The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06467

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
SERVICE

IF

WEATIIER FORECAST
Partly cloudy tonight and Wednes Wednesday,
day, Wednesday, probably showers central and
northeast portions.
y

qREATER

Brilliant Victory for French Arms is Received
With Great Elation

pE GERMAfl VERDI

Paris, May 23. The greater part
of Fort Douaumont has been recap recaptured
tured recaptured by the French. This fort was
taken by the Germans at the begin beginning
ning beginning of the great Verdun battle four
months ago, and the Germans at the
time heralded the feat as a great ac accomplishment
complishment accomplishment and predicted an early
victory over the enemy. An an announcement
nouncement announcement of the retaking of the
fort has been made and there is great
rejoicing by the French press and
public; It is expected that the effect
on neutral opinion will be great also.
The new victory of the French arms
is believed to have shaken the entire
German line at Verdun, and to have,
nullified the greatest of the German
achievements in this sector.'
General Neville, in command of the
French, took advantage of the enemy
attacks on Dead Man's hill, carefully
prepared his position, and his troops
advanced against the Douaumont lines
singing the Marseillaise, using the
bayonet in most effective fashion.
Following the general failure of the
crown prince's army, the enormous
losses sustained and the prolongation
of what expected to be a drive that
would in a few days end victoriously,
the effect of the new set back on the
German people will probably be ser
ious. . .''.'
. The French, sprung a drastic sur surprise
prise surprise in attacking the Germans north northeast
east northeast of Verdun and penetrating Fort
Douaumont. General Neville's forces
successfuly drove tfie Germans from
all but a small angle in the north northeastern
eastern northeastern corner of the fort, says to today's
day's today's official statement. The German
official statement today, however,
says that Fort Douaumont is still
firmly held, though it is admitted that
the French took some first line
trenches north of Verdun.
Furious counter attacks were made
by the Germans in their efforts to re regain
gain regain a one-mile and a quarter front
from east of Douaumont to the Thiau Thiau-mont
mont Thiau-mont farm that was captured .yes .yesterday,
terday, .yesterday, according to the French. The
only German success was the recap recapture
ture recapture of a position north of the farm.
On the other side of the river Meuse
the battle lost nothing in intensity,
but no ground changed hands. Gas
and flame attacks by the Germans
near hill 304 were employed in driv driving
ing driving out the French and occupying a
trench.
USING NAVAL GUNS
The Austrian troops operating in
the Alps against the Italians have
taken many of the huge guns from
the battleships that have been bottled
up since the war began at Pola to
positions in the Alps, where they

. have been mounted and are doing ef ef-j
j ef-j fective work. The detonations of

these huge guns, a corresponfnt
i telegraphs, have actually split Allrie
. peaks and cause frequent avalancl k.
V The latest from the Austro-Italii .n
front indicates that, the Austrians
are holding their own and gaining
j some territory in the Southern Tyrol.
, Current Austrian reports claim im-
portant successes on the Lavarone

. plateau east of Astico valley, where
a hard contested battle is in progress.
The Rome statement today is silent
regarding the fighting here, but re reports
ports reports of Austrian repulses at other
points are mentioned.
FOOD SITUATION IN BERLIN TO
BE HANDLED BY BOARD
London, May 23. Unofficial ad advices
vices advices received here today state that a
board will be selected in Berlin' to
have complete charge of the fod sit situation.
uation. situation. This "food -dictate was
forecasted some time ago i t I the
food situation in the German ,ital
began to draw the attention '- of officials.
ficials. officials. The board will conti -imports
and exports of all foo' ffs,
including raw materials and r Tes
used as food for animals. It
r r:;e
r -m
authority for fixing the ;
prices to be charged
'tuffs.'
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LINE SAID TO HAVE BEEN SHAKEN AND CRQWH
AClliEVEMEllT 111 THIS SECTOR NULLIFIED

(Associated Press)
MEXICAN ECONOMIC
Monetary Problem is Said to be Acute
and There is a Food Shortage
with No Relief in Sight
(Associated Press)
Washington, May 23. The Carran Carran-za
za Carran-za government is said to be facing a
serious economic situation. The mone monetary
tary monetary problem is already acute, there
is a food shortage in Mexico City and
there is no prospects of relief from
the strike extending virtually over all
the Mexican railroad lines.
Washington expects to get first firsthand
hand firsthand information from Consul Flet Fletcher
cher Fletcher at Chihuahua City, who is on his
way to Washington with reports from
five other consuls in Northern Mexico.
Special Agent Rodgers, who is in
Mexico City, informed the state de department
partment department today that a new note was
being prepared by Carranza, but
nothing as to its substance was re revealed.
vealed. revealed. However, while the domestic
situation is bad, the attitude of Mex Mexican
ican Mexican officials is described as more
friendly since the border conferences.
TO FILL CHRISTIAN PULPIT
Mr. R. B. Bowers, former pastor of
the Christian church here, will fill the
pulpit every other Sunday, both morn morning
ing morning and evening throughout the re remaining
maining remaining summer months. His first
engagement will be next Sunday, May
28th, at 11 o'clock in the morning and
at 7:30 p. m. ;';'. ;
Mr. Bowers gave up his work in
Ocala to accept the position as prin principle
ciple principle of the high school at Eustis,
and it will be of; interest to friends
to know that the school has just
closed with the i most successful year
of its history and as a result Mr. Bow Bowers
ers Bowers has been reelected for four years.
Although only a young man of 26
years, Mr. Bowers v introduced into
Ocala some of the highest and noblest
thought attaining toward Christian
progress. However, like all of the
deepest and most advanced thinkers,
he was not fully appreciated because
not fully understood. The world, how
ever, is making progress and there
will be many who will be indeed glad
to hear Mr. Bowers speak again in
Ocala in the interest of a practical
Christianity which is to be lived more,
and professed less.
A Booster of Practical Christianity.
WAITE IS NEARING
TnE ELECTRIC CHAIR
Testimony at nis Trial Today Tight Tightened
ened Tightened the Chain that State Says
will Take Him to the
Death House
(Associated Press)
New York, May 23. Ih the trial of
Dr. Arthur Warren Waite, for the
murder of Dr. John E. Peck, his
father-in-law, today, the druggist
who sold Waite ansenic, the physic physicians
ians physicians who 'examined the body of Peck
eid the undertaker who buried the
body were placed on the stand. All
gi.ve evidence which the state con
tends tightens the chain which will
send Waite to the electric chair. Dr.
W iite, pale and unnerved, hung his
herd and gazed almost continuously
at the floor when the state's witnesses
tes ified to the facts that tightened
the chain of evidence about him.
Or e Cent Sale at Ceng's.
SWEET DREAMS drives away
mosqjitoes. Lasts all night. The

A

Pharmacy. 18-tf

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DIE
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PRINCE'S GREATEST
Have Reached Columbus and Aviators
are Preparing Them for
. Field Service
(Associated Press)
Columbus, N. M., May 23. Two
160-horsepower aeroplanes .; have ar arrived
rived arrived at army headquarters and avia aviators
tors aviators immediately began preparing
them for field service. General Per Pershing
shing Pershing has made repeated requests for
more aircraft to assist him in his
operations in Mexico. The sending
south of eighteen carloads of sup
plies and preparations of the engin engineering
eering engineering force for work south of Col Col-onia
onia Col-onia Dublan indicates there will be
onia Dublan indicated no quick with withdrawal
drawal withdrawal of the American 'troops in
Mexico is contemplated.
WOMEN SUFFRAGE
Northern Methodists Cast Only Six
Votes Against Feminine
Enfranchisement
(Associated Press)
Saratoga Springs, N. Y., May 23.
The Northern -Methodist general con conference,
ference, conference, in session here, today en endorsed
dorsed endorsed woman suffrage. Only six
negative votes were recorded against
the proposition.
The conference elected Alexander
P. Camphor, of Birmingham, presi
dent of the Central Alabama College,
to be the negro bishop for Liberia,
Africa.
TURNS CAR INTO
A TRAVELING HOME
H. S. French, of Muskegon, Mich.,
has just reached his home after a
trip f rom Miami, Florida. Mr. .French
and his family made the long jour
ney in a leisurely fashion in a Dodge
Brothers motor car. The important
part of the story is the clever way in
which Mr. French used his car as a
home for the tourists and not only en
joyed the "open but did away with ex
pense of stopping at hotels. :
Before starting on the trip a cook
ing outfit, and table utensils, of alumi
num was purchased, and a suit case
arranged for carrying this equipment
in the easiest manner. The back of
the front seat of the car was hinged
and a large canvas cover for the car
was purchased.
During the trip the party cooked
most of its meals in the open and
practically 'every night was spent in
the car. By letting down the hinged
back of .the front seat, a comfortable
bed was secured and the canvas Cover,
which reached the. ground all around
the car protected the party from the
elements.
The" Ocala -Auto Company, Messrs
Bilhngsley, proprietors, handles the
Dodge in Ocala.
Lame Baclc
Lame back is usually due to rheu
matism of the muscles of the back.
Hard working people are most likely
to suffer from it. Relief may be had
by massaging the back with Cham
berlain's Liniment two or three times
a day. Try it. Obtainable every
where. -' Adv.

TIVO AEROPLANES
FOR PERSHING

WAS ENDORSED

One Cent Sale at Gerigs.

OCALA, FLORIDA, TUESDAY, MAY 23, 1916

TEMPLE THEATRE
Following class day exercises in the
afternoon, the formal graduation pro
gram of the -Ocala high school was
given last night at the Temple, and a
arge crowd witnessed the delivery of
diplomas to the 1916 class of 17 mem
bers, five boys and twelve girls.
Those graduating were Sidney Har
old, Charles Edward Duval, Mabel
Aurelia Akins, Annie M. Moorhead,
Katie Mae Eagleton, Claudia Chiva-
ette O'Neal, Seth Westlake Hollin
rake, James Hicks Carney Hill, Ruby
nez Sandifer, Arthur Crago, Martha
Kate Rentz, Lillian Frances Thom-
ason, Ruby Berrice Fausetti Ava Lee
dwards, Alfred Anderson Green,
laura lxmise sanaers ana iara
larie Burnett.
A feature of the class exercises in
the afternoon was the debate: Re
solved, That Wilson's Administration
Has Been Wise and Successful.
Westlake Hollinrake and Charles
Duval upheld ; the affirmative and
James Hill and Arthur Crago the neg
ative. The four young debaters
handled their suhject splendidly. It
was announced last night that the zJ-
firmative had won and the announce announcement
ment announcement was warmly received. It was
quite evident during the debate that
the Wilson administration is popular.
The diplomas were delivered to the
class by Dr. H. C. Dozier, a member
of the city school -; board, and an
alumnus of the School, of the class of
898. ; The address to the graduates
was made by Prof. Harvey W. Cox,.
of the University of Florida. Prof.
Cox s is a very fine speaker, and his
address; was greatly en joyedf
His, advice to the graduates was:
"Let Vour aspirations be as high as
the stars; but be sure to back them
with enough energy, sacrifice and
service to attain the. goal of your
aspirations." v '.. V-
The first number on) the program
in the afternoon was the welcome de-
ivered by Miss Harold, the popular
class president. It was a fine wel welcome.
come. welcome. :
Miss Irma Blake then sang a pret pret-y
y pret-y song of welcome.
The first of the afternoon's ora
tions was that of Miss Louise San Sanders,
ders, Sanders, which was splendidly delivered.
She was followed by Miss Ruby
Fausett, whose essay on the Wonders
of Shakspere was exceedingly good.
Miss Inez Sandifer, who has been
one of the best pupils in Miss Hill's
class of expression, gave a reading
Absolution. She gave this beautiful
reading faultlessly, and by many it
was considered the flower of the pro-'
gram. .'v :'..';' ..'
Miss Mabel Akin, another one of
the bright pupils in expression, gave
a reading which was cleverly render
ed and greatly enjoyed. It was one
of Samantha Allen's well known hum
orous pieces, and Miss Akin gave- her
reading in an appropriate costume
and setting.
Miss Agnes Melin and Miss Mary
Connor played a piano and violin duet,
after which Miss Lillian Thomason
and Miss Katie Mae Eagleton deliver
ed their orations, the former on Pre Preparedness
paredness Preparedness and the latter on the Great Greatest
est Greatest Giant, which honor she accorded
to electricity. Both of these vere ex excellent
cellent excellent productions. t
The two piano numbers on the pro
gram were played by Miss Sidney
Harold and Miss Ava Lee Edwards.
Miss Ava Lee Edwards and Miss
Martha Kate Rentz both had very ex-
cellent and very practical orations on
subjects that are of particular and
paramount. importance to the girls of
the high school. The former spoke of
home economics in the Ocala .high
school and traced it from its small
beginning two years ago to the high
place it now holds in the school, and

GRADUATIDIi EXERCISES

A STAR Ml C0UP01

THIS COUPON IS

VOTES IN LIBRARY CONTEST

VOTED FOR

Cut out, fill Li nane of church lodge, school or other organization
you wish to vote for, and deposit in ballot box at THE COURT
PHARMACY. -;V- -: ''. X-
The oSIcial judges of the contest are Messrs. George Pasteur, Her Herbert
bert Herbert Lattner and Ed. C. Bennett.

