The Ocala evening star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06345

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
VEN1NQ
ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DISPATCHES
LOCAL NEWS
TO
PRESS TIME
TEMPERATURES This Morning,. 64; This Afternoon, 83
WEATHER FORECAST Fair tonight and Saturday; moderate temperature.
OCALA, FLORID A.FR1DAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1922
VOLUME TWENTY-EIGHT. NO. 2tt
Sun Rises Tomorrow, 6:44; Sets, 5:39
FLORIDA BOYS AT
OFFICERS READY
FOR THE OUTLAWS
T
THE SULTAN OUT
SOME REAL MONEY
F
A GREAT AIRSHIP

OCALA

STAK

PRESIDENT BIDS US
TO RIVE THAIS

ANGORA

URNS

SETBACK FOR THE
LENGTHY SKIRTS

WAIT T

BORROW

AS

OOTBALL

PRACTICE

Escaped Convict and One of His Pals
Killed in Attack on St. Louis
And Memphis Express

Memphis, Nov. 3. Jack Kennedy,
a former convict, who served a long
term in the Missouri penitentiary for
holdup and robbery of a Frisco pas passenger
senger passenger train, and an unidentified ban bandit
dit bandit were shot and killed in what rail railroad
road railroad officials here declare was an un unsuccessful
successful unsuccessful attempt, early today, to rob
mail and express cars of the fast St.
Louis and Memphis train on the
Frisco system, which left St. Louis
last night. Six or more masked ban bandits
dits bandits were in the gang. The holdup
was planned in Memphis ten days ago,
according to postoffice inspectors, who
were tipped off to the plan. As a re result
sult result all night trains in both directions
on the Frisco system between Mem Memphis
phis Memphis and St. Louis have carried extra
guards heavily armed. When the train
stopped near Wittenburg, Mo., short shortly
ly shortly after midnight a fusillade of shots
was fired by the bandits who seemed
to be scattered along the track. The
fire was returned by guards on the
train. In the gun fight which follow followed
ed followed Kennedy and one of his compan companions
ions companions were killed. The others made
their escape in an automobile.
OFFICERS LAID A TRAP
Wittenberg, Mo., Nov. 3. (By the
Associated Press). Jack Kennedy,
veteran Missouri train robber and a
companion, whose name is believed to
be Logan, were shot and killed early
today by postoffice inspectors after
they had robbed a mail car on a
Frisco passenger train. The stolen
mail was recovered.
Six postal inspectors, three railroad
special agents and two deputies were
waiting near the scene of the robbery,
which had been anticipated through
previous watching of Kennedy's
movements. Kennedy and his com companion
panion companion were making for an automo automobile
bile automobile with the stolen mail when ordered
to halt. The bandits opened fire and
the officers returned it.
The inspectors said Kennedy and
his pal boarded the train seven miles
ncrth of here. They cut the engine,
mail and express cars off, drove the
engineer and fireman from the engine,
ran the cars several miles up the
track, held up the mail clerks and
then detached the locomotive and ran
it to Wittenberg. The officers were
waiting for them when they jumped
off.
STRIVING TO FIX THE
STATUS OF SAURIANS
Washington, Nov. 3. When is, and
when isn't, an alligator a harmless
animal, has been a much mooted ques question.
tion. question. Those who have undergone the
still more or less discussed fictional
adventure of the destruction in a big
'gator's switchable tail, are some somewhat
what somewhat decided. There are many folks
who still believe a youngster is a
playful pet that can be kept in the
parlor as a chum for the baby; but
one woh has had even the smallest
hang onto his amicably extended fore forefinger
finger forefinger with the grim persistence of a
steel vise, may still be firm in his be belief
lief belief that its best to leave 'em alone
at any age.
The postoffice department, how however,
ever, however, has decided that while under
twenty inches over-all length, the
baby saurian is harmless. So are
baby chicks, soft-shelled crabs, blood
worms and chameleons.
One may feel confident the blood
worm can be fondled with ease and
without fear of danger, and still have
his doubts also in regard to baby ter
rapins, but the latter also are classed
by the department as harmless.
This classification has been made
by the department for the ease of
mind of harassed postmatsers whose
clients have sought to make of their
offices near-menageries. The mail mail-ability
ability mail-ability of live "mail matter" is still
a haay question among the general
public, and even among many post postmasters,
masters, postmasters, the department declares, so
to clear up the matter, a circular has
been prepared to settle the question.
For more than a year live fowls
and domestic animals were acceptable
for mailing under a ruling which pre prescribed
scribed prescribed their handling only when the
complete journey was made by motor
truck, but this ruling was revoked
more than a year ago. Another ap applying
plying applying to the insurance and C. O. D.
privileges of such shipments was not
modified, under which regulations a
few shipments of live fowls and do domestic
mestic domestic animals have been accepted by
postmasters.
Only small live animals "having no
offensive odor and requiring no food
or water in transit," such as the ani animals
mals animals mentioned, and their like, may
be sent in the mails and insured
against loss. Alligators up to twenty
inches are. included in the list.

Turkish National Assembly Reported
To Have Upset An Ancient
Ottoman Tradition

London, Nov. 3. (By Associated
Press). The report that the Turkish
nationalist assembly at Angora has
passed a law suppressing the sultan sultanate
ate sultanate of Turkey and the law of succes succession
sion succession to the throne, is contained in a
Constantinople dispatch quoting An Angora
gora Angora advices.
REPUDIATING TREATIES
Angora, Nov. 2. (By Associated
Press). The Turkish nationalist as assembly
sembly assembly has announced it considers
null and void all treaties and conven conventions
tions conventions concluded since March 16th,
1920, by the Constantinople adminis administration.
tration. administration. STRIKES A BLOW AT SUPERSTI SUPERSTITION
TION SUPERSTITION Such action by the national assem assembly
bly assembly would mean that the sultan is de deposed.
posed. deposed. In future, according to the
dispatches, only the Caliph in Turkey
will be periodically elected without
government prerogative, all power
being in the hands of the national
assembly.
OXFORD
Oxford, Oct. 31 Tonight is spooks'
night and many spooks, or imaginary
spirits, are walking among the beau
tiful little orange and pecan grove of
Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Griggs, where
they have arranged to communicate
with each other and have revealed to
them their future forture or misfor
tune.
Last Sunday Mr. W. L. Brinson and
Mrs. J. S. Hall of Oxford, and Mr. W.
T. Brinson of Wildwood, through'
some previous arrangement went over
to Eureka, where they met Mr. Adam
Brinson of Palatka, and a few other
special friends at the home of their
father, Mr. J. J. Brinson, to enjoy a
small family reunion and otherwise
spend a day of real pleasure in the
old home, one of the most sacred
spots in the memory of our lives. In
our imagination we can see them
mixing and mingling with each other,
while a sumptuous repast was being
prepared to be served under a large
orange tree loaded with golden fruit,
and how they once more rehearsed the
little incidents of childhood days of
fifty or sixty years ago, when they
were little tots about the fireside; and
their school days, the happiest of all
days. And we can hear, also, among
all the pleasant and happy thoughts
of this occasion, whether it was men mentioned
tioned mentioned or not, some of the sad occur occurrences
rences occurrences along the path of life; of how
in due time the children became
grown and began to leave the fireside
and go out to distant lands, leaving
father and mother alone. And, had-
dest of all, though it is the fate of us
all, it is only a question when each
one will begin to depart this life, and
the places that once remembered us
will know us no more. Mr. Brinson is
one of the most venerable citizens in
Marion county, being about eighty-
three years old, and enjoys reasonable
good health, and in spite of a few sad
thoughts it was a Dleasant dav for
him. Let us hone that he may enjoy
many others.
Mr. W. B. Coggins of Weirsdale
and other parties supposed to be
county officials were in Oxford one
day last week interviewing" Commis Commissioner
sioner Commissioner O'Dell.
The Sumter county board of com commissioners
missioners commissioners met again last Tuesday. It
"sho" do pay to be commissioner here
this year.
Mr. WTill Morris & Co., of Wild Wild-wood,
wood, Wild-wood, the "company" consisting of
some of Wildwood's fairer sex, were
visiting Oxford last Sunday.
A streak of bad (luck) lightning
struck Mr. Joshua Driggers' barn last
Sunday night, setting fire to same
and burning up some corn, hay and a
few chickens. His hogs, cows, horses,
mules anTi other valuables were not
hurt. Not so bad after all.
Mr. Ed.: You might inform Shady
that we do not necessarily write for
either Wildwood, Coleman nor Ox Oxford,
ford, Oxford, but to some extent for amuse amusement
ment amusement and for the Ocala Star.
We got some time ago from a very
highly educated man that a "genius"
is a lop-sided person, and here comes
the Star man telling people that we
have the misfortune of being one.
Gee, how they romp on us.
The Harvard astronomers who have
located a new universe six hundred
thousand trillion miles from the earth
will be needed later to figure the total
issues of marks and rubles. Cincin Cincinnati
nati Cincinnati Enquirer.
The old-fashioned religious revival
J depended on faith. And so does a
I business revival. Fresno Republican.

