returned
from Palatka, where she made quite
a lengthy visit.
The stork visited the home of Mr.
and Mrs. E. D. Boyer this week and
left them a fine little girl.
Mr. and Mrs. U. Griffin were the
guests of Mrs. J. S. Thomas last Sun Sunday.
day. Sunday. Mr. A. J. Hall eft for North Caro Carolina
lina Carolina few days ago to see his mother,
who is not at all well.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sampson are
here for the winter from Quincy. Mr.
Sampson will look after his grove
property at Boardman.
A fine car of cattle was loaded and
shipped from here this week.
Mr. and- Mrs. S. H. Gaitskill have
returned from their summer trip.
About the Welsh.
Wales has plenty of coal, slate,
ecenery and consonants, but very few
surnames. If a Welsh schoolmaster
should say. "Jones, you may go home
now for being a good boy," the whole
school would quit.
People who are not called Jones are
called Williams, or Evans, or Hushes,
or Lloyd. They divide these names
between them and make the best of it.
They do not follow the English meth method
od method of taking their surnames from
towns and villages. They felt that to
do so would cut them off from the rest
of mankind. Nobody could possibly
call on Mrs. Llanymynech. Disloca Dislocation
tion Dislocation of the jaw is a great drawback to
social intercourse.
The Welshman has the Celtic imag imagination,
ination, imagination, says London Answers. He
never calls a spade a spade. When he
has done describing this implement of
agriculture the stolid Englishman
thinks he has been listening to a story
from the "Arabian Nights;" hence the
Englishman says the Welshman is an
"untruther." He isn't really. It's
only a difference of method.
Knots In Boards.
We Qnd knots in the boards which
we notice in a lumber pile or in any
other place where boards happen to
be because the smaller limbs which
grow away from the larger limbs of
trees grow from the inside as well as
the outside of the tree.
When you see a knot in a board it
means that before the tree was cut
down and the log sawed up Into boards
a limb was growing out from the in inside
side inside of the tree at the spot where the
knot occurs, says the Book of Won Wonders.
ders. Wonders. You will also find that the wood in
the knot is harder generally than the
rest of the board. This Is because
more strength is required at the base
of a limb and in the part of the limb
which grew inside the tree than in
other parts, for the limb must be stron?
enough to support not only the limb
itself, but also the smaller limbs which
grow out of it.
The Winner.
The difficulties of crossing Broadway
at Forty-second street can be exag exaggerated.
gerated. exaggerated. The feat is usually accom accomplished
plished accomplished by born New Yorkers without
loss of more than one limb. Out to the
visitor from Boeotia or some other
suburb it presents itself as as a dit.fi
culty which, once overcome, is to be
looked back at with U-rror and re remembered
membered remembered with gratitude tor a provi providential
dential providential escaj e One such visitor had
Jus4 crossed Broadway. lie wore long
white Tii!s' and a black hat such
as may be seen on senators from Mis Mississippi.
sissippi. Mississippi. He was on the safe side of
Broadway. He puffed agitatedly as he
turned to survey the maelstrom of
traffic he had passed through.
"Every time I cross Broad way." he
said. "I feel as if I had won a bet." bet."-New
New bet."-New York Post.
A human lire may depend upon the
accuracy and promptness with which
a prescription is looked after. Both
are features at the Court Pharmacy.

LIVE STOCK ROUND-UP
AT GAINESVILLE

Thursday morning at i:30 a r.um- I
,btr of Marion county farmers and live
stock men will leave the courthouse
square en route to the livestock
round-up at Gainesville. j
The livestock round-up i a four- j
dar meetij.-y held this week at the ;
University of Florida for the benefit j
of the livestock men of the state, j
Prof. J. M. Scott, animal husbandry husbandry-man
man husbandry-man of the university, has the meet- I
injr ir. charge. Prof. Scott has secur- j
ed prominent livestock men to discuss j
the question and the meeting will be
instructive to any Florida farmer who
attends.
Realizing the importance of this
meeting, County Agent Blacklock is
endeavoring to secure as large an at attendance
tendance attendance of Marion county farmers as
possible. To make it convenient for
those without cars to go, the county
agent is organizing an automobile
trip to Gainesville for Thursday. The
plan is for all those going from this
end of the county to meet at the Ocala
National Bank corner at, 6:30 Thurs Thursday
day Thursday morning. The promise of several
cars has been made and there will be
plenty of room to take a great many
farmers who have no car of their
own. The idea is to leave here in a
body, pick up more cars at Lowell,
Reddick and Mcintosh and all reach
Gainesville together.
The farmers of Marion county
ought to make a big showing at this
meeting not only for their own good
but also to show that Marion county
is vitally interested in the live stock
industry. All wanting to go will kind kindly
ly kindly notify County Agent Blacklock
and state whether they can" furnish a
car or desire a seat in one.
A. C. L. SCHEDULE
Trains of the Atlantic Coast Line
will arrive and depart in Ocala at the
following times:
No. 10, Lreesburg to Jacksonville,
5:40 a. m.
No. 151, Ocala to Wilcox, Monday.
Wednesday and Friday, 6:10 a. m.
No. 3 Ocala to Lakeland (Sunny (Sunny-Jim),
Jim), (Sunny-Jim), Tuesday, Thursday and Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, 6:40 a. m.
No. 141, Wilcox, Gainesville and
Palatka to Ocala, 11:15 a. m.
No. 40, St. Petersburg to Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, 12:54-1:14 p. m.
No. 43, Homosassa to Ocala, 1:06
r. m.
No. 49, Ocala to Homosassa, 2:25
p. m.
No. 32, Lakeland to Ocalu (Sunny (Sunny-Hm),
Hm), (Sunny-Hm), Tuesday, Thursdaj and Satur Saturday.
day. Saturday. 9:f-0 p. m
No. 3:, Jacksonville to St. Peters Petersburg,
burg, Petersburg, 2:36-2:40 p. m.
No. 140, Ocala to Palatka, Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville and Wilcox, 4:10 p. m.
No. 9, Jacksonville to Leesburg,
9-05 p. ra.
SEABOARD LOCAL SCHEDULE
Southbound
No. 9 Leaves Jacksonville 1:20 p.
m.; Ocala 4:15 p. m. Arrives Tampa,
7:35 p. m.
No. 1 Leaves Jacksonville 9:30 p.
m.; Ocala, 1:45 a. m. Arrives St. Pe Petersburg,
tersburg, Petersburg, 7:45 a. m.
No. 3 Leaves Jacksonville 9:30 a.
m.; Ocala, 12:59 p. m.
Northbound
No. 10 Leaves Tampa at 1 p. m.;
Ocala, 4:15 p. m. Arrives Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, 7:15 p. m.
No. 2 Leaves Tampa 9 p. m.;
Ocala, 1:55 a. m. Arrives Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, 6:45 a. m.
No. 4 Leaves Tampa, 9:10 a. m.;
arrive Ocala 1:10 p. m.; arrive Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville at 5:10 p. m.
Star ads. are business builders.