WAS CROVDED LAST HT FOR

of the benefit it has been to the girls.
Miss Rentz's oration on the Pur Purpose
pose Purpose of Cooking and What it Embrac Embraces
es Embraces was interesting as well as practi practical,
cal, practical, and was delivered in a charming
manner.
The evening exercises began short shortly
ly shortly after 8 o'clock. The program was
divided into two sections on account
of the large number in the class. The
members of the class wore their caps
and gowns. ;''
The program began with music by
the orchestra. The invocation was
offered by Rev. J. G. Glass. Then
followed the splendid address of wel welcome
come welcome by Miss Harold, a chorus by the
high school, the class history by Miss
O'Neal, the class poem by Miss Moor Moorhead,
head, Moorhead, the class will by Mr. Green, the
class prophecy by Miss Burnett. All
were exceedingly well done and
thoroughly enjoyed.
Mr. Lester Lucas delighted the
large audience with a vocal" selection.
The closing number on the program
was the valedictory given by Miss
Burnett.
The class of 1916 will have much
to remember. The members have re received
ceived received numerous compliments and
gifts.
BANQUET TONIGHT
About Forty-Four will Attend Dinner
of the Association at the
Harrington
About 44 plates will be served at
the banquet of the alumni association
of the high school tonight at the Har Harrington
rington Harrington at 8 o'clock. Miss Annie At Atkinson,
kinson, Atkinson, president of the association,
will act as toastmaster. Prof. W. H.
Cassels, principal of the city schools,
will be the guest of honor. Toasts
will be j responded to by Mr. Robert
Anderson, Mr. Robert Connor, Mr.
Westlake Hollinrake, Miss Sidney
Harold and others.
DREW STRAWS FOR
THE DELEGATES
Unusual but Effective Way of Select Selecting
ing Selecting Florida Representatives
to St. Louis
Tallahassee, May 23. The five-year-old
daughter of Attorney Gen General
eral General West yesterday drew straws to
determine who shall represent Flor Florida
ida Florida democrats at the next national
convention. There were no contests
in the first, second and fourth dis districts,
tricts, districts, and the drawings were for
contested places in the third district
and the state at large. It was agreed
by all the candidates that the first
names drawn should be the delegates.
State Chairman Raney approved the
plan, and by leaving the names off
the ticket in the June primary it will
be shortened considerably.
Pat Murphy and John C. Cooper
Jr. of Jacksonville, E. Z. Jones of
Lakeland and H. C. Sparkman of Day
tona were chosen delegates from the
state at large.
A BIRTHDAY PARTY
Little Helen, the three-year-old
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. S
Hilands, is having her firs'fc party to
day at the home "of her parents on
Fort King avenue, and had a royal
good time entertaining fourteen other
little folks of about her own age.
GOOD FOR FIVE
'!R

SCHOOL ALU

b 1 Ak

It

A New Freighter May be Placed

in Service

IS HEEDED TO TAKE CARE OF
WATER
Another freight boat will probably
be plying shortly on the river run
between Ocala and Jacksonville. A
meeting of the Ocala Transportation
company was held in the offices of Mr.
L. W. Duval this morning and the
proposejd boat was; then liscussed.
Some definite announcement will
be made in a day or two, it" is said.
If arrangements are made for the
new freighter she will be larger than
the G. A. Carmichael now making the
run. The increase in traffic demands
an additional vessel. A large portion
of the freight from the north and
west is now being brought into Ocala
via the" water route.
- The officials of the Ocala Trans
portation company are working hard
to build up the. freight traffic on the
river, believing that if they succeed
they will have gone a long way to towards
wards towards solving the freight rate, prob
lem.
BIG MILEAGE MARKS
E By MAXWELLS
Recent Performance of Touring Cars
Show a Minimum After Cost and
Low Gasoline Consumption
.Some recent Maxwell economy re
cords are as follows:
In South Africa 31.3 miles on two
ounces less than a gallon of petrol.
In London, England 33.6 miles on
a hew mixture of oil and petrol.
In Seattle, Washington 43 miles
on a gallon of gasoline.
In Detroit, Michigan 44 miles on a
gallon of gasoline.
In Oakland, California 45.6 miles
on a gallon of gasoline. j
The attention of the automobile
public has been drawn at various
times this spring to notable mileage
performances of Maxwell cars. In
view of the upward trend in the price
of gasoline, a great, deal of import
ance is attached to the aftermost of
automobiles i and the officials of the
Maxwell Motor company take great
pride in the records that have! been
made by their product.
AboveTare listed some of the more
remarkable of the seriesybf economy
marks registered by Maxwells. These
are taken from a greater list of econ
omy records. Unsolicited testimonials
to the high mileage records made by
Maxwell cars are constantly coming
to the Maxwell offices at Detroit.
Oakland Run Largest
The most encouraging feature of
the economy runs is that the highest
mileage was oBtained in the more re recent
cent recent tests. The California run was
made on May 3rd. On that day, Ray
McNamara drove a stock Maxwell
touring car from Oakland, California,
tc San Jose. The mileage obtained
was 45.6 miles on a gallon of gasoline.
This run was observed by newspaper
men and by officials of the Lincoln
Highway Association and the San
Diego Fain
This run was a little better than
the mark made by the same driver in
Michigan early in April, when he
droye a stock car and made an even
44 miles on a gallon. On that day,
the weather conditions were unfavor
able, the temperature being close to
freezing and a strong head wind pre
vailing most of the distance.
In Foreign Fields
Most of the economy tests abroad
have been staged in mountainous
country and have proved the endur endurance
ance endurance as well as the economy of Max Maxwell
well Maxwell cars. The South African test
was made around Table Mountain,
which has two fairly steep gradients.
Ask your doctor to leave your pre
scription with us. They will be com compounded
pounded compounded with the best of drugs and
delivered promptly. Tydings & Co.
Phone 30. tf

LOCAL .NEWS
TO
PRESS -TIME

YOL. 22, NO. 122
f.VSM
THE INCREASED TRAFFIC OF
ROUTE
Will Oppose Ocala Boys in the Open Opening
ing Opening Game of the Season at
Hunter Park
There is nothing to prevent the
opening of the season at Hunter Park
tomorrow afternoon at 3:30, unless
it be a rain, and the fans are hoping
against Ihis. Manager Hunter says
that his bunch is in first rate condi condi-tioh
tioh condi-tioh and fast, and he expects to have
Fruitland Park sit up and take notice.
The game will be umpired by Mr.
W. Austin Bennett, of the Ocala
House.
The probable line-up for Ocala will
be:
J. Chazal and F. Harris, p; Bartly,
c; C. .Chazal, lb; Davis, 2b; Batts,
ss; Dewey, 3b; McLin, 3b; Harris and
J. Chazal, cf; L. Blitch, rf. Several
of the high school boys will be on the
bench. These will be Liddell, Bla Bla-lock,
lock, Bla-lock, Home and Leavengood.
' General admission to the park is
25 cents, with the grand stand 10
cents extra. Ladies are admitted free
to the stand.
The Ocala Athletic Association
has decided not to enter the league
with Leesburg, Sanford and Orlando.
Tkis city would have to make long
jumps. Plans for a.V Mid-Florida
league were discussed at the meeting
in Leesburg last week, which was at attended
tended attended by Mr. C. W- Hunter, Mr. W.
Austin Bennett and Mr. G. K. Robin Robinson.
son. Robinson. '..
Not as many season tickets as de
sired have been sold yet, and it is
hoped that every fan intending to do
so will purchase a ticket at once.
Manager Hunter has worked faith
fully all winter on the park, making
several efforts to bring bis leacrue
teams here, and has now whipped
into shape what promises to be one
of .the best nines Ocala has ever had.
The following have recently pur purchased
chased purchased season tickets: L. W. Duval,
Tydings & Co., Florida Soft Phos Phosphate
phate Phosphate & Lime Co., II. W. Tucker,
Malcolm Williams, Anti-Monopoly
Drug Store, George MacKay, Carter's
Bakery.-
WILSON COMPLETED
NOTE TO ENGLAND
Sent Draft to the State Department
Without Laying it Before
Cabinet
" (Associated Press)'
Washington, May 2). President
Wilson today sent to the state de department
partment department a draft of the new note to
Great Britain protesting against in-
terference with American mails. The
not was not laid before the cabinet.
The note will be cabled to London im immediately,
mediately, immediately, at the same time France
receiving a copy.
PORTO RICAN BILL
PASSED THE HOUSE
Amendment Granting Woman Suf Suffrage
frage Suffrage to the Island was Stricken
Out of the Measure
(Associated Press)
Washington, May 23. During the
final consideration of the Porto Rican
bill by the House, the amendment
passed yesterday to grant suffrage to
the women of the island was stricken
from the bill by a vote of SO to 59.
The bill then passed without roll call.
The amendment introduced by Re Republican
publican Republican Leader Mann passed yester yesterday
day yesterday with less than a hundred mem members
bers members present.
Swimming time's here. Get your
bath caps at The Court Pharmacy, tf

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TWO OCALA EVENING STAB, TUESDAY, MAY 23, 1916

OCALA EVENING STAR
PUBLISHED EVERT DAY EXCEPT SUNDAY
v BITTISGEH A CARROLL, PROPRIETORS
R. R. Carroll, General Manager Port V. Leavengood, Boalaeaa Manager
J. II. Benjamin, Editor
Entered at Oca la, Fla., postofflce as second class matter.
' PHONE 51
. SUBSCRIPTION' RATES