New York Department Store Has Put
In a Big Order For The
Short Dresses

New York, Nov. 3. Long skirts
have received another setback if early
orders for spring are any indication.
A New York department store has
placed orders for spring suits with
skirts nine inches from the ground.
SHADY
Shady, Nov. 2. Rev. and Mrs. W.
P. Buhrman were calling on friends
here Thursday afternoon.
Mrs. R. H. Redding and Ralph Red Redding
ding Redding went to Tampa Sunday via auto automobile,
mobile, automobile, going to have a specialist
treat Ralph's eyes.
Mrs. J. I. Smith is enjoying a visit
from her sister from Savannah.
Those attending the Phillips-Van
Roy debate at the courthouse Monday
evening from here were S. R. Pyles,
Mr. and Mrs. George Buhl, W. B.
Jones, Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Douglas
and Arthur Douglas Jr.
Saturday and Sunday as per pre
vious announcement were the days of
the fifth Sunday meeting of the Shady
Baptist church and for the second
time this church has had the honor
and pleasure of entertaining a large
representation of the Marion Associa Association.
tion. Association. The services Saturday were
good and helpful. Prominent among
the speakers of the day were Rev. A.
M. Yarborough of Hawthorn, Rev.
Gibbons of Melrose, Rev. R. Y. Wal-
den of Flemington, Mr. W. T. Gary
and Rev. Boatwright of Ocala ana
Rev. J. H. Martin of Island Grove.
Sunday morning a large audience
listened to a splendid talk on the sub subject
ject subject of the Sunday school lesson by
Prof. H. G. Shealy. Other subjects
were discussed by Revs. Boatwright,
Plummer, Rogers, Hardester and
Walden. Rev. Walden preached the
morning sermon to an unusually large
audience. The building was crowded
and the crowd outside was even
larger. Rev. Walden, who is a train
ed gospel singer, delighted the audi audiences
ences audiences both days by singing some of
his favorite songs. Sunday afternoon
a short session was called and some
subjects discussed briefly. Many vis
itors, preachers and delegates left
immediately after 'this service. The
fact that the Belleview B. Y. P. U.
was to give a program in the evening
and Rev. Boatwright to follow with
one of his excellent sermons held a
large part, of the crowd at the church.
The Belleview Union arrived in due
time and their songs and the render rendering
ing rendering of their program was splendid.
This is one of the best young peo peoples'
ples' peoples' unions in the association and
has some of the brightest, most earn earnest
est earnest workers. We know. May they
continue in their efforts and may their
tribe increase.
Just across and opposite from the
Belleview visitors was that fine look looking
ing looking band from Anthony. We were
sorry we only had two eyes as we'd
liked to have been able to look at all
of these young people at the same
time. Rev. Boatwright brought An Anthony
thony Anthony over in his big school truck,
which truck we believe is the best in
the county and we ought to know for
we have seen two of the county scnooi
1 trucks
Another county truck was from
Sparr. When we tell you that in it
were A. J. Stephens and about twenty-five
others even better looking than
he, you can draw on your own imag imagination
ination imagination for the rest.
Electra was there. Rev. Brant
piloted a band from over there. Lake
Weir was there. Mr. Blair of the
Lake Weir church was ordained dea deacon
con deacon for his church Sunday afternoon,
Rev. R. F. Rogers assisted by the
other ministers present performing
the service.
Other places represented at the
services Saturday and Sunday were
Summerfield, Charter Oak, Oak and
several others. If all of the people
present were Baptists, then methinks
it was fine weather for this denomi
nation and we know Shady is much
helped and encouraged by the occas
ion as we hope all who attended from
a distance were,
Perhaps next-week we can give you
some "echoes" from the fifth Sunday
meeting.
Manuel, exiled King of Portugal,
says that he is a democrat at heart
and in practise. He must confess,
tho' the practice was forced on him.
Philadelphia Evenine Public Led
ger.
The three R's of the American
school of diplomacy seem to be Res
cue. Relieve and Relinquish. Sacra
mento Bee.
When England drops a pilot she re retains
tains retains the chart. Wall Street Journal.

In
London, Nov. 3. The German cab cabinet,
inet, cabinet, according to the Central News,
has decided to ask the reparations
commission for permission to nego negotiate
tiate negotiate a foreign loan of five hundred
million gold marks for the purpose of
stabilizing the mark.
TEUTONS WERE PEEVED
Geneva, Nov. 3. (By Associated
Press). German representatives in
the international labor conference I
here left the meeting this morning
owing to differences concerning the
use of the German language.
WOULD DO FOR WALLPAPER
New York, Nov. 3. German marks
slumped to another new low record
here today, being quoted at 1 cents
a hundred.
FORGET-ME-NOT DAY
Cincinnati, O., Nov. 3. National
"Forget-Me-Not" Day, in honor of
America's wounded and disabled vet veterans
erans veterans of the world war, to be held
Saturday, will be more extensively
observed than any of those in pre previous
vious previous years, C. Hamilton Cook, na national
tional national commander of the Disabled
Amercan Veterans of the World War,
announced today after compiling re
ports from all sections of the country.
With that announcement, Mr. Cook
stated that Mrs. Warren G. Harding
had made the first contribution to the
day in receipt of a check and accom accompanying
panying accompanying letter of "appreciation for
the work among the wounded and dis disabled
abled disabled veterans and for the attention
and sympathy shown her during her
recent illness."
The organization has within its
ranks more than 100,000 of America's
maimed and crippled heroes of the
recent war. In addition to the several (
hundred chapters of the organization
taking an active part in the day
numerous citizens' committees have
been organized in smaller cities and
towns, where the disabled veterans
are not organized.
"It is in the interest of 500,000 dis disabled
abled disabled veterans that 'Forget-Me-Not'
Day is to be observed," said Mr. Cook.
"In the maintenance of national leg legislative
islative legislative activities in their behalf, es establishment
tablishment establishment of club houses and sum
mer camps for chapters and groups of
these men, furtherance of national
hospitalization and rehabilitation pro-
ects, and numerous other active
measures for the betterment of the
country's disabled veterans.
"The life problems of the Ameri
can service men who were wounded
or disabled during the world war
were directly affected by the wounds
and disabilities they received on the
fields of action, many of whom are
still lying on beds of pain in many
parts of our country."
Governors of thirty-eight states
have issued proclamations, approving
the day and many state heads have
announced their intention of assist assisting
ing assisting in the sale of forget-me-nots.
Mayors and civic heads also have en
dorsed the campaign, which has been
approved by the National Informa Information
tion Information Bureau. President and Mrs.
Harding, officials of the government
bureaus and several other national
and state agencies interested in ex
tensive relief activities.
MEETING OF THE DeMOLAY
The Order of DeMolay meets to
night at eight o'clock at the Masonic
hall. Members urged to attend and
Masons invited

Evident that the Paper Supply
Germany is Almost
Exhausted

Rf member

WHAT A DIFFICULT 00b IT W TO PICK OUT
A HAT VVHE.M WU WERE SlNfclt BUT

Preparing to Put Up the Game Of
Their Young Lives With
' Harvard Tomorrow

Cambridge, Nov. 3 The University
of Florida football squad accompanied
by President Murphree and a lively
alligator mascot arrived today and
was soon at practice in the Harvard
stadium for its game with the Crim Crimson
son Crimson eleven tomorrow. Coach Kline
said the players stood the trip well
but that the team would probably go
into action with three regulars out,
Scott nursing a bad leg and Barchon
an( C36 being indisposed. The Har-
vard men will be mostly second string
players.
LOSING MONEY ON
A STEAMBOAT LINE
Washington, Nov. 3. The Georgia,
Florida & Alabama railroad was au authorized
thorized authorized today by the Interstate Com Commerce
merce Commerce Commission to abandon the
steamboat line it has been operating
between Carrabelle and Apalachicola.
CARLOAD OF ORANGES
SHIPPED FROM COLEMAN
Coleman, Nov. 1. The first carload
of oranges to leave Coleman since the
coolness of 1895 went forward last
week, shipped by B. H. and B. C.
Bridges, who shipped several other
cars this week. They wer the famous
Parson Browns, and should bring
fancy prices.
The cessation of orange culture, for
which Sumter was famous she has
the largest grove today in Florida
turned attention to trucking and gen
eral farming. So prolific has been the
yields with the minimum of fertilizer,
that this, the third smallest county in
all South Florida, shipped forty-five
per cent of all Florida products last
year, 32,000 out of a total of 70,000
cars.
Leading the United States in beans,
the South in cabbages and Florida in
cucumbers, and with heavy crops of
all other vegetables, fruits and mel
ons, it is good news to see her orange
land go back into that profitable in
dustry. Tampa Tribune.
KILLED BY THE KURDS
Proof That Syria Isn't Healthy For
"American Professors
New York, Nov. 3. Lester James
Wright of Waukesha, Wis., formerly
a professor at the University of Wis
consin, whore muraer near Aleppo,
Syria, was reported early this week,
met his death 'at the hands of eight
Kurd bandits, said a cablegram to the
Near East relief headquarters detail detailing
ing detailing the attack.
Wright, Enoch R. Applegate of
Jersey City, N. Jn a native chauffeur,
and two native relief workers were
returning to Aleppo by automobile
from Antioch, where they had been
on an inspection tour, the cable said,
when they were fired on without
warning. Wright was instantly killed
by a bullet through the neck, and Ap Applegate
plegate Applegate was wounded in the leg. The
chauffeur was slightly scratched but
the other two members of the party
escaped injury. They were allowed to
proceed after the bandits had strip
ped them of all valuable personal
property.
Wright had just been made direc director
tor director of the Near East relief unit at
Harpoot, and had planned to return
to his station the next day. He was
buried last Monday at the American
church in Beirut with impressive cere ceremonies
monies ceremonies attended by leading Ameri Americans,
cans, Americans, Greeks and Armenians in the
city.
o

f inn

Sets Aside November 30 as Day On
Which We Shall Eat Turkey
If We Can Get It

Washington, Nov. 3. Declaring
the state of the nation "presents very
much to justify a nation-wide and
most sincere testimony of gratitude
for the bounty which has been be bestowed
stowed bestowed upon us," President Harding
in his annual Thanksgiving proclama proclamation
tion proclamation issued today, calls upon the Am American
erican American people to observe Thursday,
Nov. 30th, as a "day of thanksgiving,
supplication and devotion."
AVEZZANO WILL BE
ITALIAN AMBASSADOR
London, Nov. 3. (By Associated
Press). Baron Romano Avezzano
has been appointed Italian ambassa ambassador
dor ambassador to the United States which post
he formerly held, to succeed Vittorio
Ricci, resigned.
FORT MEADE VS. WILDCATS
The Ocala Wildcats will measure
strength against the Fort Meade
team on the local gridiron tomorrow.
Fort Meade has a strong team. They
played Hillsborough high last week
and only lost by two touchdowns.
This puts them in a class that will be
hard to reach but the Wildcats feel
that they have what it takes to touch
them up for a few points.
The Wildcats' game with Lake City
last week showed that they had some
stuff. Lake City has a good team but
did not register a very large victory
over the Wildcats. Those who saw
the game said that our team showed
up very well along with the Lake City
boys, although we got licked. The
management of the Lake City team
is going to recommend Maurice Stev Stevens
ens Stevens for all-state center. If Steve
makes this position Ocala will be on
the high school football map.
Due to a large number of ineligible
players the line-up has been changed
somewhat from that seen in Ocala in
the Palatka game. The Wildcats
have been unfrtunate in losing some
of their best players but the subs who
are replacing them will fftl the gaps
well enough to stop most of the leaks.
The probable line-up for tomorrow
will be: Borland, left end; Lindsay
Troxler, left tackle; Hall, left guard;
Stephens (Capt.) center; Lummus,
right guard; Leak, right tackle;
Lewis, right end; Moses, quarter)
Daniels, right half; Knight, left half;
Ferguson, full back. Substitutes:
Thomas, Veal, Ausley, Timmons, Pot Potter,
ter, Potter, Simmons, Knight. Referee, Nor Norton
ton Norton Davis.
The game will be called at 3:30. The
price is four-bits (50c.) The boys
need the money and you will enjoy the
game. Come see the Wildcats in ac action.
tion. action. They will show you the result
of much hard work.
The Wildcats will play DeLand
here Nov. 11th and Bartow here Nov.
30th. These are the only other games
in Ocala this season. Dont miss a
single one of them.
RESOLUTIONS
Whereas, It has pleased Almighty
God in His wise providence to remove
from our midst by death, Mrs. Framn
Leavengood, the mother of our es
teemed friend and brother, Port V.
Leavengood; be it therefore
Resolved, That in the death of Mrs.
Leavengood we as well as the entire
community have sustained a great
loss; that we bear willing testimony
to the many virtues, the unquestioned
probity and stainless character of the
beloved deceased; that we offer to the
bereaved family and mourning friends
our heart felt condolence, and pray
that he who doeth all things well
may give to them the peace that
passeth all understanding;
Resolved, That a copy of these
resolutions be presented to the fam
ily, that they be engrossed in the re
cords of this order and furnished to
the press.
Resolutions adopted in regular
meeting October 31st, 1922.
C. Simmons,
M. M. little,
F. W. Ditto,
Committee for Tulula Lodge No. 22,
I. O. O. F. Joseph Malever, N. G.
H. G. Shealy, Secretary.
The French are trying out a new
fuel composed of a mixture of alcohol
and gasoline. We predict now it
wont work. Experiments in this
country have proved it is too danger dangerous.
ous. dangerous. Philadelphia Inpuirer.
If the nations are too poor to pay
their debts, where do they get the
money to pay for cancelation propa
ganda? Brockville Recorder.
The "wets" are now having their
ocean travaiL Washington Post.

