The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06684

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
WEATHER FORECAST
Fair tonight. Thursday thunder
showers," except generally fair south
portion.

OCALA., FLORIDA, WEDNESDAY, JULY 25, 1917.
VOL. 23, NO. 180.
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Russian Armies Compelled to Retreat, Call Up
. Reserves and Reform

HAVE "A BAD ..SfTBAGK BUT-
The retreating Russian armies bid
fair not to stop until they reach the
line held before the big offensive of
last year. The Germans announce
they took Tarnpool. Despite- this
movement the official and unofficial
Russian dispatches are not pessimis pessimistic.
tic. pessimistic. Two encouraging factors are
that the Germans admittedly have
not enough men to inaugurate a gen general
eral general offensive in the east and are
afraid to take them from the west.
RUSSIA HAS RESERVES
Russia has dependable reserves with
which to replace disloyal soldiers at
the front as soon as they are weed weeded
ed weeded out.
FRENCH HOLD THE CRAONNE
FRONT
The entente superiority in the west
is again illustrated by the French
winning the long drawn struggle for
commanding positions on the Craon Craon-ne
ne Craon-ne front. The Germans tried to re regain
gain regain them this morning, but were re repulsed.
pulsed. repulsed. .The- French are holding all
the ground gained and have consoli consolidated
dated consolidated it.
STAMSLAU RETAKEN
The Russians penetrated the Teu Teuton
ton Teuton line south of the Carpathians but
halted at a German protested posi position,
tion, position, Berlin reports. The Germans
took Stanislau and Nadvorna.
The .Flanders bombardment con continues.
tinues. continues. WOMEN IN THE WAR
Petrograd, July 25. A Russian
woman's battalion saw its first fight fighting
ing fighting yesterday on the Erevo front.
It is reported that the women be behaved
haved behaved well and won the respect of the
men soldiers. While they were suc successful
cessful successful they suffered some losses not
yet known.
AN EASIER JOB IN THE EAST
Copenhagen, July 25. The arrival
of the emperor" on the Galician front
yesterday morning is reported in a
Berlin dispatch.
BOY SCOUTS WILL KEEP BUSY
In spite of the absence of Rev.
JJunyan Stephens in Georgia,- the Boy
Scouts will remain busy and keep up
their organization until his return.
There are four squads of eight
boys each of the scouts, each with a
patrol leader, as follows: First, Sam
Phillips; second, Frank Rentz; third,
Ralph Simmons; fourth, Herman
Clayton.
. The boys will meet for rehearsal of
their duties every other, Tuesday
night. Three of our physicians have
volunteered to give them instructions
on those occasions, namely, Drs. E.
Van Hood, Dozier and Walters. One
will speak on each meeting night.
This is an excellent organization,
and the parts of the city should inter interest
est interest themselves and see that it is kept
up and increases.
PICKING COTTON
The first scattering bolls of cotton
are beginning to open and the farm farmers
ers farmers are picking small quantities here
and there, some a few pounds and
others several hundred. By another
week cotton picking will begin in a
lively manner, but it will be several
weeks before it is under full head headway.
way. headway. The season has been such that
the cotton will be opening and pick pickers
ers pickers will be busy for a long time, as
much of the cotton will not be open
till late August or early September.
The plants are so healthy and vigor vigorous
ous vigorous that the upper bolls will mature
and make many pickings. The .pick .picking
ing .picking of the great cotton crop in Mar Marion
ion Marion county this season is going to be
some job.
Let me sell you your feed crusher.
"W. J. McGehee, distributor. tf

FOIll IS FULL OF HOPE
CflAQHNE FRONT

(Associated Press)
CATTS IS COMING
Executive will Inspect State Institu Institutions
tions Institutions in Ocala Early in
August
A letter from Dr. Blitch to the
Star says:
Governor Catts will be in Ocala the
first few days of August. He will
look over some of the state institu institutions
tions institutions and on the fith of August, the
first Sunday in the month, at 11
o'clock a. m. will occupy the pulpit
of the Blitchton "Baptist church.
EIGHTY LIVES LOST IN
A MINE EXPLOSION
(Associated Press)
Halifax, July 25 Eighty men were
killed in an explosion in the Domin Dominion
ion Dominion Coal company mine at New Wat Wat-erford,
erford, Wat-erford, New Brunswick, according to
a report from Sydney. Twelve bodies
had been recovered at noon.
IMPORTANT MEETING
' IN JACKSONVILLE
The Tri-State Fair Association held
a meeting recently at the Mason hotel
in, Jacksonville for the purpose of
electing officers and mapping out a
plan of work for the interests of the
several associations who are members
thereof. '
Those present were Mr. J. M. Ash Ashley,
ley, Ashley, representing the Georgia-Florida
Fair at Valdosta, Ga.7 Mr. L. C.
Lynch and, Mr. W. M.- Pepper, of
Gainesville, representing the Alachua
County Fair; Mr. F. M. Rivers, Mr.
J. H. Scarborough, Mr. Charles Reg
ister and Mr. J. W. Townsend repre representing
senting representing the Bradford County Fair at
Lake Butler; Mr. W. H. Vanlanding Vanlanding-ham
ham Vanlanding-ham representing the Southwest
Georgia Fair at Donaldsonville, Ga.,
Capt. J. Stuart Lewis, of Tallahassee,
representing the Leon County Fair;
Mr. B. R. Kessler of Jacksonville, rep representing
resenting representing the Duval County Fair As Association
sociation Association and Mrs. A. Tweedy of
Ocala, representing the Marion Coun County
ty County Fair.
The following officers were elect elected:
ed: elected: J. M. Ashley, of Valdosta, Ga.,
president; L. C. Lynch of Gainesville,
vice president and Mrs. A. Tweedy of
Ocala, secretary.
New members were the Southwest
Georgia Fair of Donaldsonville, Ga.,
and the Bradford County Fair of Lake
Butler, Florida.
FUNERAL SERVICES
FOR MR. HENDERSON
The funeral services of the late
Mr. W. T. Henderson which were held
at the Oklawaha Bridge Baptist
church were attended by numerous
friends from the surrounding places.
Mayor Chace, Mr. and Mrs. E. L.
Carney, Dr. and Mrs. Harry Walters,
Miss Margaret Walters, Mr. and Mrs.
Baxter Cam, Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Ze-
wadski, Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Strip
ling and Mr. Carlton Ervin of this
city, were among those in attendance.
The pall bearers were Messrs. E. L.
Carney, John L. Edwards, H. D.
Stokes of Ocala, John and Robert
Rogers of Lynne and J. W. Crosby of
Citra. The services were conducted
i by Rev. H. E. Pedenhouse, who was
assisted by Col. R. F. Rogers. Quan
tities of beautiful flowers were sent
from all sections as a last tribute to
this loved and honored citizen. The
remains were laid to rest in the fam
iiy burying ground near Lynne.
PREST-O-LITE TANKS
We have half a dozen Prest-o-Lite
tanks, two sizes, for sale at bargains.
The Maxwell Agency, Ocala. 23-6t

FRENCH HAVE WON BATTLE 01

PENSACOLA IS
FULL OF PERIL
Danger Must be Averted from Our
Pure and Modest Sailors,
Says Daniels
(Associated Press)
Pensacola, July 25. Following a
conference here today between Gov Governor
ernor Governor Catts, the county solicitor,
sheriff and two hundred women ar arrested
rested arrested in aj-aid, the governor produc produced
ed produced a letter from Secretary of the
Navy Daniels saying that unless the
"restricted district" was abolished
navy men would be withdrawn from
Pensacola.
IT WAS NOT UNANIMOUS'
Jacksonville, Fla., July 24, 1917.
Editor Florida Times-Union,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Dear Sir: In a news article in your
issue of today 'It is stated that J. L.
Earman was elected chairman of the
board of control by unanimous vote
of the members.
The fact is that Mr. Earman was
elected chairman by the votes of him himself
self himself and the other two newly appoint appointed
ed appointed members. Neither Mr. King nor I
voted forhim and there was no at attempt
tempt attempt to make his election unani unanimous,
mous, unanimous, because it was thoroughly un understood
derstood understood that it could not be done.
But, now that Mr. Earman has been
elected, I shall give him my support
in everything that tends to the up upbuilding
building upbuilding of the educational institu institutions
tions institutions of the state under the care of
the board of control.
E. L. Wartmann.
DAVID EVANS STROBLE
After some weeks of intense suf
fering David Evans Stroble departec
this life at his home near Belleview
in great peace, July 17, in the pres
ence of his famliy.
He was born Jan. 6, 1850, in Alach
ua county and was married to Mis:
Rehecca W. Togg of Belleview, and tc
this union was born four girls: Annie
Belle, Alice and Lenora. The first de departed
parted departed this life at about iJ years of
age, also his wife about the same
time.
The funeral services were held in
the Baptist church in Belleview, ol
which he had been a member for i
number of years, also a senior deacon
at his death. The services were at attended
tended attended by a large concourse of friends
and relatives. The interment waf
made in Belleview cemetery, July 18
by the side of his sainted wife and
daughter. The services were conduct conducted
ed conducted by the writer. A beautiful cedai
tree set out some years ago by his
own hands marks the spot where he
rests. The floral display placed or
the grave by loving hands was elab elaborate
orate elaborate and beautiful.
Brother Stroble leaves one brother
Wm. W. Stroble, of High Springs
three children, Miss Belle Stroble of
Belleview, Mrs. S. B. Vining of Plant
City and Mrs. J. M. Goin of Shady
and five grandchildren.
The greatest eulogy that could be
paid to him is that he was an honest
Christian gentleman; in his dealing:
he always gave the best in quality anc1
quantity. He was devoted to his fam.
ily and to his church, was always in
his place in church if possible and s
liberal supporter of same.
The writer often talked with him
on the subject of religion and he had
a personal experience and was a man
of great faith in God. He has left
all evidences that he is at rest, so thf
family know where to find him.
"Blessed in the sight of the Lord
is the death of his saints." "Blessec
are the dead who die in the Lord."
J. L. Jones.
USED MAXWELL ROADSTER
A used Maxwell Roadster, good
condition. A bargain. The Maxwell
Agency, Ocala, Florida. 7-14-17.W?

