The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06376

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
0 LOCAL NEWS
0 RECEIVED TO
.0 PRESS TIME
' & & ff
ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DISPATCHES
ex
--
WEATHER FORECAST Partly cloudy in south and central ana probably local rains in extreme north portion tonight and Sunday.. Little change in tempertnre.
TEMPERATURES This Morning, 58; Thia Afternoon, 78.
Sua Rises Tomorrow-, 7:13; Sets, 5:26
OCALA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1922
VOLUME TWENTY-EIGHT. No. 294
PHILADELPHIA GREETS
THE GREAT FRENCHMAN
CREDIT PLANS ARE
AVIATORS MAY BE
LOST Hi ARIZONA
ISMET PASHA INCLINES THE
WAY OF THE ALLIES
ECO!

S

OCALA

NO

STAR

ASTORIA ARISING
FROM ITS ASHES

GHESS

Enthusiastic Welcome to Georges Clemenceao in the City Where
Was Born American Independence

Philadelphia, Dec. 9. (Associated
Press). Georges Clemenceau, speak speaking
ing speaking in the city where America's Dec Dec-lartion
lartion Dec-lartion of Independence was signed,
today urged that America come back
to Europe and help spread independ independence
ence independence throughout the world. He was
given a long ovation as he appeared
on the platform at the Academy of
Music. The academy was profusely
decorated with the stars and stripes
and the French tri-colors, and was
packed.
THE BEST THING AT THE FAIR
(Pensacola Journal)
Probably the most significant if not
the most interesting exhibit at the
State Fair at Jacksonville was that
of the state university which in gra graphic
phic graphic diagram form showed not only
that which it accomplishes in its class
rooms but that which it is achieving
through its extension work which
reaches over 6000 off the campus stud students
ents students in all parts of the state.
In this work the University of Flor Florida
ida Florida is copying and putting into prac practice
tice practice the plan first devised and perfect perfected
ed perfected by the University of Wisconsin
which has become the leader, the edu educational
cational educational pathfinder so to speak, for not
only every commonwealth college in
the country but many of our corpora corporation
tion corporation colleges. Appreciating the in infinite
finite infinite worth of such a work the mayor
of Philadelphia not long since took the
entire board of trustees of the Uni University
versity University of Pennsylvania together with
one hundred representative Philadel Philadelphia
phia Philadelphia citizens to visit the University
of Wisconsin to study its extension
work that the University of Pennsyl
vania might begin to build on similar
lines. Since then the University of
Pennsylvania has copied the Wiscon Wisconsin
sin Wisconsin educational plan and tremendous
ly multiplied not only its teaching ef
ficiency but its effectiveness in the
city of Philadelphia and in the state
of Pennsylvania.
Florida is just beginning to make
use of this splendid educational
scheme. Already results are showing
but a ereat field of work is before
this youngest of our state universities
It has been proven that no college does
so much to lift the literacy of the
state as does the state college. Every
state in this Union maintains a state
university, New York, New Jersey,
Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachu
setts and New Hampshire alone ex
cepted. And these exceptions have a
higher illiteracy than the states that
have developed their commonwealth
colleges. So much is this true that
even Massachusetts, which boasts of
her Harvard, her Massachusetts Tech
her Boston U. and Tufts, her Holyoke,
Smith, Amherst and Williams, is era
barrassingly low in the rate of liter
acy. Years ago so eminent an edu
cation, the greatest this country has
produced in a generation of time,
President-emeritus Eliot of Harvard,
advocated the conversion, of Harvard
frpm a corporation to a commonwealth
college. Conservative trustees held
fast to the less efficient thing. But
today the legislature of Massachusetts
has brought into existence a commis commission
sion commission to consider the wisdom of build building,
ing, building, and the ways and means of get getting,
ting, getting, a state university for Massa Massachusetts,
chusetts, Massachusetts, so apparent is this need.
Florida is by no means the young youngest
est youngest state in the Union. But of all the
states which have built state univers universities,
ities, universities, Florida is the last to launch
this worthy and essential enterprise.
Our state university is young. It has
grown with the inevitable rapidity
that is the story of all state univers
ities, and following the Wisconsin idea
it is literally lifting the state up by
its own bootstraps.
Thomas Jefferson, as we have more
than once stated in these columns, was
the father of the great state program
cf education idea. It was his firm be
lief, which a hundred years of history
ave proven to be so true, that a de democracy
mocracy democracy can not rise above the aver average
age average intelligence of the citizens in
whom is invested the power of fran
chise. If we lift the state, we must
educate the state. The greatest thing
in Florida by all odds the greatest
thing in Florida is her state uni university.
versity. university. The greatest story told at
the State Fair was the story of our
State university's achievements.
The State Fair is a great educa
tional institution itself. It is wel
worth while to go to the State Fair
The University of Florida exhibit told
of the wonderful work that Florida is
doing to inform minds, to educate
Florida into a higher and finer citi
zenship and into the greater com
merce that is always the product of
finer culture. .:

SERIOUS JURORS MIGHT

HAVE HUNG POWELL
That Young Man's Lawyer Better Let
Well Enough Alone
Tallahassee, Dec. 9.
Associated
Press). Allegations that the
the case of J. L. Powell, convicted
'
jurors
this week of murder in the second

degress for killing last month near REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY ATTORNEY-here
here ATTORNEY-here of James Legette, of Cairo, Ga., pfvfrai

donned convict outfits after being
ocked up for the nitrht and paraded

abotu the county court house were set judicial organization, to meet the aug aug-forth
forth aug-forth by Powell's attorneys in gling a mented work which has resulted from

motion for a new trial.
GEORGE B. LAWTON
George B. Lawton passed away
ast night in this city about 9 o'clock
after a short illness. Mr. Lawton and
his wife came to Florida about five

years ago from Iola, Kans., and set- as being approached "where a re re-tled
tled re-tled in Summerfield. About two years vamping of the machinery used in

ago Mrs. Lawton died, after which
Mr. Lawton came to Ocala to make

his home. He was a bright young the government could retain attor attor-man
man attor-man and held the position of court neys who have special knowledge of
stenographer at the time of his death, government matters in addition to

The remains will be held at the un-
dertaking parlors of Sam R. Pyles &
Company awaiting the arrival of a
sister of the deceased who lives in
ola, Kans.
The Gibson line of Holiday Boxes
in all sizes. THE SPECIALTY SHOP,
A. E. GERIG. 12-4-6t
Stove wood, ?2 per load. R.
H.
Todd Lumber Company. 25-tf
Imported Swiss, Limburger and
New York Cream Cheese at the O. K.
Teapot Grocery. 8-2t
Richard Wallace will aooear in
Watch Him Step" at the Temple the-
. I
ater tonight. A splendid comedy
"Safe in the Safe" will also be a part
of tonight's program.
If you want something pretty in a
black satin one-strap pump with a
rhinestone button, see those made by
Utz & Dunn, price six dollars and a
half, at Little's Shoe Parlor. 2-tf
We buy second-hand furniture. Ap
ply at Farmers Supply Company, Ex
position street. tf
FOR
CHRISTMAS
JEWELRY
Brooches, Sleeve Buttons,
Stick, Collar and Emblem,
Chains,
Lingerie
and Bar Pins.
WRIST WATCHES
Green, White and Red Gold, $15 up.
RINGS
Largest and best selection of all
kinds of rings in Ocala.
LEATHER GOODS
Belts, Pocketbooks, Hand Bags and
Vanity Boxes.
PENS AND PENCILS
j-iaiiresi asaui micui. tu. uuiu reus
, xy "i i nft. o ov. a
id Pencils, also Gift bets, Sheaffer's
T 4. J. f r.U Tl
and
and Waterman's.
THERMOS
Thermos and Icy-Hot, Auto, Restau
rant and Table Sets and Bottles
TABLEWARE
Community, Rogers 1847 and Sil
verfield Tableware.
"GIFTS THAT LAST"
For mother, sweetheart, sister,
brother or some one else's brother and
sister for Christmas.
CUT GLASS
Glassware. Nice assortment.
ENGRAVING
On Ivory, Gold and Silver,
OPTICAL
Optical department in charge of Dr.
K. J. Weihe, "eyesight specialist."

Two 5Iore Bills Apparently for Benefit
Of Farmers Introduced In
Both Houses

Washington, Dec. 9. (Associated
Press). Two more farm credit plans
have been placed before Congress. A
bill amending the farm loan act to
provide additional credits was intro-
duced by Senator Norbeck and Repre-
tentative Strong, while another intro-
aucea py senator XNoruecK ana rtepre-
sentatrve Nelson would authorize the
War finance Corporation to maKe
loans to fore5 Purchasers of Ameri-
: n i i
ca" "K""'"4 piuuucia.
Washington, Dec. 9. A new basic
"the ever-increasing complexity or
government," was suggested by At-
torney General Uaugherty in his an-
mal report made public here Thursday,
pn the operations of the department
of justice. Noting that 60,722 crimi-
nal cases were begun in the last hscal
year, the report declared the point
this work is inevitable."
Adoption of some method by which
legal training was one of the several
suggestions advanced by Mr. Daugh-
erty. The recently enacted legislation
providing additional judges should
help the situation, he said, but prob
ably will not entirely remedy it.
'The failure of local self-govern
ment in parts of the country," the re
port said, "results in the insistence of
the citizens of those communities that
the federal government perform that
function in which the local govern
ment has failed, and frequently in
matters where there is concurrent
jurisdiction between the state and
federal governments it is difficult to
establish a policy as to the extent to
i i 1 1 j i v i ,3
wmcn ine government Buuu,
take jurisdiction. This is peculiarly
4-mi flT nre viol r n n A Ton.
11 uc Ui
erai reserve a. mere uaa u
fffort on the Part of thls dlvlsl0n dur
ing tms nscai year to nave me umieu
es attorneys anu me siaie probe-
cutin attorneys meet irom um w
time for the Purpose of co-operation.
Evidence ol the benents oi tnese meei-
inSs 18 overwneinung.
"The existing procedure for the re
moval of a defendant to the jurisdic
tion where the crime was committed
is unduly cumbersome and results in
unjustified delay and injustice. Under
such procedure the trial is frequently
delayed from one to two years."
Announcement was made in the re
port of the "desire of the department
to return, or to recommend for return
all property seized under the trading
with the enemy act in cases where
the owners come within "the enabling
section" of the act.
The question in almost all of these
case3fi
Mr. Daugherty reported, "is
either of title or of citizenship. For
instance, the alien property custodian
has seized and now holds the prop
erty of estates, which are quite com
plicated, by reason of the rights of
United States citizens, alleged to have
been acquired subsequent to the war.
Oftentimes the question becomes one
of the validity of an assignment or
the acquisition of title prior to the
war, and in this connection it is ex
ceedingly difficult at times to distin distinguish
guish distinguish between the pre-war ownership
of a claimant and a simple claim of
JnloVit oHnfKjc a-ni it is then necessarv
I uiutx. "
. , , ;i, i i
t0 nave the question submitted to the
.
"It has also been necessary to send
representatives of the department to
Europe to secure evidence from those
familiar with certain cases. This evi
dence was material in the considera
tion and trial of these cases and in the
determination of certain claims, so
that a fair and impartial hearing
could be given to litigants and claim claimants.
ants. claimants. In fact, it was usually at the
request of litigants and claimants
that these representatives were sent
abroad, and, while such investigations
and the taking of such evidence serv served
ed served to accommodate claimants, it like-
wise protected the government in the
administration of the trusts created
over these properties.
"It may be expected that the future
will see any number of interpreta
tions by the courts of the provisions
of section 9 and of the question as to
whether the litigant is a proper party
claimant under this section. The ques
tions of law arising are many, and
while, in general, it may be said that
the provisions of section 9 do not con-
flict, it must be recognized that there
exist some exceedingly close craes
tions as to which of the provisions of
section 9 control in certain cases. The
greater majority of the precedents

Flocks of Airplanes Searching For
Two Officers Whose Machines
May Have Been Forced
Down in the Desert

San Diego, Calif., Dec. 9. (By the
Associtaed Press). -A thorough search
of the deserts of Arizona for the two
missing army officers from Rockwell
Field, San Diego, who are believed to
have been forced to make a landing,
is under way. Three army planes
from San Diego already are in Ari Ari-zone
zone Ari-zone and five more are due there today
from Fort Bliss, Texas. The missing
officers left here in a plane Thursday
morning and were last reported at 1
o'clock in the afternoon over Arizona.
FIVE PLANES HOP
EL PASO
OFF FROM
El Paso, Texas, Dec. 9. Five air airplanes
planes airplanes in charge of Major Hefferman,
commander of the Twelfth Observa Observation
tion Observation Squadron, left Fort Bliss this
morning at G:30 o'clock for Tucson,
to join in the search for Colonel Mar Marshall
shall Marshall and Lieut. Charles Webber, two
army officers.
established by the courts during the
past year have been favorable to the
government."
The report made no comment on
the railroad injunction case and mere merely
ly merely noted the legal situation arising
out of enforcement of the prohibition
statutes outside the continental limits
cf the United States.
"Since the eighteenth amendment
of the constitution and title two of
the national prohibition act became
effective," it said, "rum-running ves vessels
sels vessels of American and foreign registry.
carrying liquor from foreign ports
to our shores, have swarmed along
our seaboards, smuggling liquors into
the United States in violation of our
aws.
Eighteen vessels of foreign regis
try and eleven of American registry
with their cargoes of liquors have
been seized. No American-owned ves
sel can transport beverage liquors.
Foreign registered vessels can not
trasport beverage liquors writhin the
American territorial waters. Of the
eighteen foreign registered vessels
seized, ten were found transporting
and smuggling liquors within the
three-mile limit of our shores. The
imit, but within the four-league zone
of our shore line and unloading their
cargoes to other boats to be brought
ashore in violation of our statutes
known as the hovering acts.
The hovering statutes provide that
no vessel bound to our ports shall un
load merchandise within four leagues
of our shores, unless by a permit,
without incurring a penalty against
the captain, to satisfy which the vesel
may be subjected to forfeiture.
"Foreign governments protest sei
zures of their vesels thus violating
our revenue laws and smuggling liqu
ors to our shores, because internation
al law does not recognize our hover
ing acts as valid outside the three
mile limit, except that they may be
applicable to our own nationals."
The attorney general then called at attention
tention attention to the litigation over seizure
on which the courts have ruled, or
which now are pending.
Only general reference was made to
litigation involving patents seized by
the Alien Property Custodian, such as
the Bosch Magneto and Chemical
Foundation suits. "A number of
suits" have been filed, the report sid,
to determine title to these patents
and to decide the ownership of the
funds which have accumulated from
use of patent rights.
Post-war espionage by unnamed
foreign governments was hinted at in
the report submitted by the depart
ment's bureau of investigation.
"The attention of the bureau has
been directed, "Director W. J. Burns
reported, "to investigations of severa
individuals who have posed as repre
sentatives of foreign governments, re resulting
sulting resulting in the apprehension of the per
sons under investigation."
Attorney General Daughterly re
commended legislation "to make it a
crime to kill an officer of the United
States' while executing a process
He called attention that while it was
now deemed a crime to assault or
wound an officer engaged in such duty,
there is no law dealing with his kil
ling. Need was cited also for a stat
lute making it a crime "for a singl
j individual to defraud or attempt to
- ; de fraud the United States m any
; manner and for any purpose.
I Mr. Daughterty said work was be-
ing pushed on the war contract inves
- j tigation of the department and that
j action was being taken, as warrented
! with the ocmpletion of the audit o:
;each project,
- Call 471-Blue for the best red oak
' and pine strand wood.
Four-foot
North Os Os-16
16 Os-16 wood $3.50.
ceola street.
E. Gibbons,