McCready and Kelly Essay the

Continent Flight in a Big
Monoplane
San Diego, Nov. 3. Lieuts. John
A. McCready and .Oakley Kelly, two
army aviators, took off at Rockwell
Field at 5:59 a. m. today in an at attempt
tempt attempt to cross the continent from Ry,n
Diego to New York without stop in
the great monoplane T-2.
DUNNELLUN
Dunnellon, Nov. 1. A board and
committee meeting of the Woman's
Club was held last Wednesday and
pxans were perfected for the fall and
winter work of the club. The opening
meeting of the season will be held in
the Masonic building Nov. 10th, 3:30
p. m. Mrs. KetUy ol Gainesville, vice
president of section four, will address
the club on the ten-mill ?t. This
will be an open meeting to which the
10th, oysters will be served in any
style -at the Robinson building oppo opposite
site opposite the postoffice. Mrs. C G. Leit Leit-ner,
ner, Leit-ner, chairman of the ways and means
committee, will have charge of the
oyster supper and a treat is assured
ail who attend. The proceeds of the
oyster supper will go to swell the fund
which has been started for the club
building to be erected in the near
future and which is the hope and ex expectation
pectation expectation of club members. At the
board meeting, Mrs. H. Swartz, presi president
dent president and Mrs. J. F.. Curry, first vice
president, were elected delegates to
the federated club convention to be
held in Green Cove Springs Nov.21 Nov.21-22,
22, Nov.21-22, inclusive. Mrs. Mary S. Grum Grumbles
bles Grumbles and Mrs. A. L. Neville were
elected as alternates. Mrs. B. J. Ben
son was appointed chairman of the
year book committee and will present
a copy for the club's approval at the
next meeting.
A spirited voting contest for' queen
of the high school carnival was held
at Metcalf's drugstore Saturday eve evening,
ning, evening, and the two contestants, ''Bob ''Bobby"
by" ''Bobby" Perry, a senior; andTMarie Hem-
rick, a junior, ran a close race until
a few minutes of closing time, when
Miss Bobby won by 105 votes and
will gracefully carry out her duties
as "queen" at the carnival to be held
on the school grounds Nov. 3rd.
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Mixson, Mrs. C.
E. Hood and Miss Helen White motor motored
ed motored to Mcintosh Tuesday of last week
to attend the Presbyterial efficiency
conference, which was well attended
by Ocala, Reddick .and Archer dele delegates,
gates, delegates, this being a group conference
held for the benefit of these Presby
terian woman's auxiliaries. The meet
ing was conducted by Presbyterial
President Mrs. A S. Harris of Jack Jacksonville.
sonville. Jacksonville. Miss Bessie Dew returned to her
home in St. Petersburg Tuesday, aft
er a pleasant visit here as the guest
of Miss Clara Kibler,
Mrs. Lee Knight, Mrs. O. P. Hood
and Mrs. C. E. Hood and their broth brothers,
ers, brothers, John and Frank Waters, formed a
motor party to Madison Tuesday.
Miss Marguerite Lumpkin, one of
the high school teachers, was a week weekend
end weekend visitor to Gainesville.
Mrs. Powell, Mrs. Bawls, Mrs. Pra
ter, Mrs. Cocowitch, Mrs. Leitner and
Mrs. Strange attended the annual
session of the W. M. U. at Wflliston
last week.
Prof and Mrs. J. E. Willett were
shopping in Ocala Saturday.
Mrs. D. B. Kibler returned Satur Saturday
day Saturday from an extended visit to her
dauehter. Mrs. Herman Watson. a
Lakeland.
' The regular meeting of the Baptist
Ladies' Aid Society was held with
Mrs. J. F. Cocowitch, twenty-three
members being present. Complete ar arrangements
rangements arrangements were made for the bazaar
which is to be held the week before
Thanksgiving. The associational re report
port report showed that the aid and mission missionary
ary missionary societies had contributed $1054J)6
to the different objects fostered by
the ladies. The November meeting
will be with Mrs. J. F. Meredith.
Mrs. G. W. Scofield of Inverness
was combining business with pleasure
in town Friday.
Miss Marie Grumbles, who is a
public is very cordially invited. At
6 o'clock of the same evening, Nov.
member of the faculty of Mount Dora
high school, spent the week-end with
home folks.
A new dam across the Bine Nile at
Sennar, 150 miles above Khartum,
will be built by a well known British
contracting firm. The dam will be
more than two miles long and approx approximately
imately approximately 650 miles of drainage and
irrigation canals will be constructed.
The land so reclaimed will be used for
the cultivation of cotton. When the
work starts nearly 7,000 hands will be
employed and it will take three years
to complete the project.



OCALA EVENING STAR, TR1DAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1922

Ocala Evening Stay
blUhed Every Day Except mm&r r
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OCALA, FLORIDA
tt. J. BlttUffer, Feldemt
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. cond-clA matter.
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All rights of republication of apedal
dUpatehe' her;a- are also reserved.
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position 25 4er -cent additional. Rates
based on four-inch minimum. Less than
four Inches will take a higher rate,
which will be furnished upon applica-
ft irvr

Readies: Katieeet Five cents per line
for first insertion; three cents per line
fnw oh anftseauent insertion. One

change a week allowed on readers with without
out without extra composition charges.
Legal advertisements at legal ratea
Columbia county is staging a first
class fair at Lake City.
Ninety days on the highways or a

fine of $200 is the limit of the penalty

that can be imposed upon a person

found guilty of driving a motor car

while in an intoxicated condition.
Lakeland Star Telegram.
We haven't heard of anybody be being
ing being given such a sentence.
The Ocala Star's democratic cam

paign fund is gradually increasing. It

seems to be a hard row to hoe, but
Brother Ben's persistency will surely
win. Folks, there is still time to help
along. Summerfield Chronicle.

Let's not forget that the Chronicle

started the ball to rolling.

The Kissimmee Valley Gazette re re-'
' re-' cently published some kind' words in

regard to Frederick Van Roy of Crys

tal River, prophesying that he will

make the right sort of a representa

tive, to which office he was nominated

at the primary; We have got past
that' point, however, and are ready to

prophesy that Van Roy will make a
mighty' good governor. Lakeland
Advertiser.
If he becomes a candidate he will
find most of South Florida fighting
him;

was offered by West and North Flor

ida in an attempt more equally to di divide
vide divide the powers of the state, but for

this they have been abused and mis

represented by some of our South
Florida papers in a manner that is
likely to increase the bitterness al

ready existing.

SLIGHTLY A SLUMP

The taxpayers didn't shell out so

well yesterday as they did the day

before, which was natural. But they
brought in $272,54.

Come along, people; help your

schools and save yourselves two per

cent.

The figures are now as follows:

Due night of Nov. 1 $29,930.74

Paid in Nov. 2 272.54

ery section of Florida together and
making one grand big state without
any division talk, capital removal
talk or any other kind of talk except
speaking good about Florida. It
seems that we are wastinga lot of
valuable time with this sectionalism
and not getting anywhere with any

of it. Sanford Herald.
Sectionalism is bad for any state.
There is hardly any state it can hurt
worse than Florida.

ALBERT W. GILCHRIST
ON THE AMENDMENT

Yt due $29,658.20

DEMOCRATIC DOLLARS

Yesterday would have been a dol dol-larless
larless dol-larless day if it hadn't been for that
good scout, Fred Cook, who sent in a
plunk late in the afternoon. Brother
and sister democrats, the eleventh
hour has dwindled to twenty-four
minutes. The lamp is burning low.
In the democratic day of judgment,
where will vou stand?
Following is the list:
Summerfield Chronicle $1.00
T. D. Lancaster Jr 1.00
Nathan Mayo 5.00
Star Publishing Company 2.00
W. L. Colbert 1.00
R. A. Burford 5.00

J. E. Chace 1.00

Wm. D. Taylor 1.00
Countess -von Schimon 5.00
James P. Taylor 1.00
J. W. Hunter 1.00
W. T. Gary 1.00
J. G. Parrish 1.00
W. W. Stripling 1.00
John H. Taylor 1.00
K. C. Moore 1.00
Ocala Banner 5.00
Rev. C. L. Collins 1.00
Sam McAteer 1.00
Sam Petteway 1.00
George MacKay 2.00
Niel Ferguson 1.00
G. W. (Tex) Martin 1.00
Mrs. Cash 1.00
Harry Borland 1.00
Mrs. Florence Stenger 1.00
J, R. Moorhead 2.00
F. W. Cook 1.00

Says the Summerfield Chronicle:
"We wish to congratulate our county
commissioners on the appointment of
county engineer in the person of
, Mr. J.' E. Walker at a salary of $5000
" a year. Mr. Walker is a thorough
road builder and his services for the
state road department on the Dixie
Highway were very satisfactory. We
also feel that had the road depart department
ment department kept Mr. Walker on the job in
this section, our State Aid Road No.
124 would have been completed by
now."