SIXTY THOUSAND SOLDIERS GOING TO CAMP TO
UT FROIfl III STATES

(Associated
Washington, July 25. More than
seven thousand National Guardsmen
in North Carolina, seven thousand in
Tennessee and forty thousand in New
England mobilized for the federal!
draft today. J
South Carolina troops are mobiliz-j
ing also. J
EACH STATE WILL TRY TO BE j
AHEAD j
The race between the states to be j
the first to call the draft quotas is
on in earnest. Calling men for physi- j
cal examination began this morning.
In several regions the details of act actually
ually actually calling the men into service and
sending them to mobilization camps is
be worked out. As soon as posted as
accepted, if they, under military law
should attempt evade duty they would
be tried by court martial. The men
will be assigned to the nearest can cantonment
tonment cantonment with troops of their own
states as far as possible.'
NOT NEEDED THIS YEAR
General Crowder indicated that a
second draft will not be needed this
year.
CATTS JR. RECOMMENDED
BY HIS COLONEL
Men of Tallahassee Company Must
Accept Him or be Classed
as Mutineers
Tallahassee, July 25. There were
more developments last night in the
case of the Jocal company of Na National
tional National Guard, some members of which
have refused to accept Sydney J.
Catts Jr., son of the governor, and
appointed as captain of the company.
The first lieutenant has been dismiss dismissed,
ed, dismissed, his commission being taken from
him. In retort, some of the members
of the company declare they will not
continue in the company, -although
they were advised by Col. S. C. Har Harrison
rison Harrison Jr., commanding the regiment,
that the company has been federaliz federalized.
ed. federalized. This is borne out by telegrams
from Senators Fletcher and Tram Tram-mell,
mell, Tram-mell, who telegraphed from Wash Washington
ington Washington that the company has been
federalized.
Colonel Harrison told the men that
young Catts had been appointed cap
tain of the company on the recom
mendation of the adjutant-general
and the commanding officer of the
regiment; that he is recommended by
army officers at Fort McPherson,
where he has been in training, as one
of the most competent men at the
camp, and he advised the men not to
listen to those who would resent au
thority, for if they do, it may get
them in trouble.
Among those protesting the ap appointment
pointment appointment of Catts as captain are Sec
ond Lieut. H. Clay Crawford Jr., and
a son of State Senator A. S. Wells of
Leon. The affair has caused much
excitement here. The young" men
claim they have the right to select
their own commanding officer.
J. P. Coombs was today commis commissioned
sioned commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the First
Regiment, succeeding Col. S. C. Har Harrison
rison Harrison Jr., who is made colonel of the
regiment.
GNANN-WALDRON
The many friends of Miss Mattie
Waldron learned with interest of her
marriage to Mr. Arthur E. Gnann of
Gainesville last Monday afternoon
when they motored over to Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville and were united in wedlock by
Judge Hiers. They Were accompanied
by Mr. Gnann's father, Mr. Eugene
Gnann and Mrs. Gnann's brother, Mr
I. B. Waldron.
Mrs. Gnann is the beautiful and
charming daughter of Mr. and Mrs
D. M. WTaldron and is one of the most
beloved of our Bay Lake girls, endow endowed
ed endowed with a disposition of unusual
sweetness and possessed of most win-
flbme ways.
Mrs. Gnann holds the hearts of all
who have the good fortune to come in
contact with her and their best wishes
follow her that her future may con contain
tain contain all that means happiness and
success, and congratulate Mr. Gnanr
upon the priez he has won.
Mr. Gnann is a son of one of the
Gnann brothers who erected the saw sawmill
mill sawmill at Bay Lake and is a young man
of such sterling worth that his quali qualities
ties qualities carry with them his future suc successful
cessful successful career.
Mr. and Mrs. Gnann will make their
home with Mrs. Gnann's parents
while they are having a house erected
at the mill site.

Press)

FATAL TO FIVE
American Submarine at Cavite was
Wrrecked by an Internal
Explosion
(Associated Press)
Washington, July 25. An explo explosion
sion explosion yesterday aboaVd the United
States submarine A-7 at Cavite, Phil Philippine
ippine Philippine Islands, killed five and injured
three officers and men. The dead are
Lieut. Arnold Marcus, Machinist's
Mate H. H. Lang, Gunner's Mate O.
Hopewell, Chief Electrician J. M.
Curry and Machinist's Mate K. W.
Kunz.
NEGROES NORTH AND SOUTH
(Ocala Banner)
Ocala, Fla., July 23, 1917.
To sthe Editor Rochester Evening
News :
A friend living in your city has
mailed ,me a copy of the Evening
Times under date July 16, containing
a marked article, entitled, "Negroes
Coming North."
' I confess to' you that I was not irri irritated,
tated, irritated, and perused the article more
in sorrow than in anger, for I can
feel but pity for those living either
north or south who all their lives are
condemned to go through the world
nursing a blind, morbid, deep-seated,
irrepressible prejudice.
Just how one can manage to enter entertain
tain entertain a prejudice against a whole peo peoplea
plea peoplea people of his own race and
lineage, a people fighting for and un under
der under the same flag and worshipping the
same God is beyond my power to
analyze or comprehend.
It seems a mockery that one could
seriously entertain the belief that the
southern people, or any considerable
number of them, shpuld make it either
a business or a pastime to "shoot,
hang or burn innocent negroes."
If this were true this race could
not have increased In population from
four millions to four times four mil millions
lions millions within the period of fifty years.
And how is it possible for you to
believe that they are held in a condi condition
tion condition little less than slavery when in
the same article you quote from the
Age that within a period- of fifty years
the negroes in the south have accumu accumulated
lated accumulated farm lands to the amount of two
billions of dollars; farm implements
to the value of one and a half bil billions,
lions, billions, and have deposited in southern
banks two billions of dollars, for it is
a well known fact that the negro has
yet to learn the lesson of frugality?
If it be true that they are still held
in a condition little less intolerable
than slavery, think you, that these ac accumulations
cumulations accumulations were possible?
You do a whole people an injustice.
We of the south are not preternat preternat-urally
urally preternat-urally a bad, intolerant, overbearing,
oppressive, and certainly not a vicious
or murderous people.
If you were to come amongst us and
become fairly well acquainted with
us, you would find us a Very good peo people;
ple; people; if not loving and lovable, we.
would at least average up with the
population of other sections.
Pardon me for saying it, but we
boastingly profess to spring from the
loins of the very best stock that has
ever landed on these shores, and the
strain of our blood is the purest that
flows in American veins.
One ought to know that a section of
country that can give birth to such a
race of men as Washington,. Jeff erson,
Madison, Monroe, Patrick.Henry, John
Randolph, Henry Clay, John Rutledge,
McDuff ie, Andrew Jackson, Winfield
Scott, Zahcry Taylor, Andrew John Johnson',
son', Johnson', Abraham Lincoln, Woodrow Wil Wilson,
son, Wilson, and a thousand men like them,
cannot possibly be wholly bad.
And the sun shines on no nobler
women than the women of the south.
The mothers of these men prove this
assertion.
It must be confessed that we have
a full share of race pride and a love
for the pride of ancestry. We feel
that we owe something to posterity.
So believing we feel it a sacred

Says

New Chairman of the
Shipping Board

MEV -PROMISES A PjlOGRAM OF HO DISPUTE AMD LOIS
. OF HUSTLE

(Associated Press)

Washington, July 25. "We must
built ships,, not talk about them,"
said Edward N. Hurley, whose nomi nomination
nation nomination as chairman of the shipping
board to succeed William Denman is
expected to be speedily acted upon.
"We are going to buckle down and
get busy," he added.
Announcement of the resignation
of Theodore Brant, vice chairman of
the board, has been received at the
White House. It has not been acted
on.
MORE DELAY
The food control bill was sent to
conference by the House with in
structions to the House conferees to
disagree to all the Senate amend
ments. This presages the defeat of
the proposal for a joint congressional
war expenditure committee. The
conferees meet tomorrow.
COIN FOR CANADA
V
Secretary McAdoo has notified the
Carfadian finance minister that there
is no objection to Canada's obtaining
a short time credit of one hundred
million dollars from private Ameria Ameria-can
can Ameria-can sources. It is understood that
Canada is negotiating with New York
bankers.
duty to stand unequivocally for race
purity, race integrity.
Is that a fiendish crime? Is it a
crime at all? Is it one for which any
race should be ashamed?
We have only to cast our eyes
across the border into Mexico, towards
Central America, Cuba, Haiti or San
Domingo to measure the results of
race impurity, so we are trying as
best we can to avoid a like condition.
We do not want the south fair as
any spot on God's domain to become
mongrelized. Why blame us?
Should we be anathematized for
that? Is it immoral? Is it un-Chrls-
tian? Is it in contravention of God's j
ordinances or the very work of his-j
hands?
If it is any or all of these things
then the whole people of the sontn
need to be born again.
All of my life I have lived in the
south; have traveled through many
states, and I make the statement with
fingers uncrossed that I have yet to
see a sign that reads: "Negroes and
Dog3 Not Admitted Here." Nor hare
I ever Been a person who would say
on his honor that he had ever seen
such a sign in any part of the south.
I can, therefore, regard it but a fab fabrication.
rication. fabrication. As God in his creation differentiated
the races, making some white, some
black, others red, and yellow, we must
believe that he did so for some wise
purpose.
We know that he frowned upon race
amalgamation among "his chosen
people," and inculcated among them
the doctrine and precepts of race pur purity.
ity. purity. And throughout the ages, in
stress and storm, who does not honor
the Jew for keeping his race separate
and distinct? So we cannot be made
to believe that in carrying out his om omnipotent
nipotent omnipotent designs that we are -wholly
sinful.
It is true that in the south we have
a segregation of the races. We have
separate public schools, separate Sun Sunday
day Sunday schools, separate churches, sepa separate
rate separate public conveyances and separate
hotels and boarding houses.
The negroes first set the example,
and in saying this we are not endeav endeavoring
oring endeavoring to dodge the i3sue. They first
cut themselves loose from the white
churches and established separate
churches of their own, presided over
by their own ministers and their own
biihops.
They preferred to do this, and we
were glad for them to do so. They
felt less embarrassed, more free and
independent.
The establishment of separate
schools .was done under republican
administration in the south during the