The body is a highly
work for the common good.

you will clean the stomach, liver and bowels occasion occasionally
ally occasionally with a gentle laxative you can keep well. Too
much fuel in man's machine, such as eating too much
meat, or alcohol or tea, nervous overwork and lack
of exercise in outdoor air bring constipation and- bad
health." Eat less meat, plenty of vegetables, and with
air and good exercise you need little else. If the
liver needs rousing and most of us need this once a
week take a safe vegetable extract of the leaves of
aloe, May-apple, root of jalap made into a tiny sugar sugar-coated
coated sugar-coated pill, sold by almost every druggist as Doctor
Pierce's Pleasant Pellets and first put up nearly
fifty years ago.
Most people die eventually of an over -acid con condition.
dition. condition. If the blood can be rendered more alkaline,
the longer we live. With regular hours, six to eight
glasses of water between meals, sensible coarse food
and a chance to get the poisons out of the system, a
man will live to be a hundred. But, unfortunately,
our highly nervous way of living brings increased
storage of uric acid in the body. This acts as a
poison, and consequently we suffer from headaches,
neuralgia, lumbago, aches or pains, rheumatism, gout.
Get rid of this uric acid poison by taking a harm harmless
less harmless medicine called Anuric, which throws out the

uric acid by stimulating the kidneys. Drink a pint of hot water before meals and take Anuric (double or triple
strength) after meals and at bed time. Anuric can be obtained at almost any drug store, or send $1.00 to
Doctor Pierce, Invalids' Hotel, Buffalo, N. Y., for full treatment. .... -t w

THE STAR TOBACCO FUND

Much interest has been shown in
the fund began a few days ago by the
Star to send tobacco to the American
troops now operating in France.
While the fund ha- not yet reached
large proportion- the -pirn is work working,
ing, working, and we are in hopes that Marion
county will show that she is no less
patiiotic when it comes to furnishing
comforts for the soldier boys than
other sections of the country:
The following contributions have
been made to date:
Previously reported ?13.75
Dr. D. M. Smith. Ocala. Fla .25
Miss Blair Woodrow. Ocala. Fla. .25
Mrs. G. A. Ottmann. Ocala, Fia. .25
II. C. Bilbo, Ocala, Fla 25
Mrs. J. F. Martin. Ocala, Fla.. .25
John T. Moore, Ocala, Fla 25
Dr. C. B. Aver, Ocala. Fla 1.00
St. Leo Abbey, St. Leo, Fla 5.00
"M. E. B." 25
Ben Culverhouse. Ocala, Fla... .25
B. J. Hamil, Gainesville. Fla... .50
Leave your name and the amount
you desire to contribute either at the
Star office or at Gerig's Drugstore.
Remember, each 25 cents contributed
buys one of the packages of "smokes"
mentioned in another page of today's
paper.
OCALA FRATERNAL ORDERS
WOODMEN OF THE WORLD
Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
the K. of P. hall at 7:3tJ p. m. every
second and fourth Friday. Visiting
sovereigns are ailways welcome.
T. D. Lancaster, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk.
ORDER OF EASTERN STAR
Ocala Chapter, No. 29, O. E.
raeert at Yonge's hall the second anc
fourth Thursday evenings of eacl
month at 730 o'clock.
Mrs. Rosalie Condon, Secretary.
Mrs. Susan Cook, W. M.
OCALA LODGE NO. 286, B. P. O. E.
Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and fourth Tuesday even evenings
ings evenings in each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Club house oppo opposite
site opposite postoffice, east side.
C. W. Hunter, E. R.
E. J. Crook. Secretary.
R. A. M. CHAPTER NO. 13
Regular convocations of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13, R. A. M., on the
fourth Friday in every month at 8 p.
m. B. C. Webb, H. P.
Jake Brown, Secretary.
ODD FELLOWS
Tulula Lodge No. 22, I. O. O. F.,
meets every Tuesday evening in the
Odd Fellows' hall on the third floor of
the Star office building at 8 o'clock
promptly. A warm welcome always
extended to visiting brothers.
Oscar Andrews, N. G.
W. L. Colbert, Secretary.
KNIGHTS OF FYTtiiAS
Ocala Lodge No. 19. Conventions
held every Monday night at 7:30
at the Castle Hall, over the James
Carlisle drugstore. A cordial welcome
to visiting brothers.
E. L. Stapp, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage. K. of R. S.
MARION-DUNN MASONIC LODGE
Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. &
A. M., meets on the first and third
Thursday evenings of each month at
8 o'clock, until further notice.
Jake Brown, Secretary.
H. M. Weathers, W. M.
THREE FORD TOURING CARS
We have three Ford touring cars
for sale, $200, $225 and $250, re respectively.
spectively. respectively. The Maxwell Agency,
Ocala, Fla.

(By Dr. I. W. SHORT.)
organized machine of complicated parts in which the
Damage to any one of these organs interfers with man

ASHEVILLE
and the Mouutains of Western North Carolina are
now Only Seventeen Hours from Florida by the
Through Service of the
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY
SOUTHERN RAILWAY SYSTEM
SCHEDULE
Lv. Ocala S. A. L. Ry 4:15 p.m.
Lv. Jacksonville S. A. L. Ry 8:10 p.m.
Lv. Columbia Sou. Ry. System 7:05 a. m.
Ar. Hendersonville .Sou. Ry. System ,1:00 a.m.
Ai. Asheville .Sou. Ry. System 2:10 p.m.
r. Cincinnati .Scu. Ry. System 8:10 a.m.
Electrically lighted Pullman Standard Berth and Drawing-room
Sleeping Cars daily from Jacksonville to Asheville and Cincinnati.
Dining Car Service Columbia to Asheville.
Low Round Trip Fares. Long Limits. Liberal Stop-overs.
For Literature and Information Apply to
JOHN BOISSEAU, C. P. T. A., G. Z. PHILLIPS, A. G. P. A.,
Ocala, Fla Jacksonville, Fla.

CHIROPRACTIC IS THE SCIENCE OF REMOVING THE CAUSE
OF DISEASE
To those who have been suffering from diseased conditions and
received no relief, try CHIROPRACTIC and get well. Others have,
and you can do the same.
REMOVING THE CAUSE IS THE PRINCIPLE
NO MEDICINE, SURGERY OR OSTEOPATHY
OFFICE HOURS: ROOM FOUR
9:30 to 11:30 A. M. HOLDER BLOCK
2 to 5 and 7 to 8 P. M. PHONE 487

Excursion Mates
FROM
OCALA to
$42.05 New York $40.05 Philadelphia
$47.80 Chicago $37.55 Cincinnatti
$41.80 St. Louis
Tickets on sale daily with final limit October 31st.
THROUGH SLEEPERS DINING CARS
VIA
ATLANTIC AST "LIME.
8TANDAKI) R.UIUOAJ) OF THE SOUTH
For tickets and reservations call on

M R. WILLIAMS
T. A., Ocala, Florida.

Authoritative Styles
For Autumn

In Our Millinery Parlors You Will Find a Collection of Hats
That Rivals the Exclusive Specialty Stores of the Larger
Cities. We Are Constantly Showing UP-TO-THE-MINUTE
STYLES Approved by the Most Ar Artistic
tistic Artistic Modistes. Our Work Room Is Presided
Over By' a Thoroughly Competent and
Experienced Milliner.

Affleck Millinery Parlor
TELEPHONE NUMBER 161
Ocala House Block. Ocala, Florida

Advertise

w

!.. EGGER O. C
Chiropractor

J. G. KIRKLAND, D. P. A.
Tampa, Fla.
En Tlue Star.
n
jJ
stomach, liver and kidneys
as a motor mechanism. If



..

OCALA EVENING, STAR, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1917
page tiu:i:e

7

Sffftftt yff flirt ift
anceniVfe t,e actet So ca

III II AFFAIRS

If You Have Any News for thi De

partment, Call Two-One-Five j
or Five-One Y

Lauderdale, where Mr. Stapp has ac accepted
cepted accepted a position with a nabstract
company. Mrs. Stapp is popularly
known here as Miss Ethel Hodge, her
wedding to Mr. Stapp having been a
big event in Masonic and Eastern
Star circles early in the summer.
Miami Metropolis.

The Conuitercia.

Bank

OCALA. FLORIDA

CAPITAL STOCK $50,000.00.
Statu, County and City Depository.