(Domeatle)
One year, in advance $5.00
6lx months, in advance 2.50
Three months. In advance 1.25
One month, in advance 50
CHAMPION OF NO CHURCH
' Several times in the last few week3
the Star has received communications,
most of them anonymous, accusing it
of being a Catholic paper, or domi dominated
nated dominated by Catholics.
The Star has been in Ocala for
twenty-one years next June, and any anyone
one anyone in this town who supposes it is
influenced, not to say controlled by
Catholics, has the worst case of dam dam-foolitis
foolitis dam-foolitis that ever afflicted a mildewed
brain.
The Star is a secular paper, and a
secular paper, like a secular govern government,
ment, government, has no right to prefer one
church above another, or prefer peo people
ple people who belong to churches to those
who do not.
The Star has tried to co-operate
with all the churches in good work,
It has never championed one against
another, or shown to one any, cour
tesy that it would not show to all.
So far as its personnel can go, the
Star is as Protestant as the Metho
Hist Advocate or Bantist Witness. Its
original owners were J. C. Porter, the
well-remembered Baptist minister and
editor, and A. L. Harding, a consist consistent
ent consistent and honored layman in the Bap
tist church. Later, an interest in the
paper was bought by Mr. Bittinger,
an Episcopalian, and that interest is
still held by his widow, who is also
an Episcopalian. Mr. Porter's share
was Douent ana is now neia dv jyir
R. R. Carroll, who is a Methodist. The
business manager is a Methodist. The
editor is not a member of any church,
but, he is of Protestant ancestry, has
seldom' been inside 'any. but a Protest
ant church, was associated for ten
vears in the publication of a Protest
ant paper, and when he thinks of re
ligious matters thinks of them from
a Protestant standpoint as inevitably
as an American citizen thinks of gov
ernment from a democratic stand
point. Of the Star's hundreds of
suBscribers in the city, and thousands
altogether, not more than twenty or
thirty are Catholics. Not more than
one per cent of our advertising comes
from Catholics. To our certain
knowledge the great majority of our
Protestant readers approve of the
paper's stand against the religious and
political persecution that has recently
broken out in Florida. It has been
reported that the Star, and its con contemporary,
temporary, contemporary, the Banner, vare to be
boycotted by the Guardians of Liberty
for denouncing the policy advocated
by Catts and Parker. We will be
sorry if such is the case, but we are
glad to be able to say that such
policies cannot find any newspaper
, support in Marion county, and we
daresay, that we will be able to sur
vi ve any such boycott. It wouldn't
make any difference if we couldn't.
We would rather be a dead lion than
a live hyena, and papers that preach
the guardian of liberty doctrine are
. entirely of the hyena breeds The only
marvel is that Americans, particular particularly
ly particularly southerners, can mistake their
'rabid howls for the voice of patriot
ism. -- ','.;" ;:. .;'. .- '. ;
And now we would like to ask those
of our people who have been misled
by. this gang of sacredotal carpet
baggers, why dd they swallow their
- Butiemmiis wiuiuut investigation:
i- A. A" A.! t
Why don't they demand that they
support their allegations by the tes
timony of men of national reputation ?
Is it not strange that; of all the well
known and influential men in America
that not one is warning the people
against the "Catholic menace"? Is it
not, peculiar that of the thousands of
alert newspapers al over the United
States, all are absolutely ignoring
what would be the greatest piece of
news they could print, namely that
the pope of Rome was trying to ob
tain control of the government? Is it
left to Billyparker to tell us what
Wilson and Roosevelt and Bryan and
all the others we look up to as lead leaders
ers leaders do not tell? Is it left to the Men
ace and the American Citizen to
scoop the enterprising press of Amer
ica on this great story. Is it possible
that the 15 per cent of the Catholic
vote in this country controls our
politicians instead of the other 85
per cent? Is it to be understood that
the Catholic 'church has bribed and
muzzled the press? If so, where did it
stv w muncy ; A Dig newspaper oi oi-fice
fice oi-fice like the 'WnrM ni V.o TTot-o 11
4-Via a-4 A m
. V 4. MUV AAVA
with its expensive machinery, costs
more than the great cathedral of St.
Peter's at Rome, and its payroll
would make the payroll of the Vat Vatican
ican Vatican look slim. It is well known that
the Catholic is the poorest of churches
in America. It is made up of peo people
ple people who are almost all poor or cf
modest means. Rockefeller is a Bap Baptist,
tist, Baptist, Carnegie a freethinker, Morgan
an Episcopalian, and of all our long
list of rich men, few, very few are
Catholics. Are there no honest news newspapers
papers newspapers in this country except the
Menace and its imitators, and if so
what have people been believing all
these years?
And now who are these guardians
of liberty who come among us from
the north to teach us" a doctrine of
bate against people we have known

(Foreign)
One year, in advance $8.00
Six month, in advance 4.25
Three months, 1n advance 2.25
One month, in advance 80

all our lives, and with whom we lived
in peace and good faith until a few
years ago?
You who read the daily newspapers
with dispatches from all over the
country, did you ever notice that you
see allusion to Masons, Elks, Odd Fel
lows and other fraternal orders, even
Knights of Columbus, every now and
then, but you never see the guardians
of liberty mentioned. And why ? Be
cause in the north, where they are
known, they are precisely on a leve
with the before-day clubs that the
South will not allow to exist. Some
of them are before-day clubs in color
as well as practice, for it is a prin
ciple of the guardians that negroes
shall have the same political rights
as white men. Any Florida guardian
who goes to the grand lodge meeting
in Philadelphia is liable to find him
self sitting alongside a colored broth
er, just the same as he would do in a
republican convention here in Florida.
And who is the head of this great
order? Nelson A. Miles, who with a
negro brigade as part of his division
won a great victory over a decimated
and emaciated force of Confederates
in 1865, (you can find the record in a
history written by an aide on Lee's
staff) and who put shackles on the
sick and helpless president of the
Confederacy, and who by virtue of a
good constitution and keeping out of
danger became commander of the
United States army, and went to
Cuba in 1898, and stayed safely and
comfortably on a transport while old
Joe Wheeler, ex-Confederate, and
17,000 other good Americans, many of
them Catholics faced Spaniards and
fever on shore, and 1 who was repri
manded in public by the president of
the United States he is the illus
trious chief.
The guardians of liberty is a good
order for abolitionists and anarchists
to belong to, but a southern democrat
is about as much at home in it as a
respectable housecat would be in a
congregation of skunks, and though a
good many of "them may have been
deluded into it the Star will guar
antee that they will not stay there
very long.
, The Star would fight the Roman
P. L Billingsley
Ralph Billingsley
It is interesting to stop
and recall how many
good things you have
heard of the car and
how very ; lew of the
other sort.
It is not over-stating the case to
say that the very large first year's
production did not develop a
a single serious fault. This no notable
table notable achievement surely justi justifies
fies justifies public confidence in Dodge
Brothers as close and careful
manufacturers.
The Gasoline Consumption is
Unsually Low
The motor is 30-35 horse power
The price of the Roadster or
Touring car complete is $785
(f. o. b. Detroit)

OCALA AUTO CO.
Dodge Brothers
MOTOR CAR

Catholic menace as strenuously as
anybody if there was any such men menace,
ace, menace, but there is not and never has
been in this country. The Catholics
may control the wards in some of our
big cities, they may hold the balance
of power in two or three states, but
that is the extent of their political
power and their membership is not
growing in proportion with the in increase
crease increase in American population.
It is a significant fact that agita agitation
tion agitation against the Catholics in this
state is strongest in those district?
where there are no Catholic churches,
and few if any Catholics, and where
the people have had no information
about Catholics except from guardian
of liberty emissaries and from the
Menace and papers of its stripe.
It is also a significant fact that the
evil deeds and intentions charged to
Catholics of this day are the same as
those charged against them by the
know-nothings of three-quarters of a
century ago, and that in turn the
know-nothings of America brought
the same charges against the Cath Catholics
olics Catholics of their day that the English
anti-popery faction brought against

the Catholics of England two hundred
and fifty years ago.
After over a century of persecu
tion, in which many Catholics lost
their lives, England repudiated the
anti-popery doctrine, gave the Cath
olics equal rights and has 'had not a
ripple of, trouble with them since.
After listening to the know-nothings
ten years or more, America voted
them a nuisance. These latterday
know-nothings, unable to make any
headway in states where they are
known, come to those where they are
unknown, and where the objects o
their denunciations are the fewest.
arid the only reason why they can
make any impression, the Star regrets
to( say, is because the doctrine o:
hate is the one to which humanity is
always the most ready to listen and
also the one of which it is the most
sure to sicken after it has been tried
The great mistake that some Flor
idians are making is in allowing
themselves to be deluded into the be
lief that the American Catholic of the
twentieth century is the sarne as the
European ) Catholic of the sixteenth
They make no allowance for the
progress of the world or the influence
of their own institutions. And what
is worse, they accept without inquiry
the stuff shoved at them by people
and agencies they know nothing about
instead of comparing it with the au
thentic information that is open and
accessible to every American citizen.
JUDGE GIBBS GIVES
CATTS A JOLT
At St.; Augustine Saturday, Circuit
Judge Gibbs declared unconstitutiona
the Florida law prohibiting white
teachers from teaching in negro
schools and ; negro teachers from
teaching in white schools.
2' He ordered discharged the severa'
3isters of charity who were under
bond, charged with violating the law.
The judge ruled that the state had
no power; over ; private schools and
could not prohibit a superior race
from instructing an inferior.
i BIG WOODMEN PICNIC
Arrangements have been complet completed
ed completed by Fort King camp No. 14, to hold
a big, basket picnic at Eustis Thurs
day, May 25th. A special train has
been secured for ', the occasion and
there will be ample accommodations
for all. The, special leaves the A. C.
L. passenger station promptly at
7:30, so be on hand with your baske
ad prepare to have a big time with
the boys on that day. The drill team
of the camp will take charge of the
baskets en route, so deliver them a
the baggage car which will be provid
ed for that purpose and yours wil
be well cared for until the grounds
are reached. The train will leave
Eustis returning at 5 o'clock, thus
putting the crowd back in Ocala
about .7. v
Get your basket ready and take a
day off with the Woodmen.
SHOCK ABSORBERS
. I have the famous "C. C." shock
absorbers for any light car, such as
the Maxwell, Dodge or Saxon. Makes
your car ride 100 per cent easier and
saves your springs. No road dreaded
with these shock absorbers on your
car. Price $12 per set for rear of car,
including putting on car.
5-20-tf J. A. Bouvier.
SUMMER SCHOOL
I will open a summer school at the
Ocala high school building June 12.
All children wishing to enter the
school will please communicate with
me at an early date.
18-6t Elizabeth Mizelle.
RHEUMATIC PAIN STOPPED
The -drawing of muscles, the sore
ness, stiffness and agonizing pain of
rheumatism rmicklv vield to Sloan's
JLonimenu it stimulates circulation to
the painful part. Just apply as direct directed
ed directed to the sore spots. In a short time
the pain gives way to a tingling sen sensation
sation sensation of comfort and warmth. Here's
proof. "I have had wonderful relief
since I used vour liniment on mv
knee. To think one- annlieation cave
me relief. Sorry I haven't space to
ten you tne History. Thanking you for
what your remedv has done fnr me."
James S. Ferguson, Philadelphia, Pa.
Sloan's Liniment kills nam. 25e. at
druggists. Ad. 3
SEE THE FARM on the Silver
Springs road which furnishes the
Merchant's Cafe every day with fresh

vegetables, milk and eggs. tf

CLASS HISTORY

School Life of the Class of 1916 Told
by Miss Cluadia O'Neal at the
Closing Exercises of the
Ocala High School
On a bright and beautiful day in
the fall of the year 1903 a band of tiny
pilgrims assembled at the foot of a
steep hill, so high and so steep that
It would take them twelve long years
to climb It. There were many paths
leading to the summit; but these little
people, eager for the start, trusted
their good leader to choose the best
Little did these small travelers dream
that only three of the original climbers
would reach the summit of the hill at
the end of the twelfth year. But many
new pilgrims, from time to time
came in by bypaths and partially fil
ed the depleted ranks.
When it was time to start and the
strong leader, Miss Nellie Stephens
ha'd called the roll the little band
started out bravely; among the mos
eager of the little company were Ava
Lee Edwards, with her bright curls
and a quaint manner of shaking' her
left foot when trying to devise
means to climb over the rough places
Ruby Fausett with all the grace and
beauty of childhood and Sidney Har
old with her bright eyes and smiling
face. Great honor is due these three
perservering pilgrims because though
the hill -was often steep and the path
was hard to follow, they never falter
ed or looked back. So good progress
was made during the first stage of the
journey.
When the days grew hot the leader
thought it wise to rest in the shade o
the trees before beginning the next
stretch. There under the leadership
of Miss Margaret Taylor they forged
ahead, covering more territory and
gaining strength and power for then
long stretch yet to come.
These sturdy travelers were sorry
that all their faithful guides could
not continue with them until the end
but these same guides realizing that
they were familiar with the rough
places traversed. In this part of the
journey went back each time to help
the next band which, should come
along. And so they were forced to
change leaders many times, always,
however, welcoming each new one
with an enthusiasm which grew Into
love as the days passed by.
The third leader was Miss Fannie
Clark and the procession moved on
as before. And yet not quite as before
for a new member had joined the hapr
py band. A little girl, hitherto guid
ed by her mother, who forges ahead
by the side of Ava Lee." She is none
other than Marie Burnett.
Again the band of pilgrims toiled
on, overtaken, however, by four more
workers; Babel Akins, strong of body
and contented of mind, Inez "Sandifer,
with her graceful step and ever-ready
smile, and jiist before Christmas Ka
tie Mae Eagleton, demure and ear
nest.
Besides these there entered anoth
er who in later years was chosen his
torian of the journey.
Over two more stretches under the
guidance of Miss Souter and Miss Mi
zelle, over many troublesome rocks
the vailant band strove onward unti
Miss May Turnley took charg eof then)
and they were overtaken by two more
travelers, Martha Kate Rentz famed
for her beauty and Westlake Hollin-
raise, tne sage of tne band.
The eighth stretch when the rocks
were sharpe, the path more dim, an
THE HEART.
Bow It Acts In Every Day Life.
The human heart in a healthy man
weighs but eleven ounces. It beats
from long before birth until death, in
an average lifetime, about seven mil
lion times, allowing seventy beats to
the minute. Every twentv-four hours
this slight organ performs labor equiv
alent to lilting a ton of material eighty
feet into the air. If the blood becomes
poor, and filled -with poisons from dis diseased
eased diseased kidneys, 'he heart is not only
starved, out poisoned as well, it soon
becomes exhausted and unable to meet
any extraordinary demand which may be
made upon it. Supply pure blood; get
the kidneys to working; tone up the
feeble stomach! Dr. Pierce's Golden
Medical V Discovery purifies the blood.
relieves the kidneys and tones up the
alimentary canal. Give the heart the
food it needs and it will continue to wcrk
till the natural end of life.
Pensacola. Fla. "I was in a verv bad
shape four years ago and from what I had
read m regard to heart trouble, considered
my case quite serious, which would have
in time become fatal but for the strength
ening and sustaining eood that I received
from Dr. Pierce's valuable Golden Medical
Discovery. My heart would palpitate
very fast, and often things would grow
dam Dei ore my eyes and 1 would fall,
and remain dead to the world for some
time. Afterward I would have to re
main on my back fot a long while, as 1
was too weak and nervous to stand on
my feet. My health was ia this state
for about two years. A friend of my hus
band's from Jacksonville advised him tc
give me the 4 Golden E Medical Discovery'
After taking six botties I was made en
tirely well, and have net h.id an attack of
my old trouble sin. 'V Yins. J. A.
Fontaine, 604 W. uomana bt.
The modern improvement in pills
JJoctor fierce 8 .Pleasant pellets, lhey
help Nature, instead of fighting with
her.
E. C. Jordan & Co.
Funeral Directors and
Licensed Embalmers
1 1
WILBUR W. C. SMITH
Licensed Embalmer
Phone 10 Ocala, Fla.