mm
ITITUTIS ARE
HOT ADEQUATE
Colored Students in the South in
" Need of More and Better'
Colleges
(Associated Press)
Washington, July 25. Institutions
for the education of the negro are in inadequate,
adequate, inadequate, according to the report of
Dr. Thomas Jones, of the United
States bureau of education. The doc doctor
tor doctor suggests that co-operation toward
thedevelopmsnt of a few institutions
of the university and college grade is
desirable. The report stated that the
location of two or more negro insti
tutions in some southern cities, is a
wasteful duplication of effort.
MRS. J. C. MASSEY
Mrs. J. C. Massey died at her home
near Hahira Friday evening at 6:30
after a long illness. She suffered from
a complication of troubles, and her
condition had been very serious for
several weeks.
Mrs. Massey was a daughter of the
late D. W. Passmore, and was born
and reared in this county. She was
38 years old, and is survived by her
husband and one child, besides a large
family connection in this and adjoin-'
ing counties. Mrs. Massey had a
host of friends in Valdosta and a
number of relatives who are saddened
by her death.
The funeral and interment will oc occur
cur occur at Sunset Hill cemetery in this
city this afternoon at 3 o'clock. Val Valdosta,
dosta, Valdosta, Ga., Times.
Mrs. Massey was the wife of Mr. J.
c. Massey, a member of the W. H.
Massey company, which was in busi business
ness business so long at Orange Springs. She
had in Marion county many friends,
who sincerely regret td" hear of her
passing.
CARD OF THANKS
We wish to thank our many friends
who have been so kind to us during
the illness and death of our husband
and father, the late W. T. Henderson.
The kindness shown and sympathy ex expressed
pressed expressed will never be forgotten. We
also thank all who brought the many
beautiful flowers, a token of the es esteem
teem esteem in which our loved one was held.
Mrs. Hattie H. Henderson. ;
E. M. Henderson.
H. H. Henderson.
W. C. Henderson.
Mamie Lou Henderson.
Charlie T. Henderson.
CARD OF THANKS
We wish to thank the friends who
so kindly assisted us during the long
illness and death of our dear father,
also for the beautiful floral offerings.
Miss Belle Stroble.
Mrs. S. B. Vining.
Mrs. J. M. Goin.
REW ARD OFFERED
Stolen from my store Saturday,
June 30th, my gold hunting case
watch. Case No. 78612; Waltham 16 16-jewel
jewel 16-jewel movement No. 6534232. Suitable
reward will be paid for it3 return,
and no questions asked. G. A. Nash.
Let us nt your car up with the
famous GOODRICH TIRES. There
are none better. Blalock Bros., 107
Oklawaha avenue. jS-8-tf
reconstruction era, and gave eminent
satisfaction to all concerned.
The separate conveyances for ne-
( Concluded on Fourth Page)

mm



VAGK two

OCALA EVENING STAR, WEDNESDAY, JULY 25, 1917

OCALA EVENING STAR
'PUBLISHED EVERY DAY EXCEPT SUNDAY
I11TTINGER-& CARROLL, PROPRIETORS
It, R. Carroll, General Manager Port V. Leaveagood, Bnalaeaw Manager
J. II. Benjamin, Editor
Entered at Ocala, Fla., postoffice as second class matter

Phone Five-One

"" ... SUBSCRIPTION RATES
(Domeatle) (Forelgm)
One year, in advance .......15.00 One year, to advance
Klx months, in advance 2.60 Six month, in advance
Thre months, in advance., 1.26 Three months, in advance.
One month, in advance.... 60 One month, in advance

yjf
Board of Trade meets
night. Try to be on hand.
Friday
The Red Cross sheds the light of
mercy upon the battlefield.
The prohibitionists have started
out to remove all the bars from the
flag.
According to orders, it's only eleven
days before Company A marches
away.
Wherever there's honey there'll
always be bees, and wherever there's
girls there'll always be boys.
Friend of ours has sent us a comfy
cushion for our office chair. It seems
too nice for that purpose, so we are
using it for a pillow.
Well, Mr. Prohibitionist, who voted
for Catts, how do you like the new
chairman of the state board of con control
trol control of educational institutions?
A preacher is excusable for leaving
Florida now to work in Georgia. In
Florida we have the devil to contend
against, but in Georgia they have
both the devil and Tom Watson.
The average Southern man, after
reading the lies out of whole cloth
about his section in some of- the
northern papers,, may be excused for
being a trifle skeptical of the stories
published about the brutalities of the
Germans and the Turks. It's an uni universal
versal universal human trait for people who
don't like each other to lie about each
other.
In giving both Goethals and Den Den-man
man Den-man the bounce. President Wilson has
done the only thing he could do. He
should have done it about a month
ago. Both are to blame, but public
sentiment is to the effect that Den Den-man
man Den-man is the nearer right of the two.
Goethals has badly impaired the rep reputation
utation reputation he gained by his work on the
Panama canal.
We don't suppose the state board
of health will take our advice, but if
those interesting letters it sends out
to the press every week were con condensed,
densed, condensed, more of them would be print printed.
ed. printed. We would be glad to print them
if they werenot so long, and any
writer familiar with the art of con condensation
densation condensation could put all they have to
say in a third of the space.
Oh reading the Star's comment on
the fact that Governor Catts was of offering
fering offering as many jobs 'as possible to
members of the legislature, the Tam Tampa
pa Tampa Tribune asks, ; "What of it?"
Simply this: Catts, who was elected
because many, people believed he
would break up the "machine," is
building a machine of his own, and
members of the legislature are the
most useful parts he can put into the
said machine.
When the friends of Mr. E. L.
Wartmann of this county, a member
of the state board of control, read in
the Times-Union that Joe Earman
had been elected chairman of the said
board by an unanimous vote, they
couldn't help thinking Mr. Wartmann
had been misrepresented. His letter
elsewhere shows that he was. Ap Appointing
pointing Appointing Earman on the board, bull bulldozing
dozing bulldozing Armstrong into resigning be because
cause because he wouldn't vote for Earman,
and finally electing Earman chairman,
is one of the most disgraceful chap chapters
ters chapters in the political history of the
state. If Armstrong had possessed
the requisite amount of sand, he
would have stayed on the board, and
Messrs. Wartmann and King would
have elected him chairman. He was
too weak, so he stepped out and al allowed
lowed allowed another disgrace to be added to
the stack already heaped on his state
Messrs. Wartmann and King would
probably prefer to resign themselves,
but their resignations would only give
Catts places for two more of his
tools, so it is their duty to serve their
terms out.
The usually mild-mannered "Short
Talks" of the Times-Union, .weary at
the undeserved slams at his town,
hands the slammers the following:
"Various and many state papers have j
been hammering at Jacksonville for
thepast few weeks, declaring that the
sale of liquor in this city was the
cause of the war department's decis decision
ion decision against Black Point as a place
for a cantonment. There was never
anything in this argument, but news newspapers
papers newspapers with little to write about un unless
less unless roasting the metropolis of the
ctato Voon nn ihc naco-inp-. For their'
especial benefit, and not for the gen-!
eral public, which likely has a mind of I
, its own and understands that a can
tonment would not be placed within
a mile or two of a saloon town in one
part of the country and be refused in
Florida because of liquor stores seven
to ten miles away, it may be said that
the reasons understood for the re-

