The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06666

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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WEATHER FORECAST

OCALA

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Qcala, July 4. It looks like a pre

Wciftation of moisture is imminent.
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III

Greatest Gallantry Displayed by Muscovites
in Battles in Galicia

I.! 'MID OH EHGLAHDDESPERATE ATTACKS OF
MEET WITH DEFEAT

London, July 4. The Morning
Post's Petrograd correspondent says
that when the Russians prepared for
their offensive they picked the regi regiments
ments regiments they believed they could best
rely upon, but until the test came did
not know what might happen. The

actions of the menvbore up the tradi-
! tions of the Russian army that it can
I suffer heavy losses without losing
j its military quality better than any
J army in the world.
j-V; RUSSIANS MADE GREAT GAINS
' Petrograd, July 4. In the fighting
y of Sunday and Monday, 300 officers,
r 18,000 men, 29 large guns and 33 ma-
t chine guns were captured by the Rus-
j sians, the war office announces.

AMERICAN OFFICER WITNESSED
THE ATTACK
Petrograd, July 4. General Hugh
Scott, chief of staff of the United
States Army, also an attache of the
American Commission to Russia, wit witnessed
nessed witnessed the beginning of the Russian
offensive on July 1st. While standing
on a hill overlooking the Russian and
Austrian lines he observed the artill artillery
ery artillery preparations and said he saw the
Sixth Corps, take three lines 6f Aus Austrian
trian Austrian trenches.
FRENCH WON ON THE AISNE
iFRONT
Paris, July 4. Extremely violent
fighting was in progress all through
last night on the Aisne front, result resulting
ing resulting in the route of the attacking Ger Germans.
mans. Germans. It is officially announced the
most violent attack was east of the
Fredmont farm, west and southwest
of Cerny, north of the Alles and Cali Cali-f
f Cali-f ornie plateau, where the Germans
were able to gain a footing, but were
driven out by counter attacks.
BRITISH DROPPED' BOMBS ON
BRUGES
London, July 4. Several tons of
bombs were dropped Monday night by
ttje British on the docks at Bruges
with favorable results, it is officially
announced.
BERLIN CLAIMS A VICTORY AT
BRZEZANY
Berlin, July 4. The Russians made
further attacks in the v region of
Brzezany, in eastern Galicia, yester yesterday,
day, yesterday, but were not able to advance, it
is officially announced. ;
ANOTHER AIR RAID ON COAST
OF ENGLAND
London, July 4. Twelve to. four fourteen
teen fourteen German air raiders dropped
bombs this morning on Harwich, a
seaport town in Essex, it is officially
announced Eight persons were kill killed
ed killed and twenty-two hurt. The raiders
came from a northeasterly direction
shortly after seven o'clock. Only
material damage was done and the
formation was broken up by fire from
anti-aircraft guns, although; low lying
clouds rendered visibility bad. Brit British
ish British aircraft also attacked. After
the Germans dropped the bombs, they
started eastward. The raid lasted
only a few minutes.
ENGLAND WANTED AMERICA TO
COME IN
Paris, July 4. The Matin publishes
an interview today with David Lloyd Lloyd-George,
George, Lloyd-George, the British premier, who em emphatically
phatically emphatically contradicted the suggestion
that England was only half pleased
because the United States entered the
73.T. "We not only desired the en
trance of the United States, but we
solicited it," the premier is quoted as
saying.
LIST OF SUB LOSSES
, London, July 4. -The: weekly ship shipping
ping shipping shows that fifteen British merch merchant
ant merchant vessels of more than 1,600 tons
and five ships of less than that ton tonnage
nage tonnage were sunk during the week.
Eleven fishing vessels were also lost:

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(Associated Press)
Admiral Henry T. Mayo, Commandlna
Atlantio Fleet.
The Atlantic fleet is the most im important
portant important "unit" of our "first line of defense.".;-.'
.
TEUTON SUBS ATTACKED
AMERICAN TRANSPORTS
After a Fierce Night Battle They were
Beaten Off
'v (Associated Press)
Washington, July 4. The American
destroyers, convoying the transports,
loaded with soldiers, to France, fought
off two submarines. The first news of
the fight was given out by the commit committee
tee committee of public information with formal
announcement" of the safe arrival of
the last transport, .;'''c,::;,'v'x.v,..
At least one German submarine was
sunk in the .fight. Thl attacks show showed
ed showed that the Germans had information
of the coming of the American trans transports
ports transports and had planned to get them.
The torpedoes of the Germans failed
to hit any of the American ships,
therefore no lives were lost.
Secretary Daniels in a statement
last night, gave the details of the
voyage. The first attack was made on
the night of June 22nd. The convoys
used their heavy guns on the subma submarines
rines submarines with such effectiveness,, that the
torpedo charges decreased and be became
came became inaccurate. Powerful search searchlights
lights searchlights were used to find the subma submarines.
rines. submarines. ; ,v..:".
A second attacks was made a few
days later and as a result one sub submarine
marine submarine was sunk. The convoys used
grenades, which were thrown in the
water with the explosives timed to go
off after going a certain distance.
Last American Force has Arrived
Unknown French Port, July 4. The
last of the American expeditionary
force, comprising vessels .loaded with
supplies and horses, arrived here yes yes-ter
ter yes-ter day amid the screeching of whis whistles
tles whistles and a moaning of sirenes.
Their coming one week after the
landing of the first American troops,
was greeted almost as warmly as the
arrivaf of the troops themselves, be because
cause because it meant a success in the un undertaking.
dertaking. undertaking. MANCHUS NOT WANTED
Shanghai, July 4. Newspapers
in vernacular unanimously denounce
the return of the Manchus to the
Chinese throne. :
EAT WITH THE RED
;V CROSS THIS EVENING
The Red Cross ladies have fixed up
things in elegant style at the Ocala
House dining rooms. Take your sup supper
per supper with them this evening.

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Oil THE AISME FRGI1T
PARADED THRU PARIS
Boys in Khaki Received an Enthus Enthusiastic
iastic Enthusiastic Reception as They Marched
Along the Boulevards
(Associated Press)
Paris, France, July 4. A battalion
of American troops arrived tin Paris
yesterday to parade today. The men
were greeted by widely .cheering
crowds that packed the streets thru
which they marched to Neuilly bar barracks,
racks, barracks, where they are quartered. The
officers are being entertained at the
American club.
The Americans arrived at the Aus Aus-terlitz
terlitz Aus-terlitz station at 7:40 o'clock, having
been' 36 hours on the way from the
French port at which they disem disembarked.
barked. disembarked. The soldiers were greeted by
escorts from the French navy and
armies. The French Red Cross pro provided
vided provided refreshments and the American
Red Cross and Young Men's Christian
Association also sent representatives
to greet them. Headed by their own
band, the soldiers, carrying their
rifles and field packs, fell in and
marched off to the barracks. The
crowds waved American and French
flags. Hundreds of Americans were
in the crowds at the station.
As the men marched through the
streets French girls pinned bouquets
and American flags on the soldiers'
breasts. The band played "Yankee
Doodle," "Dixie," "Marching Through
Georgia'.' and other American airs.
French soldiers on leave grasped the
hands of Americans and marched be beside
side beside them. ",
' Several times groups of shop, girls
on their way to work slipped through
the police lines and kissed the sol soldiers,
diers, soldiers, to their great embarrassment.
Now and then an American voice
would be heard calling out, "Hello,
boys" and "Welcome., to Paris," or
"Good luck." When the regimental
colors were carried past the men
bared their heads. The Americans
were greatly surprised to see a num number
ber number of children kneel in the street as
the flag was carried by. They were
orphans, from an institution in the
neighborhood.
The soldierly bearing of the men
impressed the observers. They were
lean and brown and the new field
packs gave them quite a different ap appearance
pearance appearance from British or continental
soldiers.
ORIGINAL PLAN WILL
BE CARRIED OUT
Washington, July 4. The original
plan for assembling the j National
guard at the training, camps 'will be
carried out. The entire force will be
drafted into Federal service the same
day, however, to prevent confusion
and injustice as to the relative rank
of officers.
FOUR MILLION VALUE
MAXWELL CAR DEAL
Delivery of 6,000 Automobiles to Ex Export
port Export Firm is Called for
by Contract
Four million dollars is the amount
involved in a contract for cars for ex-?
port just made by the Maxwell Sales
Corporation, of Detroit. The contract
calls for a delivery of 6,000 Maxwell
automobiles.
A large number of the cars will be
shipped to points in South America.
The remainder will go to countries in
the Orient both the : continent of
Asia and the great islands of the
Pacific.
The contract was made with the
John D. Williams Company, New
York, N. Y. This company will act
as one of the foreign representatives
of the Maxwell company.

OOALA, FLORIDA, WEDNESDAY,

TEDDY SAYS THOSE WHO
AMERICA ARE
(Associated
Forest Hills, L. I., July 4. Declar
ing that those in America who cham
pion Germany's cause against the
cause of America are guilty of moral
treason, and are in fact, although not
in law, moral traitors, Colonel Roose
velt, in a fourth of July address here
today, pleaded for a single standard
of patriotism and loyalty.
"We are now at war with Ger
many," said Colonel Roosevelt. "For
over two years Germany has heaped
insult upon insult, injury upon injury,
on our people. We did not even dare
to prepare so as to be able effectively
to resent wrongs in the future. Our
supine inaction was partly due to the
folly engendered in our people by the
professional pacifists. But an even
more important factor was the dread
many of our politicians felt, not
merely of the German army, abroad,
but of German votes at home. The
selfishness and shortsightedness of
the American politicians were inde
fensible, and they were due to the
fact that the men who took the lead
in the German-American movement
sought entirely to subordinate the ac actions
tions actions of the country of which they
were nominally citizens, the United
States, to the needs of the country
for which they cared, Germany.
"Now we are at war with Ger
many, yet many of these persons sup supported,
ported, supported, of course, by professional
pacifists,, continue to champion Ger Germany's
many's Germany's cause as against the cause for
which we are fighting. This is a moral
treason to the republic, and all who
engage in it are in fact, although not
in-law, traitors who have ,. no fright
longer to be treated as American citi citi-ens.
ens. citi-ens. The time has come to insist
that they drop their dual allegiance,
and in good faith become outright
Germans or outright Americans. They
cannot be both, and those who pre
tend to be both are merely Germans
who hypocritically pretend to be Am.
eiicans in order to serve Germany and
damage America. At this moment
the vital thing to remember about
those half -hidden traitors is that to
attack America's allies, while we are
at death grips with, a peculiarly ruth ruthless
less ruthless and brutal foe, or to champion
that foe as against our allies, or to
apologize for that foe's infamous
wrongdoing, is to be false to the cause
of liberty and to the United States.
"There can be no half and half at
titude in this war, and no honorable
man can afford to take such an atti
tude. We are bound by every consid
eration of loyalty and good faith to
our allies, and any opposition to them,
or any aid given to their and our en enemy,
emy, enemy, is basely dishonorable as regards
our allies, and treasonable as regards
our own country.?
Colonel Roosevelt said that the
claim that it was natural for Ameri American
can American citizens of German origin to
favor Germany was "nonsense,' and
criminal nonsense to boot," and add added,
ed, added, "either a man is an American and
nothing else, or he is not an Ameri
can at all. 'We are akin by blood and
descent to most of the ; nations of
Europe, but we are separate from all
of them. We are a new and distinct
nation, and we are bound always to
give our whole-hearted and individual
loyalty to our flag, and in any inter international
national international crisis to treat every foreign
nation purely according to its con
duct in that crisis. It is both weak
and wicked to permit any of our citi citizens
zens citizens to hold dual or divided alleg allegiance,
iance, allegiance, and it is just as mischievous,
just as un-American, to discriminate
against any good American because
of his birthplace, creed or parentage."
Elaborating on that point and pro protesting
testing protesting against the plan to exclude
from American Red Cross units Am Americans
ericans Americans of German or Austrian par parentage,
entage, parentage, Colonel Roosevelt said that if
he had been permitted to raise a mil military
itary military force for service in France many
of his officers would have been chosen
from among men of Gsrman parent parentage
age parentage who were undoubted Americans.
Colonel Roosevelt severely arraign arraigned
ed arraigned those who sek to excuse the acts
of Germany "our embittered and en envenomed
venomed envenomed foe," by saying "We would
behave in like manner if we had the
opportunity," and reviewed the his history
tory history of the civil war in support of his

JULY i, 1917.