Possibilities I
There, Little Man, don't cry!
She has broken your pipe, I know; j
And your desk she's cleared,
And your papers queered, j
Till the place is a holy show,
But you may get used to this, by and
by;
There, Little Man, don't cry, don't!
cry! j
There, Little Man, don't cry! j
She has broken your spirit, I know,
And shell have her way, j
And you must obey, j
Or torments undergo. j
But she may grow different, by and
.by; I
There, Little Man, don't cry, don't j
cry! j
There, Little Man, don't cry! J

She has broken your bank, I know;
And her frocks and furs,
And those hats of hers,
Exorbitant bills you owe.
But she may learn economy, by and
by;
There, Little Man, don't cry, don't

cry!

-Carolyn Wells.

Tuesday Auction Club
The members of the Tuesday auc auction
tion auction club will play Thursday this
week instead of the regular day, with
Miss Onie Chazal at 3:30 o'clock.

We Dave the Equipment and Ability
To serve you as you ought to be servied, and when you are not let us
ask you again, to let us know, for thi is the only way we can accomplish
vur desire.
Of course, sometimes, little things go wrong, but they arj not inten intentional,
tional, intentional, and, if you will call us up, they will be corrected IMMEDIATELY.

Ocala Ice & Packing Co.

PHONE 14

OCALA, FLA

Miss Rosebud Robinson of Orange j
Park, who has been visiting Mrs. D. j
C. Stiles for the past week, returned i
home Saturday afternoon.

Miss Kate Gamsby, who has not!
given any music lessons for the past
six weeks,- will resume her teaching j
again this coming Thursday. j

HAVE YOUR TIRES CHANGED
BY DYNAMITE

Vulcanizing Is Our Spcialty
BLALOCK BROTHERS
Phone 78 107 Ocklawaha Ave.
WE HANDLE GOODRICH TIRES

hks. Tires

We have a stock of fresh, New Rubber, UNITED
STATES TIRES, in Maxwell and Ford Sizes.
We will give your Tire adjustments prompt and
satisfactory attention.

The

YONGE BLOCK, FORT KING AVENUE
Ocala, Florida.

Read the Star Want Ads It pays

Mrs. J. L. Emerson, who has been

the guest of Mrs. H. B. Clarkson since
last Wednesday, returned to her

nuiuc ill uaiiicsv uic jcavciuaj.
Little Miss Mildred Bullock return returned
ed returned home Sunday night from a two
weeks visit to Miss Susan Stovall in
Tampa. Miss Mildred went up to
Jacksonville Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. James Taylor left
early this morning for a two weeks
visit in New York and Washington.
Little Miss Martha Taylor will be
with Miss Mamie Taylor during her
parents' absence.
Mrs. Anna Tweedy left this morn morning
ing morning for a several days visit to her
son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and

Mrs. Clifford Botts in DeLand. From

there Mrs. Tweedy will go to Jack-

sonville in the interest of the fair.
j Mr. and Mrs. Peter Mackintosh,
j who were married a week ago this
afternoon, arrived safely in Denver

last Saturday and will visit there and
other points of interest in Colorado
for the next three weeks.
Miss Ophelia Sawtell, who has
spent the past month with her par parents,
ents, parents, Capt. and Mrs. S. R. Pyles and
daughters at Glenhurst, left early
this morning for Johns Hopkins in
Baltimore, where she has signed a
contract for six months.
Friends of Mr. Leroy Bridges, who
went to Georgia to attend Emory
College about a week ago, will be in interested
terested interested to hear he changed his plans,
and is now in Gainesville, where he
is taking a pre-medical course at the
University of Florida.

Mr. Frank Clarkson of Washing Washington
ton Washington and Mr. Claude Clarkson of
Bridgeport, Conn., who have been
visiting their brother, Mr. H. B.
Clarkson and family since last Wed Wednesday,
nesday, Wednesday, left yesterday for a several
days visit in St. Petersburg. They
will return to Ocala before going
home.
Miss Sara Pearl Martin will leave
next Monday for Washington, where

she will enter the National School of
Domestic Art and Science. Miss Mar Martin's
tin's Martin's credits from Worcester Acad Academy,
emy, Academy, Mass., have been transferred
and she will graduate in domestic

science from the National school this
year.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Stapp arrived in
Miami this morning for a shore visit
with relatives before going to Fort

Notice
Owing to the half holidays Thurs Thursday
day Thursday afternoon, the meeting of the
Fanny R. Gary Missionary Society
will be held this week Wednesday af afternoon
ternoon afternoon at 4 o'clock in the Baptist
church. After this week the meeting
will be held as usual, Thursdays. All
members are especially urged to be
present at the meeting tomorrow.
Essays
The essays of the following great
men are in the Ocala library and may
be taken out by high school students
for references:
Carlyle.
Addison.
Macaulay.
Materlink.
Emerson.
George Eliot.
Bacon.
Lamb.
Burroughs.
R. L. Stevenson.
Huneker.
Thoreau.
Sour Cream Dressing
1 cup thick sour cream.
14 -cup sugar.
3 tablespoons lemon juice or vine vinegar.
gar. vinegar. Beat the cream, add the sugar and
vinegar and lastly the lemon juice or
vinegar. This makes a new and de

licious salad dressing which makes
shrimp salad a most tempting dish.
Shrimp Salad
1 can shrimp.
1 green pepper.
1 cup chopped celery.
1 lemon.
Olives (as many as preferred).
1 cup sour cream dressing.
1 bunch water cress or lettuce.
Never used canned shrimp unless
soaked for at least 15 minutes in iced
water. Then drain on fresh towel, re remove
move remove veins and shred,2 saving a few
to garnish. Chop two-thirds of the
pepper, and cut the remainder in thin
strips. Squeeze the juice of half of
lemon on shredded shrimp, mix the
shrimp, peppers, celery, cut olives
and sour cream dressing, pile mixture
on carefully washed water cress or
lettuce and garnish with the whole
shrimp, olive rings and strips of pep

per.

Sister Susie's Sending
Smokes to the Soldiers

Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Anderson and
Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Burford each re received
ceived received a cablegram this morning from
their sons, Lieut. Leslie Anderson and
Lieut. Wiley Burford. Each cable cablegram
gram cablegram contained the one welcome
word, "Safe," which is not only wel welcome
come welcome news to their parents but to
their large circle of friends who have
been anxiously awaiting news of
them and their arrival on the other
side.

(Concluded on Fourth Page)

SAFETY
FIRST

Has become the slogan not
only on the highways of
travel, but also in all lines
of industry. There's no
such thing as safety if
your valuable property is
not covered by
FIRE INSURANCE
We represent a number of
the most reliable companies
in existence,, and our facil facilities
ities facilities are not surpassed in
Florida.
D. W DAVIS, Agency
HOLDER BLOCK
OCALA :-: FLA.

And so are Father and Mother, and
every one else. It's the real thing
to do.
And you can do it easily; doesn't cost much;
every little helps. And gosh, how those men over
there do love their American tobacco and cigarettes.
It's easy for you 10 send your share. Make use of
our arrangement for taking contributions.

The Ocala Star Tobacco Fund
has just been started, to supply our boys with their favorite smoke. Will you help to make it a suc success?
cess? success? This has been endorsed by the Government. Through the efforts of the STAR, arrangements
have been made with the American Tobacco Company to send 45c. worth of tobacco for 25c.
Here is what they will get:
2 packages of Lucky Stride Cigarettes. Retails at 20c
3 packages of Bull Durham. Retails at 15c
3 books Bull Durham Cigarette Papers
1 tin of Tuxedo Tobacco. Retails at . .. 10c
4 books of Tuxedo Cigarette Papers :
45c
A return post card is enclosed in each package, so that every contributor will receive a personal
acknowledgement of his gift. You will treasure this message from the trenches. Everybody wants to
give a little. Will you help make it a success by doing your bit?
CONTRIBUTE ORGANIZE YOUR CLUB, YOUR CHURCH, YOUR TOWN, YOUR OFFICE. YOUR
FACTORY AND GIVE THE BOYS JUST A LITTLE COMFORT THEIR FAVORITE SMOKE.