SOAP AND SCHOOLS

ARE GREAT CIVILIZERS

The wets are greatly elated because
the British won't let American ships

clear from British ports without at
least half a gallon of brandy for ev every
ery every hundred British subjects in the
steerage. This law was passed in
England many years ago, when the
English and most other people consid considered
ered considered brandy a necessary medicine. The
proper thing for American ship own owners
ers owners to do is to refuse to allow British
subjects to enter their steerages. This
- country already has too many of the
sort of people who come -over from
Europe in steerages.
We regret to say that a consider considerable
able considerable proportion of, the newspapers
South Florida have signally failed in
. their duty to the. people in regard to
the reapportionment amendment.. It
is the privilege of any newspaper to
oppose and argue against the amend amendment,
ment, amendment, and the Star is free to say
there is : considerable to be said
against it. .But no newspaper has
any right to misinform its readers,
or withhold information from them.
The Star knows that reapportionment

TOWN PESTS

ucm oom Gf o.w
fefc &000 Wt
XX, XUTT

There is much good sense in the

following from Collier's Weekly:

Things in Asia Minor have long

been bad Ten 'years ago, when the
Turks quit Macedonia, an able war
correspondent pointed out that they

went back to Asia Minor with the
same carts, tools, clothes and furnish furnishings
ings furnishings with which they had crossed the
Dardanelles over four hundred years
before. They had learned nothing.
Nobody had taught them.
That whole miserable country
around the eastern end of the Medi Mediterranean
terranean Mediterranean had more people, higher
culture and a better life, some seven seventeen
teen seventeen centuries back, under the Rom Romans,
ans, Romans, than it has today. They do a deal
of murdering, but they do not make
their own guns. Civilized people sell
firearms for money to these harriers
and wasters. The first point is to
take away the weapons, stop the sup

ply of cartridges and cannon. If di

plomacy' cannot arrange that, it may.

as well shut up. We did it in the
Philippines.

Second, these people are haters-

dirty haters. They teach their chil

dren hideous ancient grudges and

prolong this insane welter of fire and

blood. The natives of scores of tribes

used to hate and hunt each other in

the back parts of the Philippines. We

put them to school; had them learn
one language, English, so they could

talk things out together; taught
to wash, work and play baseball. It's

cheaper and kinder.

These Near Eastern peoples -have

all. got to live together. The Chris

tians were never able to keep the

Turks out and the Turks never could
kill off all the Christians. Diplomacy

must drop its silk hats and pourpar pourparlers
lers pourparlers and get down to the brass tacks
of schools, white enamel bathtubs and

good soap.

Asia Minor is not our back door,

not our direct responsibility, but our

teachers in the Philippines and our

Red Cross in Central Europe have

proved that some of our folks know
how to carve the heart out of these
problems of miserable savagery. The
present looks like a good time to

start.

Editor Star: In relation to the
charges of "tyranny" and "injustice"
to South Florida as regards the pro

posed constitutional amendment on

apportionment, the first thing to do
is to define South Florida. The north
boundary of Marion and Levy coun

ties has heretofore been-taken as the

north boundary of South Florida. The

prolongation of the line takes in Dixie
and Flagler counties. Only a small
part of Putnam being south of the
line, Putnam county is placed in
North Florida. The federal census of
1920 places the population of Florida
at 968,470. Guessing the population
of Dixie county at 2000, the popula population
tion population of North Florida is 516,034, and
under the proposed apportionment it
would have 54 representatives, one
for each 9553 population; South Flor Florida
ida Florida has 452,436 population and would
have 46 representatives, one for each
9835 population.
Lee county having nominated a
representative on a county division
platform, will be divided in 1923, giv giving
ing giving South Florida 47 representatives,
one to- 9626, as against one to 9553 in
North Florida.
No "tyranny' 'or "injustice" in that.
As to the senate: Take the counties
which in all justice should have a sep separate
arate separate senator Escambia, Jackson,
Gadsden, Suwanee, Duval and Alach Alachua,
ua, Alachua, seven in North Florida; and Mar Marion,
ion, Marion, Volusia, Hillsborough, Pinellas,
Polk, Palm Beach, Dade, Monroe,
eight in South Florida. This list in includes
cludes includes all the counties having a pop population
ulation population of over 18,000. The constitu

tion provides "When any senatorial
district is composed of two or more
counties, the counties of which such
district consists shall not be entirely
separated by any county belonging to
any other district." Nassau county in
North Florida, population 11,240, is

separated from every other county

except Duval, which has a population
of 113,540, by Georgia. Nassau will

have a senator. The population; of
these eight North Florida districts is

280,869, and of these eight South

riorum districts 23,4z. lhere is

Palm Beach, Pinellas, St. Lucie, Char- ?

lotte, Seminole, Dixie, Glades, Hardee,

Highlands and Sarasota, with one
representative each, and Lake with
two representatives.
Due to the failure to reapportion I
said that much discord was being ;
created in the state. When apportion- '-ed
ed '-ed the house limited to 68 representa- j
tives," each county having at least one
member. I saw the injustice which
might prevail against the creation of J
new counties. I therefore drew the i
proposed amendment as it passed the
senate, Senator, Stokes of Escambia I
county inserting before its introduc- i
tion the clause relating to the gov- I
ernor's duties. Senator Campbell of i

Palm Beach county introduced it. It j
passed the senate without amendment.
One senator (From Liberty county)
voted, against it. There was no pro protest
test protest from South Florida. As amend

ed in the house it passed the house

with two dissenting votes, one from

Lafayette and one from Hamilton

counties no protest from South Flor

ida. As amended by the house it
passed the senate with two dissenting
votes one from Levy and one from

Lake, South Florida counties.

As drawn by myself and passed by

the senate, so many counties having
the largest population were to have
three representatives, so many coun counties
ties counties having the next largest popula population
tion population wer to have two representatives,

and all the balance one representa representative
tive representative each. The house changed this
principle.

Seeing the injustice to the creation
of counties only in the years in which
apportionments were to be made, I

conceived the amendment (ratified in

1900) whereby new counties could be
created in other years. I am there therefore
fore therefore the granddaddy of every county

created since 1887.

This reapportionment constitutional
amendment and the other three pro proposed
posed proposed amendments should be ratified
at the November election.
Albert W. Gilchrist.

EIGHT YEARS AGO

The Slow-Pay Pest has the Money
and will Pay Some Time but he just
, Naturally Hates to Let Go of the
Jack: Merchants can't Pay No Bills
with Dollars that are Slow Coming
to Work, but the Slow-Pay don't give
a Dern, hence his Place In the Hall
ef Pests.

Nov. 3, 1914. Today was fought the

first great naval battle of the war. The
German Pacific fleet, consisting of six
new, up-to-date cruisers, attacked a
British squadron of five vessels.

greatly inferior to the German ships

in range of guns and speed, off the
coast of Chile. The Germans had a
picnic, steaming around the British

and out of range of their guns, mean

while battering them at will. Two

British vessels were sunk, one took
refuge in a Chilean harbor and the

others escaped under the cover of

darkness.

We also fail to see just why the
majority of the people of South Flor Florida
ida Florida should ring in West Florida all
the time. While sometimes it seems
that the representatives in South Flor Florida
ida Florida adisagree about as many times as
the South Florida and West Florida
members disagree and the whole mat matter
ter matter seems to be a case of getting ev-

not much "tyranny" or "injustice'

here. The total population of these

sixteen senatorial districts is 564,351.

The population remaining is 404,11.
The average population of the re

maining twenty-two districts is 18,-

369. The following tentatively-nam

ed senatorial districts for South
Florida seems just: Levy, population

9921, and Citrus, 5220; Marion, 23,-

968; Volusia, 23,374; Lake, 12,744, and

Sumter, 7851; Hernando, 4548, and
Pasco, 8802; Orange, 19,890; Brevard,
8505, and Seminole, 10,086; Pinellas,

28,265; Hillsborough, 98,257; Polk,
33,661; Osceola, 7194; Okeechobee,
2132, and St. Lucie, 7886; Palm Beach,

18,654; Highlands, Hardee and De De-Soto
Soto De-Soto about 20,000; Manatee and Sara

sota,, 17,712; Glades, about 1700; Lee,

9540, and Broward, 5135; Dade, 43, 43,-73;
73; 43,-73; Monroe, 19,550 seventeen South
Florida senatorial districts, with Dix

ie and Flagler in two North Florida

districts. The senate will be increas

ed from 32 to 38 members. South

Florida will gain five or six of these

new senatorial districts. South Flor

ida now has eleven senatorial dis districts.
tricts. districts. There are 61 counties, seven creat created
ed created in 1921, six in South Florida and
one, in North Florida. If this amend amendment
ment amendment is voted down the next year for
apportionment in 1927, when at the
end of the legislative session there
will be over 68 counties, with at least
one representative to each county.
The number of representatives should
then be reduced to 68 an impossi impossibility.
bility. impossibility. Yet the chamber of commerce
of a progressive and intelligent South
Florida county has solemnly declared,
with but one dissenting voice, that "a
fair and equitable reapportionment
of the legislature could and should be
secured for the people of Florida un under
der under the existing provisions of the con constitution"
stitution" constitution" in 1927.
Some advocate one senator for each
county. Georgia has 619 more square
miles than Florida and about three

times the population. Georgia now

has 160 counties, its legislature creat

ing several more at each annual ses session.
sion. session. It will soon have over 175 coun counties.
ties. counties. Florida will eventually have 175

or more counties. Just think, of 175

Florida state senators, with only 96
in the United States Senate. Georgia
now has 51 senators. None of its
senatorial districts have less than

three counties.

Under the proposed amendment, if
the legislature fails to make an ap apportionment
portionment apportionment it is the duty of the gov

ernor to call an extra session, throw throwing
ing throwing the odium of the cost of the ses session
sion session on the recalcitrant members. Be Besides,
sides, Besides, as the number of representa

tives is unlilnited, there is not the
motive for refusing to make the ap apportionment.
portionment. apportionment. Since the adoption of the present
constitution in 1886, three counties
have been created in North Florida,
Bay, Okaloosa and Union, with one
representative each. As against the
"tyranny" and "injustice" nineteen
counties have been created in South
Florida Broward, Citrus, DeSoto,
Flagler, Lee, Okeechobee, Osceola,

SEVEN DAY SERVICE

AUTO
REPAIR

Our plant is equipped for giv giving
ing giving you real service on your car.
We employ none but expert
workmen, and you do not pay
for "breaking in" mechanics.
Let us clean up and overhaul
your car. You'll be surprised at
the low cost of service in our
shop.