M
FAVOR
GERMANY AGIST
MORAL
Press)
A
Major General George Barnett, Com Commander
mander Commander of the Marine Corp.
A regiment of marines was the first
American organization to land in
France June 26.
contention that the utterance was "in "infamous
famous "infamous falsity."
A TRIBUTE TO THE ALABAMA
"Contrast the brutality shown to towards
wards towards women and children on the
Lusitania, and scores of other ships,
by the officially directed German sub submarines,
marines, submarines, with the Alabama's action
fifty years ago," he continued.
"Semmes never destroyed a vessel
without providing for the safety of
the passengers and crew. He turned
his own officers out of their cabins to
put in them the women and children
of his foes, and once when hejiad 700
prisoners and a prize he allowed them
to go in freedom on the vessel rather
than send them to a nearby port
where there was yellow fever. Com Compare
pare Compare these actions with the methodi methodical
cal methodical and organized brutality of the
German military authorities in this
war, and then brand with shame the
American traitors who seek to aid
Germany by asserting that we if
given the chance, would be guilty of
atrocities like those she has commit committed."
ted." committed." ,y A
Touching on the matter of language
Colonel Roosevelt declared that "We
must have in this country but one
flag, and for the speech of the people people-but
but people-but one language, the English lan language.
guage. language. During the present war all
newspapers published in German, or
in the speech of any of our foes,
should be required to publish, side by
side with the foreign text, columns in
English containing the exact trans
lation of everything said in the for
eign language. Ultimately this should
be done with all newspapers publish published
ed published in foreign tongues in this country.
"Universal suffrage should be
based on universal service in peace as
well as war," said Colonel Roosevelt
in concluding his address. "Those
who refuse to render the one should
have no title to the enjoyment fo the
ether. -We stand for the democracy
of servicer' we are against privileges,
therefore against the privilege which
would escape service in war.
"We must fight with steadfast en endurance,
durance, endurance, until we win the, peace of
overwhelming victory for righteous righteousness,
ness, righteousness, and even while thus fighting we
must prepare the way for the peace
of industrial justice," and the peace
of industrial democracy, which are to
come after, and to consecrate the
war." 1 : : -'
7"
NATIONAL GUARDSMEN TO
DEFEND THE NEGRO
Tampa, July 4. Governor Catts has
ordered two companies of National
Guard from .this city to Jacksonville
to act as guard to Will Miles, negro,
on a 250-mile trip to Bradentown,
where the black is to be tried for the
murder of Mrs. W. S. Palmer and her
infant child, and assaulting a young
white girl, all of Ellenton. The girl
has since died.
The largest line of bathing caps in
the city all shades, shapes arfd col colors.
ors. colors. The Court Pharmacy. 15-tf

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Scene of Race
Shift to

1 1311

EAST ST. LOUIS, AFTEIi SEVERAL DAYS OF RIOTIIIG; fflS

- RESTORED
(Associated
Chicago,. July 4. Victor Orlando,
secretary of the Illinois Federation of
Labor and a member of the State
Council of Defense, has issued a
warning to Chicago and other north northern
ern northern cities in connection with the im importation
portation importation of negroes. He said that
unemployment is increasing and
should be investigated.
F. L. Barnet, colored, former as assistant
sistant assistant states attorney, at a negro
mass meeting last night, admonished
the, negroes to prepare to protect
themselves against mistreatment.
Police reserves are held at the sta station
tion station in the negro section to prevent
disorder. The killing of an aged
saloonkeeper in the "Black Belt"
brought out the reserves. The police
fired into the negroes to stop the fight
and wounded one.
LONG LIST OF BEAD IN EAST ST.
LOUIS
East St. Louis, July 4. Danger of
more rioting this morning seemed to
have passed. Fourteen hundred na
tional guardsmen are patrolling the
streets with orders to use all force
necessary to maintain order.
Aside from numerous small fires en entailing
tailing entailing slight losses there was no dis disorder
order disorder last night. The death list now
numbers thirty. The white death list
was raisedto four when Detective
Wogley, who was shot Sunday night,
died.
LOCAL LEGISLATION
Only Routine Business was Attended
to by the Council Last Evening
There was not much business be
fore-' the city council at its meeting
Tuesday night aside from the regular
routine. v
A communication from Messrs. An
derson & Anderson, representing
Mrs.' Mazie Lyles, asking for adjust adjustment
ment adjustment of claim for. property to be used
for opening South Fourth street be between
tween between Tuscawilla and Watula, brought
up some discussion of the case. Mr.
R. B. Bullock appeared before the
council and asked relief from the con
stant overflowing of his property in
this section on account of the street
not being opened through. The city
attorney was instructed to begin at
once another suit to condemn the
property in question, and a warrant
was ordered drawn for defraying the
expenses of suit.
The matter of sheriff's costs in a
number of suits brought by former
City Attorney Spencer several years
ago was referred to a special commit
tee consisting of Messrs. Knight,
Fausett and Gerig.
A letter from the surety company
which carries the city officers' bonds
was read. It asked for a- statement
of the condition of the books, but as
no audit has ben made for some time,
it was ordered that the communica communication
tion communication be replied to, stating that an
audit would be made shortly, at which
time a report would be "f urpished.
The special committee to which had
been referred the matter of dispos disposing
ing disposing of the old light and water plants,
reported its progress, stating that a
number of flattering propositions
were being received.
The proposition to furnish power
and water to the state industrial
school for girls, which is now being
built two miles east of the city, was
discussed but nothing definite could
be decided upon at this time.
Upon recommendation of the fire
committee it was ordered that a new
chemical tank, equipment be purchas purchased
ed purchased for the chemical engine.
Police Officer Grubbs was granted a
week's vacation with pay.
Communication from Mr. $C. P.
Howell, stating that a' water pipe on
his premises had burst during the
night and caused excess meter read

VOL. 23, NO. 1B2.

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Li
Trouble
ay
Chicago
TO OODEfl
Press)
THE RED en
T tit
I
Pageant of the Nations Fighting for
the Modern Declaration of
Independence
' Program
Band concert at 5 p. m. sham on
the courthouse square followed by the
pageant of the nations:
Country National Hymns
Japan Kimiagayo
Russia ...Hymn of Free Russia
Italy.. .... Garibaldi Hymn
Great Britain. .. .God Save the King
Belguim ........... La Brabanconne
France............. La Marseillaise
United States Headed by Columbia
and Uncle Sam Star Spangled Ban
ner.
Immediately -after the parads and
singing of the national hymns, Dr.
Eunyan 'Stephens will offer a prayer
and; Mr. L. ,W. Duval will make a
patriotic address.
The pageant and the singing will
be under the direction of Miss Downs.
After Mr. Duval's address the Star
Spangled Banner will be repeated and
the public, is requested to join in the
singing, standing with hats off.
You need not worry to go home for
supper. You will be able to get some
thing good to eat and at reasonable
prices. Remember that all you pay
will go to the Red Cross and that the
more you eat the stronger will grow
the Red Cross.
ing during the last quarter, and ask asking
ing asking relief for same, was referred to
the light and water committee.
All the city officers made reports,
written or verbal, which were approve
ed.
The clerk read the finance commit
tee's report of balances on hand July
1st in the various funds, as follows:
General fund 5,843.8(5
Rest room fund . . . 390.12
Bond interest fund ....... 5,043.78
Sinking fund '. 10,731.03
Water works bond fund. .. "3,083X6
E. L. bond interest fund... 1,774.20
Carnegie library fund .... 400.
E. L. bond fund ...... 14,110.03
Sewer bond fund ......... 1,441.4
A letter from the chief engineer of
the Seaboard railroad in reference to
moving of union depot from north to
south side of the tracks, was referred
to the finance committee.
The matter of arranging for re
funding bonds to take the place of the
old electric light bonds amounting to
$14,200 was referred to the finance
committee and city attorney. These
bonds will fall due next year, and as
no sinking fund was created at the
time of their issue, it will be neces
sary to arrange for their retirement
at maturity.
All the monthly accounts properly
audited were ordered paid.
ANOTHER BUNCH OF
SUFFS LOCKED UP
, (Associated Press)
Washington, July 4. Suffragists
of the woman's party attempted to
carry out their threats to defy the
police and picket the White House in
force at noon as an Independence Day
demonstration. A large force of po
lice was on hand and drove away the
sentinels. Thirteen arrests were
made.
TEAM OF MULES FOR REN
A good heavy" team of mules wit'i
driver to rent by the day cr vrwl
Apply to Box 374 or Star oface. 3-
Advertise in the Star.

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PAGE TITO

OCALA EVENING STAR. WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 1917

OCALA

VUZlslSUED EVERY

BITTIXGEIl & CARROLL, PROPRIETORS
R. R. Carroll, General Maaaffer Port V. LeaTenseod, Dodaeu Maiaser
J. H. Denjamla, Editor
Entered at Ocala, Fl?,, poatotflce as second class matter

Phone Fire-One

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
(Domestic) (Fordarm)
On year. In advance. "..... .,..$5.00 One year. In advance...... 11.00
Ax months, in advance 2.60 Six month. In advance.. 4.25
Three months. In advance...... 1.26 Three months, in advance...... 2.25
One month, in advance... .GO One month. In advance........ .SO