Swift Measures Being Taken to Care
For the Homeless Of The
Plucky Oregon City

Astoria, Ore., Dec. 9. (By the As Associated
sociated Associated Press) Astoria is surveying
its losses in the twelve million dollar
fire which yesterday razed twenty-
four blocks of the city's business sec
tion. Measures to relieve the 2500
persons made homeless have been
started by a relief committee. An Announcement
nouncement Announcement wras made that staple
bod and clothing were needed and
word came from Portland that a spe-
lal train carrying these supplies
would be sent at once.
NO RAILWAY POSTAL
CLERK EXAMINATION
The Civil Service Commission Warns
Against Misleading Advertising
Washington, D. C. Dec. 9. The
United States Civil Service Commis Commission
sion Commission stated today that there have been
brought to its attention numerous
misleading advertising circulars and
newspaper advertisements of certain
so-called civil service schols.
Inthese circulars and advertisements
information is given that a railway
postal clerk examination is soon to be
held. The comission states that no
such examination has been announced
and that it is not known at that time
when it wil be necessry to hold an ex examination
amination examination of the kind. When one is
to be held it will be duly announced.
Many of these so-caled civil service
schools, said the commission, recruit
considerable part of their cleintele
among young people of limited edu
cation in rural communities, who fall
easy victims to alluring statements re regarding
garding regarding railway postal clerk and op
positions in the government ser
vice and extravagant claims as to the
advantages of training with the so-
called schools.
The commission points out that de
finite authentic information regard regarding
ing regarding pending examinations may always
be obtained from any of its local re
presentatives or by writing direct to
the office of the commission at Wash Washington,
ington, Washington, D. C. The commission has a
representative at the post office or
customhouse in each of approximately
3500 cities throughout the country.
HENRY HAYS
The funeral services of little Henry
Hays, age twelve years, were held
yesterday afternoon at four o'clock
from the undertaking parlors of C. V.
Roberts & Company. The little boy
died Thursday at the home of his par parents,
ents, parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Hays in St.
etersburg and the body was brought
to Ocala Friday morning. Interment
was made in Evergreen cemetery. Mr.
and Mrs. Hays formerly lived here and
their friends will regret to hear of
their sorrow. The little boy leaves to
mourn him his parents and two sis
ters, Mrs. Allen McDonald of this city
and Mrs. Young of Savannah.
CHRISTMAS PARCELS
TO AVOID LOSS AND DAMAGE
Wrap your packages carefully and
tie them securely.
In preparing your packages for
mailing, remember to
1. Wrap with tough paper.
2. Tie with a stout cord.
3. Write or print a plain address
with ink.
4. Place return address in uppei
left corner.
5. Attach address to article itself
inside the wrapper.
6. Inclose articles liable to break
age in corrugated paper or wooden
boxes and pack in excelsior or some
similar substance.
7. If contents are perishable or
fragile, mark the parcel conspicuously
or have mailing clerk do it for you.
8. Think of the miles it must
travel, rubbing up against other par parcels,
cels, parcels, handled and rehandled.
9. When ready to mail give it the
y. n a.taw" n Uiannn M4rVA0
stamps, wrapper, packing.
10. MAIL IT EARLY.
11. INSURE IT.
Robt. F. Rogers, P. M.
HAMS, HAMS
Fresh shipment of Kingan's Relieble
Hams at 27c. per lb. U-Serve Stores.
Two phones 195 and 614. 7-3t
Our Christmas cards are now on
display. Make your selections early.
THE SPECIALTY SHOP, A. E.
GERIG. 12-4-6t
We can supply your wants in the
fresh meat, poultry and vegetable line
on short notice. Try us. Phone 108.
Main Street Market. 1-tf
Advertise in the Evening Star.

Begins to Look Like the Turks are Wise to the Wiles ol the
Soviet Bear

Lausanne, Dec. 9. (By Associated
Press). Optimism reigned supreme
today in Lausanne for the Near East
conference had weathered what was
probably its most difficult session to
date. Ismet Pasha's statement of
Turkish views on the Dardanelles
question and the reply brought from
Lord Curzon on behalf of the Allies
resulted in a general clearing of the
conference atmosphere. Turkey ap apparently
parently apparently has broken away from Rus Russian
sian Russian control and Russian delegates,
although resentful, are accepting the
situation.
ALLIED PREMIERS DISCUSS
REPARATIONS
London, Dec. 9. (By Associated
Press) The conference of Allied pre premiers
miers premiers to discuss reparations and war
debts held a two-hour session this
morning, adjourning for luncheon be before
fore before two o'clock. The heads of all
four delegations, British, Italy, France
and Belgium, addressed the gathering.
Premier Poincare of France held the
floor the longest.
CLYDE TISON
Morriston, Dec. 9. This community
is sad today on account of the acci accidental
dental accidental death of Clyde Tyson, 14-year-old
son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Tyson,
which occurred yesterday afternoon
about two miles east of this place.
Young Tyson was riding in a track
with Richard Wallace and then had
intended hunting birds near the Mar Marion
ion Marion county line. As they approached
the hunting grounds Tyson began
loading his automatic shotgun, with
its muzzle extended toward him, and
it was accidentally discharged, the
load tearing through his neck and
head, causing instand death.
The funeral took place this afternoon
at the Pleasant Hill cemetery just
east of Morriston. Clyde was a' fav favorite
orite favorite among our people and his sud sudden
den sudden death has caused a gloom in the
community. His parents have the
sympathy of the entire populace In
this hour of sadness.
PAID THE PENALTY
Perry, Dec. 9. Charlie Wright, ne negro,
gro, negro, said to have confessed to the mur murder
der murder of Miss Ruby Hendry, a young
school teacher, was taken from the
sheriff and burned at a stake at the
scene of the crime early last night by
a mob estimated at several thousnad
men.
CLARK WILL TEACH THEM
TO SWING GOLF CLUBS
Daytona, Dec. 9. (By Associated
Press). Captain Charles Clark, pro professional,
fessional, professional, of the Daytona Golf and
Country Club, will succeed Gene Sara Sara-zen
zen Sara-zen as golf professional at the High Highlands
lands Highlands Country Club, Pittsburgh, Pa
it became known here today.. Clark
will remain here during the winter,
going to Pittsburgh early in the
spring.
C. CECIL BRYANT
AUDITOR
Income Tax Consultant
Phone 481 Bine
Room 23, Hulder Block
PALATKA-OCALA
BUS LINE
SCHEDULE
Leave Palatka 8:00 A. M.
Arrive Ocala 11:45 A. M
leave Ocala 2:00 P. M.
Arrive Palatka..-6:00 P. il.
Ocala leaving point, Ocala House.
Palatka leaving point, James hotel
Route via Anthony, Sparr,
Citra, Orange Springs, Kenwood
and Rodman.
C ?. PH1ANS, Prop.
Ocala, Phone 527

COAST LINE TRAINS
HAD A COLLISION

Fog Caused a Wreck TWt Mile
North of Charleston Tfcia
Morning
Charleston, S. C, Dec 9. One per-'
son was killed and eighteen injured,
two seriously, when train No. 80, A.
C. L. ran into the rear end of train
No. 52, at Hanshan station, twelve
miles from here at 7 o'clock this morn morning.
ing. morning. The injured were brought here
on a special train. A heavy fog
which obscured the signal lights is -blamed
for the collision.
ONLY WAY IS TO
KILL THEM OUT
London, Dec. 9. (By Associated
Press). The expectation that yester yesterday's
day's yesterday's executions in Dublin will be
followed by further shootings was ex ex-pressed
pressed ex-pressed by some Dublin dispatches to
London newspapers today. These cor correspondents
respondents correspondents are convinced that the
chain of reprisals will continue. The
Daily Mail's Dublin correspondent
quotes free state officials as saying
there are at least 100 desperate men
in the city who having no care for
their own lives will follow the behest
of their leaders and endeavor to assas assassinate
sinate assassinate members of the government and
Irish parliament.
STRIVING FOR FOOTBALL
HONORS OP THE STATE
Jacksonville, Dec. 9. (Associated
Press). Two contenders for the high
school football championship of the
state will emerge from two classics
today. Miami engages Plant City at
Miami and Duval plays Gainesville at
Gainesville. A championship tie will
result if Miami wins, but if Miami
loses the honors go to the winner of
the Gainesville game.
BANDITS MADE A
BIG HAUL OF BOOZE
St. Louis, Dec 9. (By Associated
Press). The police are searching for
clews in a daring theft of whisky
valued between $50,000 and $100,000
by a dozen bandits who overpowered
a watchman and government guard
at the Jack Daniel Distilling Company
here last night and escaped. The loot
consisted of fifty barrels and 400
cases.
MAIL BOAT WRECKED AT
MOUTH OF THE HARBOR
Paris, Dec. 9. (By the Associated
Press). Fleeing from a violent tem tempest
pest tempest sweeping the Mediterranean
coast of Spain, the French mail boat
Governor General Herman struck the
reefs at the entrance of the harbor at
Port Vendres. The passengers were
put ashore after much difficulty but
the vessel was lost.
HAMS, HAMS
Fresh shipment of Kingan's Relieble
Hams at 27c per lb. U-Serve Stores.
Two phones 195 and 614. 7-St
ROBERTS TREATED ROUGH
St. Augustine, Dec. 9, W. A. Rob
erts, a local vegetable dealer, was
taken from bis home in New Augus
tine last night by four masked men
and severely beaten. He was accused
of tipping officers off on moonshine
arrests. His assailants were arrested.
ENGRAVING
Engraving on gold, silver and ivory.
Watch repairing. Prices right. Mrs.
E. M. Brown, Fort King and Osceola.
Formerly with Sam T. Wilson jewelry
store. 8-2t
Gardner's famous fruit cake, layer
cake, pound cake and raisin cake at
Main Street Market. Phone 108. 10-tf
The more our customers see of our
methods of handling fresh meats, the
better we like it. Come to see us.
Main Street Market.' Phone 108. tf
THE BOOK SHOP is showing a
wonderful array of Gifts. Please shop
now so you will not be disappointed. St
See the wonderful Rock-a-Bye Dolls
at THE GIFT SHOP. 7-2t
The most complete assortment of
seals, enclosure cards, tags and gift
dressings. THE SPECIALTY SHOP,
A E. GERIG. 12-4-et



OCALA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1922

OcalaEve

ninflSlar

Pablbked Ertrr Oar Eept 4y fcy
STAR PUBLISHING C05IPANY,
OCALA, FLOEIDA
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Entered at Ocala. Fla.i -postofflct as
second-class matter.

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entitled for the use for republication or
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otherwise credited to this paper and
also th lsn;a4 ewa (published jfaere
All rigrhts of repulbrlcathm of -special
dispatches herein are also reserved.

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without extra, Witi0PnafK Witi0PnafK-Legal
Legal Witi0PnafK-Legal advertiseemnts at legal rates.

Ocala grows better, looking every
day.

Has Mrs.
death yet?

McSwiney starved to

Gov. Hardee is" squarely against a
state tax. for publicity. .His bead, is
level.

. That big edition of ; the Sanford
Herald is another, proof Chat celery is
mighty stimulating.
Head that, interesting tribute from
the Pensacola Journal to., our state
university on our front page, and feel
proud that Florida has. such a splen splendid
did splendid school.

Isn't it time to pull down them little
fair flutter-flags strung ,up around
town ? Keeping them, ,up until next
year will save some work, but they
will be frazzled, hy, then.
With all these hubby shotings pulled
off almost daily 1y wives, what's the
matter with" reintroducing that good

old ong, that was so popular in the;

iuiig agU x niau x was suigio agaiu. t

Pay your taxes cheerfully and be
sent to Chattahoochee. Inverness

Chronicle.

The average editor doesn't pay
taxes enough to pay his railroad fare

to Chattahoochee.

Ed. Bennett says' the cream of the
Marion County' Pair 'will go to the

South Florida Pair- in Tampa and
then to 'the Mid-Winter Fair in Or Orlando,
lando, Orlando, and he expects it to take prizes

at both places.
Clarence' Wood, thef brainy and en energetic
ergetic energetic secretary pf the Sumter Coun?
ty Chamber of Commerce, was in
town, yesterday. As the roads to the
south become- better and better, Clari-

ence grows happier and happier.

The first editorial column of the
tit. : 11 '.1 : .ii-L

owr ornn years gu cuncains me
following paragraph: "The Miami
Herald is two years old. It is a very
handsome newsy and well edited pa paper
per paper and a look at'it ia bound to give
anyone a good impression of its home
city."

for taxes paid in November and one

per cent for taxes paid in December,
and it would be greatly to the ad advantage
vantage advantage of both taxers and taxees to
pay as soon as possible.

ONLY SEVENTY-TWO

MORE DOLLARS

FAIR PREMIUMS

Best specimen of coleus, Mrs. J. F.
Sigmon.
Painting
Best marine view in oil, Mrs. T. H.
Johnson. Second, Mrs. W. T. Hall.
Best flowers in oil, Mrs. T. H. John Johnson.
son. Johnson. Second, Mrs. T. H. Johnson.

Onlv seventv-two more dollars are est animals m oil or water, uiris

needed of that $125 we asked for, j Industrial School. Second, Mrs. T. H.

Tuesday, for the Girls Industrial

School Christmas tree; $53 has been

taken in and only four days work
done. We hope our friends will hustle
the squiblum along; we are getting
old and feeble and could eat only a
dozen fried oysters for supper last

night that is, we mean, that was all

we could pay for. The money drifted

in, in a happy-go-lucky way yester

day. We arose early and tottered

around the streets awhile before the
thermometer warmed up, In ou p.
o. box we found a nice check from a
man who hasn't forgotten how he did
dote on a Christmas tree when he was
a boy, and coming back to the Star
office we found Carl Ray, who is a boy
yet,- tho the Germans thought he was
a bear when he was pushing his way
thru the bushes in the Argonne. Then
there was a wholesale grocer, whose
left hand didn't know his right was
pulling a legal tender out of his
pocket, and J. G. Lege, with another
dollar's worth of pretty green paper
came next. M. Haughton, the veteran
traveling man, had only one dollar
left in the world, but this he divided

with the school.

We didn't know that such short
legs could move so fast, but Calvin L.
West caught up with us as we went to
dinner; nobody likes the school more

than he does. We knew Bob Van Osten
was going to give a dollar, but were
waiting till his pocket hand got well,
but he dug up, all the same, and we
had six-fifty for the day's work.
If you don't believe those industrial
school girls are smart, just read the
list of Marion County Fair premiums,
and see how often their names appear
in it. For pretty and useful work,
their skillful and busy fingers are
difficult to equal:
The list to date:
Mrs. Edna Ayer Wright $ 2.00
Cash 1.00
Cash 1.00
J. W. Sylvester 1.00
Dr. H. W. Henry 1.00
J. H. Benjamin 5.00

Mack Taylor 1.00 I W. B. Thorn.

Johnson.