THE OCALA STAR TOBACCO FUN

OCALA. FLORIDA.

THE CORK OAK TREE.
There Is Nothing "Just aa Good" as Its
Bark Product.
When a man goes into a hardware
store for a supply of cork for some
specific purpose he generally gets what
he asks for. The reason why the dealer
does not endeavor to persuade him to
try something else "just as good" is
because there is nothing else he could
offer.
Cork is cheap, and for ages it has
stood alone in its field of usefulness.
It is tough and elastic, and its specific
gravity is only 0.24. This, added to the
fact that it is impervious to water, ac accounts
counts accounts for its use in life preservers.
The cork oak, which grows principal principally
ly principally in Spain, Portugal, Algeria and
southern France, furnishes the supply.
Only the outer bark of the tree is used
for the commercial product. When the
tree has attained a diameter of ap approximately
proximately approximately five inches, which usually
it does by the time it is twenty years
old, the cork, as the first stripping of
bark is called, is removed. This cork
is so rough, coarse and dense that it
has little commercial value. But its
removal does not kill the tree. On the
contrary, It seems to promote develop development
ment development The stripping is done in July and Au August,
gust, August, and great skill is necessary in
order not to injure the tree. If it is
injured at any place the growth there
ceases, and the spot remains ever after afterward
ward afterward scarred and uncovered. Popular
Science Monthly.

Cornmeal Mush.
It has been found after careful tests
that five pounds and two ounces of
corn are required to produce one pound
of pork that Is, a hog must consume
more than five pounds of corn to gain
a pound lu weight
Cornmeal mush or cornbread. It fol follows.
lows. follows. Is vastly more economical as a
food for our tables than ham or bacon.
The only practical difficulty in bene benefiting
fiting benefiting by this knowledge Is that many
people think that corn Is so much bet better
ter better when it Is transmuted by the lowly
bog that it is worth five times the orig original
inal original price. New York Telegram.

THE WINBSOR MOTEL
JACKSONVILLE.FLORIDA

In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a frond' yard.
Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room service is
second to none.
RATES From $1.50 per day per person to $6.
ROBfcRT M. MEYER, J. E. KAVANAUGH
Proprietor. Biantfer.

WHITE STAR LIRIE
TKANSFEE m

COVERED VANS
AUTO
TRUCK SERVICE

TORAGE

Dealers in

It T TD)

mm

Collier Bros, water Phone 296

(1D0DP

G3--

n

THE

HE DECIDES TO CHANGE
HIS OCCUPATION

373

71 HEtft'e AN "ADP4T

L16TEN& Good To MEN-

"ALL AROUND DnfllNY

MAN WflNJEl

IN PEPAKTME.NT
rTof? APPLY

ORAND MAteoN

. I 'S&A

o o,

s

V

IF I GT OtS

Place I'm gonna

CHUCK PI6 MESSENGER.,

8oY JOB Df?E A INT
ENOUGH VARIETY AN

EXCITEMENT IN T To

5unr me:

- .-

WHAT WE WNT l3 A
Pf?ofil5NO YoUfte MAN

WHO lb f)6LE To

WoRk 0OTH

OUTSIDE

I KlN FILU TrJ

First part of

OAT All RighT-

IN FACT I'm TH'

8ET UTTt-E

PR0MI9ER ON
our, Block I

7'f

iv ofcidpo To I Thanks MR.Bunk-

GVE You A TRIAL- AN" IF l-LiKE TH'
REPORT To THE (PLACE I My

HEAD FlooRWAlKER. I PECome n r
Tb-MoRRoW AT V MEM8ER OF

EIGHT O'CLOCK I J I riKM.'y-

CoPYKlfeWf -rWTiPW- CARTooN 6EgwCg CefZf- N-6

Z2

PERE'9 fcNLY ONE TrilNGr

1 PoNT LIKE ABouT
t?l9 JoB WRkiN'

'IN3ipc All RIGHT

But ip rather work
OW TH'GUTSIPE WHR

"TH &ob Cn'T WATCH

1

loo

ZPEVIC4Q

D

1

'"f f



PACK FOUft

OCALA EVENING, STAR, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1917

m mm

Dr. Purvis has opened tip his dental
office over Troxler's fruit and cold
drink store, by Harrington Hall ho hotel.
tel. hotel. 9-15-lm
Always insist upon having Carter's
BUTTERN U I bread. Get it at your
grocer's or at Carter's Bakery, North
Main street. 7-tf
Besides being the best, Carter's
BUTTERNUT bread is "made in
Ocala." Insist upon having Carter's
bread from your grocer. 7-ti
Harmony Glycerine Soap is still
15c the cake. No advance on it as
yet. Better buy now.- G-erig's Drug
Store. tf.
W. K. Lane, at. li Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat. Law Library Building. Ocala,
Kionda. tf
None but the finest strains cf se selected
lected selected garden seeds are used in the
Pakro Seedtape 30 varieties of gar garden
den garden sed .and 18 flowers. Clarkson
Hardware Company. tf
Charlie Pratt was arrested last
evening by Deputy Sheriff Grubbs on
suspicion of having a deadly weapon
concealed on his person. It was re reported
ported reported to the officer that Charlie had
a dangerous looking weapon which he
had threatened to use on one of his
color. This lead to his arrest. He
plead guilty to the charge before
Judge Smith this forenoon and was
sentenced to pay a fine of $100 or
serve six months on the county hard
road crew. Charlie is now in jail and
claims that he can raise the where
withal to pay his fine.
SCHOOL CHILDREN, ATTENTION
A full line of school- supplies of
new, fresh stock, consisting of tab tablets,
lets, tablets, of all kinds, pencils, ink, pens,
erasers, can be found at the
SPECIALTY SHOP, A. E. Gerig. 3t
PINE
Pine, Sept. 24. Miss Ruth Young
of Sparr was the attractive, guest of
Miss Marie Eldridge last week. Miss
Young will go to Pedro Monday to
begin her school.
Mr. and Mrs. G. D. Turner and
daughter, Miss Marie Eldridge, son,
Drew and nephew, Carl Thornton of
Jacksonville, were visitors at the
Martin home Sunday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. Turner and Miss Eld Eldridge
ridge Eldridge attended the funeral of Mr.
f oi i .. rri i rri..
.... amuiiiuc oueaiey inur&uay. ine writer
' extends sympathy to the bereaved
family.
Miss Alma Jordan and friends
motored to Salt Springs and spent
last Sunday.
The writer had the opportunity of
seeing the snake and insect farm Sat Saturday
urday Saturday at Eureka. It is a sight to be
seen. The owner has goods boxes
with 'screen tops and straw in them
for the snakes to lie on. He has
aboat twenty different kinds of
, snakes and a large rattler. She has
: ffVV CTTrtflll AnOQ in Vnai r?A-n onrl Vk r Vino
vrA. VMVti ill VliJ ClilU lk liaO
every kind of small snake put up in
jars of alcohol. He has ?y number of
coons and every kind of insect that
sin. I. Ti. 1 a.
to go and see them.
Mr. and Mrs. G. D. Turner and
M iss Marie Eldridge were business
callers in Ocala last Monday.
Miss Mary Forbes of Anthony is
teaching the Greenwood school this
term.
Rev. Boatwright and family passed
through our town Sunday en route to
Sparr.
Mrs. G. D. Turner is expecting her
- mother, Mrs. C. C. Caldwell, from
Reynolds, Ga., some time soon.
Mr. arid Mrs. Bryce of Ocala were
guests of Mr. 'and Mrs". L. B. Jor Jordan
dan Jordan Thursday.
Mrs. C. G. Martin is visiting hep
parents in Gainesville at present.
Mrs. J. Thomas and son. Mr. Frank
Thomas, have been visiting at Island
-P.. U t i mi
vji"c ii mc pa&L seven weeKs. mey
returned home Friday after a most
enjoyable occasion.
an. nu wis. x. rerry ana ivir. J.
H. Pery were business callers in
Sparr Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs.'G. D. Turner and
Miss Marie Eldridge motored to
Ocala to see Company A off.
J If m t-
CORN WANTED
The board of county commissioners
of Marion county will receive bids up
to Wednesday, 10 o'clock, Oct. 3rd, for
corn in any quantity, unshucked per
barrel of 80 pounds. The board re reserves
serves reserves the right to reject any and all
bids. W T1 Cam
Chairman Bd. Co. Com.
P. H. Nugent, Clerk. 24-8t
FAIRS AND CELEBRATIONS
October. 10-20 Bradford. County
Fair at Lake Butler.
October 29 to November 3 Har Harvest
vest Harvest Festival and Fair at Wst Palm
Beach. r
November 6-10 West Florida Fair
at Marianna.
November 12-17 Escambia Coun County
ty County Fair, at Molino.
November 13-17 Suwanee County
Fair at Live Oak.
November 21-23 Orange Springs
Fair at Orange Springs.
November 20-23 Alachua County
Fair, at Gainesville.
November 27-30 Marion County
Fair, at Ocala.
December 4-8 Jacksonville Poul Poultry
try Poultry Show.
January 20 to February 1 Lake
County School Fair, at Tavares.
January Pinellas County Fair at
Largr.
PHONE 117
Dr. A. R. BlQtt
(Veterinarian
TOMPKINS' STABLE
Ocala, Florida