THE COUNCIL OF
NATIONAL DEFENSE
Accomplishments of the Council, of
National Defense, its advisory com-
mission and its committees since the
council "was finally organized last J
March are set forth in a comprehen-
sive report by Director Gifford. j
Only eighty persons, according to
Director Gifford's report, are drawing
salaries, and most of these are clerks
and stenographers.
More than one hundred highly
trained men are giving their entire
time to the council.without remnuera remnuera-tion.
tion. remnuera-tion. Several hundred more are giv giving
ing giving free a large part of their time.
The chief accomplishments of the
council are summed up by Mr. Gifford
oa follows: 1 v
"Mobilization of the 262,000 miles
of railroad of the country for the gov government's
ernment's government's defense.
"Close-knit organization of the tel telephone
ephone telephone and telegraph companies of
America to insure to the government
the most rapid and efficient wire com communications.
munications. communications. "Settlement of the recent threaten threatened
ed threatened national railroad strikes.
"General acceptance by labor and
capital of the suggestion of the coun council
cil council that existing labor standards
should not be changed until the need
for such action had been determined
by the council with the steadying in influence
fluence influence on industry growing out of
such action.
"Procurement of 45,000,000 pounds
of copper for the uses of the army
and navy at less than one-half of the
then current market price -a saving
to the government of approximately
$10,000,000.
"Similar accomplishments as to
steel, zinc and aluminum.
"Completion of an inventory, for
military purposes, of 27,000 American
manufacturing plants.
' "Money saving to the government,
through appointment over the coun country
try country of committees of business men to
assist the- quartermasters' depart department
ment department of the army in the economical
and efficient purchase of supplies.
"Saving to the government of mil millions
lions millions of dollars by the co-ordination
of purchases through the agency of
ll r 1 H !l! T. I
ine uenerai ivxuniuons cuaru.
"Creation, under the medical sec section
tion section of the council, of a General Med Medical
ical Medical Board, of many of the most high highly
ly highly qualified surgeons and physicians
of the country.
"Selection by the same section of
thousands of doctors specifically qual qualified
ified qualified for membership in the medical
officers reserve corps, and the stand standardization,
ardization, standardization, far on its way to comple completion,
tion, completion, of surgical instruments and sup sup-plies.
plies. sup-plies. .-' -. '
"Creation by the council of the Air Aircraft
craft Aircraft Production Board, which is set setting
ting setting out to make 3,500 airplanes and
to train 6,000 aviators this year.
"Definite results obtained by the
council's committee on coal produc production
tion production in the procurement and expedi
tious shipment of coal, both in the
civilian and federal interests.
"Successful initiation of a move
ment to co-ordinate activities on the
part of the states of the Union for-
the national defense, brought to a
. clear and workable f orcus by the con
ference of states held recently in
Washington at the call and under the
auspices of the council.
"Organization of a railroad com
mittee to send to Russia and enlist
ment of reserve engineer regiments
to aid in rehabilitating the railroads
of France."
Besides the many things done by
the council, Mr. Gifford. enumerates
in detail the work of the boards and
committees. He begins with the Gen
eral Munitions Board, of which Frank
A. Scott is chairman, which, accord
ing to the report, has the following
accomplishments to its credit:
Development of the capacity of
small arms factories to supply one
million men with arms: contracts
signed for small arms ammunition to
meet all requirements; artillery am ammunition'
munition' ammunition' supply; developed; sources
of machine gun supplies developed;
raw material obtained for gun car
riages and. caissons; standardization
of motor transports; supply of mater
ial for ambulance bodies obtained
and satisfactory production of armor
ed cars assured; reduction in price of
machine guns obtained and increased
production arranged; arrangement of
sufficient supply of surgical instru instruments;
ments; instruments; development of an improved
optical glass for military instru instruments;
ments; instruments; recommendations made as to
fair and equitable prices for army
and navy contracts; arrangement
made for taking over British small
arms plants in this country; estab establishment
lishment establishment of priority in manufacture
(t machine tools to assure govern government
ment government of proper supplies; compilation
of list of munitions manufacturers
for guidance of army and navy in
making purchases. ' ; -:
"The General Munitions Board'
the report declared, "has, since it3
crarizafclon, through the co-ordina

ENING STAR

DAT EXCEPT SUNDAY
Editorial Room, Five-One-Y
tion of purchasing alone, saved many
millions of dollars to the govern government."
ment." government." ;
The work of the Aircraft Produc-
Jtion Board is set forth
at length
Some of the main things it had done
are:.
"Assisted in organization of air aircraft
craft aircraft manufacturers into an associa association.,
tion., association., -
"Negotiated with aircraft compan companies
ies companies and others to obtain a basis for
settlinf patent disputes and helped
put through an agreement.
"Evolved, in co-operation with the
chief signal officer, a training plan
fof aviators; assisted in starting
schools for preliminary training of
aviator cadets; arranged for sending
professors to Toronto for instruction
in this work.
"Developed in co-operation with the
signal officer and the aeronautical
division a standard type of aviation
school building and equipment of
buildings; assisted the aeronautical
division, in selecting sites for aviation
schools.
"Investigated the production facil
ities of airplanes in the United States
and made recommendations covering
orders that should be placed imme
diately.
"Arranged" for standardization of
training type of machine between
English, Canadian and United States
service.
"Developed plans for battle types
of planes, orders for which are being
placed now by the military author!
ties."
The medical section, under Dr.
Franklin Martin and Dr. F. F. Simp
son, has spent much of its time select
ing civilian physicians for recommen
dation to the army and navy, public
health service and the Red Cross.
The work has been done through com
mittees named in each state. Selec
tion of 21,000 physicians has been
completed, and the men have been
given application blanks which they
have been asked to file with the sur
geons general.
Mr. Gifford's report emphasizes the
work of an inter-departmental com
mittee whose purpose is to prevent
duplication of war work in the var
ious government departments.
The council has in the Naval Con
sulting Board a board of inventions,
which just now is investigating plans
to combat the submarine. The board
is headed by Thomas A. Edison and
numbers among its members some of
the country's most noted scientists
and inventors.
A Commercial Economy Board,
with A. W. Shaw as its chairman, is
studying means by which, commercial
business may best meet demands
made on it during the war, and how
large quantities of supplies may be
diverted to government use without
upsetting the essential services of
trade. This board is studying a plan
to economize on city delivery sys
tems and is investigating measures
of economy for adoption by retail
stores. ;. -X
The coal problem is in the hands of
a committee on coal production, head
ed by P. S. Peabody of Chicago. It is
assisting the War Railroad Board in
expediting the movement of coal and
is taking measures to stimulate pro
duction. '7 .: VV:V:;
A woman's defense committee was
created in April with Dr. Anna How
ard Shaw as its chairman. Its activ
ities will be directed along the follow
ing lines: Y;"'--
Organization of state committees,
registration of women for service
with the food administration, home
and allied relief work, food produc
tion, conservation and thrift; educa educational
tional educational propaganda, protection of wom
en and child workers, conservation of
the health and welfare : of women
conservation of the moral and spirit
ual forces of the nation.
Scientific research is being conduct
ed by the National Research Council
The work is under the direction of Dr
George E. Hale and Dr. R. A. Milli-
ken. The Research Council is co
ordinating the research activities of
the country in the fields of science
and engineering. It is now engaged
in studying devices to detect subma
rines and mines, investigating range
finders and instruments to detect in
visible aircraft and improving wire
less apparatus.
A committee on shipping is work
ing with the Shipping oBard on its
problem of increasing the country's
merchant tonnage.
The work of state defense councils
is co-ordinated through a department
headed by George F. Porter It has
assisted -in organizing state councils
and in giving them advice as to what
the federal government expects of the
states in assisting in the conduct of
the- war.'" ''.XXX-XX : -jf
Transportation questions are stud studied
ied studied by a committee on transportation.
Daniel Wfllard, president of the Bal Baltimore
timore Baltimore & Ohio railroad, is its chair chairman".
man". chairman". It operates through a War
Railroad Board, of which Fairfax
Harrison,, president of the Southern

Railway, is head. This board is run running
ning running the various transportation line3
as one continental system.

The Railroad Board has given pref
erence to fuel in moving coal ahead of
all other commodities. Food prob probably
ably probably will be the next commodity giv given
en given preferential shipment. Coal is
moved in this order: fuel for the gov.
eminent, for the road3 on which mines
are located, for other steam roads
and finally for general purposes. The
committee recommended the person personnel
nel personnel of the railroad commission now in
Russia. It is engaged in discontinu
ing passenger trains not considered
essential and expects to discourage
conventions and other meetings that
would require unusual train service.
Other accomplishments of the rail
road board are given as follows:
"Enlistment of nine regiments of
engineers to rehabilitate the French
railway systems; an arrangement for
moving coal to the Pacific coast in
box cars to prevent an uneconomical
haul back; expeditious movement of
food products."
Telephone and telegraph commit
tees of the council have arranged a
system of co-operation between the
wire companies and the government.
Government calls are given prefer
ence.
Much army and navy purchasing
has been ddne by the committee on
supplies, of which Julius Rosenwald
cf Chicago is chairman. The commit
tee is composed of six business men
chosen from different industries, who
are giving their entire time to the
work. This committee is said to have
saved the government millions of dol-
ars in the purchase of supplies. All
army and navy contracts, before sign signed,
ed, signed, are submitted to the committee
or approval, and the committee in
many instances has instituted new
purchasing systems. Associated with
the committee are a large number of
sub-committees made up of experts
on various commodities.
The committee on raw supplies,
headed by Bernard M. Baruch of New
York, has organized the purchase of
raw materials. It saved the govern government,
ment, government, according to the" report, $10,-
000,000 on the purchase of a supply
of copper.
Samuel Gompers' committee on la
bor is engaged in settling industrial
disputes and maintaining existing
abor standards.
The Committee on Industrial Pre
paredness has obtained 27,000 detail detailed
ed detailed reports from -the country's larger
manufacturing plants as to capacity
to meet the government's industrial
and military needs during the war.
This information, the report declares,
will prove invaluable in placing or orders.
ders. orders. for supplies. ..'
Engineering problems are being
studied by an engineering committee
under Dr. Hollis Godfrey."
Lovers of Cheese
Here You Are
LIMBERGER, BRICK
McLAREN'S IMPERIAL
McLAREN'S ROQUEFORT
McLAREN'S PIMENTO
PHILADELPHIA CREAM
AMERICAN CHEESE
GORGANZOLA, BRIE
IMPORTED ROQUEFORD ;
" TEAPOT
rf-V. vm W
O Iwlflll r lf Y
PHONES 16 174
Old Folk's
Best
That's what many call it,
for it puts vim and vigor into
old stomachs; rich, red blood info
old veins; sound flesh on old bones.
Drink a glass of this delicious, diges diges-tant
tant diges-tant with each meal i-
Shivar Ale
PURE DIGESTIVE ARCMAT1CS WITH
SHIYAR MINERAL WATER MD G1RSES
Your grocer or druggist will refund
your money on first dozen if you are
not pleased with results.
Bottled and guaranteed by the cele
- brated Shivar Mineral Spring, Shel
, ton, S. C If your regular dealer
cannot supply you telephone
JAKE BROWN,
DISTRIBUTOR FOR OCALA.
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL
CARPENTER AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Con Contract
tract Contract work. Gives More and Better
Work for the money than any other
contractor in the city.