Best landscape in water color, Mrs.
D W. Tompkins. Second, Girls' In Industrial
dustrial Industrial School. Second, Mrs. D. W.
Tompkins.
First and second best flowers in wa water
ter water color, Miss Mary Scott.
Best fruit in water color, Girls In Industrial
dustrial Industrial School.
Best pastelle, Miss Lora Thomas.
Second, Miss Mary Scott.
Best collection of oil or water color
pictures, Girls Industrial School.
Second, Miss Loureen Spencer.
Best cream and sugar, Miss Lou Loureen
reen Loureen Spencer. Second, Miss Lora
Thomas.
Eest cup and saucer, Miss Loureen
Spencer. Second, Miss Bessie M.
Green.
Best Plaque, Miss Loureen Spencer.
Second, Mrs. L. W. Ponder.
Best salad dish, Miss Bessie M.
Green.
Best berry dish, Miss Loureen
Spencer.
Best punch bowl. Miss Bessie M.
Green.
Best specimen of china painting
other than above, Mrs. L. W. Ponder.
Second, Mrs. T. M. McLean.

Best specimen of wood carving, J.

L. Porter. Second, D. R. Mixson.

Best specimen beaten brass, Mrs.
Rex Todd.
Best specimen pine straw work,
Miss Agnes Moreton. Second, Mrs.
D. S. Smith.

Best specimen score cards, Bernard

Doty.

Best and second specimen bead

work, Mrs. Rex Todd.

Best specimen in real basketry, Miss

Katherine Shockley. Second, Mrs
Lula M. Grimbley.
Best collection of antiques with his

tory attached, Mrs. R. E. Young. Sec

ond, Dr. J. W. Hood,

Best collection of curios with his history
tory history attached, Betty Buhrman. Sec

ond, Mrs. W. B. Thorn.

Best single antiqute with history

attached, M. M. Little. Second, Mrs

a donation' to" Marcus Faggrs chil

dren's home in Jacksonville. 'There
are lots of little children there whose
bright eyes are "' looking wistfully
northward along the road over which
Santa Clans is expected to come.

E. A. Osborne 1.00

L. W. Duval 1.00
H. L. Borland 1.00
John Taylor 1.00
Alison Wartmann 1.00
Cash 1.00
Cash 1.00
Milby Lloyd 1.00
Sam Martin 1.00
Whit Palmer 1.00
Howard Walters 1.00
Joe Borden 1.00
Mr. Cash 1.00
M. M. Little 1.00
Sam Pyles 1.00
A. E. Gerig 1.00

Another Mr. Cash 1.00
Will Taylor 1.00
Miss Cash 1.00
A Friend 2.00
W. W. Stripling 1.00
C. S. Cullen 1.00
W. K. Zewadski 3.00
C. E. Kiplinger 1.00
A. C. Blowers 1.00
Dr. F. E. McClane 1.00
Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Rose 2.00
Christian Ax 1.00
Charles Marshall 1.00
Ed. C. Bennett t 1.50
Carl Ray 1.00
Business Man 1.00
Another Business Man 1.0'J
J. G. Lege 1.00
M. i Haughton 50
Calvin West 1.00
R. L. Van Osten 1.00

Total

.. .$53.00

(To be Continued in Our Next)

W. F. Stovall,' the enterprising' and
broadminded editor of the Tampa Tri Tribune,
bune, Tribune, sends the Star a special invita invitation
tion invitation to be present at the South Florida
Fair in Tampa. Tampa always has a
splendid fair, and onless somebody

breaks a leg' the Star is likely to be
represented.
The -new associate justice, Mr.
Pierce Butler, is a 5 Catholic, as well
as being a first class lawyer. Listen
for a great howl from the Ku Klux
and other professional bigots. Tarn-

There will be more howl from bigots
of the LaFollette stripe than from

the Kuklux.
Florida's two biggest papers, the
Times-Union and the Tampa Tribune

are sending complimentary copies to
the Girls' Industrial School. Either of
those great papers carries an educa-

' mend the other dames m the state
following' the example. There is not
a daily paper in Florida that would
not be interesting and helpful to the
school.

If people would pay their city taxes
faster, the city government would
' have tmtk-k less trouble and some less

expense in meeting its obligations,
and people would' be benefited. The
. MSMAnnf tn nvav

city (taxes this year
eighty thousand dollars, of which less
than a fourth a flittle over eighteen
thousand dollars, was paid aanng the
' month of November one-fourth of
the time to pay taxes in. The city
like the county gives two per cent off

P. S.: Seven more plunks this morn

ing before 9 o'clock. That makes $60
and almost cuts the fund in half.

Propositions to suppress the Kuklux

by law, state or national, are ridicu

lous. The Kuklux are as legitimate)

an order as the Shriners, the Dokeys
or any other organization that re rejoices
joices rejoices in spectacular parades. There
are a number of labor organizations

that have an oath out and out disloyal

to the United States, and they have

never been molested. If a member or

several members of the Kuklux com commit
mit commit a crime, punish them, but a cru crusade"
sade" crusade" against the order will be both
injustice and bad policy.
If the government officials need any
good advice on how to run the navy
let them write to the editor of the
Herald. We know something about
the ways of several of the navies, our
own included, and we would like to
enlighten, the weak hearts in America
who are afraid of a big navy. San San-ford
ford San-ford Herald.
Spill it to the people, Bob; states statesmen
men statesmen don't listen to little fellows like
you and us.
OXFORD BIBLES

Many sizes and bindings." Some in inexpensive
expensive inexpensive ones and some in fine India
Bible paper. At THE BOOK SHOP. 3t
Come early and avoid the rush. I
have in connection with my general
line of groceries for the holidays Gold
Fish, Canary Birds, Love Birds, Par Parrots,
rots, Parrots, Parokeets, cages and bird and
fish "supplies. Come get your pick
while the picking is good. T. M. Kil Kil-gore,
gore, Kil-gore, West Broadway. 9-tf

Best collection paintings on wood,

Mrs. J. H. Livingston.

Best collection of pine straw work,

Girls Industrial School. Second, Mrs
D. S. Smith.
Best collection raffia, Girls Indus Industrial
trial Industrial School.

Best collection of drawing, Miss

Mary Scott. Second, D. R. Mixson.

Best portrait in water, Miss Mary

Scott.

Best figures in water or oil, Miss

Mary Scott.
Best crayon work, Miss Lora Thom
as

Best fruit in oil, Mrs. T. H. John

son.

Best hand made flowers, Miss Lu-

ella M. Grimbley.
Hand painted pillow top, Mrs. T. M.
McLean.
Needlecraft

Best French embroidered white
tablecloth and six napkins, Mrs. M.

Israelson.

Best French embroidered pillow

case, Mrs. C. A. Todd. Second, Mrs.

L C. Todd.

.Best embroidered bedroom set,

Mrs. G. A. Carmichael.

First and second best French em

broidered teddies, Loureen Leitner.

Best embroidered nightrobe, Mrs.

C. W. Moremen. Second, Miss Lillian

Russell.

Best French embroidered child's

dress, Mrs. L. C. Dodd. Second, Miss

N. Moses.

rJest French embroidered baby

dress, Mrs. Daniel Cleary.
Best pair French embroidered tow

els, Mrs. M. Israelson. Second, Mrs.

T. H. Johnson.

Best embroidered piece household

lmen, Miss Onie Chazal. Second, Mrs.

C. A. Todd.

Best French embroidered garment,

Mrs. S. J. Fraser. Second, Mrs. N
Moses.
Best colored embroidered center centerpiece,
piece, centerpiece, Mrs. W. H. Britt. Second, Mrs
L. C. Dodd.

Best specimen color embroidered

pillow, Mrs. J. M. McDonald. Sec

ond, Mrs. C. K. Sage.
Best specimen coronation embroid embroidery,
ery, embroidery, Miss Sarah Dehon. Second, Mrs,
G. K. Williams.

Best specimen colored embroidery,

any article, Mrs. G. A. Carmichael
Second, Mrs. F. P. Walker.

First and second best specimen of

cut work, Mrs. N. Moses.

Best specimen of hadranger, Miss

Edith Williams. Second, Mrs. G. K
Williams.

Best specimen eyelet embroidery,

Mrs. Otto Young.
Best specimen of aplique, Mrs. H

D, Leavengood. Second, Girls Indus

trial School.

Best specimen cross stitch, Girls

Industrial School. Second, Mrs. A. E,
Walkley.

Best specimen any other embroidery,

Mrs. C. W. Moremen. Second Mrs.

Otto Joung.
Best specimen Duchess lace, Mrs.
W. T. Hall.
Best specimen point lace, Mrs. W.
T. Hall.

Best specimen Battenberg, Miss
Edith Williams. Second, Mrs. J. B.
Burry.
Best specimen filet lace, Mrs. J. W.
Gates. Second, Mrs. J. B. Snoolc.
Best specimen crochet cloth, Mrs.

J. P. Phillips.

Best specimen: Irish lace, Mrs. W.
W Clyatt.
Embroidered luncheon set, Miss
Onie Chazal. Second, Mrs. P. V.
Leavengood.
Best crocheted luncheon set, Miss
Agnes Moreton. Second, Mrs. T. M.
McLeane.
Best collective exhibit chrocheted

lace, Girls Industrial School.

Best crocheted bedspread, Mrs. N.

Moses.

Best crocheted garment, Mrs. W. R.

R. Brown.

Best crocheted custains, Mrs. Paul

Miller. Second, Mrs. E. J. Crook.

Best specimen crocheted lace on

linen, Mrs. C. W. Moremen. Second,
Mrs. T. B. Snook.

Best specimen crocheted wearing

apparel, Mrs. M. J. Britton. Second,

Mrs. Mamie Todd.

Best specimen woolen crochet, Mrs.

J. H. Livingston. Second, Mrs. W.

W. Clyatt.

Best specimen knitted lace, Mrs. P.

W. Barrineau.

Best knitted sweater, Vesta Jarrett.

Second, Mrs. D. W. Tompkins.

Best knitted bedspread, Miss Dor

othy Schreiber. Second, Mrs. J. D.

McCaskill.

Best specimen any other knitting,

Girls Industrial School. Second. Mrs.
Jack Thompson.

Best drawnwork table cover, Mrs.

W. T. Hall. Second, Mrs. R. A. Dodd.

Best tatting luncheon set, Mrs.

Mack Carter.

Best specimen drawnwork, Mrs.
Florence Edwards. Second, Mrs. W.
H. Britt.
Best hemstiched handkerchief, Mrs.
Otto Young.
Best specimen hemstiching, Mrs. W.
H. Britt.
Best specimen tatting, Mrs. W. H.
Britt. Second, Mrs. Mac Carter.
Best specimen tatting, household
linen, Mrs. G. A. Carmichael. Second,
Mrs. W. H. Britt.
Best tatting collar, Mrs. R. A.
Dodd. Second, Mrs. W. H. Britt.
Best specimen handkerchief tatting
edging, Mrs. W. H. Britt. Second,
Miss Edith Wiliams.
Best baby cap, Mrs. Mack Taylor.
Second, Mrs. W. H. Britt.
Best woven bedspread, Mrs. C. L.
Angel.
Best silk quilt, Mrs. L. W. Ponder.
Second, Mrs. W. H. Britt.
Best worsted quilt, Mrs. Sam Gra Graves.
ves. Graves. Second, Mrs. W. A. Penland.
Best cotton quilt, Mrs. R. R. Hale.
Second, Mrs. W. A. Penland.
Best chrocheted home made rug,
Mrs. W. W. Clyatt.
Best woven rug, Mrs. Sam Graves.
Best fancy bag, Miss Sarah De De-Hon.
Hon. De-Hon. Second, Miss E. Brooks.
Best specimen fancy work not list listed
ed listed in above, Mrs. W. R. Brown. Se Second,
cond, Second, Mrs. T. H. Johnson.
. Old Ladies Corner
First and second best specimen
knitting, Mrs. Joseph Anderson.
Best specimen tatting, Mrs. W. H.
Britt.
Best specimen weaving, Mrs. E. L.
Howell.
Best specimen crochet, Mrs. J. W.
Gates. Second, Mrs. M. J. Britton.
Best specimen any kind of lace work,
Mrs. Paul Durand.
Best specimen silk embroidery, Mrs.
W. T. Hall.
Best specimen French embroidery,
Mrs. R. E. Yonge. Second, Mrs. R.
E. Yonge.
Best specimen silk quilt, Mrs. E. L.
Howell. Second, Mrs, Isabella Clark
Smith.
Best cotton quilt, Mrs. Addie G.
Smith. Second, Mrs. Isabella Clark
Smith.
Best hand made rug, Mrs. Paul
Miller.
Best specimen knit bedspread, Mrs.
E. H. Martin.
Best hand made garment, Mrs. R.
E. Yonge. Second Mrs. R. E. Yonge.
Best hand made cuptowels, Mrs. R.
E. Yonge.
Best bedspread, combination or em embroidered
broidered embroidered and crochet or knitting,
Mrs. J. W. Buffington. Second, Mrs.
R. R. Hales.
Best specimen lunch cloth, Mrs. R.
E. Yonge.
Best specimen colored embroidery,
Mrs. R. E. Yonge.
Best portierre of shell, Mrs. E. J.
Bechtelhemier.
Best colored sofa pillow, Mrs. G. A.
Carmicheal.
Sewing Machine and Hand
Best man's tailored shirt, Mrs. C.
A. Todd. Second, Mrs. L. A. Jones.
Best man's work shirt, Mrs. C. A.
Todd. Second Mrs. L. A. Jones.
Besjb house dress, Mrs. J. C. Tem Temple.
ple. Temple. Best blouse, Mrs. L. A. Jones.
Best little girl's dress, Mrs. L. A.
Jones.
Best little boy's suit, Mrs. Mack
Taylor.
Household Economics
Best made outfit for doll, Miss Doris
Russell. Second, Mrs. W. H. Britt.
Best sofa cushion, Brunell Rush.
Best tatting, Miss Frances Hayes.
Manuel Training
Bark canoes, Ernest Lee Smith.
Book ends, Nell Wallis.
Educational
Best collective of primary in any
one grade, Mrs. George Brown.
Best collection health work, third
grade, Mrs. George Brown.
Best writing by first grade pupil of
a rural school, Mrs. W. A. Cate.
Best writing by first grade pupil of
a rural school, Mrs. W. A. Cate.
Writing by third grade pupil of a
rural school, Miss Edna Waters.
Composition "Cotton" by third
grade pupil of a rural school, Miss
Bessie May Finley.
Best piece of woodwork by a third
grade boy, Stanton Gardner.

YOU CAN BUY

3t

A S1000.00 Savings Account on
the Installment plan just as easily
as anything else.

Munroe & Chambliss National Bank

The Bank of Progress

(Continued on Page Four)

A Word
To the Wise!
There's a time for all things.
It's now time to have your
car painted and topped. The
fall season's here and a paint
job done now will stay a year.
Bring your car to us and be
satisfied. When better paint
jobs are done Spencer-Ped-rick
Motor Company will do
them.
SPENCER PEDRICK
MOTOR CO.

PHONE 8

FIRE INSURANCE

g
u
C2

L. T. IZLAR I
PHONE
11

Gary Block
FIRE INSURANCE

Two new government dump carts
for sale. B. Goldman. 7-3t

Hotel

Ta-Miami

The Most Perfectly Ventilated Hotel in the Sonth'

MIAMI, FLORIDA

Rates Reasonable

The Commercial and Business Man Always Wei com

OUR PHONES
243 and 174
CHASE & SANBORN'S COFFEE and TEAS
ROYAL SCARLET CANNED GOODS'
YOURS FOR SEhVICE
COOK'S MARKET and GROCERY

Typewriters for rent. B. Gold-

man.