THE BIGGEST GUNS

Those Used on Jand Outweigh the
Largest In the Navy.
OUR COAST DEFENSE GIANTS.
The Sixteen Inch' Monster at Sandy
Hook and Panama Can Sink a Vessel
Before It Appear Above the Horizon.
How the Big Guns Are Made.
There are two classes of guns naval
guns and army or land guns. Because
they can be manipulated more easily
than those of a ship, laud guns are the
heavier. The largest naval gun is the
fifteen inch gun, and the largest land
gun is the German howitzer, or 10.5
inch gun.
Of the two the naval gun fires a shell
weighing over half a ton, while the
other fires a projectile a ton in weight.
But the new giant sixteen inh guns
of the United States defending the
Panama canal and New York at Sandv
Ilook shoot projectiles weighing 2,370
pounds, which Is over a ton. These
immense steel guns can sink a ship be before
fore before it has really come into sight on
the horizon, the location of the battle battleship
ship battleship having been determined by air airplane
plane airplane or tower.
How these huge pieces are made is
described as follows by the Popular
Science Monthly. The first steyns the
making of the pig iron from iron ore
In large furnaces like towers, called
blast furnaces. Then the pig iron is
melted with other steel in large steel
furnaces called "open hearth" until it
is freed of its impurities and convert converted
ed converted into steel.
The melted steel, thin as water, is
run from these furnaces into big iron
molds, where it is allowed to cool into
large solid cylindrical or corrugated
blocks. After cooling these are reheat reheated
ed reheated and reduced in size by pounding
them with big steel hammers and
squeezing them in rolls until at last
the steel is pressed into a long barrel barrel-like
like barrel-like mass, the embryo of a real 'gun.
This long skeleton of the inside of a
gun must be bored out from one end
to the otheron immense lathes, some
over ninety feet long. Heavy as the
mass Is, a huge lathe turns it around
as easily as a Tody turns a spool.
After the inside has been rifled or
scored to form an inside surface that
gives the shell a twist before it leaves
the muzzle and causes it to fly straight
the lower or muzzle end of the gun is
made'larger. This may be accomplish accomplished
ed accomplished in one or two ways. Either addi additional
tional additional shorter steel tubes are placed
over the main inner tube, or the main
tube is wound with wire and finished
with an outer tube. The wire wound
guns are usually the heavier and are
used on board ship.
The gun bound with wire is really
stronger than the one built of bands or
rings of steel, one on another, for the
wire re-enforces the gun tube so that
it will safely withstand the tremendous
strain which is constantly put on it
when it is fired, said to be as much as
seventeen tons pressure on each square
inch.
In the case of a "built up" gun, as
it is called when made of hoops or
bands of steel, the outer tubes or rings
are shrunk or sweated on that Is, they
are heated so that they expand or swell
a little, as all steel does when heated,
and then while hot they are fitted over
the inner part and allowed to cool and
shrink, or contract. In so doing they
fit very tightly on the main tube.
In making a wire wound gun the
wire is wound or coiled around and
around until more than 100 miles of It
has been wrapped around the bisf can cannon.
non. cannon. A twelve inch gun requires 117
miles of wire, weighing about thirteen
and one-half tons. Although the
strength of the wire is such that it
gives great resisting force to pressures
exerted, sideways, it does not bestow
strength lengthwise. Therefore an ex extra
tra extra thickness of metal must be put on
the muzzle of the gun, where the vi vibration
bration vibration caused by the shell leaving the
gun Is the greatest.
The breech, or the back end of a gun.
is a very important part. Here the
shell Is inserted in a specially built
chamber. After the shell is in place
the breech is closed by the shutting of
a very complicated and strong door.
It is fastened or fitted in the gun by
extremely strong screws, so that the
charge will not burst the gun open at
the back when it is fired.
Sometimes a shell explodes in the
barrel of the gun. In a wire bound
gun the wire tends to prevent a grave
disaster. It hinders the steel tubes
from bursting Into many pieces and
flying in every direction. The solid
gun is wholly built of tubes, while in
the wire wound gun there may be one
or two tubes, over which the wire is
wound with the jacket tubes shrunk
over the wire. A bush for the breech
ring is screwed into the rear end,
which is also re-enfbreed by a breech
ring outside.
Test In Forensic Oratory.
It is related that when a veterinary
surgeon was once called as a witness in
a case to prove that a horse was a
"roarer" the opposing counsel in, his
loudest tones said to the witness, "If
you say that my client's horse was a
'roarer,' just represent to the jury the
sort of noise he made." "No," said the
witness. "You must understand that
that is not my business. Now, If you
will be the horse and make the noise, I,
as veterinary surgeon, will express an
opinion as to whether you are a 'roarer
or not !" Fa rm and. Home.
He is a brave man who refuses to be
Asheartened by the fact that he was
beaten yesterday.
Have your prescriptions filled at the
COURT PHARMACY, where you can
be certain that they are compounded
of the best drugs, the utmost care and
without delay. 17-tf
Chesapeake Bay Oysters received
daily at the Delicatessen Shop, Ocala
House block. 17-tf
A full assortment of the famous
PAKRO Seedtape. Just the thing for
the small fall garden. Ocala Seed
Store. c tf