Editorial Room, Five-One-Y

.$S.OO
.4.25
. 2.26
. .10
usal of
f-usal of Black Point are military and
tactical. That the grounds here are
considered too flat for training sol-
diers for a campaign in a hilly coun country
try country is understood to be the most ser-
jious objection. That Black Point will
be utilized by the. war department, in
some manner, is also well understood.
The fact that the government desig designated
nated designated Black Point for the annual rifle
matches the past several years, in
which thousands of soldiers of the
regular service as well as volunteers,
participated, should suggest that its
proximity o Jacksonville is not re
garded at detrimental." V
. We give up a .good deal of our space
today to an editorial by Mr. F. E.
Harris, editor of the Ocala Banner,
in reply to an article in the Rochester
N. Y., Evening Times, in regard to the
treatment of negroes in. the boutn
The editorial is very mild in its tone,
but strictly truthful, as all versed in
history and acquainted with the South
can testify. The editor of-the aver
age northern paper doesn't know
much about the South ; and doesn't
seem to want to learh. We could give
the editor of the Rochester Times the
name and address of a well known and
highly reputable citizen of his own
town, and one probably in less than
a mile of his office, who has lived for
years in the South and who could and
would have confuted most of the
Times' article, but instead of looking
for such men northern reporters and
editors pick up every irresponsible
person who comes along, and not only
accept their "yarns at face value, but
insist on their readers accepting them.
The world in general seems to be in
one of its reactionary stages. There
is the war all over the world, and in
our own country there is an outbreak
of sectional and religious intolerarice,
Such as we had hardly thought would
ever occur again. One good thing
may come out of this war, and that is
that hundreds of thousands of our
young men are going to the camps to
train side by side, and it is likely
they will all fight side by side, and
when the war is over they will go
home with ah understanding of and
friendship for each other that will
put their narrow-minded and intol intolerant
erant intolerant daddies to shame. .
When we were a plowboy, we used
to hook up the steer to a bull tongue,
a cutting gopher, or at the most a
turnplow with a share from six to
nine inches in length, -and drive
intermittently along among the" rocks
and roots on the mountain side, often
going forward a yard only" to hitch
the plow point under an obstruction
and pull the patient bovine back a
couple of feet before we could go. on.
What wouldn't we; have given for
forty acres of Marion county land,
where we could have plowed across
the field as easily as steering a boat
across a lake. We were reminded of
those days recently when we went
into the Marion Hardware company's
store and lamped a big, two-mule
turnplow, whose broad share cutting
an eighteen-inch furrow a foot and a
half deep could be controlled in-Florida
soil far more easily than the tiny
plow points we labored with, forty
years ago. The manager of the store
called our attention to the fact that
on account of the raise in the price
of corn, it only takes 11 1-2 bushels
to pay for such a plow now, while
this time last year it took 18 1-2
bushels. That's one place where we
had it on the farmers of today, for
we could buy the share and bolts on
our plow in 1880 or thereabouts for
two bushels of corn and go out in the
woods and make the stock and
handles ourself in a day's work with
an ax, adz. and pocketknife.
The Star has received from Sen Senator
ator Senator Trammell a copy of his speech
in the Senate July 23, in which he
made an, effort to have the food bill
reconsidered, in order to have the
minimum price for wheat stricken out
of the bill. Mr. Trammell's argument
was that $2 wheat meant $12 flour.
We agree with Senator Trammell
that that provision should not be in
the bill. But the bill had been under
consideration for weeks, it had been
cussed and discussed from end to
end, and from center to circumfer circumference.
ence. circumference. Reconsideration could only
mean more delay, and for that reason
we think Mr. Trammell should have
let it alone. The time often comes,
particularly in war, when we have to
put up with one evil in order to avoid
a greater one. The greatest evil
Congress can inflict on its own coun coun-try.
try. coun-try. and its allies now is delay.
.The Ohio State Journal invites us
to shout: "On to Berlin." But isn't
that cry. ominous of a long war?
Something new might have a cheerier
sound. Times-Union.
The conflict that followed the war war-cry,
cry, war-cry, "A'Berlin," only, lasted seven
months and ended the wrong way.
We agree with the T. U. that some something
thing something else would sound better.

ANSWERS ITSELF

Speaking of ending the war without
a victory, the Ocala Star assures us
"tlin Trnfnl Ct-t-. T : :
i."t uiutcu uuiics lino 4UII. using
that particular brand of foolishness."
But when may we prove that we are
not too proud to fight ? Times Times-Union.
Union. Times-Union.
The best answer to your question
is found in the following- extract
from your own columns:
"For. America has already struck
the solar plexus and is following up
the attack on the most sensitive, or
gans, as the German press knows, be because
cause because it feels. The appearance of our
expeditionary force has already
heartened the French all down the
line and has inspired Russia to turn
Brussiloff loose; she has assured her
friends they need not fear the future,
and her three billion dollars in sup supplies
plies supplies have already driven the German
mark downward pretty good work
five months, and the worst is yet to
come." r
In his appointment of his son, Sid Sid-ney
ney Sid-ney J. Catts Jr., to the command of
the ; Tallahassee military company,
Gov. Catts has gone' the limit. It is
nepotism in the worst place. Young
Catts went to the Atlanta training
camp a couple of months ago, to be
trained to the duties of a second lieu lieutenant.
tenant. lieutenant. He did not finish his course;
but resigned, and came home. Then
his father appointed him to the com command
mand command of the Tallahassee company,
which he had no right to do, as from
the time it has been instituted the na national
tional national guard has elected its own offi officers.
cers. officers. The members of the company
refuse to accept young Catis as their
captain, and now comes tne colonel of
the First Regiment, who says that the
company has been federalized, and the
men must submit. It is certainly dif difficult
ficult difficult to understand how the governor
of a state has authority to appoint of officers
ficers officers in a federal regiment. It is a
good thing that the time is near for
the federal government to take charge
of the Florida troops.
Telegraphic reports from Portland,
Oregon, where the National Educa Educational
tional Educational Association is in session, are to
the effect that Prof W. N. Sheats has
been' elected : one of .the vice presi presidents
dents presidents of the association, and Mary M.
Bradshaw of Denver, president. -Prof.
Sheats is state superintendent of pub public
lic public instruction in. Florida, and one of
the South's leading educators. For
several years he was principal of the
Lakeland schools. -Another evidence
that when Lakeland goes after a
thing she generally,, lands it. Prof.
Sheats' many Lakeland friends will be
pleased to learn of this deserved rec recognition.
ognition. recognition. Lakeland Telegram.
Ocala will join Lakeland in con congratulating
gratulating congratulating the very efficient : state
superintendent.
Kermit Roosevelt will fight along alongside
side alongside the British in the east. Perhaps
he will win a cross or a duchy you
never can tell. But we do know that
before his father had been on such a
front a week he would be a Godfrey
of Bouillon. Times-Union-
. Godfrey de Bouillon .was one of the
greatest soldiers of the middle ages.
The Times-Union must have forgot forgotten
ten forgotten itself to put Mr. Roosevelt in his
class. We could hardly have compli
mented Teddy any .higher b'urself.
What sort of peace would be an
"honorable peace," to a people who
are said to have cut off little chil
dren's hands in Belgium ? Times
Union.
Wasn't it the T.-U. that asked the
other day, "What peace could be
worse than this war"? We feel more
cheerful. The Times-Union shows
signs of becoming American.
Notwithstanding the fact that dur
ing the past fortnight, many columns
about Joe Earman have been printed
in the newspapers, Joe has had noth
ing to say, and he owns a newspaper,
too. Punta Gorda Herald.
His. money can talk .better than his
paper.
No Use Wearing
A Shiny Palm Beach Suit
Jrmmm
r-i.-.-
1 yi-
A
We clean and press them with without
out without the use of smoothing irons.
Let us send for yours.
Ocala Steam Laundry
Just Phone 101
PHONE 117
Dr. A. R. Blott
Veterinarian
TOMPKINS
STABLE
Florida
Ocala,
1
Have your prescriptions filled at
Gerig's, the only drugstore in Ocala
employing more than one registered
pharmacist. tf

1 1

NEGROES NORTH AND SOUTH

(Continued from First Page)
groe3 are provided with the same fur furnishings
nishings furnishings and conveniences that the
vonveyanees for the whites are pro provided
vided provided with. The waiting room3 have
identically like provisions.
Can that justly be described as a
species .of cruelty? It suits them
better and it suits us better, and
avoids friction, Irritation, and at
times, perhaps, violence. If they are
satisfied with these conditions, and we
are satisfied, why should it provoke
spleen and ugliness from unconcern unconcerned
ed unconcerned outsiders?
I make the following quotation
from your article:
"As an instance of the wholesale ex exodus,;
odus,; exodus,; Rev. A. L. James, of Ocala, Flor Florida,
ida, Florida, discovered a couple of weeks ago
that his entire parish had moved to
New York.' He followed them, and Is
organizing them into a church in the
metropolis."
Rev. A. I James i3 still in Ocala
and is pastor of his flock here.
So what you say concerning him
must be regarded as a fake.
I am enclosing you a letter under
his signature, written to the Evening
Star of this, city, which I hope that
jyou will spare. the space to reprint In
your columns. You and your readers
will see how far wrong you are.
It is true, as he says, that he did
go north to study conditions, but he
returns, and, like Booker Washington,
after traveling over the greater part
of the world, was convinced that the
south is the hest place for the negro
to work out his destiny amonsr the
peoplo he knows and who know him.
But, speaking of race prejudice, do
you come into the parliament of this
discussion with clean skirts? Is not
the history of the world the history
of race antagonisms? Has it not ex existed
isted existed as far back as history and tra tradition
dition tradition reach? V
Was there not antipathy between
the Egyptians and Hebrews? Between
the Jews and all other races? Are not
whole pages of sacred history but a
recital of the total annihilation or ex:
pulsion of races by races, and vol volumes
umes volumes of profane history tell the same
story.
After the Normans conquered Eng England
land England did not the prejudices between
the conquerors exist for a number of
centuries? Was ft not for a long
time considered a disgrace for the
proudest Norman knight to marry the
richest Saxon princess? Race hatreds
between the ancient population of
Spain and the invading Goths lasted
for eight hundred years. Between
the Arabs and the Moors there was
bitter enmity. Do not race antago antagonisms
nisms antagonisms still exist in Europe, and other
parts of the globe?
On this side of the Atlantic did we
not drive the aborigines back, and
back, and back, until now they hard hardly
ly hardly have territory enough upon which
to rest their feet? And many of the
tribes have become totally extinct.
Benjamin Lundy was the first one
to start a newspaper to create a sen sentiment
timent sentiment for the liberation of the slave.
It is a little remarkable that he should
have established it in the south, and
as long as it remained here he was
unmolested, but when he removed it
from Jonesboro, Tenn., to Philadel
phia it was burned by a mob.
Jn 1784 "Thomas Jefferson proposed
an ordinance that after the year 1800
there should be neither slavery nor in involuntary
voluntary involuntary servitude in any of the
states. If the northern states had
voted for it that ordinance would
have been adopted.
Was not William Lloyd Garrison
mobbed in the streets of Boston? Was
not Mr. Owen P. Lovejoy, a Presby
terian preacher, who next had the te
merity to start an abolition newspa newspaper,
per, newspaper, when he moved it from St. Louis
to Alton, 111., humiliated, and was not
his office entered by a mob and his
type, presses and everything connect connected
ed connected with it, destroyed, and when he
purchased a new outfit, and In the
third attempt, was he not mobbed and
his printing plant" burned?
That was a long time ago, but was
not the same spirit manifested at
East St. Louis, 111., within the past
six weeks?
And what about the history of Pru Prudence
dence Prudence Crandall? She taught the first
negro school. It was at Cantebury,
Conn. Samuel May of your own city
wa sone who volunteered his services
as one- of her attorneys. The meet meeting
ing meeting refused to hear him. When her
school .was finally opened she was ar arrested
rested arrested for harboring young persons of
color and was imprisoned in the coun county
ty county jail. Finally an act of the legis legislature
lature legislature was passed prohibiting "pri "private
vate "private schools for non-resident colored
persons" and the news of the passage
of the act was received in Canterbury
by the ringing of church bells.
But why prolong the story?
We have but a small community in
Ocala, but we are living in compara comparative
tive comparative peace and harmony. We have
but little if any friction between the
races.
Our colored population, as will
attested by Rev. A. L. Jame3 and oth others,
ers, others, are never afraid of molestation.
They are conducting their businesses
in the even tenor of their ways.
It may be said that they are pros prospering,
pering, prospering, too:
They have their own stores, and
they are not -mere shacks, either.
Some of them are two-story brick
buildings. They operate a bank of
their own. It is a pretentious three three-story
story three-story brick building. They have a
two-story brick hotel and a number of
smaller hotels and boarding houses.
They have a three-story knitting mill,
built by their own efforts and conduct-