the briars and vines more numerous,
was covered with the help of Mis Mur Murphy,
phy, Murphy, and the band felt eager and
strong for the last long stretch which
would take them four long years in
the climbing.
Now the path divided into several
smaller ones leading through the fields
of English history, Latin, Mathemat Mathematics,
ics, Mathematics, and Science. And as the shoulder
of the mountain had been reached the
band needed more than one guide,
and so under the general supervision
of Mr. Workman with Miss Mays, Miss
Bartlett, and Mr. Milne as assistants
we were led on and day after day we
met and overcome all obstacles. We
were overtaken on this stretch by
the twins of our band, Annie Moor Moor-head
head Moor-head and Louise Sanders, those dear
pilgrims who always rejoiced in mis mischief.
chief. mischief. How gladly we welcomed a
short rest but oh, how glad when Mr.
Workman called us together and, in introducing
troducing introducing us to our future guides,
Miss Abernathy, Miss Scott, and Miss
Dean, started us on our way. Joyfully
we toiled over the rough places of
this stretch encouraged by our faith faithful
ful faithful guides. Here we were joined by
Arthur Crago whom we soon learned
to love and who rejoiced in wandering
through the fields of mathematics.
Just before we started on our third
year, we were dismayed to hear that
Mr. Workman would not travel with
us any longer, but nevertheless, we
welcomed Mr. Cassels, and during the
first two years he has now our ever
lasting admiration and love by his
gentleness and strength. Two more
pilgrims now joined our ranks, Lillian
Thomason and James Hill.
While we were resting from the
summer's heat gathering strength, for
the last of our long Journey, Charles
Duval, was toiling up the steep paths
alone and reaching our ranks con continued
tinued continued with us during the remainder
of the journey.
So we began the last stretch of our
pilgrimage. How glad we were to
know that we should have Miss Aber Abernathy
nathy Abernathy to help us over the rough plac places
es places In Latin and French. Miss Tidball,
Mrs. Geiger and Miss Godbey stepped
into the places of Miss Dean and Miss
Scott, and with their sympathetic help
we stumbled over the logs of Trig, and
the pitfalls of English. Just after
Christmas our most distinguished pil pilgrim,
grim, pilgrim, Alfred Green joined our ranks
and during the last, four months has
lightened our r tolls with his merry
laughter. And thus we reached the
summit of our hill but only to see a
higher and steeper one stretching out
before us. Our pilgrimage as the class
of 1916 has ended. Our last meeting
has been held. So ends pur history.

PLUMBING AND
, ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING
When you have plaaibing or elec electrical
trical electrical contracting let-1 a fiirnish yo ;
estimates. No job too large find ;no
too small. II. W. Tucker. 30-tf
SUMMER SCHOOL
I will hold classes this summer in
Trigonometry, Geometry, Algebra,
Arithmetic and subjects of the gram
mar grades. Those wishing to take
these subjects wil kindly see me at an
early date. Rates reasonable.
19-12t R. F. CONNOR.
P. O. Box 133, Ocala.
A. C. L. SCHEDULE
Trains of the Atlantic Coast Line
will arrive and depart in Ocala at the
following, times:
No. 37, : Jacksonville to St. Peters
burg, 2:18-2:25 a. m.
No. 38, St. Petersburg to Jackson
ville, 2:25 a. ; m.
No. 10, Leesburg to Jacksonville.
5:40 a m.
No. 1 51, Ocala to 'Wilcox. Monday.
Wednesday and Friday, 6:10 f m.
No. 35, Ocala to Lakeland fSunnv-
jim), Tuesday, Thursday and Satur
day, 6:40. a. ra.
No. 141, Wilcox, Gainesville and
Palatka to Ocala, 11:15 a. W
No. 40, St. Petersburg to Jackson
ville, 12:54-1:14 p. m.
No. 48, Homosassa to Ocala, 1:05
p. 1XL
No. 49, Ocala, to Homosassa, 2:25
p. m.
No. 39, Jacksonville to St. Peters
burg, 2:36-2:40 p. m.
No. 140, Ocala to Palatka. Gaines
ville and Wilcox, 4:10 p. m.
No. 9, Jacksonville to Leesbure.
9:05 p. m.
No. 150, Wilcox to Ocala. Mondav.
Wednesday and Friday, 6:45 p. rxu
No. 82, Lakeland to Ocala. fSmm-
jim), luesday, Thursday and Satur
day, 9:50 p. m. i
Best .Thing, for a Bilious Attack
"On fnriTif r x.
the printing office I have for years
been a rnrnni mffmo. J:
"n.iAti'ci HUIU 1UU.1KC3-
tion and liver trouble. A lew weeks
a?fl,I Vil9 nnt M x it.
7 aj uj tne case
for two days. Failing to get any
relief from ny other treatment, I
took Jhree of Chamberlain's Tablets
and the next day I felt like a new
r, V W3 H-C- Bailey, editor
Carolina Nova ci n al
tamable everywhere. Adv.
For inside h
LIC is the most economical wall
board made. Hm
everlasting. D. S. Welch, agent, tf.
Carter's Bnttemmf- t-a t
of pure flour, sugar, yeast, malt,
milk, lard and coif. s
"', Sir a UUIUC ouu
wrapped by machinemr n
with steam. on tf
Norris candies neveir fail to please,
resh every week at 1 ie Court Phar-

Co

mmercia

OCALA.

CAPITAL STOCK $50,000.00.
State, County and City Depository.

IPJiaeiS H'S
PHONE 108
PAIE

it i -SyZJi

J

'The Tire Man
Service-car always ready for tire
trouble on the road. Fisk and Hood
Tires and Tubes.. All orders prompt-,
ly filled.
24 N. MAGNOLIA STREET

3 'Phones 438 76 Ocala,

GO "NORTH BY SKA
Fares from Jacksonville

First Inter Inter-Class
Class Inter-Class mediate
Savannah. ...... ....$ 3J0
Baltimore . . ....... 20.00 $16.75
Washington .. ....... 20.00 17.75
Pittsburg . ....... . 255
Chicago.. .. ......... 26.15
Detroit 26.15

Tickets include meals and state room berth on, steamer, except that
tickets reading to Savannah, Ga., do not include meals.
V Sierooms on all steamers outside, large and airy. Steamers Suwan Suwannee
nee Suwannee and Somerset have special rooms with brass beds and bath, toilet, etc.
Wireless on all steamers. Automobiles carried. Through tickets to all
point.
Steam leave Jacksonville, via Savannah, Ga., for Baltimore, Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday and Saturday; and for Philadelphia Thursday and Sunday, 4 p.m.
For' tickets, reservations, etc, call on or address
MERCHANT & MINERS TRANS. CO.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
H. G. RY, Agent. J. F.WARD. T. P. A. L. D. JONES, C A.

Rl(
Only Direct Line

"LY'DE E-iWS"

Fare Includes Meals Good on Any Ship.
Tickets Now on Sale. and Stateroom Berth
Final Return Limit October 31st
CHARLESTON EXCURSIONS
Write for schedule and further particulars.
H. G. VENZEL, Florida Passenger Agent
Ticket Office, Pier 1, Foot of Liberty St, Jacksonville, Florida.

WHITE STAR LINE
Teams tor Rent Light and Heavy HanlingSIoving, Packing

I Motor Cars
BEAVER") CM
Wall Board
Collier Bros.

THE WINDSOR HOTEL

JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA

3 I 1

b.a the Heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room service is
second to none.
.. RATES From $1.50 per day per person to $6.00.
ROBERT M; MEYER, J. E. K A VAN AUG H
; "., Proprietor. Manager.

FLORIDA

OMKICET
FRESH HEATS, POULTRY,
FISH AND OYSTERS
All kinds Fresh Vegetable
in Season
OCALA, FLA
-7
3 T
it
11
7
M
4
Fla.
Class Inter Inter-First
First Inter-First mediate
Philadelphia ... . $22.40 $18.00
New York.. .. 24.40
Boston . . . .... . 27.00
Cleveland.. .. 235
Buffalo.. .. .... 27.80
Elmira . ....... 25.73
19.00
21.50
RETUR
VIA
from Jacksonville
Fire
Lithla
WATE1
Phone.:..: 298
me-
; ,-. .-
. v.. -i

N $35.00

macy

i i 2i
a



OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, MAY 23, 1916

THREE

.to8
and
f ioiaea

Jar

c?
I MM

swdl

(Eaurs

in

For Immediate
Delivery,

TOURING CARS $700
ROADSTERS $680
PRICES AT OCALA
Ask to be shown what
the MAXWELL can do.
R. CARROLL Distributor
OCALA - FLORIDA

I

For Steady Comfort and Real Economy
Keep your refrigerator well loaded with OUR ICE. And use our coupon
books. .

Ocala Ice
PHONE 34
Rt. Rev. Abbott Charles, President.
Saint Leo, Pasco
Five Miles West of Dade City and
HOARDING SCHOOL

MEN, INCORF ORATED JUNE 4, 1889
CLASSICAL AND COMMERCIAL COURSES
$225 FOR TEN SCHOOL MONTHS
U. S. POST OFFICE, TELEGRAPH, TELEPHONE, EXPRESS and
A. C. L. TICKET OFFICE AT THE COLLEGE
FALL TERM OPENS WEDNESDAY. SEPT. l b, 1915

MMf LToUNb TRIP SUMMER RATES .. I
W, y WdT FROM JACKSONVILLE I

St. I-ani. $ JT.75
Dwttr 58.60
Calorad Sprlaf..- 58.60
Salt Lak. Ciy.. 7.1.60
Y.llow.eoaa 78.00
Fartlaad 106.60
Scania .-( 90.50 106 00
Loa Aaaala 0101 aa.10

W r 'jF. -1 m a. n...u a. ui it real Ml tX 7 u.a.iii. m rm

Gi.ci.r trk S2.IS Niagara Fall ...
Law ralea ta ataar Col.r.ao. Calii.raia.

l'r..e oo( 81.601 W. la
Iha Graat Lakaa aa4 Back

nana. .. ,.
Tiokat oa ala daily aaril Sae. 30. kttara liaut Oat. 31.
VARIABLE ROUTE TO DENVER. SALT LAKE, COLORADO
SPRINGS. LOS ANGELES. SAN FRLNCISCO,
PORTLAND, SEATTLE, ETC. .'
Coiaf threat h St. Lauia, rataraiaf taraafk Chicago, ar viea vara. Lfbaral ra
a-rar aa all ticket.
.TO THE NOITH AND NORTHWEST, tkr.a all-.taai taroaffc rrmiaa daily
efcoio af tarae diffaraat raaraa.