out mm
(Continued from Third Page,

Notice to U. D. C.
The Daughters of the Confederacy
who always celebrate Marianna Day
on the 27th, and the birthday anniver anniversary
sary anniversary of the late beloved Mrs. Fanny
R. Gary the 2Gth, will combine the
two this year on Thursday, the 26th,
and will celebrate them with a short,
appropriate program that afternoon
at 4 o'clock at the home of Mrs. E.
L. Carney. 2t
Miss Marguerite Porter returned
home this afternoon from a delight delightful
ful delightful three months stay in the north.
After completing a course in music
and folk dancing at the University of
Illinois, Miss Porter visited her sis sister,
ter, sister, Mrs. Lew Lyons in Chicago and
spent the past week with her sister,
Mrs. W. A. Collier and children in
Tuscaloosa, Ala. Mis Porter will re reopen
open reopen her studio next Monday.
Mr. W. K. Zewadski has returned
from a short visit to Mr. and Mrs.
W. K. Zewadski Jr. and baby in
Tampa.
Edward Henderson is visiting rela relatives
tives relatives at Ocala for a short while.
Port Tampa City notes in Tribune.
Mr. and Mrs. Z. C. Chambliss have
returned home from a month's visit
to Mrs. Chambliss' parents in Davis Davis-boro,
boro, Davis-boro, Ga.
Next Tuesday "Our Fighting
Forces"- in two reels will be shown
in place of the usual Tuesday war
pictures, the last of which will be
shown at the Temple today.
Miss Beulah Carrington has return returned
ed returned to her home in Jacksonville after
a several days visit to her sjsters,
Mrs. Annie Aiken and Mrs. W. T.
Ritchie.
The Junior sewing circle of the
Methodist church will be entertained
Wednesday afternoon by Mrs. W. A.
Barrett and Mrs. Hary Holcomb at
Mrs. Barrett's apartment at 3:30
o'clock.
Mr. and Mrs. John McCabe and the
latter's mother, Mrs. Fanny Johnston
of Jacksonville, motored to Ocala
yesterday to visit Mrs. Johnston's
son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs.
S. E. Leigh. Mr. McCabe went south
on business and will return and take
them home Friday.
The article elsewhere in today's
paper, sent in by the food conserva conservation
tion conservation committee of the Woman's Club,
will be of interest to all the ladies
who signed the food conservation
cards this summer, as it tells in which
articles the elimination of waste is
the most necessary.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Moorhead
and daughter, Miss Frances of Char Charleston,
leston, Charleston, S. C, arrived in Ocala yes yesterday
terday yesterday for a short visit. They are
now with Mrs. E. J. Redding but will
visit Mr. Moorhead's brother, Mr. J.
R. Moorhead and family before re returning
turning returning home.
The last official government war
picture will be shown at the Temple
tonight with an unusually good other
program, which will consist of the
j L T. IZLAR, JR.
INSURANCE
FIRE
AUTOMOBILE
ACCIDENT
LIFE
INDEMNITY
Second Floor
e Gary Block
Ocala, Vis.
GLAD TO IE
Says Watoga Lady, "As To What
Cardui Has Done For Me, So
As To Help Others."
Watoga, W. Va. Mrs. S.W. Gladwell,
of this town, ssys: "When about 15 yesrs
of age, I suffered greatly . Sometirr.es
would go a month or two, and I hsd
terrible headache, backache, and bearing bearing-down
down bearing-down pains, and would just drag and
had no appctiie. Then ... it would last
. . two weeks, and was so weakening,
a-d my health was awful.
My mother bought me a bottle of
Cardui, and I began to improve after
taking the first bottle, so kept it up till I
took three ... 1 gained, and was well
and strong, and 1 owe it all to Cardui.
1 am married now and have 3 children
. . Have never had to have a doctor for
female trouble, and just resort to Cardui
if I need a toric. 1 am glad to testify to
what it has done for me, so as to help
others."
If you are nervous or weak, have head headaches,
aches, headaches, backaches, or any of the ether
ailments so common to women, why not
give Cardui a trial? Recommended by
many physicians. In use over 40 years.
Begin taking Cardui today. It may
be the very medicine you need.
NC-130
Mclver & MacKay
UNDERTAKERS and EMBALMERS
PHONES 47, 104, 305
OCALA, FLORIDA

Hearst Weekly, an L. K. O. comedy
and the first of the new Billy West
comedies, making in all a seven-reel
entertainment.
Mrs. W. A. Pelot returned Sunday
from a week's stay in Jacksonville,
and left at noon today for her home
in Arcadia. She was accompanied by
her sister, Miss Josie Williams, who
will be her guest for the winter.
Mrs. E. A. Shealey of Demorest,

i Ga., who came to attend the funeral
of her father, the late Mr. Howell,
returned to her home yesterday. She
was accompanied by her niece, Miss
Ruth Howell, who will attend Pied Piedmont
mont Piedmont Colege there this year. Miss
Ruth has not been very strong since
her operation the early part of the
summer and her many friends hope
she will greatly benefited by the
change of climate.
. j
The Ocala friends of Mrs. T. P.
Drake and son, Master William H.
Drake of Yalaha, are delighted to
hear they are to spend the winter in
Ocala at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
William Hocker. Master William will
attend school here and they will spend
the week ends in Yalaha. Master
Truxton Drake is in school in Balti Baltimore
more Baltimore this year.
The friends of Mr. and Mrs. Thos.
B. Pasteur will be interested to hear
they will reside in Miami in the fu future,
ture, future, where Mr. Pasteur will be con connected
nected connected with one of the large banks in
that city. Mrs. Pasteur will join Mr.
Pasteur in Sanford the last of this
week and they will go from there to
Miami. Mr. and Mrs. Pasteur's many
friends regret to give them up but
wish them the greatest prosperity in
their new home.
Mrs. R. A. Burford and Miss Agnes
returned this afternoon from their
visit to Troy, Ala.
Everybody who saw Jackie Saund Saunders
ers Saunders at the Temple yesterday after afternoon
noon afternoon and evening was much pleased
with that entirely original actress.
Her company seems able to frame
original plays, also.
UNCIASSIREO AD
WANTED, LOST, FOUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS
DR. D. M. BONEY
"My Optician"
EYESIGHT
SPECIALIST
I especially offer my services to the
people of Central Florida, and invite
personal visits or mail orders.
202-204 Hogan St., Park Hotel Bldg.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
FOR SALE Sugar cane seed, Rib Ribbon,
bon, Ribbon, Green Louisiana, and' Red
Cuban; $2 per sundred stalks 4-foot
cane. Order early and secure best
seed. Address Newcomb Barco, Cot Cotton
ton Cotton Plant, Fla. 17-lm
FOR SALE My new home, 6 rooms;
fine location; near both schools. A
bargain. J. E. Frampton, 1109 East
5th St., Ocala, Fla. Phone 185-G. 12t
FORD ROADSTER FOR SALE A
good Ford roadster, in fine condition,
for sale $200 cash. Apply to J. B.
Johnson or Star office. 20-6t
FOR RENT Comfortable cottage,
six rooms, corner Tuscawilla and
S. Second streets; sleeping porch, 8
foot veranda, screens, gas, bath, elec
trie lights. Apply to Dr. E. Van
Hood or phone 164. 1-tf
FOR SALE 1 1916 Ford, $260; 1
1917 Ford, $350; 1 1916 Saxon, $500.
Auto Sales Co., Ocala, Fla. 21-6t
FOR SALE Nice lot 70 x 112 in sec second
ond second ward also nice residence lot at
$200. W. W. Condon. 21-tf
FOR SALE, AT A BARGAIN One
1917 seven passenger Reo six, and
one 1916 five passenger Rea. Both in
first-class condition. A good auto for
hire business goes with the cars. Ap Apply
ply Apply to John Needham. 22-tf
FOR RENT Two or three furnished
rooms for light housekeeping; cen centrally
trally centrally located and reasonable price.
Address Box 453, Ocala, Fla. 22-6t
OVERLAND ROADSTER At a bar bargain.
gain. bargain. One Overland roadster, 30 30-horsepower
horsepower 30-horsepower motor, perfect condition
all through, tires to top. A bargain;
terms if desired. The Maxwell Agen Agency,
cy, Agency, Ocala. 19-6t
THREE FORD BARGAINS We
have three Ford touring cars, good
condition and cheap. The Maxwell
Agency, cala. 19-6t
OFFICE BOY WANTED Good,
bright boy who does not intend going
to school this term. Apply at the
Star office. 15-6t
WANTED A young man 19 to 21
years of age, high school education,
position of assistant manager to learn
the 5c. and 10c. business and become
manager. Excellent opportunity for
a young man that wants to make
good. McCrory Stores Corporation. 3t
The greatest human care and the
highest human intelligence ought to
ticn. This describes our service. The
Court Pharmacy. 17-tf
A coat now and then of DAVIS
OLD COLONY WAGON PAINT pre
serves your waeons and farm imple
ments and makes them look like new.
Ads. 17
For Sale By
THE MARION HARDWARE CO.,
Ocala, Fla,