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Ocala, Fla. Jacksonville, Fla. 1
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OCALA EVENING STAR, WEDNESDAY, JULY 25, 1917

t

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Dcllilt

OCALA. FLORIDA

CAPITAL STOCK S50.000.00.
Slale, County and City Depository.

SUMMER TOUMST FARE!

From Jacksonville to

New York and return. .$38.00
Baltimore and return. .$33.90
Philadelphia and return. $36.00
Washington and return. .$34.00

Savannah and return ... $ 7.00 7.00-Boston
Boston 7.00-Boston and return. .... .$46.00
Atlantic City and return $38.25
Niagra Falls and return. $48.90

Through tickets to all Eastern resorts, with return limit October
31, 1917, with privilege of stopovers at principal points. Sailings
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Steamships Suwannee and Somerset have staterooms de luxe with
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J. F. WARD. T. I. A..

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$47.80 Chicago $37.55 Cincinnatti ;
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If Yon. Hare Any Newu for thiu De
partment, Call Two-One-Five
or Five-One Y-

; The Flag
Against the skies, Old Glory flies,
It never Jooked so bright,
For now it seems as if it gleams
With some strange inner light;
As tho each thread of white and red
Each filament of blue,
Were spun of spiritual fire
The flame of that high desire,
Which thrills the nation through.
The flag on high it greets the eye
And grips the hearts somehow,
Thoroughly it has passed through
struggles vast.
Its proudest hour is now;
Now 'tis unfurled to show the world
That willingly we give
Our lives, our all to Liberty,
That after we have ceased to be
The flag, the flag may live!

Berton Braley.

very popular nurse in the Marion
County Hospital for a number of
years and is being welcomed by her
many friends.

Hemenway-St. John Announcement
The following cards were received

from Miami this week. They will bet MOTHERS' DEMANDS.

TEMPERANCE BOTES
(By the National Woman's Chris Christian
tian Christian Temperance Union.)

Musical

Program at
Church

the Baptist

of interest to many Ocala people, and
to the many girls who have attended
the State College in Tallahassee for
the past few years. Miss St. John,
who is a Miami. girl, graduated from
the Woman's College on June 6th, and
was one of the college's most loved
students. She was president of the
student government her senior year,
which is one of the college's highest
honors:
"Mr. and Mrs. John Oakley St.
John announce the marriage of their
daughter Mary Oakley, to Mr. Thomas
Hemenway, on Wednesday, the eight eighteenth
eenth eighteenth of July, nineteen hundred and
seventeen, Miami, Florida. At home
after the first of September, Quincy,
Florida."

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE

High Moral, intellectual standards
Liberal Arts Law, Agriculture, Engi Engineering,
neering, Engineering, Education, Graduate School.
Ron1 f rr ntalnmio nnH vipAxra.

A. A. Murphree, Pres.

STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN
TALLAHASSEE
College of the Highest Rank
Liberal Arts, Education, Music, Ex Expression,
pression, Expression, Physical Education, Art,
Home Economics. Write fo' catalogue
and views. Edw. ConradL Pr.

The following is the program which
will be given tonight at the Baptist
church under the auspices of the
Woman's Missionary Society, at 7 :45
o'clock. No admission will be charg charged
ed charged but the collection wilL be given to
Columbia College at Lake City, the
state Baptist college. All are cor

dially invited to attend.

Song service.
Reading, Pro v. 3:1-24.
Prayer.
Music by Sunday school orchestra.
Vocal solo, (a) Angels Serenade;
(b) The Homeward -Way Miss Musie
Bullock.
- Orchestra.
Solo," A Dream of Paradise Mr.
Frank Gates.
Orchestra.
Talk, Columbia College, by Mrs.
Van Hood. -'.
Collection. '
' Orchestra.
', Solo, (a) Requiem; (b) The Even Evening
ing Evening Prayer from the Oratorio "Eli"
Miss Gladys Martin.
Orchestra.
Benediction.
Mr. Max Israelson returned honie
yesterday from a week's visit to 'Mrs.
Israelson in Salisbury, N. C.
--
Mrs. R. E. Filcher of Fruitland
Park, spent Tuesday in Ocala as the
guest of Mrs. R. G. Blake and fam family.''
ily.'' family.'' "V:V-
The friends of Mr s. C. E. Morris,
who has been seriously ill for several
days, will be glad to hear she is
somewhat better today.

The junior Methodist sewing circle

is meeting this afternoon, with Miss
Gladys Martin.
Mr. C V. Miller of Tampa is spend spending
ing spending a couple of days in Ocala. He
was accompanied here yesterday, by
his little niece, Miss Marie McKean,
who will visit her relatives for a week
or more.
-
Miss Eunice Bray, who has been
visiting friends in Gainesville; spent
the week-end in Jacksonville, and
went to Lawtey yesterday for a sev several
eral several weeks visit to Mrs. J. J. McCloud.
Mrs. Sidney Haile and three little
daughters left this afternoon -for
Kanapaha, near Gainesville, to spend
a couple of "months with Mr. Haile
on his farm.
Miss Irene Toffaletti who has been
attending- the Tampa Business Col College
lege College for over a year has a position in
Mr. R. Si Hall's office, with her sis sister,
ter, sister, Miss Olivia Toffaletti.
,
Mrs. T. I." Arnold is at Blue Ridge
Springs, N. C, for the summer. Mr.
Arnold will join her in a short time
for a few weeks vacation.
.'"
. Mrs. Chaple, who has been in train training
ing training in an Atlanta hospital for the
past few months," is spending a few
days im Ocala as the guest of Mrs.
C. E. Morris. Mrs. Chaple was a

News comes from Mrs. C. R. Ty Ty-dings
dings Ty-dings at Catonville, Md., that she con continues
tinues continues to improve, which is good news
to her many friends.

Miss Pauline Pauly motored to
Ocala yesterday from St.. Petersburg,
to be the guest of Mrs. Robert Marsh
and family for a week or more.

Mr. John Rooke, who has been vis visiting
iting visiting his cousins, Mr. and Mrs. W. K.
Zewadski and baby in Tampa, since
last Friday, returned to Ocala yester yesterday.
day. yesterday. Mr. Rooke left this noon for a
short visit in Gainesville and Jack Jacksonville,
sonville, Jacksonville, after which he will return to
his .home in New York..
.
In the Red Cross list yesterday, we
left out the names of Mrs. Grider
Perkins, Miss Ruth Dreher and
Messrs. Hugo Mcintosh and H. D.
McCorquodale.
(Concluded on Fourth Page)

K

TEAPOT
GROCERY

WMEM

SAUSAGE and SMOKED MEAT
Salomi-German if you Like.
Cerevelat Sausage
Farmer Sausage
Sweast Style Metwurst
' Mortadella
. Lunch Loaf

Sliced Breakfast Bacon

Chipped Dried Beef

PHONES IS 174

WHAT'S THE USE
hanging on to old-time, old-fogy hand hand-mixed
mixed hand-mixed Lead and Oil Paint that will
soon chalk off and discolor when you
can get ; J

a thoroughly modern, scientific machine-made
Paint, that will outlast the
other, and cost you less money. 10
For Sale By'
THE MARION HARDWARE CO.,
Ocala, Fla.

There come to us very frequently
most, pathetic appeals from mothers
and other interested parties, telling of
the shocking conditions around certain
military camps where drink and licen licentiousness
tiousness licentiousness twin evils hold daily and
nightly revels, and asking "If some something
thing something cannot be done about it." says
Mrs. Margaret Dye Ellis, National W.
C. T. D. superintendent of legislative
work, writing from Washington, D. C.
As onemother expressed it, "I 'would
rather a thousand times that my son
went to the bottom of the ocean un unwarned,
warned, unwarned, but clean and pure, than to
have him back home polluted, and
tainted from drink and sensuality."
Much Is being done by the anthorities,
military and legislative, in response to
appeals from mothers of the country.
"That the saloon and brothel shall be
done away with In military centers is
a foregone conclusion," says Mrs. Ellis.
"The United States government heard
and answered the appeal of the W. C.
T. U. for tho unprotected girls in the
Philippines and placed its ban on seg segregation
regation segregation In those far-away islands
years ago and we know and believe
that the Insistent appeal to the presi president
dent president and members of congress by
mothers and friends of the soldier boy
will cause the complete overthrow of
these direful temptations from their
midst."

LIQUOR MONOPOLY.
Brewers say that beer takes the
place of bread. It often takes the
place of milk and meat also. Millions

of dollars are each year taken from
the pockets of workingmen and put
into the pockets of the brewers. Beer
is a very taking article.