If

mm
Otaar Spaaial

FIEE

lira

mere are no strings to tnis
proposition. We give this hand handsome
some handsome baby swing absolutely
Free with every $10 cash pur purchase
chase purchase or for a $15.00 deposit on
installment accounts.
See It In The Window
It is well made of steel braces

I
heavy canvas. It can be
ud so as to taKe ud no

M. v' A
room while not in use. Ask
our solicitors about it.
MARION FURNITURE CO.
West Broadway Ocala, Fla.

toe!
i i i
PacMog Co;
OCALA. FLA.
Rev. Father Benedict, Director.
Cfounty, Florida
Ono Mile East of San Antonio
for BOYS and YOUNG
M.ckiaa.
BaB.la
46.90 HuuiMk Cava..
CW. H'nHWI aad Miebifaa paSat.
Maaataia. Praaartiaaarelr U rale tram otr paiat ia

Dalath 65.70 21.40
amai, 17 P..-. n. J2.25
T.raato 48.90 lndiaaapaii 36.30
Maatraal 55.45 Freorh Lick 35.45
Pete key 52.60 Tolade 41.10

54.30 Detroi .. 43.50

(aat. jo... 41-80

30.90

"THE SOUTHLAND" ta Caieaca aad ladtaaapalia via Atlaata. Kaax.
villa, Laaiarilla, Qiactaaati aad Paaaaylvaaia Liae. toara Jaekaoavill 8:20
f. M.. arriva Caiiafa 1:4$ A. M.
"DIXIB FUYB" via Atlaata. Ckattaaoefa. Naakrilla, EvaaavilJa.
laaTa Jaekaaavilla Si30 l. M. arriya Caiea 13 A. M.
"ST. LOUIS EXPRESS" a Moatloawry. Binaiakaai, Naakyilla,
Bnaavilla, Ware JaakvaaviUa Bi20 P. M., arrive St. Loai 7:40 A. M.
Tkra daily trala ta aha Soatkw. tkroafli Naw Orlaaas. Uaaxeclled
din'af car aarviaa. Fart iaM. Raek ballaat. Na Datt. Na Din. Let at
kaew whara yaa with ta aecad tka aaaiaier aad wa will ad yoa haadaa
llattratad fcaoklet af naarrttcrirt raaarta, rate. Ieaia( car raaarvatioaa
aad ataar iaforaMtiaa. Saaatry via "I 4 N. wan yaa aay year tiokat.

H.CBRETNEY, ;
FUrUa Ptnrer Arattt,
LoviaviiU k Naobtilc R. IL,
,134 Wort B Slraa.
, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Law Rata dariag" tka giaaw ta coavaatioaa eta
j

CLASS PROPHECY

Future of Class of 1916 Predicted by
Miss Marie Burnett at the Clos Closing
ing Closing Exercises of the Ocala
High School
Ever since I can remember, for fortune
tune fortune telling has had as great a fas fascination
cination fascination for me as it had for Sir.
Roger de Coverly. A gipsy tent, or a
booth at the fair, over which is writ
ten in flaring capitals, "Madame
will read your past,' present, and fu
ture," always receives longing glances
from me; and if I have the -necessary
dollar, it is not long before I am
inside, listening with the greatest
credulity to whatever the smooth smoothtongued
tongued smoothtongued temptress has to tell me of
untold riches, a dark young man and
a fair rival. It is no wonder, there therefore,
fore, therefore, that I was delighted when I re received
ceived received the following letter several
weeks ago:
"My dear friend: If you will be at
the Coast Line crossing on Orange
avenue at eleven-thirty tomorrow
night you will learn some interesting
facts with regard to your future." Do
not be afraid for an unseen protector
will watch over you on your way and
no harm can possibly befall you.
"Yours sincerely,
"The Man in the Moon"
I thonght the matter over careful
ly, for I had heard of the dangers of
wandering around on a lonely road at
midnight; but the little phrase, "in "interesting
teresting "interesting facts with regard to your
future," proved too much for me. So
Friday night at eleven o'clock, I slip slipped
ped slipped quietly out of the house and hur hurried
ried hurried to the appointed place. To my
surprise and somewhat to my alarm
at first, I saw that I was not the only
person there. But my fear was re re-r;emoved
r;emoved re-r;emoved when I found that the others
vere my classmates. Each one had
received a note similiar to mine and
all were eager to hear that which
was to be revealed. Only one mem member
ber member of the class was absent. This
was Ruby Fausett I beg pardon,
Mrs. Costello. She did not need to
come for her future is already r de determined.
termined. determined.
Eleven-thirty came and nothing had
happened. We looked at each other
rather foolishly and were wishing we
had stayed at home, when Charles
cried, "Look; yonder!" and pointed to
the moon. Sliding down a moonbean
was a runabout of pale gold. Direct Directly
ly Directly toward us it glided without dis disturbing
turbing disturbing the profound silence which
biooded over the world at that hour,
and as it drew near we saw that it
had one occupant and that there was
just room for two. After what seem
ed ages it stopped in our midst and
its driver hopped out. Such a dain dainty,
ty, dainty, queer, little creature,- dressed in
soft satin, of the palest gold with
sparkling gauze draperies. Her gold golden
en golden hair was held back by a tiny band
and fell in soft ripples over her
shoulders. No ; one spoke for a min minute
ute minute and then in a low, musical voice,
the fairy began:
"I am Numa, one of the millions
of spirits of the moonbeams," she
said, and tonight I have become visi visible
ble visible in order to bring a message to
you from the Man. in the Moon. He
intended to send for a large float
which would hold you all, but today
it was broken so that it can never
be repaired. But my master bade
me bring one' of you to him. That
one shall be appointed by lot and to
that person he will disclose the
knowledge intended for all. The boy
or girl to whom the lot falls will be
bound by word of honor to repeat
faithfully to you what he or she shall
learn," -'
There was silence for a minute and
then, as young people will we began
clamoring to go with her and asking
all sorts of .unanswerable questions.
The sprite raised her hand and mo motioned
tioned motioned for silence. "You. forget you
must draw lots," she reminded, pro
ducing a bundle of sticks. "Each of
ycu, blindfolded, must draw one of
these sticks 'and the one who selects
the shortest will be the one to go.
I am sorry it is so, but we have done
everything in our power to prevent
disappointing you. Now choose, for
my time is almost ; V
Well, to make t. long story short,
the lot fety to me. I promised faith
fully to tell my friends what I heard
and saw on the moon and I am tak
ing advantage of this occasion to ful
fill my' promise.
As soon as I was seated in the car,
all the world disappeared and I was
floating through the air so fast that
I should have beenN afraid but in five
minutes I was fast' asleep. When I
was awakened by a light touch of
Numa's hand, I was in a land where
it is always day, but the light is
not: glaring or blinding as it is here.
It is soft and shaded so that your
eyes never, grow tired. The land is
very much like' our world, but there
is a witchery, a spirit of romance,
over it all that is entirely lacking on
the earth. "I am sorry I cannot al
low you -to explore our beautiful
country," she said, "but we have a
law that mortals cannot remain here
for more than two hours. We must
make haste. However, you may see a
little as we go to the palace. Come."
The street which led to the palace
wound in and out between hills and
valleys filled with trees and exquisite
flowers. Here and there, I caught
glimpses of mansions surrounded by
gardens. Fairy-like creatures played
among the groves and everywhere
the utmost harmony prevailed. All
too soon we came to a crystal palace
which sparkled and gleamed in the
subdued light in a most facinating
manner. A little awe-inspired by the
magnificence before me, I began to
wish myself safe at home. But my
guide never faltered. Straight

through the wonderful halls she led
me, not even pausing a moment to
allow me to examine a few of the
interesting curiosities which were
scattered throughout the building.
Then at last we entered a small
room filled with ledgers some an ancient,
cient, ancient, some more modern. But more
interesting thaa all these was the
only occupant of the room, a little old
man with long white hair and beard
and the friendliest eyes. His face

fairly beamed with good nature and
his cheery voice put me at ease in a
moment. And yet, when the first
greetings were over, there was a sad
ness in his face which touched me to
the heart, for I knew that the man
in the moon, in spite of his riches and
power, was not happy simply because
he was separated from his own kind
of creatures. I did not have long to
think of this, however, for he im
mediately entered upon the business
in hand.
"My child," he said, "perhaps you
are thinking that I have brought
you here on a sort of wild goose
chase. But please don't think so. Do
you see that large book in the corner?
Its pages fortell the future of High
School pupils, and each year it
pleases me to bring a class to see it.
This year I decided upon your class,
so now if you wish, you may learn
whate fate has destined for you."
The book to which he" pointed was
the largest I have ever seen four
by two feet. It stood on end so all I
had to do was open it. When I turn turned
ed turned the flyleaf,' these words met my
eyes, "Ulass 01 iyit, u. n. as
they will appear in 1925." My fingers
trembled with eagerness as I turned
the page and beheld a busy scene. It
was the operating room of a large
hospital in the city of Burbank and
a surgeon was performing a delicate
operation with skilled fingers. At
first I could not see her face as she
bent over her patient, but when she
raised her head with a look of tri
umph on her face, I recognized in the
world famous physician, our class
president, Sidney Harold.
The next scene was a far different
one a dainty room whose walls
were lined with books 1 and whose
windows were, filled with flowers.
Cats tumbled over cats and a parrot
was chattering wildly in its cage. On
the desk was a set of ungraded ex examination
amination examination papers. In short the whole
room proclaimed that its occupant
was a "bachelor maid" school teach
er. I was wondering which of us this
fate was awaiting twhen the door
opened and in walked Inez Sandifier.
"Why Inez, what in the world," I be
gan, but the scene changed to a
Isrge theater. The curtain was ris rising
ing rising on the opening act of a famous
ministrel. I scanned the faces of the
men. Not one was familiar to mee.
Then the black-faced comedian, Billy
Fuss was introduced. Most of his
fun was made by putting chalk down
people's backs and throwing erasers
around, so I knew at once that this
was none other than Arthur Crago,
for that was his favorite sport in
school.
As soon as I recognized him the
Puzzle
Find the car that, is Klaxonized.
This is a busy street as seen from
m aeroplane. Pedestrians are
rvalking here and there among the
mtomobile traffic. One of the cars
ias a Klaxon on it. The owner,
las sounded it, "Which one?
Wle will gladly put a Klaxon on
four car. If, after you have tried
t, you are willing to drive with without
out without it, we will take it off and
:harge you nothing.
"There is a Klaxon for every size
ind kind of car from $4 to $20.
klaxons are made only by the
ovell-McConnell Mfg. Co.,
Mewark, N. J. like all standard
irticles they are widely imitated.
To be sure, look for the Klaxon
lame-plate.
700,000 are in use
Tucker's Garage
PHONE 439
West Broadway and North Main St.
OCALA, FLORIDA

;'tfit

picture vanished and another took its
place. This time a grove of palm
trees appeared crowded with native
Africans. A missionary was preach preaching
ing preaching earnestly to those people with a
voice of passionate and melodramatic
appeal. There was something very
familiar about this voice and it did
not take me long to realize that it
was Katie May Eagleton for I re