FAIR CON CONSPIRATORS
SPIRATORS CONSPIRATORS Ey SADIS CLCOTT

The new thiLg in the slias-e of a mar marriageable
riageable marriageable mau in I Vjitoiiville was Mc McDonnell.
Donnell. McDonnell. He was a ouii;r lawyer,
who went ti the t it., every day. l'en l'en-tonville
tonville l'en-tonville beinir a u','jrla: town, and
Cid not know that in the -.niieratio;j
of the marriageable ,'ii!s of the place
he wus not only a new tiling, but a
very desirable thin;;.
"This McDonnell fellow." said Flniily
Chaniller to u number of you;:g I'en I'en-tonville
tonville I'en-tonville girls who were dismissing the
ellgibles, or, rather, the want oi eiii eiii-bles
bles eiii-bles of the town, deserves to be taiien
down from his hipa horse."
"What high horse?" asked Phoebe
Brooks.
"Why, he has refused to be Intro
duced to any of us.'
"I doubt it," said Phoebe.
"Why do you doubt it?"
"Because there's no authority for it;
It's mere talk. Anyway if it's true
Mr. McDonnell probably has his own
reason for not making our acquaint acquaintance."
ance." acquaintance." "For my part." chirped Lucy Ellison,
"if he were to ask to be introduced to
me. I would decline the honor."
"That'H a good idea. Lucy,"said Miss
Chandler. "Suppose we all take that
stand. If any one proposes to intro introduce
duce introduce him we'll decline."
An agreement was entered into by
the" girls to this e.Teet, but they had
no opportunity to sh.w their spleen to
McDonnell, because he did not ask to
be introduced to any of them. An
aunt of his lived in Pentonville, and
McDonnell spent such hours as hung
heavy on ins hands at her house, where
b? was very much at home. This lady,
Mrs. Meri weather, very soon heard of
this conspiracy and got the uames of
the conspirators.
One morning Miss Chandler received
a note from Mrs. Meriweather stating
that her nephew, Ralph McDonnell,
had sien the young lady at church and
had expressed a desire to be introduced
to her. Would Miss Chandler dine
with Mrs. Meriweather for the purpose
of enabling the nephew to make Miss
Chandler's acquaintance?
Miss Chandler dispatched an accept acceptance
ance acceptance In hot haste. McDonnell show showed
ed showed lir the attention he felt called upon
to show his aunt's guest, and Miss
Chandler was delighted. Hut she did
not epeak of the meeting to any of her
girl friends.
Soon after this Miss Lucy Ellison
received an invitation by telephone
from Mrs. Meriweather to come over
for cards( in the evening. Mrs. Meri Meri-weather's
weather's Meri-weather's nephew had seen Miss Elli Ellison
son Ellison at the Turner club and had ex expressed
pressed expressed a desire to know her.
The young lady accepted.
During a period of several weeks ev every
ery every one of the conspirators had been
informed by Mrs. Meriweather that
her nephew had expressed a desire to
be introduced to her, all receiving in invitations
vitations invitations for the purpose. Every girl
accepted the invitation, but not one of
them said a word to any of the others
about' the acceptance. Nor did either
Mrs. Meriweather or Mr. McDonnell
say anything either. Phoebe Brooks,
who had doubted the report that had
led to Mr. McDonnell's ostracization.
was one who was invited to Mrs. Men Men-weather's
weather's Men-weather's house to meet the ostracized
gentleman, but was disinclined to act
contrary to her friends. She had nei neither
ther neither acquiesced nor declined to take
part In the ostracization, but, not lik liking
ing liking to place herself in opposition to her
frierwds. found it convenient to have an
engagement.
Mrs. Meri weather's next move was
to invite the girls whom her nephew
had expressed a desire to know to an
informal dan e at her house, partners,
of course, being provided. The girls
were invited at 8, the men at half
pat 8.
The first girl to arrive was Lucy El Ellison.
lison. Ellison. The second was Emily Chan Chandler.
dler. Chandler. They arrived almost simultane simultaneously
ously simultaneously and met in the ladies' robing
room. They started on seeing each
other, and each stammered an apol apology
ogy apology for being there. Whmi they went
down into the drawing room McDon McDonnell
nell McDonnell greeted each as if he had known
her for years. As each girl came in
and stood on the threshold staling at
the conspirators who had aire: dy ar arrived
rived arrived the host advanced and greeted
her oordially, indicating by some well
timed remark a previous acquaintance.
The last girl to arrive was Miss Brooks.
When she entered Mrs. Meriweather
with unusual formality introduced.
"My nephew, Mr. McDonnell."
The girls already arrived looked at
ne another. Some colored, some irave
an embarrassed jd ingle, some were an angered,
gered, angered, but one feeling pertained to all.
To UBe an expression common nmng
them and the young fellows they knew,
they had been '"stung."
Nevertheless the hostess and the host,
her nephew, manifested no knowledge
of the real situation, but set about en entertaining
tertaining entertaining them to the best of their
ability. The young men inYited soon
be?an to connin, and it vi not long
before the girls were forget!" : the les lesson
son lesson they had received in the dance.
Fortunately that lesson had ieen for
all except Miss Brooks, but Mr. Mc McDonnell
Donnell McDonnell had the magnanimity to show
her no more attention than the next
of his aunt's guests.
However, he was not always lund
to refrain from showing a prefesence.
and, though he had the good sense and
gentlemanlike iritin t to treat the
other girls with friendliness, it was
soon manifest that ho considered him
self Miss Brooks" oj.-eial property. In
dHe time thev made a match.
PLUMBING AND
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING
When you have plumbing or elec electrical
trical electrical contracting, let us turnish rou
estimates. No Job too large and none
too small, tf H. W. Tucker.
WOOD
WTien you want wood call my resi residence,
dence, residence, phone 349, or call Teapot
Grocery, phone 16. Prompt delivery.
24- J. H. J. Counts."

HUMMER TOIM!

From Jacksonville to

New York and return . $38.00
Baltimore and return ... $33.90
Philadelphia and return $36.00
Washington and return. .$34.00

Through tickets to all Eastern resorts, with return limit October
31. 1917, with privilege of stopovers at principal points. Sailings
from Jacksonville via Savannah to Baltimore Wednesday, direct Sun Sunday.
day. Sunday. To PvUadelphia direct Thursday.
Wireless telegraph on all ships. Accommodations unsurpassed. Res Res-eievations,
eievations, Res-eievations, fare or any information cheerfully furnished on appli-
cation.
MERCHANTS & MINERS TRANSPORTATION Mim
Jacksonville, Florida
H C. Avery, Agent. J. F. WARD. T. P. A L. D. JONES, C. A.

, LEO

SAINT LEO, PASCO COUNTY, FLORIDA
IDEAL BOARDING SCHOOL FOR YOUNG GENTLEMEN
Courses in Classics, Science and Commerce. Also
Primary Department. Send for Catalogue.
Rev. F. Benedict, Director.
OPENS FOR THE FALL TERM, WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 12, 1917.