7-3t

Beautiful tissue paper for your
gifts, white and colored. THE SPE SPECIALTY
CIALTY SPECIALTY SHOP, A. E. GERIG. 4-6t j

Advertise in the Evening Star.

TAKE OUR ADVICE USE
Tk Economy baking pomnn

O. K. TEAPOT GROCERY

A

3$s

SOS

B

O

It has always been my policy to have Toys, but this year J put in
my best stock of Toys, among them the newest novelties that
have been put out. Look this list over.
The Fullback, the toy that kicks a football
The Peacock, a bird that walks as If it had life
Dolls Wagons
Carriages Guns
Tea Sets Drums
Doll Furniture Horns
Kid Karts Wheelbarrows
SPORTING AND ARMY GOODS DEPARTMENT
There is nothing nicer than to give Dad, Brother, Husband, or
Gentleman fnend than a nice present thai Le can use in following
his favorite sport. Our store this year has every thing that a
Fisherman or Hunter needs, from a Hook up to a complete camp camp-ing
ing camp-ing outfit.
Blankets Gtrns
Tackle Shells
Saddles Turkey Callers
Shirts Boots Woolen Socks

COMPLETE LINE OF NEW DRY GOODS JUST IN

J Ail 9

See the Sign on the Window A. .".'"'V
Headquarters for Gents' Funilshinos and Sporting Goods

fe'V-- ""U-'

VI



OCALA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1922

8

0. II. S. DEPARTMENT

(Published Every Saturday)

The Staff
Oscar Theus Editor
Charlotte Chazal Assistant Editor
Margaret Hocker Society Editor
Louis Knight Athletic Editor
Mrs. Sprinkle Faculty Member

The Kendal-Green orchestra fur furnished
nished furnished the music for the dance given
on last Tuesday night. This is one of
the best orchestras that has ever
played in Ocala and the dance was
enjoyed by a large number of the
"young set of our city."
The girls' basketball team will play
the Sanford team tonight at eight
o'clock in Sanford. The Ocala team
consists of: Forwards, Brent Woods,
Elizabeth Murray, Genevieve Haile;
guards, Annie MacKay, Mildred Bul Bullock,
lock, Bullock, Helen Newsom; centers, Carrie
Brooks, Gladys Rush.
Only a few more days and the long longed
ed longed for Christmas holidays will be here.
Christmas holidays furnish the last
break in the monotony of the school
year, the last oasis in the long jour journey
ney journey across the arid desert, so to speak.
But through our joyful anticipations
we can see semester examinations
silhouetted darkly above the horizon.
When he invades the 0. H. S. the
wise who have kept their lamps burn burning
ing burning will receive their just and due
rewards. Those of us who have wav waved
ed waved opportunity aside and idled away
our time will be subject to one of
fate's little Ironical jokes. But who
ever heard of a high school student
spoiling his vacation with thoughts of
school? Grey hairs are not for such
Monday afternoon the aspirants for
the boys' basketball team presented
themselves for the first praice o
the saspn. Among those present
were, Leo Lewis, Jean Hall, Malcolm
J'erguson and George Jordan, stars
pi last year's team. A rather large
crowd came put for the practice but
let's remember there is always room
for Qe more player. The boys prac practiced
ticed practiced with a spirit that shows they
mean business,
It has been accepted as a fact that
a quietness immediately precedes a

son
can
man,
the
tern.

violent storm. Often have pens
dainty and pens mighty attempted to
describe that strange hush, in song
and story. Their efforts have been
, all in vain for the theory has been ex exploded
ploded exploded right here in the O. H. S. Then
you dont believe it? Well, just pay
us a visit along about the time we
are being given tests or examinations
and see for yQursel i( there, is a quiet
to be, broken by the storm.

pn the sophomore parallel read reading
ing reading list is Scott's Ivanho.e, George
jieak, he Q. H. S. sage, says it would
fce more beneficial to acquaint them
with the 'garden hoe.'?
' t V
The past week, the week of months
ly tests, was a violent one for the 0,
H. S.
George Jordan, manager of the
boys' basketball team, is arranging a
schedule which will be published
later.
Record of the Football Team
The O. H. S. footba.ll e$yn made an
exra good showing this, year, if .the
fea:m did not win every game it play played.
ed. played. The Wildcats scored fifteen
touchdowns with four points after the
touchdown, to their opponents' ten
touchdowns and one field goal, with
four points after touendown. thereby;
Y'eragjitig: tfia el 84 points $o their
Spponeny'oV The following is the
Schedule
07 H. S. Opponents

2 Sept 7, Sanford in Sanford 18
43 Sept. 14, Palatka in Ocala Q
Spt. Sit Orlando in Orlando 0
Sept: ?8, Lake' (Sty in L. City 12
Njtfv.' 4, Fdrt Meade in Ocala 13
Nov.
Uth, DeLand in Ocala 0
Nov.
. v
17, Bt.'Augustine
in SV Augustine ft
so,
Bartow in Ocala 24

94. Total Points 7
' V'Tfiis Vejrj( is'due. to pach Blitch's
untiring work wdth the Wildcats ey ey-ery
ery ey-ery afternoqn at Hunter Park, and the
boys all appreciate hU patience un
der difficulties which at times seemed
impossible to overcome. The season

has ended with the Wildcats in the
hole financially, and a debt is a debt
which has to be paid, so the boys are
devising plans to raise the money to
crawl out of said hole.
. Grammar School Honor Roll
Lowr4, No. 1: Evelyn Cooper,
Leonora Taylor, MuTiei Galloway, Jay
Armour. No. 2, Elizabeth Milton,
Ramey Bateman, Irrpa. Smith, CpVinne
Anderson,
High' 4: Helen Gray, John Sawaya,
Martin Davis.
"'Low 5", 'No.' 1: Irene Gilmore, Vevie
Haisell, Emily Bateman, James Car
ter, Lee Wylly Bunch, Edward Clem Clement.
ent. Clement. No.' 2, Roger Dodd, Marianna
Brumby,' Elsie Burnett, Pauline Will Williams.
iams. Williams. High 5; Wilfred Ausley, Leslie
Driggers, E. W. Jone, WUhelmena
reen.
Low 6: Frances Ballard, Phyllis
Mortimer.. Esther Whitesides, James
Akin, Earl Bates, Francis Henderly,

Robert Terrell, J. D. Wilkes.
High '6: Elizabeth Dickson, Paul
.....Theus.
f. Low 7, No. 1: Dorothy Cappleman,

Dasibel Clement, Lillian Leak, Eva
Lewis. No. 2, Gladys Hales, Irene Mc Mc-Mullen.
Mullen. Mc-Mullen. High 7: Polly Smith, Hazel Ricket Ricket-son,
son, Ricket-son, Leroy Carroll.
Low 8: Frances Drake, Johanna
Tobleske, Fred Cullison, Harry Mc Mc-David.
David. Mc-David. High 8: Anita Chazal, Amy Long,
Dolly Potter, Willie Huckaby, Lucille
Home, Harry Sheppard.

JOKES
"Did he take
Tippie:
you any-

where?"
Sidney: "No, we held down the sofa
all evening."
Tippie: "Must have been a close
call."
Careful Listeners
"When the eyes are shut, the hear hearing
ing hearing becomes more acute," says a med medical
ical medical authority. We have noticed stud students
ents students trying this experiment in school.
"Oh, Cholly, I've taken up golf."

"Fine, what do you go around in?"
"Oh, knickerbockers." Puppet.
Man: "So you would ilke to be my
- in law."
Fellow: "No, I don't; but if I mar marry
ry marry your daughter, I don't see how I
help it." Orange Owl.
Bliss: "Most women try to boss a
but my nancee is an exception.
Hiss: "And after the wedding your

dear little exception will proceed to
prove the rule." Chappard.

Little Boy:
Tramp: "I
"What's your hurry?"
ain't in no hurry, but
many after
me is." Jack-O-Lan-
"Gladys must
"How's that?'
"I heard her
be a wild girl."
father say he could
LICENSE
NO. NAME OCCUPATION
573 R. E. Johnson, merchant

574 Detroit Garage, garage ...May 4, 1922...
575 Dr. 11. D. Fuller, dentist .,, ..May 5, 1922...
576 It. L. Anderson, lawyer May 5, 1922...
577 R. la. Anderson Jr.. lawyer May 5, 1922...
678 Berry Morgan, merchant May 5, 1922,,.
579 Otis Squires, merchant May 4, 1922...
680 Nathaniel Adams, merchant May 6.. 1922...
681 Joseph Bell, merchant May 8, 1922...
582 Mayo-L.yles Store, merchants ,,.,..May H, 1922..

583 Jonia liiley. merchant ...........
583 Layton & Barnett, boarding house.
585 Citizens Bank of Dumiellon.
bankers
586 J. W. Greer, merchant
587 Lucius and Reddin-g, garage
588 Marion County Creamery,
cream manufacturers
KfiQ A.Tn riftn ('iinntv Prpflmprv.
Ice
. .
ice

cream cart on streets ..June
590 Henry Harrington, merchant ....June
591 A. C. Trotter, barber ..June
593 S. A Snook, merchandise broker. .June
594 B. Wilkinson, merchant ..June
595 Wm. Summers, merchant ..June
596 J. C. Reeves, merchant ..June
597 G. L. Mortimer, merchant :. June
598 J. L- Leitner, merchant ,,...i--June
599 Peter Brown, merchant June
600 Dr. J. B. Davis, merchant June
601 David Whiteside, restaurant '...June
602 BlalcU Bros., automobile agency!- June
603 Adam Gladney, merchant ..July
604 Jim Shilly, merchant ..., July
605 J. E. Jones, fish market July
606 Hill Naval titores Co., tnercliants. July

607 Hill Naval Stores Co., turpentine
stoll .. ...
608 J. A. Ferguson, merchant
609 Laura Mitchell, merchant ,r
610 Emma Williams, merchant .....
611 Henrietta Gray, restaurant ......
612 Robert Grant, merchant ........
614 Weihe Company auctioneer .....
615 Mac kand Haynes, merchants ...
616 Booker Hinton, merchant
618 D. C. Jones, merchant
617 (Spoiled).
619 H. R. Riley, barber
620 1m B. Hames, garage
621 -Theresa Floy, merchant
622 Finch Brothers, auctioneers
623 L. B. Price Mercantile Co., mchts
624 James Sabie, merchant
825 Martin Irving, merchant
626 Clement Hardin, restaurant
1 D. H. Hannis, merchant
2 E. D. Rou and Co., merchants
3 Dr. A. S. Nelson, dentist
4 B. E. Johnson, merchant ........
5 W. F. Blesch, barber
6 Edward Donaldson, merchant . .
7 R. W, Ferguson,, merchant .,.,,,
8 W. J. Westover, merchant
9 A. Seevers, merchant
10 T. W. Troxler. merchant
11 J. E. Turnipseed & Co., merchants
12 H. D. Mathews, merchant
13 Peter Brown, restaurant
14 Wiltner Gibson,- merchant
15 Sam R. Pyles & Company, under-
takers and embalmers
16 Metropolitan Bank, banker
n jnas. -vicjjucas, .career ....
18 J. W. General, meat market
19 S. Jm Fridy and Son, merchants...'
20 !-Berry Morgan, merchant
21 Wm. Lockwood, hand bakery
22 Potter and Tyner, merchants
23 Standard Oil Co., oils and gas...'
24 Standard Oil Co.. oils
25 Standard Oil Co., oils y
26 T. C. Atkinson, merchant ........
27 Knight and Strange, merchants..-
28 O. F. Godwin, merchant
23 A. Blott, merchant
30 Mrs. E. C. Bennett, Insurance agt.
31 J. D. Bowen, insurance agent ....
32 H. S. Williams, merchant
33 Belleview Trading Co., merchant.'
34 M. W. McDavid, merchant '.. ..
35 Commercial Bank, '"bankers .......
3fi H. Martin, lawyer
87 D. E. Knoblock, merchant
38 W. M. Wilson, real estate tagent-
39 Mrs. J. L. Lawrence, merchant...
40 T. J. Murray, merchant
41 Equitable Life Insurance Society;
insurance .. ....................
42 Anti-Monopoly Drug Store, weigh weighing
ing weighing machine
43 L. T. Hickson, merchant
44 S. H. Christian, real estate.......
45 Anti-Monopoly Drug Store, mchts
46 Jeanes and Davis, sales stable....
47 D. Niel Ferguson, lawyer
48 W R. Roe, merchant
49 Ocala Telephone Co., telephone
exchange
50 James A. Bellamy, restaurant....
51 J. C. Reeves, merchant
52 Dr. W. Bennett, physician
53 W. J. Hogan. merchant
54 Nichols and Oobb, sales ocable
55 Albert Robinson, ihree pool tables
56 Adr.mj uuu Morrison, garage ....
57 ii. A. Burford, lawyer
53 W. J. Willis, merchant
59 A. H. Hargraves. merchant
60 J. A. Hicks and Son, merchants...
61 G. L. Mortimer, merchant
62 M. E. Feinberg. merchant
63 Thorn and Thomas, real estate, ,
64 L. W. Duval, lawyer.
65 Wilson L.i vv is, merchant
6 R. Hearst, merchant
67 Wilson Lewis, barber
68 Wheeler McMahon, merchant ....
69 Curry Feed Co., merchants
70 -M. Zohrn, merchant
71 Clara Jackson, restaurant
72 Hattie Feinberir, luarehant
73 Loncaliv Commissary Co.,, mchts..
74 LoTieala Pho?. Co., miners
75 J. B. Gore, merchant
76 Bank of Dunnellon, bankers
77 W, K. Zewadsk:, lawyer
78 T. F. Stewman, merchant .......
"9 Theus Bros., merchants
80 Walter Hector, restaurant
81 J. A. rtiehey, merchant
82 George Boone, meat market ....
83 Martin and Smith, merchants...
84 J. A. McCarley, merchant ......
85 D. H. Burry, merchant
86 Nelson and Co.. garage
87 Gulf Refinirrar Co., wholesale oils
88 T. J. Smith, barber
89 J. M. Liddell, merchant
5Kr-rNational Fire In.mrirce Co.. of
Hartfor,! Conn., 'nsuratice
91 Automobile Fire Insurance Co.. of
Hartford. Conn., insurance
92 Connecticut Fire Insurance Co.,
Hartford. Conn., insurance

93 (Cancelled).
94 Providence Washington Insurance
Co.. Providence. It I. Insurance.

hardly keep her in clothes." Ex.

Hazel (at the dance): "Erskine, Ij
wish you were a kangaroo." j
Loping Erskine: "Why?" j
Hazel: "'Cause then you'd be goat ;
at the hops."

in ine mwti 01 nis speecn, reaming ;
he had no supporters, he sat down. ;
Exchange. ; j

T aT. Jt 1 1
!

"Say, I'd like to try that suit on in
the window."
"Sorry, but youH have to use the
dressing room."

Miss Edwards: "Edward, you have
not given your oral theme, have
ycu?"
Edward: "Oh, yes; and when I got
though another girl gave hers."
If you do not appreciate our at attempts
tempts attempts to be funny, just hand in a
few of your own jokes and let us
have a laugh on you.