Friend

PROVES FISH CAN SMELL

Experiments Show That Fish Are At-
tracted to Angler's Hook" by
Odor of Bait.
A fish hasn't a nose, but It can smelL
Itecent experiments hare proved this.
What i3more, these experiments have
proved that odor travels through wa
ter, just as it does through air.
Anglers have laid so much stress on
the need of exciting a fish's interest by
the look of food that the effect of scene
has been overlooked. A shark will
bite at a hook containing a piece of
fat pork, although the pork does not
ook like any kind of fish that swims
the sea. Why, then, should the trout
be expected to be Interested only In an
artificial "gray hackle?"
It may be heresy In angling to sug
gest that a "fly" should smell like a
fly. These scientific experiments show
how large a part smell plays In the
food pursuit of fish. Bait, such, as
small crabs, was found and eaten by
the fishes two or three times as rap-
Idly when the shells were broken. Bait
placed Inside a gauze bag was smell ed
within three minutes of being lowered
n the water, and almost at the same
time all the fishes began nibbling at
the bag. When cotton was stuffed In Into
to Into Its so-called "nostrils' the dogfish
would seldom observe the food that
came near them. If they saw other
dogfish eating, those whose nostrils
were stuffed would Join them and take
a share In the feast, but when kept to
themselves they starved in the midst
of plenty. Chicago Herald.
SKETCHING, AT THE FRONT
Exploding Shell Spoils Artist's Work,
but He Frantically Proceeds
With New Subject.
After the battle of Neuve-Chapelle a
few correspondents, Including Elser of
the Associated Press and myself, were
taken by the British to see the ruins
of the town which they had just cap captured.
tured. captured. In our party was Matania, an
Italian sketch artist, whose' work. In
the London illustrated weeklies has
been considered the best that has ap appeared
peared appeared during the war; It was a
cloudy day, and in the late afternoon
a rainbow appeared over the shattered
village, framing it like a proscenium
arch a stage setting. Matania,, in hot
enthusiasm, began to sketch the? scene,
when a three-inch shell whistled its
way to a spot near by and burst. The
explosion drenched the party In mud
and half covered Matanla's drawing.
With an Italian expletive, the artist
tore up the drawing and began vio
lently to sketch the shell-burst as the
fresh memory of It appeared in his
mind's eye. A second and a third shell
fell near the party, and the British of
ficer ordered us to move on to another
part of the line, as the Germans had
undoubtedly found our range.
At dinner that night Matania; rum
pling his hair with excited hands, sud
denly shouted: "Fool that I ami Why
didn't I save that mud-covered drawing
and have It published to show how
near I came to being killed today 1"
William G. Shepherd in Everybody's.
Aluminum Can Now Be Soldered.
The great drawback to the use of
aluminum for industrial purposes has
hitherto been that once broken or
cracked it could be mended only by
riveting or welding, a costly process,
for there has been no way of solder
ing the metal. At last, however, a
solder has been found that seems to
remedy this defect. This has been
tested by the advisory panel of" scien scientific
tific scientific experts In the British ministry of
munitions and reported upon so favor
ably that the comptroller of munitions
has called It to the attention of the
Woolwich arsenal and other munition
makers in England. T
The inventor has not made public
the formula, but states that it lsmere-
ly an alloy of common metals, blended
In certain proportions and applied In
the ordinarv wav with a torch. He
shows a series of photographs of a
large aluminum casting with a great
piece being broken out of it being
patched on, soldered and then filed
down smooth.
For welding aluminum a temperature
of more than 900 degrees Fahrenheit
Is necessary ; 350 degrees suffice for
soldering.
Industries in Germany.
Notwithstanding that the two great
war loans of 1913 absorbed ofer 21,
000,000,000 marks, more capital went
Into German commercial companies
than in 1915. The total amount ab absorbed
sorbed absorbed by new and old companies was
616,800,000 marks. This was 148,000,
000 marks more than for 1915, but It
was 529,000,000 less than for 1913.
Tiio now concerns established last
year were chiefly of the war Industry
class: and this is also true of capital
Increases by existing companies.
Largest Bridge In World.
a hridire nrolected between San
Francisco and Oakland will be the
lartroot nf Its trlnd in the world. It
will cost more than $2,000,000 and will
carry three roadways and four rail
road tracks. The supports will consist
of 16 spans, two of which will be large
enough to allow the passage beneath
them of any ship entering San Fran
Cisco harbor.
Japan on the Sea.
The Nippon" Yusen Kaisha, Japan's
largest steamship company, announces
net profits amounting to about $MW
000 during the first half of the year
1916. This is about $3,800,000 more
than the profits during the previous
six months. A dividend of 28 per cent
will be declared at a meeting of the
stockholders this month.
ALL-AROUND SQUARE MEALS
Let the Good Fairy serve you an
all-around square meal. 2t
i Gerig's Drug Store will be closed
tomorrow from 4:30 p. m. until after
the patriotic pageant is over.
The largest line of bathing caps in
the city all shades, shapes and col
ors. The Court Pharmacy, 15-tf

I7hy Suffer With

E232SESS3 1 JL pla-

The Newest Discovery in GhettHstry.
'Eminent Medical authorities Endorso It.
A New Remedy for Kidney, Bladder and all Uric Acid Troubles.
Doctor Eberle and Doctor Braithwaite as well as Doctor Simon all distin distinguished
guished distinguished authors agree that whatever may be Cthe disease, the urine seldom fails in

by Doctor Pierce. Dr. Pierce's Favorite Prescription for weak women and
Dr. Pierce's Golden Medical Discovery for the blood have been favorably known
for the past forty years and more.0 They are standard remedies to-day, as well as
Dr. Pierce's Pleasant Pellets for the liver and bowels. You can have a large trial
package of any of the above remedies for. ten cents by writing Dr. Pierce. 3

His Choice.
Uncle Hiram from Podunk, was
taken by his nephew into a downtown
hashery for lunch.
T guess m have some coffee and
sinkers," said the nephew.
"Did you say sinkers?" asked the old
man.
"I sure did, uncle."
"Well," said Uncle Hiram, as his eye
fell on a spaghetti eater, "I reckon I'll
have a mess of fishin lines like that
there feller Is eatin' out of a bowl.
One Disadvantage of Wealth.
"'Pears to me," said Uncle Eben,
"dat 'stid o' wealth bringin' happiness,
It compels folks to go to a heap o'
parties where dar ain't a chance of
deir injoyin deirse'fs."
Apple Cleaner.
A new electrical contrivance for
cleaning apples before they are packed
for shipment, Is said to clean thor
oughly one carload of apples in a
day.
When Home Beckons to Pa.
If pa is carrying the baby he Is
ready to go home. He tells wife she
can get the balance of the things tomorrow.-
Fort Worth Star-Telegram.
Matrimonial Felicity.
Lucky is the man who marries a
good cook, for he may find that his
wife Is able, to bake the kind of pies
his mother tried to make.
Share Your Joys.
Grief can take care of itself ; but to
get the full value of a joy you must
have- somebody to divide it with,
Mark Twain.
Daily Thought.
The mind of man Is Improved by
learning and reflection. We place a
happy life In tranquility of mind.
Cicero.
.,-The Present Age.
We live in an age In which superflu
us ideas abound and essential ideas
are lacking. Joubert.
Neatly Countered.
"Before I married you, you said you
bad money." "See what one gets for
lying!" Puck.
Odd Numbers.
A hen is always given an odd num
ber of eggs to be hatched.. Why?
There Is no reason at all except su
perstition.
Salutes from warships, forts, et,
are always given In odd numbers, yet
no valid reason can be adduced. It is
a remnant of the old "odd numbers are
lucky" superstition.
Virgil records all sorts of charms
and spells practiced round odd num
bers never even ones. Seven Is the
favorite biblical number, and old di
vines taught that It held a mystical
perfection. It Is an odd number..
Falstaff, In the "Merry Wives," Is
entrapped for the third time. He him
self said : "They say there 13 a divln
ity In odd numbers," because of the old
belief In odd numbers.
Physicians of other days always In
sisted that "bleedings" should be in
odd numbers one, three, five, etc- and
never an even one. London Mail.
"Unclassified" ads bring results.
Do You Want a
A Good Seven Room House for
1100
Payments only $10 per month. See
L. JI. MURRAY
Room 5 Holder Block. Ocala, Fla.

Backache, Kidneys

furnishing us with a clue to the principles upon which
it is to be treated, and accurate knowledge concerning
the nature of disease can thus be obtained. If backache,
scalding urine or frequent urination bother or distress
you, or if uric acid in the blood has caused rheumatism,
gout or sciatica, or you suspect kidney or bladder trouble
just write DOCTOR PlERCE, at the Surgical Institute,
Buffalo, N. Y. ; send a sample of urine and describe
symptoms'. You will receive free medical advice after
"Dr. Pierce's chemist has examined the specimen, which
will be carefully done without charge, and you will be
under no obligation. Doctor Pierce, during many years
of experimentation has discovered a new remedy which
he finds is thirty-seven times more potent than lithia in
removing uric acid froirue system. If you are suffering
from backache or pains Vf rheumatism, go to your best
druggist and ask for a 50-cent box of Anurtc 11 put up

We Have the Equipment and Ability
To serve you as you ought to be servied, and when you are not let us
ask you again, to let us know, for thi? is the only way we can accomplish
ur desire. .
. Of course, sometimes, little things go wrong, but they are not inten
tional, and, if you will call us up, they will be corrected IMMEDIATELY.

caj
Ice &
-
PHONE 24

From Jacksonville to

New York and return... $38.00
Baltimore and return ... $33.90
Philadelphia and return. $36.00
Washington and return.. $34.00

Through tickets to all Eastern resorts, with return limit October
31, 1917, with privilege of stopovers at principal points. Sailings
from Jacksonville via Savannah direct to Balitmore Wednesday and
Saturday. To Philadelphia via Savannah Thursday.
Steamships Suwannee and Somerset have staterooms de luxe with
baths, also shower rooms, hot a and cold, fresh and salt. Runnig
water in all rooms. Wireless telegraph on all ships. Accommoda Accommodations
tions Accommodations unsurpassed. Reservations, fare or any information cheerful cheerfully
ly cheerfully furnished on application.
MERCHANTS & MINERS TRAHSPORTATION COMPANY

H. C. Avery, Agent.

Tickets on sale July 6, 7 and 8. Final limit to return July 20th.
' VIA

ATLANTIC

STANDARD RAILROAD OF THE SOUTH

EW YORK
n

Only Direct Line from Jacksonville
Fare Includes Meals and Stateroom Berth
Tickets Now on Sale. 5ood on Any Ship.
Final Return Limit October 31st.
CHARLESTON EXCURSIONS
Write for schedule and further particulars.
H. G. WENZEL, Florida Passenger Agent
327 East Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida.

W'Or rrff-g-t-J COVERED

AUTO

TRUCK

Dealers in

Ft ME

Collier Bros.

or Elheumatis

PaeMfitcfj C
OCALA, FLA.

EM TOUMIST FAEES

Savannah and return.... $ G.00
Boston and return ..... $45.00
Atlantic City and return $38.25
Niagra Falls and return. $48.90

Jacksonville, Florida
J. F. WARD, T. P. A-, L. D. JONES, C. A.

And
ItiFIl
AST Lid

ail

MM

WHITE STAR LINE

TRANSFER IS

VANS
STCD1AGE
SERVICE
LITHIA
WATER
mt 208

II m



OCALA EVENING STAR, WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 1917

X

! ;
J 'I J"
I
!5

1 ,'

lie Commercial

Bank

OCALA. FLORIDA

. CAPITAL STOCK $50,000.00.
Slate, County and City Depository.

THE WINDSOR HOTEL

JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA

1S( S-

- ' A,

t I

T '!.' Jfe- mJ '! -f

-

in the Heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in each room. Dining rooro rvlke is
fcond to none.
RATES From $1.50 per day per person to $G.(k.
ROBERT M. MEYER, J. E. KA VANAUGH
Proprietor. Manager.

t Si UNEXCELLED r'
VUR JOB PRINTING Department is X
, thoroughly equipped for all kinds' -.
of commercial Printing. Our facilities
, for handling
lllyp1' PAMPHLETS, BOOKLETS. PROGRAMS. 1.
V WEDDING and BUSINESS L
- -.-A -V ANNOUNCEMENTS S
and all kinds of lr
OFFICE STATIONERY 'V
J Unsurpassed in Central Florida. i.
p F F I C I E N T Workmanship, High tV
Quality Paper, Prompt Service and Jf
;f Living Prices are some of our reasons
for asking an opportunity to serve you.
JOB PRINTING :
w-L- TELEPHONE, FIVE-ONE (51) T-

at Belleview this morning, and will
return this afternoon in time to at at-terKfour
terKfour at-terKfour own festivities.