membered how her loud talking dis
tressed us in class when we would
beg her to be quiet so that the rest
of us might be heard.
The next scene showed the interior
of a convent and our sober, studious
and sedate comrade, Louise Sanders,
who had decided to become a nun as
she wished to spend the rest of her
life in quiet meditation and this was
the only way of escape from the so
cial engagements which wearied her
so during school life.
The scene which followed showed
that another of the class of '1916 had
taken the veil, but Lillian Thomason
preferred the wedding veil with
orange blossoms and lilies of the val
ley, and being Lillian, she could not
forget the touch of green.
Then a new spectacle presented it
self. This time, a circus ring. A
bareback rider was performing and 1
soon recognized in the sylph-like
furm and graceful movements of the
ciever horse woman, our small and
dainty classmate, Mable Akins.
Next I saw a pitiful sight. A timid
looking man was coming home from
work) on Saturday night. His wife
met him in the hall. "Hello," he be began,
gan, began, but could get no further.
''You're tracking dust on my carpet!"
she shrieked, "Go right back and clean
your shoes. But first you can hand
over your pay envelope. Why, you've
spend some of it. Two whole dollars!
What did you do with it? Bought
me some candy? I don't believe it!
Well, if you did, you must have been
up to something I don't like. I tell
you, Westlake, I'm tired of the way
you treat me." "I'm tired too," he
murmured. Poor Westlake
This sad display of domestic trouble
soon disappeared and a suffrage
meeting took its place. A leading
suffragist was beginning her speech.
"My sisters," she said,, "I wish this
evening, to outline briefly my plans
for an ideal community, a place where
you, my poor, downtrodden country
women, may' enjoy to the full your
rightful privileges; and above all, a
place where there are no men in
short a, modern Utopia." I needed
no more. This could be none other
than Martha Kate Rentz, whose an
tipathy for the. opposite sex is well
known among us.
The next scene revealed the fact
that another fellow-classman will dis distinguish
tinguish distinguish himself as a speaker. James
Hill was shown as a member of the
House of Representatives, and by his
long drawn out oratory delaying the
passage of bills to which he was bp-
posed. James is. well fitted for this
vork as I know, having spent a term
in senior mathematics with him.
Many a time he has prevented the
rest of us from exposing our igno
rance by taking a whole period to re recite
cite recite his proposition.'
The wonderful book next present
ed a court room where a skilful lawy lawyer
er lawyer was pleading his case. It was easy
to know him, for no one of us hut
Alfred Green has enough ability for
evading the point, making a lot out of
nothing, and remembering impor important
tant important (?) details. He has had a great
deal of training this year in the re
markable debate given at every avail available
able available opportunity, "Resolved, that wa water
ter water is wet."
When the scene changed, I saw
Claudia O'Neal teaching a private
school for girls in a large city. It
was during recess and a group of her
older students were gathered about
her. I thought I knew her at once,
but when she said, "Oh, my dears,
when you have had my experience
with the world and know men like I
do I was sure, for she is the most
sophisticated girl in the class.
A tent was shown then in which a
play was being given: All of the
parts were taken by men and I notic noticed
ed noticed a dainty, effeminate, young girl
and I could hardly believe that the
part was taken by a man. Before
the show had progressed far, some something
thing something funny happened and the actor
laughed. Then I knew that he was
Charles Duval for only he could giggle
in that queer nervous fashion.
A studio In York, Fla., appeared
next. Its owner was seated at a desk
busily planning school entertainments
and costumes. When she raised her
head and said to one of her friends,
I got my first experience when I
was a senior in planning affairs for
my class. You see, the. rest were such
blockheads along that' line." I know
that this was Annie Moorhead.
Again the scene changed. A lux
urious outmobile stopped in front of
a shabby tenement and a tall, richly
dressed lady carrying a market bas basket
ket basket on each arm stepped out. Several
dirty children crowded about her as
she entered the building. Evidently
she was a social worker. The family
she was visiting was in the most
straightened circumstances and their
gratitude was touching. When they
sat down to chat a few moments, the
social, worker crossed her knee and
began shaking her foot violently.
"Why, that must be Ava Lee,- I ex
claimed.
When the last scene has disap
peared, the book was shut fast and
try as I might, I could not open it
again. Then I lost my temper. "You
said you would show me my future,"
I stormed. "It is not fair!" The man
in the moon looked at me sadly.
"Poor child," he said, "I was going to
tell that to you myself. But since
you cannot control yourself better

.- r- S.i IS-d 1

es or
yoirs

; ot-ilebk- By

OCALA COCA-COLA BOT BOTTLING
TLING BOTTLING WORKS

3lisiaiiB

TRADE MARK
t
y
t
T
y
r
X
r
r
t
"Phoslime carries a
x

PH0BLIME
v-'-- for '

lire, which has been repeatedly demonstrated in
I practical use to keep green and well nourished the I
I LAWNS on which it was used." ?

f
TfPrTATr

Prices F. O. B. Phoslime, Fla., In Bags

t
J
I
CARLOAD
$9 Per Ton

WRITE FOR BOOKLET

I FLORIDA SOFT PHOSPHATE & LIME CO. j
f Box 462 Ocala, Florida

s

MDMM(ffl Trap

3Ch NEW YORK
v3 Limit Oct. 31st
A K CHICAGO Sold June
05yBna 2-3-4-5. Limit .'June 22
IK ST. LOUIS Sold June
OaOS 9-10-11. Limit June 25

Attlaimtlc (CoafBf Lime
Standard Railroad of the South

you do not deserve to know. Fare Farewell!"
well!" Farewell!" He touched an electric button
2nd I found myself falling down,
down, 'till it seemed that the fall
would never end and then I know no
more. When I came to my senses 1
was sitting on the front steps at
home. It was seven o'clock in the
evening and I heard a familiar
whistle at the corner. "I don't care
if he didn't tell my future," I said,
happily, to myself. 'The present is
good enough for me!"
CAMPAIGN ITINERARY
The following itinerary for candi
dates has been adopted by the cam
paign committee of the Marion coian coian-ty
ty coian-ty democratic executive committ.ee.
Speeches of county candidates limit limited
ed limited to 15 minutes.
Dunnellon, Thursday (night) May
Turner Pond, Friday, May 26. r
Levon, Saturday, May 27 (Pedro,
Summerfield and. Levon precincts).
Fort McCoy, Tuesday, May 30.
Moss Bluff (Long Lake school
house) May 31.
Ocala, Monday (night) June 5.
WILL COACH PUPILS
I will take about ten pupils from
any of the grades in the Ocala high
school to coach through the six wieks
following Monday, May 29th. If in
terested, meet me at the high school
Monday morning between 8 and 10
o'clock. 3t Mrs. II. S. Wesson.
Junior Sewing Circle
The Junior sewing circle of the
Methodist church will meet Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock with
Miss Nellie Liddon. All members
are cordially invited to be present.
SWEET DREAMS drives away
mosquitoes. Lasts all night. The
Court Pharmacy. 18-tf
Eat OCALA-MADE bread. There's
none better than Carter's Butter
nut. 20-tf

I If
utitmiiutttiMi
act
: J
ev stras.w
SS3
mKry iillioixs,
is ixo exception.
rajrei?a3a

rmimittiwxi-

liubilliiilHllit

. ri-r...

Illlli

mm

' mi

Every-j
WKarmJ J

Will I"!f!fPF'iP!?1fn7,,!,'f1,,'',n,'wl ""T"? m'W ?r
li itasiiiw

ji 1
.UiitUitiiiUili
REGISTERED
large percentage of moist- ?
rrT Ttrrntr k
LESS THAN CARLOAD
$10.00 Per Ton
VIA
J
ROUND TRIP EXCURSION RATES
Via
SEABOARD AIR LIHE RY.
The Progressive Railway of the South
New York $39.05
Philadelphia ... . ...... ... 39.05
Baltimore 36.05
Boston .. ................. 47.35
Detroit .. ............ 47.55
Chicago. 47J55
Denver .. .... ......... 62.65
Denver .. 65.50
Washington 36.05
On sale daily May 15th to Septem
ber 30th, 1916. Limit returning Octo
ber 31st, 1916.
JOHN BOISSEAU, C. P. A.
PHONE 129
G. Z. PHILLIPS, A. G. P. A
Jacksonville, Fla.
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL
CARPENTER AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Coo
tract work. Gives More and Better
Work for the Money than Any Other
Now is the time to take a good
spring tonic and VINOL is the best.
Sold only at The Court Pharmacy, tf

1



V

FOUR
OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, MAY 23, 1916

9

OCALA OCCURRENCES i

One Cent Sale at Gerig's.
Auto for hire, phones 145 and 123.
Mr. J. C. Jackson left for Seabring
this afternoon to call on hi3 trade.
Mr.'R. S. Hall has returned from
French Lick Springs, Indiana, where j
he went to spend a short time atf
those famous mineral springs.
Finiih the inside of your house
wfch FIBERLIC WALL BOARD,
fur sale by. D. S. Welch, distributor.
, i
Mr. C. B. Kittredge, secretary and j
treasurer of the Florida Soft Phos-;
phate & Lime company, has returned
from a business trip to Miami in the
interest of hi3 firm.
One Cent Sale at Gerig's.
W. K. Lane, '1. D Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat. Law Library Building. Oca!a
Florida.
A party visiting Gainesville today
was Mrs. D. M. ; Boney, Misses Be Beatrice
atrice Beatrice Boney, Virginia Sistrunk "and
Annie Moorhead and Mr. Van Boney.
They made the trip in Mr. Boney's
big Cadillac eight.
Mr. J. A. McArthur, president of
the Florida Land company with head headquarters
quarters headquarters at Montbrook, has been in
the city today attending to business
for his company. He left on the
Seaboard limited for Jacksonville for
a short business visit. Mr.' McArthur
is a prominent citizen of Levy county
and did strenuous work to save the
slicing up of Levy and Marion
counties in last summer's "Bloxham"
campaign.
FLORIDA
PRODUCTS
SOAP
BUTTER
BROOMS
FRESH MEAT
GUAVA JELLY
SMOKED MEA'A
BARREL SYRUP
BOTTLED SYRUT
SWEET POTATOES
CANNED PEACHES
CANNED TOMATOES
GRAPE FRUIT JUICE
ORANGE MARMALADE
CANNED SAUER KRAUT
CANNED STRING BEANS
GRAPE FRUIT MARMALADE
Carn-Thomas Co.
Phone 163
FAMILY AVOIDS
SERIOUS SICKNESS
By Being Constantly Supplied WilL
Thedford' Black-DraugLL
McDuff, Va. "I suffered for several
years," says Mrs. J. B. Whittaker, ot
this place, "with sick headache, and
itomach trouble.
.Ten years ago a friend told me to tr
Thedford's Black-Draught, which I did",
and I found it to be the best family medi medicine
cine medicine for young and old.
I keep Black-Draught on hand all ths
time now, and when my children feel 2
Wttle bad, they ask me for a dose, 2nd ii
does them more good than any medicine
they ever tried.
We never have a long spell of sick sickness
ness sickness in our family, since we commenced
using Black-Draught."
Thedford's Black-Draught is purely
vegetable, and has been found to regu regulate
late regulate weak stomachs, aid digestion, re relieve
lieve relieve ; indigestion, colic, wind, nausea,
headache, sick stomach, and similar
.symptoms.
It has been in constant use for more
than 70 years, and has benefited more
. than a million people.
Your druggist sells and recommend!
Black-Draught Price only 25c. Get a
Backage to-dayt n. C itt
.Mclver & Maelay
PHONES 47, 104 V)5
CCA LA, FLORIDA
IN HOT WATER BECAUSE
YOU'RE OUT OF IT?
Seerns odd, doesn't it? Yet how true.
Hot water is a great blessing. Let
us install hot water piping in your
home and you'll wonder how you ever
got along without it. Get our esti estimate
mate estimate on the cost of kerosene or gas
water heaters.
Tho's.Needham&Son
Plumbing, Tinning and
. Electrical Contracting

2 and 4 S. Orange St. PHONE 526

V

IMPORTANT MEETING
' OF THE ODD FELLOWS
There will be special anniversary
services held at Tulula lodge, I. O. O.
F., tonight, in their new home, and
all visitors in the city are especially
invited to meet with the lodge.
Today is the 30th anniversary of
the organization of Tulula lodge and
also the 97th anniversary of the or
ganization of the lodge in America.
All brothers and visitors are urged
to attend.
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur A. Olin are
the happy parents of a fine baby boy
who arrived at their home at Ken Ken-drick
drick Ken-drick Sunday morning.
One Cent Sale at Gerig's.
Mr. R. S. Rogers of the Florida
Title & Abstract company will leave
on the night train tonight for Ar Arcadia,
cadia, Arcadia, to attend the meeting of the
title men of the state.
Mr. W. W. Clyatt of the Security
Abstract company left this afternoon
for Arcadia, where he will attend the
meeting of the Florida title men.
One Cent Sale at Gerig's.
Mrs. E. S. Rogers and eleven-year
old son Edwin, arrived a few days
since from Jackson, Tenn., to spend
the summer with Col. and Mrs. R. F.
Rogers.'' .Mrs. Rogers is the widow of
Mr. E. S. Rogers, a son of Col. and
Mrs. R. F. Rogers, who died five
years ago, .March last.
Two of the clerks from the A. C. L.
freight office will be treated to bot
tled coca-cola at our expense, if they
will call at the store of T. Monsour,
in the Harrington Hall block, and
present this notice. The Ocala Coca-
Cola Bottling Works. It
One Cent Sale at Gerig's".
Mr. E. L. Stapp of the Florida
Title and Abstract Corporation, left
this afternoon for Arcadia to attend
the meeting of state title men, which
will be held there tomorrow and next
day. ...
One Cent Sale at Gerig's.
Mrs. W. J. Hilands, granddaughter
Helen and nurse left on the limited
this afternoon for Asheville, N. C,
where they will spend the summer.
Mrs. W. S. Hilands will join them in
a short time and in June Mr. Hilands
will go up for his vacation and to
participate in the golf tournament.
One Cent Sale at Gerig's.
Mrs. R. R. Carroll and daughter
Merris will leave on the early morn morning
ing morning A. C. L. train tomorrow for
Jacksonville, from whence they will
sail at 4 o'clock on the M. & M. T.
Suwannee for Baltimore. They will
go from there to Washington to visit
Mr. and Mrs. George Pollock and Miss
Mary Byfield for a few days, return returning
ing returning thento Baltimore to take another
M. & M. T. ship for Providence, R. I.,
and will sspend several months in the
New England states, where they have
been spending their summers for a
number of years. Mr. Carroll will go
to Jacksonville and see them off on
the boat.
One Cent Sale at Gerig's.
Annie Rooney and Merris Carroll
spent part of today out on Mr. Allen
Rodgers, farm, three miles east of
the city, visiting Mr. Rodgers' daugh daughter
ter daughter and their Shetland ponies, Dot and
Pet, which Mr. Rodgers is caring for.
The girls and ponies had a great
family reunion.
VEGETABLES, MILK AND EGGS
from our own farm daily. Open nigh
and day. Merchant's Cafe- tf
One Cent Sale at Gerig's.
Fresh seeds of all kinds at the
Occla Seed Store. tf
A GOOD 1 LMILY COUGH SYRUP
Can be made my mixing pine-tar,
aconite, sugar, hyoscyamus, sassafras,
peppermint, ipecac, rhubarb, mand mandrake,
rake, mandrake, capsicum muriate ammonia,
honey and glycerine. It is pleasant,
healing and soothing, raises the
phlegm, and gives almost instant re relief.
lief. relief. For convenience of those who
prefer not to fuss, it is supplied ready
made m 25c. bottles under name of
Dr. Bell's Pine-Tar-Honejr. Can be
had at your druggist. Insist on get getting
ting getting Dr. Bell's Pine-Tar-Honey and
see that the formula is on the pack
age. Ad. 3
Ocala, Fla.