.Irli L mi J

M

SURROUND YOURSELF AND THOSE YOU LOVE WITH LUX LUXURIOUS
URIOUS LUXURIOUS TOILET NECESSITIES. THEY MAKE LIFE WORTH
LIVING.
WE HAVE A SUPERB LINE OF TOILET REQUIREMENTS
AND USEFUL ARTICLES OF JEWELRY.
WHEN DESIRING PRESENTS FOR OTHERS, OR ARTICLES
FOR YOUR OWN" USE, SEE WHAT WE HAVE TO OFFER YOU.
WHEN IT COMES FROM US IT IS RIGHT.
WE MAKE QUALITY RIGHT- THEN THE PRICE RIGHT.
A. E. BURNETT
The Reliable Jeweler

4

UNEXCELLED

QUR JOB PRINTING Department is
thoroughly equipped for all kinds
of commercial Printing. Our facilities
for handling
PAMPHLETS. BOOKLETS. PROGRAMS.
WEDDING and BUSINESS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
and all kinds of
X OFFICE STATIONERY
Unsurpassed in Central Florida.
pFFICIENT Workmanship. High
Quality Paper, Prompt Service and
Living Prices are some of our reasons

for asking an opportunity to serve you.

JOB PRINTING
TELEPHONE FIVE-ONE (51)

L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER
AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Con Contract
tract Contract work. Gives More and Better
Work for the Money than any other
contractor in the city.
;
Headquarters for the newest de-1
sijErns in Distinctive and Exclusive i
Millinery. The Affleck Millinery Par
lor, Ocala House block. 21-3t

Savannah and return ... $ 7.00
Boston and return $46.00
Atlantic City and return $38.25
Niagra Falls and return. $48.90
COLLEGE
Exquisite Articles
for ike
Toil el Table
MAYR'S
Wonderful Remedy for
STOM&CH TROUBLE
One dose convinces.
The Court Pharmacy
and other reliable druggists.
Advertise in the Star.

1



Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
fcla fda yes
!-- Ocala evening star ( Newspaper ) --
METS:mets OBJID UF00075908_06737
xmlns:METS http:www.loc.govMETS
xmlns:xlink http:www.w3.org1999xlink
xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance
xmlns:daitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss
xmlns:mods http:www.loc.govmodsv3
xmlns:sobekcm http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm
xmlns:gml http:www.opengis.netgml
xmlns:lom http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm_lom
xsi:schemaLocation
http:www.loc.govstandardsmetsmets.xsd
http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss.xsd
http:www.loc.govmodsv3mods-3-4.xsd
http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcmsobekcm.xsd
METS:metsHdr CREATEDATE 2014-07-31T20:20:47Z ID LASTMODDATE 2009-04-29T15:57:01Z RECORDSTATUS COMPLETE
METS:agent ROLE CREATOR TYPE ORGANIZATION
METS:name UF,University of Florida
OTHERTYPE SOFTWARE OTHER
Go UFDC FDA Preparation Tool
INDIVIDUAL
UFAD\renner
METS:dmdSec DMD1
METS:mdWrap MDTYPE MODS MIMETYPE textxml LABEL Metadata
METS:xmlData
mods:mods
mods:accessCondition This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
mods:genre authority marcgt newspaper
sobekcm newspaper
mods:identifier type OCLC 11319113
ALEPHBIBNUM 2052267
LCCN sn 84027621
sn 84027621
mods:language
mods:languageTerm text English
code iso639-2b eng
mods:location
mods:physicalLocation University of Florida
UF
mods:note dates or sequential designation Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
funding Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855
mods:originInfo
mods:publisher Porter & Harding
mods:place
mods:placeTerm marccountry flu
mods:dateIssued September 25, 1917
marc point start 1895
end 1943
mods:frequency Daily (except Sunday)
marcfrequency daily
normalized irregular
mods:recordInfo
mods:recordIdentifier source UF00075908_06737
mods:recordCreationDate 841027
mods:recordOrigin Imported from (OCLC)11319113
mods:recordContentSource University of Florida
marcorg NPU
FUG
OCLCQ
mods:languageOfCataloging
English
eng
mods:relatedItem original
mods:physicalDescription
mods:extent v. : ; 61 cm.
series
mods:part
mods:detail Enum1
mods:caption 1917
mods:number 1917
Enum2
September
9
Enum3
25
25
lccn 84027622
oclc 11319138
mods:titleInfo
mods:title Ocala weekly star
mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
mods:geographic Ocala (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ651_2
Marion County (Fla.)
Newspapers
mods:hierarchicalGeographic
mods:country United States
mods:state Florida
mods:county Marion
mods:city Ocala
mods:nonSort The
Ocala evening star
uniform
Ocala Evening Star
alternative displayLabel Other title
Evening star
Star
mods:typeOfResource text
DMD2
OTHERMDTYPE SOBEKCM SobekCM Custom
sobekcm:procParam
sobekcm:Aggregation FDNL1
FDNLN
NDNP
sobekcm:MainThumbnail 0006thm.jpg
sobekcm:Wordmark UFPKY
NEH
CHRAM
sobekcm:bibDesc
sobekcm:BibID UF00075908
sobekcm:VID 06737
sobekcm:EncodingLevel #
sobekcm:Publisher
sobekcm:Name Porter & Harding
sobekcm:PlaceTerm Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
sobekcm:Source
sobekcm:statement UF University of Florida
sobekcm:SortDate 693595
sobekcm:serial
sobekcm:SerialHierarchy level 1 order 1917 1917
2 9 September
3 25 25
DMD3
GML Geographic Markup Language
gml:FeatureCollection
gml:featureMember
gml:Point label Place of Publication
gml:Coordinates 29.187778,-82.130556
METS:amdSec
METS:digiprovMD DIGIPROV1
DAITSS Archiving Information
daitss:daitss
daitss:AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT PROJECT UFDC
METS:techMD TECH1
File Technical Details
sobekcm:FileInfo
METS:fileSec
METS:fileGrp USE reference
METS:file GROUPID G1 JP21 imagejp2 CHECKSUM 567f09d132084261e50c7455801b3c13 CHECKSUMTYPE MD5 SIZE 9061670
METS:FLocat LOCTYPE OTHERLOCTYPE SYSTEM xlink:href 0335.jp2
G2 JP22 bde5da81f7ba20b6f00c222f5a519922 9056166
0336.jp2
G3 JP23 b11efc533c64cde41262aa1f15d5b14f 9006350
0337.jp2
G4 JP24 d6de36a9c3f9f20401eb9a54b0ec384f 9104759
0338.jp2
archive
TIF1 imagetiff ca61caacdccfc2ab408b8917c93928c6 72464649
0335.tif
TIF2 7baeff2a50a010b6a5fff4feb6de6bae 72410716
0336.tif
TIF3 a354733a89584b033e5255e38aaff153 72032108
0337.tif
TIF4 c242620801e97f219cbf0b8ff5a51906 72799354
0338.tif
TXT1 textplain b6c7ff6269a3ca68dc6c67e4f8ec4758 29149
0335.txt
TXT2 71d7ae8c20b49b77f13d94442f0b0959 26698
0336.txt
TXT3 b113e9f3c71cad9acc31ed152d130db4 12945
0337.txt
TXT4 8df804d501e34888aa96ee3c0b70ae02 29040
0338.txt
ALTO1 unknownx-alto 45e011ae87b0938cb2ce7036815fafbc 871584
0335.alto
ALTO2 652159651b6bec0a35c62eaa4332384a 832512
0336.alto
ALTO3 e9eca7c66cce2ef1dd18f12faf3968e1 423238
0337.alto
ALTO4 438251e799e0b98e44ba49ebc46a9732 904500
0338.alto
METS1 unknownx-mets e02166d3e0e47bb77c13b1c7f8bb348f 9864
UF00075908_06737.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ADMID The ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 Main
PAGE1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
PAGE2
PAGE3
PAGE4 4
STRUCT2 other
ODIV1
FILES1