WE SELL
Fox Tires and Tubes
Cord 10,000 mile guarantee.
Fabric 6,000 mile guarantee.
STANDARD PRICES
DIXIE HIGHWAY GARAGE
JAMES ENGESSER
Phone 258121 W. Broadway
' Night Phone 533

CHILDRENS SHOES
REPAIRED FOR
SCHOOL WEAR

Don't throw away the shoes
the children have been wear wearing
ing wearing this summer. There's a
lot of wear in them yet, if
youH let us repair them.
HALF SOLES SOLES-WHOLE
WHOLE SOLES-WHOLE SOLES SOLES-RUBBER
RUBBER SOLES-RUBBER HEELS HEELS-LEATHER
LEATHER HEELS-LEATHER HEELS HEELS-ALL
ALL HEELS-ALL WORK GUARANTEED

CHAS. MAZON
(Between Gerig's Drug Store
and 10c. Store)

APASTHENTS FOR '.BENT

1. One furnished apartment

with bath, including lights

and water.
Per month

$25.00

2. Two furnished apartments
with bath, including lights
$20.00

Four unfurnished apart apartments,
ments, apartments, with bath, water and

6. F.

) Reo Dealer
f Next to Fire Station

MUD BATHS FOR BEAUTY

rfffir iimifr iHHSmim 1 riiriV'hilr

This isn't really Venus rising from
the bath, but Miss Myrtle Miller, a
California beauty, just out of her dally
nrud bath at the Pacheteau springs,
Oalistoga, Cal. She says the black
mud makes her skin finer and whiter.

KENDRICK

Kendrick, Nov. 2. The W. C. T. U.
entertained last Friday evening at
the home of Mrs. J. Bradford Webb

with an informal reception, welcom welcoming
ing welcoming the teachers of Kendrick school,
Mr. C. A. McCully and Miss Laura
Tyler. During the evening a short
and interesting program was render

ed. During her talk concerning the

work of the local chapter, Miss Julia

Webb presented a W. C. T. U. tem

perance chart to be used in the school

for several weeks. After a very de

lightful social hour, the children hav having
ing having enjoyed many games, a salad
course was served, the favors being
mint cups, containing the fortune of
each guest secretly hidden among the

mints. All reported having spent a

very enjoyable evening.

Mrs. Vesta A. Thomas of Lakeland,
is visiting her mother, Mrs. W. E.
Clark.
Miss Mattie Perry of Jacksonville
is visiting with her brother, Mrs. C.
T. Perry, and family.
Mr. and Mrs. C. A. McCully spent
the week-end with friends in Okla Okla-vaha.
vaha. Okla-vaha. Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Webb were in
Mcintosh last evening attending the
Eastern Star meeting, honoring the
grand matron.
Miss Mildred Livingston is suffer suffering
ing suffering with an attack of dengue.
Mrs. J. Bradford Webb, Miss Julia
Webb, Mrs. J. N. Tiller and Mrs.
Baxter left yesterday to attend the
W. C. T. U. convention in Kissimmee.

HOME DWELLERS
AND
HOME BUILDERS
Are installing RADIANTF1RE gas heaters in their
fire places. This new and revolutionary gas heating
appliance makes the fire place a source of real comfort
at a small price, and there's no bother. "Radiant
Rays' project90 per cent, of their warmth straight
into the room.

CX HUMPHRET

TOP

GAS HEATER
Burns for hours at the cost of a shovel full of coal.
It is Odorless, Ashless, Smokeless and Dustless.
CALL AT OUR SHOW ROOMS AND ASK FOR DEMONSTRATION
Ocala Gas Company
Harrington Hall Block Ft King Avenue

OUR PHONES
243 and 174
CHASE & SANBORN'S COFFEE and TEAS
ROYAL SCARLET CANNED GOODS
YOURS FOR SEU VICE
COOK'S MARKET and GROCERY

VEGEX HAVE YOU TRIED IT?
Take home a 35c. jar at our risk. If
for any reason you do not like it, just
return the partly empty or empty jar
and we will refund the cash without
a question. U-Serve Stores. 28-7t
Want a light lunch? Stop at any
leading soda fountain, ask for a Daisy
sandwich. They are different. Small
club, chicken salad, chicken, ham and
cheese. You will be pleased. 31-3t

One quart New Honey, CC
per jar

Irish Potatoes
per peck

Palm Olive Soap,
three cakes for.
Heinz Small Can
Beans

Cream of Wheat,
package
Shredded Wheat
Biscuit package.
Corn Flakes
three for

40c
25c
11c
25c
15c
25c

Jello 12c. package,
three for

33c

Quaker Oats, 12c. pkg. OO
three for OOC

Post Toasties,
three for'...

Premier Salad
Dressing.....
Uneedas,
three for

Octagon Soap,
three for. .

Senate Coffee,
per pound..,

Pint Jars Orange Marmalade

. 25c
43c
.. 20c
. 20c
. 40c
. 40c

Purina Scratch Feed, Chicken Chowder, Cow Chow
and other Feeds
FARMERS EXCHANGE STORE
PHONE 163

LIFE

FIRE

A. E GERIG
INSURANCE
Ocala, Florida

CCLDENT

AUTOMOBILE

C V. Roberts & Co.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
AND EMBALMERS
Motor Equipment
Office Phone 350, Ocala, Fla.
Residence Phone -30 5
217 W. Broadway

JH1

ipmg

MoiPa

Sounds 4od

ttCCEM(&$:

& TO?

PANCAKE

Wie most delicious pancakes

anyone cVer fasted

AlltiouliaVe to do Af,

OldHosestead

PancalLe:
MIXTURE

is add Wsterymix

and Balce

1

li v w I x I

mA

-V R5S I u I B . I



OCALA EVENING STAfi, t R1DAT. NOV

2 S, 1922

BE CJHARITABLE r Brethren, if
I man b overtaken In a fault, y
Irfalcb are spiritual, restore ucn a
mm In the spirit of meekness; consid considering
ering considering thyself, lest thou -ala be
tempt ad. Gal. 6: 1.

"Another Nash' 6tl
A 25 -cent package of Albert's Plant
Food will perform wonders with your
pot plants. Try it. Sold at the Court
Pharmacy. tf

U

A Word
To the Wise!
There's a time for all things.
It's now time to have your
car painted and topped. The
fall season's here and a paint
job done now will stay a year.
Bring your car to us and be
satisfied. When better paint
jobs are done Spencer-Ped-rick
Motor Company will do
them.
SPENCER PEDRICK
MOTOR CO.
PHONE 8

if

OCAU OBSERVANCES

If you have any news items for this

department, phone five-one.

For your Sunday dinner try Stone's
cake at the O. K. Teapot Grocery. 2t
The friends of Mrs. F. G. B.
Weihe will regret to hear that she is
sick with dengue.
Monday is the day to buy a Sellers
at B. GOLDMAN'S for $1 first pay payment.
ment. payment. Balance on easy terms. 2-3t

Necdham Motor Co
General Auto Repairing
Firestone, Oldfield and Racine
Horseshoe
TIRES AND TUBES
GAS OIL GREASE
Give Us a Trial
THONE 252

SALT SPRINGS WATER
' Is growing in popularity every
day among Ocalans. It is also
being shipped to every part of
the state. It is sold under a
guarantee. Try a five gallon
container.
Chero-Cola Bottling Works
Phone 167

" Another Nash." 611
Mr. William Wolff, a former resi resident,
dent, resident, but now of Columbus, Ga., is
spending a few days in town.
Mr. Reuben Saffly of Tampa, rep representing
resenting representing the Florida Paper Company,
spent yesterday in Ocala.
W. K. Lane, M. D physician and
surgeon, specialist eye, ear, nose and
throat. Office over 5 and 10 cent store,
Ocala, Fla. tf

Mr. W. M. Enright will tell you

how the Sellers Kitchen Cabinet will
save you steps and he will make you

special terms. B. GOLDMAN. 2-3t

Mrs. M. G. Chambers who has been

spending the past two weeks in St.
Augustine, is expected home tomorrow.

Mr. and Mrs. William Altman are
receiving congratualtions on the ar arrival
rival arrival of a baby daughter, Monday,

October 30th.

You can get your Sellers Kitchen
Cabinet in oak or white enamel finish

for $1 down Monday, balance on easy
terms. B. GOLDMAN. 2-3t

OCALA TWENTY YEARS AGO

Cranberries, Malaga grapes, pickled
pigs' feet, mackerel, salt mullet, tripe,
boneless codfish just in at the U U-SERVE
SERVE U-SERVE STORES. Phones 614-195. 4t

Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Scofield of In Inverness,
verness, Inverness, Mrs. R. L. Hopkins of Or Orange
ange Orange Lake, Mrs. Frank Haviland of
Belleview and Mrs. Charles Mathews
of Candler were business visitors in
the city Thursday.

(Evening Star November 3, 1902)

The Ocala freight depots have not j
contained as many goods before in j
ten years as they have this fall. Al- I
though the merchants are hauling ev- j
ery day they are so full that the em- j
ployes can hardly get around in i
them.
The Dunnellon Phosphate Company j
has finished loading its third ship j

with phosphate at Port Inglis.
The old cemetery is in a woeful
state of disrepair. Weeds are grow grow-ine
ine grow-ine oromiscuously. The fence is in

bad shape and so many pickets are j

off that the goats and hogs and even
cows go in and out at will. Can
nothing be done? Where is the ceme cemetery
tery cemetery committee? (Asking the same
questions today).

Mrs. F. E. Wetherbee and little!

daughter went to Crystal River yes yesterday
terday yesterday to visit Mr. Wetherbee, who is
manager there for the Continental
Manufacturing Company.
Rev. and Mrs. R. H. Morris left to today
day today for Barnesville, Ga., where the
former has accepted the pastorate of
the Presbyterian church of that city.
Mr. and Mrs. Norris has many warm
friends in this city who will miss
them.
Ocala Ten Years Ago
(Evening Star November 3, 1912)
Another pretty little daughter is
being welcomed at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Jerry Burnett.
Mr. Emmett Robinson has sold the
Ideal theater to Messrs. C. E. Adams
and J. R. Haney of Burbank.
Mr. T. I. Arnold has returned from
a trip to Georgia and South Carolina.
He was called to Macon by the serious
illness of his father, who is now re recovering.
covering. recovering. Mr. Arnold left Mrs. Arn Arnold
old Arnold in Asheville, N. C, where she will

be for some weeks.
All the friends of Mr. and Mrs.
James Brown sympathize with them
in the loss of their bright little daugh daughter,
ter, daughter, Grace, who died Friday after afternoon.
noon. afternoon. Mr. Will Jeffcoat was able to return
to his home yesterday. The Star
deeply regrets to learn that the sight
of one of his eyes is entirely destroy destroyed.
ed. destroyed. He is bearing up nobly under his
most unfortunate injuries.