CLASS POEM, 1916
OCALA HIGH SCHOOL

(Annie M. Moorehead)
Here's to the class of Nineteen-six-teen,
Here's to the purple and gold!
May we always to our colors cling,
May our love for them ne'er grow
cold!
Here's to our motto, our life com companion,
panion, companion, "To the heights through difficulty"!
Here's to our flower, the white carna carnation
tion carnation In whose face there is purity!
m m
One bright sunshiny morning, twelve
long years ago
There stood a ship named "Prep
aration" on the pearly white sea seashore,
shore, seashore, The waves roll'ed o'er the white sea
sands, the song birds flew o'er
head,
A wiry wind began to blow, then the
sails of our ship were spread.
The silvery tongue of a bell pealed
forth, our ship was on the waves,
The Bay of Life with its trials was
before us for many days.
There were many sailor lads aboard,
and sailor lasses, too,
Indeed there was never a happier
crowd than the sailors in our
crew.
The winds were calm our first few
years, the waves did not beat
high,
The sun shone ever on our ship, and
blue was all the sky.
Our colors at the top mast were fly flying
ing flying in the air
And welcomed by all the blithe sea sea-birds
birds sea-birds that flitted here and there.
There was work each day, and then
came play till setting of the sun,
When this ball of light went to rest
for the night, the day's journey
was done.
The moon shone above o'er all the
world, bright stars from the
sky would peep,
Then as our eyelids grew heavy, the
waves would lull us to sleep.
But suddenly one morning a noise
was heard outside,
A storm was raging across the Bay,
the sky with dark clouds was
pied.
The lightning flashed, the thunder
roared, mad waves rushed o'er our
deck,
No one could stand upon our ship,
so fiercely did it shake.
We toiled all day unceasingly each
sailor lass and lad,
Each minute it seemed our ship
would be in robe of destruction
clad.
lOur captain bravely paced the deck,
and tried to calm our fears,
We looked to him for comfort as we
had for many years.
Our pilot toiled through all the storm,
our ship did ne'er go 'stray
To him and to our captain we owe the
victory of the day.
Twas during the middle of the after
noon when the thunder ceased to
roar, : V
The clouds commenced to scatter, and
the lightning flashed no more.
The sun shone out from behind the
clouds and made their silvery lin
V ing, '
And soon across the white-capped
' waves its rays were brightly
shining.
The waves calmed down as if a sham
ed,.our ship no more did tremble,
The western wind soon ceased to
blow, then our crew on deck as
sembled.
Hark! Out across the restful sea,
against the blue of sky;
We saw a black speck floating just
within the range of eye!
Our sails were hoisted higher then,
our bow rushed through the
water,
We must rescue others in distress,
we had no time to loiter.
The speck would rise above the
waves, then behind them disap
pear,
So small the raft that no one knew,
till our ship drew very near,
That, toiling and tired, there were
clinging forms
To this raft from a ship wrecked in
storm!
We lowered a life-boat and sailors to
rescue the storm-beaten few
And after a struggle they reached
our deck, and later joined our
crew.
But several sailor girls and boys who
were with us when our journey
hecan
. v
Turned back to shore because they
feared they, could not sail the
end.
So onward o'er the Bay of Life we
sailed from year to year
Some days were filled with pleasure,
while others were full of fear;
Some days the skies above were
blue, the sun would shine so
bright,
But other days the storms would
come with clouds as black as
night,
One evening just at twilight when
the shades of night were falling
We heard a horn, a sound of distress,
far o'er the waters calling.
Our pilot searched across the waves
and saw the! spreading sails
Of a ship which seemed to play hide-and-seek
with, the' waves and
winds of a gale.
Now when this ship drew very near,
when its waves on our side were
. lapping,
We could plainly see it was in dis-
f tress, the crew had lost its cap captain.
tain. captain. ""
So here's where we gave up our cap captain
tain captain to a crew less fortunate than
we,
Soon wecould could get another one,
and .their's was a troublous sea;

For several days we drifted along, till
a passing ship we hailed,
And here's where we found our cap captain.
tain. captain. Under him two years we've
sailed!
So now our crew of seventeen has
reached the Ocean of Life,
We look back o'er the Bay of Life
with thoughts and memories
bright,
But ahead is the troublous ocean,
where the ship Success is sailing;
And soon our colors at top its mast
will be so proudly waving.
So onward we will sail through life,
our voyage has just begn,
And in the end may all of us say to
our pilot, "We have won!"

CLERK'S FINANCIAL
STATEMENT FOR APRIL
Honorable City Council of the City
of Ocala, Florida:
Gentlemen: I herewith submit the
following report of receipts and dis disbursements
bursements disbursements for the month of April,
1916:
Receipts
Collected by tax collector:
Taxes .$ 8,059.20
Licenses 135.50
Interest on deposits 10.87
Interest on sinkiner fund.. 16.32
. $ 8.221.89
Collected hv marshal:
Police court fines S 38.70
Delinuqent personal taxes 16.50
i $ 55.20
Collected by stock impounder:
Pound fees $ 10.25
Collected bv clerk:
E. L. Dept., service.. $ 2,219.55
E. L. Dept., meters 62.00
Tax redemptions ......... 2.74
Kent 40.uu
Sidewalk assessments . 211.86
Miscellaneous .80
W. W. Dent., rents 2,264.77
W. W. Dept., meters 28.50
W. W. Dent., house rent.. 15.00
W. W. Dent., refund ex
pense account 39.70
v $ 4 889.92
Total collections 13l77!26
Balance on hand April 1,
1916 96,761.21
Total $109,938.47
Warrants Drawn During April, 1916
Salaries:
Officers, clerks, etc $ 370.00
Police department:
Salaries .$ 255.00
Witness fees and costs... 17.65
Feed for prisoners 2.70
Sundry expense : 9.61
284.96
253.20
105.90
29.51
Street department:
Labor . ........
Feed
Sundry expense ;'.
$ 388.61
Sanitary department:
Labor and expense .$ 334.86
Feed 105.90
.. $
Contingencies:
Health department $
Pound expense
Carnegie Library fund...
Rest room fund
Fire department:
Salaries .. $
Supplies and repairs
440.76
100.00
66.75
175.00
50.00
325.00
20.17
bundries ..
26.25
$ 371.42
Electric light department.? 2,173.80
Water works department. 1,219.44
Water works bond fund.. 396.30
Sewer bond fund .. 10,001.11
Refund of license 488.48
Total warrants drawn. .$ 16,643.86
Disbursed by Citay Treasurer During
April, 1916
General fund $ 2,590.13
Electric lierht fund 1,945.11
Water works fund 1,344.75
Rest room fund 250.00
Carnegie Library fund... 175.00
Water works bond fund.. 830.21
Sewer bond fund 10,001.11
$ 17,136.31
Balance on Hand May 1, 1916
General fund
Bond interest fund
Sinking fund
Electric light fund. ......
Water works fund
Water works bond fund..
Sewer bond fund :
Rest room and Carnegie
Library funds
3,435.66
1,796.73
5,601.25
1,786.50
519.23
43,223.60
35,570.27
868.92
' $ 92,802.16
Accounted for as Follows
(From city treasurer's report)
In Commercial Bank .$ 79,595.19
In M. & C. National Bank. 11,101.80
Interest coupons previous
ly paid 1,588.89
Int. coupons now turned in 408.00
Checks and cash items... 108.28
$ 92,802.16
Outstanding Scrip, May 1, 1916
General fund $ 151.54
Electric liirht fund 315.40
Water works fund 37.50
Water works bond fund.. 17.50
Sewer bond fund 48.75
570.69
Respectfully submitted,
H. C. Sistrunk, City Clerk.
How Mrs. Harrod Got Rid of Her
Stomach Trouble
"I suffered with stomach trouble for
years and tried everything I heard
of, but the only relief I got was tem
porary until last spring l saw Unam Unam-berlain's
berlain's Unam-berlain's Tablets advertised and pro procured
cured procured a bottle of them at our drug
store. I eo; immediate relief from
that dreadful heaviness after eating
and from pain in the stomach,"
writes Mrs. Linda Harrod, Fort
Wayne, Ind. Obtainable every
where. Adv.
BIDS WANTED
FOR 100 CEMENT POSTS
Bids will be received from Marion
county firms and opened on May 27,
at 10 o clock for one hundred rein
forced concrete posts. Plans and
specifications will be found at the
Ocala Seed Store.
We reserve the rieht to reject any
or all bids. W. D. Cam,
L. H. Chazal,
S. R. Pyles,
5-15-12t Committee.
We give prompt and accurate ser ser-ice
ice ser-ice on all prescription work. Tell
your doctor -to leave yours with
us. The Court Pharmacy. tf.