Qltt
9
FOUR
wonderful tines of
STATIONERY
all suitable for
Gins
at
THE BOOK SHOP
REPORT
DATE ISSUER
AMOUNT
State County
...My $, 122...
1.50
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
9.00
.75
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
.75
.75
.75
.75
4.50
.75
5.00
7.50
.75
5.00
.May 13, 1922..
1.50
.May10, 1922 10.00
May
23,
1922 15.00
(May
CMay
27
31.
,1922.
1.50
10.00
10.00
1.50
1.60
1.00
5.00
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.5Q
1.50
3.00
5.00
5.00
1.50
1.50
2,i
1-50,
45.00
1.50
1.50
1.50,
2.50
1.50
5.00
1.50
1.50
1.50
.50
5.00
1.50
5.00
1.5
i5ff
1.50
2.50
3.00
6.0Q
10.0Q
3.00
3.00
3.00
6.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
6.00
3.00
$;OOV
loo
25.00
15.00
3.00
5.00
6.00
3.00
3.03
3.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
3.00
9.00
3.00
3.00
1922..
.June 1, 1922..
5.00
.75
.75
.50
2.50
.75
.75
.U
.75
.75
.75
1.50
2.50
2.50
.75
.75
1.50
.75
22.50
.75
.75
.75
1.25
.75
2.50
.75
.75
.75
.25
2.50
.75
2.50
.75
.75
.75
1.
7.
8,
1922...
1922...
1922...
10.
12.
is:
19.
19.
19,
23.
23,
26,
1922.
1922..
19" 22..
1922..
1922 .
1922.
1922.,
1922 .
1922,
1922
I,
1922;...
1922...,
3, 1922...
15, 1922..
..July 15,
..July 17,
..July i9.
. .July 25,
lja
1922.......
1922.......
1922
1922
1922.
1923,..,...
1922
1922
1922
. .July
. .July
25.
2X
. .Aug.
. .Aug.
..Aug,
, .Aug.
1.
I
..Aug.
...Aug.
.Aug.
..Aug.
- Sept.
..Sept.
-Sept.
..Sept.
-ct
-x0
'$viV
Oct.
.Oct.
-Oct,
Qct
..Oct,
.Oct.
..Oct.
-Oct.
..Oct.
..Oct.
Oct.
7. 1922..
18, 1922.
28. 1922.
29, 1922.
6, 1922..
16. 1922.
16, 1922.
19, 19i22.'
1. 1922. v.
1.35
1.50
3.00
5.00
1.50
2.
2,
2,
I
2.
!:
192?...
1922...
1922..
1922,,
1922..
1922..
1922..
1922..
1922..
1922..
1922..
1922..
1922..
150 1
1.50
3.00
1.50
1.50
1.60
3,00
1.50
2.50
1.50
3.
!:
VvV
1922....
1923....
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922,,.,-
1922..
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922,,..;...
1922
1922........
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922........
1922.........
1922...
12.50
Oot.
Oct.
.Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
.Oct.
.Oct.
Oct.
,Oci
.Oct.
Oct.
.Oct;
Oct.
.Oct
.Oct
Opt
.Oct.
Oct.
Oct
.Oct
.Oct.
.Oct.
.Oct
.ct
150
2 50
3.00
1.50 1
1.50
1.50
12.50
12.50
12.50
1.50
4.54
5,'
5.
5.
5,
5.
8,
5,
5.
5,
.
6.
t
1.50
1.50
2.50
5.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
15.00
im
10.00
3.00
3.00.
.Oct 1922.
t
.
6.
1.
7.
7.
192?, 5.00
1922 3.00
1922 10.00
1922 7.50
2.50
1.50
.Oct
.Oct
.Oct
.Oct
.Oct
-Oct
.Oct
.Oct
-Oct
Oct
5.00
3.75
12.50
5.00
1922 25.00
1922 10.00
1922.
3.00
1.50
42.60 j
2.50
1.50
5.00
1.50
12.50
37.50
5.00
5.09
L50
1.50
1.50
1.50
3.00
5.00
6.00
1.50
.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
2.50
2.25
2.25
20.00
1.50
7.50
5.00
1.50
S 75
2.50
1.50
2,50
1.50
1.50
1.50
5.00
12.50
1.00
1.50
2.50
2.50
7.
1922..
85.20
5,(XJ
3.00
10.00
3.00
25.00
75.00
10.00
10.00
3.09
$.0ff
3.00
3.00
6.00
10.00
10.00
3.00
3.00
XOO
3.00
3.00
3.00
5.00
4.50
4.50
UM
3.00
15.00
10.00
3.00
7.50
5.00
3.00
5.00
j 3.00
3.00
3.00
10.90
25.00
2.00
3.00
7.
1922..
7.
1922..
7, 1932-...
7: -?923...
.Oct
1922...
- -Oct
1:
1922. .
1922...
1922...
1922...
1922...
1922...
12...
1922...
1922...
1922...
.Oct
. Oct.
..Oct
..Oct
..Oct
..Oct
..Oct,
, .Oct.
..Oct.
. .Oct
..Oct
. .Oct
. .Oct.
. .Oct.
. .Oct
..Oct
:.oct
. .Oct
..Oct.
..Oct
..Oct
OcV
..Oct
. .Oct
. .Oct.
. .Oct
..Oct
. .Oct
. .Oct
. .Oct
. .Oct
. .Oct
. .Oct.
. .Oct.
9.
9,
9.
9.
k
1:
10.
10.
1922..
1922.
1922..
1922..
1923-. :
1922..
1922.
1922..
1922..
1922..
1922..
im..
1922;.
1922 .
1922..
1922..
1922..
10.
10.
lot
10,
10.
11.
11.
11
11,
It
1L
11.
11.
11.
11.
11.
12.
12.
12.
xh
12,
12.
1922,.
1924.
1922..
1922..
1922..
1923.
1923.
1922.
.Oct.
.Oct
13,
13,
13,
1922.
1922.
.Oct
1922.

- Oct 13, uzj.

AT THE CHURCHES TOMORROW

Methodist
C. W. White, Pastor
9:45 a. m. Sunday school.
L. W.
Duval, superintendent.
n a; m.
Buhrman.
6:30 p. m
4..
Preaching by Dr. W,
Senior League.
:0 p. m. Preaching. Subject of
sermon, "Five Fatal Mistakes of a
Business Man."
Music by choirs and orchestra.
We have saved a place for you.
Grace Episcopal
J. J. Neighbour, Rector
Second Sunday in Advent
7:30 a. m. Holy communion.
9:45 a. m. Sunday school.
"-on
i.1 a. m. Morning prayer and
mon on the subject, "The Bible
ser ser-as
as ser-as Character and Warrant."
7:30 p. m. Evening prayer and ad address
dress address on subject, "Providence."
Come and worship God.
Christian
Rev. Charles H. Trout, Pastor
9:45 a. m. Sunday school.
11 a. m. Communion service.
The Ladies' Missionary Society of
this church will have charge of the
morning service and special address
by the pastor.
7:30 p. m. Evening service. Ser Sermon
mon Sermon by pastor.
You are are cordially invited.
Presbyterian
Rev. W. F. Creson, Pastor
9:45 a. m. Sabbath school. J. K.
Dickson, superintendent.
11 a. m. Morning worship. Ser Sermon,
mon, Sermon, "The Life of Fellowship."
6:30 p. m. Christian Endeavor.
NO. NAME
OCCUPATION
5 5
Mechanics and Traders Insurance
Co., of New Orleans, insurance..!.
96 Palatine Insurance Co. of New
York, insurance
97 Sevea Fire and Life Insurance
Co., Gothenberg, Sweden, Ins
98 (Cancelled).
99 Atlas Assurance Co. of New York,
N. Y., insurance
100 Girard Insurance Co., of Philadel Philadel-piiia,
piiia, Philadel-piiia, Pa., insurance
101 London Assurance Co., of New"
ork, insurance
102 Royal indemnity Co.,
York, insurance
103 American burety Co.,
of New
of New
lord, insurance
104 Scottish Union and National In-
lOo Philip Samuel, merchant
106 X. Ij. iliiams, merchant
107 X. Williams, merchant
ius J. A. Thompson, meat market,
lua George onnmacnt, merchant .
110 R. A. Swain, merchant
111 C. A. Din kins, merchant
112 First state Bank or. Mcintosh,
bankers
113 Mrs. W. J. Mixon, merchant
114 James E. B. Hall, real estate....
115 W. hi. Smith, lawyer .s
llti Joanna Riley, merchant
117 Dock Harris, merchant
11$ Moses Grocery Co., merchants .
lia Willie Burrell, merchant
120 The Texas Co., wholesale oils....
121 Tnomas Eiliott, restaurant
122 J. 1. Taylor, merchant"...,
123 Dr. 11. W. Henry, physician
124 Ida Perkins, merchant
125 J. W. Goolsby, merchant
126 G. W. Freeman, merchant .......
127 S. L. Hiers, garage
128 O. K. Teapot Grocery, merchants.
129 Liuella S. Swaim,. bill poster ..
130 Bridges Motor Co., garage ....
131 Dr. G. B. Parramore, physician
132 Nicholas Heintz, bakery-
133 P. H. Bradus, merchant ......
134 H. P. Bitting, merchant ......
135 L. J. Blalock, merchant
136 Globe Medicine Co.. hawker and

vendor of medicines Oct
137 J. J. Knoblock. merchant Oct
138 J. W. Coulter, merchant "Oct
13a S. S. Savage Jr., real estate agent"oct.
140 John Cabarias, merchant !!oct
141 A. J. Douglas, merchant !Oct
12 H. Thalgott, merchant "Oct"
143 Mrs. Joun Livingston, merchant, "oot!

ai n.. v naicueii, luciwaiii
145 J. O. Boyd, merchant
146 McCrory Stores Corporation, Tnchts
147 Dr. L. H. V. Engelken, physician,
Hi uiarKson naraware v;o., merchants
1149 G. L. Duckett, merchan t
15o Citizens Bank of Dunnellon,
i bankers
1151 Mrs. Etta Myers, merchant.
1 152 B. J. Benson, merchant
jlo3 H. McBurney, merchant
J154 c. Clark, merchant
1155 Irvine Crate & Basket Co., Mchts.
i 156 Irvine Crate. & Basket -Company,
manufacturer of crates

7.50)157 Mitchell Drug tore, merchants. ..

1" H. 1. Turner, merchant
159 Mrs. Annie J. Walling, boarding
house
160 H. J. Goldsmith, hotel
16 1 T. L. Randall, garage
162 M. M. Little, merchant
163 H. 1L Meadows, garage
164 C. A. Fort, pool tables (three) ...
1 165 C. A. Fort, barber (three chairs) ...
;i66 O. B. Kemp, merchant

16 ocala Marble worKs, maroie w. .Oct
168 Pillans and Smith, merchants- . .Oct
169 H. A. Fausett, merchant ... ..Oct

171 .Mrs. M. H. Nobles, merchant

a'Kftll72 B. P. Hatchett. merchant

1.50 173 cimith Mercantile Co., merchants.
1.50 : 174 F. W. Cook, merchant
7 50 175 G. C. Greene, merchant
j,00 i1'6 T- C.Carter, merchant
L50 !t Fishel's, merchants
6,00 ITS Ocala Tire & Vulc Co., merchants
150:179 S. A. Brown, merchant
150 180 J. A. Messur, merchant
181 Frank's, Inc.. merchants
2.50 1 182-r-Parker & Guynn, merchants

J183 Phillips Drug co., arugstore

184 Whittington & Phillips, merchants. Oct
185 Whittington & Phillips, merchants. .Oct
186 Wnittington & Phillips, merchants. .Oct
187 Whittington & Phillips, weighing
machine Oct
188 Will Lewis, marber (2 chairs) .... .Oct
IS? Mrs. Lillie Rogers, restaurant Oct,
190 A. E. Gerig, The Specialty Shop,
merchant Oct
191 Ollie Mordis, merchant ......Oct
192 W. M. Davidson, restaurant Oct
193 Ocala Iron Works, foundry Oct

194 Ocala Auto & Garage Co.. garage...
195 J. Greenstein. merchant ...
19 George Wilson, merchant
17 Mrs. w. C. Hall, merchant
198 N. F. Beshire, merchant ...
195 j$. a. Beshire, merchant
200 Federal Bakery, bakery ...
201 J. J. Katiba, m&rchant

Oct
Oct
. .Oct
Oct
Oct
Oct
Oct
Oct.
and.
Oct
......Oct.

202 A. J. aKtitA. merchant
)3 Zuber Store, merchants
204 S. E. Hughes.
undertaker
embalmer
205 Apaha Hotel Co., hotel
206 T. W. Carter, barber chairs)
207 J. G. Whaley, merchant
208 Williams Garage, garage
;209 S, M. Hooper, merchant
210 S. M. Hooper, barber
211 J. Chas. Smith, merchant
212 Sam T. Wilson, merchant ..
213 M. H. Naif, merchant
214 Needham Bros., plumbers
215 The Girt Shop, merchants ....
216 Te Book Shop, merchants ..
217 Style Hat Shop, merehaat ....
. "Ma fi.-.ro'a TjTvra. merchant ....
219 Marion Hardware Co.. merchants.
220 Belcher Mercantile Co., merchants.
i 22 1 P II. Perkins, barber (3 chairs
223 Chero-Cola Bottlinsr wonts.
! tlins- works "VLV
: 223 F. W. Schmude. pool room, 3 tables
!224 Easrle Furniture Co., merchants..
22". J. R. Dewey, restaurant
22 City Barker Shop, ) chairs)
227 Greene, barber
t T:;"kf-r and Simmons, sarage ....
22 Ocala s'.is. Co., crate mfsxs
230 Ocala Ice & Packing Company, ice
ar.i storage
231 Ocala Steam Laundry, laundry

c,232 Ocala Bazaar, merchants
'""'ss r R TvdiTiB merchant

234 The Elite Shop, merchants

235 Mary C Jackson, merchant

7:30 p. m. Evening worship. Ser Sermon,
mon, Sermon, "To Be Glorified in Saints."
We shall be glad to have any who
have no other church-home to worship
with us-
Baptist
Rev. Louis Collins, D. D., Pastor.
9:45 a. m. Sunday school.
11 a. m. Morning worship. The
pastor will speak on "Two Big
Thoughts Suggested by the Recent
State Convention of Baptists."
6:30 p. m. Junior, Intermediate
and Senior B. Y. P.. U.
7:30 p. m. Evening worship. Sub Subject
ject Subject of the pastor's sermon will be
"The Greatest Discoverey of a Great
Scientist."
"Better go to church."
Catholic
Rev. R. F. Brennan, Pastor
Mass on first Sunday of each month
at 8:30 a. m. Mass on other Sundays
of month at 9:30 a. m. Mass on week
days at 7 a. m. Sunday evening serv service
ice service at 7:30. Confessions on Saturdays
from 5 to 6 p. h. and from 7 to 8 p. m.
Christian Science Society
Room 5, Merchant's Block.
9:45 a. m. Sunday school.
11 a. m. Sunday service.
Subject of lesson-sermon, "God the
Preserver of Man."
Wednesday evening meeting 8 p. m.
Reading room open 2 to 5 p. m.
daily except Sundays.
North Ocala Sunday School
(W. D. Croft, Superintendent)
Sunday school every Sunday after afternoon
noon afternoon at 3 o'clock. Visitors always
welcome.