LEGION 'QUEEN IS DIPLOMAT
Miss Ruth Metealf, Burlington (Ta.)
Girl, Names Her Brother
Carnival "King."
Women began practicing the art of
diplomacy when Eve was about three

days old, and the
present genera generation
tion generation of fair ones
are not so bad at',
it, the world
knows. Even the
distinguished for foreign
eign foreign diplomats
who wear red
stripes across
their boiled shirts
at formal dinners
will give the palm
to a sweet Iowa
girt, however, and

ATTENTION! ATTENTION!

The American Legion Auxiliary has
made arrangements to have the rooms
of the legion at the armory repapered
and the wood work done over. New
curtains will also be put up. The
work will begin today.

Ford touring car in good condition,

Buick truck in good condition. Take

them both for $300. Spencer-Pedrick

Motor Co., Ocala, Fl Phone 8. 30-tf

By the payment of $1 down and
easy weekly terms we will keep your
Sellers Kitchen Cabinet until Christ Christmas.
mas. Christmas. B. GOLDMAN. 2-3t

For rent, the best location in town

for a grocery business; corner store.

Apply to "E," Star office. ll-2-5t

SASH

DOOR

Geo. MacKay Ho.
Ocala, Fla..
HARDWARE
HIGH GRADE PAINT

RAILROAD SCHEDULES

Arrival and departure of passenger

ains at OCALA UNION STATION.
The following schedule figures pub pub-ished
ished pub-ished as information and not guar guar-..ateed.
..ateed. guar-..ateed. (Eastern Standard Time)
ATLANTIC COAST LINE R. R.
Leave for Station Arrive from

2:15 am St. Petersburg 2:27 ;.m
2:27 am Jacksonville 2:15 am
1:45 pm Jacksonville 3:24 pm
3:24 nm St. Petersburg 1:25 pm

6:15 am Jacksonville 9:00 pm

3:30 pm Homosassa 1:16 pm
7:10 am (p) Wilcox 6:45 pm
7:25 am (j) Lakeland 11:03 pm

(p) Monday, Wednesday. Friday,
j) Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday.
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY

Leave for Station Arrive from

2:34 am Jacksonville-N'York 1:55 am
1:60 pm Jacksonville 1:15 pm
4:06 pm Jacksonville 4:06 pm

Tamoa-Manatee-

1:55 am St. Petersburg 2:34 am

2:55 am NTTork-St. Petrsburg 1:35 am
1:55 am Tampa 2:34 am

1:35 pm Tampa-Manatee 1:30 pm

4:05 pm Tampa-St. Petrsburg 4:05 pm

COCKROACHES

WATER BUGS

ANTS

The ladies of the Marion County

Hospital Auxiliary will serve lunches
at the fair grounds during the fair.

Any one wishing to help in any way

will please notify Mrs. J. W. Dumas,

who ahs charge of this work.

Mrs. R. G. Blake is looking forward

to a visit from her daughter, Mrs. C.

W. Effinger, of West Palm Beach,
sometime this month, probably over
fair week. Mrs. Effinger will be ac accompanied
companied accompanied by three young lady
friends.

MONDAY is Sellers Kitchen Cabi

net day at B. GOLDMAN'S. $1 puts

it in your kitchen. Balance on easy

terms. 2-3t

Let a Sellers Kitchen Cabinet do

your work. Monday is the day to get
it on easy terms. B. GOLDMAN. 2-3t

"Another Nash." 611
Circle B of the Baptist church will

meet Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock

at the home of Mrs. Lanier Robert'
son. on Washington street. This so society
ciety society has not held any meetings dur

ing xne summer montns and it is

hoped that there will be a large at

tendance as there are important bus

iness matters to transact. Mrs. Rob

ertson is the new chairman and at
this meeting the other officers will be

elected.

- EASILY KILLED BY USING
STEARNS' ELECTRIC PASTE
It also kills rat and mlc. It fcrc?s
these pesta to run from building for water
and frMh air. A ISe box contains enough
to kill 60 to 100 rata or mice. Get it from
your drag or general stora dealer today.
READY FOR USE BETTER THAN TRAPS

L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CONTRACTOR
. AND BUILDER
Careful estimate made cm all con contract
tract contract work." Gives more and better
work for the money fchaa any other
mtractor in tha cf.Hv

"Another Nash." 6tf

Albert's Plant Food is tne thing for

making your flower garden and pot
plants bloom. It is odorless and is

sold in 25c. and 10c. packages and $2

sacks. At the Court Pharmacy, tf

Mrs. Clarence Camp was hostess

this afternoon at the meeting of the

married ladies card club- This

was the first meeting of the season
and proved unusually pleasant. All

the members were present except one,
After a very enjoyable game of auc

tion, the tea cloths were laid and the

hostess served refreshments. Mrs

ICamp presented each of the members

with a pretty gift that she had ob obtained
tained obtained on her recent trip abroad.
Those playing were Mrs. F. H. Logan,

Mrs." N. Hickman, Mrs. L. R. Chazal,

Mrs. F. T. Schreiber, Mrs. Geo. K.
Robinson, Miss Abbie Munroe, Miss
Minnie Gamsby and the hostess.
Short skirts, short sleeves, low
necks and high heels in feminine ap apparel
parel apparel have caused several Swiss in insurance
surance insurance companys, which insure a a-gainst
gainst a-gainst illness, to raise their premiums
15 per cent for women.

BURBANK

Pearl

., is vis-

other

Burbank, Nov. 2. Mrs. E

Thomas of Collingswood,.N. J

ting Mrs. V; H. Turner and

friends here.

Mrs. Eva L. Hitchcock has return

ed from Miami, where she has been
visiting her sons for severaj weeks.

Mr. Hugh MacManus of Oak, spent

the week-end at his home here.

Miss Ola Waterman, who is attend

ing school at Anthony, spent Satur Saturday
day Saturday and Sunday with her grandpar grandparents,
ents, grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Priest.

Mrs. V. H. Turner and Mrs. H. I.

Turner were hostesses on Saturday

evening, entertaining at a Hallowe'en

dance in honor of the former's guest,

Mrs. E. Pearl Thomas. A large crowd

attended and enjoyed dancing until a
late hour, when a salad course wan

served.

Messrs. H. E. Abbott and H. I. Tur

ner were business callers in Ocala
Saturday.

Mrs. John W. Holman and little

daughter, Mozelle Louise of Anthony,

spent the week-end with Mrs. Hol Hol-man's
man's Hol-man's parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. K.

Priest.

Mr. and Mrs. Sliger and son of

Bowen, HI., have come to Mr. and Mrs.
M; D. L. Graham's for the winter and
are contemplating making Florida

their home. Mrs. Sliger is Mrs. Gra

ham's sister.

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Bowen of
Newport, R. I., arrived in Burbank
Tuesday and will make this their
home.
Mrs. Arthur Gnann spent last week
with her brother and wife, Mr. and
BIrs. Bailey Waldron.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Gnann left the
first of the week for their home at
Wilford.
Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Waldron, Mr.
and Mrs. A. Gnann and Mr. and Mrs.
A G. Geiger and sons spent this
week-end with their mother at Bay
Lake.

If they hesitate, a number of Iowa

men might have a word to say that
would prompt them.
It happened that the American Le Legion
gion Legion of Burlington, Ia having a high
carnival and desiring a queen, chos
one. The girl selected for her out outstanding
standing outstanding beauty, wit, and spirit waa
Miss Ruth Metealf, who later dis displayed
played displayed tact. Miss Metealf being duly
and fittingly crowned queen, now

would choose one of the ex-soldlera

as king, it was announced, whereat

6ome hundreds of assorted male beau beauties
ties beauties struck attitudes of attention. Af

ter looking closely over the assembled

Legionnaires, Miss Metealf calmly

picked out her own brother and

crowned him king. Whereupon the
issue was settled with nice diplomacy

and the big carnival parade got nn
der way.

ENDED SITTING BULL'S REIGN

Chief Red Tomahawk, Sioux Warrior,
and Commander MacNlder Smoko
Pipe of Peace.

Since the passing of the dime novel,
the 40 redskins who used to bite the

dust so frequent

t- ''.i"JT -t Y lrtat to thft world.

But the exploits

of old Sitting
Bull may well be

remembered, even

today, when the
marble shooting
generation is

reading deep vol

umes that puzzle

exasperated pa
rents.

Sitting Bull also

bit the dust In approved fashion and,
while touring through Bismarck, N. D.,
recently, Hanford MacNlder,' national
commander of the American Legion,
had the pleasure of meeting the gen

tleman who caused the Bull's down downfall.
fall. downfall. It was none other than old Chief
Red Tomahawk, Sioux warrior, who
some years ago captured Sitting Bull's

pelt, and who came from the reserva reservation
tion reservation to greet the big ehief of the white
tribe. With Red Tomahawk came a
number of the younger Sioux braves
who fought in France with the Aj E.
F. and gave the Germans the surprise
of their lives.
While in North Dakota Mr. Mac MacNlder
Nlder MacNlder smoked a peace pipe 'with the
Sioux chief and received congratula congratulations
tions congratulations of the chief of the first Ameri Americans
cans Americans for the organization which is en endeavoring
deavoring endeavoring to keep America for the
present Americans.

MOSS BLUFF

Moss Bluff, Nov. 2 Misses Vernice

and Janie Martin entertained quite a

number of .their friends : Saturday

evening at a birthday party, honor"

ing- their brother, Mr. Lawton Mar

tin, the occasion being the celebration

of his eighteenth birthday annivers

ary.. -The rooms of the residence

were decorated in pink and white, the
color scheme being carried out with
cut flowers and streamers of crepe

paper. Gaines were placed and at the
conclusion a drawing contest took

place'J 'Each one had to draw a pic

ture of some one.- The best drawing
was made by Miss Elsie Davis, who
waa presented with an attractive re reward.
ward. reward. Archie Fort received the

booby. The crowd was then invited

into the dining room, where fruit

punch and cake were served. The din

ing table was laid with a cloth and

centered .with a beautiful birthday

cake, which-was cut, Mr. Cam getting-
the ring, and Clarence White the
dime. At a late hour the crowd left,
after expressing themselves as hav

ing spent a most enjoyable evening.
Those present were Mr. and Mrs. W.
C. White, Mr. and Mrs. Harmon Mar Martin
tin Martin and baby, Misses Lillie Sue Clay

ton, Mabel Squires, Helen Squires,
Doris Squires, Elsie Davis, Martha
Fort, Annie McKnight, Vera Higgin Higgin-botham,
botham, Higgin-botham, Velma McKinney, Messrs.
Carl McKnight, Ray McKnight,, Ed

ward Brooks, Stuart Hall, Charles'

Mock, Sidney Fort, Archie Fort, John

Morrison, Chane Martin, Alvin

Squires, Pete Holly and Mr. Cam.