A'N'NO"tI.N.OBMB

FOR COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR
To Marion County Voters:
I hereby announce my candidacy
for Tax Collector, and I am still
standing fiat-footed on the strongest
plank in my platform of 1914, viz:
1 will keep the doors of the people's
office open every working day in the
year." In short, 1 propose to be THE
MAN ON THE JOB. (Read my
platform.) W. W. Stripling.
FOR TAX COLLECTOR
1 hereby announce myself a candi
date for re-election to the office of tax
collector of Marion county. I want
to thank you for your hearty support
given me in the past. If elected, 1
promise to give you the best service
possible and to give my persona1 at attention
tention attention to the duties of the office.
Yours very truly,
W. L. COLBERT.
'FOR TAX ASSESSOR
I am a candidate for tax assessor
for Marion county in the democratic
primary of June 6th, 1916. If nomi nominated
nated nominated and elected, I will give the peo people
ple people of the county a clean and fair ad administration
ministration administration of the duties of the office.
J. P. PHILLIPS.
FOR TAX ASSESSOR
I am a candidate for re-election to
the office of tax assessor. You never
voted for a man in your life who ap appreciated
preciated appreciated the favor more highly or
tried harder to deserve it than your
old friend, Alfred Ayer.
FOR SUPERVISOR OF REGISTRA REGISTRATION
TION REGISTRATION To the Voters of Marion County:
If I have given satisfaction as sup supervisor
ervisor supervisor of registration, vote for me in
the coming primary, and I will appre appreciate
ciate appreciate it; if not, vote for another and
we will be friends all the same.
' D. M. BARCO.
FOR SHERIFF
I announce myself for' re-election
for the office of sheriff of Marion
county and respectfully solicit the
support of the people.
Respectfully yours,
J, P. Galloway.
FOR SHERIFF
To the Democratic Voters:
I hereby announce my candidacy
for the office of sheriff of Marion
county, subject to the wishes of the
voters at the coming primary election.
I firmly believe in the majority rule,
the salary system for paying public
officers, the selection of deputies by
the citizens of each community and
the application of the law? to every
one regardless of personal desires.
Assuring you of my very best endeav
ors if elected to the ofhee to which 1
aspire, I am Yours tiuly,
JOHN T. LEWIS SR.
Ocklawaha, Fla.
FOR SHERIFF
To the Democratic Voters of Marion
County:
I hereby announce myself a candi
date for sheriff of Marion county, sub subject
ject subject to the action of the primary elec election
tion election next June. I am now serving
my second term as marshal of Ocala
and my record as such officer is an
open book. If I am elected sheriff,
my motto will be to uphold the moral
dignity of the office, do my full duty
as prescribed by law; true to all, but
subservient to none, and will go for forward
ward forward in the discharge of my duty
with an eye single to the welfare and
upbuilding of Marion county. Solicit
ing the support of all democrats, I
am, Yours to serve,
Frank Adams.
FOR SHERIFF
To the Democrats of Marion County:
I am a candidate for sheriff subject
to the action of the democratic pri
mary election to be held June 6th. If
elected I will give the people an hon
est and fair administration and will
give my personal attention to the
duties of the office. I respectfully
solicit your support.
WALTER A. PRIEST.
Anthony, Florida.
FOR SUPERINTENDENT OF PUB
LIC INSTRUCTION
I wish to extend my sincere thanks
to the good people of Marion county
for the confidence reposed in me in
the past and the support given me
for official position and I hereby an
nounce my candidacy for the demo
cratic nomination in the coming pri
mary election to succeed myself as
superintendent of public instruction
for Marion county. I pledge you my
best efforts to maintain the high de
giee of efficiency that our public
school system has attained and that I
shall use every means possible to ad
vance the same. I solicit not only
ycur votes in the election but the ac active
tive active and hearty co-operation of every
good citizen m the general promotion
if cur educational interests.
Very sincerely yours,
J. EL BRINSON.
FOR SUPERINTENDENT OF PUB
LIC INSTRUCTION
I hereby announce myself a candi
date for the office of superintendent
of public instruction for Marion coun county,
ty, county, subject to the decision of the dem
ocratic primary of June 6th. I have
been in the public school work for
more than twenty years and have had
experience in practically all its de
partments, hence .1 feel amply com competent
petent competent to perform the duties involved
in the administration of this work, tf
elected, I promise to give to it my un undivided
divided undivided attention and best efforts and
to try to merit the confidence thus
placed in me. Respectfully submitted.
E. H. MILLER.
FOR SUPERINTENDENT OF PUB PUBLIC
LIC PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
In making this announcement, I
wish first to thank the people of Mar Marion
ion Marion county for their confidence and
support in the past. Having been a
member of the school board for -seven
consecutive terms, I believe that I
fully understand the work of the of office
fice office and its responsibilities, so I here
by offer myself a candidate for sup
erintendent of public instruction. If
elected, I. pledge my -best efforts and
personal attention to the work.

Respectfully, i. H. UKANTHAM.

POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENTS

FOR COUNTY CLERK
To the Democrats of Marion County:
Having been solicited by so many
friends to become a candidate for
clerk of the circuit court, I herewith
announce myself a candidate for said
office, and will appreciate the vote3
and influence of the good people of
Marion county, promising courteous
treatment, efficitnt service and a wel welcome
come welcome to any and all that may have
business in the office.
Respectfully,-
S. T. SISTRUNK.
FOR CLERK OF THE COURT
To the People of Marion County:
Having served for several years as
tax collector, and I think to the satis satisfaction
faction satisfaction of the masses of the people, I
now believe I can again make you an
honest, efficient and a satisfactory of official.
ficial. official. So I am announcing myself a
candidate for clerk of the circuit court
of Marion county. It has always been
a source of great pleasure to me to
feel that I have had the good will and
support of so many of Marion's citi citizens
zens citizens in the past, and if these same
friends think me worthy of the office
I now seek, I solicit your assistance,
and I will also appreciate the support
of the nw friends I may have made
within the past few years. My candi candidacy
dacy candidacy is submitted to, and I will abide
by, the epressions of the people in the
democratic primary of June 6th, next.
Very respectfully,
E. L. CARNEY.
FOR COUNTY CLERK
I respectfully state to the people of
this county I think my citizenship
and official conduct has merited a sec second
ond second term as clerk, and solicit your
support in the coming democratic
primary, saying plainly that if elect elected
ed elected I will not ask for a third term.
Respectfully, P. H. NUGENT.
FOR COUNTY JUDGE
W. E. SMITH
I am a candidate for re-election to
the office of county judge of Marion
county. I have held the office for one
term and have done my duty at all
times as I saw it. I ask the voters of
Marion county for the office for an another
other another term, and if I am elected will
continue to give the people my best
efforts, and feel that I am in a posi position
tion position to serve them, with the exper
ience I have gained, better in the fu future
ture future than I have during the term that
is drawing to a close
Respectfully, W. E. SMITH.
FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER
District No. 1
I hereby announce myself for the
office of county commissioner from
the first commissioner's district of
Marion county, subject to the pri primary
mary primary and the votes of the people of
my district. I have had experience
in this office, having served on the
board of St. Johns county, and feel
that I am thoroughly competent to
serve the public. Respectfully,
A. S. PICKETT.
.s Ocala, Fla. (Blitchton Road).
FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER
First District
I announce myself a candidate for
county commissioner for the first
commissioner's district, and if elect elected
ed elected I promise to give to the office
faithful service the very best that I
possess. Any support given me will
be very gratefully appreciated.
14-tf C. (Ed) CarmichaeL
FOR COMMISSIONER
. First District
I am a candidate for the democrat democratic
ic democratic nomination for county commission commissioner
er commissioner from the first commissioner's dis district,
trict, district, Marion county, subject to the
action of the primary to be held June,
1916. I will appreciate any support.
Respectfully, W. D. Cam.
FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER
Third District
S. R. Pyles announces for re-election
as county commissioner, district
No. 3. To my many friends who were
so loyal to me in the past and to those
who may be added to the list in sup supporting
porting supporting my, candidacy in the approach
ing primary of June 6th next, I will
feel grateful and if elected will en endeavor
deavor endeavor to prove worth of your every
confidence in the discharge of my
duties as i see them for the common
good of a1. S. R. Pyles.
FOR COUNTY SURVEYOR
To the Democratic Voters of Marion
County:
In announce myself a candidate for
re-election to the office of county sur
veyort of Marion county. I want to
thank my friends for the liberal sup support
port support in the past and will greatly ap appreciate
preciate appreciate their votes and support in tne
ccming primary election.
W. A. MOORHEAD.
FOR COUNTY SURVEYOR
L. B. MARSH
To the Democrats of Marion County:
I hereby announce my candidacy
for county surveyor subject to the
action of the democratic primary to
be held June 6th, 1916. My experience
in this line of work for the past twen
ty years I believe has thoroughly
qualified me for the position. I solicit
your support at the polls in the com coming
ing coming election. L. B. MARSH.
Burbank, Fla., May 9, 1916.
We Do a General line of
Automobile Repairing
We Rebuild (not repair)
Broken Springs
We have Springs, Axles and Other
Parts for. Ford Cars
Also a fine Motor Car Black to make
an Old Ford Look Like New
YOURS FOR BUSINESS
MEADOWS REPAIR SHOP
410 N. Orange St. Ocala, Fla.

NTS

FOR REPRESENTATIVE
(Second Group)
To the Democratic Voters of Marion
County:
I hereby announce myself a candi candidate
date candidate for representative to the state
legislature (group No. 2) in the the
democratic primary of June 6th. If
elected I will endeavor to serve the
people, realizing that an officer is the
servant and not the master. Solicit Soliciting
ing Soliciting your support and vote.
Respectfully,
F. J. TITCOMB.
FOR THE LEGISLATURE
(First Group)
To the Democratic Voters of Marion
County:
, I hereby announce that I am a can candidate
didate candidate for re-election to the legisla legislature,
ture, legislature, in the first group. I will appre appreciate
ciate appreciate the vote of every democrat in
the county on June 6th.
Very respectfully,
W. J. CROSBY.
Citra, Fla., Feb. 24, 1916.
FOR MEMBER OF THE LEGISLA LEGISLATURE
TURE LEGISLATURE (Group No. 2)
I take this method of thanking my
many f rierlds throughout the county
for their kind expressions in request requesting
ing requesting me to be a candidate for the legis legislature.
lature. legislature. I therefore submit my name to
the voters for the nomination in the
coming primary for member of the
legislature in group No. 2.
W. K. ZEWADSKI.
FOR STATE COMPTROLLER
To the Deurocfttts"of Florida:
I take this method of placing be before
fore before you my announcement as a can candidate
didate candidate for the office of state comp comptroller
troller comptroller at the coming democratic pri primary.
mary. primary. I feel that my connection of
tho past few years with this depart department
ment department fully qualifies me for the posi position
tion position to which I aspire, and I solicit
your votes. E. P. THAGARD
Whooping Cough
"When my daughter had whocping
cough she coughed so hard at one
time that she had hemorrhage of the
liyigs. I was terribly alarmed about
her condition. Seeing Chamberlain's
Cough Remedy so highly recommend recommended,
ed, recommended, I got her a bottle and it relieved
the cough at once. Before she had
finished two bottles of this remedy
she was entirely well," writes Mrs.
S. F. Grimes, Crooksville, Ohio. Ob Obtainable
tainable Obtainable everywhere. Adv.
Adequately NamsoV
The poker editor ot the New York
American says. "Trip!et3 and twins
in lt month3 a poor man's full
house."
AVOID SPRING COLDS
Sudden changes, high winds, shift shifting
ing shifting seasons cause colds and grip, and
these spring colds are annoying and
dangerous and are likely to turn into
a chronic summer cough. In such
cases take a treatment of Dr. King's
New Dissovery, a pleasant laxative
tar syrup. It soothes the cough
checks the cold and helps break up an
attack of grip.. Its already prepared,
no mixing or fussing. Just ask your
druggist for a bottle of Dr. King's
New Discovery. Tested and tried for
over 40 years. Ad. 3
Cheese the Chief Export.
Berne, Switzerland, exports a much
ilgher value in S'viss chee3e than la
iwiss watches.
KEEP YOUR SKIN
CLEAR AND HEALTHY
There is only one way to have a
clear, healthy complexion and that i3
to keep the bowels active and regular.
Dr. King's New Life Pills will make
your complexion healthy and clear,
move the Dowels gently, stimulate the
liver, cleanse the system and purify
the blood. A splendid spring medi medicine.
cine. medicine. 26k at your druggist. Ad. 3
UNCLASSIFIED ADS,
LOST Somewhere between The1!
Book Shop and Mrs. E. P. Rentz's
or Mrs. A. M. Perry's residence, a No.
5 Parker fountain pen fitted with
a No. 5 Akin-Lambert point. Return
to this office. 5-22-3t
FOR RENT Six room cottage, mod modern
ern modern improvements, large lot; 419
West Broadway. Rent reasonable.
Apply to Miss'L. E. Frost, 423 West
Broadway. 5-20-Gt
PREST-O-LITE tank lost on Tucker
Hill road or between 3-mile post on
Blitchton road and Ocala. Finder
please return to this office and receive
reward. 5-15-tf
FOUND A small fountain pen, with without
out without cap. Owner can have same by
calling at this office and paying for
this ad. 22-3t
FOR SALE Sweet potato plants,
Porto Rico variety, $1 per thousand
at shipping point, Oak, Fla. Ad Address
dress Address J. M. Luff man, Route A, Ocala,
Fla. 5-9-20t
FOR SALE Mixed peas, $1.55,
Whipporwills $1.65, Brabham $1.95
per busheL Freight paid to Ocala,
Fla. Geo. W. Heard, P. O. Box No. r
136, Atlanta, Ga. 5-8-tf
FOR SALE One good family horse.
Apply to Ocala Coca-Cola Bottling
WorkS, Ocala, Fla. 5-2-tf.
FOR SALE First class milk cow;
fresh. Apply to Ocala Coca-Cola
Bottling Works, N. Magnolia street,
Ocala. 5-2-tf.
BARGAIN IN JACKSONVILLE
VACANT LOTS Any one wishing to
make an investment in well located
lots, fronting Lackawanna avenue,
one block from the corner of Edge Edge-wood,
wood, Edge-wood, that will pay large returns,
will please communicate with XY.
care Star office. 6-12-t



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mods:note dates or sequential designation Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
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mods:placeTerm marccountry flu
mods:dateIssued May 23, 1916
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mods:title Ocala weekly star
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Newspapers
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Marion County (Fla.)
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