DATE ISSUED
AMOUNT
State County
2.50
2.50
2.60
2.50
2.E0
.Oct.
.Oct
.Oct.
13, 1922.
13, 1922.
13, 1922.
.Oct. 13,
1922.
.Oct. 13, 1922.
.Oct 13. 1922.
2.50
2.50
2.50
2.50
1.60
l.'O
.150
2.50
3.00
1.50
1.50
7.50
1.50
5.00
5.00
1.50
1.50
15.75
1.50
12.50
2.50
1.50
6.00
1.50
1.50
1.50
6.00
2.25
2.60
5.00
6.00
1.50
2.25
2.25
1.50
12.50
2.25
1.50
5.00
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
1.50
..Oct. 13, 1922.
.Oct. 13. 1922.
.Oct.
13,
13.
13,
13.
13,
13.
13.
13.
13.
14,
14.
14.
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922....
1922....
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922....
1922....
1922
1922
1922
1922....
1922
1922
1922....
1922
1922
1922....
1922
1922....
1922
1922
1922
1922...,
i-Oct.
I .Oct.
.Oct
3.00
3.00
3.00
5.00
6.00
3.00
3.00
15.00
2.00
10.00
10.00
3.00
3.00
31.60
3.00
25.00
6.00
3.00
10.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
10.00
4.50
5.00
10.00
10.00
3.00
4.50
4.50
3.00
25.00
4,5ft
3.00
10.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
9.00
10.00
9.00
3.00
15.00
3.00
7.60
3.00
3.00
7.50
15.00
0.00
3.00
5.00
10.00
10.00
7.50
10.00
76.00
3.00
3.00
10.00
19.50
3.00
5.00
3.00
4.50
4.50
3.00
3.00
3.00
6,0
3.00
3.00
3.00
10.50
6.00
10.50
6.0Q
4,5
3.00
5.00
2.00
5.00
4.50
4,50
10.00
25.00
10.00
3.00
8.00
3,0
3.09
3.00
3.00
3.00
3,00
1
23.00
25.00
2.00
3.0
19.00
2.00
2.00
3.00
.0H
5,0
5.09
3.00
9.00'
3.00
3.00
40.59
3.0ft
X.0
15.00
75.00
3.00
10.00
2.00
1.00
10.00
15.00
60.00
10.00
f.00
7.50
.Oct.
' 1 .Oct
. .Oct.
..Oct
. .Oct
. .Oct.
. .Oct.
. .Oct.
. .Oct.
. .Oct
..Oct
. .Oct
.Oct
. .Oct
. .Oct
. .Oct
. .Oct
. .Oct.
14,
14,
14,
14.
14.
16.
10.
16,
16.
16.
1.
16,
16.
16,
16.
16.
1.
1S 1S-17.
17. 1S-17. 17.
17,
17,
17,
18,
18.
18.
18
19,
18.
18,
19.
19.
19.
19,
19.
19.
19.
20.
20.
20,
20.
20.
2V
21,
21,
21,
21,
23.
23.
23.
23.
33.
.Oct.
. .Oct
. .Oct
. .Oct
. .Oct
..Oct.
'..Oct.
; .Oct.
.Oct
1922...,
1922
1922
1922
1922. ....
1822....
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922. .
1922.
1922. i.
1922 r...
1922
192....
122
1922
1922....
1922
.. Oct
"Oct
" oct
1.50
4.50
Oct.
Oct
Oct.
IIS
1.50
..Oct
oct
ioct
..Oct
!!oct
'
7.50
1.50
2.75
1.50
1.60
3.76
..Oct
7.50
.Oct
2.00
..Oct
"..Oct.
..Oct.
.. .Oct.
. .Oct
1822.
1922f.
.Oct
122
1922
1922.3JV."
1922.7;...
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
192?.......,
Ii32
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
cut
.Oct
.Oct.
23.
23,
23.
24.
24.
24.
24.
24.
24.
24,
24,
24.
24,
24.
24,"
24.
24.
24.
24.
24.
24.
v
24.
24,
24,
25.
24,
Ik
25.
25,
25,
25.
25,
W
25,
25,
9.75
1.50
2.50
1.50
2.25
2.25
1.50
1.50
1.50
3.00
1.50
1.50
1.50
5.25
3.00
S.25
3.00
2.25
1.60
2.25
1.00
2-80
2.25
2,25
3.00
12.60
9.00
1.50
1.60
Oct.
.Oct
.Oct.
.Oct
.Oct
.Oct.
.Oct
.Oct.
.Oct.
Oct.
Oct
-Oct
-Oct
..Oct
1922
1922". .'. .
1922
1922
1922
1922.
1922,
193&
1922.....
1922
1922
1922. ....
1922...
1922...:...
1942
1922
1922
1922.....
192.....
1922
1922
1922....,
1922....
1023
1922
1922....
1922....
Oct
Oct.
1.6ft
.
1.50
1.60
1,50
1.60
12.50
12.50
1.00
25.
25..
2 a,
25,
25.
55,
25,
25.
25.
25,
25.
25,
?5
25.
25.
25,
26.
25.
25.
25.
25.
25,
25.
...Oct
. .Oct
...Ofrt
. ..Oct
.. .Oct
...Oct
. .Oct
. ,Oet
...Oct
. .Oct.
...Oct
...Oct
...Oct
1.50
s oa
1922.
1922.
1922.
1923.
2.50
1.50
4.30
1.3ft
1.S0
20.7S
1.60
L50
-Oct
-Oct
-Oct
1922..
1922..
1923..
.Oct
.Oct
.Oct
.Oct.
.Oct.
.Oct.
.Oct
.Oct.
1922
1922
1922 ..-
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922
1922..
1922
1922
1922
1922
7.50
27.60
1.50
6.00
.
-;2
.60
E.00
7.50
.Oct

25.
25.
25.
26.
20.
2t.

25.00
5.00
2.0ft
2.TS
42-50
1M

Oct
..Oct

S.00
2.00

Oct

1922

OCALA TWENTY YEARS AGO

(Evening Star Dec. 9, 1902)
Mrs. Maude Gary Turnley, wife of
Rev. W. D. Turnley of Fulton, Ky,
and children arrived Saturday after afternoon
noon afternoon and will spend the winter with
her mother, Mrs. Fannie Gary. Later
they will be joined by Mr. Turnley.
Mr. Tom Bailey, the night engineer
of the Ocala spoke and rim factory
short line at Raleigh, where the fac factory
tory factory is getting a great deal of hard
wood, came in Saturday to spend a
week with-his parents.
Mr. E. M. Howard, the up-to-date
Ocala laundryman, has bought the E.
M. Hood place south of Mr. W. W.
Clyatt's residence and is having it put
in tip top shape for a home,
Mr. C. P. Pillans, superintendent of
the big West mill commissary, with
his friend, Mr. J. W. Sperring Jr.,
spent Sunday with Mr. Pillans' friends
in Ocala.
The Teapot has engaged the serv services
ices services of Oscar Gale of Belleview, an
old time grocery man. He is at his
post of duty and wears a smile that
spreads its refreshing beams on all
the customers.
Ocala Ten Years Ago
(Evening Star Dec. 9, 1902)
The Star has received a copy of the
Free Lance, printed in the Philippine
Islands. It is edited by J. Hudson
Curry, well known in Ocala sixteen
years ago.
Mrs. Hopkins, wife of Judge L. L.
Hopokins, died at her home in Belle Belle-view
view Belle-view yesterday and was buried in the
cemetery there today. Mrs. Hopkins
had been quite sick for some time.
Little Alma, the three-year-old
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Mc-
jMahon, died Sunday morning at the

236 Ocala Seed & Supply Co., Mchts.... Oct
237 Lloyd Tobacco Co., tobacco dealers.. Oct
238 LfcS. Haisell, merchant ..Oct
239 E. C. Jordan and Co., merchants.. .Oct
240 O'Neal and Holly, garage Oct
241 Court Pharmacy, merchant .Oct
242 Court Pharmacy, weighing ma machine
chine machine .....Oct
243 Farmers' Supply Co.,- merchants. .. .Oct

244 E: T. Helvenston, merchant Oct
245 J. J. Gerig, merchant Oct
246 M. 6. Sawaya. merchant Oct
247 J. A. McNeill, barber, (2 chairs) ... -Oct
248 Ocala Electric Shoe Shop, Mcht....Oct
248 H. B. Masters Co., merchants ..Oct.
250 .Mrs. A. L. Martin, merchant ..Oct
251 'Mrs. H. M. Cook, merchant ..Oct.
252 Magnolia House, rooms .Oct
253 Jas. R. Sutton, physician ..Oct
254 Joe Bomolinl, merchant ...Oct
255 E. P. Pacetti, merchant ..Oct;
256 Gore's Grocery Co., merchants. .. Oct
257 Brigham bicycle Shop, merchant. -Oct
258 Ed Mach, merchant ..Oct
259 White Star Line. Etnratr. .Oct

260 Dr. K. J. Welhe. ntomstrlst
261 Farmers Exchange Store, Mcht..
ioa rs. r uonaon, merchant
263 B. P. Condon, auto agency and
garasre
264 Weihe Company, merchant
265 M. S. Sawaya, merchant ..
266 B. B. Cafe, restaurant
267 Annie Griffin, merchant
268 R. E. Johnson, merchant
269 J. C. Dupree, merchant
270 H. T. Hall and Co.. merchants....
271 L. M. Hill, merchant ...!.!T..""
272 Ocala Motor Co.. garage
273 W. R. Bryant, merchant
274 Jacob Henderson, merchant
oi2 nomonni. meat market
I5 Ca.rl A. Sommers, real estate
f ' ;eter m. Flnley, merchant
178 Dunnellon Sale Co.. garage
JiJ T. J. Galmon, merchant
280 Jake Goldman, merchant
Fred Malever. merchant
282 J. Malever. merchant
of5 Mc-ten Bagley. merchant
284 Phillips Drug Co., weighing ma machine
chine machine 285 E. H Wilson, merchant'
ooS John Metric restaurant
287 J- W. Alexander, mcrchnnt
Ottis Squires, merchant ..
SSXi;rTse ,a?acJSay & Co., merchants
-eor?e MacKay and Company un-
... lertakers and embalmers ....
nze t MaKay Co.. archltecta.
9a9SVvv'ohPso.n' restaurant
292 Robert Martin, merchant
- . v t a.1 a. i i in.
1294 A. TWV a-K.

!l9-$ataTel H,a11' chairs): -get.,
?96 M. R. Hunntcutt. merrhTit 'Oct-

i . v. ii a-1 it.
1 : Kis. merchant
I :f Jar2. -"Part- merchant

'"..Oct.
' .Oct
..Oct
"".wNoc.
..Not.

! f 2!:?- Wolw!n, merchant 1 1
X", v i- r "rt- mercnant
i: Dawkins. merchant
ov4 u. r. unereers. TnivhBTi
303 McD. Llntor, barter (1 chair) ''
304 J. H. Smith, boardfAg hosef:::::
1 307 Dan Killens. rest an rant

1.50 308 Bessie Rountree, restaurant -.Nov.
f 309 D. L. Sander?, merchant .. ,..."Nor'
2.50 j 210 H. 6. Mlnsball. contracting plant- rw
6.00 1 her "VrOT'
6.00 311 Bank of Citra. bankers "S0T
3.76 ,212 O. C. Hooper, merchant "tj?!
5.00 22 J. E. Spencer, merchant "SSI
37.50 31 4 E- O. Peek, physician
1.50i 315 Mack Taylor, garage "SSI'
1.50 31 6 w- N. Knight, meat market '5I't

aio Stewart ureen. oamer i cnalr) ..'
319 National Supply Co, merchants.
320 V. A. Stone, merchant
321 Berry Washtnsrton. merchant ...
322 Jack King, comedians
32-3 Rheinauer & Co.. merchants
324 J. C. Turnlnseed. merchant
325 Jerry Burnett, merehant tailor. ..
326 Dr. H. C. Dozier. physician
327 W. M. Summers, merchant
1328 W. V. Weathers, merehant
329 J. M. Potter, merchant
330 Geo. L. Bunch, merchant
I33T Dr. J. E. Chac. dentist
332 S. P. Burton, merchant
333 Dr. R. D. Puller, dentist
334 Elizabeth Harper, merchant
334 Z. Graham, merchant
336 J. S. Grantham, merchant

337 w. n. Marsfi, mtrcnant ..wot.
338 J. E. Frampton, merchant ..Not.
339 H. H. Williams Produce Co. Mcht.--Nov-
340 Union Assurance Society, Ltd.. lag, .Nor.
341 Insurance Co. tSate of Pa.. Ins.. Not.
342 Atlas Underwriters, insurance, .... .Nor.

343 Scottish Union & Nat. Ins. Co.. Im..Not.

1344 Eastern Underwriters Agency. Ina

i iiy or .new rork ins. Co., Im...-.o.
;34 Fidelity & Deposit Co. of Md., Ins--No.
347 Columbia Ins. Co.. Ins ". ....Not.

'343 Victory Ins. Co., Ina
cocowitch and Rawis, merchants
!350 MeClellan Drusr C.. drne tor

1.50.351 Meffert Mercantile Co., merchants

szz .nrs. ii. is. .-settles, mercnant wot.
353 T. B. Snook, merchant Not.
354 Needham Motor Co., garage Nor.
355 H. A. Waterman, merchant ........Not.
s56 Sparks Shows, shows Nor.
357 M. J. Stephens, merchant ........ .Nor.
358 E. W. Rush and Co.. merchants.. .Not.
S 859 Mrs. L. Miller, restaurant .Nor.
! 260 H. L. Wikle. merchant Not.

i aJ v. KODerts ana company, qd-
I dertakers and embalmers

1.0ft i 262 C. V. Roberts and Co.. merchants. .Not.
leftj3S3 L. A. Dewey, merchant .....Not.
ISO36 w- SL Spates, merchant ....Not.
3 00 365 J. R. DaTenport, merchant ........Nor.
i'ss' 300 T. Chisena, merchant ...Nor.

. ....
oo i xj. u. Lamu, earaire
368 Q. SL Scott, insurance, twentr-frra
companies
369 F. w. Webber, merchant
370 Sid R. Whaley. merchant

372 N. E. 1 we. merchant ........,....Not.24. 1922. ...T. I
373 DeVore and Tongue, merchants.. .Nor.'lS, 1922......
374 Hogan's Groc Co merchants . ..-.Not. 2T, 1922. ......
275 T. M. Kilgore. merchant ..Not. 17. 1922.......
370 R. H. Todd Lumber Co.. lumber U
errhaBts 22, 1922.......
277 J. E. Brown, merchant Nor.' 22, 1922..;....

? no.s .................
379 Dr. J. H. Walters, physician . .
380 L. C. Smith Dry Goods Co.. Mchts.
STATE OF FLORIDA.
COCNTT OF MARION:

L L. E. .FTJTCH. County Judge tm and for Marion cunty. do certlfr th
foTeolns report contains a true statement of all occupational licenses Issued
Vi&H ty fromtho 1st day of May, 1922, to ths 20th day C NoremSer
1922 both Avm fn1nf . -t .-

home of her parents and was laid to
rest today in Evergreen cemetery.