If Yoa Have Any New for thij De Department,
partment, Department, Call Two-One-Five
or Five-One Y

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE
High Moral, Intellectual Standards
Liberal Arts Law, Agriculture, Engi Engineering,
neering, Engineering, Education, Graduate School.
Send for catalogue and views.
A. A. Murphree, Pres.

STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN
TALLAHASSEE
College of the Highest Rank
Liberal Arts, Education, Music, Ex Expression,
pression, Expression, Physical Education, Art,
Home Economics. Write for catalogue
and views. Edw. Conradi, Pres.

Read the Star Want Ads It pays

Hymn of Freedom
Unfurl the flag of freedom,
Fliner far the bucle hlast!

There comes a sound of marching

t rom out the mighty past.
Let every peak and valley
Take up the valiant cry:
Where, beautiful as morning,
Our banner cuts the sky.

Free-born to peaee and justice,

We stand to eaard and save

The liberty of manhood,

lhe faith our lathers cave.

Then soar aloft, Old Glory,

And tell the waiting breeze
No law but Right and Mercy
Shall rule the Seven Seas.
No hate is in pur anger,
No vengeance in our wrath,
We hold the line of freedom
Across the tyrant's path.
Where'er oppression vounted
We loose the sword once more

To stay the feet of conquest,

And pray an end or war.
Mary Perry King in Collier's.

Mrs. H. S. Minshall and little Miss I

Natalie left last Sunday for Savan Savannah,
nah, Savannah, for a month's visit to Mrs. Min-
shall's sister, Mrs. J. B. Loyal.
daughters, Misses Blanche and Olive,
and Miss Elizabeth Davis expect to
motor to Daytona Sunday for a
week's visit.
Miss Loureen Spencer has returned
home from a delightful two weeks
visit to Mrs. M. G. Porter in Jackson Jacksonville.
ville. Jacksonville. Miss Spencer also visited
friends in Lake City.
Mrs. John Taylor came up from the
lake this morning to attend the fourth
of July pageant. She will return to
the lake late this afternoon accom accompanied
panied accompanied by Miss Mary McDowell who
will be her guest for the remainder of
the week.
Meeting of King's Daughter
There will be an important meeting
of the King's Daughters at the Meth Methodist
odist Methodist church at four o'clock Thursday
afternoon. All members are special specially
ly specially requested to be present, as there
i3 urgent business to be attended to.
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Edwards arid
children are visiting Mrs. Edwards'
parents, Mr. and Mrs. V. P. Smith at
Wacahoota.
Miss Mignon Perez arrived from
Jacksonville today for a visit to Miss
Isabelle Davis. ..
Mrs. Otto Mente and little daugh

ter have returned to their home in

Jacksonville after a short visit to

Mrs. Mente's parents, Mr. and Mrs.
R. E. Yonge. They were accompanied

by Mrs. Yonge, who will visit them
for a week.

MrsrR. A. Purdom left yesterday

for. a visit to her little sons at the

home of their grandmother in Geor

gia.

Miss Agnes Ellen Harris of Talla

hassee left last night for Arcadia af

ter a short visit to 'Mrs. J. R. Moor-

head.

Mr." Edgar Hillary Price of Willis-

ton has joined Mrs. Price and little
daughter at the home of Mrs. P. W.

Whiteside for several days.
.-
Mrs. Claude E. Nelson and two lit little
tle little sons of Jacksonville have arrived
in Ocaal for a several weeks' visit to
relatives. They are now the guests of
Mrs. Nelson's sister, Mrs. R. O. Con Connor.
nor. Connor. Mr. and Mrs. T. T. Williams motor motored
ed motored from Jacksonville late yesterday
afternoon for a several days visit to
Mrs. Williams' brother, Mr. Loring
Bracken at the Harrington. Mrs.
Williams is most pleasantly remem remembered
bered remembered here as Miss Eileen Bracken.
Mr. and Mrs. Z. C. Chambliss, Mr.

J. M. Thomas and Mr. Joe Borden

attended the 4th of July celebration

In Honor of Mrs. W. J. Frink
Mrs. Eugene G. Peek will entertain
at auction at 4 o'clock Thursday aft afternoon
ernoon afternoon at her pretty home on Okla Okla-waha
waha Okla-waha avenue in honor of Mrs. W. J.
Frink of Jacksonville, formerly Miss
Mettie Mclver of this city.
Notice

The Missionary Society of the
Methodist church will meet at nine
o'clock Thursday morning at the
church. A full attendance is desir desired
ed desired as all reports must be in and mail mailed
ed mailed on July 5th.
Mrs. Richard McConathy, Pres.
m m
Library Closed Today
The Ocala public library is closed
today on account of the fourth.
Mr. Emmett Crook and Mr. Rich Richard
ard Richard Dewey are spending the day at
Fairy Island.
The friends of Mrs. H. A. Daviess
are sorry to hear she has been quite
ill for several days.
m
Mr. James Ieslie of Panasoffkee,
came up today to spend the week-end
with Mr. and Mrs. F. G. B. Weihe.
(Continued on iasi Page)

MISTAKE HARD TO CONDONE

Excursion Rates
VIA

On Sale Daily May 15 to October 15.
Return Limit October 31
NEW YORK $42.05
PHILADELPHIA 40.05
BALTIMORE 37.95
WASHINGTON 37.20
BUFFALO 53.90
ATLANTIC CITY 42.55
ASHEVILLE 23.20
HENDERSONVILLE 22.30
CHICAGO 47.80
DETROIT 48.05

ELK'S CONVENTION
BOSTON, MASS. $46.20
Date of sale July 5, 6 and 7. Final
limit July 20, 1917.

PHONE 129 PHONE 129
CITY TICKET OFFICE
JOHN BOISSEAU, C. P. & T. A.

Evening Star
Unclassified
Ads.
?ring
Results

RATES Twenty-five words
or less one time 25 cents;
three times 50 cents; six
times 75 cents. Over twenty-five
words, and under fif fifty,
ty, fifty, double above rate.
This rate is for consecutive
insertions. Special rate by
the month. Try them out.
PHONE

It May Be Set Down as Certain That

Neighbor Will Never Borrow
Money From Perkins.
Some people keep gramophones as a
hobby ; some do it on purpose. I live at
the Nook, situated In a quiet avenue. I
have lived here for two weeks, but
when I came I didn't know they had a
gramophone let loose.
The house next door to me is called
the Retreat. From nine in the morn morning
ing morning until the last car home there comes
from this house the sound of an oboe,
a D-flat piccolo, two more piccolos,
more D-flat than usual, a concertina In
the last stages of croup, the bagpipes,
and the clarionet disguised as bronchial
catarrh.
Wnat did Edison want to Invent such
things for? One of these days I shall
write him a Jolly stiff note about it.
I ask you, what would you do if you
were writing an article on "The Eco Economical
nomical Economical Aspect of the Black Beetle's
Patella as Compared With the Phys Physiology
iology Physiology of the Gnat Fly," and then to be
greeted with Information that it is still
a considerable distance to Tipperary?
The matter Is fast becoming serious.
Only the other morning when I came
downstairs I found our cat lying dead
with cotton wool In each ear. I cannot
Set anything to grow In the garden.
The other day I decided upon action.
I said to Perkins, who lives at the Re Retreat,
treat, Retreat, when I saw him In his garden:
"Do you want to sell your gramo gramo-prone,
prone, gramo-prone, Perkins?"
"Gramophone?" he said. "That isn't
a gramophone. That's my daughter
singing. Got a good voice, don't you
think? Writes good poetry, too. I
ought to get some advice for her, don't
you think?"
"Yes," I said. "You ought to see a
doctor. Perhaps a piece of bone is
pressing on the brain I"
Perkins doesn't speak to me any
more. London Answers.

RADIO MEN GETTING SCARCE

Ships In American Ports Are Delayed
Because Wireless Operators
Fear the Submarines..
There Is a shortage of first-class
wireless telegraph operators, and, In
some Instances recently, boats leaving
American ports have been held up un until
til until a man could be found.
A few days ago a boat bound for an
English port wanted an operator bad badly.
ly. badly. The place was offered to two
Philadelphia operators, but they hesi hesitated
tated hesitated at taking chances with German
submarines, and the master of the
craft was forced to pick up a gallant
soul from New York, who agreed to
make the trip. Wireless operators on
cargo boats get from $40 to $60 a
month and their keep.

Build Vast Artificial Lake.
A remarkable engineering feat was
recently accomplished in southern
India when the mammoth artificial
lake of Marikanave was completed in
Mysore an Indian state twice as
large as Maryland, ruled by an en enlightened
lightened enlightened and progressive maharaja. It
is 18 miles long and has an area of SO
square miles. The dam thrown across
the gorge 240 feet wide to impound
water that formerly ran to waste and
is now being utilized for irrigating
land that would be otherwise parched
and barren, is 1,330 feet long, 162 feet
high, and 15 feet thick. A weir 470
feet long has been built to discharge
excess water, which, during the mon monsoon
soon monsoon is heavy. The work was initiat initiated
ed initiated and finished by Indian engineers
and is a monument to their engineer engineering
ing engineering skill, as It Is a credit to the gov government
ernment government of his highness, the maharaja,
who furnished the money for It $1,
500,000.

Instantaneous Hot Water.
The "thermo-faucet" Is the name
of a new invention designed to
bring a supply of hot water from the
most stubbornly cold spigot within a
few seconds. It Is. a 660-watt elec electric
tric electric heater which is readily at attached
tached attached to the plumbing piping, and
when connected with the nearest elec electric
tric electric lighting outlet heats the water In
the faucet to the boiling point three
seconds after the current is turned on.
The water coming through this heater
Is pure, we are told, and may there therefore
fore therefore beTised "where ordinary tank wa water
ter water would not be sufficiently sanitary."
Hence It should prove a boon to doc-,
tors, dentists, trained nurses, confec confectioners,
tioners, confectioners, as well as to the long-suffering
male who prefers but seldom gets
hot, water for his shave.
Advertise in the Star.

?!

tl

m

'5.

mm

Whsrc

" m mm

I You Can -Save Money

& Ru I nnkino Arminri

i

At The Savoy Cafe you will find the Most Reason
able Prices, the Coolest and Most Comfortable

Dining Room and the Quickest bervice m the city. g

'M Dinner 35c,

SMIOY

...

(A I?"

y i

1rl-il TIIr Ce 99

.

!x; Commercial Bank Building. Ocala, Fla.

' m vv v "-

E J. METRE. PROP.

lis now a universally acknowledged necessity. No business man 13
prepared to meet the daily affairs of his business if he is not pro- It
A A i 2 t

FIRE INSURANCE

We represent not only the best fire insurance companies, but
also the highest class INDEMNITY AND BONDING concerns in
the world. Talk is over with us.

n VII nAUIC AGENCY

u. m. unvid, Holder

OCALA, FLA.

SEABOARD LOCAL SCHEDULE

Southbound
No. 9 Leaves Jacksonville 1:20 p.

m.; Ocala 4:15 p. m. Arrives Tampa,

7:35 p. m.

No. 1 Leaves Jacksonville 9:30 p.

m.; Ocala, 1:45 a, m. Arrives St. Pe Petersburg,
tersburg, Petersburg, 7:45 a. m.

No. 3 Leaves Jacksonville 9:30 a.

m.; Ocala 12:59 p. m.