22,000,000 REASONS.
Uncle Sam has 22,000,000 trained
soldiers to fight against. Twenty-two
million reasons why we should have
nationwide prohibition.

A. C. L. SCHEDULE

Trains of the Atlantic Coas Line
will arrive and depart in Ocala at the
following times:
No. 10, Lieesburg to Jacksonville,
5:40 a. m.
No. 151, Ocala to Wilcox, Monday,
Wednesday and Friday, 6:10 a. m.
No. 35, Ocala to Lakeland (Sunny (Sunny-Jim),
Jim), (Sunny-Jim), Tuesday, Thursday and Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, 6:40 a. m.
No. 141,, Wilcox, Gainesville and
Palatka to Ocala, 11:15 a. m.
No. 40, St. Petersburg to Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, 12:54-1:14 p. m.
No. 48, Homosassa to Ocala, 1:05
p. m.
No. 49, Ocala to Homosassa, 2:25
p. m".

No. 39, Jacksonville to St. Peters

burg, 2:36-2:40 p. m.

No. 140, Ocala to Palatka, Gaines

ville and Wilcox, 4:10 p. m.

No. 9, Jacksonville to Leesburg,

9:05 p, m.
No. 32, Lakeland to Ocafu (Sunny
Jim), Tuesday, Thursdaj and Satur
day, 9:P0 p. m

BIG MAXWELL BARGAINS

Two 1916 Maxwell touring cars, the

biggest bargains you ever saw,

cash or terms. The Maxwell Agency,
Ocala, Fla. 7-9-tf

CHAPTER NO. 13, R. A.

M.

Regular convocation of the Ocala

Chapter No. 13, R: A. M., on th
fourth Friuay m every mouth 1
8 p. m. B. C. Webb, H. P.
Jake Brown. Sec'y.

i

ISIflTOfl lm A ITS If 1?fiT

SS.V. WlJllii siaic UK

-Vr fVi'-J1' COVERED VANS

TRUCK SERVICE it hAtikIl
Dealers in

EW

Collier Bros. Phone 296

0

WIMPSOK HOTEL

JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA

- fS

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Sj --.iyf

j.n the Heart of" the city with tiemming Park for a front yard.
7-rry modern convenience in cb room. Dining'room service if
-?"nd to none,
RATES From $1.50 per day per person to $6.00.
ROBERT M. MEYER, J. E. K A VAN AUG H
Proprietor. Manager.

, .7 vwmm pmy ?
ik UNEXCELLED V j
fUR JOB PRINTING Department s TlJ
thoroughly equipped for all kinds
of commercial Printing. Our facilities
: for handling I
' jiV PAMPHLETS. BOOKLETS, PROGRAMS, f yI
" V NJ WEDDING and BUSINESS 1 1
- A ANNOUNCEMENTS S I
and all kinds of
m S OFFICE STATIONERY 11.,,,,
V J A Unsurpassed in Central Florida. Ss.
r- sjjT-;. EFFICIENT Workmanship, High
" Quality Paper, Prompt Service and
uiiiIi-. y Living Prices are some of our reasons
r for asking an opportunity to serve you.
L JOB PRINTING S7
'VMk fin. cw tm i i i

The coffee that you are drinking at
the Harrington Hall dining room and
cafe is the famous Senate brand cof coffee,
fee, coffee, roasted and distributed exclusive exclusively
ly exclusively by the Tampa Coffee Mills. Get
the habit. 7-10-tf

FORD FOR SALE
A wide-tread Ford touring car,
equipped with electric lighting and
starting system, one-man top, shock
absorbers, large V radiator, etc. Ap Apply
ply Apply to the Maxwell Agency. 4t

n

THE

HE HAS A RUSH OF
PROSPERITY TO THE HEAD

HoopLA 1 flWfr VP TH' CURTiti

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STAR P&qgMgl xt&Si.

THlUMPHrlL. EtfTffartCE!

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BARK AfitooNP TH'

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NOT To GPEAK ABOVE

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in inn m JXr



PAGE FOUR

OCA LA EVENING STAR, WEDNESDAY, JULY 25, 1917
-.

m : OIK

Woodmen meet Friday evening.
Royal Arch meets Friday night.
Board of Trade meets Friday even evening.
ing. evening. Mr. R. S. Hall left yesterday for a
few days' business trip to Atlanta.
Let me quote you on a pumping
outfit. W. J. McGehee, distributor, tf
. Mr. E. A. Osborne is a Jacksonville
visitor today, and is expected hxrniejin
tonight.
Now is the time to take up the
matter of buying a pea huller. W. J.
McGehee, distributor. tf
Mr. II. M. Hampton left yesterday
afternoon for Atlanta for a few days'
business trip.
The largest line cf bathing caps in
the city all shades, shapes and col colors.
ors. colors. The Court Pharmacy. 15-tf
Mr. Joseph Bell is home from
Tampa, where he underwent, exami examination
nation examination for the officers' training camp.
Now 13 the time to plant camphor
trees. Prices low. Call 288. tf
The Star regrets to hear of the
illness of Capt. George Russell of
Lake Weir. The genial captain has
been suffering from rheumatism for
several weeks.
Half of the male population of
Pedro was in town today. Several'
of the gentlemen called at the Star
office and all afe enthusiastic over
their fine staple crop prospects.
It's a mighty good time right now
to cut dovn all the weeds on the va vacant
cant vacant lots, and everywhere else, in the
city. It's been a long time since
there was such a plague of gnats in
Ocala, and the luxuriant weed crops
have something to do with it.
corn sheller. W.
tributor.
J. McGehee,
dis dis-tf
tf dis-tf Mr. Bob Sanders of Dunnellon was
in town today, arid told a Star man
that the corn and cotton crcp of the
Dunnellon section was looking mighty
fine and the acreage was larger than
it ever has been. It is very gratify gratifying
ing gratifying to see the great acreage of crops
on the fine lands surrounding Dun Dunnellon,
nellon, Dunnellon, where formerly practically
nothing was planted.
The largest line of battling caps in
the city all shades, shapes trd col colons.
ons. colons. The Court Pharmacy. 15-tf
A card from Mrs. Berry Carter
rays they made the trip in their car
to Sylvester, Ga., without znj tremble.
Mr. and Mrs. Carter and James are
enjoying life and "eating peaches in
the old Georgia home, but will return
in August. Mr. Carter had a flatter flattering
ing flattering offer for his fine farm three
miles south of town but turned it
down. He Is a wise man who knows
a good thing when he has it.
Come in and let me show you a
Williams Grist Mill. W. J. McGehee,
distributor. tf
Mr. Blowers of the Blowers Lime
& Phosphate Co., four miles north of
Ocala, has bought a modern peanut peanut-picking
picking peanut-picking machine. Mr. Blowers has
such a large acreage of peanuts and
the yield is going to be so heavy that
he had to have a more rapid method
of picking than by hand. Mr. Blow Blowers
ers Blowers expects to send the machine to
some of the nearby farms to pick
pea"huts for a toll of the crop.
Buy your drugs, from the Rexall
store it h always the best drug
Btore. tf
The Star regrets to hear of the ill illness
ness illness of Mr. J. V. Tarver.
Mr. Ray Bullock came up from St.
Petersburg yesterday and went on to
Washington today. He expects to
return to Ocala next week to join the
ranks of Company A.
.
V"
P
;V:
()
'TJ
c

iiii

Will sell my place as a whole or will
sell stock, equipment, crops or land or
any part of either separately. . .
The price is right. See me.

j; ..

Mr. M. H. Dorsett, a popular rail railroad
road railroad man of Jacksonville, was at the
Harrington yesterday.