. Mr. Walter Perkins, whTe oa a
fishing trip down the Oklawaha the
other day, landed a big trout weigh weighing
ing weighing 10 pounds. The piscatorial
sport of the Oklawaha shows no sign'
of falling off.
Messrs. Smoak and Caxmichael Lars
placed an order with Frank Mathews
for 'another glass-bottom boat to ac accommodate
commodate accommodate the tourists at Silver
Springs.
Rev. James Glass of Anniaton, Ala.,
who is' now Irving. at his winter home
at Island Grove filled the pulpit Sun Sunday
day Sunday morning at Grace Episcopal
church. While in the eity Rev. Glass
was entertained by Mr. and Mrs. F.
T. Schreiber.
CRESCENT GROCERY SPECIALS
FOR SATURDAY AND MONDAY

15 lbs of. sugar for... ....... ..$1X9
(with $1 purchase of. other goods)
8 pounds Snowdrift IL49
4 pounds Snowdrift ....7Ge
24 lbs. White Rang flour ...... L23
12 pounds White Ring floor 65c
24 lbs. Omega floor ..;.$L35
12 pounds Omega floor . . . ;70e ;
24 lbs. POhburyV.Best floar.Tr. $135
12 lbs. Pillsbory ; Best floor. .Y. .70e
24 lbs. BirdaeyV Best flour .'.'...$L25
12 lbs. Birdsey's Best flour...... '.70c
24 lbs. Lighthouse floor... $L1S
12 lbs. Lighthouse floor .......... 60e
1 peck Irish Potatoes ......45c
Sweet Potatoes, per peck..... ...,40c
Apalachicola Oysters, per qt. . ,60c
CRESCENT GROCERY CO,
12-8-2t Ifcone 662.

The very newest thing in'whits kid,
one-strap pumps, made by Uts &
Dunn. Price is seven dollars and a
half at little's Shoe Parlor 2-tf
26.
20,
26.
t.
2.
.
26.
26.
26.
36.
26.
26.
26.
26,
26
26.
26.
26.
26.
26.
26.
27,
27.
27,
1922..
1922
1922.......
1922
1923
1922
1922.......
1922
3.00
6.00
3.00
- O.00
10.00
9.00
COO
- 2.00
1.69
2.50
LiO
4.50
5,00
4.10
2.50
1.50
12.00
6.26
1.60
LOO
1.60
10.60
2.00
LOO
2.60
1922.......
'24.00
1922 10.60
1922,
1922,
S.00
2.00
1922
1922
.1922.......
1922
1922
,1922
1922..
1922
1922. :
1922
1923
1922.......
1922
; s.00
-33.00
f.00
3.00
5.00
10.00
2.00
2.00
3.00
r 2.00
. 3.00
- 1O.00
10.00
T.60'
S.00
"io.oo ',
'-4.60
. 6.00
10.00
5 3.00
3.00
4.60
.-4.60
4.60
10.00
3.00
-3.00
. r.00
'10.00 :
3.00
10.00
' 8.00
- 0.00 -i
2.60
,9.00 1
3.00
'
. f.00
' F.oo
'1.00
6.00
1.60
1.60
2.60
1.60
LOO
6.00
. -Oct
5 00
' 2.26
1,60
5.00
2.26
.. 2.60
6.00
1.60
1.60
2.26
2.26
2.26
6.00
1.60
1.60
2.60
6.00
1.60
5.00
1.60
' 2.00
2.76
' 4.60
L60
150
1.60
2.60
1.60
1.60
23.00
12.50
2.50
. 2.60
1.60
.60
. LOO
1.60
. LOO
LOO
; LOO
LOO
LOO
L60
.60
2.50
' 2.60
.60
2.60
2.50
LOO
Oct.
27.' 1922
27, 1922
Oct
.Oct 27. 1922..
..Oct 27, 1922..
.iOoU 27, 1922..
..WCU 4, JLV22
..Oct
27.
27.
28.
33,
28,
28.
28-
1932.
1922.
..Oct.
. .Oct
.iOct
..Oct
1922
1922
1922.......
1922.......
1823.......
1922
1922.......
1922...
"..Oct
' .Oct
"..Oct
28,
"..Oct. 28.
"..Oct 28.
-. .Oct
"..Oct
'..Oct
.' .Oct .Oct-..Oct
..Oct .Oct-..Oct -.Oct
10, 1922
30. 1922
30, 1121. ......
80. 1922
30, 1922
30. .1922
Oct 30;'1932.
..Oct, 30, ,1922
..Oct 30, 1922
..Oct. 30, 1922
..Oct 10. 1922
t.oo
..Oct 30. 1923....... fl
Oct 30.t 1922
Oct 30, 1922
.Oct. 30 1922.
J26 0O
0.00
J 5.00
1.00
; loo
2.00
3.00
.oo
3.00
2.00
- 3.00
3.00
2.00
K 1.00
6.00
" 6.00
1.60
6.00
.Ot.
31, 1922
fc88:::::::
31; 1923.......
31. 1922
21,-1923
31. 1922
lr 1922
1. 1922
U 1922
1. 1922
1, 1923
,1, 1922
1. 1922
"..Oct
'5
- 'S0
"'
1, 1922
6.00
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I'TL 2TL"lt'H.



OCALA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1922

f if

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS

(HATES under ttal heading ara u
fol wj; Maximum of alx lluea one tima
c; three tlmea 60c; six times 75c; one
month 93.00. AU accounts varabla la
advance except to those who have reg regular
ular regular advertUus; accounts.
WANTED Ten or twelve crosstie
choppers. See S. I. Long at B la la-lock
lock la-lock Bros, Ocala. 9-6t
FOR RENT Three connecting un unfurnished
furnished unfurnished rooms on ground floor.
See Mrs. H. S. Wesson- 9-3t
STRAYED Dec. 5th, one small bay
mare with roach mane; one small
dark bay horse with right front
foot crippled. Strayed from my
house, on N. Pine St., Ocala. Any
one returning them or giving any
information of their whereabouts
will receive suitable reward. G. W.
Wimberly, P. O. Box 160. 9-6t
MAN WANTED To travel Marlon f
. county with good proposition. Sal Salary
ary Salary $100 guaranteed, plus bonus.
. Must have car. Apply at once to
P. .0- Box 417, Ocala, Fla. 9-tf
DRESSMAKING Plain and fancy.
Mrs. N. S. Wells, No. 1 West Fifth
St. 12-8-6t
LOST Gold cuff button Thursday;
engraved "DNF." Finder please re return
turn return to. D. .N. Ferguson, Holder
block. .... 8-3t
FOR SALE-r-Setting eggs from
White Rock and Buff Orpington
chickens. Won blue ribbon at the
fair. $1.50 per setting. See Evans
at George MacKay Co. or call
phone 263. 8-6t
WANTED About ten acres of land
suitable for orange grove, not over
five miles from Ocala. State price
and terms in first letter. Address,
"M. B." care Star office, Ocala,
Fla. 12-8-3t
FOR RENT 33 acres of good farm farming
ing farming land, all fenced and cleared of
stumps. Three miles from town
and near shipping station. Apply
at 310 N. Magnolia St., Mrs. L.
Toffaletti. 12-7-6t
FOR SALE One Ford light truck;
one Oakland "6." Terms if desired.
Autogenous Welding Co. 7-6t
WANTED One or two light house
keeping rooms for three weeks' use.
Young married couple, no children.
Write or wire, giving terms, until
Saturday evening, Harry Cansdale,
Hotel Boyer, Eustis, Fla. T-3t
FOR SALE Two lots in North Ocala,
fronting fifty feet on ne'w 'Dixie
Highway. Terms if desired or will
take part in one-year-old hens or
fryers. Mrs. Edna Blair, Box '186,
Lemon City, Fla. 12-6-2t
FOR RENT Two rooms furnished for
light housekeeping. Apply 102-S.
10th St., or phone 343. 6-6t
FOR RENT One small bedroom,
$1.50 per week. Room with or
without board. Phone 543. Mrs
Geo. F. Young, 512 E. 8th St., op opposite
posite opposite high school building. 5V6t
WANTED To buy a second hand
roll-top desk. Address with price,
Box 439, Ocala. . 7-3t
FOR RENT Down stairs apartment,
four rooms and bath; modern con
veniences. Unfurnished apart'
ments. Phone 450 or see Dr. W. K
Lane. 24-tf
FOR SALE One good gentle mart,
extra fine buggy or saddle horse;
also two nice Jersey cows and two
Jersey heifers. One of the cows
will be fresh by January. Will
sell cheap or trade for land near
town. W. D. Cam. 23-tf
.FOR RENT Part of my farm, 40 to
70 acres, as good trucking land as
there is in the county. Standing
rent or share crop. Stock and tools
furnished. Free of stumps. Call on
or write T. O. Thrash, Ocala. 10-tf
POSITION WANTED A young lady
desires position with opportunity of
learnine a trade. Will consider
small recompense at beginninf. Call
phone 620. 9-3t
ONLY 15 DAYS
TO CHRISTMAS
Merry Christmas
Cards
We have the Christmas
Cards that you are looking for.
Come in and get them. We do
not stand on formality our
doors are wide open; walk in
and make yourself at home.
You will find tags, seals,
tuck-ins, cards for Mother,
Dad and the whole family,
cards for your friends humor humorous,'
ous,' humorous,' witty and conventional,
cards from 5 cents to $1.00, in
fact, anything your heart de desires
sires desires in a Christmas Greeting
Card.
Hurry up and call while
our assortment is complete; we
want you to be pleased.
Court Pharmacy

i

QCALA OCCURRENCES

If you have any local or society
items for the Star, phone five-one.
Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Ditto spent yes yesterday
terday yesterday and today in St. Augustine.
Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Blowers went to
Jacksonville yesterday, expecting to
return tomorrow.
The beaches of the North and the
rocky shores of New England are
pleasantly reached through use of
Merchants and Miners steamers. Fre Frequent
quent Frequent sailings from Jacksonville. Ad
dress Mr. C. M. Haile, general agent,
for information. It
Saturday and Monday, 14 pounds
of sugar for $1 with a dollar purchase
of other groceries. U-Serve. 8-2t
The Woman's Missionary Society of
the Baptist church will hold a meeting
Monday afternoon at 3:30 at the
church.
Miss Louise Spencer accompanied
the Ocala high school basketball team
to Sanford and will be a referee in
today's game at that place.
Many new Toys and Games at THE
GIFT SHOP. 7-3t
Solid silverware and Solid Gold
Jewelry for gifts at THE BOOK
SHOP. 7-3t
Dr. and Mrs. H. C. Dozier, Miss
Cornelia Dozier and Miss Loureen
Spencer motored to Jacksonville yes
terday for a short visit.
The friends of Mr. Britt Sanders
will be glad to hear that he has so far
recovered from his accident of two
weeks ago as to be able to be moved
to his home in North Ocala.
Scatter sunshine with Gift Shop
greeting cards. We have several
wonderful lines for Christmas, New
Year and all occasions. THE GIFT
SHOP, Harrington Hall corner. 8-3t
Saturday and Monday, 14 pounds
of sugar for $1 with a dollar purchase
of other groceries. U-Serve. 8-2t
"Uncle Wiggly" wants to see you at
THE GIFT SHOP.
Mrs. Dudley Spain and little son
will arrive this afternoon to spend
the Christmas holidays with Mrs.
Spain's parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. R.
Whaley. Mr. Spain will join his fam family
ily family after the 15th.
Mr. and Mrs. Connie Moore and
three children of Tampa and Miss
Agnes Moore of that place, spent yes yesterday
terday yesterday in Ocala the guests of Mr. and
Mi's. P." H. Perkins. They left this
morning for their home.
See the "Log Cabins" at THE GIFT
SHOP. 7-3t
We would like to show you our line
of Little Gifts, for the grown-ups and
the kiddies. THE SPECIALTY
SHOP, A. E. GERIG. 12-4-Ct
Ford sedan
man.
for
sale. B.
7-3t
Gold-
Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Leavengood,
Miss Bettie Davis and Mr. Frank Har Harris
ris Harris Jr. motored to Gainesville today
to attend the game between the Duval
high school and the Gainesville high
school for the state football cham championship.
pionship. championship. A complete line
Goods at THE
BOOK SHOP. 7-3t
Machine hemstitching; artistic
handicraft; forenoons. Mrs. Luella M.
Grimbly, 701 Oklawaha avenue, Ocala.
Phone 409 15-tf
South Sanchez street from Second
to Fourth, which has been closed for
some months while the grade was be-
ing lowered and a new hard surface
put on, is open for traffic again. Work
will continue on the street until it is
put in good condition for its entire
length.
Please begin your shopping now at
THE BOOK SHOP. We are ready to
serve you. If you deiyy you may
miss something you can get now. 3t
Madame Hendren Dolls can be ob obtained
tained obtained only at THE GIFT SHOP.
Some fine Mama Dolls, Crying Dolls
and Dolls that go to sleep while being
rocked at THE GIFT SHOP. 7-3t
Ocala sent quite a large delegation
to the DeMolay convention meeting in j
Jacksonville yesterday and today. The ;
following left yesterday morning and j
will rpturn Sundav afternoon: Mrs
A. C Blowers, Ralph Simmons, John
Pnolr Ralnh Tlpvpland. Turnev Col-

hPrt. Wilfred Harold. Fred LeSuerJhis table in many moons. Mr. John

Elton Henderlv, Carl Henderly, James
T1K an H Rascom Cobb.
Be sure and see our Juvenile Books,
THE SPECIALTY SHOP, A. E
GERIG. 12-4-6t
Mr. John T. Moore of Tampa was in
Ocala yesterday, having accompanied
Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Hayes of St. Fe-
tersburg, who brought the remains
of their little son here for burial.
The weak and the strong enjoy eat eating
ing eating the hest fresh meats obtainable.
That's the kind to be found at the
Main Street Market. Phone 10S. tf