The fifth Sunday meeting which

was held here at the Christian church

Sunday proved to be quite a success.
People were present from Ocala,
Leesburg, Eustis, Oxford, Oklawaha

and other places. Dinner was served

about one o'clock, and if any one went
home hungry it was their fault, as
there was a bountiful dinner spread.
Services will continue through the
week until Friday night, when the
meeting will close.
Mr. Busbee Cochran is up again
after an attack of dengue fever.
Miss Lillie Sue Clayton 'spent the
week-end with Miss Martha Fort.
Miss Mabel Squires is on the sick
list.
Mr. Dan Fort,7 Misses Lillie Sue
Clayton and Martha Fort spent Sat Saturday
urday Saturday afternoon in Weirsdale.
Mr. and Mrs. Hayes of Pennsylva Pennsylvania
nia Pennsylvania arrived Tuesday and are guests
of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. White.

A Clean-Up Sale j
of-
Late Fall and Winter j
MILLINERY 1 1
will be in progress from j
November 4th to November 30th
The Purpose of this Sale is Two -fold y
First, to clean out our FaU Merchandise and make room:
for Holiday Goods and, second, to give our cus- i :
tomers the benefit of Special Cat Prices before
their season is over. ;
',

STYLE HAT SHOP
Miss Rena Smith
OCALA . FLORIDA

k? ?

fTeVe iyt f9mwi!'mWtY99W:W

AUTOMOBL

E

STORAG

F

Large Fire Proof Building

OPEN DAY AND NIGHT

Cars Washed and Polished
PHONE 291
Florida Auto Supply Company

314-320 N. MAIN STREET

Physical Deterioration.
"Physical examinations of regular
army officers show the most dear dear-cut
cut dear-cut evidence of physical deterioration
which Is due to strain Incident to
the World war," the i army medical
department reports. That InTestiga
tlon may bring to light a scientific
explanation of some part of the rest restlessness
lessness restlessness among former soldiers which
can be laid to their having undergone
a severe nervous strain.

PRIVATE SCHOOL

All grades, day and night classes.
Special coaching. For appointment
phone 277. Mrs. Jennie Cassil, 820
East Third street. 2-6t

Alaska Has the Wealth.
Alaska could not only pay for ad adjusted
justed adjusted compensation, If it were rightly
developed, but the whole war- debt
besides, according to Albert B. Pall,
secretary of the interior. What is
believed to he the greatest ofl field In
the world is in the Arctic near the
Aleutian islands. A tremendous coal
belt In Alaska is undeveloped, and the
greatest copper mine In the world as
well.

NOTICE

1 have cut the price of strand wood 1

75 cents on the cord, as I am com compelled
pelled compelled to get it off the land. Four-

foot wood $3.50 per cord. Phone 471.

E. Gibbons. N. Osceola St 16-tf

CHIROPRACTIC

All that is good in this line of re

storing the afflicted to health and

harmony of body can now be had by

Florida's oldest and most reliable
Chiropractor, who has again return returned
ed returned to Ocala. Dr. Kiplinger, Ocala
House. 2-3t

We have a service car. Call
on us when out on the road.

HOOD and FEDERAL
TIRES and TUBES

Ocala Tire & Vulcanizing Co.

J. R. LONG

PHONE 438

W. A. STROUD

Star Ads are Business Builders. Phone 51

Nah Lead the World in Motor Car Value

Touring Model
Four Cylinders
Five Passengers
Reduced Pries

Legion Aske for New Law.
"Oh-o-o say. can yon see-e V The
band-organ man ground out the nat national
ional national anthem and the monkey danced
and squinted his sharp eyes. Then
the hand-organ man pasted the hat.
But in New York state he will have
to change n!s tune. If the American
Legion gets Its bill through the legis legislature
lature legislature prohibiting the playing of the
'Star Spangled Banner" for the pur purpose
pose purpose of collecting money.

Carrying On With the
American Legion

7

:

The official American Legion grave
markers may be had from national
headquarters for $L30 each. now.
The Legion poet of Decatur. Ark
has bought the city's telephone system
and, after an overhauling, will oper-

i ate it

Special Display: Now we
are exhibiting a Nash Four
consignment just received.
They are swung smartly
h7 to the road on a rug ruggedly
gedly ruggedly built chassis and
powered by the exception

ally powerful Nash per perfected
fected perfected valve-in-head motor.
Owners everywhere report
them remarkably eco economical
nomical economical in operation and
notably free from need of
mechanical attention

HERE'S A VAIUE EXTRAORDINARY
We are taking in on a Studebaker a very late
model Haynes Sedan, run only 6,800 miles, and in per perfect
fect perfect condition. This car has had private me only, and
is like new. Has wire wheels, bumpers and many ex extras,
tras, extras, and cost owner new $4,100, Upholstered in soft
mohair velvet plush, with dome lights, corner reading
lights, etc.
Will give same 90 days guarantee as on a new car.
Price $1,200, one-third down, balance in twelve
equal monthly payments, if desired. Phone 170 for
demonstration.
McLEOD & WATERS
Corner Osceola and Fort King

FOURS and SIXES
Rcfccod Prices Range from $9 15 to $2190. t a b. Factory

BLALOCK BROTHERS
Phone 78
Corner Main St and Oklawaha Ave. OCALA. FLA.



OCALA EVENING STAB, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1922

UNCLASSIFIED

(RATES under this heading are u
follows: Maximum of six lines on time
He; three times 50c; six times 76c; one
month $3.00. All accounts jujmhl
except to those who have reg regular
ular regular advertising accounts.

WANTED Two young ladies to rep represent
resent represent publishing house, taking or orders
ders orders for greatest book of the year.
Call for Mr. Clark, at the Carlton
House Saturday morning from 8 to
10 o'clock. It

WANTED Three burner gas plate.
Phone 270. 3-lt

50 FUEl, SAVED Whether you

use a gas or oil stove the Spengler
Cooker will save half your fuel bill.
You can save the price of the Spen

gler in a few weeks. Let me dem

onstrate it. Mrs. H. P. Johnson,

704 Wenona street. 3-6t

FOR RENT Furnished apartment.

til mo i x ero n

x nune oio or appiy t wo. -uv

WANTED To buy bearing orange

grove, 5 to 15 acres, in Marion

county. State size, location, price.

Address "J. B." care Evening Star

office. ll-2-2t

FOR RENT The best location in

town for a grocery business; corner

store. Apply to "E," care Star of

fice. ll-2-5t

UPHOLSTERING And furniture re-

finishing done in any style. Phone

' 107. l-6t

FOR RENT Three bedrooms, with

or without table board. Mrs. George

Young, 512 E. 8th St. l-6t

WANTED M. Baker (colored). Any

parties knowing him will please

have him call at postoffice here for
important mail; or have him get in

touch with O. W. Coleman, Fort

Myers, Fla., by wire. 10-31-6t

WANTED To buy a small farm;

good land, twenty to eighty acres;
six room or larger house; outbuild outbuildings.
ings. outbuildings. Address P. O. Box 54, An-
thony, Fla. 30-6t

FOR RENT An apartment. Phono

207-Blue. .No. 1129 E. Fort King

avenue. 30-tf

FOR RENT A house lately renovat

ed throughout, on the north side of
Oklawaha avenue; also'-rooms for

rent on Oklawaha avenue. Apply
to Mrs. O. T. Green. 605 E. Okla Oklawaha
waha Oklawaha Ave. Phone 383. 28-tf

WANTED Four room furnished

house. Would want possession on
Nov. 10th. E. A. Groting, Box 262,
Ocala, Fla. 3-3t

SPECIALS FOR SATURDAY

WANTED To buy, well trained deer
hound. Write, with full description
and price to P. O. Box 985, Orlando,
Fla. 30-9t

FOR RENT Four room furnished
apartment; large screened porch;
electric range; electric water heat heater;
er; heater; attractive and modern furnish furnishings;
ings; furnishings; all conveniences; private en entrances,
trances, entrances, private bath. Apply to
Mrs. George Blitch or Joseph Bell,
iity. 28-tf

24-lb. Pillsbury Flour $00
24-lbs. Birdsey's Best $1.30
12-lbs. Omega Flour 65e
24-lbs. Lighthouse Flour $1.10
85c. Broom 49c

! 15-lbs. Irish Potatoes 45c
Best Steak, per pound 20c
IBest Roast, per pound 18c

13-lbs. Sugar $1.00
Everything at reduced prices for
Saturday. Call early or telephone.
We deliver free.
CRESCENT GROCERY AND MAR MARKET.
KET. MARKET. PHONE 562

As the coal shortage continues, it
becomes increasingly evident that Mr.
Daugherty will be compelled to for forbid
bid forbid a severe winter. Pasadena Post.

Coal is plentiful in Skowhegan,
Maine. This town established a mu-

i nicipal fuel yard several years ago,

and at the end of each season a sur surplus
plus surplus of from 500 to 1,000 tons of coal
is purchased, to guard against strikes
or other emergencies. Consequently,

there is plenty of coal to supply the

needs of every householder.

SATURDAY SPECIALS
NOVEMBER 4th

13 1-2 lbs.... $1.00

Guava Jelly
3 glasses
Royal Anne Cher Cherries,
ries, Cherries, No. 2 can.

Chase & Sanborn's

Tea, 1-4 lb..

Chase & Sanborn's

-Tea, 1-2 lb...

Crisco
3-lb can.

20c
25c

17c

30c

Crisco
6-lb can
Salt Mackerel
3 for

Bananas
per doz

67c
1.28
25c
35c

0. K. Tea Pot Grocery

SELF-SERVE

i i 1

Ttie "COLONIAL"
Design 1961 In Twin Pair

Then

entan

for Simmons

Beds

YOU may sometime wonder why this store
gives so much space to Simmons Beds.
As a responsible concern we are concerned
with having our store represent the most ad advanced
vanced advanced thought Simmon Beds Built for Sleep.
As progressive merchants, we aim to show
the merchandise most strongly in favor with
alert customers.
The need of a noiseless, steady bed for restful
sleep is too well known today to be disregarded
and we are glad to display and sell such beds.
Look at Our Simmons Bed Display
Here and Now

Here is one of the exquis exquisite
ite exquisite Period Designs, the
"COLONIAL," built of
Simmons Square Steel Tub Tubing;
ing; Tubing; seamless and smooth;
beautifully enameled in
Ivory White and Decora Decorative
tive Decorative Colors. We offer a

very complete line of
Simmons Metal Beds,
Cribs, Day Beds, and Sim Simmons
mons Simmons Springs in every way
worthy to go with Sim Simmons
mons Simmons Beds and are ready
to show you the newest
designs anytime.