We're in business for YOUR health,
and fill your prescriptions just as
your physician orders them. Prompt
service and pure drug3. The Court
Pharmacv. Phone 284. 15-tf
Mrs. J. L. Beck and Mrs. J. H.
Pearce of Fellowship were in town
today shopping. They cheered the
heart of the Star man by telling him
they appreciated the paper.
State Attorney Scofield and his two
mart sons, George and Frank, were
town from Inverness today.
The remains of Hugh Mills, the
little boy killed at the Seaboard sta station
tion station yesterday, were taken this morn morning
ing morning to his childhood home at Fellow Fellowship
ship Fellowship for burial. He was a bright and
clever lad, and the deep sympathy of
all goes out to his bereaved, mother.
The largest line of bathing caps in
the city all shades, shapes and col colors.
ors. colors. Th-i Court Pharmacy. 15-tf
- i'
Mr. Bailey of the Maxwell agency
is at. Orange Springs today and Mr.
Yonce is in Levy county, demonstrat
ing their cars.
ELECTRA
Electra, July 24. Mr. Pat Holly
and brother Flint.and Mr. Alva Bar Barber
ber Barber spent two or three days at Salt
Springs last week. They report hav having
ing having a good time, catching and eatin
fish.
Mr. H. P. Griggs and Mr. L. D
Marsh made 'a flying trip to Ocala
Friday.
Miss Myrtle Mock is spending a few
days at Lake Weir.
Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Griggs spent
Sunday at the home of Mr. and Mrs
L. D.' Marsh.
A large crowd was disappointed
Sunday afternoon when Col. Rogers
afiled to arrive, as it was reported
that he would make a talk at the Elec Electra
tra Electra Baptist church. The Sunday schoo1
gave an entertainment in the fore forenoon
noon forenoon and then had dinner on the
ground which was enjoyed by all.
Mr. J. B. Holton, Mr. George Grigg.-
and brother from Lake Gem were
shaking'hands with. friends here Sun Sunday.
day. Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Brant Jr. arc
all smiles. It's a girl.
Mrs. John Martin and children ol
Moss Bluff, visited Mrs. Martin'.
mother, Mrs.-'J. C. Pillans, Sunday.
Miss Olive Griggs spent last week
-1 1 i i r rn i i 1 li
wun ner aunt, mrs. xoDe vaiaweii.
PINE
Pine, July 24. Mr., Holmes Gates
of Anthony, and Miss Marie Eldridge
attended church at Sparr Sunday
j night.
Our community had another ic
cream supper Saturday night, under
the oaks in' front" of. Mrs. Macklin's
residence. Quite a crowd was out.
Mrs. J. E. Hall and four little tots
left Saturday for a visit to Winter
Haven, where Mr. Hall is in business
Mrs. Jane Hall is visiting her son
Mr. Harmon Hall, while her daugh
ter-in-law has gone to Winter Haven
Mr. L. B. Jordan and daughter
Miss Alma, were callers in Fort Mc McCoy
Coy McCoy Saturday afternoon.
Sir. and Mrs. G. D. Turner and
daughter, Miss Marie Eldridge, were
callers in Sparr Saturday morning.
Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Jordan and
daughter, Miss Alma Jordan and son
Mr. Clyde Jordan, were the guests f oi
dinner Sunday at the home of Mr
and Mrs. Willis Hall.
We are sorry so many of our young
men must go to the front, but young
men be brave and fight for your coun country,
try, country, as you all know if it had not been
for France the United States might
not have been free and not have the
liberty we enjoy. So I say go and
help France. I wish I'were a man sc
I could go and fight for my country
but as I cannot I will help to provide
for the men who go.
SEABOARD LOCAL SCHEDULE
Southbound
No. 9 Leaves Jacksonville 1:20 p.
m. Ocala 4:15 p. m. Arrives Tampa,
7:35 p. m.
No. 1 Leaves Jacksonville 9:30 p.
Im.; Ocaja, 1:45 a.m. Arrives St. Pe
tersburg, 7:45 a.m.
No. 3 Leaves Jacksonville 9:30 a.
m.; Ocala, 12:59 p. m.
Northbound
No. 10 Leaves Tampa at 1 p. m.;
Ocala, 4:15 p. m. Arrives Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, 7:15 p. m.
No. 2 Leaves Tampa 9 p. m.;
Ocala, 1:55 a. m. Arrives Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, 6:45 a. m.
No. 4 Leaves Tampa, 9:10 a. m.;
arrive Ocala. 1:10 p. m; arrive Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville 5:10 p. m.
FA I'M
1
if"'
v
iv
i
V
E. E. McLIN.
Ocala, Florida.
.. Jn

SALE

ALA SOCIAL AFFAIRS

(Continued from Third Page,
Miss Ella Bogie is spending a fewj
days wun inenas in jacicsonviiie.

jjleinpnij, Tenn., were accompanied!
Mrs. Helen Mallard and Miss Roseiu.me owing to Mr Tarver's illness,'
Reagan have returned to their home j by his sister, Mrs. C. B. Richards i
in Gainesville after a short visit to;amJ her fnend, Miss Nuese, who will!
the former's aunt, Mrs. J. Y. Purvis. ; mu;n unlil Mr. Tarver is fully re-1
jc-v.feifd. -Miss lances Tarver, who
Mrs. M. A. TenEyck leaves today :hi.j Utn vidiing in Augusta, Ga.,
for Jacksonville, where she will meetly accompanied hy her cousin, Mis
her sister, who will accompany her to:,ik.ander Tarver wno will remain for
-r II T1 l r ill j.

raDio ueacn ior a monm s siay.
Mr. Sawyer of the firm of Purvis

ft feawyer, Havana, uuoa, was an t j0;ciil.. OVfcr the arrivai at
Ocala visitor last week, and has gonejhorKe of a fine HuIe son who
to New York before returning home, i Sunday.

Dr. and Mrs. Van Hood will motor
to Gainesville tomorrow to. attend the
health day exercises held at the Uni University
versity University of Florida. Dr. Hiram Byrd
will be the chief speaker. j
m
I
Miss Martha Kate Rentz who is
now visiting Mrs. Mason, nee Miss
Minnie Stovall, in Tampa, will arrive
in Ocala next Monday to be the guest
of Miss Mary Burford.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Rogers and
two children and Mrs. Rogers' mother.
Mrs. Fort of Lynne, are spending the
dayln Ocala with Col .and Mrs. R. F.
Rogers.
The W. C. -T. U. held a small but
most enthusiastic meeting yesterday
afternoon at the Presbyterian church.
Mrs. W. H. Clark was asked to act as
secretary during Mrs. Packham's ab
sence this summer.
Mr. and Mrs. Z. C. Chambliss, who
left yesterday for Plant City, went to
attend the special services at the
Primitive Baptist church.' They will
be the guests of Dr. and Mrs. W. J.
Holton until Monday.
,.
Messrs. Marcus Purvis and Will
Purvis of New York and Mr. Clem
Purvis of Raiford, have returned to
their homes after a brief visit to
father, Mr. J. Y. Purvis and Mrs.
Purvis.
V,
Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Hodges, Mr. C.
B. Hodges and Mr. and Mrs. Ander Anderson
son Anderson of Hodges Island motored to
'Ocala yesterday and spent the day
with Mr. and Mrs. Lanier Robertson
and children.
ine dainty, popular nttie mjjvie
star, Anita Stewart, will appear at
the Temple today in "The Most Ex
cellent Way." This is one of the
Vitagraph pictures, which are always
good.
,..
Mrs. George Carlton of Wauchua
and little Miss Charlirie Scott "of
Deerfield, returned to their homes to
day after a brief visit .to the latter's
aunt, Mrs. D. W. Tompkins and. fam family.
ily. family. mm
Master James Ladelle of Micanopy,
who has been visiting his aunt, Mrs.
D. W. Tompkins for the past week,
will be joined today, by his mother,
who will visit her sister and family
for a week or more.
Little Miss Marjorie Pickerell re-
turnedhome today after a pleasant
week's visit to Mrs. George Dyke at
Burbank. She was accompanied by
Mrs. Dyke who will visit Mrs. W. T.
Spencer and Mrs. Kate Pickerell for
several days.
The friends of Miss Mary Betty of
Montgomery, Ala., who visited her
sister, Mrs. E. M. Finch in Ocala last
season, will regret to know that she
has been ill for several months with
rheumatism. As soon as she can
travel sTie will go to Hot Springs for
an indefinite stay.
A number of Ocala ladies put up
fresh pineapples this morning. The
chairman of the food conservation
committee suggests that no one dis
card the peelings of this fruit as
they way be boiled down with sugar,
making a most delicious pineapple
honey.
m m m
Mrs. C. G. Barnett and children
have gone to the lake where they
have taken rooms at Mrs. R. L. Mar Martin's
tin's Martin's residence for a month. They
have as their guests for the next two
weeks Mrs. J. S. Johnson and three
children of Moultrie, Ga.
Mrs. Jas. H. Hill, who formerly
lived in Ocala and was one of the
most popular and admired of our
women, has just returned from a
month's stay in New York. She is
now at Lake WTeir the guest of Mr.
John L. Carney, her brother, and will
visit friends m Ocala next week.
Dr. and Mrs. W. Moore Scott and
son Warren, of Savannah, left yes yesterday
terday yesterday in their car for the mountains
of Georgia. Tomorrow Dr. Scott will
address the W. C. T. U. in Nacoochee,
Ga. Friday they will motor to a re resort
sort resort near Athens for a month's stay,
after which they will go to Asheville,
N. C, for the remainder of the sum summer.
mer. summer. Mr. and Mrs. Stirling Hooper, Mrs.
Hooper's mother and sister, Mr. and
Mrs. H. W. Tucker and Mr. A. O.
Harriss and Mr. E. L. Carney and
Mr. Sam Howell of Georgia, who has
been visiting Mr. and Mrs. Carney
for the past eight months, formed
J three of the numerous parties that

camped at Salt Springs last week.
They als-j spent some time at Lake
George and came home with quanti quantities
ties quantities of fisn and crabs for their friends
and ne;ghbors.
m m m