DAUGHTERS OF REBEKAH

Ocala Rebekah Lodge No. 63 meets
at the Odd Fellows hall every first
and third Thursday evenings each
month at 8 o'clock. A cordial welcome
to visiting sisters and brothers.
Mrs. M. A. Ten Eyck, N. G.
Mrs. Earl Gibbons, Secretary.
NOTICE
Special evangelistic meetings will
1 held in the First Christian church
of Ocala beginning about Feb. 20th.
An able evangelist has been secured.
Rev. Chas. H. Trout, Pastor.
The warm weather which has ex extended
tended extended through fall this year with the
exception of a cool spell about ten
days ago, has Scted like magic on the
poinsettias. Wherever you go over
town, a bunch of these brilliant red
flowers, which are becoming so popu popular
lar popular through the state, may be seen.
Some homes have only a few, and
rome yards are filled with them. Mr.
T. P. Drake, who has taken special care
with the poinsettias at his beautiful
home on East Eighth street, has been
doubly rewarded by the care he has
given them. The hedge which goes
across the front of his place, is a
beautiful sight and worth a special
trip to see. A written description
would only give the reader an idea of
the gorgeous hedge with its dark
reen leaves and the bright blossoms
of red. Just what one can accom
plish in this vicinity with a little time
and the flowers, which are suitable to
this climate, is clearly shown, and
Mr. Drake's place is a glowing ex
ample which should be followed by
every property owner.
Miss Clem Hampton and Messrs. P.
H. Hensley and Thomas Kirk, mem
bers of the flying squadron, who have
been here all this week, will stop
flying for a while and put in a few
days checking. The Star is glad to
say that Miss Clem expects to spend
all next week in Ocala. Miss Clem
says she loves Ocala, and it is unneces
sary to say Ocala reciprocates. The
next legislature may abolish the fly
ing squadron, but if it does we want
it to put Miss Clem on a pension,
on condition that she spends at least
eight months of the year in Ocala.
Mr. and Mrs. Benns of Alabama,
have taken an apartment at the home
of Mr. and Mrs. William Littledale,
and expect to spend the winter in
Ocala.
Mrs. C. W. Effinger, Mrs. Mont and
Mrs. Dinkins, who have been guests
of Mrs. Effinger's mother, Mrs. L. S
Blake for the past two weeks, left
yesterday for their home in West
Palm Beach. During their stay in
Ocala they were the honorees of sev
eral large parties and numerous in informal
formal informal affairs which made their stay
in Ocala very pleasnt.
(jet JVlarocal ice cream for your
Sunday dessert. Marion County
Creamery. Phone 94. It
Mrs. R. J. Perkins has returned
from a brief visit to her mother, Mrs
W. J. Calton, in Daytona.
Circuit court will be in session Mon
day.
Marocala ice cream Sunday din
ner. Marion County Creamery. It
Mrs. J. W. Irving of Elizabeth, N
J., is expected to arrive in Ocala this
afternoon or tonight and will be the
guest of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Drke.
rnone y4 for Marocala ice cream
delivered for Sunday dinner. Marion
County Creamery. It
Mr. and Mrs. Hoag of Minneapolis
Minn., are the guests of their daugh
ter, Mrs. Ed Carmicheal.
Mrs. Harley Marsh of Tampa, who
has been in Ocala since Thursday, the
guest of her sister, Mrs. Harry Wikle
expects to return home Monday.
I The weekly game of auction was en-
i joyed yesterday afternoon by the la-
(dies of the Friday afternoon bridbe
i club, who were entertained by Miss
j Emily Stotesbury at the home of her
j sister, Mrs. H. A. Ford. After a pleas
jant time spent playing bridge the
J ladies were served with refreshments
i Those present were Mrs. Clarence
Camp, Mrs. L. R. Chazal, Mrs. N
Hickman, Mrs. Christian Ax, Mrs. F.
H. Logan, Mrs. F. T. Schreiber, Mrs
G. K. Robinson, Mrs. E. J. Mills-Price,
Mrs. H. F. Watt, Miss Minnie Gamsby
and Miss Abbie Munroe.
Let us supply your groceries. Reas
or able prices and prompt delivery our
i sloeran. Main Street Market. Phone
! 108. 1-tf
The business manager of the Star
under obligations to Mr. J. W.
Johnson of Sparr, for a jug of the
' finest Florida syrup that has graced
j son puts up his product in attrctive
packages and with such contents it
; cannot fail to please tnose wno are
jso fortunate as to get hold of it.
Marocala ice cream can not be sur
passed for a Sunday dinner dessert
(Marion County Creamery. It
What flavor of Marocala ice cream
'do you want for your Sunday dinner?
! We have it. Marion County Creamery.
W. K. Lane, M. D, physician and
surgeon, specialist eye, ear, nose and
throat. Office over 5 and 10 cent storm,
Ocala, Fla. tf

FAIR PREMIUMS

(Continued from Second Page)
Best article of sewing by a third
grade girl, Miss Leggia Shealey.
Best collection of fourth grade work
from any one school, Miss Donnie
Proctor.
Best collection of fifth grade work
from one school, Margaret McNeill.
Best written lesson, illustrated by
drawing by fourth grade pupil, Kath Kath-erine
erine Kath-erine Griffin.
Best writing by fourth grade pupil
of rural school, Edna Blackman.
Best map of Florida, locating four
argest cities and giving water boun
daries and leading railways, fourth
grade pupil, Ethel Snowden.
Best map of Marion county, giving
principal features and important
towns, hard surface highways and
railways, fifth grade pupil, Mrs. W.
Cate.
Best individual exhibit of arithme
tic, fourth grade pupil of any school,
Leonora Taylor.
Best individual exhibit of arithme-
tic, fifth grade pupil of any school,
Girls Industrial School.
Best collection of sixth grade work
from any one school, Mrs. Blanche
Thompson.
Best collection of seventh grade
work from any one school, Miss Min Minnie
nie Minnie Lee Carlisle.
Best collection of eighth grade
work from any one school, Mrs. H. S.
Wesson.
Best product map of Florida, sixth
grade pupil, Marins Toffaletti.
Best product map of Marion county
by seventh grade pupil, Elmore Moree.
Best map. of United States giving
boundaries of states, locating ten im important
portant important cities, principal production
and physical features, any grammar
pupil, William Drake.
Best written lesson illustrated by
drawing, sixth grade pupil, Girls In
dustrial School.
Best written lesson illustrated by
drawing, seventh grade pupil, Gladys
Hall.
Best individual collection of phys
iology drawings, eighth grade pupil,
Johanna Tobleske.
Best individual exhibit of arithme
tic, seventh grade pupil, Frances
Gary.
Best individual exhibit of arithme
tic, eighth grade pupil, Mabel Tob
leske.
Best agricultural exhibit by indi-
dividual of agricultural class, Louis
Toffaletti.
Best specimen of writing, thirty
lines, any pupil of rural school above
fifth grade, Girls Industrial School.
Largest and best general exhibit
by any high school, Miss Mary Shep-
pard.
Largest and best exhibit any two or
more teacher school not ranked as
senior high, R. G. Sumner.
Largest and best general exhibit
by any one teacher school, Miss Bessie
May Finley.
Best individual collection of draw drawings
ings drawings in botany, zoology, physics or
chemistry, Albert Frampton.
Best collection of mounted pictures,
showing the various industries of
Marion county, Ada Carter.
Teacher whose class makes the best
showing, first Miss Minnie Lee Car Carlisle;
lisle; Carlisle; second Miss Betty Davis.
Best original story, 800 words or
more, Pauline Shafer.
Best original poem, Irene Gilmore.
Best exhibit of native woods, Car Carlos
los Carlos Proctor.
Best exhibit of zoological speci specimens,
mens, specimens, Betty Davis.
Best essay, "Florida Birds, their
Value and Protection," Edna Milton.
Poster showing advantages of your
community, Girls Industrial School.
Model work extra, J. E. Willett.
Best made apron, Bessie Perry.
Second, Mildred Brodes.
Poultry
Anconas: First cockerel, first pul pullet,
let, pullet, Gardner Poultry Farms. First
and second pen, Mrs. E. F. Moore.
Blue Andalusians: First cock, first
hen, first cockerel, second pullet, the
Gardner Poultry Farm. First pullet,
M. L. Prine.
Speckled Sussex: First cockerel,
first pullet, first pen, Gardner Poultry Poultry-Farm.
Farm. Poultry-Farm. Buff Cochins: First cockerel, first
and second pullet, Gardner Poultry
Farm.
- Partridge Cochins: First cockerel,
first pullet, Gardner Poultry Farm.
Jersey Black Giants: First cock cockerel,
erel, cockerel, first and second hen, first and
second cockerel, first and second pul pullet,
let, pullet, Gardner Poultry Farm.
(Continued Monday)
RAILROAD SCHEDULES
Arrival and departure of passenear
ains at OCALA UNION STATION,
fhe following schedule figures pun punished
ished punished as information and not guar guar-.Jteed.
.Jteed. guar-.Jteed. (Eastern Standard Time)
ATLANTIC COAST LINE R. R.
Leave for Station Arrive from
2:15 am St. Petersburg 2:27 ;jn
2 :27 am Jacksonville 2 : 1 5 am
1:45 pm Jacksonville 3:24 pm
3:24 pm St. Petersburg 1:25 pm
6:15 am Jacksonville 9:00 pm
3:30 pm Homosassa 1:16 pm
7:10 am (p) Wilcox 6:45 pm
7:25 am (j) Lakeland 11:03 pm
(p)Monday, Wednesday, Friday,
j) Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday.
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY
Leave for Station Arrive from
2:34 am Jacksonville-N'York 1:55 am
1:50 pm Jacksonville 1:15 pm
4:06 pm Jacksonville 4:06 pm
Tampa-Manatee-1:55
am St. Petersburg 2:34 am
2:55 am NTfork-St. Petrsburg 1:35 am
1:55 am Tampa 2:34 am
1:35 pm Tampa-Manatee 1:30 pm
3:00 pm Tampa-St- Petrsburg 4:05 pm

1 VICTORY NOTES AND 1918 WAR SAVING STAMPS
& Victory Notes, series "A to "F" inclusive, are called for redemption
December 15, 1922, after which date interest ceases.
;x 1918 War Saving Stamps are payable January 2d, 1923. To avoid
l& congestion' and delay, the above should be surrendered early as
possible.
V:

This Bank will receipt for and make collections for above without charge
THE OCALA NATIONAL BANK

NEVER AN EXPENSE ALWAYS A SAVING
Ice is the one home necessity that always pays for itself
many times over.
The food it saves alone makes ice worth much more than you
pay foi it.
Take it regularly and take enough. Then you protect your
health add to your comfort.
To get the most benefit from your refrigerator, you should
keep the ice compartment free from food and filled with ice
then you're sure of greatest possible daily savings.
Ocala Ice & Packing Company

u
C2t:t:t::
HOW'S YOUR
AUTO RUNNING
Maybe you hear those little
squeaking noises in the running
of your car. If so, you'd bet better
ter better have us listen to them for
you they may be serious. We
are experts in repairing elec electrical
trical electrical troubles.
I DIXIE HIGHWAY GARAGE
James Engesser
Phone 258 Night Phone 533
1 121 West Broadway
2 SEVEN DAY SERVICE
DEWEY'S RESTAURANT
"On the Square," west side. Oysters
and fish daily. Open ail nJght. tf
NOTICE of ANIMALS IMPOUNDED
This is to certify that I have this
dy placed in the city pound the fol following
lowing following described animal which has
been found running at large within the
corporate limits of the city of Ocala,
. & J .!aH.
contrary to tne ordinance oi saiu city;
One yellow bull calf, unmarked.
The owner thereof or his agent
and all whom it may concern, are
hereby notified that if the animal is
not claimed and all expenses of taking
and impounding thereof are not paid
within three days from date hereof,
to-wit: On the 11th day of December,
1922, 1 will sell the same to the high highest
est highest and best bidder, said sale to take
place between the hours of 11 a. m.
and 3 p. m. on said day at the city
pound in Ocala, Florida..
Henry Gordon,
Marshal City of Ocala.
J. S. Mixson, Impounder.
The
Four-Passenger
Sedan
$4600
F. O. B. Detroit
Ten Body Types

. ,,..,

Needham Motor Co
AUTO REPAIRING
We specialize in
REO and FORD
REPAIRING
PHONE 252
SAVED
SPELLS
Black-DrangU Fcind Valuable by
a Texas Farmer, Who Has
Known Its Usefulness
Oyer 30 Years.
Naples, Texas. "I have used Thed Thed-ford's
ford's Thed-ford's Black-Draught for years I can
safely say for more than 30 years," de declares
clares declares Mr. H. H. Cromer, a substantial.
well-known fanner, residing out from
here on Route 3.
"1 am 43 years old, and when a small
ooy i naa indigestion ana was puny ana
my folks gave me a liver regulator. Then
Black-Draught was advertised and we
heard of it.
"I began to taice Black-Draught, and
have used it, when needed, ever since.
1 use Black-Draught now in my home,
and certainly recommend it for any liver
trouble.
"I have given it a thorough trial, and
after thirty years can say Black-Draught
is my stand-by. it has saved me many
6ick spells."
Mr. Cromer writes that he is "never
out of Black-Draught," and says several
of his neighbors prefer it to any other
liver medicine. "1 always recommend
Black-Draught to my friends," he adds.
This valuable, old, powdered liver
medicine is prepared from medicinal
roots and herbs, and has none of the bad
effects so often observed from the use of
calomel, or other powerful mineral drugs.
Be sure to get the genuine, Thedford's.
NC-145
Playthings "Wcrth While" at THE
GIFT SHOP. 7-3t

LI NCOLN
Get Behind the Wheel

Lincoln motor cars are produced by the world's
greatest automobile manufacturing institution in.
accordance with the highest standards of manu'
facture known to the industry. Quality and
character will persistently stand foremost.
It is the avowed purpose of the Ford Motor Company that
each Lincoln purchaser shall receive the finest and most
satisfying motor car which it is possible to produce. To that
end the development of the Lincoln, its manufacture, its
distribution and its service will be carried to the highest
degree of perfection by placing behind it the vast resources
cf the Ford Motor Company.

TUCKER & SIMMONS

DEALERS
OCALA,
FLORIDA

XOTICE

La the Circuit Court of the Fifth Judi Judicial
cial Judicial Circuit, of Florida. Marion
County In Chancery.
H. M. Hampton, Complainant, Tarsus
Joseph p. Kendall and others. De Defendants.
fendants. Defendants. To Joseph P. Kendall. Ella R. Reesa,
Thomas W. Moore. Jonn C. DuBois,
lienrv Mrlntvro Riohar-.-i r t tit
Moore. C. C Warwick. C. C Warwick
as irusiee, ai organ tucka, fi. M. All All-red
red All-red and A. K. iSpooner, and all person
claiming an interest in and to the west
half of the southeast Quarter of eee-
nou o, lowcsnip x south, range 22
east, under the above named persons,
whether as hir at i. A.- . .
grantees, or other claimants adversely
i w-i-iixiini., ana an persons whom whomsoever
soever whomsoever claiming an interest In the aid
lands abov iirihaH
complainant.
s HEUEAS, II. M. Hampton, the com complainant
plainant complainant in the above cause, aas this
day filed his bill of complaint against
you for the quieting of his title to the
above described lands, and asked for
the making of this order.
THEREFORE you are hereby requir required
ed required to appear and answer the bill of
complaint herein on
Monday the Kirt Day of Jaanary, 1823,
the rule day in said. month; etherwise
complainant will proceed ex parte.
Further ordered that this order be
published once a week for eight con consecutive
secutive consecutive weeks In the Ocala Star,
newspaper published in Marion county.
Witness the Honorable W. S. Bul Bullock,
lock, Bullock, Judge of said court, and T. D.
Lancaster Jr.. the clerk thereof and
the seal of said court at Ocala, Flor Florida,
ida, Florida, this November 4th, 1922.
(Ct. Ct. Seal) T. D. LANCASTER JR.,
Clerk .Circuit Court. Marion County.
ll-4-9tSat By Frances Tarver, D. C
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Notice is hereby given to all cred creditors,
itors, creditors, legatees, distributees and all
other persons having claims against
the estate of W. H. Smith, deceased,
to nresent Kirl claims Hnlir TM-nvan to
the undersigned within one year from
the date of the first publication of
tms notice, to-wit: .November 3rd
1922. Hporcra W .QmiVi
Administrator of the Estate of W. H.
fcimtn, ueceased.
n ,
oena claims in rnro nf s t
trunk, attorney for the administrator,
wvaia, i ia. lI-3-yt-Sat
ATTENTION J EVERT PROPERTY
OWXER AFFECTED
The Muprrme onrt ku recently- rnled
that all real estate mot returned far
KHMeKsment by the owners ntuat be a,
aoaked a unknowa. The tax -aui'a
office in nowr mpn and will be dartnsr
the entire tax paying: peiiori, thrrefarv
1 appeal to the eltlxeaa aad taxpayer
t. Hut their property with ne for 1821
ariaeaament when they pay 1922 taxes.
If thla la not practicable, bo anre anal
either aee me on my round In January
or write me.
Youra for beat possible service.
n-2T-ir Tax
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CONTRACTOR AND
BUILDER
Careful estimates made on all con contract
tract contract work. Give3 more and better
work for the money than any other
contractor in tne cuy.
DEWEY'S RESTAURANT
"On the Square," west side. Oysters
and fish daily. Open all night tf



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