Northbound
No. 10 Leaves Tampa at 1 p. m.;
Ocala, 4:15 p. m. Arrives Jackson

ville, 7:15 p. m.

No. 2 Leaves Tampa 9 p. m.;

Ocala, 1:55. a. m. Arrives Jackson

ville, 6:45 a. m.
No. 4 Leaves Tampa, 9:10 a. m.;
arrive Ocala 1:10 p. m.; arrive Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville 5:10 p. m.

Let us fit your car up with the

famous GOODRICH TIRES. There
are none better. Blalock Bros., 107

Oklawaha avenue. 6-8-tf

PLUMBING AND

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING

When von have nlumbins' or elec

trical contracting let us furnish tou

estimates. No job too large and none

too small, tf, 11. W. Tucker.

TEAM OF MULES FOR RENT

A good heavy team of mules with
driver to rent by the day or week.
Apply to Box 374 or Star ofSce. 26-7t
W. K. Lane, Thysician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat. Law Library Building, Ocala,
Florida. tf

leiver 'l laelai

UNDERTAKERS and EKIDALQERS
PHONES 47, 104, 205
OCALA, FLORIDA

THE

ipoN'T UKE ME NEW)
f SUiTeuT I'VE A
'HUNCH I'M GOt4Nf J
BE TH' Bl6 tt (
-4 rOJSE WID tHV

HSftE I m ALL

Polled up ah Wip

A HAN DRILL OF

MAZUMA tti ME KCK-

nttEN TO COMPLtTS

TH PCTUffE.'

' : -'r' jut

FARMERS HEED RAIH BUT
HIKE IS HO FARMER

If

mm

292

HULLY GEE-HEffE'5

FINE NOTE TH' CLOUDS
ARB BEGINNW lb LEK
l'fJ f HALF A Wl-
FffoM HCMB AN' No CAR5

m ei&HT.

. i i if-. I t rrriT A

CARE .016 UIT ft 1 1

IS OENOINB WOOL W J :

NOT To QHRtrtK: J

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if m y s

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if pese cLcrrHE& continues
To 6Hf?fK AT ViS f?ATE I'LL
BE LUCKY To CrVT HOME

WIPOOT BElN' Ar?E6TP FER (

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PAGE FOUR

OCALA EVENING STAR, WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 1917

mm
Masons meet Thursday evening.
Mr. R. O. Connor is spending a
few days in Tampa at the Bay View
hotel.
The rain is falling today on the just
and the unjust, but mostly on the un unjust,
just, unjust, because there are more of them.
If we printed our opinion of
the
weather clerk, it would cause the pa
per to be excluded from the mails
We should have thoueht that Ban-
tist gathering at Lake City would
have taken all the wet weather "with
it
Mr. Edwin Spencer Jr. of Lakeland
was in town this morning, on his way
to Belleview, where he will deliver the
fourth of July oration.
A telephone message from Belle
view at 10 o'clock this morning an
nounced that hundreds of people I
were coming in to attend tne great
in oi juiy ceieprauon tnere uay.
The line-up of the Williston base
ball team is as follows: Wynn, c;
Bartley, p; Epperson,
2ndb; Schmidt, 3rdb;
lsb; Crosby,
Reddick, if; f
Wallace, cf; T. Bartley, rf; Taylor, ss.
Uncle Joe Shuford. who has sold
his place out on the Silver Springs
boulevard, is going down to Camp's
dam on the Withlacoochee, to visit hi&

iStfl

son. Mr. John Shuford. enerineer. atlas errand marshal. The following

that big industrial plant.
The following party of Lakeland
r-eoDle. in two cars, oassed thru town
this morning, in order to attend the
Baptist encampment in Lake City:
Mrs. Adelaide Rogers, Misses Smith,
DavisMyrtle Wear, Nina Childs and
Frieda Rogers, Rev Wallace Wear and
Mr. A. C. Carver.
The Boy Scouts, under the tutelege
of Rev. BunyapStephens, had a well
attended meeting at the library last
evening. Thirty-one were present, of
whom nine passed examination as
tenderfoot scouts. The others will
take examination later. The "ten-
derfeet" will go in a few days on a
hike to "Heartsease." ont on Silver
Springs run, and camp there for the
night.
The flag bought by students of the
high school, but which did not arrive
in time to be used this term, came the
other day and was taken charge of by
Principal Cassels. Mr. Cassels loaned
the flag to the fire department, to be
hoisted on the public square today. It
is a beautiful flag and will oe greatly
admired by the people if the ram will
allow it to stay up long enough for
them to see it.
The officers and members of the
Ocala lodge of Odd Fellows have been
invited to go to Inverness tomorrow
night to attend and aid in the in
stallation of the officers of "Growing
perous town. Noble Grand Andrews,
and Secretary Colbert will go with
their cars and as many as they can
carry, and there may be others.
If the ducks had only issued a dec
laration of independence 141 years
aero, wnat ceieDrauon tney couia nave
.
The aUraction at the Temple this
fi. ic TV, Hniirl- a V toino
., , umii
Diue-riDDon ieaiure. ii.arie vvuuaras
4.1. i, j ;.
is the star of the cast, and it is a live
picture.
Rio Use Wearing
A Shiny Palm Beach Suit
7 ,.mrip-
9 iU'm
i
We clean and press them with
out the use of smoothing irons.
Let us send for yours.
i rAAAM I Awm, I
OCOlQ btCOni LOUIlury
Just Phone 101
Let Us Submit You
Designs on
CEMETERY WORK
MARBLE OR GRANITE
We can save you money,
whether, it be a large or small
Memorial you contemplate pur purchasing.
chasing. purchasing. CCAIA MARBLE WORKS
OCALA, FLORIDA

THE WEATIIER

At 10 a. m. we had some rain:
At 11 o'clock it rained again;
At the noonday hour it rained some
more;
At 1 there was another pour.
At 2 o'clock some more rain fell,
At 3 o'clock it poured like h -.
And so at the close of this 4th of July
No acre of Marion's soil is dry.
As the A. C. L. switch engine was
towing a train of cars past the Star
office at 4 p. m. yesterday, a cylinder
head blew off off the engine, not the
Star. There was, a loud report, and
everybody in the SCar shop thought a
zeppelin had dropped a bomb on the
building. Everybody from the car.
ner boys up scattered like a hock oi
chickens. The paper was on the press
at the time and the editor at once be
gan looking around to see if there
f 1 t. : nf Ant
was enouS ;"-"- 1Ci" w V
an eXlTa. A ne uusuieas uiauaci saiu,
Well, if I'm dead, I won't have to
raise money to pay off this crew of
pirates Saturday night.". Jim, the
orAnre-A nressman. dived under the
press and wouldn't come out until ev
erybody else came and told him they
,. m the cylinder head
, ftflr it tried see how close it
. Ppvtnn Raiiev. who was
u w
quietly sitting in the door of the Max
vell garage. The engine, which could
still work on one side,, pulled its cars
mto the yard and the excitement sub-
sided.
In spite of the rain, Tulula Lodge,
I. O. O. F., met in its hall last night
and installed officers for the ensuing
term. District Deputy Colbert offU.
dated and was aided by Jake Brown
were installed: Oscar Andrews, IN. U.:
D. E. -Busier, V. G.; W. L. -Colbert,
secretary; Fred Burden, warden; C.
W. Moremen. I. G.: Albert Luff man,
O. G.J Perry Anthony, conductor; J.
P. Phillips, chaplain; Jake Brown, K.
S. N. G.; C. K. Sage, L. S. N. G.; M.
M. Carter, R. S. V. G.; L. H. Pillans
L. S. V. G.; Charles Simmons, K. to.
S.; W. T. Whitley, L. S. S.
Mr. C. W. Hunter is making a great
success out of the delicatessen store
he has established next door to the
Ocala House restaurant
The Williston boys came over this
morning and engaged the Ocala bal
team at Hunter Park. Three and a
half innines were played and the
score was one and one when rain
slopped the game. The boys will play
a earn this afternoon if the weather
will let them. As the Star goes to
press they are considering putting on
their bathing suits and having a game
of water polo.
jf the rain doesn't break it up, the
Dae.eant on the public square this af t-
ernoon win be the prettiest thing of
the sort ever seen in Ocala.
Messrs. C. E. Connor, B. F. Condon
and C. F. Flippen are going to Crys
tal River today to try and land a tar tarpon
pon tarpon apiece.
Old man Hyman was lazy during
the traditional month of June, but it
looks llke he u make UP for lost
time during July
SOME GOOD ADVICE
7 AZl 'n
' of backachej
, v A.B
headache, dizziness or urinary disor-
UCI i, UU 611UU1U glVC WIC vy vv.aiv.v
kidneys prompt attention. ,Eat httle
I ""-"
lia Die Kianey tonic, inere s no omer
, ., t ,
kidney medicine so well recommended
,
as Doan's Kidney Pills. Ocala people
rely on them. Here's one of the many
statements from Ocala people.
C. C. French, carpenter, KT3 W.
Sanchez street, says: "Doan's Kid
ney, fills ma me more gooa tnan
anything else I ever used. I had been
having attacks of backache and trou
ble with my kidneys for some time.
It made me feel miserable-and. run
down in health. As soon as I used
Doan's Kidney Pills, I got relief. I
have relied on this medicine .ever
since."
Price 50c. at all dealers. Don't
simply ask for a kidney remedy get
Doan's Kidney rms tne same tnat
Mr. French had. -Foster-Milburn Co.,
Prons.. Buffalo. N. Y. Adv. 7
NOTICE OF INSTITUTION
OF SUIT BY ATTACHMENT
Leesbure State Bank, a Florida Cor
poration, Plamtm, vs. N.-U. iong,
In the Circuit Court, Marion county
Assumpsit, Damages $300.
To N. G. Long, N. G. Long, Trustee
and Long Blue Granite Company, a
Corporation, and all persons inter
ested:
Notice is hereby given to the above
named parties, and each of them, and
named parties, and eacn oi tnem, and
to all persons interested, that the
Leesburff State Bank, a Florida cor
poration, plaintiff, has instituted s
suit of attachment against N. G
Long, N. G. Long, trustee, and Long
Blue Granite Company, defendants in
the above styled court, on the 1st day
of June, 1917, the writ of attachment
being levied upon the following de
scribed land in Marion county, Jb lor
ida, to-wit: E of se& of section
28, township 17 south, range 25 east.
You. N. G. Loner, ri. fcr. Long, trus
tee. and Lone: Blue Granite Company
and all other persons interested are
hereby required to appear in said ac
tion on the rule day in August, 1517
the same being the
7th day of August, 1917.
Given under my hand and seal of
said court, this the 6th day of June
A. D. 1917.
(Seal) P. H. Nugent,
Clerk Circuit Court, Marion County
Florida. By Ruth Ervin, D. C.
L. W. Duval,
Attorney for Plaintiff. 6-6-9t-wed
'Advertise in the Star.