Mr. and Mr t v Tarver and Mr.
;jchr, Tarver. who have returned frnm!
several weeV
Mr and Mrg M Sawaya are re
their I
came I
Protection Against Catarrh.
Any constitutional exercise which
Improves the circulation and makes i
the body resistant hc-lps to protect one
froM catarrh. This is particularly true j
of ail breathing exercises because the
ekeets are beneficial locally as well as
constitutionally, says one of the hest-
kuo.mi pnysicai culture teucrers in j
New York. So let us teach our ciiil-
(irt ii the value of correct and deep j
ru earning, ana in doing so we improve
our own health and thereby impart
cheerfulness and happiness to our
home.
Fish That Builds a Nest.
The .stickleback "is ne of the most
interesting members of the finny tribe.
It constructs a home for Its prospec prospective
tive prospective mate, .and then mounts guard over
it -until the mate comes along. The
home is built from seaweed, twigs
:snd aquatic plants, which are ingen ingeniously
iously ingeniously woven together. There are two
entrances to the home, which are
never left unguarded by the master of
the house until the lady of his choice
signifies her willingness to enter.
Popular Science Monthly.
Vers Libre.
"Vers libre" (free verse) Is so called
because of Its freedom from the for formal
mal formal laws governing poetic rhythm. It
is by no means "new." Walt Whitman
wrote almost entirely in "free" ca cadences,
dences, cadences, and Milton, to quote one class classic
ic classic example, used what, we would call
"vers libre" in the choruses of Sam Samson
son Samson Agonistes. The demand for "com "complete
plete "complete metrical freedom" stands out,
however, as the most obvious element
in "the new poetry."
The Orange in Spain.
It is considered a very healthful
thing to eat an orange before break breakfast.
fast. breakfast. But who can eat an orange well?
One must go to Spain to see that done.
The senorita cuts off the rind with her
silver knife ; then, putting her fork in into
to into the peeled fruit, she detaches every
morsel with her pearly teeth and con continues
tinues continues to eat the orange without los losing
ing losing a drop of the juice and lays down
the core with the fork still in it. Ex Exchange.
change. Exchange. fc
South France.
Of all parts of France perhaps the
Nimes country is the most Interesting.
Nimes itself, with its Roman amphi amphitheater,
theater, amphitheater, still used for circus shows
and bull fights, its "Maison carree,"
otherwise a perfectly preserved second-century
temple, and its beautiful
gardens, is a charming place to stay
in, though dusty when the mistral
blows.
We have two Ford cars for sale.
Bargains. The Maxwell Agency,
Ocala, Fla. 7-14-4t
I have anything in the electrical
line. Ask about them. W. J. McGehee,
distributor. tf
Let me figure with you on your oil
engine. W. J. McGehee, distributor, tf
OCALA FRATERHAL ORDERS
MARION-DUNN MASONIC LODSB
Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. &
. :.. meets on the nrs; aim thirtf
Thursday evening? o' each month a
r00 o'clock, until farther notice.
H. M. Weathers. W. M.
ODD FELLOWS
Tulula Lodge No. 22, I. O. O. F..
meets every Tuesday evening in the
Odd Fellows' hall on the third floor of
the Star office building at 8 o'clock
promptly. A warm welcome always
extended to visiting brothers.
Orcar Andrews, N. G.
W. L. Colbert, Secretary.
WOODMEN OF THE WORLD
Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
the K. of P. hall at 7:30 p. m. every
second and fourth Friday. Visiting
sovereigns are ailways welcome.
T. D. Lancaster, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk.
ORDER OF' EASTERN STAR
Ocala Chapter, N. 29, O. E. S,
neeis. at Yonge s hall the second anJ
uirth Thursday evenings of eac!l
T.f'a at 7 "o o'clock.
Mrs Rosalie Condon, Secretary.
Mrs. Susan Cook, W. M.
OCALA LODGE NO. 286, B. P. O. E
Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and fourth Tuesday even evenings
ings evenings in each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Club house oppo opposite
site opposite postoffice, east side.
C. W. Hunter, E. R.
E. J. Crook, Secretary.
KNIGHTS OK PYTHiAS
Ocala Lodge No. 10. Conventions
held every Monday night at 7:30
at the Castle Hall, over the James
Carlisle drugstore. A cordial welcome
to visiting brothers.
E. L. Stapp, C. C.
CLas. K. Sage, K. of R. S.

- Every WOMAN -'owes it to herself to maintain health she is naturally weak.
Every YOUNG GIRL owes it to herself to fortify against any handicap in the development,
of healthy womanhood.
Every PROSPECTIVE MOTHER, during the hours of expectancy, owes it to herself and babe

to keep in perfect condition as
Every MIDDLE-AGED
WOMAN owes it to herself to
prepare her system for the
ordeal it must undergo during:
the Change in life."
No WOMAN has the right to
suffer when she can obtain relief
safely, certainly and promptly.
Suppose you do have
Headaches,
Backaches,
Cxtreme Nervousness,
Low Spirits, or gen general
eral general Ctood-For -Nothing
Feelings at times!
Your case is not hopeless. These
symptoms are evidence that the
delicate organism of the f eniinine
body has become out of order and
needs the help Nature's remedies
can. bestow.

Will These Bearing-Down Pains

"Favorite Prescription is prepared from the natural remedial herbs growing la csa
native forests, combined with glycerine without alcohol and without narcotics.
Sold by dealers, in tablet or liquid form. Send ten cents to Invalids' Hotel. Bu2s 13. 21
large trial package,

UNCLASSIFIED ADS,
WANTED, LOST. FOUND, FOR
wSALE. FOR RENT AND SIM
ILAR LOCAL NEEDS
FOR SALE Grist mill; a 24-inch un under
der under runner French corn mill complete,
practically new. Will be sold for half
price. Apply to George Giles &'Co.,
Ocala, Fla. 7-20-bt
WANTED Three thousand or more
laborers and carpenters for work in
constructing government cantonment
near Columbia, S. C. Quarters for
boarding and sleeping men right on
the grounds. Don't write but come.
Plenty of work for everybody and
good wages. Be patriotic and do your
bit. Take receipt for raHroad fare,
which we will refund to you after
you have worked a week. Hardaway
Contracting Company, "Columbia, S.
C. 7-23-6t
WANTED Fifty plumbers and pipe
fitters; wages $5.50 for eight hours.
Take receipt from railroad for trans transportation
portation transportation which will be returned to
you whenvyou report for work. Walker
Electric and Plumbing Co., United
States Cantonment, Columbia, S. C.
OF LOCAL INTEREST
Sonie People We Know, and We Wili
Profit by Hearing About Them
This is a purely local event.
It took place in Ocala.
Not in some faraway place.
Yo uare asked to, investigate it.
Asked' to believe a citizen's word;
To confirm a citizen's statement.
Any article that is endorsed at
Home is more worthy of confidence
Than one you know nothing about,
Endorsed by unknown people.
H. J. Ashley, proprietor of the
Ashley Sheet Metal Works, Ocala,
says: "I used Doan's Kidney Pills,
procured at Gerig's Drug Store, and
found them to be just as represented.
They 'soon relieved me of backache
and disordered kidneys. I think, if
taken as directed, Doan's Kidney
Pills will cure kidney complaint and
I don't hesitate giving my name
praising them."
Price 60c. at, all -dealers. Don't
simply ask for a kidney remedy get
Doan's Kidney Pills the same that
Mr. Ashley had. Foster-Milburn Co.,
Props., Buffalo, N. Y. Adv. 2
WHEN YOU HAVE PAID YOUR
RENT YOU HAVE
KISSED IT GOODBYE
Why not pay a small amount each
month and see it go into
YOUR OWN HOME
I have a number of Jiouses you can
buy that way at
$10 A MONTH
call and see my list of houses from
$1000.00 up.
L M. MURRAY
Room 5 Holder Blk. Ocala, Fla.
Mclver & ioeKay
UND&RI4KEHS and BiB ALGIERS
PHONES 47. 104, 305
OCALA, FLORIDA
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL
CARPENTER AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on ail Con Contract
tract Contract work. Gives More and -Better
Work for the mouy than any other
contractor in the city.
Advertise in the Star.

WEAKER

a strong child depends largely
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You Can Save Money

By Looking Around!
At The Savoy Cafe you will find the Most Reason Reasoned)
ed) Reasoned) able Prices, the Coolest and Most Comfortable
3 Dining Roqm and the Quick'est Service in the city.

2? Dinner 35c.

E J. METRE. PROP.

W. Commercial Bank Building.

NOTICE OF INSTITUTION
OF SUIT BY ATTACHMENT
Leesburg State Bank, a Florida Cor Corporation,
poration, Corporation, Plaintiff, vs. N. G. Long,
In the. Circuit Court, Marion County.
Assumpsit, Damages $300.
To N. G. Long, N. G. Long, Trustee
and Long Blue Granite Company, a
Corporation, and all persons inter interested:
ested: interested: Notice is hereby given to the above
named parties, and each of them, and
to all persons interested, that the
Leesburg State Bank, a Florida cor corporation,
poration, corporation, plaintiff has instituted a
suit of attachment against N. G.
Long, N. G. Long, trustee, and Long
Blue Granite Company, defendants in
the above styled court, on the 1st day
of June, 1917, the writ of attachment
being levied upon the following de described
scribed described land in Marion county, Flor Florida,
ida, Florida, to-wit: E of se of section
28, township 17 south, range 25 east.
You, N. G. Long, N. G. Long, trus trustee,
tee, trustee, and Long Blue Granite Company
and all other persons interested are
hereby required to appear in said ac action
tion action on the rule day in August, 1917;
the same being the
7th day of August, 1917.
Given under my hand and seal of
said court, this the 6th day of June..
A. D. 1917.
(Seal) P. H. Nugent,
Clerk Circuit Court, Marion County
Florida. By Ruth Ervin, D. C.
L. W. DuvaL
Attorney for Plaintiff. 6-6-9t-wed
'Unclassified" ads bring results.

upon the mother s neaitn.

Dr. Pierce's Favorite Prescrip
tion has helped thousands of suf suffering
fering suffering women to
BETTER HEALTH,
GREATER STRENGTH;
BRIGHTER SPIRITS,
BETTER LOOKS.
It corrects nervous irritabilitj.
exhaustion and other distressing
symptoms of the deranged
feminine organs.
For Special Confidential Ad
vice write to DOCTOR PIERCB,
Invalids Hotel, Buffalo, N. Y.
The latest in medical science
is contained in Dr. Pierce's ft
Common Sense MedicaU
Adviser new and revised i
edition of 1008 pages, onfys
three dimes or thirty cents
Address Dr. Pierce, Invalids
Hotel, Buffalo, N. Y.
Never Let Up?
n
li s
- fc -bo krs-ow its- W$
.
- 5 & -Z' w -Z--Z
(
21-Llcal Ticket 05.25
Ocala, Fla.
& & & -2 & ?s Zt -lb 3
PLUMBING AnO
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING
WThen .you have plumbing or elec electrical
trical electrical contracting, let us furnish you
estimates. No job too large and none
too small, tf IL W. Tucker.
BRING GOOD THINGS
FOR THE BOYS
Will the women of Marion county
give of their supply of jam, jellies,
preserves and pickles for our soldiers
in Co. A (Ocala Rifles). The com company
pany company leaves Aug. 5th, so please send
not later than Aug. 1st. Please label
the jars, giving contents and donor.
Send to either Mrs. W. S. Bullock or
Mrs. Louis R. Chazal, at Ocala.
ICE CREAM SUPPER
FOR COMPANY A
At Fort McCoy on Thursday night,
July 26th, there will be an ice cream
supper to raise money for Company
A. Everybody has a special invitation
to come. Ocala people are specially
invited.
W. K. Lane, si. D Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose ani
Throat. Law Library Building, 0cil2.
Florida. tf

JIW f

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