"q" wLL FNP IT AT I
1 LAC J VAY

k- SIMMONS BEDS
. Built for Sleep A

OCALA OCCURRENCES

If you have any local or society

items for the Star, phone five-one.

Mr. William Bullock, who spent

several days in Jacksonville this
week, has returned home.

WOMAN'S CLUB
BUSINESS MEETING

The Woman's Club will hold its
regular business meeting at the club
house Saturday, November 4th, at 3
o'clock. Board meeting at 2:45. All
members are especially requested to
bring year books. Louise Spencer,
Recording Secretary.

HALLOWE'EN PARTY

Miss Harriet Sherman of Jackson

ville, arrived in the city today for a

short visit and is registered at the

Colonial.

The splendor of days and starry

nights at sea invigorate and rest one.

Ask Mr. C. M. Haile, general agent.

Jacksonville, about Merchants and

Miners service. It

Heintz sweet mixed pickles in bulk
at the U-SERVE STORES. 3-2t

The friends of Mr. E. C. Jordan will
regret to hear that he is sick at his
home and hope for his speedy recovery.

Mrs. H. B. Clarkson and daughter,
Miss Lillian Clarkson, who have been
enjoying the past month in Washing Washington,
ton, Washington, are expected home the first of
next week.

Cranberries, Malaga grapes, pickled
pigs' feet, mackerel, salt mullet, tripe,
boneless codfish just in at the U U-SERVE
SERVE U-SERVE STORES. Phones 614-195. 4t

The more our customers see of our
methods of handling fresh meats, the
better we like it. Come to see us.
Main Street Market. Phone 107. tf

Irish potatoes, sweet potatoes, cab cabbage,
bage, cabbage, beets, carrots, eggplant, okra,
tangerines and apples at the Eagle
Market. Phone 74. 3-3t

Ghosts, goblins and all the other
spirits of Hallowe'en made the home
of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Brooks on South

Lime street their rendezvous Tuesday j
night, when the S. A. C. Club enter entertained
tained entertained its friends with a masquerade.
The house and lawn were gaily dec decorated
orated decorated with the Hallowe'en colors and
Japanese lanterns and with the va varied
ried varied costumes of the guests made a
very attractive scene.

Various games were soon in order

and these with the guesses of the
guests as to the identity of each
other passed the time quickly until

unmasking, when there were several
surprises. In a tent near the center
of the lawn a mysterious gypsy show showed
ed showed surprising skill in reading the

palms of those who would test her

occult powers.

Mrs. Clara Thomas and Miss Cevie
Roberts gave pleasing vocal solos

and Miss Gladys Brooks gave several

selections on the piano. Punch was
served on the porch during the eve evening
ning evening and refreshments of ice cream
and cake were served after the music

al program.

The merry crowd was then taken
for a ride about the city, after which
they reassembled at the house to bid
their host and hostess good-night,
and to assure them they had spent a
most enjoyable evening.

Mr. Harris, section foreman for the
A. C. L., whose arm was broken Sat Saturday
urday Saturday when his handcar ran into an
open switch, is getting along nicely
and is back on the job although he
has to carry his arm in a sling.
The Dunnellon high school is mak making
ing making big preparations for a school car carnival.
nival. carnival. The Ocala school band went to

Dunnellon -this afternoon to play at

the carnival there tonight. This
bright little organization under the
direction of Mrs. Brown G. Cole, is
always ready to help and will be quite
a drawing card at the carnival.
We can supply your wants in the
fresh meat, poultry and vegetable line
on short notice. Try us. Phone 108.
Main Street Market. 1-tf

$1 delivers a Sellers Kitchen Cabi Cabinet
net Cabinet to you Monday. B. Goldman. 3t

Irish potatoes, sweet potatoes, cab cabbage,
bage, cabbage, beets, carrots, eggplant, okra,
tangerines and apples at the Eagle
Market. Phone 74. 3-3t

Miss Harriet Sherman of the child's
welfare bureau of the state board of
health, Jacksonville, will speak to the
mothers o Ocala Monday afternoon
at the Methodist church at 4 o'clock,
on the care of infants. It is hoped
that the church will be filled as the
lecture will be interesting and instructive.

We sell VEGEX. Farmers Exchange
Store. Phone 163. 24-12t

Heintz sweet mixed pickles in bulk
at the U-SERVE STORES. 3-2t

The King's Daughters are desirous
of procuring clothing, bedding, etc.,
for the family which was burned out
a few days ago on Tucker Hill, and
lost everything they possessed. Cloth Clothing
ing Clothing for two men, two women and two
children is badly needed. Contribu Contributions
tions Contributions may be left with Mrs. C. L. Bit Bit-tinger,
tinger, Bit-tinger, president, 314 E. 4th St.
Fertilize your pot plants and lawn
flowers with Albert's Plant Food. Sold
in 25c., 50c. and $2 packages at the
Court Pharmacy. 18-tf
The weak and the strong enjoy eat eating
ing eating the best fresh meats obtainable.
That's the kind to be found at the
Main Street Market. Phone 108. tf

A Word to Our Customers
Pattern Hats
and all other early bought hats, to be sac-

rificed at lowest possible prices. Come

early and get your choice.
New Dress, Street and Sport Hats
arriving every few days, and at extremely
moderate prices.
WORKROOM
in charge of expert milliner at your ser service.
vice. service. Affleck Millinery Parlor
111 East Broadway

NOTICE OF REMOVAL

I have moved by shoe repair shop
to Gold street, east of the Anthony
road. I am better prepared than
ever before to give you good service.
Those in need of my services will
please bring in their work and call
for same. H. H. SUMMERLIN,
11-3-m Boot and Shoe Repairer.
HOUSEKEEPERS. TAKE NOTICE

The Ladies Aid of the Christian
church is giving a rummage sale Sat Saturday,
urday, Saturday, November 4th. If you have
old clothing, hats, shoes, etc., that
you care to dispose of and will notify
either Mrs. J. E. Chace or Miss Ma Mamie
mie Mamie Taylor, they will be glad to call
for same. l-3t

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Bateman of Mc Mcintosh
intosh Mcintosh spent today in Ocala.

Mrs. Cheney of Orlando, state sec secretary
retary secretary and treasurer of the American
Legion Auxiliary, spent yesterday in
Ocala, coming here especially to take
over her work which Mrs. Philip Mur Murphy,
phy, Murphy, which Mrs. Murphy has been do doing
ing doing for her. Mrs. Murphy expects to
leave tomorrow for Tampa, where she
will join Mr. Murphy.

Let us supply your groceries. Reas Reasonable
onable Reasonable prices and prompt delivery our
slogan. Main Street Market. Phone
108. 1-tf

Cranberries, Malaga grapes, pickled
pigs' feet, mackerel, salt mullet, tripe,
boneless codfish just in at the U U-SERVE
SERVE U-SERVE STORES. Phones 614-195. 4t

Although Reginald MacKay has
finished high school and is not per personally
sonally personally responsible for any of the
athletic activities of this burg, he
still has a soft place in his heart for
all things along that line. His sport sporting
ing sporting goods corner in one of the George
MacKay Company's show windows is
worth looikng at. Every line of
sporting goods used at this season is
tastily shown in Reggie's corner.

ONLY BIG CIRCUS COMING TO
OCALA THIS YEAR

All

CHILDREN
Under 12

30c

Adults 75, including war tax

res' "V mnu

Look at our new goods, just arriv arrived.
ed. arrived. Gold Bar Brand, Section 4. O.
K. Teapot Grocery, Self Serve. It

You will get good values for yout
money at the rummage sale erven by
the Ladies Aid of the Christian
church, Saturday, November 4th, op opposite
posite opposite Harrington Hall. Shoes, hats,
clothes and many useful things will
be sold. l-3t

Mrs. Jesse Lanier received a letter
yesterday afternoon from her sister,
Mrs. H. H. Brower, stating that Mr.
Brower, who is an engineer and was
badly burned in a wreck near -Lakeland
Wednesday night, was doing
well, but that his son, Tillman
Brower, fireman on the wrecked train,
was seriously scalded and is in a crit critical
ical critical condition. The wreck was caused
by a washout due to the heavy rains.

C3

PRESENTING ON ONE STUPENDOUS

PROGRAM AND FOR THE FIRST TIME

IN ALL CIRCUS HISTORY

NOT MANY, BUT ALL THE

WORLDS GREATEST

ARENIC

STARS

n

m m

i

1

i

liEi-ireim-wi

OCALA
2 PERFORMANCES 2
; Street Parade10:30 A. M.
J TUESDAY, NOV.

n

(3

Fresh Milk
Wanted!
We are in need of a quantity of Fresh Milk,
as our output is increasing daily. Cash set settlement
tlement settlement every Monday morning for previous
week's supply.
Marion County Creamery Co.
Katherine Pyles, Manager

LOOK AGAIN. YOU'RE RIGHT.
There's no ice in the refrigerator. But there's food, plenty of it.
Yet it's a picture of a refrigerator owned by a housewife who
thinks she is "saving" by keeping costly food in an uniced refrig refrigerator.
erator. refrigerator. She stops taking ice at hot summer's end; she thinks cold
weather sufficient protection.
And it would cost her only a few cents a day to make sure that
the food is protected.
Ocala Ice & Packing Company

Oinally!

$IOO

VICTOR ADDING
MACHINE
Take One on Trial for a
Few Days
THE BOOK SHOP
Exclusive Dealers
OCALA, FLA.

A wi?dl t sM

Where the recipe calls for bak baking
ing baking powder, it s a warning to
i choose it carefully because Gak-

- ing powder is vital to baking

O success.
O i. i m.

s; aiumet possesses sucn unus

ual leavening strength that you
can depend upon light, tender,
tasteful things every time you

use il inarswny
The Economy BAKINGS PQtWEDIEEl

Hp
llli
BEST
BT
U3T

should be your choice thafs
why it is the choice of millions
of housewives who have learned their
baking lessons through all their
bake day experiences.
The sale of Calumet is 2H times 83
much as that of any other brand.
Moderate in cost -prevents failure
never varies.
A pound can of Ccdamet contains
fall 16 ounces. Some baking pow
den come in 22 ounce instead of 16
ounce cans. Be sure you get a
pound when you x&ar.t iL -



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