ftfini n onnini nrrnmo

h mn a i m m ma

UUI1LII UUUU1L III I IIIHU

(Continued from Third Page

Fosnot-Johnson
A wedding of more than usual in
terest took place in this city Sunday
afternoon at 2:30 when Mr. Robert L.
Fornot of Eastlake led to the altar
Miss Sarah V. Johnson of Fort Pierce,
Dr. N. B. O'Kelly, pastor of the First
Baptist church, officiating. The cere ceremony
mony ceremony took place at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. C. C. Myers, 205 Arlington
street, uncle and aunt of the bride.
The contracting parties to this
marriage are deaf mutes, and in get getting
ting getting their consent to the marriage
vows the minister had to let each one
read the questions propounded and
signify their acceptance by signs as
he was unable to communicate with
them. The groom is a marine engi
neer, and the bride who is at attrac attractive
tive attractive young lady, graduated last year
from the school for the deaf and dumb
at St. Augustin.
The couple entered the parlor to
the strains of the wedding march
played by Miss Hattie English, an
aunt of the bride.
Congratulations followed the cere
mony and after serving dainty re
freshments, the happy couple took the
3:80 A. C. L. for Jacksonville, and
will visit St. Cloud, Tampa, St. Pe
tersburg and other points, and will be
at home to their friends in Eastlake
alter. July 18.
The bride loked very pretty in a
white organdie, and carried an arm
j bouquet of bride roses. Her going
away dress was of mustard colored
silk, with white trimmings and acces accessories
sories accessories to match.
.'
Mrs. W. T. Burton and son, Marvin,
vent to Ocala yesterday where they
will be the guests of Miss Eunice Bray
for a few days Gainesville Sun.
1
After pleasant visits to friends in
Alabama and Kentucky, Miss Mar Marguerite
guerite Marguerite Porter has entered on her
9
music studies in North-Western Uni
versity, Evanston, 111.
Mrs. A. L. Bureess has returned
home from a visit to Miss Angie Dor
many at Plant City.
SHADY
' Shady, July 3. Mr. and Mrs. J. H.
Knoblock drove over from Martin
Saturday and carried Mrs. Knoblock's
mother, Mrs. Carl Buhl back to Mar Martin
tin Martin for a few days' visit. Those Mar
tin neonle iust fairly beam with pros
perity as the buzzing of automobiles
and the other things that go with
them testify.
Mr. Will Leak, George Leak and
Ebbie Hugh Douglas have gone to
Gum Swamp this week on a camping
and fishing trip.'
Mr. J. E. T. Gaskms is doing a
land office business" selling sweet
potato vines just now, having sold
$160 worth off of less than an acre,
and still on the job. Now what will
the potatoes bring?
Mr. and Mrs. Nasri are enjoying a
visit from Mrs. Nasri's mother -and
brother, who have just arrived from
Mexico.
Sunday is the regular preaching day
here. Kev. Strickland win preacn in
the morning at 11 o'clock and in the
evening at 7:30. Everybody is invit invited.
ed. invited.
Dr. Gross will preach at the school
house at 3:30 p. m. Everybody wel welcome.
come. welcome. Preaching Sunday is a good day to
use up some of those toasted bread
crumbs you are supposed to be sav saving,
ing, saving, Sample each variety of canned
goods you have put up and not cook
more than necessary and take your
family and go to all the preaching
services. Try it next Sunday.
Mr. Otis Gaskin and Miss Mabel
Hogan were married last Sunday
morning in Ocala at the home of Mr
and Mrs. Jim Brown, Dr. Bunyan
btephens omciating.
Shady will be represented at the
Belleview fourth of July celebration,
also in Ocala.
We are listening for more weddiner
bells as the little bird has told us we
might. None of our newly weds are
moving away from Shady, tho'.
Buy your drugs from the Rexall
store it if alwnys the best drug
store. tf
The largest line of bathing caps in
the city all shades, shapes and col
ors. The Court Pharmacy. 15-tf
UNCLASSIFIED ADS.
WANTED, LOST, FOUND. FOB
SALE. FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS
FOR SALE Five-room cottage in the
second ward; modern improvements.
Part cash, balance terms. A splendid
proposition. Address "Owner", care
Star office. 7-3-3t.
FOR RENT Four or five large rooms
on first floor. Room far garden. Ap-
ly Mrs. H. S. Wesson, corner 8th and
Orange Ave., Monday or Tuesday. 3t
T S T f A T-t -w mt
r un aALiu fine jersey milk cow
Mrs. H. S. Wesson. 30-3t
WANTED Information as to where
a copy of "Tragedies of Oakhurst"
can be had. Address, "H. H. C," care
Star.
30-3t
POTATO VINES FOR SALE 200,?
000 pure Porto Ricas for immediate
delivery, $2 per thousand. Address
box 43, or Berry Carter, Ocala. 29-6t
FOR RENT Furnished liouse with
all modern conveniences, on North
Sanchez street. Can give immediate
possession. Apply at Carter's Bak Bakery,
ery, Bakery, or phone 360. 15-tf.

SODA WATER WELLES FOUND

it
Is in the Philippines, and Experts
Declare It Is Carbonized by
Nature.
Many queer thlng3 have been dis discovered
covered discovered by the drill since and before
Colonel Drake discovered that oil
could be obtained by the artesian pro process,
cess, process, but the most unique one is that
recently struck in the Philippines. It
is located in the town of San Fernan Fernando,
do, Fernando, on the island of Ticao. At the
depth of 403 feet an enormous vein of
water was struck, with such a gas
pressure that the volume was thrown
80 feet In the air. It was only by ex exerting
erting exerting every possible effort that a
small flood was averted. The flow was
finally checked, however, aad the wa
ter directed out and downward
through two small pipes, through
which it continues to rush with un
diminished force.
Samples of the water taken show
that it is heavily charged with car carbonic
bonic carbonic acid gas and appears and tastes
like ordinary soda water, but analysis
is not yet completed.
The man in charge of the drilling,
who has had 40. years experience in
drilling artesian wells in many parts
of the world, maintains that he has
never seen or heard of the equal of
the Ticao island phenomenon.
WHEN ONE'S LIFE IS SHAPED
Not in the Cradle, But From 12 to 18
Years of Age, Prof. Earl
Barnes Declares.
The hand that rocks the cradle
rules the world?' Nonsense; It only
handles the material. The time of the
shaping of life is from twelve to eight eighteen
een eighteen years old; that Is the formative
period. All great educators know
that," Earl Barnes said in his lecture
on Jean Christophe at Pittsburgh. It
was the last of six studies in genius
given by Mr. Barnes before the Uni University
versity University Extension society.
"Nothing Is more tragic than thee re relation
lation relation of genius to professional life,"
said Mr. Barnes. "Genius is solitary
and individual, can never be fulfilled
until it goes out from the routine and
stays out. If genius were respectable,
like you or me, he would be mediocre
like you or me."
Perfect Watch.
When a part of the Shackleton expe expedition
dition expedition to the Antarctic land was ma marooned
rooned marooned at Elephant island they had
only one timekeeper, and it hung over
a blubber stove for four months, in
the smoky atmosphere of a hut wade
of stray pieces of wood, blocks of ice,
odd bits of canvas and an upturned
boat. But this is only a part of Its
history. The watch belonged to the
man who had charge of the motor
sledges, and it was reported that in
the two and one-half years of the ex
pedition this watch was never altered,
never stopped going and gained just
one minute.
The following incident from an Eng
lish paper shows how important a
chronometer is on an expedition of
this kind.
At one period, in order to accom
plish an arduous march, Sir Ernest
Shackelton told his companions to dis
card all their personal belongings. It
was Imperative to march "light." Sir
Ernest himself set the example by
throwing away .50 sovereigns (per
haps, had they been treasury notes
instead of gold he might have retained
them), and everything else went but
six pairs of sox, one pound 'of tobacco
and one pound of cocoa and the
watch.
Bean-Shooter Minds.
Bean-shooter minds is the latest san
ity to be reported. They are the dis
covery of Dr. George Edgar Vincent,
president of the University of Minne Minnesota
sota Minnesota and president-elect of the Rocke
feller foundation.
Speaking on "Crowd Psychology" in
Chicago "a few evenings ago he said,
among other things : "The truth is,
we are so much alike that we bore each
other almost to distraction.
"Some people have tubular minds,
like bean shooters. You load them at
one end and shoot the contents out of
the other.
"Idiots and children are the only
ones you cannot hypnotize.
"A society for the suppression of the
obvious remark would soon fill a city
block."
Fastidious Fox.
Waldemar Eitingon of New York re recently
cently recently presented a live silver fox to the
Zoological society of St.-Louis. The
animal Is valued at $550. The gift was
hurriedly accepted with profuse expres expressions
sions expressions of thanks which are now in a fair
way to be reconsidered and revised.
The fox refuses to eat ordinary food
and rejects practically everything of offered
fered offered it except fresh eggs. And fresh
eggs are 60 cents a dozen in St. Louis,
scarce and apparently looking up.
Unsentimental Thing.
He There are times when I 5are
nothing for riches when I would not
so much as put forth a hand to re receive
ceive receive millions.
She Indeed! That must be when
you are tired of the world and its
struggles and vanities when your
soul yearns- for higher and nobler
things, is It not?
He No. You're wrong. It's when
Tm asleep.
Cumulative Responsibilities.
"What do you think an extra session
would accomplish?"
"Probably," answered Senator Sor
ghum, "it will dig up material for more
extra sessions." Washington Star.
Let us fit your car up with the
famous GOODRICH TIRES. There
are none better. Blalock Bros., 107
Oklawaha avenue. 6-8-tf
The largest line of bathing caps in
the city all shades, shapes and col
ors. The Court Pharmacy. 15-tf
W. K. Lane, M. D Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat. Law Library Building, Ocala,

Florida. tf

SOUL'S ENTRANCE INTO BODY

Matter Over Which -Theologians Have
Differed Since the First Time a
Theory Was Advanced.
Dr. Austin O'Malley of New York
has just revived the ancient discus discussion
sion discussion concerning the moment the hu human
man human soul enters the body. In an ar
tide in America he contrasts the two
opposite theories: (1) That of Aris
totle, that the soul Is Infused about
the fortieth day, to which St. Thomas
Aquinas, St. Anselm, Sti Alphonsus
Liguori and most of the medieval mor moralists
alists moralists and theologians adhered. (2)
That the entrance of the soul Is simul simultaneous
taneous simultaneous with the fusion of the single
nuclei in the two parental germ cells,
to which most modern embryologists,
physicians and moralists "give their
adhesion.
Cardinal Mercier.- and some other
great theologians cling to the Aristote Aristotelian
lian Aristotelian theory today, basing their belief
on the idea that not until the body
takes actual human form Is the
breath of life" breathed into it and It
becomes "a living souL"
But Doctor O'Malley and the embry
ologists hold that the earliest embryo
is a human being, therefore a body
with a human soul.
SCIENCE AND WAR A UNIT
Members of French Military Expedition
In Balkans Are Devoting Much
Time to Both.
The French military expedition in
the Balkans, following the example of
the armies of Napoleon and Marshal
Maison in carefully preserving and
classifying all objects of archeblogical
interest discovered by the troops, has
gathered data that it is thought will
throw much light on the primitive his history
tory history of Macedonia.
Objects unearthed In trench digging
at the front in Macedonia and in the
construction of field works in the in
trenched camp are assembled at Sa Sa-loniki
loniki Sa-loniki all duly labeled, with full de details
tails details of their discovery.
Organized research Is being done so
farss circumstances permit. Three
flying columns have been sent to cover
particularly interesting regions to
make soundings with a view to the
preparation of archeological charts or
maps.
These columns have already collect collected
ed collected information of inestimable value,
with specimens of poetry, fragments of
ceramics, with data as to the depth at
which they were discovered.
Racial Differences.
A new idea is that races of men may
be differentiated chemically, just as
they are separated by easily seen phy physical
sical physical or anatomical peculiarities of
make-up, hair, skin, etc. In the blood
of Germans a count of 4,570,000 white
corpuscles per cubic millimeter has
been made, while a similar count in the
blood of French has shown an average
of 5,500,000; and it Is believed that
other racial differences quite as notable
will be revealed when a wide compara comparative
tive comparative study shall have been made. The
study as suggested would include the
density of organs, viscosity of the
blood, and the general chemical rela relations
tions relations of the various parts of the body.
It is pointed out that the results might
clear up the mystery of the immunity
of certain races to certain diseases, ex
plain the cat-and-dog antipathies of
same races, and show us why certain
instincts and appetites are so persist
ent in various people. Doctor Barillon
foresees that the chemical test of races
woum even greatly ala in shaplng'im
migration and marriage laws.
Steel for Battleships.
Nearly 15,000 gross tons of steel will
be neededxto build the 66 various new
battleships, destroyers and submarines,
bids for the construction of which were
taken by the United States navy In
October. When these are added to our
navy they will make it one of the most
formidable in the world. Some en
lightening statistics regarding these
naval vessels appear in Popular Me Mechanics
chanics Mechanics Magazine. In each of the four
new battle cruisers there will be 15,025
tons of steel ; in each of the four new
battleships there will be 13,761 tons
of steel ; in the 20 new destroyers, 325
tons of steel each, and in the 30 new
submarines, 186 tons each. A hospital
ship and an ammunition ship will need
4,000 tons of steel each; Taking $70 a
ton as the average price of steel at
present, these vessels mean an outlay
of not less than $10,000,000 for the
steel only.
War on Mosquitoes.
The New Jersey Mosquito Extermin
atlon association has asked the legis
lature of that state to appropriate $100,'
000 for prosecution of scientific war warfare
fare warfare on mosquitoes. This sum will be
supplementary to funds provided by
counties, cities and towns in the state
for the same purpose. "Part of the
work consists in drainage of extensive
salt marshes, filling in lowlands, study studying
ing studying the habits of the insects, oiling
pools, etc It is expected that in the
course of the campaign more than 200,'
000 acres of now useless land where
the insects propagate will be redeemed
and made agriculturally available.
Not Like a Church.
The express elevator In one of the
office buildings flew up to the tenth
floor. Nobody called for a floor num number,
ber, number, nobody spoke.
All at once a timid little voice said:
"Mother, please, may I speak?"
"Ui course, aear, way not? an
swered mother.
"O, it Is not here like in church
then. Isn't it?" came the quite relieved
reply.
PLUMBLXG AND
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING
When you have plumbing or elec
trical contracting,: let us furnish you
estimates. No job too large'and none
too small, tf H. W. Tucker.
We're in business for YOUR health,
and fill your prescriptions just as
your physician orders them. Prompt
service and pure drugs. The Court

Pharmacy. Phone 284. 15-tf

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'TTM.i IPMI 'ifl if 1 jl i'i V ii'll' )t-V'-'-rjr r if -i W IT! V -ri"' w y

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from
S:r Get out on the waters; fill

'. rir live "r ncninnr ari-i cwimmmi I t-iA-A ... -.

M j v -

I i jsr numerous lake resorts readied rrom .lucago by water trips, -rr-
fVK long and short, on commodious and modern steamships. .--51
JaGAJ? m.: u t

t'i WUilKgr VJ vuaw "iuiuui

Leave Jacksoville 8:30 P. M.
Arrive Chicago 7:10 A. M.

p.

TEHIGE NOTES
(By the National Woman's Chris Christian
tian Christian Temperance Union.)
GIVE US NATION-WIDE PROHIBI PROHIBITION.
TION. PROHIBITION. Capt. Richmond Pearson Hobson,
who, as everybody is aware, knows
something of government service both
as a navy officer and as a civilian, 'say9
that a first-class government should
standardize its service as do all first first-class
class first-class American railroads. It should
require abstinence from liquor In army,
navy and civil departments, and among
all its employees at home and abroad.
This in the Interests of efficiency and
the public welfare. Scientific experi
ment has proved that the drinking of
an ordinary glass of wine or stein of
beer will lower a man's efficiency to a
measurable degree for 24 houre in
ordinary muscular occupations about 8
per cent on the average. Three times
this amount a day regularly, is cumula cumulative
tive cumulative In its effect. Increasing the loss of
efficiency from day to day. At the
end of 12 days ordinary muscular effi efficiency
ciency efficiency will go down 25 per cent on the
average, and higher mental activity
twice that amount.
Let us raise the standard of citizen
ship throughout all these United
States and all territory under the jur jurisdiction
isdiction jurisdiction thereof by putting prohibi
tion into the national constitution.
LICENSE MONEY NOT NEEDED
FOR PUBLIC SCHOOLS.
The liquor interests continually re
mind us of the need of license money
for the public schools. The experi experience
ence experience of prohibition states shows the
weakness of that argument. Take
North Carolina for example. Ex-Gov.
Locke Craig is authority for the state
ment that since prohibition went into
effect there has been an Increase in
school enrollment of 20.47 per cent,
and an actual Increased dally attend
ance of 32 per cent. In other words,
since its adoption nearly 21 more chil children
dren children out of every 100 of school age
have enrolled In the schools and 32
more children out of every 100 of
school age have actually been at school
each day.
THE LIQUOR TRAFFIC IS THE
CURSE.
"The great curse of the laboring man
is intemperance. It has brought more
desolation to the wage-earners than
strikes, or war, or sickness, or death.
It is a more unrelenting tyrant than
the grasping monopolist. It has
caused little children to be hungry and
cold, to grow up among evil associates,
to be reared without the knowledge of
God. It has broken up more homes
and wrecked more lives than any other
curse on the face of the earth." Car Cardinal
dinal Cardinal Gibbons.
And there will be intemperance as
long as the beverage traffic In alcoholic
liquors continues to exist.
BREWERS TO BENEFIT BY PROHI PROHIBITION.
BITION. PROHIBITION. The sixty or more breweries in the
state of Michigan, which under the
dry law close April 30, 1918, will very
likely be used for the manufacture
of denatured alcohoL The brewers
seem to be taking kindly to the sug suggestion
gestion suggestion of Henry Ford that they thus
utilize their plants. It Is believed that
they can make much greater profit on
denatured alcohol for automobile con consumption
sumption consumption than on beer for human con consumption,
sumption, consumption, and that-inany more men
will be employed.
Every license to sell intoxicating
liquor that hangs in the win window
dow window or behind the bar of an American
saloon today will be a scrap of paper
In ten years. Clinton N. Howard In
the 808th lecture in his home city,
Rochester, N. Y.
"Regulating the private lives of
other people" is one newspaper's esti estimate
mate estimate of what prohibition aims at. Yet
the same Issue contains an account of
the shooting up of a neighborhood and
the beating of a defenseless womamfcy
her drunken husband. Exchange.
"If buttermilk affected people like
liquor does you'd kill every cow."
ALL-AROUND SQUARE MEALS
Let the Good Fairy serve you an
all-around square meal. 3t
Gerig's Drug Store will be closed
tomorrow from 4:30 p. m. until after
the patriotic pageant is over.
Do you read the "unclassified' ads?

a
-

cute, IIqM

Chicago
yourself with fresh lake breezes, 5f--
4
i
- 111 Lkt 1. 1 IVI v. cuv T 1
uii
ft;

j. a. wuu uuicu, r. 1 tm SrxK:.
124 W. Bay St. Jacksonville M' V'

--f ; i"r-
A. C. L. SCHEDULE
Trains of the Atlantic Coast Line
will arrive and depart in Ocala at the
following times:
No. 37, Jacksonville to St. Peters Petersburg,
burg, Petersburg, 2:18-2:25 a. m.
No. 38, St. Petersburg to Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, 2:25 a. m.
No. 10, Leesburg to Jacksonville,
0:40 a. m.
No. 151, Ocala to Wilcox, Monday,
Wednesday and Friday, 6:10 a. m..
No. 35, Ocala to Lakeland (Sunny (Sunny-Jim),
Jim), (Sunny-Jim), Tuesday, Thursday and' Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, 6:40 a. m.
No. 141, Wilcox, Gainesville and
Palatka to Ocala, 11:15 a. m.
No. 40, St. Petersburg to Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, 12:54-1:14 p. m.
No. 48, Homosassa to Ocala, 1:05
p. m.
No. 49, Ocala to Homosassa, 2:25
p. m.
No. 39, Jacksonville to St. Peters Petersburg,
burg, Petersburg, 2:36-2:40 p. m.
No. 140, Ocala to Palatka, Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville and Wilcox, 4:10 p. m.
No. 9, Jacksonville to I sesburg,
9:05 p.m.
No. 4 Leaves Tampa 9 a. m.; Ocala
1 p. m. Arrive s Jacksonville, 5:10 pan.
No. 32, Lakeland to Ocala (Sunny (Sunny-Jim),
Jim), (Sunny-Jim), Tuesday, Thursday and Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, 9:tM) p. m
; )
MARE FOR SALE
One nice btj mare, in perfect con condition;
dition; condition; work anywhere; any woman or
child can drive her; 10 years old.
Cheap for cash. Address S. H. Cauth Cauth-en,
en, Cauth-en, Summerfield, Fla. 2-6t
TWO FORDS FOR SALE
One 1914 Touring Car. -One
1915 Touring Car.
- Both in good condition. Cash or
terms. Maxwell Agency, Ocala. 3td
Have your prescriptions filled at
Gerig's, the only drugstore in Ocala
employing more .than one registered
pharmacist. tf
Star ads. are business builders.
OCALA FRATERNAL ORDERS
OCALA LODGE NO. 286, B."P. O. E.
Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and fourth Tuesday even evenings
ings evenings in each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Club house oppo opposite
site opposite postoffice, east side.
C. W. Hunter, E. R.
E..J. Crook, Secretary.
WOODMEN OF THE WORLD
Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
the K. of P. hall at 7:30 p. m. every
second and fourth Friday. Visiting
sovereigns are ailways welcome.
T. D. Lancaster, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk.
CHAPTER NO. 13. R. A. M.
Regular cou vocation 8 of the Oc&i
Chapter No. 13, R. A. M., on ths
fourth Friuay in every month at
8 p. m. B. C. Webb, H. P.
Jake Brown. Sec'y.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Ocala Lodge No. 19. Conventions
held every Monday night at 7:20
at the Castle Hall, over the James
Carlisle drugstore. A cordial welcome
to visiting brothers.
E. L. Stapp, C. C.
Chas. K. Saee. K. of R-S.
MARION-DUNN MASONIC LODGE
Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. &
A. M., meets on the first and third
Thursday evening of each month at
8:00 o'clock, until further notice.
H. M. Weathers, W M.
Jake Brown, Secretary. Ad
ODD FELLOWS
Tulula Lodge No. 22, I. O. O. F
meets every Tuesday evening in the
Odd Fellows' hall on the third floor of
the Star office building at 8 o'clock
promptly. A warm welcome always
extended to visiting brothers.
J. D. McCaskill, N. G.
W. L. Colbert, Secretary.
ORDER OF EASTERN STAR
Ocala Qapter, No. 29, O. E. S
tieets at Yonge'b hall the second aad
'ourth rhursday evenings of e&e
nonth at 730 o'clock.
Mrs. Susan Cook, W. M.
Mrs. Rosalie Condon, Secretary.

" v.



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